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Sample records for primary mixed leucocyte

  1. Defective production of leucocytic endogenous mediator (interleukin 1) by peripheral blood leucocytes of patients with systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed Central

    Whicher, J T; Gilbert, A M; Westacott, C; Hutton, C; Dieppe, P A

    1986-01-01

    Leucocytic endogenous mediator is one of the activities ascribed to the cytokine or family of cytokines known as interleukin 1. In this study we have examined the ability of circulating blood leucocytes from patients with rheumatic diseases to produce this mediator in vitro. Leucocytic endogenous mediator production was found to be significantly decreased below normal values (mean 107 units, s.e.m. +/- 25) in systemic sclerosis (-6 units +/- 18), systemic lupus erythematosus (-25 units +/- 13), rheumatoid arthritis (-3 units +/- 13) and mixed connective tissue disease (-4 units +/- 40). A control group of ill patients with cancer produced 57 units +/- 8. PMID:3491701

  2. Peripheral blood late mixed chimerism in leucocyte subpopulations following allogeneic stem cell transplantation for childhood malignancies: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Pichler, Herbert; Fritsch, Gerhard; König, Margit; Daxberger, Helga; Glogova, Evgenia; Pötschger, Ulrike; Breuer, Sabine; Lawitschka, Anita; Güclü, Ece D; Karlhuber, Susanne; Holter, Wolfgang; Haas, Oskar A; Lion, Thomas; Matthes-Martin, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    The impact of persistent mixed chimerism (MC) after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains unclarified. We investigated the incidence of MC in peripheral blood beyond day +50 after HSCT and its impact on rejection, chronic graft-versus-host disease (c-GvHD) and relapse in 161 children receiving allogeneic HSCT for haematological malignancies. The 1-year incidence of late MC was 26%. Spontaneous conversion to complete donor chimerism (CC) occurred in 43% of patients as compared to 62% after donor lymphocyte infusions. No graft rejection occurred. The 1-year incidence of c-GvHD was 20 ± 7% for MC, and 18 ± 4% for CC patients (P = 0·734). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) according to chimerism status at days +50 and +100 was 22 ± 4% for CC patients vs. 22 ± 8% for MC patients (day +50; P = 0·935) and 21 ± 4% vs. 20 ± 7% (day +100; P = 0·907). Three-year CIRs in patients with persistent MC and patients with CC/limited MC were comparable (8 ± 7% vs. 19 ± 4%; P = 0·960). HSCT for acute leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome as secondary malignancies (hazard ratio (HR) 4·7; P = 0·008), for AML (HR 3·0; P = 0·02) and from mismatched donors (HR 3·1; P = 0·03) were independent factors associated with relapse. Our data suggest that late MC neither protects from c-GvHD nor does it reliably predict impending disease relapse.

  3. Peripheral blood late mixed chimerism in leucocyte subpopulations following allogeneic stem cell transplantation for childhood malignancies: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Pichler, Herbert; Fritsch, Gerhard; König, Margit; Daxberger, Helga; Glogova, Evgenia; Pötschger, Ulrike; Breuer, Sabine; Lawitschka, Anita; Güclü, Ece D; Karlhuber, Susanne; Holter, Wolfgang; Haas, Oskar A; Lion, Thomas; Matthes-Martin, Susanne

    2016-06-01

    The impact of persistent mixed chimerism (MC) after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains unclarified. We investigated the incidence of MC in peripheral blood beyond day +50 after HSCT and its impact on rejection, chronic graft-versus-host disease (c-GvHD) and relapse in 161 children receiving allogeneic HSCT for haematological malignancies. The 1-year incidence of late MC was 26%. Spontaneous conversion to complete donor chimerism (CC) occurred in 43% of patients as compared to 62% after donor lymphocyte infusions. No graft rejection occurred. The 1-year incidence of c-GvHD was 20 ± 7% for MC, and 18 ± 4% for CC patients (P = 0·734). The 3-year cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) according to chimerism status at days +50 and +100 was 22 ± 4% for CC patients vs. 22 ± 8% for MC patients (day +50; P = 0·935) and 21 ± 4% vs. 20 ± 7% (day +100; P = 0·907). Three-year CIRs in patients with persistent MC and patients with CC/limited MC were comparable (8 ± 7% vs. 19 ± 4%; P = 0·960). HSCT for acute leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome as secondary malignancies (hazard ratio (HR) 4·7; P = 0·008), for AML (HR 3·0; P = 0·02) and from mismatched donors (HR 3·1; P = 0·03) were independent factors associated with relapse. Our data suggest that late MC neither protects from c-GvHD nor does it reliably predict impending disease relapse. PMID:26996395

  4. Space maintenance in the primary and mixed dentitions.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas; Nwabueze, Ifechide; Oueis, Hassan; Stenger, James

    2012-01-01

    Loss of space in the primary dentition is considered one of the main causes of malocclusion in the permanent dentition. The purpose of this paper is to review ond summarize the indications and use of space maintainers in primary and mixed dentitions as preventive measures of future malocclusion. Two main types of space maintainers are used to maintain the space in primary ond mixed dentitions: fixed and removable appliances. Band and loop is the appliance of choice when a primary maxillary or mandibular first molar is prematurely lost. With the premature loss of a second primary molar, Nance or transpalatal (TPA) appliances can be used on the maxillary arch and the lower lingual holding arch (LLHA) for the mandibular arch.

  5. Leucocyte function in children with kwashiorkor.

    PubMed

    Rosen, E U; Geefhuysen, J; Anderson, R; Joffe, M; Rabson, A R

    1975-03-01

    A study of leucocyte response to infection, polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis and bactericidal activity, and nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction in children with kwashiorkor was undertaken and compared with a control group. The results show that total leucocyte counts were depressed in children with kwashiorkor, and lymphopenia was not infrequent. NBT reduction was normal. Abnormal polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis and bactericidal activity, though frequently found in children with kwashiorkor, was shown to be dependent on infection and not on protein depletion per se. Therefore, apart from some impairment of leucocyte mobilization in the presence of infection, the qualtiy of polymorphonuclear function, as determined by the above techniques, appears to be normal in kwashiorkor.

  6. Space maintenance in the primary and mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Durward, C S

    2000-10-01

    The maintenance of arch length in the primary, mixed and early permanent dentition is important for the normal development of the occlusion. Premature loss of primary teeth can result in the loss of arch length leading to malocclusion. Space maintenance can often prevent space loss and either prevent the development of a later malocclusion or reduce its severity. The pattern of space loss depends on many factors including age, stage of development, which teeth have been lost, the presence of crowding or spacing, and occlusal relationships. Careful consideration of many factors is required when deciding whether space maintenance is indicated. Radiographs and space analysis can be helpful. Space maintainers can be fixed or removable. Band and loop space maintainers have fewer problems than other types. Frequent follow-ups to check for any problems following space maintainer insertion is recommended.

  7. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is up-regulated on leucocytes from patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, A; Liebers, U; John, M; Gerl, V; Meyer, M; Witt, C; Wolff, G

    2005-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a dysregulated recruitment of circulating leucocytes into the lung which is associated with the onset and progress of the disease. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) is expressed on leucocytes and plays an essential role in primary leucocyte-endothelial cell adhesive contacts. The present study investigated if PSGL-1 is up-regulated on leucocytes of COPD patients. Peripheral blood samples were collected from COPD patients as well as controls (smoking, nonsmoking volunteers) and subjected to analysis of PSGL-1 expression on leucocytes, i.e. neutrophils, eosinophils, monocytes and lymphocytes by flow cytometry. No significant difference was observed between healthy nonsmoking and healthy smoking control subjects. In contrast, PSGL-1 expression was found to be significantly increased on the surface of all four leucocyte populations in COPD patients compared to both control groups. The finding that PSGL-1 surface expression is up-regulated on leucocytes of COPD patients as compared to leucocytes of controls suggests PSGL-1 as a potential target for anti-inflammatory treatment. PMID:16232226

  8. Changes in leucocyte migration after renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. G. M.; Eddleston, A. L. W. F.; Dominguez, J. A.; Evans, D. B.; Bewick, M.; Williams, Roger

    1969-01-01

    The leucocyte migration test, an in-vitro measure of cellular immunity, has been used to follow the changes in cell-mediated hypersensitivity to kidney and histocompatibility antigens in three patients after renal transplantation. Inhibition of leucocyte migration, indicating strong sensitization to the antigens used, occurred in each patient, starting five to seven days after transplantation. Satisfactory renal function had not been established in any of the patients at this time. In one case inhibition of leucocyte migration persisted almost continuously until the 24th day and was associated with poor renal function proved histologically to be due to rejection. Treatment with increased dosage of prednisone was associated with a rapid reversion to normal of the migration index and improvement in renal function. Later, inhibition of migration occurred again, and shortly afterwards the graft ceased to function. In the other two cases the migration index became normal without alteration in immunosuppressive therapy and a satisfactory diuresis followed. It is suggested that this simple test should prove useful in the specific diagnosis of rejection and in control of immunosuppressive therapy. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4899455

  9. Primary Biliary Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma (MANEC): A Short Review.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Andres M; Wiley, Elizabeth Louise

    2016-10-01

    Mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANECs) are composite neoplasms with areas of adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma intermingled with neuroendocrine carcinoma or neuroendocrine tumor, each composing at least 30% of the neoplasm. MANECs are very infrequent overall, and they are more commonly diagnosed in the appendix, colon, and stomach. Biliary MANECs are particularly rare, and their histogenesis is debated because neuroendocrine cells are seldom identified in the normal biliary tract. They can show one of the 3 different architectural patterns described in Lewin's original classification: collision tumors, combined lesions, or amphicrine neoplasms. The neuroendocrine component is usually of a high grade, with small or large cell cytomorphology, whereas the adenocarcinoma component is either an intestinal or biliary type. Clinical presentation is characterized by locally advanced disease at the time of initial diagnosis. Recent studies suggest that treatment should be guided by the most aggressive histologic component. PMID:27684986

  10. Regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in the circulation.

    PubMed

    Scheiermann, Christoph; Frenette, Paul S; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2015-08-01

    The functions of blood cells extend well beyond the immune functions of leucocytes or the respiratory and hemostatic functions of erythrocytes and platelets. Seen as a whole, the bloodstream is in charge of nurturing and protecting all organs by carrying a mixture of cell populations in transit from one organ to another. To optimize these functions, evolution has provided blood and the vascular system that carries it with various mechanisms that ensure the appropriate influx and egress of cells into and from the circulation where and when needed. How this homeostatic control of blood is achieved has been the object of study for over a century, and although the major mechanisms that govern it are now fairly well understood, several new concepts and mediators have recently emerged that emphasize the dynamism of this liquid tissue. Here we review old and new concepts that relate to the maintenance and regulation of leucocyte homeostasis in blood and briefly discuss the mechanisms for platelets and red blood cells.

  11. Leucocyte responses to fighting in the adult male bandicoot rat.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, P R; Sahu, A; Maiti, B R

    1983-01-01

    The effect of fighting stress on blood leucocyte count was studied in the adult male bandicoot rat. Exposure to fighting stress for 3 h induced neutrophilia, eosinopenia, lymphopenia and monocytopenia. The changes were more significant in the subordinate rat than in the dominant animal. It is suggested that leucocyte responses to fighting are perhaps mediated by the adrenal gland in these animals.

  12. Phagocytosis and leucocyte enzymes in protein–calorie malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Ratnam J.; Bhat, K. Seetharam

    1972-01-01

    1. Enzymes pertinent to bactericidal activities of leucocytes were assayed in children suffering from protein–calorie malnutrition. 2. Leucocytes obtained from malnourished and control children contained similar activities for glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Granule-bound NADPH oxidase activity was low in leucocytes isolated from malnourished patients and failed to show the phagocytic stimulation which is normally seen in control leucocytes. Further, leucocytes obtained from malnourished patients did not release the acid phosphatase from lysosomes during phagocytosis, unlike those from controls. 3. Treatment of the malnourishment with a diet high in calories and protein resulted in significant increase in the activities of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase and NADPH oxidase and in releasing the acid phosphatase from the lysosomes into the supernatant fraction during phagocytosis. 4. The significance of these enzyme changes are discussed in relation to the increased susceptibility of these patients to infection. PMID:4403728

  13. Inhibition of leucocyte elastase by heparin and its derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Redini, F; Tixier, J M; Petitou, M; Choay, J; Robert, L; Hornebeck, W

    1988-01-01

    Leucocyte proteinases, e.g. leucocyte elastase and cathepsin G, are inhibited by heparin. The activities of pig pancreatic and Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastases are unaffected by this polysaccharide. Heparin derivatives of known Mr and degree of sulphation were isolated. The inhibition of leucocyte elastase by these oligosaccharides can be classified as tight-binding hyperbolic non-competitive. Ki values ranged from 40 nM to 100 microM and were found to be inversely correlated with the chain length of the oligosaccharides. Desulphated compounds lacked inhibitory potential towards leucocyte elastase. Over-O-sulphated di- and tetra-saccharides are more potent inhibitors than their over-N-sulphated counterparts. It is proposed that the therapeutic use of heparin and its derivatives could be extended to disease states such as emphysema and rheumatoid arthritis, where the role of leucocyte elastase has been clearly established. PMID:3415672

  14. A model study of seasonal mixed-layer primary production in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, John; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor

    1994-06-01

    We combined a surface irradiance model with a non-spectral photosynthesisirradiance model to estimate the daily, average rate of mixed-layer primary production in the Arabian Sea for the 15th day of months at the end of the northeast monsoon, the southwest monsoon, and the fall and spring inter-monsoons. Our model experiment uses climatologies of cloud cover, mixed-layer thickness, and satellite ocean-color observations of phytoplankton biomass. Modelled surface radiation is at an annual maximum in May beneath nearly cloud-free skies just prior to the summer solstice. The model estimate of surface radiation diminishes through the southwest monsoon over most of the northern Arabian Sea to an annual minimum in August due to intense cloudiness. In agreement with previous ship-based measurements, the photosynthesis-irradiance model predicts that the mixed-layer primary production in the Arabian Sea is extremely seasonal, and peaks annually during the southwest monsoon to the north-west of the atmospheric Findlater Jet and along the coast of Somalia. Northern Arabian Sea maxima predicted for both the summer and winter monsoons are separated by periods of low mixed-layer primary production, the fall and spring inter-monsoons. The annual cycles of modelled mixed-layer primary production differ by region in the Arabian Sea due to varying monsoon influence and circulation dynamics.

  15. Primary health care experiences of hispanics with serious mental illness: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J; Gomes, Arminda P; Meyreles, Quisqueya; Capitelli, Lucia; Younge, Richard; Dragatsi, Dianna; Alvarez, Juana; Nicasio, Andel; Druss, Benjamin; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    This mixed-methods study examines the primary health care experiences of Hispanic patients with serious mental illness. Forty patients were recruited from an outpatient mental health clinic. Participants reported a combination of perceived discrimination and stigmatization when receiving medical care. They rated the quality of chronic illness care as poor and reported low levels of self-efficacy and patient activation. These indicators were positively associated with how patients viewed their relationships with primary care providers. A grounded model was developed to describe the structural, social, and interpersonal processes that shaped participants' primary care experiences.

  16. Malignant mixed müllerian tumor of primary peritoneal origin☆

    PubMed Central

    Kanis, Margaux; Kesterson, Joshua P.; Shroff, Stuti; Lele, Shashikant; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe 2 cases of primary peritoneal malignant mixed müllerian tumor (MMMT). Two patients with primary peritoneal MMMT were examined for their clinical and pathologic features. We describe 2 cases of primary peritoneal MMMT in which the carcinomatous and mesenchymal components were readily identifiable, predominantly involving the peritoneum, with no ovarian involvement. The peritoneum and ovaries, with their common embryologic origin, likely account for the peritoneum’s ability to undergo a similar malignant transformation, with the resultant genesis of an MMMT of peritoneal origin. PMID:20952288

  17. Primary Health Care Experiences of Hispanics with Serious Mental Illness: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Gomes, Arminda P.; Meyreles, Quisqueya; Capitelli, Lucia; Younge, Richard; Dragatsi, Dianna; Alvarez, Juana; Nicasio, Andel; Druss, Benjamin; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examines the primary health care experiences of Hispanic patients with serious mental illness. Forty patients were recruited from an outpatient mental health clinic. Participants reported a combination of perceived discrimination and stigmatization when receiving medical care. They rated the quality of chronic illness care as poor and reported low levels of self-efficacy and patient activation. These indicators were positively associated with how patients viewed their relationships with primary care providers. A grounded model was developed to describe the structural, social, and interpersonal processes that shaped participants’ primary care experiences. PMID:24162079

  18. In vitro interactions between Neoparamoeba spp. and salmonid leucocytes; The effect of parasite sonicate on anterior kidney leucocyte function

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, K.; Alcorn, S.; Murray, A.; Morrison, R.; Nowak, B.

    2006-01-01

    Sonicated Neoparamoeba spp. (Nspp) did not affect the in vitro respiratory burst response of leucocytes isolated from Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha anterior kidneys (P > 0.05). Atlantic salmon and chinook salmon leucocytes pre-incubated with the parasites, however, responded to phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation with a greater response compared to cells incubated with PMA on its own (P < 0.05). Sonicated Nspp was not chemo-attractive for anterior kidney leucocytes isolated from all three fish species. ?? 2006 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  19. Complexes with mixed primary and secondary cellulose synthases are functional in Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Andrew; Mansoori, N; Li, Shundai; Lei, Lei; Vernhettes, Samantha; Visser, Richard G. F.; Somerville, Chris R; Gu, Ying; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2012-10-01

    In higher plants, cellulose is synthesized by so-called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as catalytic subunits of the complex. The CESAs are divided into two distinct families, three of which are thought to be specialized for the primary cell wall and three for the secondary cell wall. In this article, the potential of primary and secondary CESAs forming a functional rosette complex has been investigated. The membrane-based yeast two-hybrid and biomolecular fluorescence systems were used to assess the interactions between three primary (CESA1, CESA3, CESA6), and three secondary (CESA4, CESA7, CESA8) Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CESAs. The results showed that all primary CESAs can physically interact both in vitro and in planta with all secondary CESAs. Although CESAs are broadly capable of interacting in pairwise combinations, they are not all able to form functional complexes in planta. Analysis of transgenic lines showed that CESA7 can partially rescue defects in the primary cell wall biosynthesis in a weak cesa3 mutant. Green fluorescent protein-CESA protein fusions revealed that when CESA3 was replaced by CESA7 in the primary rosette, the velocity of the mixed complexes was slightly faster than the native primary complexes. CESA1 in turn can partly rescue defects in secondary cell wall biosynthesis in a cesa8ko mutant, resulting in an increase of cellulose content relative to cesa8ko. These results demonstrate that sufficient parallels exist between the primary and secondary complexes for cross-functionality and open the possibility that mixed complexes of primary and secondary CESAs may occur at particular times.

  20. Leucocyte specific antinuclear antibodies. Preparation and fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Lampert, I A; Evans, D J; Chesterton, C J

    1975-09-11

    Tissue and species specific anti-nuclear sera detectable by immunofluorescence were produced by immunising rabbits with D.N.A.-non-histone protein extract from human leucocytes. This is a potentially valuable method for the morphological study of differentiation.

  1. Characteristics of the transport of ascorbic acid into leucocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Raghoebar, M.; Huisman, J.A.M.; van den Berg, W.B.; van Ginneken, C.A.M.

    1987-02-02

    The degree and the mode of association of (/sup 14/C)-ascorbic acid with leucocytes are examined. The degree of association of ascorbic acid with polymorphonuclear leucocytes (1-3 %) is dependent on cell type, extracellular concentration of ascorbic acid, incubation temperature, intactness of the cells and the extracellular pH. All experiments are performed according to strict protocols as these compounds are labile in aqueous solutions. Further it is noticed that in all experiments an outward gradient of leucocyte endogenic ascorbic acid exists. The results suggest that the association process comprises at least one saturable pathway. The activation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes by phorbol myristate acetate increases the accumulation of ascorbic acid threefold. 30 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  2. The effects of temporal variability of mixed layer depth on primary productivity around Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissett, W. Paul; Meyers, Mark B.; Walsh, John J.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal variations in primary production and surface chlorophyll concentrations, as measured by ship and satellite around Bermuda, were simulated with a numerical model. In the upper 450 m of the water column, population dynamics of a size-fractionated phytoplankton community were forced by daily changes of wind, light, grazing stress, and nutrient availability. The temporal variations of production and chlorophyll were driven by changes in nutrient introduction to the euphotic zone due to both high- and low-frequency changes of the mixed layer depth within 32 deg-34 deg N, 62 deg-64 deg W between 1979 and 1984. Results from the model derived from high-frequency (case 1) changes in the mixed layer depth showed variations in primary production and peak chlorophyll concentrations when compared with results from the model derived from low-frequency (case 2) mixed layer depth changes. Incorporation of size-fractionated plankton state variables in the model led to greater seasonal resolution of measured primary production and vertical chlorophyll profiles. The findings of this study highlight the possible inadequacy of estimating primary production in the sea from data of low-frequency temporal resolution and oversimplified biological simulations.

  3. Primary Student-Teachers' Conceptual Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect: A mixed method study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratinen, Ilkka Johannes

    2013-04-01

    The greenhouse effect is a reasonably complex scientific phenomenon which can be used as a model to examine students' conceptual understanding in science. Primary student-teachers' understanding of global environmental problems, such as climate change and ozone depletion, indicates that they have many misconceptions. The present mixed method study examines Finnish primary student-teachers' understanding of the greenhouse effect based on the results obtained via open-ended and closed-form questionnaires. The open-ended questionnaire considers primary student-teachers' spontaneous ideas about the greenhouse effect depicted by concept maps. The present study also uses statistical analysis to reveal respondents' conceptualization of the greenhouse effect. The concept maps and statistical analysis reveal that the primary student-teachers' factual knowledge and their conceptual understanding of the greenhouse effect are incomplete and even misleading. In the light of the results of the present study, proposals for modifying the instruction of climate change in science, especially in geography, are presented.

  4. Avian leucocyte counting using the hemocytometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F.J.; Wilson, A.; Fischer, D.; Langenberg, P.

    1994-01-01

    Automated methods for counting leucocytes in avian blood are not available because of the presence of nucleated erythrocytes and thrombocytes. Therefore, total white blood cell counts are performed by hand using a hemocytometer. The Natt and Herrick and the Unopette methods are the most common stain and diluent preparations for this procedure. Replicate hemocytometer counts using these two methods were performed on blood from four birds of different species. Cells present in each square of the hemocytometer were counted. Counting cells in the corner, side, or center hemocytometer squares produced statistically equivalent results; counting four squares per chamber provided a result similar to that obtained by counting nine squares; and the Unopette method was more precise for hemocytometer counting than was the Natt and Herrick method. The Unopette method is easier to learn and perform but is an indirect process, utilizing the differential count from a stained smear. The Natt and Herrick method is a direct total count, but cell identification is more difficult.

  5. Primary Malignant Mixed Germ Cell Tumour with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Mandible; A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arun; Parmar, Harshad; Chacko, Rabin

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell Tumours (GCT) are neoplasm derived from germ cells. GCT usually occurs inside the gonads. Extragonadal GCT’s are rare. Most common GCT associated with head and neck region are the teratomas. Of the few teratomas found in the head and neck, malignant transformation of a teratomatous element is very uncommon, and primary bone involvement within the head and neck is even rare. We present a case of primary malignant mixed germ cell Tumour involving the mandible, the present case presented malignant transformation of the epithelial component showing foci of squamous cell carcinoma within the GCT. PMID:26266228

  6. Single and mixed dyslipidaemia in Canadian primary care settings: findings from the Canadian primary care sentinel surveillance network database

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Shabnam; Aref-Eshghi, Erfan; Godwin, Marshall; Duke, Pauline; Williamson, Tyler; Mahdavian, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Dyslipidaemia is a major risk factor to cardiovascular disease (CVD)—the leading cause of death worldwide. Limited data are available about the prevalence of various dyslipidaemia in Canada. The objective of this study is to describe the prevalence of various single and mixed dyslipidaemia within the Canadian population in a primary care setting. Setting A cross-sectional study, using the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN), was undertaken. Participants Non-pregnant adults older than 20 years were included. Outcome measures Canadian guidelines were used to define dyslipidaemia. Descriptive statistics and multivariate regression analyses were conducted to compare the prevalence of single/mixed dyslipidaemia. Results 134 074 individuals with a mean age of 59.2 (55.8% women) were identified. 34.8% of this population had no lipid abnormality, whereas 35.8%, 17.3% and 3.2% had abnormalities in one, two and three lipid components, respectively. Approximately 86% of these patients did not receive any lipid-lowering medication. Among the medication users (14%), approximately 12% were on statin monotherapy. Statin users (n=16 036) had a lower rate of low-density lipoprotein dyslipidaemia compared to non-medication users (3% vs 17%), whereas the prevalence of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (20% vs 12%) and triglycerides (TG) (12% vs 7%) dyslipidaemia were higher in statin users. Statin users had a greater prevalence of HDL, TG and combined HDL-TG dyslipidaemia compared to non-medication users (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.36 to 153), (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.27) and (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.38), respectively, (all p values<0.0001). Conclusions One of every five patients in primary care settings in Canada is suffering from mixed dyslipidaemia. The overall prevalence of dyslipidaemia remains the same between treated and untreated groups, although the type of abnormal lipid component is considerably different. Among the CVD risk factors

  7. The influence of mixing on primary productivity: A unique application of classical critical depth theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ruth, Paul D.; Ganf, George G.; Ward, Tim M.

    2010-06-01

    Mixing and primary productivity was examined in upwelling influenced nearshore waters off south western Eyre Peninsula (SWEP) in the eastern Great Australian Bight (EGAB), the economically and ecologically important shelf region off southern Australia that forms part of the Southern and Indian oceans. Mixing/stratification in the region was highly temporally variable with a unique upwelling circulation in summer/autumn (November-April), and downwelling through winter/spring (May-September). Highest productivity was associated with upwelled/stratified water (up to 2958 mg C m -2 d -1), with low productivity during periods of downwelling and mixing (∼300-550 mg C m -2 d -1), yet no major variations in macro-nutrient concentrations were detected between upwelling and downwelling events (silica > 1 μmol L -1, nitrate/nitrite > 0.4 μmol L -1, phosphate > 0.1 μmol L -1). We hypothesise that upwelling enriches the region with micro-nutrients. High productivity off SWEP appears to be driven by a shallowing of mixed layer depth due to the injection of upwelled waters above Zcr. Low productivity follows the suppression of enrichment during downwelling/mixing events, and is exacerbated in winter/spring by low irradiances and short daylengths.

  8. Leucocyte phagocytosis during the luteal phase in bitches.

    PubMed

    Holst, Bodil Ström; Gustavsson, Malin Hagberg; Lilliehöök, Inger; Morrison, David; Johannisson, Anders

    2013-05-15

    Pyometra is a disease that affects a large proportion of intact bitches, and typically is seen during the latter half of dioestrus. Several factors contribute to the development of pyometra, including genetic factors, an infectious component (most often Escherichia coli), and hormonal factors. Hormones may act directly on the endometrium, and also affect the immune system. In dogs, the phagocytic ability has been shown to decrease with age, and ovarian hormones have also been shown to affect immune resistance. The aim of the present study was to examine whether phagocytosis by canine leucocytes varies significantly during the luteal phase. Eight bitches were followed by repeated blood sampling. Samples were taken at the calculated optimal day for mating (Day 1), and thereafter on days 8, 15 and 22 (early luteal phase) and 29, 43, 57 and 71 (late luteal phase). Blood was collected from the cephalic vein into EDTA tubes for leucocyte counts and heparinised tubes for testing of phagocytosis and oxidative burst using commercial kits and flow cytometry. The cell activity of the phagocyting leucocytes, expressed as mean fluorescence activity, MFI, was significantly lower during late luteal phase than during early luteal phase. The proportion of leucocytes that was induced to phagocyte did not differ significantly. The percentage of cells stimulated by E. coli to oxidative burst was significantly lower during late luteal phase. Their activity did not differ between the two periods. The number of cells stimulated to oxidative burst by a low stimulus was too low to evaluate, and leucocytes stimulated with the high stimulus did not vary in oxidative burst between the two periods. The changes in phagocytic activity and in the number of leucocytes that showed oxidative burst were not associated with any change in the proportion of different leucocytes. The decreased phagocytic capacity possibly contributes to the higher incidence of diseases such as pyometra during the latter

  9. The primary and mixed dentition, post-eruptive enamel maturation and dental caries: a review.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Richard J M

    2013-12-01

    The mouth is in flux from the time the primary teeth begin to erupt, in the first year of life, through to the end of the 'mixed dentition' (i.e. the concurrent eruption of the permanent teeth and exfoliation of the primary teeth), at around 12 years of age. Primary teeth facilitate the development of the facial muscles and speech. They act as 'guides' for erupting permanent teeth. If lost prematurely, subsequent misalignment of permanent teeth can make them difficult to clean and possibly more caries-prone. During the mixed dentition phase, teeth are at relatively high risk of caries. Erupting teeth are difficult to clean and cleaning may be avoided because of tender gums and behavioural factors in children. Permanent enamel (and possibly primary enamel) undergoes post-eruptive maturation, accumulating fluoride, becoming harder, less porous and less caries-prone. Overall, primary teeth are more vulnerable to caries than permanent teeth. Widespread use of fluoride toothpaste has effected marked reductions in caries. Some evidence exists that fluoride delivered from toothpastes may be somewhat more effective in reducing caries in primary than in permanent teeth. However, caries remains a public health concern globally. New fluoride toothpaste formulations, optimised using in vivo fluoride delivery and efficacy studies, may improve the caries resistance of mineral deposited during post-eruptive maturation. Behaviour should not be ignored; new formulations will be more effective if used according to professionally endorsed recommendations based on sound science. Establishing good oral hygiene behaviour early in life can lead to lasting anti-caries benefits.

  10. Connecting the Dots and Merging Meaning: Using Mixed Methods to Study Primary Care Delivery Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Scammon, Debra L; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Day, Rachel L; Day, Julie; Kim, Jaewhan; Waitzman, Norman J; Farrell, Timothy W; Magill, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the value of mixed methods in the study of practice transformation and illustrate procedures for connecting methods and for merging findings to enhance the meaning derived. Data Source/Study Setting. An integrated network of university-owned, primary care practices at the University of Utah (Community Clinics or CCs). CC has adopted Care by Design, its version of the Patient Centered Medical Home. Study Design. Convergent case study mixed methods design. Data Collection/Extraction Methods. Analysis of archival documents, internal operational reports, in-clinic observations, chart audits, surveys, semistructured interviews, focus groups, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services database, and the Utah All Payer Claims Database. Principal Findings. Each data source enriched our understanding of the change process and understanding of reasons that certain changes were more difficult than others both in general and for particular clinics. Mixed methods enabled generation and testing of hypotheses about change and led to a comprehensive understanding of practice change. Conclusions. Mixed methods are useful in studying practice transformation. Challenges exist but can be overcome with careful planning and persistence. PMID:24279836

  11. Antinuclear antibodies in scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease and "primary" Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Cruz, M; Mejia, G; Lavalle, C; Cortes, J J; Reyes, P A

    1988-03-01

    The diversity of antibodies in patients with scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease or "primary" Raynaud's phenomenon could be used as a laboratory aid in the clinical diagnosis. In serum samples of 75 patients we screened for antinuclear antibodies (HEp 2 cells), anti DNA, soluble nucleoprotein and extractable nuclear antigens (Sm, rRNP, U1-nRNP, SSA/Ro, SSB/La and Scl-70). Distinctive antinuclear antibodies pattern was identified in each group of patients. This immunologic profile is valuable for clinical diagnosis and the preferential association of certain autoantibodies with some diseases and not with others, suggest an antigen-driven stimulus for its production.

  12. Comparison of Effects of Running and Playing Exercises on Differential Leucocyte Count in Young Elite Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cenikli, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present research are to test the effects of running and playing exercises on leucocyte and differential leucocyte accounts, and to test the possible differences between running and playing exercises in terms of leucocyte accounts. They were thirty two male young soccer players. Participants arrived at the laboratory after a 12-hour…

  13. Production of leucocyte migration inhibitory factor by neonatal lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wolf, R L; Lomnitzer, R; Rabson, A R

    1976-06-19

    Lymphocytes (mononuclear cells) from cord blood of 10 normal placentas and from 10 normal adults were assessed for production of leucocyte migration inhibiting factor (LIF) after phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, as a measure of cell-mediated immunity. Mononuclear cells from both adult and cord blood produced adequate quantities of LIF, indicating that neonatal lymphocytes have the ability to manufacture normal amounts of lymphokines.

  14. Proliferative potential in benign mixed salivary gland tumors and its value in primary and recurrent neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Kazanceva, Anna; Groma, Valerie; Smane, Liene; Kornevs, Egils; Teibe, Uldis

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Mixed salivary gland tumors are characterized by a marked diversity in the cell proliferation. It course in the stromal component, and, especially in recurrent neoplasms, is not completely understood. This study evaluated cell proliferative potential, its value and the clinical course of primary and recurrent salivary gland pleomorphic adenomas (PA). MATERIALS AND METHODS. 322 benign salivary gland tumors were used in this study. The cell proliferation was estimated by Ki-67 expression levels. RESULTS. Ki-67 immunoreactivity showed a wide range of spectra; in the epithelial and stromal type of PA the cell proliferation had the value from 0.07±0.03 (95% CI 0.01-0.14) to 4.81±0.60 (95% CI 3.61-6.02) and from 0 to 0.79±0.11 (95% CI 0.57-1.00), respectively. The Ki-67 value was higher in recurrent tumors compared with primary, and the mean number of Ki-67-positive cells per visual microscopic field constituted 2.14±1.60 (95% CI 1.47-2.47) comparing with 1.43 (95% CI 0.97-1.55) revealed in primary tumors. CONCLUSION. Cell proliferation values correlate with a recurrence of neoplasm, and elevation of proliferation potential in the stromal component of recurrent PA is indicative of clinical course change for the worse.

  15. Skill mix, roles and remuneration in the primary care workforce: who are the healthcare professionals in the primary care teams across the world?

    PubMed

    Freund, Tobias; Everett, Christine; Griffiths, Peter; Hudon, Catherine; Naccarella, Lucio; Laurant, Miranda

    2015-03-01

    World-wide, shortages of primary care physicians and an increased demand for services have provided the impetus for delivering team-based primary care. The diversity of the primary care workforce is increasing to include a wider range of health professionals such as nurse practitioners, registered nurses and other clinical staff members. Although this development is observed internationally, skill mix in the primary care team and the speed of progress to deliver team-based care differs across countries. This work aims to provide an overview of education, tasks and remuneration of nurses and other primary care team members in six OECD countries. Based on a framework of team organization across the care continuum, six national experts compare skill-mix, education and training, tasks and remuneration of health professionals within primary care teams in the United States, Canada, Australia, England, Germany and the Netherlands. Nurses are the main non-physician health professional working along with doctors in most countries although types and roles in primary care vary considerably between countries. However, the number of allied health professionals and support workers, such as medical assistants, working in primary care is increasing. Shifting from 'task delegation' to 'team care' is a global trend but limited by traditional role concepts, legal frameworks and reimbursement schemes. In general, remuneration follows the complexity of medical tasks taken over by each profession. Clear definitions of each team-member's role may facilitate optimally shared responsibility for patient care within primary care teams. Skill mix changes in primary care may help to maintain access to primary care and quality of care delivery. Learning from experiences in other countries may inspire policy makers and researchers to work on efficient and effective teams care models worldwide.

  16. Obstruction of the lung capillaries by blood platelet aggregates and leucocytes in sudden infant death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Tor-Arne; Jørgensen, Leif

    2010-12-01

    Altogether 34 cases of sudden infant death were studied postmortem with particular emphasis on the pathological changes in the lungs. Light microscopy, including application of immunohistochemical methods, and transmission electron microscopy were used for the identification of blood platelets and white blood cell types in alveolar capillaries. The main findings were platelet aggregates and a varying number of neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes in the lung capillaries, mixed with a smaller number of lymphocytes. The findings may be interpreted as an early sign of inflammation with capillary thrombosis, resulting in ischaemia, i.e. arrest of flow. In 21% of the cases, inflammatory cells had also expanded focally into alveolar spaces, creating the picture of localized areas of bronchopneumonia. An infant dying suddenly of a traumatic head injury served as a control. Neither platelets nor leucocytes were observed in the alveolar capillaries of this infant. In conclusion, in lungs from cases of sudden infant death syndrome, the alveolar capillaries are obstructed by platelet aggregates and leucocytes, interpreted as signs of an initial stage of lung inflammation with ischaemia. PMID:21091777

  17. Mixed functional microarchitectures for orientation selectivity in the mouse primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Satoru; Yoshida, Takashi; Ohki, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    A minicolumn is the smallest anatomical module in the cortical architecture, but it is still in debate whether it serves as functional units for cortical processing. In the rodent primary visual cortex (V1), neurons with different preferred orientations are mixed horizontally in a salt and pepper manner, but vertical functional organization was not examined. In this study, we found that neurons with similar orientation preference are weakly but significantly clustered vertically in a short length and horizontally in the scale of a minicolumn. Interestingly, the vertical clustering is found only in a part of minicolumns, and others are composed of neurons with a variety of orientation preferences. Thus, the mouse V1 is a mixture of vertical clusters of neurons with various degrees of orientation similarity, which may be the compromise between the brain size and keeping the vertical clusters of similarly tuned neurons at least in a subset of clusters. PMID:27767032

  18. Anterior crossbite correction in primary and mixed dentition with removable inclined plane (Bruckl appliance).

    PubMed

    Jirgensone, Irena; Liepa, Andra; Abeltins, Andris

    2008-01-01

    Anterior crossbite correction in early mixed dentition is highly recommended as this kind of malocclusion do not diminish with age. Uncorrected anterior crossbite may lead to abnormal wear of the lower incisors, dental compensation of mandibular incisors leading to thinning of labial alveolar plate and/or gingival recession. There are several methods for solving this problem. In this article we would like to describe removable inclined plane. This is a removable simple functional appliance on the lower arch (jaw), which works as inclined plane. One of the advantage of the Bruckl appliance is that it can also be used as retention appliance after active treatment as well as it is possible to add acrylic teeth if necessary. Therefore it can be used as a removable partial denture in lower jaw in case where there is a premature loss of the primary teeth. The use of this appliance is illustrated with three cases.

  19. Quantifying subtropical North Pacific gyre mixed layer primary productivity from Seaglider observations of diel oxygen cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David P.; Wilson, Samuel T.; Doney, Scott C.; Karl, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Using autonomous underwater gliders, we quantified diurnal periodicity in dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and temperature in the subtropical North Pacific near the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Station ALOHA during summer 2012. Oxygen optodes provided sufficient stability and precision to quantify diel cycles of average amplitude of 0.6 µmol kg-1. A theoretical diel curve was fit to daily observations to infer an average mixed layer gross primary productivity (GPP) of 1.8 mmol O2 m-3 d-1. Cumulative net community production (NCP) over 110 days was 500 mmol O2 m-2 for the mixed layer, which averaged 57 m in depth. Both GPP and NCP estimates indicated a significant period of below-average productivity at Station ALOHA in 2012, an observation confirmed by 14C productivity incubations and O2/Ar ratios. Given our success in an oligotrophic gyre where biological signals are small, our diel GPP approach holds promise for remote characterization of productivity across the spectrum of marine environments.

  20. Slow conduction in mixed cultured strands of primary ventricular cells and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kucera, Jan P; Prudat, Yann; Marcu, Irene C; Azzarito, Michela; Ullrich, Nina D

    2015-01-01

    Modern concepts for the treatment of myocardial diseases focus on novel cell therapeutic strategies involving stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SCMs). However, functional integration of SCMs requires similar electrophysiological properties as primary cardiomyocytes (PCMs) and the ability to establish intercellular connections with host myocytes in order to contribute to the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The aim of this project was to investigate the properties of cardiac conduction in a co-culture approach using SCMs and PCMs in cultured cell strands. Murine embryonic SCMs were pooled with fetal ventricular cells and seeded in predefined proportions on microelectrode arrays to form patterned strands of mixed cells. Conduction velocity (CV) was measured during steady state pacing. SCM excitability was estimated from action potentials measured in single cells using the patch clamp technique. Experiments were complemented with computer simulations of conduction using a detailed model of cellular architecture in mixed cell strands. CV was significantly lower in strands composed purely of SCMs (5.5 ± 1.5 cm/s, n = 11) as compared to PCMs (34.9 ± 2.9 cm/s, n = 21) at similar refractoriness (100% SCMs: 122 ± 25 ms, n = 9; 100% PCMs: 139 ± 67 ms, n = 14). In mixed strands combining both cell types, CV was higher than in pure SCMs strands, but always lower than in 100% PCM strands. Computer simulations demonstrated that both intercellular coupling and electrical excitability limit CV. These data provide evidence that in cultures of murine ventricular cardiomyocytes, SCMs cannot restore CV to control levels resulting in slow conduction, which may lead to reentry circuits and arrhythmias.

  1. Slow conduction in mixed cultured strands of primary ventricular cells and stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Jan P.; Prudat, Yann; Marcu, Irene C.; Azzarito, Michela; Ullrich, Nina D.

    2015-01-01

    Modern concepts for the treatment of myocardial diseases focus on novel cell therapeutic strategies involving stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (SCMs). However, functional integration of SCMs requires similar electrophysiological properties as primary cardiomyocytes (PCMs) and the ability to establish intercellular connections with host myocytes in order to contribute to the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. The aim of this project was to investigate the properties of cardiac conduction in a co-culture approach using SCMs and PCMs in cultured cell strands. Murine embryonic SCMs were pooled with fetal ventricular cells and seeded in predefined proportions on microelectrode arrays to form patterned strands of mixed cells. Conduction velocity (CV) was measured during steady state pacing. SCM excitability was estimated from action potentials measured in single cells using the patch clamp technique. Experiments were complemented with computer simulations of conduction using a detailed model of cellular architecture in mixed cell strands. CV was significantly lower in strands composed purely of SCMs (5.5 ± 1.5 cm/s, n = 11) as compared to PCMs (34.9 ± 2.9 cm/s, n = 21) at similar refractoriness (100% SCMs: 122 ± 25 ms, n = 9; 100% PCMs: 139 ± 67 ms, n = 14). In mixed strands combining both cell types, CV was higher than in pure SCMs strands, but always lower than in 100% PCM strands. Computer simulations demonstrated that both intercellular coupling and electrical excitability limit CV. These data provide evidence that in cultures of murine ventricular cardiomyocytes, SCMs cannot restore CV to control levels resulting in slow conduction, which may lead to reentry circuits and arrhythmias. PMID:26442264

  2. Effects of repetitive low-pressure explosive blast on primary neurons and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Banton, Rohan; Benjamin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury represents a considerable health concern, particularly for athletes and military personnel. For blast-induced brain injury, threshold shock-impulse levels required to induce such injuries and cumulative effects with single and/or multiple exposures are not well characterized. Currently, there is no established in vitro experimental model with blast pressure waves generated by live explosives. This study presents results of primary neurons and mixed cultures subjected to our unique in vitro indoor experimental platform that uses real military explosive charges to probe the effects of primary explosive blast at the cellular level. The effects of the blast on membrane permeability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), uptake of sodium ions, intracellular calcium, and release of glutamate were probed 2 and 24 hr postblast. Significant changes in membrane permeability and sodium uptake among the sham, single-blast-injured, and triple-blast-injured samples were observed. A significant increase in ROS and glutamate release was observed for the triple-blast-injured samples compared with the sham. Changes in intracellular calcium were not significant. These results suggest that blast exposure disrupts the integrity of the plasma membrane, leading to the upset of ion homeostasis, formation of ROS, and glutamate release. Published 2016. †This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Effects of repetitive low-pressure explosive blast on primary neurons and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Banton, Rohan; Benjamin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury represents a considerable health concern, particularly for athletes and military personnel. For blast-induced brain injury, threshold shock-impulse levels required to induce such injuries and cumulative effects with single and/or multiple exposures are not well characterized. Currently, there is no established in vitro experimental model with blast pressure waves generated by live explosives. This study presents results of primary neurons and mixed cultures subjected to our unique in vitro indoor experimental platform that uses real military explosive charges to probe the effects of primary explosive blast at the cellular level. The effects of the blast on membrane permeability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), uptake of sodium ions, intracellular calcium, and release of glutamate were probed 2 and 24 hr postblast. Significant changes in membrane permeability and sodium uptake among the sham, single-blast-injured, and triple-blast-injured samples were observed. A significant increase in ROS and glutamate release was observed for the triple-blast-injured samples compared with the sham. Changes in intracellular calcium were not significant. These results suggest that blast exposure disrupts the integrity of the plasma membrane, leading to the upset of ion homeostasis, formation of ROS, and glutamate release. Published 2016. †This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:27317559

  4. Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) activity in human leucocytes after freezing.

    PubMed

    Hill, R S; Kennedy, M; Mackinder, C

    1978-01-01

    Human peripheral blood leucocytes (neutrophil-rich) were collected either with heparin or acid citrate dextrose, frozen with dimethyl sulphoxide at a controlled rate, stored in liquid nitrogen at--196 degrees C and reconstituted with a solution containing dextran. After reconstitution, 20.2% of cells (in absolute numbers 1 in 5 fresh cells) showed a strongly positive nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reaction. The quantitative NBT test confirmed the synthesis of formazan/10(6) reconstituted neutrophilsa s15% of the fresh capacity. A slow titration reconstitution method for cells did not improve the functional capacity of thawed leucocytes as judged by the NBT test. When comparing anticoagulants, heparin increased the post-reconstitution cell yields after freezing and increased the absolute number of reconstituted cells capable of developing a positive NBT reaction. PMID:643322

  5. Purification of human leucocyte DNA: proteinase K is not necessary.

    PubMed

    Douglas, A M; Georgalis, A M; Benton, L R; Canavan, K L; Atchison, B A

    1992-03-01

    A rapid nontoxic method for the purification of DNA from human leucocytes is described. Preliminary experiments which tested different methods of DNA purification indicated that digestion of proteins with proteinase K was unnecessary. This led to the development of a simple procedure involving lysis of the cells in SDS followed by extraction with 6 M NaCl. The method described overcomes the requirement for lengthy incubations in the presence of expensive proteinase K and subsequent extraction with toxic chemicals.

  6. Characterization of the liver-macrophages isolated from a mixed primary culture of neonatal swine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kitani, Hiroshi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Takenouchi, Takato; Sato, Mitsuru; Yamanaka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    We recently developed a novel procedure to obtain liver-macrophages in sufficient number and purity using a mixed primary culture of rat and bovine hepatocytes. In this study, we aim to apply this method to the neonatal swine liver. Swine parenchymal hepatocytes were isolated by a two-step collagenase perfusion method and cultured in T75 culture flasks. Similar to the rat and bovine cells, the swine hepatocytes retained an epithelial cell morphology for only a few days and progressively changed into fibroblastic cells. After 5-13 days of culture, macrophage-like cells actively proliferated on the mixed fibroblastic cell sheet. Gentle shaking of the culture flask followed by the transfer and brief incubation of the culture supernatant resulted in a quick and selective adhesion of macrophage-like cells to a plastic dish surface. After rinsing dishes with saline, the attached macrophage-like cells were collected at a yield of 10(6) cells per T75 culture flask at 2-3 day intervals for more than 3 weeks. The isolated cells displayed a typical macrophage morphology and were strongly positive for macrophage markers, such as CD172a, Iba-1 and KT022, but negative for cytokeratin, desmin and α-smooth muscle actin, indicating a highly purified macrophage population. The isolated cells exhibited phagocytosis of polystyrene microbeads and a release of inflammatory cytokines upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. This shaking and attachment method is applicable to the swine liver and provides a sufficient number of macrophages without any need of complex laboratory equipments. PMID:24707456

  7. Evaluation of facial morphology and sagittal relationship between dental arches in primary and mixed dentition

    PubMed Central

    Traldi, Aline; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; de Souza, Luciane Zanin; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess facial morphology (Pattern) and sagittal relationship between dental arches (Class), and establish a potential association between them and the variables sex, age and ethnicity, among schoolchildren aged between 4 and 9 years old (mean age of 6.7 years) in primary and mixed dentitions. METHODS: The sample comprised 875 children (457 males and 418 females) attending schools in Descalvado, São Paulo, Brazil. An attempt was made with a view to establish a potential association between children's morphological features with sex, age and ethnicity. RESULTS: Descriptive analysis revealed a predominance of facial Pattern I (69.9 %) and Class I (67.4 %). Statistical tests (p < 0.001) showed that Class I was more frequent among Pattern I children, whereas Class II prevailed among Pattern II, and Class III was frequent among Pattern I and III children. Ethnicity was the only variable associated with facial pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that facial pattern and sagittal relationship between dental arches tend to be correlated. Ethnicity was associated with facial pattern, with Pattern I being the most recurrent among Caucasians and facial Pattern II being recurrent among Afro-descendant subjects. PMID:26352847

  8. Preparation of Rodent Primary Cultures for Neuron–Glia, Mixed Glia, Enriched Microglia, and Reconstituted Cultures with Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Heng; Oyarzabal, Esteban A.; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, neurons, and macroglia (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) are the major cell types in the central nervous system. In the past decades, primary microglia-enriched cultures have been widely used to study the biological functions of microglia in vitro. In order to study the interactions between microglia and other brain cells, neuron–glia, neuron–microglia, and mixed glia cultures were developed. The aim of this chapter is to provide basic and adaptable protocols for the preparation of these microglia-containing primary cultures from rodent. Meanwhile, we also want to provide a collection of tips from our collective experiences doing primary brain cell cultures. PMID:23813383

  9. Induction of primary mixed leukocyte reactions with ultraviolet B or chemically modified stimulator cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mincheff, M.S.; Meryman, H.T. )

    1989-12-01

    Treatment of stimulator cells with paraformaldehyde for 60 sec or ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation eliminates their ability to elicit T cell proliferation in a primary mixed leukocyte reaction. However, a T cell response equal to 20-40% of control value could be elicited by paraformaldehyde fixed or UV-B irradiated cells providing the latter are incubated at 37 degrees C for 18 hr prior to treatment. The incubation also induces a one-log increase in the density of fluorescence when the cells are stained with monoclonal antibodies against class II molecules DR and DP as well as the intercellular adhesion molecule -1. We interpret this as an increase in the membrane expression of these structures following incubation. Chloroquine and cerulenin, known to inhibit protein degradation and antigen processing and presentation do not influence the upregulation in membrane expression of these class II and adhesion molecules, but do prevent incubation from overriding the effect of paraformaldehyde treatment. Colchicine, which reduces the traffic through tubular lysosomes, also has no effect on the upregulation but enhances allopresentation. We propose that incubation of stimulator cells in the presence of chloroquine and cerulenin results in the membrane expression of class II molecules without associated peptides. The inability of stimulator cells expressing such nude MHC molecules to elicit T cell proliferation after chemical modification could be due to easier crosslinking of the allodeterminants by paraformaldehyde when the binding site is empty but could also mean that nude MHC molecules are not per se immunogenic and become so only after acquisition of a peptide. It is also possible that chloroquine, NH4Cl, and cerulenin block the expression of signals other than the class II and cell adhesion molecules that are essential for induction of T cell proliferation.

  10. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis-diabetes co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo ) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8(+) T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8(+) T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition.

  11. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis–diabetes co-morbidity

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis–type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4+ T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8+ T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8+ T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition. PMID:26095067

  12. Polymorphonuclear leucocyte motility in men with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed Central

    Pease, C T; Fennell, M; Brewerton, D A

    1989-01-01

    The polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) response to a chemotactic or chemokinetic stimulus is enhanced in men with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This effect does not parallel the severity of disease activity or the size of the acute phase response, and it is independent of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment. Polymorph function is normal in HLA-B27 positive brothers of probands with AS and in other HLA-B27 positive individuals in the absence of disease. Polymorph motility is also normal in patients with psoriasis vulgaris or Crohn's disease, indicating that enhanced PMN motility is not a non-specific consequence of all inflammatory disorders. PMID:2784306

  13. Leucocyte arylsulphatase A activity and subtypes of chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Heavey, A M; Philpot, M P; Fensom, A H; Jackson, M; Crammer, J L

    1990-07-01

    Previous studies have suggested that arylsulphatase A (ASA - the biochemical marker of metachromatic leucodystrophy) deficiency may be present in a sizeable proportion of patients with chronic psychosis. This study surveyed leucocyte ASA activity in a group of chronic psychotic patients and compared ASA activity in 3 subgroups fulfilling Research Diagnostic Criteria for schizophrenia (undifferentiated), paranoid schizophrenia and schizoaffective psychosis. Three of 45 patients had significantly reduced ASA activity but none had metachromatic leucodystrophy. Although ASA levels did not differ significantly between the groups, schizophrenics without a family history of schizophrenia had significantly lower ASA levels than those with. The implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Preliminary results of lab-scale investigations of products of incomplete combustion during incineration of primary and mixed digested sludge.

    PubMed

    Braguglia, C M; Bagnuolo, G; Gianico, A; Mininni, G; Pastore, C; Mascolo, G

    2016-03-01

    Separation between primary and secondary sludge treatment could be a valuable solution for sludge management. According to this approach, secondary sludge can be conveniently used in agriculture while primary sludge could be easily dried and incinerated. It follows that some concern may arise from incinerating primary sludge with respect to the current practice to incinerate mixed digested sludge. Incineration of primary and mixed digested municipal sludge was investigated with a lab-scale equipment in terms of emissions of products of incomplete combustion (PICs) during incineration failure modes. PICs can be grouped in three sub-categories, namely aliphatic hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes), compounds with a single aromatic ring, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). After-burning temperature was the most important parameter to be controlled in order to minimize emissions of alkanes and alkenes. As for mono-aromatic compounds, benzene and toluene are the most thermally resistant compounds, and in some cases, an after-burning temperature of 1100 °C was not enough to get the complete destruction of benzene leading to a residual emission of 18 mg/kgsludge. PAHs showed an opposite trend with respect to aliphatic and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons being the thermal failure mode the main responsible of PIC emissions. A proper oxygen concentration is more important than elevated temperature thus reflecting the high thermal stability of PAHs. Overall, obtained results, even though obtained under flameless conditions that are different from those of the industrial plants, demonstrated that separation of primary and secondary sludge does not pose any drawbacks or concern regarding primary sludge being disposed of by incineration even though it is more contaminated than mixed digested sludge in terms of organic pollutants.

  15. Social Orders and Interactions among Children in Age-Mixed Classes in Primary Schools--New Perspectives from a Synthesis of Ethnographic Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huf, Christina; Raggl, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The article synthesises data from two ethnographic projects, which both explore interactions of children in age-mixed groups in primary schools. It illuminates critical perspectives on social orders and children's interactions in age-mixed classes by showing how pupils in age-mixed groups become involved in power relations and how the teacher's…

  16. Inhibition of leucocytic lysosomal enzymes by glycosaminoglycans in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Convit, J

    1975-01-01

    1. A lysosomal fraction was separated by density-gradient centrifugation from a highly purified human polymorphonuclear leucocyte suspension. 2. Some 23 different lysosomal enzymes were assayed for activity in the presence of various concentrations of glycosaminoglycans. 3. The 21 acid hydrolases assayed were strongly inhibited to different degrees by low (0-12 mmol/l) concentrations of glycosaminoglycans in a pH-dependent manner. Thus inhibitions were stronger below pH4.5, with activity returning to control values at about pH5.0. 4. On a molar basis, the inhibitory activity for the several glycosaminoglycans studied was: heparin greater than chondroitin sulphate greater than hyaluronic acid. 5. Once the glycosaminoglycan-acid hydrolase complex was formed, it was partially dissociated by slight elevations in the pH of the incubation medium, by increasing the ionic strength of the incubation medium, or by adding several cationic proteins (e.g. histone, protamine). 6. As leucocytic lysosomes contain large amounts of chondroitin sulphate, and have a strongly acid intragranular pH, we suggest that glycosaminoglycans may modify lysosomal function through the formation of complexes with lysosomal enzymes, by inhibiting the digestive activity of the acid hydrolases when the intralysosomal pH is below their pI. PMID:2162

  17. Multidrug punch cards in primary care: a mixed methods study on patients' preferences and impact on adherence

    PubMed Central

    Boeni, Fabienne; Hersberger, Kurt E.; Arnet, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multidrug punch cards are frame cards with 28 plastic cavities filled with a patient's oral solid medication. They are used in primary care to facilitate medication management and to enhance adherence. Main criticism concerned handling difficulties and fading knowledge about medication of patients using them. This study aimed at exploring daily use, preferences, and adherence of primary care patients using multidrug punch cards. Methods: Community pharmacies in Switzerland recruited primary care patients using multidrug punch cards. A mixed methods approach was applied with quantitative interviews performed by telephone and qualitative interviews face-to-face. Results: Of 149 eligible patients from 21 community pharmacies, 22 participated 2011 in the quantitative and 11 participated 2013/14 in the qualitative interview. Patients were very satisfied with the multidrug punch cards and stated increased medication safety. All considered adherence as very important. Self-reported adherence was 10 (median) on a visual analog scale (0 = no intake, 10 = perfect adherence). The absence of package inserts and predefined handling difficulties e.g., tablets spiking at removal were not perceived as problems. Conclusions: Patients are satisfied with the multidrug punch cards, feel safe, mostly have no handling problems and adhere to their treatment. Trust in health-care professionals and patients' experiences emerged as key variables for initiating multidrug punch card use and for medication adherence. This mixed methods study invalidates previous concerns about disadvantages of multidrug punch cards. Health-care professionals should actively recommend them for primary care patients with polypharmacy and poor adherence. PMID:25324777

  18. A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Achievement Disparities in Guatemalan Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meade, Ben

    2012-01-01

    Although most Guatemalan rural students currently have access to primary school, there are large differences in the levels of learning that take place among different populations and in different contexts. This paper uses multiple data and methods to examine the interrelated factors underlying achievement disparities in Guatemalan primary schools.…

  19. Human leucocyte neutral proteases, with special reference to collagen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Nagai, Y

    1978-09-01

    Three different types of neutral proteases related to collagen metabolism have been found in the granule fraction of human leucocytes from normal adults, using collagen, gelatin, and synthetic peptides as substrates. These are collagenase, an enzyme showing a potent hydrolytic activity against gelatin but little against native collagen, and one splitting the cross-links region of collagen. Their molecular weights were estimated to be about 75,000 150,000, and 25,000, respectively, by gel chromatography. The former two enzymes were inhibited by a alpha2-macroglobulin and ethylenediaminetetraacetate, but not by alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-antitrypsin) or phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, while the latter enzyme, associated in behavior with an enzyme hydrolyzing succinyl-(l-alanyl)3-p-nitroanilide, was inhibited by alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin, and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride, but not by ethylenediaminetetraacetate. A possible cooperative function of these enzymes in collagen catabolism is discussed.

  20. An improved DNA test for bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tammen, I; Klippert, H; Kuczka, A; Treviranus, A; Pohlenz, J; Stöber, M; Simon, D; Harlizius, B

    1996-05-01

    A modified DNA test, based on the polymerase chain reaction, was developed for the monogenic recessive disease bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). The test was improved by the selection of new primers which facilitated the interpretation of the results. An easily scorable banding pattern makes the test useful in cattle breeding schemes and for clinical diagnosis. A total of 2381 samples was analysed over a period of three years. The carrier rate among young bulls at artificial insemination (AI) stations decreased from 11.6 per cent in 1993 to 9.9 per cent in the first five months of 1995. Continuous screening of young bulls before entering AI is still recommended unless both parents are proven to be genetically free of BLAD. The carrier rate among clinically suspect animals was not increased, and carriers are therefore not expected to be immunodeficient. Despite all efforts to eradicate the disease, calves with BLAD were still observed in 1995. PMID:8735510

  1. Leucocyte function in Crohn's disease. Studies on mobilisation using a quantitative skin window technique and on the function of circulating polymorphonuclear leucocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Wandall, J H; Binder, V

    1982-01-01

    Leucocyte function was evaluated by mobilisation to skin windows with chambers and by the chemotactic, phagocytic, and nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) reducing activity of circulating leucocytes in vitro in 20 patients with Crohn's disease, 21 healthy volunteers, and nine patients with sarcoidosis or tuberculosis. Leucocytes had been mobilised in significantly reduced numbers at 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours in Crohn's disease compared with healthy volunteers (P less than 0.01) and patients with sarcoidosis/tuberculosis (P less than 0.01). The leucocyte migration rate showed that mobilisation in Crohn's disease begins after a prolonged lag phase and is reduced compared with healthy volunteers (P less than 0.01) and patients with sarcoidosis/tuberculosis (P less than 0.02). The reduced mobilisation was not correlated with disease activity. In vitro random migration by leucocytes was slightly lower in Crohn's disease (P less than 0.05) than in healthy volunteers, but there was no difference after removal of the autologous plasma. Chemotactic response to casein did not differ between the groups studied. Serum independent and dependent phagocytosis did not differ from control groups. Serum independent phagocytosis was positively and significantly correlated to the disease activity (rho 0.4812, P less than 0.05). Resting leucocyte NBT reduction was increased in Crohn's disease and sarcoidosis/tuberculosis (P less than 0.01), but during phagocytosis a lower NBT reduction was found in Crohn's disease than in healthy volunteers (P less than 0.02). The inflammatory response in Crohn's disease, with reduced leucocyte accumulation, differs from patients with other granulomatous reactions and is independent of the disease activity. Our data suggest that the defect is not cellular. They support the hypothesis that a pathogenic factor in Crohn's disease may be foreign material that is normally eliminated remaining in the tissue and eliciting a chronic inflammatory response. PMID:7040174

  2. Release of enzymes from human leucocytes during incubation with Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Senff, Leah Morford; Sawyer, William D.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on release of enzymes from human leucocytes was determined. Supernatants from incubation mixtures containing leucocytes and gonococci were assayed for activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactic acid dehydrogenase, as well as for activity of the hydrolytic enzymes, β-glucuronidase and lysozyme, which are found primarily in leucocyte granules. Thirty-minute incubation of leucocytes with pilated T1 gonococci resulted in a negligible release of lactic acid dehydrogenase and little release of β-glucuronidase even at bacteria to leucocyte ratios as high as 50 to 1. Lysozyme release, however, was significant at this ratio and at 20 to 1 but not at 5 to 1. Incubation with non-pilated T4 bacteria yielded no significant release of lactic acid dehydrogenase or β-glucuronidase, but it caused a significant release of lysozyme at bacteria to leucocyte ratios as low as 2 to 1. These results suggested that the lysozyme release might be related to the degree of phagocytic activity since, at low ratios, T4 was readily ingested but T1 was not. Consistent with this hypothesis, serum which promoted the phagocytosis of the pilated gonococci also stimulated lysozyme release at low ratios of T1 to leucocyte. Absorption of the serum with T1 abolished the opsonic effect and markedly diminished the amount of lysozyme released. PMID:414817

  3. Release of enzymes from human leucocytes during incubation with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Senff, L M; Sawyer, W D

    1977-12-01

    The effect of Neisseria gonorrhoeae on release of enzymes from human leucocytes was determined. Supernatants from incubation mixtures containing leucocytes and gonococci were assayed for activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme, lactic acid dehydrogenase, as well as for activity of the hydrolytic enzymes, β-glucuronidase and lysozyme, which are found primarily in leucocyte granules. Thirty-minute incubation of leucocytes with pilated T1 gonococci resulted in a negligible release of lactic acid dehydrogenase and little release of β-glucuronidase even at bacteria to leucocyte ratios as high as 50 to 1. Lysozyme release, however, was significant at this ratio and at 20 to 1 but not at 5 to 1. Incubation with non-pilated T4 bacteria yielded no significant release of lactic acid dehydrogenase or β-glucuronidase, but it caused a significant release of lysozyme at bacteria to leucocyte ratios as low as 2 to 1. These results suggested that the lysozyme release might be related to the degree of phagocytic activity since, at low ratios, T4 was readily ingested but T1 was not. Consistent with this hypothesis, serum which promoted the phagocytosis of the pilated gonococci also stimulated lysozyme release at low ratios of T1 to leucocyte. Absorption of the serum with T1 abolished the opsonic effect and markedly diminished the amount of lysozyme released.

  4. A novel somatic MAPK1 mutation in primary ovarian mixed germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yang; Deng, Wei; Wang, Feng; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Liu, Fa-Ying; Yang, Bi-Cheng; Huang, Mei-Zhen; Guo, Jiu-Bai; Xie, Qiu-Hua; He, Ming; Huang, Ou-Ping

    2016-02-01

    A recent exome-sequencing study revealed prevalent mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK1) p.E322K mutation in cervical carcinoma. It remains largely unknown whether ovarian carcinomas also harbor MAPK1 mutations. As paralogous gene mutations co‑occur frequently in human malignancies, we analyzed here a total of 263 ovarian carcinomas for the presence of MAPK1 and paralogous MAPK3 mutations by DNA sequencing. A previously unreported MAPK1 p.D321N somatic mutation was identified in 2 out of 18 (11.1%) ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, while no other MAPK1 or MAPK3 mutation was detected in our samples. Of note, OCC‑115, the MAPK1‑mutated sample with bilateral cancerous ovaries affected, harbored MAPK1 mutation in the right ovary while retained the left ovary intact, implicating that the genetic alterations underlying ovarian mixed germ cell tumor may be different, even in patients with similar genetic backgrounds and tumor microenvironments. The results of evolutionary conservation and protein structure modeling analysis implicated that MAPK1 p.D321N mutation may be pathogenic. Additionally, mutations in protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit α (PPP2R1A), ring finger protein 43 (RNF43), DNA directed polymerase ε (POLE1), ribonuclease type III (DICER1), CCCTC‑binding factor (CTCF), ribosomal protein L22 (RPL22), DNA methyltransferase 3α (DNMT3A), transformation/transcription domain‑associated protein (TRRAP), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and IDH2 were not detected in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors, implicating these genetic alterations may be not associated with MAPK1 mutation in the development of this malignancy. The present study identified a previously unreported MAPK1 mutation in ovarian mixed germ cell tumors for the first time, and this mutation may be actively involved in the tumorigenesis of this disease.

  5. Mixed Messages: How Primary Agents of Socialization Influence Adolescent Females Who Identify as Multiracial-Bisexual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alissa R.

    2013-01-01

    The goals of this study were to highlight the often stigmatized and invisible identities of six female participants who identify as multiracial/biracial-bisexual/pansexual, focusing on the pre-college context. Findings, using in-depth interviews, indicated that the primary socializing agents within the pre-college context strongly influenced…

  6. STUDIES OF PHAGOCYTOSIS OF GROUP A STREPTOCOCCI BY POLYMORPHONUCLEAR LEUCOCYTES IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, James G.; Church, Alice B.

    1960-01-01

    Studies have been made on phagocytosis and killing of Group A streptococci during mixing with suspensions of leucocytes in vitro. Under appropriate test conditions an anti-phagocytic effect can be demonstrated for the streptococcal hyaluronic acid capsule as well as for its M protein. The results obtained suggest an explanation for the suitability of human, but not rabbit, blood for opsonophagocytic tests designed to measure type-specific streptococcal antibodies. Human sera contain a factor which counteracts the anti-phagocytic effects of streptococcal hyaluronic acid capsules, and hence human blood serves well for detection of antibodies which combine with the only other phagocytosis-resisting component of this microorganism, namely M protein. In contrast, rabbit sera contain none of this factor, and addition of antibody to M protein to phagocytic test systems employing rabbit serum does not necessarily render the streptococci susceptible to engulfment by white cells, since the hyaluronic acid capsule may continue to interfere with phagocytosis. The nature of the human serum factor which opsonizes encapsulated streptococci is unknown. It does not appear to be an antibody or an enzyme capable of depolymerizing hyaluronic acid. PMID:13714578

  7. Sorption and Release of Organics by Primary, Anaerobic, and Aerobic Activated Sludge Mixed with Raw Municipal Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Modin, Oskar; Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    New activated sludge processes that utilize sorption as a major mechanism for organics removal are being developed to maximize energy recovery from wastewater organics, or as enhanced primary treatment technologies. To model and optimize sorption-based activated sludge processes, further knowledge about sorption of organics onto sludge is needed. This study compared primary-, anaerobic-, and aerobic activated sludge as sorbents, determined sorption capacity and kinetics, and investigated some characteristics of the organics being sorbed. Batch sorption assays were carried out without aeration at a mixing velocity of 200 rpm. Only aerobic activated sludge showed net sorption of organics. Sorption of dissolved organics occurred by a near-instantaneous sorption event followed by a slower process that obeyed 1st order kinetics. Sorption of particulates also followed 1st order kinetics but there was no instantaneous sorption event; instead there was a release of particles upon mixing. The 5-min sorption capacity of activated sludge was 6.5±10.8 mg total organic carbon (TOC) per g volatile suspend solids (VSS) for particulate organics and 5.0±4.7 mgTOC/gVSS for dissolved organics. The observed instantaneous sorption appeared to be mainly due to organics larger than 20 kDa in size being sorbed, although molecules with a size of about 200 Da with strong UV absorbance at 215–230 nm were also rapidly removed. PMID:25768429

  8. Sorption and release of organics by primary, anaerobic, and aerobic activated sludge mixed with raw municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Modin, Oskar; Saheb Alam, Soroush; Persson, Frank; Wilén, Britt-Marie

    2015-01-01

    New activated sludge processes that utilize sorption as a major mechanism for organics removal are being developed to maximize energy recovery from wastewater organics, or as enhanced primary treatment technologies. To model and optimize sorption-based activated sludge processes, further knowledge about sorption of organics onto sludge is needed. This study compared primary-, anaerobic-, and aerobic activated sludge as sorbents, determined sorption capacity and kinetics, and investigated some characteristics of the organics being sorbed. Batch sorption assays were carried out without aeration at a mixing velocity of 200 rpm. Only aerobic activated sludge showed net sorption of organics. Sorption of dissolved organics occurred by a near-instantaneous sorption event followed by a slower process that obeyed 1st order kinetics. Sorption of particulates also followed 1st order kinetics but there was no instantaneous sorption event; instead there was a release of particles upon mixing. The 5-min sorption capacity of activated sludge was 6.5±10.8 mg total organic carbon (TOC) per g volatile suspend solids (VSS) for particulate organics and 5.0±4.7 mgTOC/gVSS for dissolved organics. The observed instantaneous sorption appeared to be mainly due to organics larger than 20 kDa in size being sorbed, although molecules with a size of about 200 Da with strong UV absorbance at 215-230 nm were also rapidly removed.

  9. Morphology of Mixed Primary and Secondary Organic Particles and the Adsorption of Spectator Organic Gases during Aerosol Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Imre, D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2010-04-13

    Traditional semi-empirical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) models assume that SOA mixes well with primary organic aerosols (POA), which significantly enhances the modeled SOA yields. These models further assume that the organic compounds in the gas phase do no condense on SOA as it forms. These assumptions were challenged through a detailed experimental investigation of the compositions and morphologies of SOA particles formed during ozonolysis of α-pinene in the presence of dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles and DOP gas phase component using a single particle mass spectrometer. Ultraviolet (UV) laser depth-profiling experiments were used to characterize different types of mixed SOA/DOP particles: those formed by condensation of the oxidized α-pinene products on size-selected DOP particles and by condensation of DOP on size-selected α-pinene SOA particles. The results of these measurements conclusively show that the hydrophilic SOA and hydrophobic DOP do not mix, but instead form distinct phases. An examination of homogeneously-nucleated SOA particles formed in the presence of DOP shows them to be encapsulated by a thin DOP layer. Thus SOA can adsorb gas-phase DOP even though it has an extremely low vapor pressure (1.3×10-7 Torr), which has significant implications for SOA formation and fate in the atmosphere, where numerous organic compounds with various volatilities are present.

  10. User-generated quality standards for youth mental health in primary care: a participatory research design using mixed methods

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Tanya; Rose, Diana; Murray, Joanna; Ashworth, Mark; Tylee, André

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop user-generated quality standards for young people with mental health problems in primary care using a participatory research model. Methods 50 young people aged 16–25 from community settings and primary care participated in focus groups and interviews about their views and experiences of seeking help for mental health problems in primary care, cofacilitated by young service users and repeated to ensure respondent validation. A second group of young people also aged 16–25 who had sought help for any mental health problem from primary care or secondary care within the last 5 years were trained as focus groups cofacilitators (n=12) developed the quality standards from the qualitative data and participated in four nominal groups (n=28). Results 46 quality standards were developed and ranked by young service users. Agreement was defined as 100% of scores within a two-point region. Group consensus existed for 16 quality standards representing the following aspects of primary care: better advertising and information (three); improved competence through mental health training and skill mix within the practice (two); alternatives to medication (three); improved referral protocol (three); and specific questions and reassurances (five). Alternatives to medication and specific questions and reassurances are aspects of quality which have not been previously reported. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of using participatory research methods in order to develop user-generated quality standards. The development of patient-generated quality standards may offer a more formal method of incorporating the views of service users into quality improvement initiatives. This method can be adapted for generating quality standards applicable to other patient groups. PMID:24920648

  11. Differences in leucocyte-endothelium interactions between normal and adenocarcinoma bearing tissues in response to radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, N. Z.; Ross, B. A.; Gulledge, C.; Klitzman, B.; Dodge, R.; Dewhirst, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the interaction between leucocytes and endothelial cells in tumour tissues is greatly diminished compared with normal tissues under several induced inflammatory conditions. Radiation has been reported to cause release of inflammatory mediators and to promote neutrophil adhesions to cultured endothelial monolayers. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that radiation would cause increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion in both tumour and normal tissues. We examined these two parameters in response to 6 Gy of gamma-radiation in mammary adenocarcinomas implanted into rat skinfold window chambers as well as normal (i.e. non-tumour-bearing) preparations. Leucocyte rolling and adhesion were measured in terms of flux of rolling leucocytes (F(rolling)) and density of adhering leucocytes (D(adhering)) in microvessels. F(rolling) and D(adhering) were measured in two groups of preparations: irradiated and control. In normal preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were both increased significantly by radiation. In contrast, in adenocarcinoma-bearing preparations, F(rolling) and D(adhering) were either unchanged (in the tumour centre) or reduced (in tumour periphery and the normal tissue surrounding the tumour) by radiation. Radiation did not cause changes in haemodynamics in these preparations, thus the observed changes in leucocyte rolling and adhesion could not be accounted for by haemodynamic factors. These results indicate that: (1) in normal preparations, radiation could cause inflammation as manifested by increased leucocyte rolling and adhesion; and (2) in tumour-bearing preparations, radiation caused changes in the vascular surface properties such that they became less adhesive to leucocytes. Such differences in radiation response may have important implications for radiation therapy and provide new insights into the unique features of tumours. Images Figure 2 PMID:8180019

  12. Mixed primary squamous cell carcinoma, follicular carcinoma, and micropapillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland: A case report.

    PubMed

    Dong, Su; Song, Xue-Song; Chen, Guang; Liu, Jia

    2016-08-01

    Primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid gland is rare, and mixed squamous cell and follicular carcinoma is even rarer still, with only a few cases reported in the literature. The simultaneous presentation of three primary cancers of the thyroid has not been reported previously. Here we report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the thyroid, follicular thyroid carcinoma, and micropapillary thyroid carcinoma. A 62-year-old female patient presented with complaints of pain and a 2-month history of progressively increased swelling in the anterior region of the neck. Fine-needle-aspiration cytology of both lobes indicated the possibility of the presence of a follicular neoplasm. Total thyroidectomy with left-sided modified radical neck dissection was performed. Postoperative pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of thyroid follicular carcinoma with squamous cell carcinoma and micropapillary carcinoma of the thyroid. Thyroid-stimulating hormone suppressive therapy with l-thyroxine was administered. Radioiodine and radiotherapy also were recommended, but the patient did not complete treatment as scheduled. The patient remained alive more than 9 months after operation. The present case report provides an example of the coexistence of multiple distinct malignancies in the thyroid.

  13. Food safety knowledge, practices and beliefs of primary food preparers in families with young children. A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Meysenburg, Rebecca; Albrecht, Julie A; Litchfield, Ruth; Ritter-Gooder, Paula K

    2014-02-01

    Food preparers in families with young children are responsible for safe food preparation and handling to prevent foodborne illness. To explore the food safety perceptions, beliefs, and practices of primary food preparers in families with children 10 years of age and younger, a mixed methods convergent parallel design and constructs of the Health Belief Model were used. A random sampling of 72 primary food handlers (36.2±8.6 years of age, 88% female) within young families in urban and rural areas of two Midwestern states completed a knowledge survey and participated in ten focus groups. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for codes and common themes. Forty-four percent scored less than the average knowledge score of 73%. Participants believe children are susceptible to foodborne illness but perceive its severity to be low with gastrointestinal discomfort as the primary outcome. Using safe food handling practices and avoiding inconveniences were benefits of preventing foodborne illness. Childcare duties, time and knowledge were barriers to practicing food safety. Confidence in preventing foodborne illness was high, especially when personal control over food handling is present. The low knowledge scores and reported practices revealed a false sense of confidence despite parental concern to protect their child from harm. Food safety messages that emphasize the susceptibility and severity of foodborne illness in children are needed to reach this audience for adoption of safe food handling practices. PMID:24211815

  14. Aggregation of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes during phagocytosis of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Henricks, P A; van der Tol, M E; Verhoef, J

    1984-01-01

    The process of aggregation of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) during the uptake of bacteria was studied. Radiolabelled S. aureus were opsonized in different sera, washed, resuspended in buffer and added to the PMN. Uptake of the bacteria and aggregation of the PMN were measured simultaneously. Maximal aggregation occurred within 6 min, when 5 X 10(6) PMN had phagocytosed 2.5 X 10(8) S. aureus. Also the effects of serum concentrations and different sera for opsonization of the bacteria on PMN aggregation were studied. Despite normal uptake, aggregation of PMN was low when bacteria were opsonized in complement-deficient sera. Furthermore when PMN were treated with pronase to inactivate complement receptors on the cell surface of the PMN, and bacteria preopsonized in immune serum were added, no change in uptake occurred, although the degree of aggregation halved compared to control PMN. So, interaction between the bacteria and the complement receptor of the PMN cell membrane is needed for triggering the process of aggregation. By using dansylcadaverin and diphenylamine to modulate lysosomal enzyme release, azide or PMN from a chronic granulomatous disease patient to study the effect of the formation of oxygen species, and theophylline, DB-cAMP or 8 Br-cAMP to increase cAMP levels, it was concluded that aggregation of PMN during phagocytosis was not dependent on oxygen metabolism, degranulation or cAMP levels of PMN. PMID:6086503

  15. Labile disulfide bonds are common at the leucocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Ciaccia, Laura; Thomas, Benjamin; Barclay, A. Neil

    2011-01-01

    Redox conditions change in events such as immune and platelet activation, and during viral infection, but the biochemical consequences are not well characterized. There is evidence that some disulfide bonds in membrane proteins are labile while others that are probably structurally important are not exposed at the protein surface. We have developed a proteomic/mass spectrometry method to screen for and identify non-structural, redox-labile disulfide bonds in leucocyte cell-surface proteins. These labile disulfide bonds are common, with several classes of proteins being identified and around 30 membrane proteins regularly identified under different reducing conditions including using enzymes such as thioredoxin. The proteins identified include integrins, receptors, transporters and cell–cell recognition proteins. In many cases, at least one cysteine residue was identified by mass spectrometry as being modified by the reduction process. In some cases, functional changes are predicted (e.g. in integrins and cytokine receptors) but the scale of molecular changes in membrane proteins observed suggests that widespread effects are likely on many different types of proteins including enzymes, adhesion proteins and transporters. The results imply that membrane protein activity is being modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism. PMID:22645650

  16. National community pharmacy NHS influenza vaccination service in Wales: a primary care mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Andrew M; Wood, Fiona C; Carter, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza is a significant cause of morbidity and excess mortality, yet vaccine coverage in the UK remains below target. Community pharmacies are increasingly being promoted as an alternative to vaccination by GPs. Aim To explore and verify the factors that influence the relative performance of pharmacies providing NHS influenza vaccinations. Design and setting A mixed methods study utilising qualitative, semi-structured interviews and quantitative analysis of predictors of vaccination numbers in community pharmacies in Wales. Method Interviews were conducted with 16 pharmacists who participated in the Welsh national pharmacy influenza service in 2013–2014. A purposive sampling strategy was used. Qualitative findings were analysed using framework analysis. Potential predictors of vaccination numbers were identified from interviews and a literature review, and included in a multivariable regression model. Results The contribution of community pharmacies towards vaccination in Wales is small. Findings suggest that community pharmacies reach younger at-risk individuals, in whom vaccine uptake is low, in greater proportion than influenza vaccination programmes as a whole. Extended opening hours and urban locations were positively associated with the number of vaccinations given, although pharmacists reported that workload, vaccine costs, unforeseen delays, lack of public awareness, and GPs’ views of the service limited their contribution. Pharmacists, aware of the potential for conflict with GPs, moderated their behaviour to mitigate such risk. Conclusion Before community pharmacies take greater responsibility for delivering healthcare services, obstacles including increasing pharmacist capacity, vaccine procurement, health service delays, managing GP–pharmacy relationships, and improving public awareness must be overcome. PMID:26965025

  17. Case-finding for hepatitis C in primary care: a mixed-methods service evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Shivani; Horwood, Jeremy; Hickman, Matthew; Sharp, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C is often asymptomatic, presenting with liver failure and cancer decades after infection. People who inject drugs (PWID) and immigrant populations from countries with a moderate-to-high prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are the main risk groups. Deaths and hospital admissions due to HCV cirrhosis tripled between 1998 and 2010, but the majority of people with chronic HCV are unaware of it. Aim To identify patients at risk of developing hepatitis C using routine GP data, to determine the proportion not tested, and to explore GPs’ views regarding testing. Design and setting Mixed-methods service evaluation (density-based selection of PWID) in six NHS practices in Bristol. Method Patients at risk of HCV were identified. The Health Protection Agency laboratory (now part of Public Health England) provided test results. Semi-structured interviews with 17 GPs were audiorecorded and thematic analyses conducted on anonymised transcripts. Results Of 3765 patients identified as being at risk of developing hepatitis C, 3051 (81%) had no test result, including 53% of PWID and 93% of the ‘ethnicity’ group. All GPs said they usually test PWID. Most GPs test for HIV and hepatitis B in immigrants more often than they test for HCV. Barriers to testing included not questioning patients about risk factors, competing priorities, the chaotic lifestyle of PWID, difficulty extracting information from computerised records, and forgetting to address HCV. Conclusion Computer prompts and GP education on whom to test are warranted. Ensuring that country of origin and drug use is included on the new-patient questionnaire might also aid case-finding for HCV. PMID:24567619

  18. Independent Living Oldest Old and Their Primary Health Provider: A Mixed Method Examination of the Influence of Patient Personality Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Stadtlander, Lee M; Giles, Martha J; Sickel, Amy E; Brooks, Emma; Brown, Cherri; Cormell, Melissa; Ewing, Lara; Hart, Delores; Koons, Dawn; Olson, Christy; Parker, Pamela; Semenova, Veronica; Stoneking, Shawna

    2015-10-01

    This convergent mixed methods study examined 35 healthy, independent living individuals' (above 85 years) perceptions of their relationship with their primary health provider (PHP) and health practices. The relationship between PHP relationship perceptions and locus of control (LOC), resilience, and self-efficacy was explored through surveys and interviews. The majority indicated they visited their PHP just for preventative care; the number of PHP visits per year was significantly lower than reported for individuals above 85 by the CDC, possible reasons for this finding are provided. A positive relationship between LOC, resiliency, and self-efficacy for the oldest old was found. Few participants indicated their PHP had discussed normal changes with aging. This study has deepened understanding of the complexity inherent to the healthy oldest olds' relationship with their PHP. The findings suggest this relationship relates to the PHP's personal characteristics, the older adult patients' personality, and the influence of the accompanying patient escort.

  19. Critical appraisal of laropiprant and extended-release niacin combination in the management of mixed dyslipidemias and primary hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Ayman A; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2010-04-15

    Niacin is a B-complex vitamin which has been used for decades for the management of mixed dyslipidemias and primary hypercholesterolemia. It decreases the risk of cardiovascular events either when used as a monotherapy or in combination with other lipid lowering medications. However, a major limitation to its use is niacin-induced flushing occurring even with the extended-release formulations. Laropiprant, a selective prostaglandin-2 receptor inhibitor, specifically targets the cascade of events causing the flushing. It has been recently used in combination with extended-release niacin. This article will review the early experience with this combination with focus on efficacy, safety, tolerability and current place in therapy. Early data are promising and suggest that more patients in clinical practice will benefit from niacin combined with laropiprant. Ongoing clinical trials will provide a better insight on the long-term safety of the drug and its efficacy for reducing cardiovascular events.

  20. Automatic characterisation of primary, secondary and mixed sludge inflow in terms of the mathematical generalised sludge digester model.

    PubMed

    de Gracia, M; Huete, E; Beltrán, S; Grau, P; Ayesa, E

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the characterisation procedure of different types of sludge generated in a wastewater treatment plant to be reproduced in a mathematical model of the sludge digestion process. The automatic calibration method used is based on an optimisation problem and uses a set of mathematical equations related to the a priori knowledge of the sludge composition, the experimental measurements applied to the real sludge, and the definition of the model components. In this work, the potential of the characterisation methodology is shown by means of a real example, taking into account that sludge is a very complex matter to characterise and that the models for digestion also have a considerable number of model components. The results obtained suit both the previously reported characteristics of the primary, secondary and mixed sludge, and the experimental measurements specially done for this work. These three types of sludge have been successfully characterised to be used in complex mathematical models. PMID:22097032

  1. Cultural responses to pain in UK children of primary school age: a mixed-methods study.

    PubMed

    Azize, Pary M; Endacott, Ruth; Cattani, Allegra; Humphreys, Ann

    2014-06-01

    Pain-measurement tools are often criticized for not addressing the influence of culture and ethnicity on pain. This study examined how children who speak English as a primary or additional language discuss pain. Two methods were used in six focus group interviews with 34 children aged 4-7 years: (i) use of drawings from the Pediatric Pain Inventory to capture the language used by children to describe pain; and (ii) observation of the children's placing of pain drawings on red/amber/green paper to denote perceived severity of pain. The findings demonstrated that children with English as an additional language used less elaborate language when talking about pain, but tended to talk about the pictures prior to deciding where they should be placed. For these children, there was a positive significant relationship between language, age, and length of stay in the UK. The children's placement of pain drawings varied according to language background, sex, and age. The findings emphasize the need for sufficient time to assess pain adequately in children who do not speak English as a first language.

  2. Ambulatory care groups and the profiling of primary care physician resource use: examining the application of case mix adjustments.

    PubMed

    Greene, B R; Barlow, J; Newman, C

    1996-01-01

    A variety of profiling models and tools is utilized by payers, providers, and regulators to evaluate physician work, performance, and resource utilization. In physician profiling, the provider's pattern of practice is expressed as a rate of service or outcome. The article by Tucker, Weiner, Honigfeld, and Parton (this issue) compares the practice-based norms of primary care physicians by adjusting for case mix using ambulatory care groups (ACGs), a population-based classification method. Once the case mix is adjusted, the actual use of resources, as measured by overall charges, is compared with the expected value of resource use. In the Center for Research in Ambulatory Health Care Administration (CRAHCA) Physician Profiling Project, funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, physicians learn which services other physicians in their specialties perform. Physicians are able to compare their profiles with state and national level medians. The profiling project is one of the first demonstration projects in the field to profile ambulatory care practice patterns and collect patient demographics. An aspect of the project is to test the ACG classification system to data selected from 130 nonacademic practices representing over 5,000 physicians.

  3. DCAF4, a novel gene associated with leucocyte telomere length

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Massimo; Christiansen, Lene; Stone, Rivka; Hunt, Steven C; Horvath, Kent; Eisenberg, Dan T A; Kimura, Masayuki; Petersen, Inge; Kark, Jeremy D; Herbig, Utz; Reiner, Alex P; Benetos, Athanase; Codd, Veryan; Nyholt, Dale R; Sinnreich, Ronit; Christensen, Kaare; Nassar, Hisham; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Levy, Daniel; Bataille, Veronique; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Chen, Wei; Berenson, Gerald S; Samani, Nilesh J; Martin, Nicholas G; Tishkoff, Sarah; Schork, Nicholas J; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Dalgård, Christine; Spector, Timothy D; Aviv, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Background Leucocyte telomere length (LTL), which is fashioned by multiple genes, has been linked to a host of human diseases, including sporadic melanoma. A number of genes associated with LTL have already been identified through genome-wide association studies. The main aim of this study was to establish whether DCAF4 (DDB1 and CUL4-associated factor 4) is associated with LTL. In addition, using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), we examined whether LTL-associated genes in the general population might partially explain the inherently longer LTL in patients with sporadic melanoma, the risk for which is increased with ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Results Genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis and de novo genotyping of 20 022 individuals revealed a novel association (p=6.4×10−10) between LTL and rs2535913, which lies within DCAF4. Notably, eQTL analysis showed that rs2535913 is associated with decline in DCAF4 expressions in both lymphoblastoid cells and sun-exposed skin (p=4.1×10−3 and 2×10−3, respectively). Moreover, IPA revealed that LTL-associated genes, derived from GWA meta-analysis (N=9190), are over-represented among genes engaged in melanoma pathways. Meeting increasingly stringent p value thresholds (p<0.05, <0.01, <0.005, <0.001) in the LTL-GWA meta-analysis, these genes were jointly over-represented for melanoma at p values ranging from 1.97×10−169 to 3.42×10−24. Conclusions We uncovered a new locus associated with LTL in the general population. We also provided preliminary findings that suggest a link of LTL through genetic mechanisms with UVR and melanoma in the general population. PMID:25624462

  4. Phospholipid turnover during phagocytosis in human polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    García Gil, Merche; Alonso, Fernando; Alvarez Chiva, Vicente; Sánchez Crespo, Mariano; Mato, José M.

    1982-01-01

    We have previously observed that the phagocytosis of zymosan particles coated with complement by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes is accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of phosphatidylcholine synthesis by transmethylation [García Gil, Alonso, Sánchez Crespo & Mato (1981) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 101, 740–748]. The present studies show that phosphatidylcholine synthesis by a cholinephosphotransferase reaction is enhanced, up to 3-fold, during phagocytosis by polymorphonuclear cells. This effect was tested by both measuring the incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine in cells labelled with [Me-14C]choline, and by assaying the activity of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase. The time course of CDP-choline:diacylglycerol cholinephosphotransferase activation by zymosan mirrors the inhibition of phospholipid methyltransferase activity previously reported. The extent of incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine induced by various doses of zymosan correlates with the physiological response of the cells to this stimulus. This effect was specific for phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine turnover was not affected by zymosan. The purpose of this enhanced phosphatidylcholine synthesis is not to provide phospholipid molecules rich in arachidonic acid. The present studies show that about 80% of the arachidonic acid generated in response to zymosan derives from phosphatidylinositol. A transient accumulation of arachidonoyldiacylglycerol has also been observed, which indicates that a phospholipase C is responsible, at least in part, for the generation of arachidonic acid. Finally, isobutylmethylxanthine and quinacrine, inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol turnover, inhibit both arachidonic acid generation and phagocytosis, indicating a function for this pathway during this process. PMID:6181780

  5. Physical activity assessment in practice: a mixed methods study of GPPAQ use in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Insufficient physical activity (PA) levels which increase the risk of chronic disease are reported by almost two-thirds of the population. More evidence is needed about how PA promotion can be effectively implemented in general practice (GP), particularly in socio-economically disadvantaged communities. One tool recommended for the assessment of PA in GP and supported by NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) is The General Practice Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPPAQ) but details of how it may be used and of its acceptability to practitioners and patients are limited. This study aims to examine aspects of GPPAQ administration in non-urgent patient contacts using different primary care electronic recording systems and to explore the views of health professionals regarding its use. Methods Four general practices, selected because of their location within socio-economically disadvantaged areas, were invited to administer GPPAQs to patients, aged 35-75 years, attending non-urgent consultations, over two-week periods. They used different methods of administration and different electronic medical record systems (EMIS, Premiere, Vision). Participants’ (general practitioners (GPs), nurses and receptionists) views regarding GPPAQ use were explored via questionnaires and focus groups. Results Of 2,154 eligible consultations, 192 (8.9%) completed GPPAQs; of these 83 (43%) were categorised as inactive. All practices were located within areas ranked as being in the tertile of greatest socio-economic deprivation in Northern Ireland. GPs/nurses in two practices invited completion of the GPPAQ, receptionists did so in two. One practice used an electronic template; three used paper copies of the questionnaires. End-of-study questionnaires, completed by 11 GPs, 3 nurses and 2 receptionists and two focus groups, with GPs (n = 8) and nurses (n = 4) indicated that practitioners considered the GPPAQ easy to use but not in every consultation

  6. Metastasizing mixed tumor of the parotid: initial presentation as a solitary kidney tumor and ultimate carcinomatous transformation at the primary site.

    PubMed

    Czader, M; Eberhart, C G; Bhatti, N; Cummings, C; Westra, W H

    2000-08-01

    Benign mixed tumors of the salivary glands are generally regarded as indolent and harmless neoplasms. A subset of benign mixed tumors, however, can undergo carcinomatous transformation (that is, carcinoma ex-mixed tumor). Even more rarely, a mixed tumor that is seemingly benign at the microscopic level will metastasize like a true carcinoma (that is, metastasizing mixed tumor [MZMT]). Despite the benign appearance of the metastatic implants, there is usually little doubt regarding their true nature and origin. Patients invariably have had a mixed tumor removed from the parotid or some other salivary gland, and metastatic spread is usually preceded by multiple episodes of local tumor recurrence. We report a case of MZMT that presented as a solitary kidney mass. In the absence of a previous or concurrent salivary gland tumor, its metastatic nature was not appreciated and it was regarded as an unusual but benign kidney adenoma. One year after removal of the kidney mass, the patient presented with signs and symptoms of an aggressive parotid tumor. Pathologic examination of the tumor in the parotid demonstrated a high-grade carcinoma arising from a mixed tumor. This case underscores the importance of considering MZMT when a seemingly benign mixed tumor is encountered at a nonsalivary site, even in patients without a supportive history. Failure to do so may cause an unnecessary delay in primary tumor diagnosis and management, allow the primary tumor to progress toward a more malignant phenotype, and deny the patient a high expectation for a complete cure.

  7. Removal of leucocytes from whole blood and erythrocyte suspensions by filtration through cotton wool. IV. Immunization studies in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Engelfriet, C P; Diepenhorst, P; Van den Giessen, M; von Riesz, E

    1975-01-01

    Hetero-immunization experiments in rabbits were performed to evaluate the quantity of leucocyte antigens present in red cell suspensions prepared by the filtration method of DIEPENHORST et al., in which no intact leucocytes could be detected. It was found that the quantity of leucocyte antigens is smallest in blood filtered immediately after taking. More leucocyte-antigenic material seems to be present in blood that is filtered after storage and in frozen-thawed red cell suspensions. Evidence was obtained that granulocyte-specific antigens are more strongly immunogenic in the rabbit than lymphocyte-specific antigens or antigens common to both cells.

  8. Nitric oxide radicals in leucocytes and vaginal washes of Trichomonas vaginalis -infected symptomatic and asymptomatic women.

    PubMed

    Yadav, M; Dubey, M L; Gupta, I; Malla, N

    2006-03-01

    The clinical spectrum of Trichomonas vaginalis infection varies from asymptomatic to mild, moderate or severe vaginitis. Nitric oxide and other reactive nitrogen radicals produced by immune effector cells are important cytotoxic and cytostatic mediators against several microorganisms including parasites. In the present study, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) were determined in leucocyte cultures (stimulated with T. vaginalis in vitro) and vaginal washes (VWs) of 22 symptomatic and 20 asymptomatic T. vaginalis-infected and 20 healthy women by immunoblotting and Griess method respectively. The iNOS protein was detected in leucocytes and VWs of all the symptomatic and asymptomatic women, but was not detected in any of the samples from healthy women. Mean iNOS protein band intensity was significantly higher in leucocytes as compared to VWs (P<0.001) of both symptomatic and asymptomatic women and was also higher in leucocytes of asymptomatic as compared to symptomatic women (P<0.05). Mean RNI concentration was also significantly higher in leucocytes (P<0.01) and VWs (P<0.05) of asymptomatic as compared to symptomatic women, and was also higher in samples of infected as compared to healthy women (P<0.001). These results suggest that reactive nitrogen radicals may have a role in limiting T. vaginalis infection in asymptomatic women. PMID:16529664

  9. Do leucocytes reflect condition in nestling burrowing parrots Cyanoliseus patagonus in the wild?

    PubMed

    Masello, Juan F; Choconi, R Gustavo; Helmer, Matthias; Kremberg, Thomas; Lubjuhn, Thomas; Quillfeldt, Petra

    2009-02-01

    The different leucocyte types are an important part of the immune system. Thus, they have been used in ecological studies to assess immune function and physiological stress in wild birds. It is generally assumed that increased stress and decreased condition are associated with an increase in the ratio of heterophils to lymphocytes, the H/L ratio. We studied leucocyte profiles in relation to body condition in nestling Burrowing Parrots (Cyanoliseus patagonus) in North-eastern Patagonia, Argentina. As in other wild parrots, heterophils were the most numerous leucocyte type, suggesting strong investment into innate immunity. Leucocyte profiles did not change with the age, while nestlings in better body condition increased the number of heterophils. Because the number of lymphocytes was independent of body condition, as a result we observed a positive correlation between body condition and the H/L ratio. The total number of leucocytes relative to erythrocytes increased in nestlings in better body condition, indicating a larger overall investment into immune function in well-nourished nestlings. The observed heterophilic profiles of nestling Burrowing Parrots together with the positive relationship between H/L ratio and body condition may indicate a favoured investment in a robust innate immunity that reduces the risk of infection taking hold in these long-lived birds.

  10. Phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity in lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.) leucocytes analysed by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Haugland, Gyri T; Jakobsen, Ragnhild Aakre; Vestvik, Nils; Ulven, Kristian; Stokka, Lene; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we have isolated leucocytes from peripheral blood, head kidney and spleen from lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.), and performed functional studies like phagocytosis and respiratory burst, as well as morphological and cytochemical analyses. Different leucocytes were identified, such as lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages and polymorphonuclear cells with bean shaped or bilobed nuclei. In addition, cells with similar morphology as described for dendritic cells in trout were abundant among the isolated leucocytes. Flow cytometry was successfully used for measuring phagocytosis and respiratory burst activity. The phagocytic capacity and ability were very high, and cells with different morphology in all three leucocyte preparations phagocytised beads rapidly. Due to lack of available cell markers, the identity of the phagocytic cells could not be determined. The potent non-specific phagocytosis was in accordance with a high number of cells positive for myeloperoxidase, an enzyme involved in oxygen-dependent killing mechanism present in phagocytic cells. Further, high respiratory burst activity was present in the leucocytes samples, verifying a potent oxygen- dependent degradation. At present, the specific antibody immune response could not be measured, as immunoglobulin or B-cells have not yet been isolated. Therefore, analyses of the specific immune response in this fish species await further clarification. The present study presents the first analyses of lumpsucker immunity and also the first within the order Scopaeniformes.

  11. Adoption of a Portal for the Primary Care Management of Pediatric Asthma: A Mixed-Methods Implementation Study

    PubMed Central

    DuRivage, Nathalie; Mayne, Stephanie L; Finch, Stacia; Ross, Michelle E; Giacomini, Kelli; Suh, Andrew; McCarn, Banita; Brandt, Elias; Karavite, Dean; Staton, Elizabeth W; Shone, Laura P; McGoldrick, Valerie; Noonan, Kathleen; Miller, Dorothy; Lehmann, Christoph U; Pace, Wilson D; Grundmeier, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient portals may improve communication between families of children with asthma and their primary care providers and improve outcomes. However, the feasibility of using portals to collect patient-reported outcomes from families and the barriers and facilitators of portal implementation across diverse pediatric primary care settings have not been established. Objective We evaluated the feasibility of using a patient portal for pediatric asthma in primary care, its impact on management, and barriers and facilitators of implementation success. Methods We conducted a mixed-methods implementation study in 20 practices (11 states). Using the portal, parents of children with asthma aged 6-12 years completed monthly surveys to communicate treatment concerns, treatment goals, symptom control, medication use, and side effects. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of portal use with child characteristics and changes to asthma management. Ten clinician focus groups and 22 semistructured parent interviews explored barriers and facilitators of use in the context of an evidence-based implementation framework. Results We invited 9133 families to enroll and 237 (2.59%) used the portal (range by practice, 0.6%-13.6%). Children of parents or guardians who used the portal were significantly more likely than nonusers to be aged 6-9 years (vs 10-12, P=.02), have mild or moderate/severe persistent asthma (P=.009 and P=.04), have a prescription of a controller medication (P<.001), and have private insurance (P=.002). Portal users with uncontrolled asthma had significantly more medication changes and primary care asthma visits after using the portal relative to the year earlier (increases of 14% and 16%, respectively). Qualitative results revealed the importance of practice organization (coordinated workflows) as well as family (asthma severity) and innovation (facilitated communication and ease of use) characteristics for implementation success

  12. Morphology of mixed primary and secondary organic particles and the adsorption of spectator organic gases during aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Timothy D; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A; Imre, Dan; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2010-04-13

    Primary organic aerosol (POA) and associated vapors can play an important role in determining the formation and properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). If SOA and POA are miscible, POA will significantly enhance SOA formation and some POA vapor will incorporate into SOA particles. When the two are not miscible, condensation of SOA on POA particles forms particles with complex morphology. In addition, POA vapor can adsorb to the surface of SOA particles increasing their mass and affecting their evaporation rates. To gain insight into SOA/POA interactions we present a detailed experimental investigation of the morphologies of SOA particles formed during ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence of dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles, serving as a simplified model of hydrophobic POA, using a single-particle mass spectrometer. Ultraviolet laser depth-profiling experiments were used to characterize two different types of mixed SOA/DOP particles: those formed by condensation of the oxidized alpha-pinene products on size-selected DOP particles and by condensation of DOP on size-selected alpha-pinene SOA particles. The results show that the hydrophilic SOA and hydrophobic DOP do not mix but instead form layered phases. In addition, an examination of homogeneously nucleated SOA particles formed in the presence of DOP vapor shows them to have an adsorbed DOP coating layer that is approximately 4 nm thick and carries 12% of the particles mass. These results may have implications for SOA formation and behavior in the atmosphere, where numerous organic compounds with various volatilities and different polarities are present.

  13. Morphology of mixed primary and secondary organic particles and the adsorption of spectator organic gases during aerosol formation.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Timothy D; Song, Chen; Zaveri, Rahul A; Imre, Dan; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2010-04-13

    Primary organic aerosol (POA) and associated vapors can play an important role in determining the formation and properties of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). If SOA and POA are miscible, POA will significantly enhance SOA formation and some POA vapor will incorporate into SOA particles. When the two are not miscible, condensation of SOA on POA particles forms particles with complex morphology. In addition, POA vapor can adsorb to the surface of SOA particles increasing their mass and affecting their evaporation rates. To gain insight into SOA/POA interactions we present a detailed experimental investigation of the morphologies of SOA particles formed during ozonolysis of alpha-pinene in the presence of dioctyl phthalate (DOP) particles, serving as a simplified model of hydrophobic POA, using a single-particle mass spectrometer. Ultraviolet laser depth-profiling experiments were used to characterize two different types of mixed SOA/DOP particles: those formed by condensation of the oxidized alpha-pinene products on size-selected DOP particles and by condensation of DOP on size-selected alpha-pinene SOA particles. The results show that the hydrophilic SOA and hydrophobic DOP do not mix but instead form layered phases. In addition, an examination of homogeneously nucleated SOA particles formed in the presence of DOP vapor shows them to have an adsorbed DOP coating layer that is approximately 4 nm thick and carries 12% of the particles mass. These results may have implications for SOA formation and behavior in the atmosphere, where numerous organic compounds with various volatilities and different polarities are present. PMID:20194795

  14. The effects of marine primary biogenic organic aerosols as heterogeneous ice nuclei in mixed-phase clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Y.; Penner, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    There have been reports in the literature about marine primary biogenic organic aerosols (marine POA) acting as ice nuclei. These marine POA can be transported to the atmosphere through the bursting of air bubbles by breaking waves. In this study, we add marine POA as heterogeneous ice nuclei in mixed-phase clouds in a coupled general circulation model and aerosol transport model (CAM-IMPACT). The emission of the marine POA is determined by the sea salt emissions and a sea spray organic fraction function. The wet and dry deposition scheme in the CAM-IMPACT model will be extended to treat marine POA. The ice nucleation ability of the marine POA will be determined according to the in situ observation of the surface ice nuclei ratio, as well as the simulated surface concentration of marine POA and other aerosols. Several sensitivity tests will be performed on the sea salt emission flux, the sea spray organic fraction function, as well as the freezing efficiency of marine POA. The simulated ice water amount will be compared to satellite observations. This study attempts to evaluate the effect of marine biological organics as ice nuclei on a global scale.

  15. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  16. Primary mixed malignant tumor of bone in an 18-year-old male: Report of a case with radiologic-pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Courtier, Jesse; Robbins, Elizabeth; Soares, Bruno; Horvai, Andrew; Mackenzie, John D.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of primary malignant mixed tumor (MMT) of bone in an 18-year-old boy with X-ray, CT, MR, scintigraphic, FDG PET, and pathologic correlation. Primary MMT of bone is a highly aggressive tumor and presents both a diagnostic and clinical treatment challenge. This tumor is extremely rare and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the diagnostic imaging findings for primary MMT arising from bone in a patient of this age group. PMID:26909264

  17. Characterization of binding specificities of Bovine Leucocyte class I molecules: Impacts for rational epitope discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Her...

  18. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dianne; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. Objective: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance that should be assessed when investigating the relationship between safety culture and performance in primary care. Methods: Two consensus-based studies were carried out, in which subject matter experts and primary healthcare professionals from several EU states rated (a) the applicability to their healthcare system of several existing safety culture assessment tools and (b) the appropriateness and usefulness of a range of potential indicators of a positive patient safety culture to primary care settings. The safety culture tools were field-tested in four countries to ascertain any challenges and issues arising when used in primary care. Results: The two existing tools that received the most favourable ratings were the Manchester patient safety framework (MaPsAF primary care version) and the Agency for healthcare research and quality survey (medical office version). Several potential safety culture process indicators were identified. The one that emerged as offering the best combination of appropriateness and usefulness related to the collection of data on adverse patient events. Conclusion: Two tools, one quantitative and one qualitative, were identified as applicable and useful in assessing patient safety culture in primary care settings in Europe. Safety culture indicators in primary care should focus on the processes rather than the outcomes of care. PMID:26339832

  19. Pediatric immunization-related safety incidents in primary care: A mixed methods analysis of a national database

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Philippa; Edwards, Adrian; Powell, Colin; Evans, Huw Prosser; Carter, Ben; Hibbert, Peter; Makeham, Meredith; Sheikh, Aziz; Donaldson, Liam; Carson-Stevens, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Background Children are scheduled to receive 18–20 immunizations before their 18th birthday in England and Wales; this approximates to 13 million vaccines administered per annum. Each immunization represents a potential opportunity for immunization-related error and effective immunization is imperative to maintain the public health benefit from immunization. Using data from a national reporting system, this study aimed to characterize pediatric immunization-related safety incident reports from primary care in England and Wales between 2002 and 2013. Methods A cross-sectional mixed methods study was undertaken. This comprised reading the free-text of incident reports and applying codes to describe incident type, potential contributory factors, harm severity, and incident outcomes. A subsequent thematic analysis was undertaken to interpret the most commonly occurring codes, such as those describing the incident, events leading up to it and reported contributory factors, within the contexts they were described. Results We identified 1745 reports and most (n = 1077, 61.7%) described harm outcomes including three deaths, 67 reports of moderate harm and 1007 reports of low harm. Failure of timely vaccination was the potential cause of three child deaths from meningitis and pneumonia, and described in a further 113 reports. Vaccine administration incidents included the wrong number of doses (n = 476, 27.3%), wrong timing (n = 294, 16.8%), and wrong vaccine (n = 249, 14.3%). Documentation failures were frequently implicated. Socially and medically vulnerable children were commonly described. Conclusion This is the largest examination of reported contributory factors for immunization-related patient safety incidents in children. Our findings suggest investments in IT infrastructure to support data linkage and identification of risk predictors, development of consultation models that promote the role of parents in mitigating safety incidents, and improvement

  20. Cyclic AMP and the mechanism of leucocyte lysosomal enzyme release during an immediate hypersensitivity reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Deporter, D A

    1977-11-01

    The pleural cavity of rats was used to study the effect of altering leucocyte cyclic AMP content on the release of B-glucuronidase activity during an immediate hypersensitivity reaction. The effect on intravenous colchicine was also studied. Despite an increase of 135 to 235% in leucocyte cyclic AMP content no decrease in B-glucuronidase release was observed. Similarly, colchicine had no effect on enzyme release. It was concluded that the cyclic nucleotides and leucocyte microtubules may have no significant role to play in the release of lysosomal enzymes during acute inflammation in vivo. PMID:201738

  1. Physicochemical characteristics of the glycosaminoglycan-lysosomal enzyme interaction in vitro. A model of control of leucocytic lysosomal activity.

    PubMed Central

    Avila, J L; Convit, J

    1976-01-01

    1. The activities of 30 different lysosomal enzymes were determined in vitro in the presence of the sulphated glycosaminoglycans, heparin and chondroitin sulphate, all the enzymes being measured on a density-gradient-purified lysosomal fraction. 2. Each enzyme was studied as a function of the pH of the incubation medium. In general the presence of sulphated glycosaminoglycans induced a strong pH-dependent inhibition of lysosomal enzymes at pH values lower than 5.0, with full activity at higher pH values. However, in the particular case of lysozyme and phospholipase A2 the heparin-induced inhibition was maintained in the pH range 4.0-7.0. 3. For certain enzymes, such as acid beta-glycerophosphatase, alpha-galactosidase, acid lipase, lysozyme and phospholipase A2, the pH-dependent behaviour obtained in the presence of heparin was quite different to that obtained with chondroitin sulphate, suggesting the existence of physicochemical characteristic factors playing a role in the intermolecular interaction for each of the sulphated glycosaminoglycans studied. 4. Except in the particular case of peroxidase activity, in all other lysosomal enzymes measured the glycosaminoglycan-enzyme complex formation was a temperature-and time-independent phenomenon. 5. The effects of the ionic strength and pH on this intermolecular interaction reinforce the concept of an electrostatic reversible interaction between anionic groups of the glycosaminoglycans and cationic groups on the enzyme molecule. 6. As leucocytic primary lysosomes have a very acid intragranular pH and large amounts of chondroitin sulphate, we propose that this glycosaminoglycan might act as molecular regulator of leucocytic activity, by inhibiting lysosomal enzymes when the intragranular pH is below the pI of lysosomal enzymes. This fact, plus the intravacuolar pH changes described during the phagocytic process, might explain the unresponsiveness of lysosomal enzymes against each other existing in primary lysosomes as

  2. /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scanning in ampicillin-associated right-sided hemorrhagic colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Saverymuttu, S.H.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1984-07-01

    Hemorrhagic colitis is a rare but well-recognized complication with ampicillin or penicillin derivative treatment. Early colonoscopy has been advocated in establishing the diagnosis by demonstrating the characteristic pattern of only right-sided involvement and so distinguishing it from other colitides. The authors report a patient who developed colitis after amoxycillin therapy in whom /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan demonstrated right-sided colitis which alerted them to the diagnosis. Discontinuation of the antibiotic resulting in rapid improvement, and return of the /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan to normal in this patient suggests that ampicillin-associated colitis should not be considered purely as a hemorrhagic disease but may in some cases have an inflammatory component.

  3. Brain macrophages in rats following intravenous labelling of mononuclear leucocytes with colloidal carbon.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, E A

    1978-01-01

    Intravenous injections of colloidal carbon were used to label circulating mononuclear leucocytes. In the neonatal rats (3-5 days old), either 24 or 48 hours later, carbon-labelled macrophages were seen in the brain tissue. In the areas examined, notably the corpus callosum and the cerebral cortex, labelled macrophages were distributed randomly. They were either perivascular, perineuronal or lay between the nerve fibres. The labelled cells were mostly spindle-shaped with an eccentric nucleus and the cytoplasm at one pole of the cell was engorged with dark carbon particles. Abundant labelled cells were also seen over the brain surface in the layers of meninges. There was no evidence of leucocytic infiltration into the brain tissue of mature animals. It is concluded from the present work that a proportion (but not all) of the macrophages in the neonatal rat brain are derived from the blood stream. Images Figs. 1-8 PMID:632205

  4. A comparative study of two methods for the isolation of human leucocytes for DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Lim, L H; Ton, S H; Cheong, S K

    1990-06-01

    The 'Dextran' and the 'Buffy-coat' methods for isolation of human leucocytes for DNA extraction were compared on the basis of DNA yield from the same amounts (10 ml) of blood. Human leucocytes from a total of 11 samples were isolated using both methods for each sample after which DNA was extracted. Extracted DNA samples were treated with ribonucleases and proteinase K after which the yields were quantitated by measuring absorbance at 260 nm. The 'Buffy-coat' method yielded a mean concentration of DNA of 476.7 micrograms/ml (range: 212 to 700 micrograms/ml) while the 'Dextran' method yielded 188.4 micrograms/ml (range: 64 to 340 micrograms/ml). The difference was confirmed by subjecting the extracted DNA samples to agarose gel electrophoresis.

  5. A mannose-receptor is possibly involved in the phagocytosis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by seabream (Sparus aurata L.) leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Esteban, M A; Meseguer, J

    2003-05-01

    In this paper the possible involvement of the mannose-receptor on the non-specific recognition and phagocytosis of heat killed yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) by gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) head-kidney leucocytes was established by studying the ability of different sugars to inhibit the uptake of the yeast cells by leucocytes. Leucocytes were preincubated for 30min with different concentrations of sugar (alpha-mannan, d-mannose, d-fucose, l-fucose, d-glucose, d-glucosamine and n-acetyl-glucosamine, all of them described as specific ligands of the vertebrate mannose-receptor) and afterwards incubated with FITC-labelled yeast cells for phagocytosis assays. The phagocytic ability (percentage of cells with one or more ingested yeast cells within the total cell population) and capacity (number of ingested yeast cells per cell) of leucocytes was analysed by flow cytometry. The results demonstrate the potential existence of a specific receptor-sugar or receptor-yeast cell binding process, which was saturable, specific and dose-dependent. More specifically, when leucocytes were preincubated with appropriate doses of d-mannose, d- or l-fucose, d-glucose or n-acetyl-glucosamine the phagocytosis of yeast cells by head-kidney leucocytes was partially blocked. Seabream leucocytes were also preincubated with chloroquine, a lysosomotropic drug which downregulates (in a nonspecific manner) the expression of mannose-receptors in mammals, before phagocytosis assays were performed. The results demonstrated that the phagocytosis of yeast was completely blocked by this substance. The overall results seem to corroborate the presence of the mannose-receptor in seabream phagocytes, which is involved in the non-specific binding and phagocytosis of yeast cells by head-kidney leucocytes. PMID:12711272

  6. Increased CD11/CD18 expression on the peripheral blood leucocytes of patients with HIV disease: relationship to disease severity.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, S; Hamblin, A S

    1993-01-01

    In HIV disease increased adhesion between leucocytes themselves and between leucocytes and endothelium may contribute to cell loss and viral spread. Using a novel method for the preparation of blood leucocytes for flow cytometry, we report increased expression of leucocyte adhesion molecules (LeuCAMs) (CD11/CD18) on peripheral blood leucocytes of patients with HIV disease compared with normal controls. Patients were divided into two groups on the basis of CD4 T lymphocyte numbers (those with > 0.5 x 10(9)/l and those with < 0.2 x 10(9)/l), and assessed for p24 antigen expression, viral load and serum tumour necrosis factor (TNF) levels as well as LeuCAM expression. Patients with < 0.2 x 10(9)/lCD4 cells had more p24 antigen and more HIV infectious virus and more serum TNF than those with > 0.5 x 10(9)/l. Whilst the percentages of only monocytes and polymorphs expressing CD11b were significantly increased in patients with the least CD4 cells, the density of LeuCAMs, expressed as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI), was significantly increased on all leucocytes, with the most significant increases being seen on patients with the fewest CD4 T cells. Our findings are consistent with leucocyte activation by a soluble factor, although we could find no correlation between levels of TNF and LeuCAM expression. The increased expression of adhesion molecules on peripheral blood leucocytes could play a role in the cellular extravasation and aggregation seen in HIV disease. PMID:8103716

  7. Platelet serotonin release by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes stimulated by cotton dust bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Holt, P. G.; Holt, Barbara J.; Beijer, Lena; Rylander, R.

    1983-01-01

    The release of serotonin from platelets was examined using polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) from normal volunteers. The stimulating agents emplyed were zymosan and heat-killed bacteria from Enterobacter agglomerans, which is commonly found in cotton dust. Optimal conditions for release were established. Both zymosan and E. agglomerans yielded a release of serotonin of an equal magnitude. The data are discussed in relation to the pathogenesis of respiratory disease associated with occupational exposure to cotton dust. PMID:6831770

  8. Phenotypic and functional analysis of human CD3- decidual leucocyte clones.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Bulmer, J N; Meager, A; Johnson, P M

    1990-10-01

    CD3- leucocyte clones were generated from human first-trimester decidualized uterine endometrium in a culture system containing interleukin-2 (IL-2) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). All CD3- clones tested by Southern blot analysis had T-cell receptor (TcR) gamma and delta genes in germ-line configuration. Thirty-six CD3- cell clones obtained from eight decidual samples were mostly CD2+CD56+ but, unlike fresh decidual leucocytes, many were also CD16+. Morphological differences were noted between CD16+CD56+ and CD16-CD56+ clones, with the latter cells possessing granules of more variable size. All CD16+ clones expressed strong cytotoxic activity against natural killer (NK) sensitive and NK-resistant cell targets, while CD16- clones had low or negligible activity. Some CD3- clones produced high levels of interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-negligible activity. Some CD3- clones produced high levels of interferon-gamma, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) upon stimulation, but there was no relationship between specific cytokine production and cell clone phenotype or cytotoxic function. Levels of TGF-beta were generally higher than those produced by decidual CD3+ T-cell clones. Since decidual CD3- CD16- leucocytes have a low proliferative capacity in response to IL-2, and as clones with this phenotype invariably possess low NK cell activity, it is suggested that the NK cell activity of fresh decidual leucocyte populations is mediated largely by the small numbers of CD3- CD16+ cells present.

  9. The effects of ambient temperature and mixing time of glass ionomer cement material on the survival rate of proximal ART restorations in primary molars

    PubMed Central

    Kemoli, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Temperature fluctuations and material mixing times are likely to affect the consistency and integrity of the material mixture, and hence the restoration made out of it. The purpose of the present study was to determine the influence of the ambient temperature and the mixing time of glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorative material on the survival rate of proximal atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations placed in primary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 804 restorations were placed in the primary molars of 6-8-year-olds using the ART approach. The restorations were then followed for a period of 2 years and evaluated at given intervals. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS computer statistical program, and the results tested and compared using the Chi-square, Kaplan Meier survival analysis and Cox Proportional hazard statistical tests. Results: The cumulative survival rate of the restorations dropped from the initial 94.4% to 30.8% at the end of 2 years. The higher survival rate of the restorations was associated with the experienced operators and assistants when using the rubber dam isolation method. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the survival rate of the restorations when related to the room temperature and the mixing time of the GIC materials used in spite of the variations in the temperature recoded and the methods used in mixing the materials. Conclusion: The ambient temperature and mixing time of GIC did not have a significant effect on the survival of the proximal ART restorations. PMID:24808692

  10. Food supplements modulate changes in leucocyte numbers in breeding male ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Bachman, Gwendolyn C

    2003-07-01

    Immunosuppression may be an important cost of reproduction in breeding males. It can result from elevated levels of testosterone or stress hormones and may serve to lower the energetic cost of maintaining immune function at a time of high demand. This suggests that greater access to energy resources could reduce immunosuppression as a cost of reproduction, minimizing the trade-off between energetic investment in current reproductive effort and survival. I examined the impact of food availability on immune function by provisioning male Belding's ground squirrels in the field from the time they emerged from hibernation to the start of breeding. Temporal changes in immune status, measured by leucocyte counts, differed between provisioned males and un-provisioned controls. Provisioning advanced the increase in lymphocytes and neutrophils from after breeding to before. At the start of breeding, the leucocyte count was three times greater in provisioned males than in controls and was still nearly twice as great at the end of breeding. Control males increased all leucocyte numbers after breeding. This experiment demonstrates that variation in food intake can lead to individual variation in the extent of immunosuppression during breeding and therefore that reduced immune function may not be an obligatory cost of reproduction.

  11. Effects of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) administration on leucocytes in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Corssmit, E P; Heijligenberg, R; Hack, C E; Endert, E; Sauerwein, H P; Romijn, J A

    1997-02-01

    Plasma concentrations of IFN-alpha are increased in several inflammatory conditions. Several lines of evidence indicate that IFN-alpha has anti-inflammatory properties. To study the effects of IFN-alpha on leucocyte subsets and activation and on cytokines, we administered IFN-alpha (rhIFN-alpha2b; 5 x 10(6) U/m2) to eight healthy human subjects in a randomized controlled cross-over study and analysed changes in circulating leucocytes and parameters for neutrophil and monocyte activation. After administration of IFN-alpha, neutrophil counts increased, monocyte counts decreased transiently, whereas the number of lymphocytes, basophils and eosinophils showed a sustained decrease. IFN-alpha administration was also associated with neutrophil activation, reflected in an increase in the plasma concentrations of elastase-alpha1-antitrypsin complexes and lactoferrin. Serum neopterin, a marker for monocyte activation, was significantly increased 10 h after administration of IFN-alpha. IFN-alpha significantly increased plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Although IL-1 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) remained undetectable, plasma concentrations of soluble TNF receptors p55 and p75 increased after IFN-alpha administration. We conclude that IFN-alpha induces multiple alterations in the distribution and functional properties of leucocytes. IFN-alpha exerts pro- as well as anti-inflammatory effects within the cytokine network.

  12. The effect of wound ointments on tissue microcirculation and leucocyte behaviour.

    PubMed

    Peter, F W; Li-Peuser, H; Vogt, P M; Muehlberger, T; Homann, H H; Steinau, H U

    2002-01-01

    An intact microcirculation is essential for normal healing to occur. Wound repair may be impaired by various endogenous and exogenous factors, such as reduced microvascular perfusion, infection and debris. In the nonhealing wound, radical surgical debridement is critical. To supplement healing, various ointments are used in clinical practice. Little is known about their effects on tissue perfusion. We have therefore selected two substances widely used, the antiseptic Betadine and the enzyme combination Elase and investigated their impact on the microcirculation and on leucocyte activity, using the cremaster muscle as a model. We found that functional capillary density and arteriolar diameters were significantly reduced by Betadine, whereas leucocyte activity was not affected. In the Elase group, capillary flow and arteriolar diameters were significantly increased, and again leucocyte activity was not changed. The mechanism by which Betadine reduces microvascular flow is believed to be the same as in reperfusion injury. The positive effect of Elase on the microcirculation might be attributed to plasmin, which has been shown to dilate blood vessels.

  13. Leucocyte profiles of Arctic marine birds: correlates of migration and breeding phenology

    PubMed Central

    Mallory, Mark L.; Little, Catherine M.; Boyd, Ellen S.; Ballard, Jennifer; Elliott, Kyle H.; Gilchrist, H. Grant; Hipfner, J. Mark; Petersen, Aevar; Shutler, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Most Arctic marine birds are migratory, wintering south of the limit of annual pack ice and returning north each year for the physiologically stressful breeding season. The Arctic environment is changing rapidly due to global warming and anthropogenic activities, which may influence the timing of breeding in relation to arrival times following migration, as well as providing additional stressors (e.g. disturbance from ships) to which birds may respond. During stressful parts of their annual cycle, such as breeding, birds may reallocate resources so that they have increased heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios in their white blood cell (leucocyte) profiles. We analysed leucocyte profiles of nine species of marine birds to establish reference ranges for these species in advance of future Arctic change. Leucocyte profiles tended to cluster among taxonomic groups across studies, suggesting that reference values for a particular group can be established, and within species there was evidence that birds from colonies that had to migrate farther had higher heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios during incubation than those that did not have to travel as far, particularly for species with high wing loading. PMID:27293713

  14. Leucocyte profiles of Arctic marine birds: correlates of migration and breeding phenology.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Mark L; Little, Catherine M; Boyd, Ellen S; Ballard, Jennifer; Elliott, Kyle H; Gilchrist, H Grant; Hipfner, J Mark; Petersen, Aevar; Shutler, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Most Arctic marine birds are migratory, wintering south of the limit of annual pack ice and returning north each year for the physiologically stressful breeding season. The Arctic environment is changing rapidly due to global warming and anthropogenic activities, which may influence the timing of breeding in relation to arrival times following migration, as well as providing additional stressors (e.g. disturbance from ships) to which birds may respond. During stressful parts of their annual cycle, such as breeding, birds may reallocate resources so that they have increased heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios in their white blood cell (leucocyte) profiles. We analysed leucocyte profiles of nine species of marine birds to establish reference ranges for these species in advance of future Arctic change. Leucocyte profiles tended to cluster among taxonomic groups across studies, suggesting that reference values for a particular group can be established, and within species there was evidence that birds from colonies that had to migrate farther had higher heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios during incubation than those that did not have to travel as far, particularly for species with high wing loading. PMID:27293713

  15. 111-Indium labelled autologous leucocytes in diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wandall, J.H.; Edeling, C.J.; Jensen, J.T.; Lund, J.O.; Bonnevie, O.; Haxholdt, H.; Jensen, H.C.; Matzen, P.; Myschetsky, P.S.; Nielsen, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    111-Indium labelled leucocytes have been used to visualize inflammatory lesions in ulcerative colitis (CU) and in Crohn's disease (CD). The aim of this study was to compare findings by scintigraphy, radiology and endoscopy. Material: Twelve patients with CU and 15 patients with CD were studied. All patients were non-febrile. Two patients received prednisolone 5 mg/daily, 8 sulphasalazine. Methods: Autologous leucocytes were labelled with 111-In-Oxine and given i.v. Scintigrams were obtained 3 and 24 hrs. p.i. Double contrast x-ray studies were done of the colon and small intestine after 2 and 14 days respectively. Colonscopy with biopsy was done after 4 days. Results: Active lesions were found in 24 and 27 patients. Scintigrams 24 hrs.p.i. did not give and additional information compared with scintigrams 3 hrs.p.i. Intraluminal activity masked the location and extension of lesions after 24 hrs. Excretion in the stool was 2.4-25.8% of administered activity. Compared with scintigraphy a corresponding extension and location was found by colonscopy. In 4 patients x-ray of the colon was normal but scintigraphy and colonscopy showed active inflammation. Conclusion: Scintigraphy after injection of 111-In labelled leucocytes is a atraumatic method for visualization of inflammatory lesions in UC and CD. Furthermore, it appears to be more sensitive than conventional x-ray studies.

  16. Leucocyte profiles of Arctic marine birds: correlates of migration and breeding phenology.

    PubMed

    Mallory, Mark L; Little, Catherine M; Boyd, Ellen S; Ballard, Jennifer; Elliott, Kyle H; Gilchrist, H Grant; Hipfner, J Mark; Petersen, Aevar; Shutler, Dave

    2015-01-01

    Most Arctic marine birds are migratory, wintering south of the limit of annual pack ice and returning north each year for the physiologically stressful breeding season. The Arctic environment is changing rapidly due to global warming and anthropogenic activities, which may influence the timing of breeding in relation to arrival times following migration, as well as providing additional stressors (e.g. disturbance from ships) to which birds may respond. During stressful parts of their annual cycle, such as breeding, birds may reallocate resources so that they have increased heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios in their white blood cell (leucocyte) profiles. We analysed leucocyte profiles of nine species of marine birds to establish reference ranges for these species in advance of future Arctic change. Leucocyte profiles tended to cluster among taxonomic groups across studies, suggesting that reference values for a particular group can be established, and within species there was evidence that birds from colonies that had to migrate farther had higher heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratios during incubation than those that did not have to travel as far, particularly for species with high wing loading.

  17. Flow cytometry analyses of phagocytic and respiratory burst activities and cytochemical characterization of leucocytes isolated from wrasse (Labrus bergylta A.).

    PubMed

    Haugland, Gyri T; Rønneseth, Anita; Wergeland, Heidrun I

    2014-07-01

    We have isolated leucocytes from peripheral blood (PBL), head kidney (HKL) and spleen (SL) of wrasse (Labrus bergylta A.) and studied the innate immune responses phagocytosis and respiratory burst using flow cytometry. Further, we have characterized the phenotypic properties of the leucocytes by cytochemical staining. We could differentiate between several subsets of leucocytes; lymphocytes, monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils and small leucocytes that might be precursor or immature cells. One striking observation was the eosinophils which were present among HKL, PBL and SL. The neutrophils had rounded, bean shaped or bi-lobed nuclei and resembled neutrophils in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) and lumpsucker (Cyclopterus lumpus L.), but were different from the polymorphonucleated neutrophils in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and humans. Basophils were observed, but they were rare. Phagocytosis and respiratory burst activities were detected among different cell types. Highest phagocytic activity was observed among monocytes/macrophages and small leucocytes. Several different subtypes had ability to perform an oxygen-dependent degradation of microbes, measured as respiratory burst activity. Knowledge of the basic properties of wrasse's leucocytes and innate immunology can benefit further studies on its adaptive immune responses.

  18. A Flow Adhesion Assay to Study Leucocyte Recruitment to Human Hepatic Sinusoidal Endothelium Under Conditions of Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Shishir; Weston, Christopher J.; Adams, David H.; Lalor, Patricia F.

    2014-01-01

    Leucocyte infiltration into human liver tissue is a common process in all adult inflammatory liver diseases. Chronic infiltration can drive the development of fibrosis and progression to cirrhosis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that mediate leucocyte recruitment to the liver could identify important therapeutic targets for liver disease. The key interaction during leucocyte recruitment is that of inflammatory cells with endothelium under conditions of shear stress. Recruitment to the liver occurs within the low shear channels of the hepatic sinusoids which are lined by hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HSEC). The conditions within the hepatic sinusoids can be recapitulated by perfusing leucocytes through channels lined by human HSEC monolayers at specific flow rates. In these conditions leucocytes undergo a brief tethering step followed by activation and firm adhesion, followed by a crawling step and subsequent transmigration across the endothelial layer. Using phase contrast microscopy, each step of this 'adhesion cascade' can be visualized and recorded followed by offline analysis. Endothelial cells or leucocytes can be pretreated with inhibitors to determine the role of specific molecules during this process. PMID:24686418

  19. Primary care, income inequality, and self-rated health in the United States: a mixed-level analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, L; Starfield, B

    2000-01-01

    Using the 1996 Community Tracking Study household survey, the authors examined whether income inequality and primary care, measured at the state level, predict individual morbidity as measured by self-rated health status, while adjusting for potentially confounding individual variables. Their results indicate that distributions of income and primary care within states are significantly associated with individuals' self-rated health; that there is a gradient effect of income inequality on self-rated health; and that individuals living in states with a higher ratio of primary care physician to population are more likely to report good health than those living in states with a lower such ratio. From a policy perspective, improvement in individuals' health is likely to require a multi-pronged approach that addresses individual socioeconomic determinants of health, social and economic policies that affect income distribution, and a strengthening of the primary care aspects of health services.

  20. The Assessment of Math Learning Difficulties in a Primary Grade-4 Child with High Support Needs: Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mundia, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods study incorporated elements of survey, case study and action research approaches in investigating an at-risk child. Using an in-take interview, a diagnostic test, an error analysis, and a think-aloud clinical interview, the study identified the child's major presenting difficulties. These included: inability to use the four…

  1. Glucocorticoid-and non-glucocorticoid induction of lipocortins (annexins) 1 and 2 in rat peritoneal leucocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Peers, S. H.; Smillie, F.; Elderfield, A. J.; Flower, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have studied the occurrence, distribution and disposition of lipocortins (annexins) 1, 2 and 5 in mixed peritoneal leucocytes obtained from rats in which glucocorticoid levels were altered by adrenalectomy, administration of the glucocorticoid antagonist, RU486, or by injection of dexamethasone or hydrocortisone, as well as from rats in which the peritoneal cells were elicited by inflammatory stimuli. 2. In cells obtained from untreated rats with an intact adrenal cortex, lipocortins 1, 2 and 5 were readily detectable: the majority of each of the proteins was apparently located intracellularly with much smaller amounts in the membrane. Lipocortin 1 and to a lesser extent lipocortin 5 were also seen in a Ca(2+)-dependent association with the external plasma membrane. Following administration of RU486 (2 x 20 mg kg-1) the amounts of lipocortin 1 and 2 in cells were greatly reduced. Conversely, injection of hydrocortisone (1 mg kg-1) or dexamethasone (0.08 mg kg-1) caused an increase in the amount of lipocortin 1 and 2 in peritoneal cells within 30 min. Lipocortin 5 was unchanged by any manipulation of glucocorticoid levels. 3. Lipocortins 1 and 2 were elevated in both intracellular and membrane-associated fractions of macrophages elicited by intraperitoneal injection in inflammogens. This phenomenon also occurred in adrenalectomized animals. 4. Our data indicate that glucocorticoids control the synthesis of some members of the lipocortin family in rat mixed peritoneal cells but also suggest the existence of a separate system for controlling the generation of this protein. The significance of these observations is considered in relation to the mechanism of glucocorticoid hormone action on eicosanoid production. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8428216

  2. Differential response of planktonic primary, bacterial, and dimethylsulfide production rates to static vs. dynamic light exposure in upper mixed-layer summer sea waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galí, M.; Simó, R.; Pérez, G. L.; Ruiz-González, C.; Sarmento, H.; Royer, S.-J.; Fuentes-Lema, A.; Gasol, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial plankton experience short-term fluctuations in total solar irradiance and in its spectral composition as they are vertically moved by turbulence in the oceanic upper mixed layer (UML). The fact that the light exposure is not static but dynamic may have important consequences for biogeochemical processes and ocean-atmosphere fluxes. However, most biogeochemical processes other than primary production, like bacterial production or dimethylsulfide (DMS) production, are seldom measured in sunlight and even less often in dynamic light fields. We conducted four experiments in oligotrophic summer stratified Mediterranean waters, where a sample from the UML was incubated in ultraviolet (UV)-transparent bottles at three fixed depths within the UML and on a vertically moving basket across the same depth range. We assessed the response of the phyto- and bacterioplankton community with physiological indicators based on flow cytometry singe-cell measurements, fast repetition rate fluorometry (FRRf), phytoplankton pigment concentrations and particulate light absorption. Dynamic light exposure caused a subtle disruption of the photoinhibition and photoacclimation processes associated with ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which slightly alleviated bacterial photoinhibition but did not favor primary production. Gross DMS production (GPDMS) decreased sharply with depth in parallel to shortwave UVR, and displayed a dose-dependent response that mixing did not significantly disrupt. To our knowledge, we provide the first measurements of GPDMS under in situ UV-inclusive optical conditions.

  3. Differential response of planktonic primary, bacterial, and dimethylsulfide production rates to vertically-moving and static incubations in upper mixed-layer summer sea waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galí, M.; Simó, R.; Pérez, G. L.; Ruiz-González, C.; Sarmento, H.; Royer, S.-J.; Fuentes-Lema, A.; Gasol, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Microbial plankton experience fluctuations in total solar irradiance and in its spectral composition as they are vertically moved by turbulence in the oceanic upper mixed layer (UML). The fact that the light exposure is not static but dynamic may have important consequences for biogeochemical processes and ocean-atmosphere fluxes. However, most biogeochemical processes other than primary production, like bacterial production or dimethylsulfide (DMS) production, are seldom measured in sunlight and even less often in dynamic light fields. We conducted four experiments in oligotrophic summer stratified Mediterranean waters, where a sample from the UML was incubated in ultraviolet (UV)-transparent bottles at three fixed depths within the UML and on a vertically-moving basket across the same depth range. We assessed the response of the phyto- and bacterioplankton community with physiological indicators based on flow cytometry singe-cell measurements, Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf), phytoplankton pigment concentrations and particulate light absorption. Dynamic light exposure caused a disruption of the photoinhibition and photoacclimation processes associated to ultraviolet radiation (UVR), which slightly alleviated bacterial photoinhibition but did not favor primary production. Gross DMS production (GPDMS) decreased sharply with depth in parallel to shortwave UVR, and displayed a dose-dependent response that mixing did not significantly disrupt. To our knowledge, we provide the first measurements of GPDMS under in situ UV-inclusive optical conditions.

  4. Primary Malignant Mixed Müllerian Mesodermal Tumor Mimicking a Rectosigmoid Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Levin

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old female who presented with chronic constipation and abdominal discomfort for six months. Her past surgical history was significant for a total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy, performed eight years ago, for uterine fibroids and endometriosis. Workup revealed a mass measuring 5 × 4.5 × 2 cm in the rectosigmoid colon. Patient underwent a low anterior resection and a fungating, centrally ulcerated rectosigmoid mass with a positive mesorectal margin was removed. Histopathology revealed a heterologous mixed mesodermal tumor (chondroid and osteoid elements). The epithelial component was compatible with a grade 2 endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical stains were supportive, with positive expression for CK7 and ER, negative for CK20, and only very focally and weakly positive for both CDX2 and p63. Chromogranin, synaptophysin, and TTF-1 were negative. Following surgery, she was treated with five cycles of carboplatin (AUC 6) and paclitaxel (175 mg/m2), followed by irradiation. Twenty-six months later, patient continues to be asymptomatic and disease-free. Mixed müllerian mesodermal tumors mimicking colorectal cancer have been reported in the past. Our case highlights the rarity and the challenges encountered in diagnosing and treating these rare tumors. PMID:24716055

  5. Reprogramming Neutral Lipid Metabolism in Mouse Dendritic Leucocytes Hosting Live Leishmania amazonensis Amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Lecoeur, Hervé; Giraud, Emilie; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Milon, Geneviève; Lang, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Background After loading with live Leishmania (L) amazonensis amastigotes, mouse myeloid dendritic leucocytes/DLs are known to undergo reprogramming of their immune functions. In the study reported here, we investigated whether the presence of live L. amazonensis amastigotes in mouse bone marrow-derived DLs is able to trigger re-programming of DL lipid, and particularly neutral lipid metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings Affymetrix-based transcriptional profiles were determined in C57BL/6 and DBA/2 mouse bone marrow-derived DLs that had been sorted from cultures exposed or not to live L. amazonensis amastigotes. This showed that live amastigote-hosting DLs exhibited a coordinated increase in: (i) long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) and cholesterol uptake/transport, (ii) LCFA and cholesterol (re)-esterification to triacyl-sn-glycerol (TAG) and cholesteryl esters (CE), respectively. As these neutral lipids are known to make up the lipid body (LB) core, oleic acid was added to DL cultures and LB accumulation was compared in live amastigote-hosting versus amastigote-free DLs by epi-fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. This showed that LBs were both significantly larger and more numerous in live amastigote-hosting mouse dendritic leucocytes. Moreover, many of the larger LB showed intimate contact with the membrane of the parasitophorous vacuoles hosting the live L. amazonensis amastigotes. Conclusions/Significance As leucocyte LBs are known to be more than simple neutral lipid repositories, we set about addressing two related questions. Could LBs provide lipids to live amastigotes hosted within the DL parasitophorous vacuole and also deliver? Could LBs impact either directly or indirectly on the persistence of L. amazonensis amastigotes in rodent skin? PMID:23785538

  6. Bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency: a review of a modern disease and its implications.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, A S

    1996-11-01

    Bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD) is a genetic disease of cattle which affects the hematopoietic system. In the last decade BLAD has become a disease of economic importance in the dairy industry. This review describes the chronological developments and thinking that led to the elucidation of BLAD as a disease distinct from previous models in canine and human populations. All species affected show signs of chronic and recurrent infections. Necrotic and/or gangrenous infections of soft tissues are prevalent, in addition to secondary infections with bacteria or fungi. Low birthweight and unthriftiness are key signs in all species affected by leucocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD). Dermatomycoses and impaired pus formation are also common findings. The physiological basis for BLAD is a deficiency in the chemotactic and phagocytic properties of leucocytes and particularly neutrophils. The inhibition of diapedesis in the inflammatory response prevents normal immune reactions to invading pathogens. Chronic infections are a consequence of the faulty immune mechanisms. The biochemical aetiology of BLAD involves cell surface glycoprotein molecules known as integrins. These are responsible for the cell-cell interactions necessary for neutrophils to adhere to vascular endothelium in a normal individual. Experiments with monoclonal antibodies to block LFA-1, Mac-1, and p150,95 (three integrins vital for cell-cell interactions) mimic BLAD symptomatology and have led to the discovery of the reciprocal intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM). Through pedigree analysis and biochemical detection with restrictive endonucleases, BLAD has been isolated genetically to a single gene locus. The economic significance and prophylaxis of the disease are briefly discussed. In addition, the beneficial aspects of the study of BLAD are considered. There are advantages in producing a BLAD-like state for preventing transplant rejection, ischaemia-reperfusion injury and other problems arising

  7. Expression of functional molecules by human CD3- decidual granular leucocyte clones.

    PubMed

    Gudelj, L; Deniz, G; Rukavina, D; Johnson, P M; Christmas, S E

    1996-04-01

    Cell surface and cytoplasmic antigen expression by 35 CD3- decidual granular leucocyte (DGL) clones, derived from human endometrial tissue in the first trimester of pregnancy, has been compared with both that of fresh CD3- decidual leucocytes and that of CD3- peripheral blood natural killer (PBNK) cell clones (n = 12). The majority of DGL clones retained the antigenic phenotype of fresh cells, although CD103 (HML-1) was expressed on 50% of DGL clones but only 17% of fresh DGL. Both cytoplasmic CD3 zeta and CD3 epsilon chains were detected in > 90% of DGL clones in the absence of cell surface CD3. Cytoplasmic CD3 zeta was present in almost all fresh CD3- DGL, whereas CD3 epsilon was not. Most DGL clones did not express surface Fc gamma receptors I-III (CD64, -32 and -16, respectively) and complement receptors (CR) types 1 and 2 (CD35 and 21, respectively), but 43% expressed CR3 (CD11b/18); in contrast, all PBNK clones were CR3+. The NK cell-associated molecules Kp43 (CD94) and the p58 molecule recognized by the HP3E4 monoclonal antibody were both present on a higher proportion of CD3- PBNK (91% and 50%, respectively) than DGL clones (31% and 14%, respectively), despite expression of CD94 by > 90% of fresh CD56+ decidual leucocytes. Five of 35 CD3- DGL clones expressed cytoplasmic CD3 zeta in the absence of expression of CD2, CD16 or the p58 molecule recognized by HP3E4. These variations between CD3- DGL and PBNK cell clones in expression of functional molecules may be related to previously reported differences in major histocompatibility complex-non-restricted cytotoxic activities between these two cell types.

  8. A human model of platelet–leucocyte adhesive interactions during controlled ischaemia in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, L; Pirro, M; Lombardini, R; Ciuffetti, G; Dragani, P; Mannarino, E

    2002-01-01

    Aims: In humans, little is known about the effects of platelet–leucocyte interactions on blood viscosity and microvascular perfusion. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) activation and interactions between platelets and leucocytes may have an impact on microvascular blood viscosity and perfusion in patients with stage II peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and (2) a powerful antiplatelet drug such as Clopidogrel might help to improve microvascular perfusion by reducing platelet–leucocyte activation and blood viscosity. Methods: Plasma concentrations of certain markers of leucocyte and platelet activation, in addition to low and high shear rate blood viscosity, were measured before and after a repeated exercise treadmill test. Functional parameters including maximum walking time, transcutaneous oxygen pressure, and half recovery time were also measured. Results: Blocking platelet activation only with a single dose of Clopidogrel (300 mg) did not improve microvascular blood viscosity and perfusion after repeated exercise, but a significant improvement in microvascular perfusion during controlled ischaemia and a lack of post exercise increase in low shear rate blood viscosity was achieved when both platelet and leucocyte activation were suppressed by a relatively longer treatment with Clopidogrel (four days). Conclusions: Clopidogrel, by inhibiting platelet activation and aggregation, might also block the vicious cycle of leucocyte–platelet activation, thus improving the functioning of the microcirculation. PMID:12461065

  9. Flow cytometry assays of respiratory burst in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) and in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Kalgraff, Cathrine A K; Wergeland, Heidrun I; Pettersen, Eirin Fausa

    2011-09-01

    The oxidation of dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) to the fluorescent rhodamine 123 (RHO) was detected using flow cytometry. This assay for detection of respiratory burst activity was established in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) and head kidney leucocytes (HKL) of Atlantic salmon and Atlantic cod. The leucocytes were stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). For cod cells 10 times lower concentration of PMA had to be used compared to salmon cells, as higher concentrations were toxic and resulted in considerable cell death. The cells found to be RHO-positive were monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils based on the scatter dot plots, but for salmon also some small cells were found to have high fluorescence intensity both in the flow cytometry analyses and by fluorescence microscopy of cytospin preparations. The nature of these cells is not known. For cod leucocytes, such cells were not obvious. The instrument settings are a bit more demanding for cod, as cod cells die more easily compared to salmon cells. In both assays the limit between negative and positive cells has to be carefully considered. The presented flow cytometry protocols for measurements of respiratory burst in salmon and cod leucocytes can be applied in various studies where respiratory burst functions are involved, such as to verify if it is activated or suppressed in connection with infections and immunostimulation.

  10. Rapid enrichment of leucocytes and genomic DNA from blood based on bifunctional core shell magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xin; Nie, Xiaorong; Yu, Bingbin; Zhang, Xu

    2007-04-01

    A series of protocols are proposed to extract genomic DNA from whole blood at different scales using carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as solid-phase absorbents. The enrichment of leucocytes and the adsorption of genomic DNA can be achieved with the same carboxyl-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. The DNA bound to the bead surfaces can be used directly as PCR templates. By coupling cell separation and DNA purification, the whole operation can be accomplished in a few minutes. Our simplified protocols proved to be rapid, low cost, and biologically and chemically non-hazardous, and are therefore promising for microfabrication of a DNA-preparation chip and routine laboratory use.

  11. Leucocyte migration inhibition test with two gastric antigens in pernicious anaemia and in simple atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Fixa, B; Komárková, O; Nozicka, Z

    1979-02-01

    Leucocyte migration inhibition test was used for evaluation of cell-mediated immunity in patients with pernicious anaemia (PA) and simple atrophic gastritis (SAG). As antigens microsomal antigen from gastric mucosa of swine foetus and relatively pure hog intrinsic factor (IF) were used. Significant differences were found between PA and SAG with microsomal antigen, but not with IF. It was concluded, that the microsomal antigen might be more active than IF. This observation could contribute to explane the higher incidence of parietal cell antibody than that of IF antibody in PA patients.

  12. Ocular microbiota and polymorphonuclear leucocyte recruitment during overnight contact lens wear.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, F; Willcox, M D; Sansey, N; Holden, B A

    1997-05-01

    Bacterial colonization of the ocular surface and contact lens (CL) and recruitment of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) during overnight CL wear was examined in 11 asymptomatic wearers. The ocular surface was more frequently colonized than the CL, with commensal bacteria (P < 0.05). Following sleep, more bacteria were recovered from the CL compared with daily use (P < 0.05), and fewer PMN were recruited compared to sleep without CL wear (P < 0.05). Overnight CL wear may inhibit physiological PMN recruitment to the cornea by preventing their access, by modifying the chemotactic signal or by altering the activation state of the recruited cells.

  13. Good practice statements on safe laboratory testing: A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Paul; Forrest, Eleanor; Price, Julie; Verstappen, Wim; Cunningham, David; Halley, Lyn; Grant, Suzanne; Kelly, Moya; Mckay, John

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The systems-based management of laboratory test ordering and results handling is a known source of error in primary care settings worldwide. The consequences are wide-ranging for patients (e.g. avoidable harm or poor care experience), general practitioners (e.g. delayed clinical decision making and potential medico-legal implications) and the primary care organization (e.g. increased allocation of resources to problem-solve and dealing with complaints). Guidance is required to assist care teams to minimize associated risks and improve patient safety. Objective: To identify, develop and build expert consensus on ‘good practice’ guidance statements to inform the implementation of safe systems for ordering laboratory tests and managing results in European primary care settings. Methods: Mixed methods studies were undertaken in the UK and Ireland, and the findings were triangulated to develop ‘good practice’ statements. Expert consensus was then sought on the findings at the wider European level via a Delphi group meeting during 2013. Results: We based consensus on 10 safety domains and developed 77 related ‘good practice’ statements (≥ 80% agreement levels) judged to be essential to creating safety and minimizing risks in laboratory test ordering and subsequent results handling systems in international primary care. Conclusion: Guidance was developed for improving patient safety in this important area of primary care practice. We need to consider how this guidance can be made accessible to frontline care teams, utilized by clinical educators and improvement advisers, implemented by decision makers and evaluated to determine acceptability, feasibility and impacts on patient safety. PMID:26339831

  14. Identification of monoclonal antibodies with specificity to alpha- or beta-chains of beta 2-integrins using peripheral blood leucocytes of normal and bovine leucocyte adhesion deficient (BLAD) cattle.

    PubMed

    Rutten, V P; Hoek, A; Müller, K E

    1996-08-01

    The reactivity of monoclonal antibodies entered in the panels of the Third Workshop on Ruminant Leucocyte Antigens with lymphocytes and monocytes of normal and beta 2-integrin deficient (Bovine Leucocyte Adhesion Deficiency: BLAD) animals was determined by flow cytometry to investigate potential specificities to alpha- or beta-chains of beta 2-integrins. From the 13 monoclonal antibodies that were entered as having specificity for CD11/CD18 antigens, ten were confirmed correct, but three had reactivity with cells from BLAD animals. We conclude that our approach provides an easy way to reliably identify the majority of beta 2-integrin specific monoclonal antibodies. PMID:8896223

  15. Simultaneous administration of 111In-human immunoglobulin and 99mTc-HMPAO labelled leucocytes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mairal, L; de Lima, P A; Martin-Comin, J; Baliellas, C; Xiol, X; Roca, M; Ricart, Y; Ramos, M

    1995-07-01

    Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) labelled leucocytes and indium-111 polyclonal immunoglobulin (IgG) were simultaneously injected into a group of 27 patients routinely referred for the investigation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ten-minute anterior abdomen and tail on detector views were obtained at 30 min, 4 h and 24 h p.i. of both tracers. The diagnosis of IBD was obtained in all cases by endoscopy with biopsy and/or surgery. Images were blindly evaluated by two experienced observers who only knew of the clinical suspicion of IBD. IBD was confirmed in 20 patients (12 with Crohn's disease and eight with ulcerative colitis). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100%, 85% and 96% respectively for labelled leucocytes and 70%, 85% and 74% for IgG. Both IgG and leucocyte scans were normal in six out of seven patients in whom a diagnosis of IBD was excluded; the remaining patient, with ischaemic colitis, was falsely positive with both agents. As far as disease extension is concerned, the IgG study localized 27 diseased segments, whereas 49 were seen with the leucocyte study. Eighty-four segments were normal and 25 showed tracer uptake with both agents. Twenty-four were positive only with the leucocyte study and two were positive only with the IgG study. Agreement between the agents was 80.7%. These results confirm that 111In-human polyclonal scintigraphy is less sensitive than 99mTc-HMPAO scintigraphy both for the diagnosis of IBD and in the evaluation of disease extension. Nevertheless, if leucocyte labelling is not available, labelled IgG can be used only for diagnostic purposes. PMID:7498228

  16. Evaluation of disease activity in rheumatic patients by leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Berliner, S; Fried, M; Caspi, D; Weinberger, A; Yaron, M; Pinkhas, J; Aronson, M

    1988-01-01

    Previous work has shown that leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation (LAA), as measured by the leukergy test, correlates well with disease severity in rheumatic patients. As LAA is probably a manifestation of the acute phase reaction various components of the acute phase reaction were measured in order to identify the best marker of disease activity. In addition to LAA, the following variables were measured in 79 patients with various rheumatic diseases and in 10 controls: white blood cell and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, haptoglobin, fibrinogen, C reactive protein, albumin, globulin, caeruloplasmin, alpha 1, alpha 2, beta, and gamma globulin, and haemoglobin concentrations. Patients were graded according to the state of their disease as mild, moderate, or severe. The extent of leucocyte adhesiveness/aggregation in peripheral blood proved to be the best laboratory variable for the grading of disease activity. Correct grading was obtained in 63% of the patients by means of the LAA, compared with 48% with C reactive protein, 41% with caeruloplasmin, 40% with haptoglobin, and 32% with haemoglobin. It is suggested that LAA of the peripheral blood during inflammation may be used as a reliable marker of disease severity. PMID:3260093

  17. Ontogeny of leucocyte populations in the spleen of fetal lambs with emphasis on the early prominence of B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Press, C M; Hein, W R; Landsverk, T

    1993-01-01

    The presence and distribution of B cells and other early leucocyte populations are described in the spleen of fetal lambs from 40 to 134 days of gestation (length of gestation 150 days). Computer-assisted morphometric analysis and flow cytometry were used to quantify the early predominance of B cells in mid-gestation. B cells appeared at about 48 days and increased in number to occupy over 20% of the spleen area at 77 days. All spleens were collected on their respective livers and at no stage did the livers contain more than a few IgM-positive (+) cells, which were usually close to blood vessels. Two-colour flow cytometry demonstrated that only 1-2% of IgM+ cells expressed CD5 at 81 days. Beyond 77 days, with the expanding presence of T cells, the percentage of area occupied by IgM+ cells declined to stabilize at about 7% during late gestation. The conventional organization of the splenic white pulp was observed from 90 days along with 5' nucleotidase-positive primary follicles. Double staining technique using immunohistochemical methods demonstrated that IgM+ cells were proliferating in the spleen from as early as 51 days and that clusters of proliferating IgM+ cells were prominent between 60 and 77 days. The results of the present study suggest that during the ontogeny of fetal lambs the spleen is a site of B-cell development or expansion before colonization of the ileal Peyer's patch and the subsequent generation of the preimmune antibody repertoire. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:7508421

  18. Preventing childhood obesity during infancy in UK primary care: a mixed-methods study of HCPs' knowledge, beliefs and practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a strong rationale for intervening in early childhood to prevent obesity. Over a quarter of infants gain weight more rapidly than desirable during the first six months of life putting them at greater risk of obesity in childhood. However, little is known about UK healthcare professionals' (HCPs) approach to primary prevention. This study explored obesity-related knowledge of UK HCPs and the beliefs and current practice of general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses in relation to identifying infants at risk of developing childhood obesity. Method Survey of UK HCPs (GPs, practice nurses, health visitors, nursery, community and children's nurses). HCPs (n = 116) rated their confidence in providing infant feeding advice and completed the Obesity Risk Knowledge Scale (ORK-10). Semi-structured interviews with a sub-set of 12 GPs and 6 practice nurses were audio recorded, taped and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was applied using an interpretative, inductive approach. Results GPs were less confident about giving advice about infant feeding than health visitors (p = 0.001) and nursery nurses (p = 0.009) but more knowledgeable about the health risks of obesity (p < 0.001) than nurses (p = 0.009). HCPs who were consulted more often about feeding were less knowledgeable about the risks associated with obesity (r = -0.34, n = 114, p < 0.001). There was no relationship between HCPs' ratings of confidence in their advice and their knowledge of the obesity risk. Six main themes emerged from the interviews: 1) Attribution of childhood obesity to family environment, 2) Infant feeding advice as the health visitor's role, 3) Professional reliance on anecdotal or experiential knowledge about infant feeding, 4) Difficulties with recognition of, or lack of concern for, infants "at risk" of becoming obese, 5) Prioritising relationship with parent over best practice in infant feeding and 6) Lack of shared understanding for dealing with early years

  19. The health status and health service needs of primary caregivers of cancer survivors: a mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Santin, O; Treanor, C; Mills, M; Donnelly, M

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to measure the health status and care needs of people who provide informal care to cancer survivors in the UK. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 24 cancer professionals to identify the care needs of caregivers. In addition, we conducted a postal survey measuring the health and well-being [36-item short-form health survey (SF-36)] and health service utilisation of 98 primary caregivers of a random sample of cancer survivors, 2-20 years post-treatment. Interviews indicated that caregivers' needs were largely unmet. In particular, there appeared to be a need in relation to statutory healthcare provision, information, psychological support and involvement in decision-making. There were no significant differences between survivors and caregivers in terms of mental health scores; and caregivers performed better on physical health domains compared with cancer survivors. Compared with UK norms and norms for caregivers of other chronic conditions, cancer caregivers had substantially lower scores on each SF-36 health domain. Cancer may impact negatively on an informal caregiver's health long after treatment has ended. Providing appropriate and cancer-specific information may alleviate difficulties and improve health and well-being. Specific concentration should be given to the development and delivery of information support for caregivers of post-treatment cancer survivors.

  20. The Impact of Polio Eradication on Routine Immunization and Primary Health Care: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Closser, Svea; Cox, Kelly; Parris, Thomas M.; Landis, R. Matthew; Justice, Judith; Gopinath, Ranjani; Maes, Kenneth; Banteyerga Amaha, Hailom; Mohammed, Ismaila Zango; Dukku, Aminu Mohammed; Omidian, Patricia A.; Varley, Emma; Tedoff, Pauley; Koon, Adam D.; Nyirazinyoye, Laetitia; Luck, Matthew A.; Pont, W. Frank; Neergheen, Vanessa; Rosenthal, Anat; Nsubuga, Peter; Thacker, Naveen; Jooma, Rashid; Nuttall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background. After 2 decades of focused efforts to eradicate polio, the impact of eradication activities on health systems continues to be controversial. This study evaluated the impact of polio eradication activities on routine immunization (RI) and primary healthcare (PHC). Methods. Quantitative analysis assessed the effects of polio eradication campaigns on RI and maternal healthcare coverage. A systematic qualitative analysis in 7 countries in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa assessed impacts of polio eradication activities on key health system functions, using data from interviews, participant observation, and document review. Results. Our quantitative analysis did not find compelling evidence of widespread and significant effects of polio eradication campaigns, either positive or negative, on measures of RI and maternal healthcare. Our qualitative analysis revealed context-specific positive impacts of polio eradication activities in many of our case studies, particularly disease surveillance and cold chain strengthening. These impacts were dependent on the initiative of policy makers. Negative impacts, including service interruption and public dissatisfaction, were observed primarily in districts with many campaigns per year. Conclusions. Polio eradication activities can provide support for RI and PHC, but many opportunities to do so remain missed. Increased commitment to scaling up best practices could lead to significant positive impacts. PMID:24690667

  1. Quantitative effects of a nickel-titanium palatal expander on skeletal and dental structures in the primary and mixed dentition: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Virgilio F; Garattini, Giovanna; Colombo, Anna; Filippi, Vittorio; Pozzoli, Silvio; Sforza, Chiarella

    2003-08-01

    The present study analysed the six-month effects of a nickel-titanium (NiTi) palatal expander on the dental and palatal structures of four primary (mean age 5.8 years) and nine mixed dentition children (mean age 8.7 years), with a posterior unilateral crossbite. Standardized dental and palatal landmarks were digitized using a three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic instrument. Collected data were analysed with geometric-mathematical models. During a six-month interval, the natural growth and development of the dental arches and hard tissue palate was negligible, as assessed in seven control children (two in the primary dentition, mean age 4.4 years; five in the mixed dentition, mean age 7.7 years). In all children the crossbite was completely corrected. Indeed, dental expansion was always more than or corresponded to the palatal expansion. A smoothing of the size-independent (shape) palatal curvature in the transverse plane was observed. No differences in maximum palatal height were noted. Symmetrical derotation of the anchorage teeth in a distal direction occurred in almost all children. The inclination of the facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) in the anatomical transverse plane of those teeth with differences between dental and palatal expansion always showed significant modifications (vestibular inclination up to 16.7 degrees). The clinical crown height of anchorage teeth remained nearly the same in all patients. No significant modifications in mandibular arch size were observed. The increase in maxillary arch width, especially in younger children, was probably due to a combination of different effects: opening of the midpalatal suture, tipping of the alveolar process, and molar tipping.

  2. Human transfer factor in vitro. II. Augmentation of the secretion of leucocyte migration inhibitory factor (LIF) by leucocyte dialysate and by its components L-serine and glycine.

    PubMed Central

    Ashorn, R G; Räsänen, L; Marnela, K M; Krohn, K J

    1979-01-01

    The effect of human transfer factor (TF) or its components L-serine and/or glycine in tuberculin (PPD), or leucoagglutinin (LA) induced leucocyte migration inhibitory factor (LIF) secretion was studied. Augmentation of LIF secretion was seen with low concentration ( = 0.078 g/l) of TF when lymphocytes were cultured in minimum essential medium for suspension cultures (MEM-S), a culture medium lacking L-serine and glycine. High concentrations (0.3125-5.0 g/l dry weight) of TF were inhibitory in MEM-S. In RPMI 1640, a culture medium containing L-serine and glycine, TF was either inhibitory or had no effect. The combination of L-serine and glycine, at concentrations equivalent or lower than the optimum of TF, had an augmenting effect on LIF secretion identical to that of TF, but no inhibition at higher concentrations was seen. The results indicate that human TF contains components which have suppressive or augmenting effects on LIF secretion in vitro. The augmenting effect may be mainly due to L-serine and glycine and thus not related to TF's activity in vivo. PMID:385187

  3. Adaptive capacity of the Adjusted Clinical Groups Case-Mix System to the cost of primary healthcare in Catalonia (Spain): a observational study

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velasco, Soledad; Navarro-Artieda, Ruth; Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Bolibar-Ribas, Buenaventura; Violan-Fors, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the adaptive capacity of the Adjusted Clinical Groups (ACG) system to the cost of care in primary healthcare centres in Catalonia (Spain). Design Retrospective study (multicentres) conducted using computerised medical records. Setting 13 primary care teams in 2008 were included. Participants All patients registered in the study centres who required care between 1 January and 31 December 2008 were finally studied. Patients not registered in the study centres during the study period were excluded. Outcome measures Demographic (age and sex), dependent (cost of care) and case-mix variables were studied. The cost model for each patient was established by differentiating the fixed and variable costs. To evaluate the adaptive capacity of the ACG system, Pearson's coefficient of variation and the percentage of outliers were calculated. To evaluate the explanatory power of the ACG system, the authors used the coefficient of determination (R2). Results The number of patients studied was 227 235 (frequency: 5.9 visits per person per year), with a mean of 4.5 (3.2) episodes and 8.1 (8.2) visits per patient per year. The mean total cost was €654.2. The explanatory power of the ACG system was 36.9% for costs (56.5% without outliers). 10 ACG categories accounted for 60.1% of all cases and 19 for 80.9%. 5 categories represented 71% of poor performance (N=78 887, 34.7%), particularly category 0300-Acute Minor, Age 6+ (N=26 909, 11.8%), which had a coefficient of variation =139% and 6.6% of outliers. Conclusions The ACG system is an appropriate manner of classifying patients in routine clinical practice in primary healthcare centres in Catalonia, although improvements to the adaptive capacity through disaggregation of some categories according to age groups and, especially, the number of acute episodes in paediatric patients would be necessary to reduce intra-group variation. PMID:22734115

  4. Variability in prescription drug expenditures explained by adjusted clinical groups (ACG) case-mix: A cross-sectional study of patient electronic records in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Alba; Guinó, Elisabet; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Sicras, Antoni; Serrat, Josep; Acedo, Mateo; Ferro, Juan Jose; Moreno, Victor

    2008-01-01

    Background In view of rapidly increasing prescription costs, case-mix adjustment should be considered for effective control of costs. We have estimated the variability in pharmacy costs explained by ACG in centers using patient electronic records, profiled centers and physicians and analyzed the correlation between cost and quality of prescription. Methods We analyzed 65,630 patient records attending five primary care centers in Spain during 2005. Variables explored were age, gender, registered diagnosed episodes of care during 2005, total cost of prescriptions, physician and center. One ACG was assigned to each patient with ACG case-mix software version 7.1. In a two-part model, logistic regression was used to explain the incurrence of drug expenditure at the first stage and a linear mixed model that considered the multilevel structure of data modeled the cost, conditional upon incurring any expense. Risk and efficiency indexes in pharmacy cost adjusted for ACG were obtained for centers and physicians. Spearman rank correlation between physician expenditure, adjusted for ACG, and a prescription quality index was also obtained. Pediatric and adult data were analyzed separately. Results No prescription was recorded for 13% of adults and 39.6% of children. The proportion of variance of the incurrence of expenditure explained by ACGs was 0.29 in adults and 0.21 in children. For adults with prescriptions, the variance of cost explained by ACGs was 35.4%, by physician-center was 1.8% and age 10.5% (residual 52.3%). For children, ACGs explained 22.4% of cost and physician-center 10.9% (residual 66.7%). Center efficiency index for adults ranged 0.58 to 1.22 and for children 0.32 to 2.36. Spearman correlation between expenditure and prescription quality index was -0.36 in family physicians (p = 0.019, N = 41) and -0.52 in pediatricians (p = 0.08, N = 12). Conclusion In our setting, ACG is the variable studied that explains more variability in pharmacy cost in adults

  5. A case of leucocyte chimerism (78,XX/78,XY) in a dog with a disorder of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Szczerbal, I; Nowacka-Woszuk, J; Nizanski, W; Salamon, S; Ochota, M; Dzimira, S; Atamaniuk, W; Switonski, M

    2014-06-01

    A 1-year-old Shih Tzu dog was presented for examination because of abnormal external genitalia. A residual penis with a prepuce was located in a position typical of a male. The dog had no palpable testicles or scrotum. The ultrasound examination revealed the presence of the prostate, but the gonads remained undetectable. Cytogenetic analysis performed on chromosome preparations obtained from lymphocyte culture showed two cell lines - 78,XX and 78,XY. Molecular analysis of 14 polymorphic microsatellite markers allowed us to distinguish leucocyte chimerism from whole body chimerism. The presence of 3 or 4 alleles was confirmed in DNA isolated from blood, while in DNA isolated from hair follicles only 1 or 2 alleles were detected. The case was classified as leucocyte 78,XX/78,XY chimerism. Our study showed that XX/XY leucocyte chimerism might be associated with disorder of sexual development in dogs. Furthermore, it is emphasized that the use of cytogenetic study, in combination with analysis of polymorphic markers in DNA isolated from different somatic cells, facilitates distinguishing between leucocyte and whole body chimerism.

  6. Measurement of in vitro leucocyte mitogenesis in fish: ELISA based detection of the thymidine analogue 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, David T.; Cartwright, Deborah D.; Densmore, Christine L.; Blazer, Vicki; Ottinger, Christopher A.

    2003-01-01

    In this study we present a method for the measurement of in vitro mitogenesis in fish leucocytes that is based on the incorporation of the thymidine analogue 5′-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) into the DNA of replicating cells, followed by ELISA-based detection. This technique, adapted from methods developed for mammalian cells, operates on a similar biological principle to 3H-thymidine incorporation, but circumvents the logistical and safety issues inherent with the radioactive label. Because it directly measures DNA proliferation, the assay has advantages over other colorimetric methods that may be strongly influenced by leucocyte metabolic status. Using BrdU incorporation followed by ELISA, we evaluate the responsiveness of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss [Walbaum]) leucocytes to the mammalian T-cell mitogen Concanavalin A (Con A) as well as the differential response of white perch (Morone americana [Gmelin]) leucocytes to Con A and pokeweed mitogen. Specific considerations intrinsic to the assay system are discussed, including the implications of utilising enzyme-based detection.

  7. Toxicological in vitro effects of heavy metals on gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) head-kidney leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, Patricia; Cordero, Héctor; Meseguer, José; Esteban, María Á; Cuesta, Alberto

    2015-12-25

    Heavy metals provoke toxicological effects on aquatic animal species, including fish, though their effects on fish leucocytes and immunotoxicology are still limited. In the present work the effects of heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb or As) on viability, oxidative stress and innate immune parameters of isolated head-kidney leucocytes from gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) are studied. Cytotoxicity results indicated that short exposures (30 min or 2h) to Hg promoted both apoptosis and necrosis cell death of leucocytes whilst Cd, Pb and As did only by apoptosis, in all cases in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, production of free oxygen radicals was induced by Cd, Hg and As heavy metals. Cd failed to change phagocytosis but Hg and As increased the percentage of phagocytic cells but decreased the number of ingested particles per cell whilst Pb increased both phagocytic parameters. On the other hand, respiratory burst activity was significantly reduced by incubation with Cd, Hg and As but increased with Pb. Furthermore, the gene expression profiles partly support the functional finding of this work. This study provides an in vitro approach for elucidating the heavy metals toxicity, and particularly the immunotoxicity, in fish leucocytes.

  8. Inhibition of PAF synthesis by stimulated human polymorphonuclear leucocytes with cloricromene, an inhibitor of phospholipase A2 activation.

    PubMed Central

    Ribaldi, E.; Mezzasoma, A. M.; Francescangeli, E.; Prosdocimi, M.; Nenci, G. G.; Goracci, G.; Gresele, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. A phospholipase A2 (PLA2) represents the key enzyme in the remodelling pathway of platelet-activating factor (PAF) synthesis in human polymorphonuclear (PMN) leucocytes. 2. PLA2 activation is also the rate-limiting step for the release of the arachidonic acid utilized for the synthesis of leukotrienes in stimulated leucocytes; however, it is unknown whether the PLA2s involved in the two biosynthetic pathways are identical. 3. Cloricromene (8-monochloro-3-beta-diethylaminoethyl-4-methyl-7-ethoxy- carbonylmethoxy coumarin) is an antithrombotic coumarin derivative which inhibits platelet and leucocyte function and suppresses arachidonic acid liberation by interfering with PLA2 activation. 4. The aim of the present study was to assess whether chloricromene inhibits PAF synthesis by stimulated human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs). 5. Cloricromene (50-500 microM) inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the release of PAF, as measured by h.p.l.c. bioassay, from A23187-stimulated PMNs. Significant inhibition (45%) of PAF-release was obtained with 50 microM cloricromene and the IC50 was 85 microM. Mepacrine (500 microM), a non-specific PLA2 inhibitor, strikingly reduced PAF release. 6. The incorporation of [3H]-acetate into [3H]-PAF induced by serum-treated zymosan in human PMNs was also inhibited concentration-dependently by cloricromene, with an IC50 of 105 microM. Mepacrine also suppressed [3H]-acetate incorporation into [3H]-PAF. 7. Cloricromene did not affect the activities of the enzymes involved in PAF-synthesis acetyltransferase or phosphocholine transferase. 8. Our data demonstrate that cloricromene, an inhibitor of PLA2-activation in human leucocytes, reduces the synthesis of PAF by stimulated PMNs. This finding has a twofold implication: the PLA2s (or the mechanisms that regulate their activation) involved in PAF synthesis and arachidonate release in human leucocytes are either identical or else indistinguishable by their sensitivity to cloricromene

  9. Non-pathogenic bacteria elicit a differential cytokine response by intestinal epithelial cell/leucocyte co-cultures

    PubMed Central

    Haller, D; Bode, C; Hammes, W; Pfeifer, A; Schiffrin, E; Blum, S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM—Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) are thought to participate in the mucosal defence against bacteria and in the regulation of mucosal tissue homeostasis. Reactivity of IEC to bacterial signals may depend on interactions with immunocompetent cells. To address the question of whether non-pathogenic bacteria modify the immune response of the intestinal epithelium, we co-cultivated enterocyte-like CaCO-2 cells with human blood leucocytes in separate compartments of transwell cultures.
METHODS—CaCO-2/PBMC co-cultures were stimulated with non-pathogenic bacteria and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. Expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, monocyte chemoattracting protein 1 (MCP-1), and IL-10 was studied by enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (cytokine secretion) and by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.
RESULTS—Challenge of CaCO-2 cells with non-pathogenic E coli and Lactobacillus sakei induced expression of IL-8, MCP-1, IL-1β, and TNF-α mRNA in the presence of underlying leucocytes. Leucocyte sensitised CaCO-2 cells produced TNF-α and IL-1β whereas IL-10 was exclusively secreted by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. CaCO-2 cells alone remained hyporesponsive to the bacterial challenge. Lactobacillus johnsonii, an intestinal isolate, showed reduced potential to induce proinflammatory cytokines but increased transforming growth factor beta mRNA in leucocyte sensitised CaCO-2 cells. TNF-α was identified as one of the early mediators involved in cellular cross talk. In the presence of leucocytes, discriminative activation of CaCO-2 cells was observed between enteropathogenic E coli and non-pathogenic bacteria.
CONCLUSION—The differential recognition of non-pathogenic bacteria by CaCO-2 cells required the presence of underlying leucocytes. These results strengthen the hypothesis that bacterial signalling at the mucosal surface is dependent on a network of

  10. Bone marrow transplantation in a Holstein heifer with bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Matsuki, S; Higuchi, H; Inanami, O; Kuwabara, M; Kobayashi, K

    1998-07-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was performed in a 9-month-old heifer with bovine leucocyte adhesion deficiency (BLAD). Clinical and haematological findings, selected neutrophil function and CD18 expression of neutrophils in a B2 integrin-deficient heifer were examined. Twelve months after BMT, a small fluorescent region in the CD18-positive area of a flow cytometric profile was demonstrated and estimated to represent 0.3-0.5% of the CD18-positive neutrophils as measured by flow cytometric analysis following immunomagnetic separation. The animal's clinical condition appeared to improve and stabilize over our observation period of 28 months following BMT. Newly expressed CD18 seemed to play an important role in ameliorating the clinical signs of BLAD in this heifer. PMID:9691847

  11. Impairment of polymorphonuclear leucocyte function in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with lymphadenopathy syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lazzarin, A; Uberti Foppa, C; Galli, M; Mantovani, A; Poli, G; Franzetti, F; Nóvati, R

    1986-01-01

    Granulocyte functions were studied in 20 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), 20 subjects with lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS) and 15 symptom-free drug addicts (SFDA). Polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMNL) phagocytosis and killing of C. albicans appeared normal in homosexual men with AIDS, while drug addicts with AIDS or LAS and SFDA showed a significant defect of these functions as compared to healthy controls. Migration of PMNL in response to a chemoattractant was normal in SFDA, but markedly defective both in LAS and in AIDS patients. In the AIDS group no significant differences were evident between homosexual men and drug addicts. We conclude that defective PMNL phagocytosis and killing, unlike defective migration, are somehow related to drug abuse rather than to infection with the causative agent of the immunodeficiency. PMID:3791696

  12. Cystine exodus from normal leucocytes is stimulated by MgATP.

    PubMed

    Greene, A A; Clark, K F; Smith, M L; Schneider, J A

    1987-09-01

    Cystine exodus from partially purified granular fractions of normal leucocytes is stimulated by MgATP. N-Ethylmaleimide, an inhibitor of the lysosomal H+-translocating ATPase, eliminated the stimulated exodus, but had no effect on basal exodus. As the initial content of cystine was increased, the initial velocity of both the basal and ATP-stimulated egress increased. However, as saturation with substrate was approached, the ATP stimulation disappeared leaving only the N-ethylmaleimide-insensitive basal exodus. The increased initial velocity in the presence of ATP may represent improved binding of cystine to the partially saturated inner transporter as a result of conformational or charge optimization brought about by the action of the H+-translocating ATPase.

  13. Soluble mediators and cytokines produced by human CD3- leucocyte clones from decidualized endometrium.

    PubMed

    Deniz, G; Christmas, S E; Johnson, P M

    1996-01-01

    CD3- granulated leucocyte clones have been generated from human first-trimester decidualized endometrial tissue following culture in interleukin-2 (IL-2). Supernatants from both CD3- decidual granulated leucocyte (dGL) and CD3- peripheral blood natural killer (PBNK) cell clones inhibited the proliferation of choriocarcinoma cell lines. A panel of CD3- dGL clones, with or without phytohaemagglutinin stimulation, was assayed for cytokine secretion compared with CD3- PBNK clones and fresh tissue extracts. Levels of interferon-gamma, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-10 produced by stimulated CD3-CD8- dGL clones were greater than those produced by stimulated CD3-CD8+ dGL clones. In contrast, CD8+ dGL clones were more effective in production of IL-6 than CD8- dGL clones. Immunoreactive transforming growth factor-beta 2 (TGF-beta 2) was undetectable in supernatants from CD3- dGL and PBNK clones. CD3- dGL clones generally produced higher levels of all cytokines than PBNK clones. Some unstimulated CD3- dGL and PBNK clones spontaneously produced these cytokines, but usually at a reduced level. Fresh extracts of first-trimester decidual tissue contained detectable GM-CSF, TNF-alpha, IL-10,IL-6 and TGF-beta 2. Cytokine production by fresh CD3- dGL and CD3- dGL clones indicates that these cells could play an important role in the regulation of placental growth.

  14. The role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in leucocyte recruitment induced by exogenous methylglyoxal.

    PubMed

    Su, Yang; Lei, Xi; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2012-09-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite formed during glucose, protein and fatty acid metabolism. In hyperglycaemic conditions, increased MG level has been linked to the development of diabetes and its vascular complications at the macrovascular and microvascular levels where inflammation plays a role. To study the mechanism of MG-induced inflammation in vivo, we applied MG locally to healthy mice and used intravital microscopy to investigate the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in cremasteric microvasculature. Administration of MG (25 and 50 mg/kg) to the tissue dose-dependently induced leucocyte recruitment at 4.0-5.5 hr, with 84-92% recruited cells being neutrophils. Such MG treatment up-regulated the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, but not vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB signalling pathway contributed to MG-induced up-regulation of these adhesion molecules and leucocyte recruitment. The role of the up-regulated endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment was determined by applying specific functional blocking antibodies to MG-treated animals and observing changes in leucocyte recruitment parameters. Our data demonstrate that the up-regulation of P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contributes to the increased leucocyte rolling flux, reduced leucocyte rolling velocity, and increased leucocyte adhesion, respectively. Our results reveal the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in microvasculature, an inflammatory condition related to diabetic vascular complications.

  15. The role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in leucocyte recruitment induced by exogenous methylglyoxal

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yang; Lei, Xi; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2012-01-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite formed during glucose, protein and fatty acid metabolism. In hyperglycaemic conditions, increased MG level has been linked to the development of diabetes and its vascular complications at the macrovascular and microvascular levels where inflammation plays a role. To study the mechanism of MG-induced inflammation in vivo, we applied MG locally to healthy mice and used intravital microscopy to investigate the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in cremasteric microvasculature. Administration of MG (25 and 50 mg/kg) to the tissue dose-dependently induced leucocyte recruitment at 4·0–5·5 hr, with 84–92% recruited cells being neutrophils. Such MG treatment up-regulated the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, but not vascular cell adhesion molecule-1. Activation of the nuclear factor-κB signalling pathway contributed to MG-induced up-regulation of these adhesion molecules and leucocyte recruitment. The role of the up-regulated endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment was determined by applying specific functional blocking antibodies to MG-treated animals and observing changes in leucocyte recruitment parameters. Our data demonstrate that the up-regulation of P-selectin, E-selectin and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 contributes to the increased leucocyte rolling flux, reduced leucocyte rolling velocity, and increased leucocyte adhesion, respectively. Our results reveal the role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules in MG-induced leucocyte recruitment in microvasculature, an inflammatory condition related to diabetic vascular complications. PMID:22681228

  16. Net primary productivity and rain-use efficiency as affected by warming, altered precipitation, and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xia; Sherry, Rebecca A; Niu, Shuli; Li, Dejun; Luo, Yiqi

    2013-09-01

    Grassland productivity in response to climate change and land use is a global concern. In order to explore the effects of climate change and land use on net primary productivity (NPP), NPP partitioning [fBNPP , defined as the fraction of belowground NPP (BNPP) to NPP], and rain-use efficiency (RUE) of NPP, we conducted a field experiment with warming (+3 °C), altered precipitation (double and half), and annual clipping in a mixed-grass prairie in Oklahoma, USA since July, 2009. Across the years, warming significantly increased BNPP, fBNPP , and RUEBNPP by an average of 11.6%, 2.8%, and 6.6%, respectively. This indicates that BNPP was more sensitive to warming than aboveground NPP (ANPP) since warming did not change ANPP and RUEANPP much. Double precipitation stimulated ANPP, BNPP, and NPP but suppressed RUEANPP , RUEBNPP , and RUENPP while half precipitation decreased ANPP, BNPP, and NPP but increased RUEANPP , RUEBNPP , and RUENPP . Clipping interacted with altered precipitation in impacting RUEANPP , RUEBNPP , and RUENPP , suggesting land use could confound the effects of precipitation changes on ecosystem processes. Soil moisture was found to be a main factor in regulating variation in ANPP, BNPP, and NPP while soil temperature was the dominant factor influencing fBNPP . These findings suggest that BNPP is critical point to future research. Additionally, results from single-factor manipulative experiments should be treated with caution due to the non-additive interactive effects of warming with altered precipitation and land use (clipping).

  17. A pseudo-cryptococcal artefact derived from leucocytes in wet India ink mounts of centrifuged cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Thiruchelvan, N; Wuu, K Y; Arseculeratne, S N; Ashraful-Haq, J

    1998-03-01

    Wet India ink mounts of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are useful in the laboratory diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. Pseudo-cryptococcal artefacts in such mounts have been attributed to leucocytes in CSF but their mode of formation has not been explained. This report describes the reproduction of such an artefact in cryptococcus free CSF-leucocyte mixtures that had been subjected to high speed centrifugation. The viscosity of DNA that could provide a morphological pseudo-capsule, and the yellow-green fluorescence of the pseudo-capsular material on staining with acridine-orange, suggest that lymphocytic nuclear DNA, which possibly leaked out after damage to the lymphocyte membrane by centrifugation, was responsible for this artefact.

  18. Leucocyte esterase, glucose and C-reactive protein in the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    De Vecchi, E; Villa, F; Bortolin, M; Toscano, M; Tacchini, L; Romanò, C L; Drago, L

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of joint fluid is of paramount importance for the diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections. Different markers of inflammation and/or infection in joint fluid have been proposed for diagnosis of these infections. In this study we evaluated the performance of leucocyte esterase, C-reactive protein (CRP) and glucose assays in synovial fluids from 129 patients with septic (n = 27) or aseptic (n = 102) prosthetic joint failure. Samples were collected in serum tubes and centrifuged to limit the presence of corpuscle interfering with the assays. Determinations of leucocyte esterase and glucose were carried out by means of enzymatic colorimetric reactions performed on strips for urine analysis. Tests were considered positive when graded + or ++ whereas traces or absence of colour were considered negative. CRP was measured using an automated turbidimetric method and considered suggestive for infections when >10 mg/L. Leucocyte esterase was positive in 25/27 infected patients and negative in 99/102 not infected patients (sensitivity 92.6%, specificity 97.0%). CRP was higher than the threshold in 22/27 infected patients and in 6/102 not infected patients (sensitivity: 81.5%; specificity: 94.1%) whereas glucose showed the lowest sensitivity (77.8%) and specificity (81.4%), being negative in 21/27 and 19/102 infected and not infected patients, respectively. CRP led to a correct diagnosis in 19 of 22 patients with discordant esterase and glucose results. In conclusion, evaluation of leucocyte esterase, glucose and CRP may represent a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of prosthetic joint infections. PMID:27040804

  19. In vitro immunotoxicological effects of heavy metals on European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) head-kidney leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, Patricia; Cordero, Héctor; Meseguer, José; Esteban, M Ángeles; Cuesta, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    The knowledge about the direct effects of heavy metals on fish leucocytes is still limited. We investigate the in vitro effects of heavy metals (Cd, Hg, Pb or As) on oxidative stress, viability and innate immune parameters of head-kidney leucocytes (HKLs) from European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Production of free oxygen radicals was induced by Cd, Hg and As, mainly after 30 min of exposure. Cd and Hg promoted both apoptosis and necrosis cell death while Pb and As did only apoptosis, in all cases in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, expression of genes related to oxidative stress and apoptosis was significantly induced by Hg and Pb but down-regulated by As. In addition, the expression of the metallothionein A gene was up-regulated by Cd and Pb exposure though this transcript, as well as the heat shock protein 70, was down-regulated by Hg. Cd, methylmercury (MeHg) and As reduced the phagocytic ability, whereas Hg and Pb increased it. Interestingly, all the heavy metals decreased the phagocytic capacity (the number of ingested particles per cell). Leucocyte respiratory burst changed depending on the metal exposure, usually in a time- and dose-manner. Interestingly, the expression of immune-related genes was slightly affected by Cd, MeHg, As or Pb being Hg the form producing the greatest alterations, which included down-regulation of immunoglobulin M and hepcidin, as well as the up-regulation of interleukin-1 beta mRNA levels. This study provides an in vitro approach for elucidating the heavy metals toxicity, and particularly the immunotoxicity, in fish leucocytes. PMID:26363228

  20. Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis replicates within Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) leucocytes and inhibits respiratory burst activity.

    PubMed

    Vestvik, Nils; Rønneseth, Anita; Kalgraff, Cathrine A K; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Wergeland, Heidrun I; Haugland, Gyri T

    2013-09-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis, causing granulomatosis in cod, has been shown to reside within cod immune cells, mainly within monocytes and macrophages. In the present study, we analysed the ability of the bacterium to replicate within adherent cells isolated from head kidney by in vitro infection of leucocytes. Two different technical approaches for flow cytometry analyses were performed for detection of intracellular bacteria. The presence of the wild type was assessed after identification by intracellular binding of specific antibodies to the pathogen. The other way was to use green fluorescent protein (GFP) transformed bacterium for infection studies allowing direct measurements of fluorescence from infected cells. By both methods we found an increase in fluorescence in infected cells, verifying bacterial replication, both after 4 and 28 h post infection in leucocytes isolated from head kidney (HKL). The GFP transformed bacterium was similar to the wild type in growth and infectivity pattern, showing that it can be a valuable tool for further studies of infection routes and pathology. Further, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis was found to inhibit respiratory burst activity, a potent pathogen killing mechanism, in cod leucocytes, but not in such cells from salmon. Our findings may indicate that inhibition of respiratory burst during Francisella infection is a key to its intracellular existence. This strategy seems to be conserved through evolution as it is also observed during infections in higher vertebrates caused by bacteria within the Francisella genus. The results presented here, showing the intracellular existence of Francisella, its replication within leucocytes and the inhibitory effect on respiratory burst, strongly support that these factors contribute to disease and pathology in infected cod. The intracellular replication shown in the present study might contribute to explain the problems of obtaining protective vaccines against

  1. In vitro immunotoxicity of untreated and treated urban wastewaters using various treatment processes to rainbow trout leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Gagné, François; Fortier, Marlène; Fournier, Michel; Smyth, Shirley-Anne

    2013-07-01

    Municipal effluents are known to impede the immune system of aquatic organisms. The purpose of this study was to examine the immunotoxicity of urban wastewaters before and after 6 treatment processes from 12 cities toward trout leucocytes. Freshly prepared trout leucocytes were exposed to increasing concentrations of solid phase (C18) extracts of wastewaters for 24 hr at 150C. Immunocompetence was determined by following changes in leucocyte viability and the proportion of cells able to ingest at least one (immunoactivity) and at least three (immunoefficiency) fluorescent beads. The influents were treated by six different treatment strategies consisting of facultative aerated lagoons, activated sludge, biological aerated filter, biological nutrient removal, chemically-assisted physical treatment and trickling filter/solid contact. Water quality parameters of the wastewaters revealed that the plants effectively removed total suspended solids and reduced the chemical oxygen demand. The results revealed that the effluents' immunotoxic properties were generally more influenced by the properties of the untreated wastewaters than by the treatment processes. About half of the incoming influents decreased leucocyte viability while 4 treatment plants were able to reduce toxicity. The influents readily increased phagocytosis activity for 8/12 influents while it was decreased in 4/12 influents. This increase was abolished for 4/12 of the effluents using treatments involving biological and oxidative processes. In conclusion, municipal effluents have the potential to alter the immune system in fish and more research will be needed to improve the treatments of wastewaters to better protect the quality of the aquatic environment. PMID:24218853

  2. 99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphy fails to detect Crohn's disease in the proximal gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Davison, S; Chapman, S; Murphy, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the use of 99mTc-HMPAO (hexamethyl propylene amine oxime) leucocyte scintigraphy as a non-invasive screening test for inflammatory bowel disease.
PATIENTS—10 children with suspected Crohn's disease, in whom routine investigation using barium contrast radiology, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, colonoscopy, and mucosal biopsies had identified severe gastroduodenal and/or jejunal involvement.
DESIGN—99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphic studies performed in each of these cases were assessed by a radiologist who was blinded to the disease distribution.
RESULTS—In nine cases there was no scintigraphic evidence of inflammation in the proximal gastrointestinal tract. The 10th child had both gastroduodenal and jejunal involvement, but scintigraphy only revealed faint jejunal positivity.
CONCLUSIONS—99mTc-HMPAO leucocyte scintigraphy should not be depended upon as a screening test for Crohn's disease. False negative results are likely in cases with Crohn's disease confined to the proximal gastrointestinal tract.

 PMID:11420197

  3. Different impact of heat-inactivated and viable lactic acid bacteria of aquatic origin on turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) head-kidney leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Araújo, Carlos; Lluch, Nuria; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M; Magadán, Susana

    2015-05-01

    In aquaculture, several criteria should be considered to select an appropriate probiotic, including the aquatic origin and safety of the strain and its ability to modulate the host immune response. The properties and effects of probiotics are strain-specific and some factors such as viability, dose and duration of diet supplementation may regulate their immunomodulatory activities. In this study, we assessed the in vitro effect of eight heat-inactivated and viable lactic acid bacteria (LAB) of aquatic origin belonging to the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus and Weissella on the viability and innate immune response of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) leucocytes. Head-kidney leucocytes were incubated with viable and heat-inactivated LAB at different concentrations. After incubation, the viability of leucocytes was evaluated using colorimetric assays (MTT and LDH) and flow cytometry (annexin V/propidium iodide). Heat-inactivated LAB showed no cytotoxic effect while viable LAB exerted variable influence on apoptosis of turbot phagocytes and lymphocytes. Leucocyte respiratory burst activity and phagocytosis were also differentially activated, as viable LAB stimulated leucocytes more efficiently than the heat-inactivated LAB. Our results suggest diverse strain-specific mechanisms of interaction between the evaluated LAB and turbot leucocytes. Furthermore, our work sets up in vitro systems to evaluate the effect of LAB as potential probiotics, which will be useful to develop efficient screening.

  4. Different impact of heat-inactivated and viable lactic acid bacteria of aquatic origin on turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) head-kidney leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Atienza, Estefanía; Araújo, Carlos; Lluch, Nuria; Hernández, Pablo E; Herranz, Carmen; Cintas, Luis M; Magadán, Susana

    2015-05-01

    In aquaculture, several criteria should be considered to select an appropriate probiotic, including the aquatic origin and safety of the strain and its ability to modulate the host immune response. The properties and effects of probiotics are strain-specific and some factors such as viability, dose and duration of diet supplementation may regulate their immunomodulatory activities. In this study, we assessed the in vitro effect of eight heat-inactivated and viable lactic acid bacteria (LAB) of aquatic origin belonging to the genera Enterococcus, Lactobacillus, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, Pediococcus and Weissella on the viability and innate immune response of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) leucocytes. Head-kidney leucocytes were incubated with viable and heat-inactivated LAB at different concentrations. After incubation, the viability of leucocytes was evaluated using colorimetric assays (MTT and LDH) and flow cytometry (annexin V/propidium iodide). Heat-inactivated LAB showed no cytotoxic effect while viable LAB exerted variable influence on apoptosis of turbot phagocytes and lymphocytes. Leucocyte respiratory burst activity and phagocytosis were also differentially activated, as viable LAB stimulated leucocytes more efficiently than the heat-inactivated LAB. Our results suggest diverse strain-specific mechanisms of interaction between the evaluated LAB and turbot leucocytes. Furthermore, our work sets up in vitro systems to evaluate the effect of LAB as potential probiotics, which will be useful to develop efficient screening. PMID:25707601

  5. Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia caused by human leucocyte antigen-B27 antibody.

    PubMed

    Thude, H; Schorner, U; Helfricht, C; Loth, M; Maak, B; Barz, D

    2006-04-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) occurs when maternal alloantibodies to antigens presented on foetal platelets cause their immune destruction. Whether human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies can cause NAIT is controversial. Here, a patient was described who suffered from a NAIT caused by an HLA-B27 antibody. Sera from the mother and the newborn were tested for human platelet antigen antibodies and HLA antibodies by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) assay, solid phase-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), lymphocytotoxicity assay (LCT) and flow cytometric analysis. No antibodies against cluster designation (CD)109 and platelet glycoproteins of the father were found in patient's and mother's serum. However, HLA ELISA was used to identify HLA antibody in both sera. The antibody was specified as HLA-B27 antibody. Typing results showed that the father descended HLA-B27 antigen on patient and his brother. The mother was HLA-B27 negative. It is most conceivable that the previous pregnancy of the mother induced the production of anti-HLA-B27 antibody, which crossed the placenta and subsequently caused an NAIT in the case presented. PMID:16623921

  6. Effects of adenosine on polymorphonuclear leucocyte function, cyclic 3': 5'-adenosine monophosphate, and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Nielson, C. P.; Vestal, R. E.

    1989-01-01

    1. Inhibition of human polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) function by adenosine was studied with respect to effects of adenosine on intracellular cyclic AMP and calcium during the PMN respiratory burst. 2. The adenosine analogue 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide-adenosine (NECA) and L-N6-phenyl-isopropyl-adenosine (L-PIA) inhibited PMN oxygen metabolite generation with relative potencies (NECA greater than adenosine greater than L-PIA) characteristic of an A2 receptor. 3. The respiratory burst was inhibited by adenosine when PMN were activated by calcium ionophore or chemotactic peptide but not when cells where activated by oleoyl-acetyl-glycerol (OAG). 4. Adenosine increased intracellular cyclic AMP during the PMN respiratory burst regardless of whether cells were stimulated by ionophore, chemotactic peptide or OAG. 5. To determine whether the differences in cell inhibition by adenosine were related to differences in intracellular calcium mobilization by each activating agent, calcium was evaluated with the fluorescent probe, indo-1. Adenosine suppressed the increase in intracellular calcium following PMN activation by calcium ionophore or chemotactic peptide. In contrast, calcium did not increase in PMN activated by OAG and adenosine did not affect intracellular calcium changes following this stimulus. 6. These results demonstrate that physiological concentrations of adenosine inhibit the PMN respiratory burst in association with an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP and reduction of intracellular calcium. PMID:2547490

  7. Depletion of mitochondrial DNA in leucocytes harbouring the 3243A→G mtDNA mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pyle, Angela; Taylor, Robert W; Durham, Steve E; Deschauer, Marcus; Schaefer, Andrew M; Samuels, David C; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2007-01-01

    Background The 3243A→G MTTL1 mutation is the most common heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation associated with disease. Previous studies have shown that the percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases in blood as patients get older, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Objectives and method To understand the dynamics of the process and the underlying mechanisms, an accurate fluorescent assay was established for 3243A→G heteroplasmy and the amount of mtDNA in blood with real‐time polymerase chain reaction was determined. The amount of mutated and wild‐type mtDNA was measured at two time points in 11 subjects. Results The percentage of mutated mtDNA decreases exponentially during life, and peripheral blood leucocytes in patients harbouring 3243A→G are profoundly depleted of mtDNA. Conclusions A similar decrease in mtDNA has been seen in other mitochondrial disorders, and in 3243A→G cell lines in culture, indicating that depletion of mtDNA may be a common secondary phenomenon in several mitochondrial diseases. Depletion of mtDNA is not always due to mutation of a nuclear gene involved in mtDNA maintenance. PMID:16950816

  8. Age-dependent alterations of Fc gamma receptor-mediated effector functions of human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Fülöp, T; Fóris, G; Wórum, I; Leövey, A

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the effector functions in polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL), harvested from blood of young and aged healthy subjects of both sexes, were studied. FC gamma-receptor (Fc gamma R)-mediated incorporation of IgG coated 51Cr-HRBC significantly increased in the aged male group, while the phagocytosis of pre-opsonized fungi (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans) was independent of both the age and sex. However, the intracellular killing capacity of neutrophils obtained from aged male subjects significantly decreased toward 51Cr-labelled c. albicans. The antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was also impaired with ageing in both sexes. The age-dependent decrease in the effector functions of PMNL may be explained, among others, by the fact that during yeast cell incorporation the increased cAMP level does not return to the basic level in the old group. On the other hand, the cGMP level which increased in PMNL of aged subjects does not show any progressive increase as in the young subjects, but remains unchanged. The oxidative metabolism producing free radicals being necessary for the effective intracellular killing and ADCC diminished in PMNL of aged subjects of both sexes. The above findings indicate that the adaptation of cyclic nucleotide system and the oxidative burst to the cell activation becomes impaired with ageing. PMID:2994926

  9. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Leucocyte Subsets in the Sinonasal Mucosa of Cats with Upper Respiratory Tract Aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Whitney, J L; Krockenberger, M B; Day, M J; Beatty, J A; Dhand, N K; Barrs, V R

    2016-01-01

    Leucocyte populations in the sinonasal mucosa of cats with and without upper respiratory tract aspergillosis were compared using immunohistochemistry and computer-aided morphometry. Inflammation was identified in the nasal mucosa of all affected cats, comprising predominantly of lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the lamina propria associated with epithelial proliferation and degeneration. There was intense and diffuse expression of class II antigens of the major histocompatibility complex, associated with sites of hyphal invasion with hyperplasia and ulceration of the epithelium adjacent to fungal elements. Significantly more CD79b(+) cells, total lymphocytes, immunoglobulin (Ig)-expressing cells and MAC387(+) cells infiltrated the epithelium and more IgG(+) cells and total Ig-expressing cells infiltrated the lamina propria in affected cats compared with controls. Importantly, the inflammatory profile in affected cats was not consistent with the T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cell-mediated response that confers protective acquired immunity against invasive aspergillosis in dogs and people and in murine models of the infection. This finding may help to explain the development of invasive aspergillosis in systemically immunocompetent cats. PMID:27576043

  10. The leucocyte count: correlates and relationship to coronary risk factors: the CARDIA study.

    PubMed

    Friedman, G D; Tekawa, I; Grimm, R H; Manolio, T; Shannon, S G; Sidney, S

    1990-12-01

    Correlates of the leucocyte count (WBC) and its relationships to other coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors were assessed in 4981 black and white young adults. Mean WBC was higher in women than men, higher in whites than blacks, and higher in those aged 18-24 than aged 25-30 years. It also varied by season with the highest levels in the autumn. Other characteristics with persistent statistically significant direct associations with the WBC after multivariate adjustments were cigarette smoking, marijuana use, geographical location (possibly an inter-laboratory artifact), use of birth control pills, body mass index, pulse rate, and systolic blood pressure; height, physical fitness and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level were inversely associated with the WBC. The negative association of WBC with HDL-C was too small to explain the association of WBC with CHD found elsewhere. The WBC is a commonly performed clinical test; yet much remains to be learned about its variation in the general population and its value as a predictor rather than merely an indicator of disease.

  11. Leucocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 with developmental delay secondary to CMV infection and filiation questions.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Alexis; Gallo, Silvanna; King, Alejandra; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2015-04-09

    Leucocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is a group of rare autosomal recessive (<1:1 000 000 births) inherited disorders characterised by immune deficiency and peripheral neutrophilia. Three types of LAD syndrome have been distinguished. LAD type 1 (LAD-I) is the most common. It results from a mutation in the integrin β 2 (ITGB2) gene that codes the ITGB subunit (CD18 antigen). Since 1970, it has been reported in more than 300 children worldwide. It is characterised by delayed separation of the umbilical cord, recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, defective wound healing, blood neutrophilia and a high mortality rate at an early age. We report the second fatal case of an infant with LAD-I diagnosed in Chile, with developmental delay associated with a congenital cytomegalovirus infection. CD18/CD11 expression was normal. Genetic analysis of CD18 revealed a homozygous mutation in ITGB2, viz.c.1835G>T; p.C612F, and led us to suspect a biological parent other than the legal father and, therefore, an unwanted social situation.

  12. Control of leucocyte function-associated antigen-1-dependent cellular conjugation by divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A M; Alexandroff, A B; Lappin, M B; Esuvaranathan, K; James, K; Chisholm, G D

    1994-01-01

    The control of integrin activation is fundamental to an understanding of the integrin-dependent cellular adhesion thought to be important for a plethora of basic cellular functions. Using a cell-cell conjugation assay the role of divalent cations in leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-dependent cellular adhesion was further investigated. The conjugation of interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes to tumour cells was found to be energy dependent and required the presence of various divalent cations, removal of which decreased the level of conjugation. Increased concentrations of calcium, magnesium and manganese ions resulted in a corresponding increase in levels of conjugation. This increase in conjugation was LFA-1 dependent. Interestingly, when calcium ions were first removed from LFA-1, treatment of lymphocytes with magnesium and manganese ions gave significantly higher levels of conjugation than in the presence of calcium. Using a simple displacement study, calcium ions were shown to displace magnesium ions resulting in decreased conjugation. However, calcium ions were unable to displace manganese ions for binding to LFA-1. That manganese was exerting its effect via an LFA-1-dependent mechanism was confirmed using monoclonal antibodies to CD11a which negated the increased conjugation frequency due to manganese. PMID:7907574

  13. Leucocyte kinesis in blood, bronchoalveoli and nasal cavities during late asthmatic responses in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed

    Nabe, T; Shinoda, N; Yamashita, K; Yamamura, H; Kohno, S

    1998-03-01

    Recently, we reported a reproducible model of asthma in guinea-pigs in vivo, which developed a late asthmatic response (LAR) as well as an early response. In this study, time-related changes in the occurrence of the LAR and leucocyte kinesis were assessed. Furthermore, the state of the activation of eosinophils that migrated into the lower airways was characterized in vitro. Guinea-pigs were alternately sensitized/challenged by inhalation with aerosolized ovalbumin adsorbed on aluminium hydroxide and ovalbumin alone, once every 2 weeks. At defined times before and after the fifth challenge, airway resistance was measured, blood was drawn and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and nasal cavity lavage (NCL) were performed. Superoxide anion (.O2-) production of eosinophils was measured with cytochrome c. Occurrence of LAR and considerable increases in circulating eosinophils coincided with each other 5-7 h after the challenge. After 7 h, eosinophil infiltrations into bronchoalveolar spaces were observed. The capacity of eosinophils from the sensitized animals to produce .O2- was higher than those from the non-sensitized ones, when eosinophils were stimulated by platelet-activating factor. Although an increased number of eosinophils in the NCL fluid was observed, it was much less than that in the BAL fluid. Thus, it has been concluded that eosinophilia in the blood and the lung may participate in the occurrence of the late asthmatic response, which is thought to be preferentially evoked in the lower airways in guinea-pigs in vivo.

  14. Reduced expression of galectin-1 and galectin-9 by leucocytes in asthma patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Cuellar, S; Fuente, H; Cruz-Adalia, A; Lamana, A; Cibrian, D; Giron, R M; Vara, A; Sanchez-Madrid, F; Ancochea, J

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that galectins play roles in the initiation and resolution phases of inflammatory responses by promoting anti- or proinflammatory effects. This study investigated the presence of three members of the galectin family (galectin-1, -3 and -9) in induced sputum samples of asthma patients, as well as their possible implication in the immunopathogenesis of human asthma. Levels of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-13, and galectins were determined in leucocytes isolated from induced sputum samples by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. High levels of IL-5 and IL-13 mRNA were detected in sputum cells from asthma patients. In parallel, immunoregulatory proteins galectin-1 and galectin-9 showed a reduced expression on macrophages from sputum samples compared with cells from healthy donors. In-vitro immunoassays showed that galectin-1 and galectin-9, but not galectin-3, are able to induce the production of IL-10 by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. These findings indicate that macrophages from sputum samples of asthma patients express low levels of galectin-1 and galectin-9, favouring the exacerbated immune response observed in this disease. PMID:23121677

  15. Leucocyte adhesion deficiency type 1 with developmental delay secondary to CMV infection and filiation questions.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Alexis; Gallo, Silvanna; King, Alejandra; Rosenzweig, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Leucocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) is a group of rare autosomal recessive (<1:1 000 000 births) inherited disorders characterised by immune deficiency and peripheral neutrophilia. Three types of LAD syndrome have been distinguished. LAD type 1 (LAD-I) is the most common. It results from a mutation in the integrin β 2 (ITGB2) gene that codes the ITGB subunit (CD18 antigen). Since 1970, it has been reported in more than 300 children worldwide. It is characterised by delayed separation of the umbilical cord, recurrent bacterial and fungal infections, defective wound healing, blood neutrophilia and a high mortality rate at an early age. We report the second fatal case of an infant with LAD-I diagnosed in Chile, with developmental delay associated with a congenital cytomegalovirus infection. CD18/CD11 expression was normal. Genetic analysis of CD18 revealed a homozygous mutation in ITGB2, viz.c.1835G>T; p.C612F, and led us to suspect a biological parent other than the legal father and, therefore, an unwanted social situation. PMID:25858935

  16. The influence of climate and fructification on the inter-annual variability of stem growth and net primary productivity in an old-growth, mixed beech forest.

    PubMed

    Mund, M; Kutsch, W L; Wirth, C; Kahl, T; Knohl, A; Skomarkova, M V; Schulze, E-D

    2010-06-01

    The periodic production of large seed crops by trees (masting) and its interaction with stem growth has long been the objective of tree physiology research. However, very little is known about the effects of masting on stem growth and total net primary productivity (NPP) at the stand scale. This study was conducted in an old-growth, mixed deciduous forest dominated by Fagus sylvatica (L.) and covers the period from 2003 to 2007, which comprised wet, dry and regular years as well as two masts of Fagus and one mast of the co-dominant tree species Fraxinus excelsior (L.) and Acer pseudoplatanus (L.). We combined analyses of weather conditions and stem growth at the tree level (inter- and intra-annual) with fruit, stem and leaf production, and estimates of total NPP at the stand level. Finally, we compared the annual demand of carbon for biomass production with net canopy assimilation (NCA), derived from eddy covariance flux measurements, chamber measurements and modelling. Annual stem growth of Fagus was most favoured by warm periods in spring and that of Fraxinus by high precipitation in June. For stem growth of Acer and for fruit production, no significant relationships with mean weather conditions were found. Intra-annual stem growth of all species was strongly reduced when the relative plant-available water in soil dropped below a threshold of about 60% between May and July. The inter-annual variations of NCA, total NPP and leaf NPP at the stand level were low (mean values 1313, 662 and 168 g C m(-2) year(-1), respectively), while wood and fruit production varied more and contrarily (wood: 169-241 g C m(-2) year(-1); fruits: 21-142 g C m(-2) year(-1)). In all years, an annual surplus of newly assimilated carbon was calculated (on average 100 g C m(-2) year(-1)). The results suggest that stem growth is generally not limited by insufficient carbon resources; only in mast years a short-term carbon shortage may occur in spring. In contrast to common assumption, stem

  17. The detection of membrane and cytoplasmic immunoglobulins in human leucocytes by immunoperoxidase staining.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, D Y; Labaume, S; Preud'homme, J L

    1977-01-01

    A sensitive immunoperoxidase technique for the detection of immunoglobulin (the peroxidase--anti-peroxidase or PAP procedure) has been applied to fixed smears of normal human white cells. IgM was detected in approximately 5% of lymphocytes from normal donors. Most positive cells showed a characteristic 'hairy' peripheral staining pattern; a similar morphological appearance was seen in samples stained for IgD. The membrane (rather than cytoplasmic) localization of this IgM was inferred from the redistribution of staining induced by preliminary incubation of cell suspensions with anti-mu antisera before smearing and staining. B cell-depleted and B cell-enriched suspensions showed, respectively, reduced and increased percentages of IgM-positive cells. IgG was detectable in approximately 25% of normal lymphoid cells. In contrast to the IgM and IgD reaction patterns, these cells commonly showed a discontinuous distribution of reactivity, often localized to the cell uropod or to small cytoplasmic vesicles. However, when cells were prepared at 0 degree C, staining tended to be diffuse. These findings suggested that the PAP procedure was detecting Fc receptor-bearing lymphoid cells which had bound serum IgG. IgG was also demonstrated in normal polymorphs and monocytes. The specificity of this reaction was confirmed by the use of immunoabsorbant-purified antibodies. The possible practical advantages of this immunoperoxidase procedure for the detection of leucocyte immunoglobulin are considered, and the relevance of the demonstration of IgG in non-lymphoid cells to recent reports of this immunoglobulin in Hodgkin's disease and malignant 'reticulum' cells is briefly discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:338219

  18. Leucocyte expression of genes implicated in the plasminogen activation cascade is modulated by yoghurt peptides.

    PubMed

    Theodorou, Georgios; Politis, Ioannis

    2016-08-01

    The urokinase-plasminogen activator (u-PA), its receptor (u-PAR) and the inhibitors of u-PA (PAI-1 and PAI-2) provide a multi-molecular system in leucocytes that exerts pleiotropic functions influencing the development of inflammatory and immune responses. The objective of the present study was to examine the ability of water soluble extracts (WSE) obtained from traditional Greek yoghurt made from bovine or ovine milk to modulate the expression of u-PA, u-PAR, PAI-1 and PAI-2 in ovine monocytes and neutrophils. WSE were obtained from 8 commercial traditional type Greek yoghurts made from ovine or bovine milk. WSE upregulated the expression of all 4 u-PA related genes in monocytes but the upregulation was much higher in the PAI-1 (10-fold) than in u-PA and u-PAR (3-4 fold) thus, shifting the system towards inhibition. In line with this observation, WSE reduced total and membrane-bound u-PA activity in monocytes. In neutrophils, WSE caused small (50-60%) but significant (P < 0·05) reductions in expression of u-PAR and PAI-2 but had no effect on expression of u-PA, PAI-1 and on total cell-associated and membrane-bound u-PA activity. WSE from yoghurts made from bovine or ovine milk were essentially equally effective in affecting the u-PA system except for the u-PAR gene in ovine neutrophils that was affected (reduced) by the ovine and not the bovine WSE. In conclusion, peptides present in WSE modulated the expression of u-PA related genes but the effect was much more prominent in monocytes than in neutrophils. PMID:27600972

  19. Age and gender leucocytes variances and references values generated using the standardized ONE-Study protocol.

    PubMed

    Kverneland, Anders H; Streitz, Mathias; Geissler, Edward; Hutchinson, James; Vogt, Katrin; Boës, David; Niemann, Nadja; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Schlickeiser, Stephan; Sawitzki, Birgit

    2016-06-01

    Flow cytometry is now accepted as an ideal technology to reveal changes in immune cell composition and function. However, it is also an error-prone and variable technology, which makes it difficult to reproduce findings across laboratories. We have recently developed a strategy to standardize whole blood flow cytometry. The performance of our protocols was challenged here by profiling samples from healthy volunteers to reveal age- and gender-dependent differences and to establish a standardized reference cohort for use in clinical trials. Whole blood samples from two different cohorts were analyzed (first cohort: n = 52, second cohort: n = 46, both 20-84 years with equal gender distribution). The second cohort was run as a validation cohort by a different operator. The "ONE Study" panels were applied to analyze expression of >30 different surface markers to enumerate proportional and absolute numbers of >50 leucocyte subsets. Indeed, analysis of the first cohort revealed significant age-dependent changes in subsets e.g. increased activated and differentiated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subsets, acquisition of a memory phenotype for Tregs as well as decreased MDC2 and Marginal Zone B cells. Males and females showed different dynamics in age-dependent T cell activation and differentiation, indicating faster immunosenescence in males. Importantly, although both cohorts consisted of a small sample size, our standardized approach enabled validation of age-dependent changes with the second cohort. Thus, we have proven the utility of our strategy and generated reproducible reference ranges accounting for age- and gender-dependent differences, which are crucial for a better patient monitoring and individualized therapy. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. PMID:27144459

  20. The effects of vitamin A supplementation with measles vaccine on leucocyte counts and in vitro cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Fisker, Ane Bærent; Andersen, Andreas; Sartono, Erliyani; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Aaby, Peter; Erikstrup, Christian; Benn, Christine Stabell

    2016-02-28

    As WHO recommends vitamin A supplementation (VAS) at vaccination contacts after age 6 months, many children receive VAS together with measles vaccine (MV). We aimed to investigate the immunological effect of VAS given with MV. Within a randomised placebo-controlled trial investigating the effect on overall mortality of providing VAS with vaccines in Guinea-Bissau, we conducted an immunological sub-study of VAS v. placebo with MV, analysing leucocyte counts, whole blood in vitro cytokine production, vitamin A status and concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP). VAS compared with placebo was associated with an increased frequency of CRP ≥ 5 mg/l (28 v. 12%; P=0·005). Six weeks after supplementation, VAS had significant sex-differential effects on leucocyte, lymphocyte, monocyte and basophil cell counts, decreasing them in males but increasing them in females. Mainly in females, the effect of VAS on cytokine responses differed by previous VAS: in previous VAS recipients, VAS increased the pro-inflammatory and T helper cell type 1 (Th1) cytokine responses, whereas VAS decreased these responses in previously unsupplemented children. In previous VAS recipients, VAS was associated with increased IFN-γ responses to phytohaemagglutinin in females (geometric mean ratio (GMR): 3·97; 95% CI 1·44, 10·90) but not in males (GMR 0·44; 95% CI 0·14, 1·42); the opposite was observed in previously unsupplemented children. Our results corroborate that VAS provided with MV has immunological effects, which may depend on sex and previous VAS. VAS may increase the number of leucocytes, but also repress both the innate and lymphocyte-derived cytokine responses in females, whereas this repression may be opposite if the females have previously received VAS. PMID:26678511

  1. Primary haemostasis: newer insights.

    PubMed

    Berndt, M C; Metharom, P; Andrews, R K

    2014-05-01

    At the same time as biophysical and omics approaches are drilling deeper into the molecular details of platelets and other blood cells, as well as their receptors and mechanisms of regulation, there is also an increasing awareness of the functional overlap between human vascular systems. Together, these studies are redefining the intricate networks linking haemostasis and thrombosis with inflammation, infectious disease, cancer/metastasis and other vascular pathophysiology. The focus of this state-of-the-art review is some of the newer advances relevant to primary haemostasis. Of particular interest, platelet-specific primary adhesion-signalling receptors and associated activation pathways control platelet function in flowing blood and provide molecular links to other systems. Platelet glycoprotein (GP)Ibα of the GPIb-IX-V complex and GPVI not only initiate platelet aggregation and thrombus formation by primary interactions with von Willebrand factor and collagen, respectively, but are also involved in coagulation, leucocyte engagement, bacterial or viral interactions, and are relevant as potential risk markers in a range of human diseases. Understanding these systems in unprecedented detail promises significant advances in evaluation of individual risk, in new diagnostic or therapeutic possibilities and in monitoring the response to drugs or other treatment.

  2. Comparison of 99m technetium hexamethylpropylene-amine oxime labelled leucocyte with 111-indium tropolonate labelled granulocyte scanning and ultrasound in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, M J; Joseph, A E; French, A; Saverymuttu, S H; Maxwell, J D

    1995-01-01

    Fifty patients with suspected intra-abdominal abscess were investigated prospectively with ultrasound and with 99mTc-hexamethylpropylene-amine oxime (HMPAO) isotope labelled mixed leucocytes, using 111-In tropolonate granulocyte scanning as the reference standard. Twenty five patients had inflammatory bowel disease (three were postoperative): 21 of these had Crohn's disease and four had ulcerative colitis. The remainder comprised nine with postoperative fever and 16 with fever and abdominal pain. An abscess was diagnosed when focal activity on serial 111-In tropolonate and 99m-Tc-HMPOA images at one, three, and 24 hours resulted in activity at least equal to liver activity at 24 hours. Thirteen abscesses were diagnosed using each type of white cell scanning, resulting in 100% sensitivity for 99m-Tc-HMPAO compared with 111-In tropolonate. Bowel inflammation was easily distinguished from abscess on serial images. Eight of these 13 abscesses were detected by ultrasound. Altogether 17 abscesses were found. Ultrasound detected 12, including four liver abscesses which were not purulent and had not been detected by white cell scanning. Ultrasound had a sensitivity of 71% (12 of 17) and a specificity of 87% (33 of 38) using all confirmed abscesses as the reference standard. White cell scanning showed a sensitivity of 76% (13 of 17: as a result of the four non-purulent liver abscesses) and a specificity of 100%. 99m-Tc-HMPAO scanning is as accurate as 111-In tropolonate scanning, and has several advantages including simplicity, availability, superior image quality, and reduced radiation dose. Both methods are more sensitive and specific than ultrasound for intra-abdominal abscess detection but ultrasound is advisable if a neutrophil infiltrate is not suspected. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7489945

  3. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Reed, Daniel M.; Edin, Matthew L.; Rauzi, Francesca; Mataragka, Stefania; Vojnovic, Ivana; Bishop-Bailey, David; Milne, Ginger L.; Longhurst, Hilary; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Mitchell, Jane A.; Warner, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Eicosanoids are important vascular regulators, but the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isoforms supporting their production within the cardiovascular system are not fully understood. To address this, we have studied platelets, endothelial cells, and leukocytes from 2 siblings with a homozygous loss-of-function mutation in group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α). Chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to determine levels of a broad range of eicosanoids produced by isolated vascular cells, and in plasma and urine. Eicosanoid release data were paired with studies of cellular function. Absence of cPLA2α almost abolished eicosanoid synthesis in platelets (e.g., thromboxane A2, control 20.5 ± 1.4 ng/ml vs. patient 0.1 ng/ml) and leukocytes [e.g., prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), control 21.9 ± 7.4 ng/ml vs. patient 1.9 ng/ml], and this was associated with impaired platelet activation and enhanced inflammatory responses. cPLA2α-deficient endothelial cells showed reduced, but not absent, formation of prostaglandin I2 (prostacyclin; control 956 ± 422 pg/ml vs. patient 196 pg/ml) and were primed for inflammation. In the urine, prostaglandin metabolites were selectively influenced by cPLA2α deficiency. For example, prostacyclin metabolites were strongly reduced (18.4% of control) in patients lacking cPLA2α, whereas PGE2 metabolites (77.8% of control) were similar to healthy volunteer levels. These studies constitute a definitive account, demonstrating the fundamental role of cPLA2α to eicosanoid formation and cellular responses within the human circulation.—Kirkby, N. S., Reed, D. M., Edin, M. L., Rauzi, F., Mataragka, S., Vojnovic, I., Bishop-Bailey, D., Milne, G. L., Longhurst, H., Zeldin, D. C., Mitchell, J. A., Warner, T. D. Inherited human group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 deficiency abolishes platelet, endothelial, and leucocyte eicosanoid generation. PMID:26183771

  4. JC Polyomavirus Infection Is Strongly Controlled by Human Leucocyte Antigen Class II Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, Emilie; Buck, Dorothea; Warnke, Clemens; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Khademi, Mohsen; Lima Bomfim, Izaura; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Link, Jenny; Alfredsson, Lars; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Hillert, Jan; Oturai, Annette B.; Hemme, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50–60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP) kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10−15) and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10−5). In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006), and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10−5). The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10−4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes). HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and lays

  5. JC polyomavirus infection is strongly controlled by human leucocyte antigen class II variants.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Emilie; Buck, Dorothea; Warnke, Clemens; Albrecht, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Khademi, Mohsen; Lima Bomfim, Izaura; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Link, Jenny; Alfredsson, Lars; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Hillert, Jan; Oturai, Annette B; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hemme, Bernhard; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas

    2014-04-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP) kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO) method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10(-15)) and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10(-5)). In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006), and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10(-5)). The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10(-4) and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes). HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and lays the

  6. High-throughput deep screening and identification of four peripheral leucocyte microRNAs as novel potential combination biomarkers for preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonghong; Yang, Xukui; Yang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Wenjun; Zhao, Meiling; Liu, Huiqiang; Li, Dongyan; Hao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the specific microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers of preeclampsia (PE), the miRNA profiles analysis were performed. Study Design: The blood samples were obtained from five PE patients and five normal healthy pregnant women. The small RNA profiles were analyzed to identify miRNA expression levels and find out miRNAs that may associate with PE. The quantitative reverse transcriptase–PCR (qRT-PCR) assay was used to validate differentially expressed peripheral leucocyte miRNAs in a new cohort. Result: The data analysis showed that 10 peripheral leucocyte miRNAs were significantly differently expressed in severe PE patients. Four differently expressed miRNAs were successfully validated using qRT-PCR method. Conclusion: We successfully constructed a model with high accuracy to predict PE. A combination of four peripheral leucocyte miRNAs has great potential to serve as diagnostic biomarkers of PE. PMID:26675000

  7. Classification of platelet concentrates: from pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP) to leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF).

    PubMed

    Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Rasmusson, Lars; Albrektsson, Tomas

    2009-03-01

    The topical use of platelet concentrates is recent and its efficiency remains controversial. Several techniques for platelet concentrates are available; however, their applications have been confusing because each method leads to a different product with different biology and potential uses. Here, we present classification of the different platelet concentrates into four categories, depending on their leucocyte and fibrin content: pure platelet-rich plasma (P-PRP), such as cell separator PRP, Vivostat PRF or Anitua's PRGF; leucocyte- and platelet-rich plasma (L-PRP), such as Curasan, Regen, Plateltex, SmartPReP, PCCS, Magellan or GPS PRP; pure plaletet-rich fibrin (P-PRF), such as Fibrinet; and leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (L-PRF), such as Choukroun's PRF. This classification should help to elucidate successes and failures that have occurred so far, as well as providing an objective approach for the further development of these techniques.

  8. Determinants of Primary School Non-Enrollment and Absenteeism: Results from a Retrospective, Convergent Mixed Methods, Cohort Study in Rural Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    King, Nia; Dewey, Cate; Borish, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Education is a key element in the socioeconomic development required to improve quality of life in Kenya. Despite the introduction of free primary education, primary school enrollment and attendance levels remain low. Drawing on qualitative and quantitative data, this study explores the determinants of non-enrollment and absenteeism in rural western Kenya and potential mitigation strategies to address these issues. Methods The study was conducted in Bwaliro village in rural western Kenya. A random sample of 64 students was obtained by blocking the village primary school’s student population according to grade level, gender, and orphan status. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through interviews with parents, guardians, and key informants, and focus group discussions with students. Quantitative data were compared using chi-square tests, Student’s T-test, and Poisson regressions. Qualitative data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Results Malaria, menstruation, and lack of money were among the most notable determinants of primary school dropout and absenteeism, and these factors disproportionately impacted orphans and female students. Potential mitigation strategies suggested by the community included provision of malaria treatment or prevention, reduction in education costs, expansion of the established school-feeding program, and provision of sanitary pads. Conclusion Despite free primary education, numerous factors continue to prevent children in rural western Kenya from attending primary school. The findings suggest that interventions should primarily target orphaned and female students. Prior to implementation, suggested mitigation strategies should be assessed for cost-effectiveness. PMID:26371885

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Oral Azithromycin in Serum, Urine, Polymorphonuclear Leucocytes and Inflammatory vs Non-Inflammatory Skin Blisters in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ballow, C H; Amsden, G W; Highet, V S; Forrest, A

    1998-01-01

    Two open-label studies were conducted to assess the serum, urine, polymorphonuclear (PMN) and red blood cell (RBC) pharmacokinetics of a 5-day course (1500mg total) of oral azithromycin. Inflammatory and non-inflammatory blisters were also induced to study the propensity of azithromycin to preferentially concentrate at a model infection site. 14 subjects participated in the two studies and tolerated azithromycin and the study methods well. Comodelling of the serum and urine data demonstrated very extensive distribution into peripheral compartments, low renal clearance (7% of total oral clearance) and an extended terminal half-life (79 hours). PMN leucocyte concentrations peaked at 119 mg/L following the final dose and remained above 60 mg/L 7 days after the final dose. The ratio of blister to serum AUCs was significantly higher in inflammatory (2.2) vs non-inflammatory (1.2) blisters (p < 0.02). The extensive uptake of azithromycin into PMNs coupled with the accumulation of azithromycin into an inflammatory compartment (e.g. infection site) support the hypothesis that PMN leucocytes laden with azithromycin migrate to sites of inflammation, thereby enhancing local concentrations. These studies further demonstrate the unique pharmacokinetic properties of azithromycin and its preferential delivery by phagocytes to the site of infection. PMID:18370479

  10. Suppression of polymorphonuclear leucocyte chemotaxis by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase in vitro: a study of the mechanisms and the correlation with ring abscess in pseudomonal keratitis.

    PubMed Central

    Ijiri, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Kamata, R.; Nishino, N.; Okamura, R.; Kambara, T.; Yamamoto, T.

    1994-01-01

    Bacteria, or the culture supernatants of an elastase non-producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, elicited a chemotactic response from polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) in vitro. The chemoattractive capacity was diminished under the presence of Boc-Phe-Leu-Phe-Leu-Phe, a receptor antagonist of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP) which is a bacterial chemotactic peptide to PMN. This indicated that the chemoattractant derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was a fMLP-like molecule(s). In contrast, culture supernatants of an elastase producing strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced negligible chemotactic response from PMN. Indeed, an inhibitory effect of the culture supernatants or of purified Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (PAE) on PMN chemotaxis was observed when fMLP was used as a chemoattractant. Another fMLP-induced function of PMN, respiratory burst activation, was also diminished by pretreatment of PMN with PAE. PAE hydrolysed fMLP at the Met-Leu bond and diminished the chemoattractant capacity. In addition, a receptor analysis with fML-3H-P demonstrated a decrease in numbers of fMLP receptors on PMN without changing the dissociation constant values after the treatment of the cells with PAE. In the primary structure of the fMLP receptor previously reported, a preferential amino acid sequence for cleavage by PAE was identified in what was believed to be an extracellular portion of the receptor molecule. These results suggested that PAE could diminish PMN infiltration in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vivo by cleavage of the fMLP-like pseudomonal chemotactic ligand and the receptors on PMN. Images Figure 4 PMID:7734333

  11. Altered gene expression in T-cell receptor signalling in peripheral blood leucocytes in acute coronary syndrome predicts secondary coronary events

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shin-ichiro; Usui, Soichiro; Kurokawa, Keisuke; Kitano, Teppei; Kato, Takeshi; Murai, Hisayoshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Oda, Hiroyuki; Maruyama, Michiro; Nagata, Yoshiki; Usuda, Kazuo; Kubota, Koji; Takeshita, Yumie; Sakai, Yoshio; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Objective Comprehensive profiling of gene expression in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBLs) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as a prognosticator is needed. We explored the specific profile of gene expression in PBLs in ACS for long-term risk stratification. Methods 30 patients with ACS who underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and 15 age-matched adults who participated in medical check-ups were enrolled from three centres. Peripheral blood samples were collected to extract RNA for microarray analyses. Results During the 5-year follow-up, 36% of this cohort developed the expected non-fatal coronary events (NFEs) of target lesion revascularisation (TLR) and PCI for a de novo lesion. Class comparison analysis (p<0.005) demonstrated that 83 genes among 7785 prefiltered genes (41 upregulated vs 42 downregulated genes) were extracted to classify the patients according to the occurrence of NFE. Pathway analysis based on gene ontology revealed that the NFEs were associated with altered gene expression regarding the T-cell receptor signalling pathway in ACS. Univariate t test showed that the expression level of death-associated protein kinase1 (DAPK1), known to regulate inflammation, was the most significantly negatively regulated gene in the event group (0.61-fold, p<0.0005). Kaplan-Meier curve analysis and multivariate analysis adjusted for baseline characteristics or clinical biomarkers demonstrated that lower DAPK1 expression in PBL emerged as an independent risk factor for the NFEs (HR: 8.73; CI 1.05 to 72.8, p=0.045). Conclusions Altered gene expression in T-cell receptor signalling in PBL in ACS could be a prognosticator for secondary coronary events. Trial registration number UMIN000001932; Results. PMID:27403330

  12. Primary malignant mixed müllerian mesodermal tumor mimicking a rectosigmoid carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Sakshi; Miles, Levin

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old female who presented with chronic constipation and abdominal discomfort for six months. Her past surgical history was significant for a total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy, performed eight years ago, for uterine fibroids and endometriosis. Workup revealed a mass measuring 5 × 4.5 × 2 cm in the rectosigmoid colon. Patient underwent a low anterior resection and a fungating, centrally ulcerated rectosigmoid mass with a positive mesorectal margin was removed. Histopathology revealed a heterologous mixed mesodermal tumor (chondroid and osteoid elements). The epithelial component was compatible with a grade 2 endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical stains were supportive, with positive expression for CK7 and ER, negative for CK20, and only very focally and weakly positive for both CDX2 and p63. Chromogranin, synaptophysin, and TTF-1 were negative. Following surgery, she was treated with five cycles of carboplatin (AUC 6) and paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2)), followed by irradiation. Twenty-six months later, patient continues to be asymptomatic and disease-free. Mixed müllerian mesodermal tumors mimicking colorectal cancer have been reported in the past. Our case highlights the rarity and the challenges encountered in diagnosing and treating these rare tumors.

  13. Α₁-acid glycoprotein modulates phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli by bovine polymorphonuclear leucocytes and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Cristina; Scarafoni, Alessio; Bronzo, Valerio; Martino, Piera Anna; Cavallini, Alice; Sartorelli, Paola; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    α1-Acid glycoprotein (AGP) is an acute phase protein that modulates innate immunity and increases in response to infection or injury. The effects of native (phosphorylated) and partially dephosphorylated AGP on the antimicrobial activities of bovine polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) and monocytes were evaluated. Native AGP inhibited phagocytosis and killing of Escherichia coli by PMNs and monocytes. Engulfment and killing of E. coli were reduced at the acute phase concentration of AGP (0.9 mg/mL) compared with a physiological concentration (0.3mg/mL). The ability of AGP to inhibit phagocytosis by monocytes and the killing of E. coli by PMNs was reduced following dephosphorylation. The findings indicate that the functions of PMNs and monocytes are differentially regulated by varying concentrations of AGP and its phosphorylation state.

  14. Effect of vegetable consumption on the association between peripheral leucocyte telomere length and hypertension: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Fuzhi; Wang, Jinquan; Huang, Xianhong; Wu, Yinyin; Cao, Yifei; Tan, Xiaohua; Xu, Xianrong; Hong, Yu; Yang, Lei; Gao, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Peripheral leucocyte telomere length has been suggested to be inversely associated with hypertension risk. Both telomere length and hypertension risk can be modified by certain dietary factors, such as fruit and vegetables. This study was to examine the potential effect of these dietary factors on the association between telomere length and hypertension risk. Study design A community-based case–control study. Participants 271 hypertensive patients and 455 normotensive controls aged 40–70 years and living in Yinzhou, Zhejiang Province, China. Outcome measures Peripheral leucocyte relative telomere length (RTL) was measured using quantitative real-time PCR. Dietary intake was assessed by a brief semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. The association between RTL and hypertension risk was analysed using logistic regression, and the modulatory effect of dietary intake on RTL-related hypertension risk was analysed using likelihood ratio tests. Results Among controls, longer age-adjusted RTL was associated with higher vegetable intake (p=0.01). Individuals with longer age-adjusted RTL (based on median value) were 30% less likely to have hypertension (OR=0.70, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.96; p=0.03). The observed RTL-hypertension relationship appeared to be modified by vegetable intake—longer RTL was significantly associated with lower hypertension risk only in those with greater vegetable consumption (OR=0.28, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.57; p<0.001), but not in those with lower vegetable intake (P-interaction=0.008). Conclusions Certain dietary factors might modify telomere-related hypertension risk. PMID:26560064

  15. Analyses of leucocytes in blood and lymphoid tissues from mink infected with Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (AMDV).

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Aasted, B

    1998-06-12

    Mink were infected with Aleutian Mink Disease Parvovirus (AMDV) and sacrificed at monthly intervals after infection. During this time humoral immune responses and leucocyte numbers in blood, mesenteric lymph node, spleen and thymus were monitored. Serum hypergammaglobulinaemia was observed together with elevated antibody responses to AMDV NS1 and VP1/2 proteins. In blood, a highly significant increase in CD8+ lymphocytes was observed. However, (presumed)CD4+ cells defined as CD3+CD8- cells, and B lymphocytes remained relatively constant throughout the study. The (presumed)CD4+/CD8+ ratio decreased significantly from greater than 2 to less than 0.5 and MHC-II+ blood leucocytes increased significantly during infection, a large proportion of these being CD8+. Similar changes were observed in the mesenteric lymph node and spleen. Immunohistology of lymph nodes showed a massive expansion of the paracortical area due to increased numbers of CD8+ cells. The staining intensity of B lymphocytes in lymph nodes with a CD79a reactive monoclonal antibody was decreased in the late infection, indicating a possible greater number of plasma cells. Thymic involution was observed during the AMDV infection, although relative increases in CD3high (presumed)CD4+ and CD3highCD8+ single positive cells were observed. These increases were countered by a corresponding reduction in the CD3low(presumed)CD4+CD8+ double positive cell population. Immunohistology of the thymus in normal mink showed that most of the matured CD3+ T cells were present in the inner medulla, while only few CD3+ cells could be found in the outer cortex. In severely infected mink the thymic structural organisation vanished, and CD3+ cells were found throughout the organ. PMID:9656422

  16. A FIRE-ACE/SHEBA Case Study of Mixed-Phase Arctic Boundary Layer Clouds: Entrainment Rate Limitations on Rapid Primary Ice Nucleation Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridlin, Ann; vanDiedenhoven, Bastiaan; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; Mrowiec, Agnieszka; Morrison, Hugh; Zuidema, Paquita; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of long-lived mixed-phase Arctic boundary layer clouds on 7 May 1998 during the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment (FIRE)Arctic Cloud Experiment (ACE)Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) campaign provide a unique opportunity to test understanding of cloud ice formation. Under the microphysically simple conditions observed (apparently negligible ice aggregation, sublimation, and multiplication), the only expected source of new ice crystals is activation of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN) and the only sink is sedimentation. Large-eddy simulations with size-resolved microphysics are initialized with IN number concentration N(sub IN) measured above cloud top, but details of IN activation behavior are unknown. If activated rapidly (in deposition, condensation, or immersion modes), as commonly assumed, IN are depleted from the well-mixed boundary layer within minutes. Quasi-equilibrium ice number concentration N(sub i) is then limited to a small fraction of overlying N(sub IN) that is determined by the cloud-top entrainment rate w(sub e) divided by the number-weighted ice fall speed at the surface v(sub f). Because w(sub c)< 1 cm/s and v(sub f)> 10 cm/s, N(sub i)/N(sub IN)<< 1. Such conditions may be common for this cloud type, which has implications for modeling IN diagnostically, interpreting measurements, and quantifying sensitivity to increasing N(sub IN) (when w(sub e)/v(sub f)< 1, entrainment rate limitations serve to buffer cloud system response). To reproduce observed ice crystal size distributions and cloud radar reflectivities with rapidly consumed IN in this case, the measured above-cloud N(sub IN) must be multiplied by approximately 30. However, results are sensitive to assumed ice crystal properties not constrained by measurements. In addition, simulations do not reproduce the pronounced mesoscale heterogeneity in radar reflectivity that is observed.

  17. Mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline: tridentate 3N primary ligands determine DNA binding and cleavage and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ganeshpandian, Mani; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Suresh, Eringathodi; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher

    2014-11-01

    A series of mononuclear mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(L)(2,9-dmp)](ClO4)21-4, where L is a tridentate 3N ligand such as diethylenetriamine (L1) (1) or N-methyl-N'-(pyrid-2-yl-methyl)ethylenediamine (L2) (2) or di(2-picolyl)amine (L3) (3) or bis(pyrid-2-ylmethyl)-N-methylamine (L4) (4) and 2,9-dmp is 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, has been isolated and characterized. The complexes 1 and 3 possess square-based pyramidal coordination geometry. Absorption spectral studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity varies as 1>2>3>4. The higher DNA binding affinity of 1 arises from L1, which offers lower steric hindrance toward intercalation of 2,9-dmp co-ligand into DNA base pairs and is involved in hydrogen bonding interaction with DNA. Interestingly, all the complexes cleave pUC19 supercoiled DNA in the absence of an activating agent. They also exhibit oxidative (H2O2) DNA cleavage ability, which varies as 1>2>3>4, the highest cleavage efficiency of 1 being due to the largest amount of ROS it generates. The tryptophan emission-quenching experiment reveals that the stronger binding of 3 and 4 with bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the hydrophobic region, which is in line with DNA viscosity measurements. The IC50 values of 1-4 for MCF-7 breast cancer cell line are lower than that of cisplatin. Flow cytometry analysis reveals that 1 mediates the arrest of S and G2/M phases in the cell cycle progression at 24h harvesting time, which progresses into apoptosis. Hoechst 33258 staining studies indicate the higher potency of 1 to induce apoptosis.

  18. A Web-Based Clinical Decision Support Tool for Primary Health Care Management of Back Pain: Development and Mixed Methods Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher; Holbrook, Rachel; Lindner, Robyn; Reeve, James; Das, Anurina; Maher, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with back pain do not receive health care in accordance with best practice recommendations. Implementation trials to address this issue have had limited success. Despite the known effectiveness of clinical decision support systems (CDSS), none of these are available for back pain management. Objective The objective of our study was to develop a Web-based CDSS to support Australian general practitioners (GPs) to diagnose and manage back pain according to guidelines. Methods Asking a panel of international experts to review recommendations for sixteen clinical vignettes validated the tool. It was then launched nationally as part of National Pain Week and promoted to GPs via a media release and clinic based visits. Following this, a mixed methods evaluation was conducted to determine tool feasibility, acceptability, and utility. The 12 month usage data were analyzed, and in-depth, semistructured interviews with 20 GPs were conducted to identify barriers and enablers to uptake. Results The tool had acceptable face validity when reviewed by experts. Over a 12 month period there were 7125 website visits with 4503 (63.20%) unique users. Assuming most unique users are GPs, around one quarter of the country’s GPs may have used the tool at least once. Although usage was high, GP interviews highlighted the sometimes complex nature of management where the tool may not influence care. Conversely, several “touch-points”, whereby the tool may exert its influence, were identified, most notably patient engagement. Conclusions A novel CDSS tool has the potential to assist with evidence-based management of back pain. A clinical trial is required to determine its impact on practitioner and patient outcomes. PMID:24694921

  19. User Manuals for a Primary Care Electronic Medical Record System: A Mixed Methods Study of User- and Vendor-Generated Documents

    PubMed Central

    Dow, Rustam; Barnsley, Jan; Tu, Karen; Domb, Sharon; Jadad, Alejandro R.; Lemieux-Charles, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Research problem Tutorials and user manuals are important forms of impersonal support for using software applications including electronic medical records (EMRs). Differences between user- and vendor documentation may indicate support needs, which are not sufficiently addressed by the official documentation, and reveal new elements that may inform the design of tutorials and user manuals. Research question What are the differences between user-generated tutorials and manuals for an EMR and the official user manual from the software vendor? Literature review Effective design of tutorials and user manuals requires careful packaging of information, balance between declarative and procedural texts, an action and task-oriented approach, support for error recognition and recovery, and effective use of visual elements. No previous research compared these elements between formal and informal documents. Methodology We conducted an mixed methods study. Seven tutorials and two manuals for an EMR were collected from three family health teams and compared with the official user manual from the software vendor. Documents were qualitatively analyzed using a framework analysis approach in relation to the principles of technical documentation described above. Subsets of the data were quantitatively analyzed using cross-tabulation to compare the types of error information and visual cues in screen captures between user- and vendor-generated manuals. Results and discussion The user-developed tutorials and manuals differed from the vendor-developed manual in that they contained mostly procedural and not declarative information; were customized to the specific workflow, user roles, and patient characteristics; contained more error information related to work processes than to software usage; and used explicit visual cues on screen captures to help users identify window elements. These findings imply that to support EMR implementation, tutorials and manuals need to be customized and

  20. [Effects of selective cutting on the carbon density and net primary productivity of a mixed broadleaved-Korean pine forest in Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Hui-Ying; Jin, Guang-Ze

    2013-10-01

    To accurately quantify forest carbon density and net primary productivity (NPP) is of great significance in estimating the role of forest ecosystems in global carbon cycle. By using the forest inventory and allometry approaches, this paper measured the carbon density and NPP of the virgin broadleaved-Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) forest and of the broadleaved-Korean pine forest after 34 years selective-cutting (the cutting intensity was 30%, and the cutting trees were in large diameter class). The total carbon density of the virgin and selective-cutting broadleaved-Korean pine forests was (397.95 +/- 93.82) and (355.61 +/- 59.37) t C x hm(-2), respectively. In the virgin forest, the carbon density of the vegetation, debris, and soil accounted for 31.0%, 3.1%, and 65.9% of the total carbon pool, respectively; in the selective-cutting forest, the corresponding values were 31.7%, 2.9%, and 65.4%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the total carbon density and the carbon density of each component between the two forests. The total NPP of the virgin and selective-cutting forests was (36.27 +/- 0.36) and (6.35 +/- 0.70) t C x hm(-2) x a(-1), among which, the NPP of overstory, understory, and fine roots in virgin forest and selective-cutting forest accounted for 60.3%, 2.0%, and 37.7%, and 66.1%, 2.0%, and 31.2%, respectively. No significant differences were observed in the total NPP and the contribution rate of each component between the two forests. However, the ratios of the needle and broadleaf NPPs of the virgin and selective-cutting forests were 47.24:52.76 and 20.48:79.52, respectively, with a significant difference. The results indicated that the carbon density and NPP of the broadleaved-Korean pine forest after 34 years selective-cutting recovered to the levels of the virgin broadleaved-Korean pine forest.

  1. Gamma ray induced DNA damage in human and mouse leucocytes measured by SCGE-Pro: a software developed for automated image analysis and data processing for Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, R C; Bhilwade, H N; Rajagopalan, R; Bannur, S V

    2001-02-20

    The studies reported in this communication had two major objectives: first to validate the in-house developed SCGE-Pro: a software developed for automated image analysis and data processing for Comet assay using human peripheral blood leucocytes exposed to radiation doses, viz. 2, 4 and 8 Gy, which are known to produce DNA/chromosome damage using alkaline Comet assay. The second objective was to investigate the effect of gamma radiation on DNA damage in mouse peripheral blood leucocytes using identical doses and experimental conditions, e.g. lyses, electrophoretic conditions and duration of electrophoresis which are known to affect tail moment (TM) and tail length (TL) of comets. Human and mouse whole blood samples were irradiated with different doses of gamma rays, e.g. 2, 4 and 8 Gy at a dose rate of 0.668Gy/min between 0 and 4 degrees C in air. After lyses, cells were electrophorased under alkaline conditions at pH 13, washed and stained with propidium iodide. Images of the cells were acquired and analyzed using in-house developed imaging software, SCGE-Pro, for Comet assay. For each comet, total fluorescence, tail fluorescence and tail length were measured. Increase in TM and TL was considered as the criteria of DNA damage. Analysis of data revealed heterogeneity in the response of leucocytes to gamma ray induced DNA damage both in human as well as in mouse. A wide variation in TM and TL was observed in control and irradiated groups of all the three donors. Data were analyzed for statistical significance using one-way ANOVA. Though a small variation in basal level of TM and TL was observed amongst human and mouse controls, the differences were not statistically significant. A dose-dependent increase in TM (P<0.001) and TL (P<0.001) was obtained at all the radiation doses (2-8 Gy) both in human and mouse leucocytes. However, there was a difference in the nature of dose response curves for human and mouse leucocytes. In human leucocytes, a linear increase in TM

  2. Levels of expression of complement regulatory proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 on resting and activated human peripheral blood leucocytes

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, Stephen E; de la Mata Espinosa, Claudia T; Halliday, Deborah; Buxton, Cheryl A; Cummerson, Joanne A; Johnson, Peter M

    2006-01-01

    The cell surface complement regulatory (CReg) proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 are widely expressed on human lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells. This study aimed to compare systematically levels of CReg expression by different leucocyte subsets and to determine whether levels were increased following activation in vitro. Levels of each CReg protein were similar on freshly isolated monocytes and all major lymphocyte subsets, except that CD4+ cells expressed significantly less CD46 than CD8+ cells (P < 0·05) while the reverse was observed for CD55 (P < 0·02). CD56+ cells, predominantly natural killer cells, expressed significantly lower levels of CD59 than T cells (P < 0·02). CD45RO+ cells had higher levels of surface CD46 and CD59, but lower levels of CD55, than CD45RO– cells (P < 0·02); CD25+ cells also expressed significantly less CD55 than CD25− cells (P < 0·002). Neutrophils expressed higher levels of CD59, but lower levels of CD55, than monocytes. Following activation with phytohaemagglutinin, CD46 was up-regulated on all leucocyte subsets with the exception of CD56+ cells. Both CD55 and CD59 were also markedly up-regulated on monocytes, and CD55 expression was greater on CD8+ than CD4+ cells following activation (P < 0·02). Lipopolysaccharide treatment did not significantly alter B-cell expression of CReg proteins whereas CD55 and CD59, but not CD46, were significantly up-regulated on monocytes (P < 0·02). These observations that CReg proteins are up-regulated on certain activated leucocyte subsets indicate that levels would be increased following immune responses in vivo. This could enhance both protection against local complement activation at inflammatory sites and also the immunoregulatory properties of these leucocytes. PMID:16999828

  3. Levels of expression of complement regulatory proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 on resting and activated human peripheral blood leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Stephen E; de la Mata Espinosa, Claudia T; Halliday, Deborah; Buxton, Cheryl A; Cummerson, Joanne A; Johnson, Peter M

    2006-12-01

    The cell surface complement regulatory (CReg) proteins CD46, CD55 and CD59 are widely expressed on human lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells. This study aimed to compare systematically levels of CReg expression by different leucocyte subsets and to determine whether levels were increased following activation in vitro. Levels of each CReg protein were similar on freshly isolated monocytes and all major lymphocyte subsets, except that CD4(+) cells expressed significantly less CD46 than CD8(+) cells (P < 0.05) while the reverse was observed for CD55 (P < 0.02). CD56(+) cells, predominantly natural killer cells, expressed significantly lower levels of CD59 than T cells (P < 0.02). CD45RO(+) cells had higher levels of surface CD46 and CD59, but lower levels of CD55, than CD45RO(-) cells (P < 0.02); CD25(+) cells also expressed significantly less CD55 than CD25(-) cells (P < 0.002). Neutrophils expressed higher levels of CD59, but lower levels of CD55, than monocytes. Following activation with phytohaemagglutinin, CD46 was up-regulated on all leucocyte subsets with the exception of CD56(+) cells. Both CD55 and CD59 were also markedly up-regulated on monocytes, and CD55 expression was greater on CD8(+) than CD4(+) cells following activation (P < 0.02). Lipopolysaccharide treatment did not significantly alter B-cell expression of CReg proteins whereas CD55 and CD59, but not CD46, were significantly up-regulated on monocytes (P < 0.02). These observations that CReg proteins are up-regulated on certain activated leucocyte subsets indicate that levels would be increased following immune responses in vivo. This could enhance both protection against local complement activation at inflammatory sites and also the immunoregulatory properties of these leucocytes.

  4. Colostral proteins from cows immunised with Streptococcus mutans/S. sobrinus support the phagocytosis and killing of mutans streptococci by human leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Loimaranta, V; Nuutila, J; Marnila, P; Tenovuo, J; Korhonen, H; Lilius, E M

    1999-10-01

    Passive immunisation, based on bovine colostral preparations, is an area of active research. Specific bovine antibodies inhibit the virulence factors of target pathogens but the interactions between whey preparations and human immune defence cells are not well known. Bovine colostrum inhibits the phagocytic activity of bovine leucocytes and this may reflect the biological activity of immunoglobulins in it. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the effects of bovine whey protein preparations from the colostrum of Streptococcus mutans/S. sobrinus-immunised and sham-immunised cows on binding, ingestion and killing of these bacteria by human leucocytes. Binding and ingestion of FITC-labelled bacteria were estimated by flow cytometry and leukocyte activation was measured as chemiluminescence. Killing rate was estimated by plate counting and by measuring bioluminescence from S. mutans- containing the insect luciferase gene. Colostral whey protein preparation from hyperimmunised cows activated human leucocytes by opsonising specific bacteria. Neutrophils, eosinophils and monocytes weakly phagocytosed non-opsonised bacteria and bacteria opsonised with control product. On the contrary, binding and ingestion were efficient in the presence of the preparation from immunised cows. Thus, these results show that bovine colostral whey proteins are able to support the activation of human phagocytes against pathogenic microbes and that this property is related to specific antibodies in whey preparations. These whey proteins may also be clinically useful, especially in preventing the colonisation of newly erupted teeth by mutans streptococci.

  5. The effect of different isolation procedures on canine leucocyte populations and on lectin-induced lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, T; de Rooster, H; van Bree, H; Cox, E

    2005-11-01

    Proliferation assays performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are commonly used in experimental and clinical immunology. A prerequisite for an in vitro assay is the ability to obtain relatively pure populations of mononuclear cells from whole blood, as contaminating polymorphonuclear cells may affect the proliferation of lymphocytes. Purification of canine leucocytes from whole blood is associated with difficulties in obtaining pure lymphocytes in high yields. The aim of this study was to optimize the lymphocyte purification from canine whole blood in terms of total cell recovery and purity, while not influencing the proliferation capacity of the isolated cells. To acquire optimal isolation of canine lymphocytes several density gradient media of different densities and osmolalities were examined. For optimal phagocyte removal, pre-treatment of whole blood with carbonyl iron/arabic gum and/or adherence to fibrinogen pre-coated polystyrene tissue flasks were examined. Lectin-induced proliferation was used as measurement of cell activity of the obtained cell fractions after the different separation procedures. Canine blood pre-treated with carbonyl iron/arabic gum followed by density gradient centrifugation with medium 'G' (density: 1.079 g/cm(3), osmolality: 256 mOsm) and adherence to pre-coated polystyrene tissue flask obtained the best PBMC cultures with a median lymphocyte purity of 88% and a median yield of recovered lymphocytes of 54%. This culture also resulted in the highest proliferation and subsequently the highest stimulation index upon lectin stimulation. PMID:16268957

  6. Recruitment of 99m-technetium- or 111-indium-labelled polymorphonuclear leucocytes in experimentally induced pyogranulomas in lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Guilloteau, L.; Pepin, M.; Pardon, P.; Le Pape, A. )

    1990-10-01

    The recruitment of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) during the development of experimental pyogranulomas induced by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis was followed in nine male lambs by scintigraphic examination. Autologous blood PMNs were labelled with 99m-technetium or 111-indium and were re-injected intravenously into infected lambs. The functional properties of the labelled cells were monitored (1) in vitro by measuring their phagocytic and bactericidal activity against C. pseudotuberculosis and their chemotaxis under agarose, and (2) in vivo by following scintigraphically their capacity to accumulate in an inflammatory focus induced by intradermal injection of latex beads coated with Salmonella abortus equi lipopolysaccharide. Following inoculation of corynebacteria into the right ear of lambs, radioactive foci were observed to be localized in the right ear and in the draining lymph nodes during the 4 days following inoculation. Histopathological examination performed 32 h after inoculation confirmed the intense accumulation of PMNs at these sites. With the exception of one animal, which presented visible foci in the neck 14 days postinoculation, no radioactive foci were observed during the later phases of experimental infection, despite the presence of multiple pyogranulomas which were confirmed by bacteriological examination after necropsy of the lambs. Histopathological examination of these lesions revealed layers of fibroblasts, lymphocytes, and macrophages surrounding a necrotic centre. The results of these studies suggest that the contribution of PMNs during the chronic phase of inflammation is considerably reduced in comparison with the acute inflammatory phase of the infectious process.

  7. The differential effects of aspirin on platelets, leucocytes and vascular endothelium in an in vivo model of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Y; Tsujioka, Y; Hashimoto, M; Giddings, J C; Yamamoto, J

    1999-02-01

    Unanswered questions remain with regard to the therapeutic use of aspirin and the selective inhibition of thromboxane A2 and prostacyclin in platelets and endothelial cells. In the present study, the effects of aspirin on platelets and endothelial cells in vivo were examined using a helium-neon (He-Ne) laser-induced thrombosis model. Single intravenous injections of aspirin at concentrations of more than 0.5 mg/kg body weight mediated a dose dependent inhibition of thrombus formation in arterioles but not in venules. This antithrombotic effect was optimum after 15 min and declined after 90 min. Potent antithrombotic activity in arterioles was manifest at doses of 2.5 mg/kg to 50 mg/kg, and initial inhibition of thrombogenesis in vivo was most pronounced at high doses. Oral aspirin also inhibited thrombus formation in arterioles but not in venules, although the antithrombotic effects were delayed and prolonged. Maximum inhibition of ex vivo, collagen induced platelet aggregation by aspirin was observed approximately 180 min after intravenous injection. The results demonstrated that, although aspirin might have differential effects on platelets and endothelial cells, potent antithrombotic activity was manifest in arterioles at all concentrations. The findings suggest that the concept of the aspirin dilemma might be ignored for therapeutic purposes in many clinical circumstances. The antithrombotic effects of aspirin were unchanged in granulocyte-depleted animals, indicating that leucocyte-related mechanisms including neutrophil superoxide anion production did not modulate the potency of aspirin in this model. PMID:10197261

  8. Primary meningococcal conjunctivitis: an unusual case of transmission by saliva.

    PubMed

    Dryden, Alexander W S; Rana, Mrinal; Pandey, Pravin

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old diabetic man presented with a 2-day history of a painful right eye associated with a purulent discharge. Prior to becoming symptomatic, he reported that someone spat at him, resulting in direct contact between the saliva and his affected eye. Gram stain revealed numerous leucocytes with Gram-negative diplococci, and culture yielded Neisseria meningitidis (serogroup C). There was no evidence of any systemic infection, and blood cultures were negative for any growth. He was treated for primary meningococcal conjunctivitis (PMC) with intensive topical antibiotic eyedrops as well as systemic antibiotics. One week after commencing treatment he remained systemically well and his symptoms had fully resolved. PMID:27330479

  9. Characterisation of pleural inflammation occurring after primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, A; Vanderlinden, E; Demanet, C; De Waele, M; Goossens, A; Noppen, M

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the inflammatory reaction occurring in the pleural space of patients suffering from primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) using pleural lavage, which was performed in patients with PSP and in healthy control subjects (essential hyperhidrosis patients undergoing thoracoscopy for sympathicolysis treatment). Cellular and solute composition of lavage fluid, peripheral blood and parietal pleural biopsies were analysed. PSP lavage fluid showed an increase in all differentiated leucocytes, but most strikingly eosinophils and neutrophils. In the blood of patients with PSP, the total number of leucocytes and the absolute number of eosinophils, neutrophils and monocytes were also significantly increased. The time in which air was present in the pleural space was positively correlated with the increase of eosinophils in lavage fluid, parietal pleura and blood. Eosinophilic cationic protein was elevated after PSP and strongly correlated with the absolute number of lavage eosinophils. Chemo and cytokine analysis in lavage fluid showed differences in concentrations of interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p40, tumour necrosis factor-alpha and RANTES, but not of eotaxin. Surprisingly, high levels of lipopolysaccharide binding protein were also measured. Primary spontaneous pnumothorax is associated with a substantial pleural inflammatory reaction. The authors hypothesise that mechanical stretch factors, lipopolysaccharide binding protein/lipopolysaccharide complexes or other environmental components trigger pleural inflammation after primary spontaneous pnumothorax. PMID:15219004

  10. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis: correlation with respiratory atopy.

    PubMed

    Sawai, T; Ikai, K; Uehara, M

    1998-05-01

    We determined the cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear leucocytes from 100 patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) aged 13-57 years (mean +/- SD, 29.8 +/- 17.7 years). The correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and clinical parameters such as the severity of eczema and a personal or family predisposition to atopic respiratory diseases (ARD) (asthma or allergic rhinitis) was examined. Although the enzymic activity varied from normal to very high in the AD patients, cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.005) elevated in AD patients (42.1 +/- 22.0 units) as compared with the normal controls (12.4 +/- 5.6) and clinical control subjects (13.4 +/- 9.5). In contrast, we found no correlation between cAMP-PDE activity and the severity of eczema when AD patients were classified into four categories (remission, mild, moderate and severe) according to the extent of their skin involvement. Furthermore, we found that systemic corticosteroid therapy in severe AD patients did not alter the cAMP-PDE activity. cAMP-PDE activity was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in those AD patients who had a personal history of ARD (47.2 +/- 11.2) than in AD patients with a family history of ARD (37.2 +/- 17.4) and those without a personal or family history ('pure' AD) (34.4 +/- 19.8). Nevertheless, the cAMP-PDE activity was significantly higher even in 'pure' AD patients than in the controls. These results suggest that an elevation of cAMP-PDE activity is closely related to a predisposition to respiratory atopy, and does not follow inflammation in AD patients. PMID:9666832

  11. Protective Human Leucocyte Antigen Haplotype, HLA-DRB1*01-B*14, against Chronic Chagas Disease in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto, Florencia; Nishizawa, Juan Eiki; Kikuchi, Mihoko; Roca, Yelin; Avilas, Cinthia; Gianella, Alberto; Lora, Javier; Velarde, Freddy Udalrico Gutierrez; Miura, Sachio; Komiya, Norihiro; Maemura, Koji; Hirayama, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the flagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi affects 8–10 million people in Latin America. The mechanisms that underlie the development of complications of chronic Chagas disease, characterized primarily by pathology of the heart and digestive system, are not currently understood. To identify possible host genetic factors that may influence the clinical course of Chagas disease, Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) regional gene polymorphism was analyzed in patients presenting with differing clinical symptoms. Methodology Two hundred and twenty nine chronic Chagas disease patients in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, were examined by serological tests, electrocardiogram (ECG), and Barium enema colon X-ray. 31.4% of the examinees showed ECG alterations, 15.7% megacolon and 58.1% showed neither of them. A further 62 seropositive megacolon patients who had undergone colonectomy due to acute abdomen were recruited. We analyzed their HLA genetic polymorphisms (HLA-A, HLA-B, MICA, MICB, DRB1 and TNF-alpha promoter region) mainly through Sequence based and LABType SSO typing test using LUMINEX Technology. Principal Findings The frequencies of HLA-DRB1*01 and HLA-B*14:02 were significantly lower in patients suffering from megacolon as well as in those with ECG alteration and/or megacolon compared with a group of patients with indeterminate symptoms. The DRB1*0102, B*1402 and MICA*011 alleles were in strong Linkage Disequilibrium (LD), and the HLA-DRB1*01-B*14-MICA*011haplotype was associated with resistance against chronic Chagas disease. Conclusions This is the first report of HLA haplotype association with resistance to chronic Chagas disease. PMID:22448298

  12. Relationship between plasma 25-hydroxymitamin D and leucocyte telomere length by sex and race in a US study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jason J; Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Linet, Martha S; Little, Mark P; Dagnall, Casey L; Higson, Herbert; Savage, Sharon A; Freedman, D Michal

    2016-09-01

    A few studies have examined the association between vitamin D and telomere length, and fewer still have examined the relationship in black or male populations. We investigated the cross-sectional association between the vitamin D metabolite 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration in plasma and relative leucocyte telomere length (LTL) in 1154 US radiologic technologists who were 48-93 years old (373 white females, 278 white males, 338 black females, 165 black males). Plasma 25(OH)D concentration was measured by the chemiluminescence immunoassay, and relative LTL was measured by quantitative PCR. Logistic regression was used to obtain OR and 95 % CI for long v. short (based on median) LTL in relation to continuous 25(OH)D, quartiles of 25(OH)D and 25(OH)D deficiency. We found no significant association between continuous 25(OH)D and long LTL in all participants (P trend=0·440), nor in white females (P trend=0·845), white males (P trend=0·636), black females (P trend=0·967) or black males (P trend=0·484). Vitamin D deficiency (defined as 25(OH)D<30 nmol/l), however, was significantly associated with short LTL in whites (P=0·024), but not in other groups. In this population, we found little evidence to support associations between 25(OH)D and long LTL over the entire range of 25(OH)D in the overall study population or by sex and race. PMID:27515444

  13. Mixed waste characterization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.E.; Stakebake, J.; Peters, M.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive mixed wastes containing a radioactive component subject to the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and hazardous waste subject to resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are generated, treated, and stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and are subject to federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) are the two primary regulatory agencies which enforce these requirements. This paper describes the mechanism by which RFP will characterize mixed wastes within the LDR provisions of RCRA and the LDR FFCA as well as for meeting the waste acceptance criteria for disposal.

  14. Mixed waste characterization strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.E.; Stakebake, J.; Peters, M.

    1992-08-01

    Radioactive mixed wastes containing a radioactive component subject to the Atomic Energy Act (AEA) and hazardous waste subject to resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are generated, treated, and stored at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) and are subject to federal and state statutory and regulatory requirements. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Colorado Department of Health (CDH) are the two primary regulatory agencies which enforce these requirements. This paper describes the mechanism by which RFP will characterize mixed wastes within the LDR provisions of RCRA and the LDR FFCA as well as for meeting the waste acceptance criteria for disposal.

  15. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  16. Leucocytes isolated from simply frozen whole blood can be used in human biomonitoring for DNA damage measurement with the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Akor-Dewu, Maryam B; El Yamani, Naouale; Bilyk, Olena; Holtung, Linda; Tjelle, Torunn E; Blomhoff, Rune; Collins, Andrew R

    2014-04-01

    Preservation of human blood cells for DNA damage analysis with the comet assay conventionally involves the isolation of mononuclear cells by centrifugation, suspension in freezing medium and slow freezing to -80 °C-a laborious process. A recent publication (Al-Salmani et al. Free Rad Biol Med 2011; 51: 719-725) describes a simple method in which small volumes of whole blood are frozen to -20 or -80 °C; on subsequent thawing, the comet assay is performed, with no indication of elevated DNA strand breakage resulting from the rapid freezing. However, leucocytes in whole blood (whether fresh or frozen) are abnormally resistant to damage by H2 O2 , and so a common test of antioxidant status (resistance to strand breakage by H2 O2 ) cannot be used. We have refined this method by separating the leucocytes from the thawed blood; we find that, after three washes, the cells respond normally to H2 O2 . In addition, we have measured specific endogenous base damage (oxidized purines) in the isolated leucocytes, using the enzyme formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. In a study of blood samples from 10 subjects, H2 O2 sensitivity and endogenous damage-both reflecting the antioxidant status of the cells-correlated significantly. This modified approach to sample collection and storage is particularly applicable when the available volume of blood is limited and has great potential in biomonitoring and ecogenotoxicology studies where samples are obtained in the field or at sites remote from the testing laboratory.

  17. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  18. Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Arthur L.; Krawza, Kenneth I.

    1997-01-01

    In a hydraulically powered pump for excavating and transporting slurries in hich it is immersed, the improvement of a gravel and cobble eductor including an expandable mixing section, comprising: a primary flow conduit that terminates in a nozzle that creates a water jet internal to a tubular mixing section of the pump when water pressure is applied from a primary supply flow; a tubular mixing section having a center line in alignment with the nozzle that creates a water jet; a mixing section/exit diffuser column that envelopes the flexible liner; and a secondary inlet conduit that forms an opening at a bas portion of the column and adjacent to the nozzle and water jet to receive water saturated gravel as a secondary flow that mixes with the primary flow inside of the mixing section to form a combined total flow that exits the mixing section and decelerates in the exit diffuser.

  19. Leucocyte profiles and H/L ratios in chicks of Red-tailed Tropicbirds reflect the ontogeny of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Dehnhard, Nina; Quillfeldt, Petra; Hennicke, Janos C

    2011-07-01

    Immune defence is fundamentally important for the survival prospects of young animals. While innate immunity offers initial protection from a variety of pathogens, acquired immunity responds more specifically to pathogens, but is considered to be more costly and to respond slower. Moreover, the acquired immunity is not yet fully developed in neonatal chicks. Little is known about the ontogeny of the immune system of wild birds. Long-lived seabirds, with their slow chick development, are good models to investigate how young birds invest in both arms of their immune system. We determined leucocyte profiles and heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratios of Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaeton rubricauda westralis) on Christmas Island, Indian Ocean. Young chicks (N = 10) had significantly higher H/L ratios than older chicks (N = 19), while adults (N = 47) showed intermediate values and did not differ from either chick age class. High H/L ratios in young chicks were caused by high initial numbers of heterophils per 10,000 erythrocytes that declined with age. In contrast, the number of lymphocytes per 10,000 erythrocytes was similar for young and older chicks. These data suggest that young chicks invested heavily in innate immunity to protect themselves from pathogens, while investment into acquired immunity became more important in older chicks with a functional acquired immune response. Body condition did not have a significant influence on any leucocyte parameter.

  20. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 19 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  1. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 10 rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  2. A robust rabbit line increases leucocyte counts at weaning and reduces mortality by digestive disorder during fattening.

    PubMed

    García-Quirós, A; Arnau-Bonachera, A; Penadés, M; Cervera, C; Martínez-Paredes, E; Ródenas, L; Selva, L; Viana, D; Corpa, J M; Pascual, J J

    2014-10-15

    The present work evaluates how a rabbit line selected for robustness and two other lines selected for productive criteria, could have affected the physiological maturity and blood leukocytes counts of young rabbits at weaning, as well as their possible effect on the subsequent performance and health status during the growing period. The study was conducted on a total of 2904 young rabbits weaned at 30 days, belonging to three different genetic types (line H, founded for litter size at birth and selected for litter size at weaning during 17 generations; line LP, characterised by robustness founded for reproductive longevity criteria and selected for litter size at weaning for 7 generations; and line R, founded and selected during 25 generations for average daily gain from the 4th to the 9th week of life). Two different diets were used during lactation. The two diets were both isoenergetic and isoprotein but their main energy source differed, being either animal fat (AF) or cereal starch (CS). Leucocyte subsets were characterised at weaning, and growing performance was studied until 58 days of age (feed intake, live weight, mortality by digestive disorders and morbidity) for both medicated and non-medicated dietary versions. At weaning, young rabbits fed an AF lactating diet evidenced greater B lymphocyte count (on av. +8.6 ± 3.5 × 10(6)/L; P < 0.05) than those fed a CS diet. With respect to H and R rabbits, blood from LP ones had higher counts for total (on av. 591 ± 167 × 10(6)/L; P < 0.05), B (on av. +11.05 ± 4.3 × 10(6)/L; P < 0.05), T CD5(+) (on av. +266 ± 83 × 10(6)/L; P < 0.05) and CD8(+) lymphocytes (on av. +72.5 ± 28 × 10(6)/L; P < 0.05), and with respect to R, higher counts of CD4(+) (on av. +121 ± 47 × 10(6)/L; P < 0.05) lymphocytes (on av. +12.3 ± 4.1 × 10(6)/L; P < 0.05), monocytes (on av. +66 ± 32 × 10(6)/L; P < 0.05) and granulocytes (on av. +567 ± 182 × 10(6)/L; P<0.05) at weaning. LP line rabbits also showed lower mortality by

  3. Diffuse expression of PAX2 and PAX8 in the cystic epithelium of mixed epithelial stromal tumor, angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts, and primary renal synovial sarcoma: evidence supporting renal tubular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Karafin, Matthew; Parwani, Anil V; Netto, Georges J; Illei, Peter B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ladanyi, Marc; Argani, Pedram

    2011-09-01

    Over the past decade, 3 novel, typically cystic renal neoplasms have been described: angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts (AMLEC), mixed epithelial stromal tumor (MEST), and primary renal synovial sarcoma (SS). In all 3 neoplasms, the nature of the cystic epithelium is not clear; some have postulated that the cysts represent cystically dilated, entrapped renal tubular epithelium, whereas an alternative interpretation is that the epithelium represents epithelial differentiation by the stromal component of the neoplasm. The latter is supported by the extrarenal location of the epithelium in some cases. PAX2 and PAX8 are tissue-specific transcription factors expressed primarily in the renal and Müllerian systems and also in Wolffian duct structures (such as seminal vesicle). Their expression has not been examined in these lesions. We performed PAX2 and PAX8 immunohistochemistry on representative sections of cases of AMLEC (8 cases), MEST (8 cases), and renal SS (3 cases). The relative percentage and intensity (none, weak, moderate, and strong) of nuclear labeling were evaluated in both the benign adjacent renal tubules and the lesion's epithelial cysts. In the benign kidney, distal convoluted tubules (DCTs) labeled strongly for PAX2 and PAX8, whereas proximal convoluted tubules labeled minimally. The cystic epithelium of all 8 cases of AMLEC, including 5 that protruded beyond the renal capsule into the perirenal fat, demonstrated strong diffuse labeling for both PAX2 and PAX8. We also identified a mimic of entirely extrarenal AMLEC, angiomyolipoma with endosalpingiosis. PAX2 and PAX8 diffusely and strongly labeled the epithelial component of all 8 cases of MEST, including all architectural (phyllodes-like, large cysts, small cysts, clustered microcysts) and virtually all cytologic (hobnail, flat, cuboidal, columnar, apocrine, and clear cell) epithelial variants present. The epithelial cysts of all 3 cases of primary renal SS labeled diffusely and strongly for PAX2

  4. CHARACTERIZING PULSATING MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the physical properties for defining the operation of a pulse jet mixing system. Pulse jet mixing operates with no moving parts located in the vessel to be mixed. Pulse tubes submerged in the vessel provide a pulsating flow due to a controlled combination of applied pressure to expel the fluid from the pulse tube nozzle followed by suction to refill the pulse tube through the same nozzle. For mixing slurries nondimensional parameters to define mixing operation include slurry properties, geometric properties and operational parameters. Primary parameters include jet Reynolds number and Froude number; alternate parameters may include particle Galileo number, particle Reynolds number, settling velocity ratio, and hindered settling velocity ratio. Rating metrics for system performance include just suspended velocity, concentration distribution as a function of elevation, and blend time.

  5. [Mixed cryoglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    Roque, R; Ramiro, S; Vinagre, F; Cordeiro, A; Godinho, F; Santos, Maria José; Gonçalves, P; Canas da Silva, J

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases of cryoglobulinemia. A 70 years old woman, having skin ulcers on lower limbs, arthralgias, paresthesias and constitutional symptoms, for about 10 months. Exams revealed mild anemia, elevation of the biological parameters of inflammation and aminotransferases, positive cryoglobulin and rheumatoid factor in serum, and a severe reduction in C4 complement fraction. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology was negative. Idiopathic mixed cryoglobulinemia was diagnosed and corticosteroid therapy started. Given the lack of response, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis were added. Two weeks later the patient died in septic shock. The second case refers to a 41 years old female, with untreated hepatitis C who developed over a 6 month period petechiae and livedoid lesions on the lower limbs, peripheral neuropathy, and constitutional symptoms and was admitted with intestinal necrosis. Exams were consistent with the diagnosis of mixed cryoglobulinemia associated, with HCV. She started therapy with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, with improvement. PMID:22113605

  6. Identification of peptides fromm foot-and-mouth disease virus structural proteins bound by class I swine leucocyte antigen (SLA) alleles, SLA-1*0401 and SLA-2*0401

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The analysis of peptide binding to porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has not been extensively performed. Critical to understanding the adaptive immune response of swine to infection is characterization of Swine Leucocyte Antigens (SLA) class I and class II peptide bind...

  7. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF): a second-generation platelet concentrate. Part III: leucocyte activation: a new feature for platelet concentrates?

    PubMed

    Dohan, David M; Choukroun, Joseph; Diss, Antoine; Dohan, Steve L; Dohan, Anthony J J; Mouhyi, Jaafar; Gogly, Bruno

    2006-03-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) belongs to a new generation of platelet concentrates, with simplified processing and without biochemical blood handling. In this third article, we investigate the immune features of this biomaterial. During PRF processing, leucocytes could also secrete cytokines in reaction to the hemostatic and inflammatory phenomena artificially induced in the centrifuged tube. We therefore undertook to quantify 5 significant cell mediators within platelet poor plasma supernatant and PRF clot exudate serum: 3 proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6, and TNF-alpha), an antiinflammatory cytokine (IL-4), and a key growth promoter of angiogenesis (VEGF). Our data are correlated with that obtained in plasma (nonactivated blood) and in sera (activated blood). These initial analyses revealed that PRF could be an immune regulation node with inflammation retrocontrol abilities. This concept could explain the reduction of postoperative infections when PRF is used as surgical additive.

  8. Testing for 'threads' and leucocyte esterase in first-void urine to exclude the diagnosis of non-specific urethritis in asymptomatic men.

    PubMed

    Pallawela, Sanjeeva N S; Sonnex, Christopher; Burdett, Julia; Cooper, Dawn; Nethercott, Katrina; Thomas, Catherina M; Goon, Peter; Webb, Hayley; Carne, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that asymptomatic nonspecific urethritis (NSU), which is not routinely tested for, is a clinically significant pathology.The aim of this pilot study was to determine if testing for urinary threads, leucocyte esterase (LE) or both in asymptomatic men is a good screening tool for NSU. Of the126 asymptomatic men, 8% met microscopic criteria for the diagnosis of NSU. The positive predictive value for NSU was 71% (95% confidence interval (CI): 29.3-95.5%) and the negative predictive value was 96% (95% CI: 92.8-99.5%). The absence of threads and negative LE makes urethritis highly unlikely, making urinary chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) and gonorrhoea (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) testing sufficient. Incidental findings of further pathology occurred in 7%.

  9. The human leucocyte antigen-G 14-basepair polymorphism correlates with graft-versus-host disease in unrelated bone marrow transplantation for thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    La Nasa, Giorgio; Littera, Roberto; Locatelli, Franco; Lai, Sara; Alba, Francesco; Caocci, Giovanni; Lisini, Daniela; Nesci, Sonia; Vacca, Adriana; Piras, Eugenia; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Di Cesare-Merlone, Alessandra; Orrù, Sandro; Carcassi, Carlo

    2007-10-01

    The presence of the 14-bp insertion polymorphism of the human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G gene (HLA-G) promotes immune tolerance through increased synthesis of HLA-G molecules. We investigated this polymorphism in a large cohort of 53 thalassaemia patients transplanted from an unrelated donor. Sixteen patients (30.2%) homozygous for the 14-bp deletion had a higher risk of developing acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD) than patients homozygous for the 14-bp insertion (-14-bp/-14-bp vs +14-bp/+14-bp: Relative Risk = 15.0; 95% confidence interval 1.59-141.24; P = 0.008). Therefore, the 14-bp polymorphism could be an important predictive factor for aGvHD following bone marrow transplantation. PMID:17897304

  10. Destruction of IgG anti-A sensitized erythrocytes by mononuclear leucocytes from normal and ABO haemolytic disease affected infants.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, E L; Rossi Devivo, M L; Soyano, A; Linares, J

    1984-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to investigate the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity of mononuclear leucocytes (MNL) from cord and healthy adult blood and that from infants with ABO haemolytic disease. The ADCC levels of MNL from both types of newborn blood were found to be higher than that of MNL from adult blood. The extent of ADCC was positively related to the degree of antibody sensitization of the red cells and to the effector cell target cell ratio. The ADCC activity was effected mainly by the adherent cell fraction and could be inhibited by cytochalasin B, hydrocortisone and also by high concentrations (more than 0.5 mg/ml) of non-specific free human IgG. Phagocytosis was also demonstrated to be an important mechanism in the destruction of IgG anti-A coated red cells by the MNL. PMID:6538121

  11. Testing for 'threads' and leucocyte esterase in first-void urine to exclude the diagnosis of non-specific urethritis in asymptomatic men.

    PubMed

    Pallawela, Sanjeeva N S; Sonnex, Christopher; Burdett, Julia; Cooper, Dawn; Nethercott, Katrina; Thomas, Catherina M; Goon, Peter; Webb, Hayley; Carne, Christopher

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that asymptomatic nonspecific urethritis (NSU), which is not routinely tested for, is a clinically significant pathology.The aim of this pilot study was to determine if testing for urinary threads, leucocyte esterase (LE) or both in asymptomatic men is a good screening tool for NSU. Of the126 asymptomatic men, 8% met microscopic criteria for the diagnosis of NSU. The positive predictive value for NSU was 71% (95% confidence interval (CI): 29.3-95.5%) and the negative predictive value was 96% (95% CI: 92.8-99.5%). The absence of threads and negative LE makes urethritis highly unlikely, making urinary chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) and gonorrhoea (Neisseria gonorrhoeae) testing sufficient. Incidental findings of further pathology occurred in 7%. PMID:24717166

  12. Role of adenosine deaminase, ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in cyanide-induced adenosine monophosphate catabolism in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Newby, A C

    1980-01-01

    1. The role of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) (EC 3.1.3.5) and ecto-(non-specific phosphatase) in the CN-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides in intact rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes was investigated by inhibiting the enzymes in situ. 2. KCN (10mM for 90 min) induced a 20-30% fall in ATP concentration accompanied by an approximately equimolar increase in hypoxanthine, ADP, AMP and adenosine concentrations were unchanged, and IMP and inosine remained undetectable ( less than 0.05 nmol/10(7) cells). 3. Cells remained 98% intact, as judged by loss of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27). 4. Pentostatin (30 microM), a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, completely inhibited hypoxanthine production from exogenous adenosine (55 microM), but did not black CN-induced hypoxanthine production or cause adenosine accumulation in intact cells. This implied that IMP rather than adenosine was an intermediate in AMP breakdown in response to cyanide. 5. Antibodies raised against purified plasma-membrane 5'-nucleotidase inhibited the ecto-(5'-nucleotidase) by 95-98%. Non-specific phosphatases were blocked by 10 mM-sodium beta-glycerophosphate. 6. These two agents together blocked hypoxanthine production from exogenous AMP and IMP (200 microM) by more than 90%, but had no effect on production from endogenous substrates. 7. These data suggest that ectophosphatases do not participate in CN-induced catabolism of intracellular AMP in rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 8. A minor IMPase, not inhibited by antiserum, was detected in the soluble fraction of disrupted cells. PMID:6249264

  13. TLR21's agonists in combination with Aeromonas antigens synergistically up-regulate functional TLR21 and cytokine gene expression in yellowtail leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Becerril, Martha; Ascencio-Valle, Felipe; Hirono, Ikuo; Kondo, Hidehiro; Jirapongpairoj, Walissara; Esteban, Maria Angeles; Alamillo, Erika; Angulo, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the TLR21 gene from yellowtail (Seriola lalandi) and its functional activity using TLR agonist stimulation and Aeromonas antigens. The TLR21 nucleotide sequence from yellowtail was obtained using the whole-genome shotgun sequencing method and bioinformatics tools. Basal TLR21 gene expression was analyzed in several tissues. Subsequently, the gene expression of TLR21 and cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α was evaluated in TLR agonist (CpG-ODN2006, LPS, and Poly I:C) exposing head kidney leucocytes, which were then subjected to Aeromonas antigen stimulation. The yellowtail full-length cDNA sequence of SlTLR21 was 3615 bp (980 aa) showing a high degree of similarity with the counterparts of other fish species and sharing the common structural architecture of the TLR family, including LRR domains, one C-terminal LRR region, and a TIR domain. Gene expression studies revealed the constitutive expression of TLR21 mRNA in all the analyzed tissues; the highest levels were observed in spleen and head kidney where they play an important role in the fish immune system. Transcripts of TLR21 and the downstream IL-1β and TNF-α cytokine genes were most strongly up-regulated after exposure to the TLR agonists following Aeromonas antigen stimulation, suggesting they are involved in immune response. The results indicated that TLR agonists, in combination with Aeromonas antigens in head kidney leucocytes, synergistically enhance TLR21 and cytokines in yellowtail. PMID:26987525

  14. Role of E- and P-selectin in migration of monocytes and polymorphonuclear leucocytes to cytokine and chemoattractant-induced cutaneous inflammation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, U M; Issekutz, A C

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of E- and P-selectin in the rat to the migration of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) and monocytes to acute dermal inflammation induced by a chemoattractant (C5ades Arg) or endothelial cell activating agents [lipopolysaccharide, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), alpha-thrombin and interferon-gamma] administered intradermally was investigated. Migration was quantitated using radiolabelled blood PMNL and monocytes and new, function-blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to rat E- and P-selectin were employed. Monocyte migration to inflamed skin was partially inhibited (40-75%) by P-selectin mAb with all stimuli tested, but not by anti-E-selectin. PMNL migration in response to all stimuli was also inhibited (50-75%) by blocking P-selectin, but in contrast to monocytes, PMNL accumulation was partially inhibited by mAb to E-selectin in alpha-thrombin and TNF-alpha lesions. When P-selectin was blocked by mAb, mAb to E-selectin significantly inhibited further (by 70-90%) both PMNL and monocyte accumulation in all lesions, indicating that both P- and E-selectin contribute to the migration of these leucocytes. Blocking L-selectin in addition to P- and E-selectin, had no effect on the remaining migration. Thus, optimal PMNL and monocyte migration to chemotactic factor- and cytokine-induced skin inflammation is P-selectin dependent. E-selectin becomes important, in most conditions used here, when P-selectin mediated recruitment is not operative. A selectin independent pathway likely mediates up to 20% of PMNL and monocyte migration to acute inflammation, at least in skin. Images Figure 5 PMID:9415039

  15. Molecular characterization of ten F8 splicing mutations in RNA isolated from patient's leucocytes: assessment of in silico prediction tools accuracy.

    PubMed

    Martorell, L; Corrales, I; Ramirez, L; Parra, R; Raya, A; Barquinero, J; Vidal, F

    2015-03-01

    Although 8% of reported FVIII gene (F8) mutations responsible for haemophilia A (HA) affect mRNA processing, very few have been fully characterized at the mRNA level and/or systematically predicted their biological consequences by in silico analysis. This study is aimed to elucidate the effect of potential splice site mutations (PSSM) on the F8 mRNA processing, investigate its correlation with disease severity, and assess their concordance with in silico predictions. We studied the F8 mRNA from 10 HA patient's leucocytes with PSSM by RT-PCR and compared the experimental results with those predicted in silico. The mRNA analysis could explain all the phenotypes observed and demonstrated exon skipping in six cases (c.222G>A, c.601+1delG, c.602-11T>G, c.671-3C>G, c.6115+9C>G and c.6116-1G>A) and activation of cryptic splicing sites, both donor (c.1009+1G>A and c.1009+3A>C) and acceptor sites (c.266-3delC and c.5587-1G>A). In contrast, the in silico analysis was able to predict the score variation of most of the affected splice site, but the precise mechanism could only be correctly determined in two of the 10 mutations analysed. In addition, we have detected aberrant F8 transcripts, even in healthy controls, so this must be taken into account as they could mask the actual contribution of some PSSM. We conclude that F8 mRNA analysis using leucocytes still constitutes an excellent approach to investigate the transcriptional effects of the PSSM in HA, whereas prediction in silico is not always reliable for diagnostic decision-making.

  16. Early PREdiction of Severe Sepsis (ExPRES-Sepsis) study: protocol for an observational derivation study to discover potential leucocyte cell surface biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Jean; Warner, Noel; Brown, Kenneth Alun; Wright, John; Simpson, A John; Rennie, Jillian; Hulme, Gillian; Lewis, Sion Marc; Mare, Tracey Anne; Cookson, Sharon; Weir, Christopher John; Dimmick, Ian; Keenan, Jim; Rossi, Adriano Giorgio; Shankar-Hari, Manu; Walsh, Timothy S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sepsis is an acute illness resulting from infection and the host immune response. Early identification of individuals at risk of developing life-threatening severe sepsis could enable early triage and treatment, and improve outcomes. Currently available biomarkers have poor predictive value for predicting subsequent clinical course in patients with suspected infection. Circulating leucocytes provide readily accessible tissues that reflect many aspects of the complex immune responses described in sepsis. We hypothesise that measuring cellular markers of immune responses by flow cytometry will enable early identification of infected patients at risk of adverse outcomes. We aim to characterise leucocyte surface markers (biomarkers) and their abnormalities in a population of patients presenting to the hospital emergency department with suspected sepsis, and explore their ability to predict subsequent clinical course. Methods and analysis We will conduct a prospective, multicentre, clinical, exploratory, cohort observational study. To answer our study question, 3 patient populations will be studied. First, patients with suspected sepsis from the emergency department (n=300). To assess performance characteristics of potential tests, critically ill patients with established sepsis, and age and gender matched patients without suspicion of infection requiring hospital admission (both n=100) will be recruited as comparator populations. In all 3 groups, we plan to assess circulating biomarker profiles using flow cytometry. We will select candidate biomarkers by cross-cohort comparison, and then explore their predictive value for clinical outcomes within the cohort with suspected sepsis. Ethics and dissemination The study will be carried out based on the principles in the Declaration of Helsinki and the International Conference on Harmonisation Good Clinical Practice. Ethics approval has been granted from the Scotland A Research Ethics Committee (REC) and Oxford C

  17. Mixing It Up with Acrylics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley

    1999-01-01

    Presents an art activity for fifth-grade students in which they learn about basic shapes and what happens when shapes overlap, draw seven overlapping geometric shapes, review the use of acrylic paint and mixing colors, and finally paint with primary colors. (CMK)

  18. Critical Appraisal of Mixed Methods Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyvaert, Mieke; Hannes, Karin; Maes, Bea; Onghena, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    In several subdomains of the social, behavioral, health, and human sciences, research questions are increasingly answered through mixed methods studies, combining qualitative and quantitative evidence and research elements. Accordingly, the importance of including those primary mixed methods research articles in systematic reviews grows. It is…

  19. Primary meningococcal conjunctivitis: an unusual case of transmission by saliva

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Alexander W.S.; Rana, Mrinal; Pandey, Pravin

    2016-01-01

    Summary A 49-year-old diabetic man presented with a 2-day history of a painful right eye associated with a purulent discharge. Prior to becoming symptomatic, he reported that someone spat at him, resulting in direct contact between the saliva and his affected eye. Gram stain revealed numerous leucocytes with Gram-negative diplococci, and culture yielded Neisseria meningitidis (serogroup C). There was no evidence of any systemic infection, and blood cultures were negative for any growth. He was treated for primary meningococcal conjunctivitis (PMC) with intensive topical antibiotic eyedrops as well as systemic antibiotics. One week after commencing treatment he remained systemically well and his symptoms had fully resolved. PMID:27330479

  20. Mixed gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Al Qassabi, Salim S; Al-Harthi, Saud M; Al-Osali, Magdi E

    2015-09-01

    Gynecomastia is an enlargement of male breast resulting from a proliferation of its glandular component, and it is usually due to an altered estrogen-androgen balance. It should be differentiated from pseudogynecomastia, which is characterized by fat deposition without glandular proliferation and from breast carcinoma. Gynecomastia could be physiological in neonates and pubertal or pathological due to drug intake, chronic liver, or renal disease, hyperthyroidism, testicular or adrenal neoplasms, and hypogonadism whether primary, or secondary. Properly organized work-up is needed to reach the cause of gynecomastia. Here, we reported a case of a young Omani man with gynecomastia with the aim of creating awareness of the occurrence of Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) in patients with gynecomastia, to observe any differences in clinical presentation of KS from those reported in the literature, and highlight the needed diagnostic work-up and treatment. PMID:26318471

  1. Syphilis - primary

    MedlinePlus

    Primary syphilis; Secondary syphilis; Late syphilis; Tertiary syphilis ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted, infectious disease caused by the spirochete bacterium Treponema pallidum . This bacterium causes ...

  2. THE MECHANISM OF THE INFLAMMATORY PROCESS : III. ELECTROPHORETIC MIGRATION OF INERT PARTICLES AND BLOOD CELLS IN GELATIN SOLS AND GELS WITH REFERENCE TO LEUCOCYTE EMIGRATION THROUGH THE CAPILLARY WALL.

    PubMed

    Abramson, H A

    1928-07-20

    1. Quartz particles and certain other particles move cataphoretically in certain soft gelatin gels, with the same velocity as in the sol. The speed is a function of the true viscosity of the sol or gel, and it is See PDF for Structure apparently not altered in these soft gels by the presence of gel structure. It is proportional to the applied difference of potential. 2. This finding is compatible with the fact that certain sols undergo gelation with no increase of the true viscosity although a marked change in the apparent viscosity takes place. 3. Red cells in soft gelatin-serum gels show a distinct difference in behavior. They migrate through the sol or gel with a speed that is about twice as great as the leucocytes and quartz particles, which latter particles migrate with the same velocity. This ratio has been found to hold for serum and plasma. The absolute velocities are comparatively slightly decreased by the presence of the gel. 4. In more concentrated or stiffer gels, leucocytes, red cells and quartz particles all move at first with the same velocity. By producing mechanical softening of these gels (shearing from cataphoretic movement of the micells within the cell) the red cells presently resume their previous property of independent migration through the gel. 5. The movements of particles in gelatin gels produced by a magnetic force or the force of gravity are of a different nature than those movements produced by cataphoresis. 6. The mechanical nature of obstruction to the cataphoretic migration of leucocytes and red cells in fibrin gels is briefly described. 7. The correlation of cataphoresis of microscopic particles in gels with the order of magnitude and nature of the potential differences in the capillary wall, lends additional evidence to the theory that polymorphonuclear leucocyte emigration and migration are dependent upon these potential differences.

  3. TANK MIXING STUDY WITH FLOW RECIRCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2014-06-25

    The primary objective of this work is to quantify the mixing time when two miscible fluids are mixed by one recirculation pump and to evaluate adequacy of 2.5 hours of pump recirculation to be considered well mixed in SRS tanks, JT-71/72. The work scope described here consists of two modeling analyses. They are the steady state flow pattern analysis during pump recirculation operation of the tank liquid and transient species transport calculations based on the initial steady state flow patterns. The modeling calculations for the mixing time are performed by using the 99% homogeneity criterion for the entire domain of the tank contents.

  4. Antibodies against human platelet alloantigens and human leucocyte antigen class 1 in Saudi Arabian multiparous women and multi-transfused patients

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ouda, Sarah K.; Al-Banyan, Abdulmajeed A.; Al-Gahtani, Farjah H.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Al-Dakhil, Lateefa O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of alloimmunization against human platelet antigens (HPAs) and human leucocyte antigen class 1 (HLA1) in multiparous women and multi-transfused patients. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between January and August 2013, on 50 multiparous women with no history of previous blood transfusion recruited from the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic, and 50 patients, who received multiple platelet transfusions, recruited from the Hematology/Oncology Ward, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: The frequency of alloimmunization among multiparous pregnant women was 76%, as follows: 16% against HLA1 only, 8% against HPAs only, 52% against both HPAs and HLA1 antigens. In multi-transfused patients, the rate of alloimmunization was 42% as follows: 2% against HLA1 only, 22% against HPAs only, 18% against both HPAs and HLA1 antigens. The frequency of alloimmunization increases with the number of pregnancies, but not with the number of platelet transfusions. Conclusion: Alloimmunization against HPAs and HLA1 is very common among Saudi multiparous women and multi-transfused patients, which encourages the search for the extent of the possible complications in the fetus and newborn and in multitransfused patients and how to prevent their occurrence. PMID:25987107

  5. Prevalence of Alloimmunization to Human Platelet Antigen Glycoproteins and Human Leucocyte Antigen Class I in β Thalassemia Major Patients in Western India.

    PubMed

    Philip, Joseph; Kumar, Sudeep; Chatterjee, T; Mallhi, R S

    2014-12-01

    Present management of β thalassemia major by regular packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions poses risk of alloimmunization not only to red blood cell antigens, but also to human platelet antigens (HPA) and Human leucocyte antigens class I (HLA I). However data in this context is very limited in Indian population. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA I in β thalassemia major patients who have received multiple PRBC transfusions over the years. A cross sectional study was performed at our tertiary care blood bank. β thalassemia major patients of more than 6 years of age were included who were receiving fresh, leucoreduced and irradiated PRBC units regularly with annual requirement of more than ten PRBC transfusions. A total of 9 out of 80 (11.25 %) patients were found to be alloimmunized for HPA antigens of various specificity and 24 out of 80 (30 %) developed antibodies to HLA I. The awareness of development of alloimmunization to HPA and HLA antigens in multi PRBC transfused thalassemics, despite use of leucofilters will prompt us, to look for improvement in our current PRBC preparations to minimise platelet alloimmunisation. Further studies are required to validate the findings and build the base line data in this regard. This is of importance, especially in view of providing suitable cross-matched platelets when required in future especially when considering future haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  6. The human leucocyte antigen DQB1*0602 allele is associated with electroencephelograph differences in individuals with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manzotte, Thais; Guindalini, Camila; Mazzotti, Diego R; Palombini, Luciana; de Souza, Altay L; Poyares, Dalva; Bittencourt, Lia R A; Tufik, Sergio

    2013-04-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1*0602 allele, a well-known genetic risk factor for narcolepsy, has been associated with sleep parameters in healthy subjects. We aimed to assess the association of this allele with daytime sleepiness and altered sleep electroencephalogram characteristics in the general population and in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). Eight hundred and ninety-four individuals from the Epidemiologic Study of Sleep were genotyped for the HLA DQB1*0602 allele. Full-night polysomnography was performed, and daytime sleepiness was analysed according to the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. HLA-DQB1*0602 allele-positive and -negative subjects in the general population, as well as in patients with OSAS, exhibited similar sleep parameters and levels of daytime sleepiness. However, spectral analysis showed that allele-positive individuals with OSAS exhibited higher theta power during sleep Stage 1 (P < 0.05) in occipital derivations, and lower delta power during sleep Stages 1 and 2 (P < 0.01) compared with individuals negative for the allele, even after correction for potential confounders as age, sex, body mass index and European ancestry. No significant differences in the electroencephalogram variables were found in individuals without OSAS. The data highlight the HLA-DQB1*0602 as a potential genetic factor influencing sleep physiology in individuals diagnosed with OSAS. PMID:23136848

  7. Apoptosis is associated with reduced expression of complement regulatory molecules, adhesion molecules and other receptors on polymorphonuclear leucocytes: functional relevance and role in inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J; Morgan, B P

    1995-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) express proteins that protect them from damage by homologous complement. Protection may be particularly important when these cells migrate to inflammatory sites where complement activation is taking place. Resolution of inflammation involves removal of these PMN. The major mechanism of removal is likely to involve PMN apoptosis followed by recognition and engulfment by macrophages. However, little attention has been paid to the possible relevance of apoptosis to PMN susceptibility to immune effectors. Here we describe a reduction in cell surface expression of two complement regulatory proteins, CD59, an inhibitor of the membrane attack complex and CD55 (decay accelerating factor), an inhibitor of the C3/C5 convertase, on a subpopulation of PMN aged in culture. Loss of these proteins, both attached to the membrane by glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, correlated closely with the appearance of apoptotic morphology. We also observed a marked reduction in expression of the GPI-anchored molecule CD16 on apoptotic PMN. Reduced expression of membrane proteins was not confined to those anchored through GPI--several transmembrane molecules including CD11a CD11b and CD18 were also reduced on apoptotic PMN, whilst other were little changed (CD35, CD46). The precipitous fall in CD16 surface expression on PMN was not specific for apoptosis--in vitro incubation of PMN with lipopolysaccharide-inhibited apoptosis but caused a reduction in CD16 expression to 'apoptotic' levels. Images Figure 2 PMID:8567034

  8. CELL RESPIRATION STUDIES : II. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE OXYGEN CONSUMPTION OF BLOOD FROM NORMAL INDIVIDUALS AND PATIENTS WITH INCREASED LEUCOCYTE COUNTS (SEPSIS; CHRONIC MYELOGENOUS LEUCEMIA).

    PubMed

    Daland, G A; Isaacs, R

    1927-06-30

    1. The oxygen consumption of blood of normal individuals, when the hemoglobin is saturated with oxygen, is practically zero within the limits of experimental error of the microspirometer used. 2. The oxygen consumed in a microspirometer by the blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia with a high white blood cell count, and of one with leucocytosis from sepsis, was proportional to the number of adult polymorphonuclear neutrophils in the blood. 3. No correlation could be made between the rate of oxygen absorption and the total number of white blood cells in the blood, or the total number of immature cells, or the number of red blood cells, or the amount of oxyhemoglobin. 4. The blood of patients with chronic myelogenous leucemia continued to use oxygen in the microspirometer longer than that of normal individuals, and the hemoglobin, in the leucemic bloods, became desaturated even though exposed to air. 5. In blood in which the bulk. of the cells were immature and the mature cells few, the oxygen consumption was lower than in blood in which the mature cells predominated. The rate of oxygen consumption of the immature cells was relatively low as compared to the mature. 6. The slower rate of oxygen absorption by the immature leucocytes in chronic myelogenous leucemia as compared to the mature cells, places them, in accord with Warburg's reports, in the class of the malignant tissues in this respect rather than in the group of young or embryonic cells.

  9. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fabrício C.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.; Silva, Maria C.; Tristão, Fabrine S. M.; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Soares, Edson G.; Menezes, Jean G.; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O.; Marin-Neto, José A.; Silva, João S.; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25688175

  10. Human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) and its murine functional homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    PubMed

    Dias, Fabrício C; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Silva, Maria C; Tristão, Fabrine S M; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Moreau, Philippe; Soares, Edson G; Menezes, Jean G; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O; Marin-Neto, José A; Silva, João S; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3'UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  11. [Primary hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Maruani, G; Cornière, N; Nicolet, L; Baron, S; Courbebaisse, M; Renaud, S; Houillier, P

    2013-10-01

    For the past 40 years, primary hyperparathyroidism has been recognized as a common endocrine disease which is, most often, "non-symptomatic", without the occurrence of nephrolithiasis or osteitis fibrosa cystica. Our knowledge in the pathophysiology has increased largely and diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism is usually easy. The only radical treatment is surgery and the surgical indications have been codified by several consensus conferences. For patients who do not undergo surgery, prolonged medical monitoring is needed.

  12. Housing Mix, School Mix: Barriers to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camina, M. M.; Iannone, P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent UK policy has emphasised both the development of socially mixed communities and the creation of balanced school intakes. In this paper, we use a case study of an area of mixed tenure in eastern England to explore policy in practice and the extent to which mechanisms of segregation impact on both the creation of socially mixed neighbourhoods…

  13. Generation of T memory cells in one-way mixed lymphocyte culture. IV. Primary and secondary responses to soluble and insoluble membrane preparations and to ultraviolet-light-inactivated stimulator cells.

    PubMed

    Häyry, P; Anderson, L C

    1976-01-01

    Neither normal CBA (H-2k) nor purified spleen T cells respond in vitro to soluble or insoluble membrane preparations or to ultraviolet-light-inactivated stimulator cells of the allogeneic DBA/2 (H-2d) strain. However, CBA spleen cells deprived of phagocytic cells show a slight proliferative response under these conditions. After being primed against mitomycin-blocked DBA/2 cells in one-way mixed lymphocyte culture, the secondary blast-derived T 'memory' cells display a good secondary blast (proliferative) response to both membrane antigens and to ultraviolet-light-inactivated stimulator cells. In addition to this, the secondary T lymphocytes--in contrast to nonprimed T cells--respond by cytotoxicity when ultraviolet-light-inactivated cells are used as the second stimulant.

  14. Mixing and Transport.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; Chapman, Tom; Siverts-Wong, Elena; Wei, Li; Mei, Ying

    2016-10-01

    This section covers research published during the calendar year 2015 on mixing and transport processes. The review covers mixing of anaerobic digesters, mixing of heat transfer, and environmental fate and transport. PMID:27620101

  15. Primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Madkhali, Tarıq; Alhefdhi, Amal; Chen, Herbert; Elfenbein, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common endocrine disorder caused by overactivation of parathyroid glands resulting in excessive release of parathyroid hormone. The resultant hypercalcemia leads to a myriad of symptoms. Primary hyperparathyroidism may increase a patient’s morbidity and even mortality if left untreated. During the last few decades, disease presentation has shifted from the classic presentation of severe bone and kidney manifestations to most patients now being diagnosed on routine labs. Although surgery is the only curative therapy, many advances have been made over the past decades in the diagnosis and the surgical management of primary hyperparathyroidism. The aim of this review is to summarize the characteristics of the disease, the work up, and the treatment options. PMID:26985167

  16. Differential stimulation by oxygen-free-radical-altered immunoglobulin G of the production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by human polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Kleinveld, H A; Sluiter, W; Boonman, A M; Swaak, A J; Hack, C E; Koster, J F

    1991-04-01

    1. The effect of free-radical-altered IgG (monomer and polymer u.v.-irradiated IgG), compared with that of native and heat-aggregated IgG, on the production rate of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide by granulocytes (polymorphonuclear leucocytes) from normal blood and granulocytes obtained from the blood and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was studied. 2. Similar rates of superoxide production by granulocytes from normal blood at rest and in the presence of any form of IgG were found. In contrast, the rate of hydrogen peroxide production could be stimulated in a dose-dependent fashion by monomer or polymer u.v.-irradiated IgG. 3. The stimulatory effect of free-radical-altered IgG on the rate of hydrogen peroxide production did not occur in the presence of 2-deoxyglucose, which deprives the NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase of its substrate NADPH by inhibition of glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway. This points to a stimulatory effect on the direct divalent reduction of oxygen without intermediate superoxide production by this enzyme complex. 4. Granulocytes obtained from the blood and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis reacted differently to polymer u.v.-irradiated IgG. In the presence of this stimulus the rate of release of both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide was increased. Furthermore, these granulocytes synthesized superoxide and hydrogen peroxide at a higher rate than did granulocytes from normal blood in the presence of serum-treated zymosan but not in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate. 5. Taken together, these results indicate that the rate of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by the granulocyte NADPH:O2 oxidoreductase depends on the pathological condition of the donor and the type of stimulus used.

  17. Dog leucocyte antigen class II diversity and relationships among indigenous dogs of the island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Runstadler, J A; Angles, J M; Pedersen, N C

    2006-11-01

    The genetic polymorphism at the dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II loci DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 was studied in a large genetically diverse population of feral and wild-type dogs from the large island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea (Bali street dog, dingo and New Guinea singing dog, respectively). Sequence-based typing (SBT) of the hypervariable region of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles was used to determine genetic diversity. No new DQA1 alleles were recognized among the three dog populations, but five novel DLA-DRB1 and 2 novel DLA-DQB1 allele sequences were detected. Additional unknown alleles were postulated to exist in Bali street dogs, as indicated by the large percentage of individuals (15%-33%) that had indeterminate DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles by SBT. All three groups of dogs possessed alleles that were relatively uncommon in conventional purebreds. The New Guinea singing dog and dingo shared alleles that were not present in the Bali street dogs. These findings suggested that the dingo was more closely related to indigenous dogs from New Guinea. Feral dog populations, in particular large ones such as that of Bali, show genetic diversity that existed prior to phenotypic selection for breeds originating from their respective regions. This diversity needs to be identified and maintained in the face of progressive Westernization. These populations deserve further study as potential model populations for the evolution of major histocompatibility complex alleles, for the study of canine genetic diversity, for the development of dog breeds and for studies on the comigration of ancestral human and dog populations.

  18. The use of reference strand-mediated conformational analysis for the study of cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) feline leucocyte antigen class II DRB polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Drake, G J C; Kennedy, L J; Auty, H K; Ryvar, R; Ollier, W E R; Kitchener, A C; Freeman, A R; Radford, A D

    2004-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence to suggest the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has limited genetic diversity. However, the extent of this and its significance to the fitness of the cheetah population, both in the wild and captivity, is the subject of some debate. This reflects the difficulty associated with establishing a direct link between low variability at biologically significant loci and deleterious aspects of phenotype in this, and other, species. Attempts to study one such region, the feline leucocyte antigen (FLA), are hampered by a general reliance on cloning and sequencing which is expensive, labour-intensive, subject to PCR artefact and always likely to underestimate true variability. In this study we have applied reference strand-mediated conformational analysis (RSCA) to determine the FLA-DRB phenotypes of 25 cheetahs. This technique was rapid, repeatable and less prone to polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-induced sequence artefacts associated with cloning. Individual cheetahs were shown to have up to three FLA-DRB genes. A total of five alleles were identified (DRB*ha14-17 and DRB*gd01) distributed among four genotypes. Fifteen cheetahs were DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17, three were DRB*ha15/ha16/ha17, six were DRB*ha14/ha16/ha17 and one was DRB*ha14/ha15/ha16/ha17/gd01. Sequence analysis of DRB*gd01 suggested it was a recombinant of DRB*ha16 and DRB*ha17. Generation of new alleles is difficult to document, and the clear demonstration of such an event is unusual. This study confirms further the limited genetic variability of the cheetah at a biologically significant region. RSCA will facilitate large-scale studies that will be needed to correlate genetic diversity at such loci with population fitness in the cheetah and other species.

  19. Dog leucocyte antigen class II diversity and relationships among indigenous dogs of the island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Runstadler, J A; Angles, J M; Pedersen, N C

    2006-11-01

    The genetic polymorphism at the dog leucocyte antigen (DLA) class II loci DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1 was studied in a large genetically diverse population of feral and wild-type dogs from the large island nations of Indonesia (Bali), Australia and New Guinea (Bali street dog, dingo and New Guinea singing dog, respectively). Sequence-based typing (SBT) of the hypervariable region of DLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 alleles was used to determine genetic diversity. No new DQA1 alleles were recognized among the three dog populations, but five novel DLA-DRB1 and 2 novel DLA-DQB1 allele sequences were detected. Additional unknown alleles were postulated to exist in Bali street dogs, as indicated by the large percentage of individuals (15%-33%) that had indeterminate DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 alleles by SBT. All three groups of dogs possessed alleles that were relatively uncommon in conventional purebreds. The New Guinea singing dog and dingo shared alleles that were not present in the Bali street dogs. These findings suggested that the dingo was more closely related to indigenous dogs from New Guinea. Feral dog populations, in particular large ones such as that of Bali, show genetic diversity that existed prior to phenotypic selection for breeds originating from their respective regions. This diversity needs to be identified and maintained in the face of progressive Westernization. These populations deserve further study as potential model populations for the evolution of major histocompatibility complex alleles, for the study of canine genetic diversity, for the development of dog breeds and for studies on the comigration of ancestral human and dog populations. PMID:17092255

  20. Leucocyte complement receptor 1 (CR1/CD35) transcript and its correlation with the clinical disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Anand, D; Kumar, U; Kanjilal, M; Kaur, S; Das, N

    2014-01-01

    In view of the exaggerated complement activation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and significance of complement receptor 1 (CR1/CD35) as a complement regulatory protein (CRP), we aimed to determine the leucocyte-complement receptor 1 (L-CR1) transcript levels and the relationship of this protein with the clinical disease activity of RA patients. Sixty-six controls and 45 RA patients were enrolled. L-CR1 transcript levels were correlated with the levels of circulating immune complexes (CIC), C3, C4 and C3d in controls and patients and with disease activity score 28 (DAS28) in patients only. CIC levels were determined by polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, C3 and C4 levels by nephlometry and C3d levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Eleven patients were recruited for follow-up of L-CR1 and DAS28 levels at weeks 0, 12 and 24. Appropriate statistical methods were used for the data analysis. L-CR1 (P < 0·01) transcript levels were decreased in patients compared to controls. L-CR1 levels correlated negatively with DAS28, CIC and C3d. DAS28 correlated positively with levels of CIC, C3 and C3d. Levels of CIC correlated positively with C3 and C3d. Levels of C3 correlated positively with C3d in patients and with C4 in both controls and patients. Levels of L-CR1 increased with decline in DAS28 scores in follow-up patients. Observations were statistically significant. Lower levels of L-CR1 transcript in patients compared to controls, their correlations with the levels of CIC, C3d and DAS28 at different time-points in RA patients suggest CR1 as a potential disease marker for RA. PMID:24433281

  1. Helium Microbeam Mixing of Bilayers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, John Baran

    This study is an experimental and theoretical investigation of room-temperature mixing of bilayers by micron-width He^+ ion beams. Bilayer targets, including Cu/Al, Cu/Si and Sb/Si, were irradiated at room temperature in the University at Albany's Dynamitron particle accelerator with 2-MeV He^+ ion beams ranging from 2 to 6 μm in width. At doses on the order of 10^ {19}/cm^2, RBS spectra revealed evidence of interface mixing in all targets to depths of several thousand A within the cylinder irradiated by the beam. Both RBS spectra and isometric RBS contour maps of the target also showed that mixing of the interface extends laterally well beyond the irradiated area. The interface mixing reaches a maximum in an annular region several times larger in diameter than the ion-beam. Standard theories of primary-recoil, secondary -cascade and thermal-spike mixing predicted interface widths two orders of magnitude smaller than observed for Cu/Al bilayers. Furthermore, He^+ irradiation of Cu/Al targets at liquid-nitrogen temperature did not produce interface mixing, further indicating that ballistic interpretations of the mixing are inadequate. Defect concentrations as a function of position and time were calculated by numerical solution of coupled rate equations for vacancies and interstitials in aluminum. The results of these calculations show that room-temperature He^+ mixing of Cu/Al results almost exclusively from interstitial migration. The numerically calculated concentration of interstitials within the damage cylinder was used to derive an approximate expression for interface width as a function of dose. Comparisons of these predicted values with the experimentally determined interface width as a function of dose agree, within uncertainties. In addition, the annular region observed on RBS maps is explained by the continued presence of a non-equilibrium concentration of interstitials after the ion beam is shut off. Interface mixing in Cu/Si targets, although

  2. Can whales mix the ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavery, T. J.; Roudnew, B.; Seuront, L.; Mitchell, J. G.; Middleton, J.

    2012-07-01

    Ocean mixing influences global climate and enhances primary productivity by transporting nutrient rich water into the euphotic zone. The contribution of the swimming biosphere to diapycnal mixing in the ocean has been hypothesised to occur on scales similar to that of tides or winds, however, the extent to which this contributes to nutrient transport and stimulates primary productivity has not been explored. Here, we introduce a novel method to estimate the diapycnal diffusivity that occurs as a result of a sperm whale swimming through a pycnocline. Nutrient profiles from the Hawaiian Ocean are used to further estimate the amount of nitrogen transported into the euphotic zone and the primary productivity stimulated as a result. We estimate that the 80 sperm whales that travel through an area of 104 km2 surrounding Hawaii increase diapycnal diffusivity by 10-6 m2 s-1 which results in the flux of 105 kg of nitrogen into the euphotic zone each year. This nitrogen input subsequently stimulates 6 × 105 kg of carbon per year. The nutrient input of swimming sperm whales is modest compared to dominant modes of nutrient transport such as nitrogen fixation but occurs more consistently and thus may provide the nutrients necessary to enable phytoplankton growth and survival in the absence of other seasonal and daily nutrient inputs.

  3. Drug modulation of antigen-induced paw oedema in guinea-pigs: effects of lipopolysaccharide, tumour necrosis factor and leucocyte depletion.

    PubMed

    da Motta, J I; Cunha, F Q; Vargaftig, B B; Ferreira, S H

    1994-05-01

    -oedematogenic effects of LPS and/or TNF alpha are possibly associated with their capacity to inhibit leucocyte emigration. Accordingly, guinea-pigs rendered leucopenic with vinblastine exhibited less intense oedema after ovalbumin. Vinblastine did not affect oedema induced by PAF or bradykinin,indicating that vascular responsiveness was not involved. PMID:8032630

  4. Effects of type II collagen epitope carbamylation and citrullination in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR4(+) monozygotic twins discordant for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    De Santis, M; Ceribelli, A; Cavaciocchi, F; Generali, E; Massarotti, M; Isailovic, N; Crotti, C; Scherer, H U; Montecucco, C; Selmi, C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the native, citrullinated or carbamylated type II human collagen T cell- and B cell-epitopes on the adaptive immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Peripheral blood T and B cells obtained from a human leucocyte D4-related (antigen DR4(-) HLA-DR4)(+) woman with early RA, her healthy monozygotic twin and an unrelated HLA-DR3(+) woman with early RA were analysed for activation (CD154/CD69), apoptosis (annexin/7-aminoactinomycin), cytokine production [interferon (IFN)γ/interleukin (IL)-17/IL-4/IL-10/IL-6] and functional phenotype (CD45Ra/CCR7) after stimulation with the collagen native T cell epitope (T261-273), the K264 carbamylated T cell epitope (carT261-273), the native B cell epitope (B359-369) or the R360 citrullinated B cell epitope (citB359-369), and the combinations of these. The T cell memory compartment was activated by T cell epitopes in both discordant DR4(+) twins, but not in the DR3(+) RA. The collagen-specific activation of CD4(+) T cells was induced with both the native and carbamylated T cell epitopes only in the RA twin. Both T cell epitopes also induced IL-17 production in the RA twin, but a greater IL-4 and IL-10 response in the healthy twin. The citrullinated B cell epitope, particularly when combined with the carbamylated T cell epitope, induced B cell activation and an increased IL-6/IL-10 ratio in the RA twin compared to a greater IL-10 production in the healthy twin. Our data suggest that circulating collagen-specific T and B cells are found in HLA-DR4(+) subjects, but only RA activated cells express co-stimulatory molecules and produce proinflammatory cytokines. Carbamylation and citrullination further modulate the activation and cytokine polarization of T and B cells. PMID:27314557

  5. Neisseria gonorrhoeae phagosomes delay fusion with primary granules to enhance bacterial survival inside human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M Brittany; Criss, Alison K

    2013-08-01

    Symptomatic infection with Neisseria gonorrhoeae (Gc) promotes inflammation driven by polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs, neutrophils), yet some Gc survive PMN exposure during infection. Here we report a novel mechanism of gonococcal resistance to PMNs: Gc phagosomes avoid maturation into phagolysosomes by delayed fusion with primary (azurophilic) granules, which contain antimicrobial components including serine proteases. Reduced phagosome-primary granule fusion was observed in gonorrheal exudates and human PMNs infected ex vivo. Delayed phagosome-granule fusion could be overcome by opsonizing Gc with immunoglobulin. Using bacterial viability dyes along with antibodies to primary granules revealed that Gc survival in PMNs correlated with early residence in primary granule-negative phagosomes. However, when Gc was killed prior to PMN exposure, dead bacteria were also found in primary granule-negative phagosomes. These results suggest that Gc surface characteristics, rather than active bacterial processes, influence phagosome maturation and that Gc death inside PMNs occurs after phagosome-granule fusion. Ectopically increasing primary granule-phagosome fusion, by immunoglobulin opsonization or PMN treatment with lysophosphatidylcholine, reduced intracellular Gc viability, which was attributed in part to serine protease activity. We conclude that one method for Gc to avoid PMN clearance in acute gonorrhoea is by delaying primary granule-phagosome fusion, thus preventing formation of a degradative phagolysosome. PMID:23374609

  6. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  7. Mixing in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2011-01-07

    Turbulent mixing plays a vital role in many fields in astronomy. Here I review a few of these sites, discuss the importance of this turbulent mixing and the techniques used by astrophysicists to solve these problems.

  8. Theoretical study of mixing in liquid clouds - Part 1: Classical concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Alexei; Khain, Alex; Pinsky, Mark; French, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    The present study considers final stages of in-cloud mixing in the framework of classical concept of homogeneous and extreme inhomogeneous mixing. Simple analytical relationships between basic microphysical parameters were obtained for homogeneous and extreme inhomogeneous mixing based on the adiabatic consideration. It was demonstrated that during homogeneous mixing the functional relationships between the moments of the droplets size distribution hold only during the primary stage of mixing. Subsequent random mixing between already mixed parcels and undiluted cloud parcels breaks these relationships. However, during extreme inhomogeneous mixing the functional relationships between the microphysical parameters hold both for primary and subsequent mixing. The obtained relationships can be used to identify the type of mixing from in situ observations. The effectiveness of the developed method was demonstrated using in situ data collected in convective clouds. It was found that for the specific set of in situ measurements the interaction between cloudy and entrained environments was dominated by extreme inhomogeneous mixing.

  9. A peptide (P2) derived from the variable heavy chain of an anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody (LYP20) inhibits leucocyte adhesion to thrombin-activated platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Joseph F; McGregor, John L

    2003-02-01

    P-selectin, a member of the selectin family of adhesion molecules, is present in endothelial Weibel-Palade bodies and platelet alpha-granules, and is rapidly expressed on their surface upon activation, resulting in leucocyte adhesion. LYP20 is a functional monoclonal antibody previously generated in our laboratory that binds with high affinity and specificity directed against P-selectin. This binding is largely imparted by the specific sequence of amino acids present on the hypervariable portions of the IgG chains. We now show that a peptide derived from the heavy chain of mAb LYP20 dose dependently inhibits the adhesion of poly morphonuclear cells to resting and thrombin-activated endothelial cells (EC) and platelets. The scrambled form of this peptide, identical in amino acid composition to the authentic peptide but with altered sequence, was not inhibitory at corresponding concentrations. Binding studies revealed that this peptide also dose dependently bound to both resting and thrombin-activated EC and platelets. Our results may prove useful for the development of new therapeutic inhibitors to modulate leucocyte interactions in inflammatory disorders. PMID:12588346

  10. Primary scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Rigopoulos, Dimitrios; Stamatios, Gregoriou; Ioannides, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Scarring alopecia or cicatricial alopecia results from follicular damage that is sufficient to cause the destruction and replacement of pilosebaceous structures by scar tissue. Primary scarring alopecias represent a group of disorders that primarily affect the hair follicles, as opposed to secondary scarring alopecias, which affect the dermis and secondarily cause follicular destruction. Inflammation may predominantly involve lymphocytes or neutrophils. Cicatricial alopecias that mainly involve lymphocytic inflammation include discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia, central centrifugal alopecia, and pseudopelade (Brocq). Cicatricial alopecias that are due to predominantly neutrophilic inflammation include folliculitis decalvans, tufted folliculitis, and dissecting cellulitis of the scalp. Folliculitis keloidalis is a cicatricial alopecia with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. PMID:26370646

  11. Mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Noll, L.A.

    1990-12-01

    The results of an evaluation of mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several surfactant combinations have been studied. These include alkyl aryl sulfonates as primary surfactants and carboxymethylated ethoxylated (CME) surfactants and ethoxylated sulfonates (ES) as secondary surfactants. The ethoxylated surfactants increase the salinity tolerance of the primary surfactants and, in theory, allow tailoring of the surfactant system to match selected reservoir conditions. The experiments conducted included interfacial tension (IFT) measurements, phase behavior measurements, adsorption and/or chromatographic separation of mixed surfactant systems, measurements of solution properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant mixtures, and crude oil displacement experiments. The effects of temperature, surfactant concentration, salinity, presence of divalent ions, hydrocarbon type, and component proportions in the mixed surfactant combinations, and injection strategies on the performance potential of the targeted surfactant/hydrocarbon systems were studied. 40 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Foundations of chaotic mixing.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Stephen; Ottino, Julio M

    2004-05-15

    The simplest mixing problem corresponds to the mixing of a fluid with itself; this case provides a foundation on which the subject rests. The objective here is to study mixing independently of the mechanisms used to create the motion and review elements of theory focusing mostly on mathematical foundations and minimal models. The flows under consideration will be of two types: two-dimensional (2D) 'blinking flows', or three-dimensional (3D) duct flows. Given that mixing in continuous 3D duct flows depends critically on cross-sectional mixing, and that many microfluidic applications involve continuous flows, we focus on the essential aspects of mixing in 2D flows, as they provide a foundation from which to base our understanding of more complex cases. The baker's transformation is taken as the centrepiece for describing the dynamical systems framework. In particular, a hierarchy of characterizations of mixing exist, Bernoulli --> mixing --> ergodic, ordered according to the quality of mixing (the strongest first). Most importantly for the design process, we show how the so-called linked twist maps function as a minimal picture of mixing, provide a mathematical structure for understanding the type of 2D flows that arise in many micromixers already built, and give conditions guaranteeing the best quality mixing. Extensions of these concepts lead to first-principle-based designs without resorting to lengthy computations.

  13. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  14. Hematological parameters in Polish mixed breed rabbits with addition of meat breed blood in the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Tokarz-Deptuła, B; Niedźwiedzka-Rystwej, P; Adamiak, M; Hukowska-Szematowicz, B; Trzeciak-Ryczek, A; Deptuła, W

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we studied haematologic values, such as haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit value, thrombocytes, leucocytes: lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils and monocytes in the pheral blood in Polish mixed-breeds with addition of meat breed blood in order to obtain the reference values which are until now not available for this animals. In studying this indices we took into consideration the impact of the season (spring, summer, autumn, winter), and sex of the animals. The studies have shown a high impact of the season of the year on those rabbits, but only in spring and summer. Moreover we observed that the sex has mean impact on the studied values of haematological parameters in those rabbits. According to our knowledge, this is the first paper on haematologic values in this widely used group of rabbits, so they may serve as reference values. PMID:26812808

  15. Space maintenance in the primary and early mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Daly, D; Walker, P O

    1990-01-01

    Many malocclusions are caused by a loss of arch length subsequent to premature tooth loss. Dental practitioners with a knowledge of several simple but effective types of arch length maintainers, can prevent some developing malocclusions.

  16. Mixed exhaust flow supersonic jet engine and method

    SciTech Connect

    Klees, G.W.

    1993-06-08

    A method of operating a supersonic jet engine installation is described comprising (a) providing an engine having a variable area air inlet means and an outlet to discharge engine exhaust; (b) providing a secondary air passageway means; (c) receiving ambient air in the air inlet means and providing the ambient air as primary air to the engine inlet and secondary air to the secondary air passageway means; (d) providing a mixing section having an inlet portion and an exit portion, utilizing the mixing section in directing the exhaust from the engine to primary convergent/divergent exit passageway segments, where the exhaust is discharged at supersonic velocity as primary flow components, and directing secondary air flow from the secondary air passageway means to secondary exit passageway segments which are interspersed with the primary segments and from which the secondary air is discharged at subsonic velocity as secondary flow components; and (e) providing an exhaust section to receive the primary and secondary flow components in a mixing region and causing the primary and secondary flow components to mix to create a supersonic mixed flow, the exhaust section having a variable area final nozzle through which the mixed flow is discharged.

  17. Scoping Study of Airlift Circulation Technologies for Supplemental Mixing in Pulse Jet Mixed Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Berglin, Eric J.; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Buchmiller, William C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2015-04-07

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a scoping study to investigate supplemental technologies for supplying vertical fluid motion and enhanced mixing in Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels designed for high solids processing. The study assumed that the pulse jet mixers adequately mix and shear the bottom portion of a vessel. Given that, the primary function of a supplemental technology should be to provide mixing and shearing in the upper region of a vessel. The objective of the study was to recommend a mixing technology and configuration that could be implemented in the 8-ft test vessel located at Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE). Several mixing technologies, primarily airlift circulator (ALC) systems, were evaluated in the study. This technical report contains a review of ALC technologies, a description of the PNNL testing and accompanying results, and recommended features of an ALC system for further study.

  18. Primary hyperoxaluria.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Víctor; Torres, Armando; Salido, Eduardo

    2014-05-21

    Primary hyperoxaluria (PH) occurs due to an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder of the metabolism of glyoxylate, which causes excessive oxalate production. The most frequent and serious disorder is due to enzyme deficit of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase (PH type I) specific to hepatic peroxisome. As oxalate is not metabolised in humans and is excreted through the kidneys, the kidney is the first organ affected, causing recurrent lithiasis, nephrocalcinosis and early renal failure. With advance of renal failure, particularly in patients on haemodialysis (HD), calcium oxalate is massively deposited in tissues, which is known as oxalosis. Diagnosis is based on family history, the presence of urolithiasis and/or nephrocalcinosis, hyperoxaluria, oxalate deposits in tissue forming granulomas, molecular analysis of DNA and enzyme analysis if applicable. High diagnostic suspicion is required; therefore, unfortunately, in many cases it is diagnosed after its recurrence following kidney transplantation. Conservative management of this disease (high liquid intake, pyridoxine and crystallisation inhibitors) needs to be adopted early in order to delay kidney damage. Treatment by dialysis is ineffective in treating excess oxalate. After the kidney transplant, we normally observe a rapid appearance of oxalate deposits in the graft and the results of this technique are discouraging, with very few exceptions. Pre-emptive liver transplantation, or simultaneous liver and kidney transplants when there is already irreversible damage to the kidney, is the treatment of choice to treat the underlying disease and suppress oxalate overproduction. Given its condition as a rare disease and its genetic and clinical heterogeneity, it is not possible to gain evidence through randomised clinical trials. As a result, the recommendations are established by groups of experts based on publications of renowned scientific rigour. In this regard, a group of European experts (OxalEurope) has

  19. Mixed matrix membrane development.

    PubMed

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    2003-03-01

    Two types of mixed matrix membranes were developed by UOP in the late 1980s. The first type includes adsorbent polymers, such as silicalite-cellulose acetate (CA), NaX-CA, and AgX-CA mixed matrix membranes. The silicalite-CA has a CO(2)/H(2) selectivity of 5.15 +/- 2.2. In contrast, the CA membrane has a CO(2)/H(2) selectivity of 0.77 +/- 0.06. The second type of mixed matrix membrane is PEG-silicone rubber. The PEG-silicone rubber mixed matrix membrane has high selectivity for polar gases, such as SO(2), NH(3), and H(2)S.

  20. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  1. To Mix or Not to Mix?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuttlewood, Rosemary

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the teaching strategy of the mixed independent school where she works, in which they split the students into four or five ability sets. The sets are decided primarily either by pupil achievement in the entrance examinations prior to Y9 or by pupil performance in the prep school. The author also presents the…

  2. Mixed Ability Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skov, Poul

    1986-01-01

    As a basis for taking a position on the future school structure in grades 8-10 in Denmark, an extensive study was carried out on mixed ability teaching (teaching in heterogeneous classes) on these grade levels. Results showed that mixed ability teaching gave at least as good results as teaching in differentiated classes. (Author/LMO)

  3. Recurrent mixed tumor.

    PubMed

    Batsakis, J G

    1986-01-01

    Recurrence of benign neoplasms can usually be attributed to incomplete excision. Such is the case with benign mixed tumors of salivary glands. Certain histopathologic features of mixed tumors, however, appear to facilitate recurrences. These are: a predominantly myxoid composition, and transcapsular extension by the tumor. Multicentric origin is possible, but it must be regarded as a much lower order of probability.

  4. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  5. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to - π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.

  6. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to ‑ π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.

  7. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  8. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  9. Mixing of the lunar regolith. [by meteoritic impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, D. E.; Hoerz, F.; Brownlee, D. E.; Hartung, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A probabilistic model for mixing and turnover rates for the lunar regolith due to meteoritic impact is presented and evaluated using results from laboratory impact experiments and estimated meteoritic fluxes. The upper millimeter of the lunar surface is shown to be the primary mixing zone in the regolith and an important source for impact melts and vapors. Below this 'mixing layer' the rate of mixing and turnover decreases very rapidly with increasing depth, consistent with well-preserved stratigraphy and resident times deduced from deep drill core tube samples.

  10. Research on the optimization of viscous fluid mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, O. H.; Powell, W.; Prentakis, A.

    1980-10-01

    Primary objectives of this project are: (1) to gain a better undertanding of mixing and; (2) to develop a practical method for epoxy encapsulation of electronics. Development of design criteria for a new type of mixer is reported. Such a mixer produces an irreversibly mixed output in contrast to conventional mixers which produce outputs that may be unmixed. The report describes calibration and flow visualization experiments in which various mixing methods are evaluated and another experimental verifying the mixing concept. Fluids used in the experiments are glycerine and a low cost potting epoxy. A method for estimating the diffusion coefficient of reactive systems is incuded. Results obtained generally confirm the mathematically analysis presented.

  11. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  12. Nearly discontinuous chaotic mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David Howland; Lim, Hyun K; Yu, Yan; Glimm, James G

    2009-01-01

    A new scientific approach is presented for a broad class of chaotic problems involving a high degree of mixing over rapid time scales. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows are typical of such problems. Microscopic mixing properties such as chemical reaction rates for turbulent mixtures can be obtained with feasible grid resolution. The essential dependence of (some) fluid mixing observables on transport phenomena is observed. This dependence includes numerical as well as physical transport and it includes laminar as well as turbulent transport. A new approach to the mathematical theory for the underlying equations is suggested.

  13. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  14. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1998-03-01

    During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

  15. Idealized mixing impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.A.

    1999-12-08

    The dispersion of tetraphenylborate in continuous stirred tank reactors plays a significant role in the utility achieved from the tetraphenylborate. Investigating idealized mixing of the materials can illuminate how this dispersion occurs.

  16. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  17. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1994-07-01

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value.

  18. Influence of stimulated Raman scattering on the conversion efficiency in four wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderlich, R.; Moore, M.A.; Garrett, W.R.; Payne, M.G.

    1988-01-01

    Secondary nonlinear optical effects following parametric four wave mixing in sodium vapor are investigated. The generated ultraviolet radiation induces stimulated Raman scattering and other four wave mixing process. Population transfer due to Raman transitions strongly influences the phase matching conditions for the primary mixing process. Pulse shortening and a reduction in conversion efficiency are observed. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  19. CFD simulation of mixing in egg-shaped anaerobic digesters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-03-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model that characterizes mechanical draft tube mixing in egg-shaped anaerobic digesters was developed. Simulation of flow patterns were carried out with a propeller rotating from 400 to 750rpm, assuming liquid manure to be Newtonian (water) and non-Newtonian fluids depending on the total solids (TS) concentration. Power number and flow number of the propeller in water mixing were validated against lab specifications and experimental data from a field test. The rotational direction and placement of the propeller were examined to identify the primary pumping mode and the optimum position of the propeller fixed inside the tube. Quantitative comparisons of two mixing methods and two digester shapes indicated that mechanical draft tube mixing is more efficient than external pumped recirculation, and that the egg shape provides for more efficient mixing than the cylindrical shape. Furthermore, scale-up rules for mixing in egg-shaped digesters were investigated. PMID:19913870

  20. Mixed waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  1. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  2. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  3. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  4. Atomization and mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art in atomization and mixing for triplet, pentad, and coaxial injectors is described. Injectors that are applicable for LOX/hydrocarbon propellants and main chamber and fuel rich preburner/gas generator mixture ratios are of special interest. Various applicable correlating equations and parameters as well as test data found in the literature are presented. The validity, utility, and important aspects of these data and correlations are discussed and the measurement techniques used are evaluated. Propellant mixing tests performed are described and summarized, results are reported, and tentative conclusions are included.

  5. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  6. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  7. MixDown

    2010-01-01

    MixDown is a meta-build tool that orchestrates and manages the building of multiple 3rd party libraries. It can manage the downloading, uncompressing, unpacking, patching, configuration, build, and installation of 3rd party libraries using a variety of configuration and build tools. As a meta-build tool, it relies on 3rd party tools such as GNU Autotools, make, Cmake, scons, etc. to actually confugure and build libraries. MixDown includes an extensive database of settings to be used formore » general machines and specific leadership class computing resources.« less

  8. [Optimizing Color Rendering for Mixed-Color White Light LED].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-yu; Jin, Peng; Zhou, Qi-feng

    2015-05-01

    To optimize color rendering of mixed-color LEDs, the Gaussian model was used to analyze the color-mixed LED's spectrum power distribution. The peak wavelength "λm", spectral half width "Δλ" and amplitude "A" were basic parameters for optimizing color rendering R9, which is very important for objects to be colorful and vivid under the white light LED's'illuminating. The typical methods for color mixing were used to get white light LEDs. Result was that to get the satisfied color rendering index, one of the color primaries should be certain and then other color primaries would be analyzed through changing three basic parameters step by step. It was concluded that the analysis in this paper would be referential to optimize the color-mixed white LED's color rendering. PMID:26415452

  9. [Optimizing Color Rendering for Mixed-Color White Light LED].

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-yu; Jin, Peng; Zhou, Qi-feng

    2015-05-01

    To optimize color rendering of mixed-color LEDs, the Gaussian model was used to analyze the color-mixed LED's spectrum power distribution. The peak wavelength "λm", spectral half width "Δλ" and amplitude "A" were basic parameters for optimizing color rendering R9, which is very important for objects to be colorful and vivid under the white light LED's'illuminating. The typical methods for color mixing were used to get white light LEDs. Result was that to get the satisfied color rendering index, one of the color primaries should be certain and then other color primaries would be analyzed through changing three basic parameters step by step. It was concluded that the analysis in this paper would be referential to optimize the color-mixed white LED's color rendering.

  10. Sylgard® Mixing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie; Welch, Cynthia F.; Goodwin, Lynne Alese; Keller, Jennie

    2014-08-22

    Sylgard® 184 and Sylgard® 186 silicone elastomers form Dow Corning® are used as potting agents across the Nuclear Weapons Complex. A standardized mixing procedure is required for filled versions of these products. The present study is a follow-up to a mixing study performed by MST-7 which established the best mixing procedure to use when adding filler to either 184 or 186 base resins. The most effective and consistent method of mixing resin and curing agent for three modified silicone elastomer recipes is outlined in this report. For each recipe, sample size, mixing type, and mixing time was varied over 10 separate runs. The results show that the THINKY™ Mixer gives reliable mixing over varying batch sizes and mixing times. Hand Mixing can give improved mixing, as indicated by reduced initial viscosity; however, this method is not consistent.

  11. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  12. True Anonymity Without Mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Jimenez, C.; Marshall, L.

    2002-04-01

    Anonymizers based on mix computers interposed between the sender and the receiver of an e-mail message have been used in the Internet for several years by senders of e-mail messages who do not wish to disclose their identity. Unfortunately, the degree of anonymity provided by this paradigm is limited and fragile. First, the messages sent are not truly anonymous but pseudo-anonymous since one of the mixes, at least, always knows the sender's identity. Secondly, the strength of the system to protect the sender's identity depends on the ability and the willingness of the mixes to keep the secret. If the mixes fail, the sender/'s anonymity is reduced to pieces. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for sending truly anonymous messages over the Internet where the anonymous message is sent from a PDA which uses dynamically assigned temporary, non-personal, random IP and MAC addresses. Anonymous E-cash is used to pay for the service.

  13. Mixing and Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditmars, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of longitudinal dispersion, mixing and transport in streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and oceans. This review covers also: (1) fluid-solid mixtures and (2) oil spill behavior. A list of 189 references published in 1976 and 1977 is presented. (HM)

  14. Progress in mix modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, A.K.

    1997-03-14

    We have identified the Cranfill multifluid turbulence model (Cranfill, 1992) as a starting point for development of subgrid models of instability, turbulent and mixing processes. We have differenced the closed system of equations in conservation form, and coded them in the object-oriented hydrodynamics code FLAG, which is to be used as a testbed for such models.

  15. Stabilizer for mixed fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, M.; Igarashi, T.; Ukigai, T.

    1984-03-13

    A stabilizer for mixed fuels containing a reaction product obtained by reacting (1) a polyol having at least 3 hydroxyl groups in the molecule and a molecular weight of 400-10,000 with (2) an epihalohydrin, as the principal component.

  16. Mixed valent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, P. S.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger’s theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer–Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach’s diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc.

  17. Mixed valent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, P. S.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger’s theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach’s diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc.

  18. Detecting plastic strain distribution by a nonlinear wave mixing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guangxin; Liu, Minghe; Jacobs, Laurence J.; Qu, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear wave mixing method is used to measure the plastic strain distribution in polycrystalline materials. A pair of collinear longitudinal and shear waves is generated. Under the phase matching condition, a resonant shear wave with a difference frequency is generated and propagates towards the shear wave transducer. The amplitude of this resonant shear wave is proportional to the acoustic nonlinearity parameter β, which is known to be related to plastic deformation. By adjusting the two primary waves so that they mix at different locations, the distribution of β can be obtained. This study demonstrates the feasibility of detecting plastic strain distribution in polycrystalline materials by the nonlinear wave mixing technique.

  19. Influence of human leucocyte antigen‐DRB1 on the susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis and on the production of anti‐cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in a Portuguese population

    PubMed Central

    Ligeiro, D; Fonseca, J E; Abade, O; Abreu, I; Cruz, M; Nero, P; Cavaleiro, J; Teles, J; Trindade, H; Caetano, J M; Branco, J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To clarify the influence of the HLA‐DRB1 locus on the susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis and the production of anti‐cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti‐CCP) in a Portuguese population. Methods: 141 patients with rheumatoid arthritis fulfilling the American College of Rheumatology 1987 revised criteria for rheumatoid arthritis were compared with 150 healthy controls. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)‐DRB1 locus genotyping was assessed by polymerase chain reaction reverse probing assays and sequence‐specific primers. Anti‐CCP antibodies were quantified by ELISA in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Frequencies between groups were compared by the two‐sided Fisher's exact test and considered significant if p<0.05. Results The HLA‐DRB1*04 and HLA‐DRB1*10 groups were highly associated with rheumatoid arthritis (p<0.001 and p = 0.031, respectively). High titres of anti‐CCP antibodies were largely associated with the presence of HLA‐DRB1*04/10. Conclusion The well‐recognised susceptibility alleles to rheumatoid arthritis, HLA‐DRB1*04, were associated with rheumatoid arthritis in Portuguese patients. The relatively rare DRB1*10 was also associated with rheumatoid arthritis, as was described previously in other southern European countries. Both groups were associated with high anti‐CCP titres, reinforcing its relevance to disease onset. PMID:16793843

  20. Monitoring of chimerism following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT): technical recommendations for the use of short tandem repeat (STR) based techniques, on behalf of the United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Service for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping Chimerism Working Group.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jordan R; Scott, Stuart D; Jack, Andrea L; Lee, Helena; Mason, Joanne; Carter, Geoffrey I; Pearce, Laurence; Jackson, Tony; Clouston, Hazel; Sproul, Anne; Keen, Leigh; Molloy, Karen; Folarin, Najeem'deen; Whitby, Liam; Snowden, John A; Reilly, John T; Barnett, David

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of short tandem repeats (STR) is the predominant method for post-transplant monitoring of donor engraftment. It can enable early detection of disease relapse, level of engraftment and provide useful information on the graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)/graft-versus-tumour (GVT) effect, facilitating therapeutic intervention. Harmonization and standardization of techniques and result interpretation is essential to reduce the impact of laboratory variability on both clinical management and the results of multi-centre clinical trials. However, the United Kingdom National External Quality Assessment Service for Leucocyte Immunophenotyping (UK NEQAS LI) has highlighted significant issues inherent in STR testing that impact upon inter- and intra- laboratory variation. We present here consensus best practice guidelines and recommendations for STR chimerism testing, data interpretation and reporting that have been drawn up and agreed by a consortium of 11 UK and Eire clinical laboratories. This document uses data obtained from the UK NEQAS LI Post-Stem Cell Transplant (SCT) Chimerism Monitoring Programme.

  1. Unitarity constraints on trimaximal mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2010-07-01

    When the neutrino mass eigenstate {nu}{sub 2} is trimaximally mixed, the mixing matrix is called trimaximal. The middle column of the trimaximal mixing matrix is identical to tribimaximal mixing and the other two columns are subject to unitarity constraints. This corresponds to a mixing matrix with four independent parameters in the most general case. Apart from the two Majorana phases, the mixing matrix has only one free parameter in the CP conserving limit. Trimaximality results in interesting interplay between mixing angles and CP violation. A notion of maximal CP violation naturally emerges here: CP violation is maximal for maximal 2-3 mixing. Similarly, there is a natural constraint on the deviation from maximal 2-3 mixing which takes its maximal value in the CP conserving limit.

  2. Jet mixing in a reacting cylindrical crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leong, M. Y.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the mixing of air jets into the hot, fuel-rich products of a gas turbine primary zone. The mixing, as a result, occurs in a reacting environment with chemical conversion and substantial heat release. The geometry is a crossflow confined in a cylindrical duct with side-wall injection of jets issuing from round orifices. A specially designed reactor, operating on propane, presents a uniform mixture without swirl to mixing modules consisting of 8, 9, 10, and 12 holes at a momentum-flux ratio of 57 and a jet-to-mainstream mass-flow ratio of 2.5. Concentrations of O2, CO2, CO, and HC are obtained upstream, downstream, and within the orifice plane. O2 profiles indicate jet penetration while CO2, CO, and HC profiles depict the extent of reaction. Jet penetration is observed to be a function of the number of orifices and is found to affect the mixing in the reacting system. The results demonstrate that one module (the 12-hole) produces near-optimal penetration defined here as a jet penetration closest to the module half-radius, and hence the best uniform mixture at a plane one duct radius from the orifice leading edge.

  3. Experiments in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krum, David M.; Sadek, Ramy; Kohli, Luv; Olson, Logan; Bolas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Institute for Creative Technologies and the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, the Mixed Reality lab develops technologies and techniques for presenting realistic immersive training experiences. Such experiences typically place users within a complex ecology of social actors, physical objects, and collections of intents, motivations, relationships, and other psychological constructs. Currently, it remains infeasible to completely synthesize the interactivity and sensory signatures of such ecologies. For this reason, the lab advocates mixed reality methods for training and conducts experiments exploring such methods. Currently, the lab focuses on understanding and exploiting the elasticity of human perception with respect to representational differences between real and virtual environments. This paper presents an overview of three projects: techniques for redirected walking, displays for the representation of virtual humans, and audio processing to increase stress.

  4. Mixed Acid Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, R.A.

    1999-10-26

    Several non-thermal processes have been developed to destroy organic waste compounds using chemicals with high oxidation potentials. These efforts have focused on developing technologies that work at low temperatures, relative to incineration, to overcome many of the regulatory issues associated with obtaining permits for waste incinerators. One such technique with great flexibility is mixed acid oxidation. Mixed acid oxidation, developed at the Savannah River Site, uses a mixture of an oxidant (nitric acid) and a carrier acid (phosphoric acid). The carrier acid acts as a non-volatile holding medium for the somewhat volatile oxidant. The combination of acids allows appreciable amounts of the concentrated oxidant to remain in the carrier acid well above the oxidant''s normal boiling point.

  5. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark W.; Landrum, D. Brian; Spetman, David

    1997-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ambient air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane. The modeling basis was centered on using convective Mach Number as the similarity parameter to establish correlation between subscale, cold flow tests and full scale, hot firing modes. This parameter has been used successfully to correlate supersonic shear layer growth rates. The experiment design includes hot (600 R) air as the rocket exhaust simulant and hot (760 R) carbon dioxide as the turbine exhaust gas simulant. The combination of gases and their elevated temperatures was required to achieve a convective Mach Number which matched the fall scale item design conditions. The carbon dioxide is seeded with Acetone to permit tracing of the mixing processes through Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) techniques. The experiment and its design will be discussed in detail. Both the rocket and turbine exhaust duct nozzles are of unique (square and rectangular) shape and the turbine exhaust e)dt intersects the rocket nozzle wall upstream of the exit. Cold flow testing with the individual nozzles has been conducted to ascertain their behavior in comparison to conventional flow theory. These data are presented.

  6. Mixing, entropy and competition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, A. Y.

    2012-06-01

    Non-traditional thermodynamics, applied to random behaviour associated with turbulence, mixing and competition, is reviewed and analysed. Competitive mixing represents a general framework for the study of generic properties of competitive systems and can be used to model a wide class of non-equilibrium phenomena ranging from turbulent premixed flames and invasion waves to complex competitive systems. We demonstrate consistency of the general principles of competition with thermodynamic description, review and analyse the related entropy concepts and introduce the corresponding competitive H-theorem. A competitive system can be characterized by a thermodynamic quantity—competitive potential—which determines the likely direction of evolution of the system. Contested resources tend to move between systems from lower to higher values of the competitive potential. There is, however, an important difference between conventional thermodynamics and competitive thermodynamics. While conventional thermodynamics is constrained by its zeroth law and is fundamentally transitive, the transitivity of competitive thermodynamics depends on the transitivity of the competition rules. Intransitivities are common in the real world and are responsible for complex behaviour in competitive systems. This work follows ideas and methods that have originated from the analysis of turbulent combustion, but reviews a much broader scope of issues linked to mixing and competition, including thermodynamic characterization of complex competitive systems with self-organization. The approach presented here is interdisciplinary and is addressed to the general educated readers, whereas the mathematical details can be found in the appendices.

  7. Mixing of carbonate waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wigley, T.M.L.; Plummer, L.N.

    1976-01-01

    When mineral solutions of different compositions are mixed, the molalities and activities of individual ions in the mixture are often non-linear functions of their end-member values. This non-linearity is particularly significant in determining mineral saturation levels. Mixtures of saturated solutions may be either undersaturated or supersaturated depending on the end-member compositions and the physical conditions in which end-members and their mixtures exist. In carbonate solutions important non-linear effects occur due to redistribution of carbonate species. In extreme cases this causes mixture pH to be below both the end-member pH values. A simple but precise computer program (WATMIX) has been developed for calculating mixture composition for closed and open system mixing of arbitrary end-members. A number of mixing examples are considered which allow one to isolate three important processes leading to non-linear behaviour: the algebraic effect, the ??PCO2 effect, and the ionic strength effect. ?? 1976.

  8. Impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Barth, M. C.; Trainer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Isoprene, a volatile organic compound that is mainly emitted from trees, rapidly reacts with hydroxyl radical (OH) during daytime and subsequently forms ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. The isoprene-OH reaction can be affected by the interplay between chemistry and mixing because the two processes occur at a similar time scale. We investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene-OH reactivity with large eddy simulations (LES) coupled with comprehensive chemistry. Our results show that the covariance of isoprene and OH causes ~20% decrease to ~10% increase of the horizontal average reaction rate, depending on nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) abundances, compared to the rate that neglects the covariance. This wide range of effects on reaction rates is caused by the primary production and loss reactions of OH in each NOx regime. Our research promotes the use of LES for better understanding the role of turbulence in isoprene-OH reaction and parameterizations in large-scale models.

  9. Mixed tumor of deep soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Toshisada; Oda, Yoshinao; Sakamoto, Akio; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Tamiya, Sadafumi; Hachitanda, Yoichi; Masuda, Sachio; Tsuneyoshi, Masazumi

    2003-01-01

    Mixed tumors of the salivary gland and skin are relatively common but are quite rare in soft tissue. It is believed that, as in the salivary gland form, most of these lesions are benign, but that a small subset behave in an aggressive fashion. We report here a patient with recurrent mixed tumor of soft tissue with infiltrative growth. The primary tumor arose in deep subfascial soft tissue of the right lower leg and was adjacent to the surface of the fibula. An open biopsy and complete resection were performed. Upon histological examination of the resected specimen, neoplastic cell infiltration at the tumor/soft tissue interface was not obvious; local recurrence, however, was observed 1 year later. The patient was treated with wide resection. Histological examination confirmed that the recurrent tumor with an extensive chondroid area invaded the osseous tissue of the fibula. At present, 1 year after the second resection surgery, there is no evidence of disease.

  10. Treatment of mixed waste coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, S.; Bowers, J.S.

    1995-02-01

    The primary processes used at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for treatment of radioactively contaminated machine coolants are industrial waste treatment and in situ carbon adsorption. These two processes simplify approaches to meeting the sanitary sewer discharge limits and subsequent Land Disposal Restriction criteria for hazardous and mixed wastes (40 CFR 268). Several relatively simple technologies are used in industrial water treatment. These technologies are considered Best Demonstrated Available Technologies, or BDAT, by the Environmental Protection Agency. The machine coolants are primarily aqueous and contain water soluble oil consisting of ethanol amine emulsifiers derived from fatty acids, both synthetic and natural. This emulsion carries away metal turnings from a part being machined on a lathe or other machining tool. When the coolant becomes spent, it contains chlorosolvents carried over from other cutting operations as well as a fair amount of tramp oil from machine bearings. This results in a multiphasic aqueous waste that requires treatment of metal and organic contaminants. During treatment, any dissolved metals are oxidized with hydrogen peroxide. Once oxidized, these metals are flocculated with ferric sulfate and precipitated with sodium hydroxide, and then the precipitate is filtered through diatomaceous earth. The emulsion is broken up by acidifying the coolant. Solvents and oils are adsorbed using powdered carbon. This carbon is easily separated from the remaining coolant by vacuum filtration.

  11. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  12. Organic aerosol mixing observed by single-particle mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Ellis Shipley; Saleh, Rawad; Donahue, Neil M

    2013-12-27

    We present direct measurements of mixing between separately prepared organic aerosol populations in a smog chamber using single-particle mass spectra from the high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Docosane and docosane-d46 (22 carbon linear solid alkane) did not show any signs of mixing, but squalane and squalane-d62 (30 carbon branched liquid alkane) mixed on the time scale expected from a condensational-mixing model. Docosane and docosane-d46 were driven to mix when the chamber temperature was elevated above the melting point for docosane. Docosane vapors were shown to mix into squalane-d62, but not the other way around. These results are consistent with low diffusivity in the solid phase of docosane particles. We performed mixing experiments on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) surrogate systems finding that SOA derived from toluene-d8 (a surrogate for anthropogenic SOA (aSOA)) does not mix into squalane (a surrogate for hydrophobic primary organic aerosol (POA)) but does mix into SOA derived from α-pinene (biogenic SOA (bSOA) surrogate). For the aSOA/POA, the volatility of either aerosol does not limit gas-phase diffusion, indicating that the two particle populations do not mix simply because they are immiscible. In the aSOA/bSOA system, the presence of toluene-d8-derived SOA molecules in the α-pinene-derived SOA provides evidence that the diffusion coefficient in α-pinene-derived SOA is high enough for mixing on the time scale of 1 min. The observations from all of these mixing experiments are generally invisible to bulk aerosol composition measurements but are made possible with single-particle composition data.

  13. Primary Care's Dim Prognosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Philip R.

    2010-01-01

    Given the chorus of approval for primary care emanating from every party to the health reform debate, one might suppose that the future for primary physicians is bright. Yet this is far from certain. And when one looks to history and recognizes that primary care medicine has failed virtually every conceivable market test in recent years, its…

  14. Investigating Primary Source Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Joanne; Hanlon, Ann M.; Levine, Jennie A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary source research requires students to acquire specialized research skills. This paper presents results from a user study testing the effectiveness of a Web guide designed to convey the concepts behind "primary source literacy". The study also evaluated students' strengths and weaknesses when conducting primary source research. (Contains 3…

  15. MixSIAR: advanced stable isotope mixing models in R

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods The development of stable isotope mixing models has coincided with modeling products (e.g. IsoSource, MixSIR, SIAR), where methodological advances are published in parity with software packages. However, while mixing model theory has recently been ex...

  16. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinoma Causing Colonic Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, André Costa; Marques, Ana; Lopes, Joanne; Duarte, Alexandre; da Silva, Pedro Correia; Lopes, José Manuel; Maia, J. Costa

    2016-01-01

    Colonic intussusception is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction in adults and is caused by a malignant lesion in about 70% of cases. Early diagnosis and treatment are essential. We present a 64-year-old male patient with right colonic intussusception caused by a mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC), presenting as a giant pedunculated polyp (54 mm of largest diameter). The patient underwent right colectomy with primary anastomosis and adjuvant chemotherapy. The diagnosis of intussusception of the colon in adults is difficult because of its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation. In this case, the cause was a rare histological type malignant tumor (MANEC). PMID:27525153

  17. RBCC Mixing Studies: Ejector Ramjet Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The research project reported herein extended over a period from October 1997 through August 1999. The research resulted in three technical papers presented at the AIAA/SAE/ASME/ASEE 35th Joint Propulsion Conference in Los Angeles in July 1999. These three papers are attached to this Executive Summary to constitute the final report. Objective: The objective of this research was to determine the mixing characteristics between the primary rocket jets and the turbine exhaust stream in a simulated Rocket Based Combined Cycle propulsion concept operating in the air augmented rocket mode.

  18. Mix/Cast Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallentine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presented is a training handbook for Mix/Cast Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/Cast facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/Cast.

  19. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    DOEpatents

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2015-09-22

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  20. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    DOEpatents

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  1. The mixed chemistry problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Gesicki, K.; Lagadec, E.; Jones, D.; Millar, T. J.; Woods, P. M.; Chuimin, R. N.

    2014-04-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) represent the last stage of evolution of intermediate mass stars (0.8 to 8M⊙) and, hence, by their very nature are fundamental to galactic evolution. The massive envelopes ejected during their earlier evolution (AGB phase) are an important source of recycled material in the form of dust and molecular gas into the interstellar medium. A small fraction of PNe show both O- and C-rich features and are therefore classified as mixed-chemistry objects. The origin of their mixed-chemistry is still uncertain. Our chemical models show that the PAHs may form in irradiated dense tori, and HST images confirm the presence of such tori in some of the objects. Using the VISIR/VLT, we spatially resolved the precise location of the PAHs. We find a dense dusty structures in all of the objects observed. The ionised [SIV] material is located inside the dusty tori, while the PAHs are present at the outer edges of these tori. This confirms that the PAHs formation is due to the photodissociation of CO. In the Galactic Disk, very few PNe have shown to harbour these mixed-chemistry phenomenon. We propose to observe the tori of a sample of bipolar PNe from the Galactic Disk that harbour a close binary system inside them. The chemical models show that the formation of long C-chain molecules is possible to occur in O-rich environments, but the formation of these C-rich molecules require a very dense region (Av˜4). To test this theory we propose to observe the very dense tori of these Galactic Disk PNe and compare these sample with the already observed sample of PNe in the Galactic Bulge (Guzman-Ramirez, et al., 2011;Guzman-Ramirez, et al., 2013, submitted).

  2. Hydrogen peroxide generation from hydrated protein drink mixes.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L

    2013-11-01

    Generation of oxygen radicals upon hydration of powdered protein products was examined using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. Among individual proteins powders examined oxidative bursts occurred almost immediately, and then rapidly declined in the 1st 5 min. Commercially available powdered protein drink mixes behaved differently, with an initial lag phase followed by a sustained increase in luminol-enhanced luminescence, lasting for an hour or beyond. The drink mix that produced the highest level of luminol-enhanced luminescence also contained 379 nM ascorbate radical when hydrated (28 nmole/g of powdered drink mix). The entire ascorbic acid content of this drink mix was oxidized to nondetectable levels (using HPLC-diode array detection) within 60 min of being hydrated. Treatment of the hydrated drink mixes with the enzyme catalase almost completely inhibited the luminol-enhanced luminescence from the hydrated drink mix demonstrating that hydrogen peroxide generated via a chemical reaction among the drink mixes' ingredients was a primary reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is the strongest oxidative capacity demonstrated in a food product as consumed (without any manipulation to increase ROS) and the 1st time that the ascrobate radical in a food product as been quantified. Generation of hydrogen peroxide in the hydrated drink mixes from metal catalyzed reactions involving oxygen and reducing equivalents from ascorbic acid is proposed.

  3. B Lifetimes and Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Harold G.; /Indiana U.

    2009-05-01

    The Tevatron experiments, CDF and D0, have produced a wealth of new B-physics results since the start of Run II in 2001. We've observed new B-hadrons, seen new effects, and increased many-fold the precision with which we know the properties of b-quark systems. In these proceedings, we will discuss two of the most fruitful areas in the Tevatron B-physics program: lifetimes and mixing. We'll examine the experimental issues driving these analyses, present a summary of the latest results, and discuss prospects for the future.

  4. Using a Video Projector for Color-Mixing Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartels, Richard A.

    1982-01-01

    Suggestions are provided for using color television projector systems to demonstrate color mixing. With such a projector, manipulation of the three primary colors can be done by simply covering and uncovering the three separate beams. In addition, projector systems serve as good examples in studying geometrical optics. (Author/JN)

  5. Mixed waste focus area alternative technologies workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Borduin, L.C.; Palmer, B.A.; Pendergrass, J.A.

    1995-05-24

    This report documents the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA)-sponsored Alternative Technology Workshop held in Salt Lake City, Utah, from January 24--27, 1995. The primary workshop goal was identifying potential applications for emerging technologies within the Options Analysis Team (OAT) ``wise`` configuration. Consistent with the scope of the OAT analysis, the review was limited to the Mixed Low-Level Waste (MLLW) fraction of DOE`s mixed waste inventory. The Los Alamos team prepared workshop materials (databases and compilations) to be used as bases for participant review and recommendations. These materials derived from the Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR) data base (May 1994), the Draft Site Treatment Plan (DSTP) data base, and the OAT treatment facility configuration of December 7, 1994. In reviewing workshop results, the reader should note several caveats regarding data limitations. Link-up of the MWIR and DSTP data bases, while representing the most comprehensive array of mixed waste information available at the time of the workshop, requires additional data to completely characterize all waste streams. A number of changes in waste identification (new and redefined streams) occurred during the interval from compilation of the data base to compilation of the DSTP data base with the end result that precise identification of radiological and contaminant characteristics was not possible for these streams. To a degree, these shortcomings compromise the workshop results; however, the preponderance of waste data was linked adequately, and therefore, these analyses should provide useful insight into potential applications of alternative technologies to DOE MLLW treatment facilities.

  6. Analysis and testing of high entrainment single nozzle jet pumps with variable mixing tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickman, K. E.; Hill, P. G.; Gilbert, G. B.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical model was developed to predict the performance characteristics of axisymmetric single-nozzle jet pumps with variable area mixing tubes. The primary flow may be subsonic or supersonic. The computer program uses integral techniques to calculate the velocity profiles and the wall static pressures that result from the mixing of the supersonic primary jet and the subsonic secondary flow. An experimental program was conducted to measure mixing tube wall static pressure variations, velocity profiles, and temperature profiles in a variable area mixing tube with a supersonic primary jet. Static pressure variations were measured at four different secondary flow rates. These test results were used to evaluate the analytical model. The analytical results compared well to the experimental data. Therefore, the analysis is believed to be ready for use to relate jet pump performance characteristics to mixing tube design.

  7. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr/sup +3/:LaF/sub 3/ verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the /sup 3/H/sub 4/, /sup 3/H/sub 6/, and /sup 3/P/sub 0/ levels of the praseodymium ions.

  8. A new unsteady mixing model to predict NO(x) production during rapid mixing in a dual-stage combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1992-01-01

    An advanced gas turbine engine to power supersonic transport aircraft is currently under study. In addition to high combustion efficiency requirements, environmental concerns have placed stringent restrictions on the pollutant emissions from these engines. A combustor design with the potential for minimizing pollutants such as NO(x) emissions is undergoing experimental evaluation. A major technical issue in the design of this combustor is how to rapidly mix the hot, fuel-rich primary zone product with the secondary diluent air to obtain a fuel-lean mixture for combustion in the second stage. Numerical predictions using steady-state methods cannot account for the unsteady phenomena in the mixing region. Therefore, to evaluate the effect of unsteady mixing and combustion processes, a novel unsteady mixing model is demonstrated here. This model has been used to study multispecies mixing as well as propane-air and hydrogen-air jet nonpremixed flames, and has been used to predict NO(x) production in the mixing region. Comparison with available experimental data show good agreement, thereby providing validation of the mixing model. With this demonstration, this mixing model is ready to be implemented in conjunction with steady-state prediction methods and provide an improved engineering design analysis tool.

  9. Suppression of allo-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies secreted by B memory cells in vitro: intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) versus a monoclonal anti-HLA-E IgG that mimics HLA-I reactivities of IVIg

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, D; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Miyazaki, T; Pham, T; Jucaud, V

    2014-01-01

    B memory cells remain in circulation and secrete alloantibodies without antigen exposure > 20 years after alloimmunization postpartum or by transplantation. These long-lived B cells are resistant to cytostatic drugs. Therapeutically, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is administered to reduce allo-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies pre- and post-transplantation, but the mechanism of reduction remains unclear. Recently, we reported that IVIg reacts with several HLA-I alleles and the HLA reactivity of IVIg is lost after its HLA-E reactivity is adsorbed out. Therefore, we have generated an anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody that mimics the HLA-reactivity of IVIg to investigate whether this antibody suppresses IgG secretion, as does IVIg. B cells were purified from the blood of a woman in whose blood the B memory cells remained without antigen exposure > 20 years after postpartum alloimmunization. The B cells were stimulated with cytokines using a well-defined culture system. The anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody (mAb) significantly suppressed the allo-HLA class-II IgG produced by the B cells, and that this suppression was far superior to that by IVIg. These findings were confirmed with HLA-I antibody secreted by the immortalized B cell line, developed from the blood of another alloimmunized woman. The binding affinity of the anti-HLA-E mAb for peptide sequences shared (i.e. shared epitopes) between HLA-E and other β2-microglobulin-free HLA heavy chains (open conformers) on the cell surface of B cells may act as a ligand and signal suppression of IgG production of activated B memory cells. We propose that anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody may also be useful to suppress allo-HLA IgG production in vivo. PMID:24611451

  10. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus–target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14+ monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14+ human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+ monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14+ monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14+ CD16+ activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14high CD16+ monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14high CD16+, indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in order to control both intense

  11. Differential regulation of toll-like receptor-2, toll-like receptor-4, CD16 and human leucocyte antigen-DR on peripheral blood monocytes during mild and severe dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Azeredo, Elzinandes L; Neves-Souza, Patrícia C; Alvarenga, Allan R; Reis, Sônia R N I; Torrentes-Carvalho, Amanda; Zagne, Sonia-Maris O; Nogueira, Rita M R; Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia M; Kubelka, Claire F

    2010-06-01

    Dengue fever (DF), a public health problem in tropical countries, may present severe clinical manifestations as result of increased vascular permeability and coagulation disorders. Dengue virus (DENV), detected in peripheral monocytes during acute disease and in in vitro infection, leads to cytokine production, indicating that virus-target cell interactions are relevant to pathogenesis. Here we investigated the in vitro and in vivo activation of human peripheral monocytes after DENV infection. The numbers of CD14(+) monocytes expressing the adhesion molecule intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) were significantly increased during acute DF. A reduced number of CD14(+) human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR(+) monocytes was observed in patients with severe dengue when compared to those with mild dengue and controls; CD14(+) monocytes expressing toll-like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were increased in peripheral blood from dengue patients with mild disease, but in vitro DENV-2 infection up-regulated only TLR2. Increased numbers of CD14(+) CD16(+) activated monocytes were found after in vitro and in vivo DENV-2 infection. The CD14(high) CD16(+) monocyte subset was significantly expanded in mild dengue, but not in severe dengue. Increased plasma levels of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin (IL)-18 in dengue patients were inversely associated with CD14(high) CD16(+), indicating that these cells might be involved in controlling exacerbated inflammatory responses, probably by IL-10 production. We showed here, for the first time, phenotypic changes on peripheral monocytes that were characteristic of cell activation. A sequential monocyte-activation model is proposed in which DENV infection triggers TLR2/4 expression and inflammatory cytokine production, leading eventually to haemorrhagic manifestations, thrombocytopenia, coagulation disorders, plasmatic leakage and shock development, but may also produce factors that act in

  12. Biochemical and functional characterization of the leucocyte tyrosine phosphatase CD45 (CD45RO, 180 kD) from human neutrophils. In vivo upregulation of CD45RO plasma membrane expression on patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, R; Alvarez, V; Mollinedo, F; Sánchez-Madrid, F

    1992-01-01

    The biochemical and functional characterization, and the regulation of plasma membrane expression of the leucocyte tyrosine phosphatase CD45, have been investigated in neutrophils from healthy donors and patients undergoing haemodialysis. CD45 proteins of 180 kD and 130-150 kD were precipitated from neutrophils from both healthy subjects and haemodialysed patients. Prolonged storing, as well as trypsin treatment of samples containing the 180-kD CD45 protein, generated the 130-150-kD polypeptides. The 130-150-kD CD45 polypeptides carried extracellular CD45 epitopes, including the sialic acid-related UCHL1 epitope (CD45RO). Furthermore, these trypsin-generated CD45 polypeptides did not possess phosphatase activity, which could be detected on the 180-kD protein. A remarkable quantitative increase of cell surface expression of the neutrophil CD45 components was detected both after in vitro neutrophil activation and after dialysis treatment with neutropenic membranes. The CD45 biochemical pattern did not qualitatively change upon either in vitro or in vivo dialysis-induced neutrophil activation. The upregulated expression of CD45 on neutrophils from dialysed patients correlated with the neutropenic effect induced by the different dialyser membranes. Maximal upregulation of CD45 expression was observed after 15 min of dialysis with neutropenic membranes, and normal expression levels were restored after 1 h. By contrast, increase of CD45 plasma membrane expression induced in vitro by treatment of normal neutrophils with the degranulatory agents fMLP or Ca2+ ionophore was maintained. These results demonstrate that neutrophil cell surface expression of the 180-kD CD45 protein is upregulated during the in vivo haemodialysis process, and suggest that a proteolytic activity could regulate the enzymatic activity of CD45 by degranulation of its cytoplasmic phosphatase domains. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:1370931

  13. Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report, Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Chase, J.

    1999-04-29

    During fourth quarter 1998, ten constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from the upgradient monitoring wells.

  14. Hydrodynamic growth and mix experiments at National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Caggiano, J.; Casey, D.; Cerjan, C.; Clark, D. S.; Edwards, J.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hsing, W.; Hurricane, O.; Kilkenny, J.; Kline, J.; Knauer, J.; Landen, O.; McNaney, J.; Mintz, M.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Pino, J.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Rowley, D.; Tipton, R.; Weber, S.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamic growth and its effects on implosion performance and mix were studied at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Spherical shells with pre-imposed 2D modulations were used to measure Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth in the acceleration phase of implosions using in-flight x-ray radiography. In addition, implosion performance and mix have been studied at peak compression using plastic shells filled with tritium gas and imbedding localized CD diagnostic layer in various locations in the ablator. Neutron yield and ion temperature of the DT fusion reactions were used as a measure of shell-gas mix, while neutron yield of the TT fusion reaction was used as a measure of implosion performance. The results have indicated that the low-mode hydrodynamic instabilities due to surface roughness were the primary culprits to yield degradation, with atomic ablator-gas mix playing a secondary role.

  15. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  16. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  17. MIxed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP): Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is to develop and demonstrate innovative and emerging technologies for the treatment and management of DOE`s mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) for use by its customers, the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30) and the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). The primary goal of MWIP is to develop and demonstrate the treatment and disposal of actual mixed waste (MMLW and MTRU). The vitrification process and the plasma hearth process are scheduled for demonstration on actual radioactive waste in FY95 and FY96, respectively. This will be accomplished by sequential studies of lab-scale non-radioactive testing followed by bench-scale radioactive testing, followed by field-scale radioactive testing. Both processes create a highly durable final waste form that passes leachability requirements while destroying organics. Material handling technology, and off-gas requirements and capabilities for the plasma hearth process and the vitrification process will be established in parallel.

  18. Biogenic inputs to ocean mixing.

    PubMed

    Katija, Kakani

    2012-03-15

    Recent studies have evoked heated debate about whether biologically generated (or biogenic) fluid disturbances affect mixing in the ocean. Estimates of biogenic inputs have shown that their contribution to ocean mixing is of the same order as winds and tides. Although these estimates are intriguing, further study using theoretical, numerical and experimental techniques is required to obtain conclusive evidence of biogenic mixing in the ocean. Biogenic ocean mixing is a complex problem that requires detailed understanding of: (1) marine organism behavior and characteristics (i.e. swimming dynamics, abundance and migratory behavior), (2) mechanisms utilized by swimming animals that have the ability to mix stratified fluids (i.e. turbulence and fluid drift) and (3) knowledge of the physical environment to isolate contributions of marine organisms from other sources of mixing. In addition to summarizing prior work addressing the points above, observations on the effect of animal swimming mode and body morphology on biogenic fluid transport will also be presented. It is argued that to inform the debate on whether biogenic mixing can contribute to ocean mixing, our studies should focus on diel vertical migrators that traverse stratified waters of the upper pycnocline. Based on our understanding of mixing mechanisms, body morphologies, swimming modes and body orientation, combined with our knowledge of vertically migrating populations of animals, it is likely that copepods, krill and some species of gelatinous zooplankton and fish have the potential to be strong sources of biogenic mixing. PMID:22357597

  19. Fluid mixing in stratified gravity currents: the Prandtl mixing length.

    PubMed

    Odier, P; Chen, J; Rivera, M K; Ecke, R E

    2009-04-01

    Shear-induced vertical mixing in a stratified flow is a key ingredient of thermohaline circulation. We experimentally determine the vertical flux of momentum and density of a forced gravity current using high-resolution velocity and density measurements. A constant eddy-viscosity model provides a poor description of the physics of mixing, but a Prandtl mixing length model relating momentum and density fluxes to mean velocity and density gradients works well. For the average gradient Richardson number Ri(g) approximately 0.08 and a Taylor Reynolds number Re(lambda) approximately 100, the mixing lengths are fairly constant, about the same magnitude, comparable to the turbulent shear length.

  20. Combustor with two stage primary fuel assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sharifi, Mehran; Zolyomi, Wendel; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    2000-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having first and second passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air supplied to a primary combustion zone. The flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages is separately regulated using a single annular fuel distribution ring having first and second row of fuel discharge ports. The interior portion of the fuel distribution ring is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel distribution manifolds and is located upstream of the inlets to the two pre-mixing passages. The annular fuel distribution ring is supplied with fuel by an annular fuel supply manifold, the interior portion of which is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel supply manifolds. A first flow of fuel is regulated by a first control valve and directed to the first fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to first fuel supply tubes that direct it to the first fuel distribution manifold. From the first fuel distribution manifold, the first flow of fuel is distributed to the first row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the first pre-mixing passage. A second flow of fuel is regulated by a second control valve and directed to the second fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to second fuel supply tubes that direct it to the second fuel distribution manifold. From the second fuel distribution manifold, the second flow of fuel is distributed to the second row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the second pre-mixing passage.

  1. Medics in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Colin

    2003-01-01

    Some time ago a flyer on "Medics in Primary School" came the author's way. It described a programme for making placements in primary schools available to medical students. The benefits of the program to medical students and participating schools were highlighted, including opportunities to develop communication skills and demystify medicine. It…

  2. Primary Science Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Liz Lawrence has recently finished her term as Chair of Primary Science Committee (PSC). She is one of the 41 hub leaders who have led and mentored 192 schools across England and British Forces' schools in Germany, to achieve the first ever nationally recognised awards to celebrate excellence in primary science. In this article, the author writes…

  3. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peng; Venkatachalam, Jonathen; Lee, Victor Kwan Min; Tan, Sze Khen

    2016-05-01

    Leiomyoma is a smooth muscle neoplasm that commonly occurs in the genitourinary system and the gastrointestinal tract of the body. Primary pulmonary leiomyoma is rarely reported in literature. We report a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyoma of a 55-year-old male patient presenting with symptoms of cough for six months. PMID:27516882

  4. Transforming Primary Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askew, Mike

    2011-01-01

    What is good mathematics teaching? What is mathematics teaching good for? Who is mathematics teaching for? These are just some of the questions addressed in "Transforming Primary Mathematics", a highly timely new resource for teachers which accessibly sets out the key theories and latest research in primary maths today. Under-pinned by findings…

  5. Using Primary Source Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Explores the use of primary sources when teaching about U.S. slavery. Includes primary sources from the Gilder Lehrman Documents Collection (New York Historical Society) to teach about the role of slaves in the Revolutionary War, such as a proclamation from Lord Dunmore offering freedom to slaves who joined his army. (CMK)

  6. EMR Curriculum Guide: Primary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruschmeier, Veronica M., Ed.; Rockwell, Linda, Ed.

    Presented is a curriculum guide for educable mentally retarded children in primary and intermediate grades which specifies behavioral and interim objectives in the areas of basic verbal and arithmetic skills, vocational competencies, social competencies, and physical skills. Objectives such as the following are identified at the primary level:…

  7. Turbulent Mixing in the Ocean and Shelf Seas Surrounding Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, L.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean turbulence and mixing data have been collected from the Southern Ocean and coastal seas surrounding Antarctica since the early 1990's. I summarize these observations, discuss their implications for parameterization of diapycnal mixing in southern seas, and identify regions and processes deserving of further study. Mixing data have been acquired from: the western Weddell Sea; Maud Rise in the eastern Weddell Sea; the Bellingshausen Sea continental shelf; the northwest Ross Sea; the shelf break and inner shelf near the Mertz Glacier Tongue; Drake Passage; the region surrounding the South Scotia Ridge; and locations near the Kerguelen Plateau and the adjacent Antarctic coastal zone. Vertical diffusivities estimated for these diverse regions span at least three orders of magnitude. The different regions exhibit a variety of primary mechanisms for mixing including shear-driven instabilities, nonlinear equation-of-state effects (cabbeling and thermobaricity), double diffusion, and boundary-layer stresses and buoyancy exchange. Energy sources include density flows, extreme surface forcing by cold coastal katabatic winds, tide-driven mixing in the benthic layer, and in the pycnocline due to locally strong baroclinic tides; downward propagation of wind-forced near-inertial waves, and flow interactions with large-scale topographic features. From this review I identify regions and processes for which we presently have little information on which to base mixing parameterizations, and suggest field and analysis activities to overcome these limitations in the representation of mixing in Southern Ocean and global models.

  8. Authoring Immersive Mixed Reality Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misker, Jan M. V.; van der Ster, Jelle

    Creating a mixed reality experience is a complicated endeavour. From our practice as a media lab in the artistic domain we found that engineering is “only” a first step in creating a mixed reality experience. Designing the appearance and directing the user experience are equally important for creating an engaging, immersive experience. We found that mixed reality artworks provide a very good test bed for studying these topics. This chapter details three steps required for authoring mixed reality experiences: engineering, designing and directing. We will describe a platform (VGE) for creating mixed reality environments that incorporates these steps. A case study (EI4) is presented in which this platform was used to not only engineer the system, but in which an artist was given the freedom to explore the artistic merits of mixed reality as an artistic medium, which involved areas such as the look and feel, multimodal experience and interaction, immersion as a subjective emotion and game play scenarios.

  9. Mixing entropy in Dean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, Petru; Vyhnalek, Brian; Kaufman, Miron

    2013-03-01

    We investigate mixing in Dean flows by solving numerically the Navier-Stokes equation for a circular channel. Tracers of two chemical species are carried by the fluid. The centrifugal forces, experienced as the fluid travels along a curved trajectory, coupled with the fluid incompressibility induce cross-sectional rotating flows (Dean vortices). These transversal flows promote the mixing of the chemical species. We generate images for different cross sections along the trajectory. The mixing efficiency is evaluated using the Shannon entropy. Previously we have found, P. S. Fodor and M. Kaufman, Modern Physics Letters B 25, 1111 (2011), this measure to be useful in understanding mixing in the staggered herringbone mixer. The mixing entropy is determined as function of the Reynolds number, the angle of the cross section and the observation scale (number of bins). Quantitative comparison of the mixing in the Dean micromixer and in the staggered herringbone mixer is attempted.

  10. Lepton mixing and discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, D.; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2012-09-01

    The pattern of lepton mixing can emerge from breaking a flavor symmetry in different ways in the neutrino and charged lepton Yukawa sectors. In this framework, we derive the model-independent conditions imposed on the mixing matrix by the structure of discrete groups of the von Dyck type which include A4, S4, and A5. We show that, in general, these conditions lead to at least two equations for the mixing parameters (angles and CP phase δ). These constraints, which correspond to unbroken residual symmetries, are consistent with nonzero 13 mixing and deviations from maximal 2-3 mixing. For the simplest case, which leads to an S4 model and reproduces the allowed values of the mixing angles, we predict δ=(90°-120°).

  11. Smoothing of mixed complementarity problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, S.A.; More, J.J.

    1995-09-01

    The authors introduce a smoothing approach to the mixed complementarity problem, and study the limiting behavior of a path defined by approximate minimizers of a nonlinear least squares problem. The main result guarantees that, under a mild regularity condition, limit points of the iterates are solutions to the mixed complementarity problem. The analysis is applicable to a wide variety of algorithms suitable for large-scale mixed complementarity problems.

  12. Optimal broadcasting of mixed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dang Guifang; Fan Heng

    2007-08-15

    The N to M (M{>=}N) universal quantum broadcasting of mixed states {rho}{sup xN} is proposed for a qubit system. The broadcasting of mixed states is universal and optimal in the sense that the shrinking factor is independent of the input state and achieves the upper bound. The quantum broadcasting of mixed qubits is a generalization of the universal quantum cloning machine for identical pure input states. A pure state decomposition of the identical mixed qubits {rho}{sup xN} is obtained.

  13. A comparative study of primary and secondary stereotypies.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debabrata; Rajan, Prashant V; Erenberg, Gerald

    2013-12-01

    This study compares primary stereotypies (repetitive, self-stimulating, and seemingly nonsensical movements that can occur within typically developing children) and secondary stereotypies (those occurring within autistic or mentally retarded children). Utilizing a retrospective chart review from 1995 to 2010, the current study compares primary and secondary stereotypies by the application of a classification system that organizes the movement by its type (motor only, phonic only, mixed) and complexity. In addition, it investigates other parameters associated with the movements such as duration, frequency, age, functional impairment, and progression. The sample group consisted of 28 primary and 28 secondary cases. Primary stereotypies were predominantly motor, simple, of shorter duration, and of less frequency, whereas secondary stereotypies had more vocalization, complexity, longer durations, and higher frequencies. Moreover, functional impairment due to stereotypies was noted in 3 primary and 7 secondary cases, and worsening of stereotypies was noted in 70% of primary versus 44% of secondary cases.

  14. Visualizing renal primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Deane, James A; Verghese, Elizabeth; Martelotto, Luciano G; Cain, Jason E; Galtseva, Alya; Rosenblum, Norman D; Watkins, D Neil; Ricardo, Sharon D

    2013-03-01

    Renal primary cilia are microscopic sensory organelles found on the apical surface of epithelial cells of the nephron and collecting duct. They are based upon a microtubular cytoskeleton, bounded by a specialized membrane, and contain an array of proteins that facilitate their assembly, maintenance and function. Cilium-based signalling is important for the control of epithelial differentiation and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various cystic kidney diseases and in renal repair. As such, visualizing renal primary cilia and understanding their composition has become an essential component of many studies of inherited kidney disease and mechanisms of epithelial regeneration. Primary cilia were initially identified in the kidney using electron microscopy and this remains a useful technique for the high resolution examination of these organelles. New reagents and techniques now also allow the structure and composition of primary cilia to be analysed in detail using fluorescence microscopy. Primary cilia can be imaged in situ in sections of kidney, and many renal-derived cell lines produce primary cilia in culture providing a simplified and accessible system in which to investigate these organelles. Here we outline microscopy-based techniques commonly used for studying renal primary cilia.

  15. Mixed additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Francisco; Covas, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We consider mixed models y =∑i =0 w Xiβi with V (y )=∑i =1 w θiMi Where Mi=XiXi⊤ , i = 1, . . ., w, and µ = X0β0. For these we will estimate the variance components θ1, . . ., θw, aswell estimable vectors through the decomposition of the initial model into sub-models y(h), h ∈ Γ, with V (y (h ))=γ (h )Ig (h )h ∈Γ . Moreover we will consider L extensions of these models, i.e., y˚=Ly+ɛ, where L=D (1n1, . . ., 1nw) and ɛ, independent of y, has null mean vector and variance covariance matrix θw+1Iw, where w =∑i =1 n wi .

  16. Mixed oxide fuel development

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.D.; Omberg, R.P.

    1987-05-08

    This paper describes the success of the ongoing mixed-oxide fuel development program in the United States aimed at qualifying an economical fuel system for liquid metal cooled reactors. This development has been the cornerstone of the US program for the past 20 years and has proceeded in a deliberate and highly disciplined fashion with high emphasis on fuel reliability and operational safety as major features of an economical fuel system. The program progresses from feature testing in EBR-II to qualifying full size components in FFTF under fully prototypic conditions to establish a basis for extending allowable lifetimes. The development program started with the one year (300 EFPD) core, which is the FFTF driver fuel, continued with the demonstration of a two year (600 EFPD) core and is presently evaluating a three year (900 EFPD) fuel system. All three of these systems, consistent with other LMR fuel programs around the world, use fuel pellets gas bonded to a cladding tube that is assembled into a bundle and fitted into a wrapper tube or duct for ease of insertion into a core. The materials of construction progressed from austenitic CW 316 SS to lower swelling austenitic D9 to non swelling ferritic/martensitic HT9. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Mixed waste analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.J.; Turner, C.A.

    1993-12-31

    Improved superpower relations followed by the Soviet Union`s collapse acted as catalysts for changing the mission at Rocky Flats. Now, environmental concerns command as much attention as production capability. As a result, laboratory instruments once dedicated to plutonium production have a new purpose - the analysis of mixed wastes. Waste drums destined for WIPP require headspace analysis by GS/MS (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) for volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOC and SVOC). Flame AA analysis provides information on inorganic constituents. EPA guidelines for waste analysis (SW-846) overlook the obstacles of glove box manipulations. Sometimes, SW-846 guidelines conflict with the Rocky Flats waste minimization effort. However, the EPA encourages SW-846 adaptations if experimental data confirms the results. For water and soil samples, AA analysis of laboratory control samples show method capability inside a glove box. Non-radioactive drum headspace samples use a revised version of USEPA compendium method TO-14. Radioactive drum headspace samples require new instrumentation and change to SW-846 methods.

  18. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H.; Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  19. Anomalous Sediment Mixing by Bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, K. R.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Xie, M.; Packman, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Bioturbation, the reworking of sediments by animals and plants, is the dominant mode of sediment mixing in low-energy environments, and plays an important role in sedimentary biogeochemical processes. Mixing resulting from bioturbation has historically been modeled as a diffusive process. However, diffusion models often do not provide a sufficient description of sediment mixing due to bioturbation. Stochastic models, such as the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, provide more general descriptions of mixing behavior that are applicable even when regular diffusion assumptions are not met. Here we present results from an experimental investigation of anomalous sediment mixing by bioturbation in freshwater sediments. Clean and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments were collected from Lake DePue, a backwater lake of the Illinois River. The burrowing worm species Lumbriculus variegatus was introduced to homogenized Lake DePue sediments in aerated aquaria. We then introduced inert fine fluorescent particles to the sediment-water interface. Using time-lapse photography, we observed the mixing of the fluorescent particles into the sediment bed over a two-week period. We developed image analysis software to characterize the concentration distribution of the fluorescent particles as a function of sediment depth, and applied this to the time-series of images to evaluate sediment mixing. We fit a one-dimensional CTRW model to the depth profiles to evaluate the underlying statistical properties of the mixing behavior. This analysis suggests that the sediment mixing caused by L. variegatus burrowing is subdiffusive in time and superdiffusive in space. We also found that heavy metal contamination significantly reduces L. variegatus burrowing, causing increasingly anomalous sediment mixing. This result implies that there can be important feedbacks between sediment chemistry, organism behavior, and sediment mixing that are not considered in current environmental models.

  20. Serum antibodies to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E, HLA-F and HLA-G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during disease flares: Clinical relevance of HLA-F autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Jucaud, V; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Hiepe, F; Rose, T; Biesen, R

    2016-03-01

    T lymphocyte hyperactivity and progressive inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients results in over-expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ib on the surface of lymphocytes. These are shed into the circulation upon inflammation, and may augment production of antibodies promoting pathogenicity of the disease. The objective was to evaluate the association of HLA-Ib (HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G) antibodies to the disease activity of SLE. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM reactivity to HLA-Ib and β2m in the sera of 69 German, 29 Mexican female SLE patients and 17 German female controls was measured by multiplex Luminex(®)-based flow cytometry. The values were expressed as mean flourescence intensity (MFI). Only the German SLE cohort was analysed in relation to the clinical disease activity. In the controls, anti-HLA-G IgG predominated over other HLA-Ib antibodies, whereas SLE patients had a preponderance of anti-HLA-F IgG over the other HLA-Ib antibodies. The disease activity index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2000, was reflected only in the levels of anti-HLA-F IgG. Anti-HLA-F IgG with MFI level of 500-1999 was associated with active SLE, whereas inactive SLE revealed higher MFI (>2000). When anti-HLA-F IgG were cross-reactive with other HLA-Ib alleles, their reactivity was reflected in the levels of anti-HLA-E and -G IgG. The prevalence of HLA-F-monospecific antibodies in SLE patients was also associated with the clinical disease activity. Anti-HLA-F IgG is possibly involved in the clearance of HLA-F shed from lymphocytes and inflamed tissues to lessen the disease's severity, and thus emerges as a beneficial immune biomarker. Therefore, anti-HLA-Ib IgG should be considered as a biomarker in standard SLE diagnostics.

  1. Mixed-Methods Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-Method studies have emerged from the paradigm wars between qualitative and quantitative research approaches to become a widely used mode of inquiry. Depending on choices made across four dimensions, mixed-methods can provide an investigator with many design choices which involve a range of sequential and concurrent strategies. Defining…

  2. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  3. Primary aldosteronism and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Morton, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of secondary hypertension. Less than 50 cases of pregnancy in women with primary aldosteronism have been reported, suggesting the disorder is significantly underdiagnosed in confinement. Accurate diagnosis is complicated by physiological changes in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis in pregnancy, leading to a risk of false negative results on screening tests. The course of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is highly variable, although overall it is associated with a very high risk of fetal and maternal morbidity and mortality. The optimal management of primary aldosteronism during pregnancy is unclear, with uncertainty regarding the safety of mineralocorticoid antagonists and amiloride, their relative efficacy compared with the antihypertensive medications commonly used during pregnancy, and as to whether prognosis is improved by laparoscopic adrenalectomy where an adrenal adenoma can be demonstrated.

  4. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor, relieve symptoms, and improve brain function or comfort. Surgery is often needed for most primary brain ... and pressure Anticonvulsants to reduce seizures Pain medicines Comfort measures, safety measures, physical therapy, and occupational therapy ...

  5. Staging Primary CNS Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... large vein near the heart. Having a weakened immune system may increase the risk of developing primary CNS ... immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or other disorders of the immune system or who have had a kidney transplant . For ...

  6. Genetics of primary hyperaldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Ravi Kumar; Söderkvist, Peter; Gimm, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    Hypertension is a common medical condition and affects approximately 20% of the population in developed countries. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form of secondary hypertension and affects 8-13% of patients with hypertension. The two most common causes of primary aldosteronism are aldosterone-producing adenoma and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Familial hyperaldosteronism types I, II and III are the known genetic syndromes, in which both adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of aldosterone. However, only a minority of patients with primary aldosteronism have one of these syndromes. Several novel susceptibility genes have been found to be mutated in aldosterone-producing adenomas: KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, CTNNB1, CACNA1D, CACNA1H and ARMC5 This review describes the genes currently known to be responsible for primary aldosteronism, discusses the origin of aldosterone-producing adenomas and considers the future clinical implications based on these novel insights. PMID:27485459

  7. Primary infertility (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  8. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  9. Thanksgiving in Primary Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branum, Nell Carter

    1996-01-01

    Examines how the holiday of Thanksgiving is treated in primary books and offers comparisons of 28 popular titles in print. Innovative classroom and media center projects are described, including discussions, drawings, bulletin boards, problem-solving activities, and cooking. (LRW)

  10. Mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ragnar; Hetlevik, Siri Opsahl; Lilleby, Vibke; Molberg, Øyvind

    2016-02-01

    The concept of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) as a separate connective tissue disease (CTD) has persisted for more than four decades. High titers of antibodies targeting the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) in peripheral blood are a sine qua non for the diagnosis of MCTD, in addition to distinct clinical features including Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), "puffy hands," arthritis, myositis, pleuritis, pericarditis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recently, population-based epidemiology data from Norway estimated the point prevalence of adult-onset MCTD to be 3.8 per 100,000 and the mean annual incidence to be 2.1 per million per year, supporting the notion that MCTD is the least common CTD. Little is known about the etiology of MCTD, but recent genetic studies have confirmed that MCTD is a strongly HLA (​human leukocyte antigen)-linked disease, as the HLA profiles of MCTD differ distinctly from the corresponding profiles of ethnically matched healthy controls and other CTDs. In the first section of this review, we provide an update on the clinical, immunological, and genetic features of MCTD and discuss the relationship between MCTD and the other CTDs. Then we proceed to discuss the recent advances in therapy and our current understanding of prognosis and prognostic factors, especially those that are associated with the more serious pulmonary and cardiovascular complications of the disease. In the final section, we discuss some of the key, unresolved questions related to anti-RNP-associated diseases and indicate how these questions may be approached in future studies. PMID:27421219

  11. Biomass conversion to mixed alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, M.T.; Loescher, M.; Ross, M.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses the MixAlco Process which converts a wide variety of biomass materials (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, agricultural residues) to mixed alcohols. First, the biomass is treated with lime to enhance its digestibility. Then, a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms converts the lime-treated biomass to volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. To maintain fermentor pH, a neutralizing agent (e.g. calcium carbonate or lime) is added, so the fermentation actually produces VFA salts such as calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The VFA salts are recovered and thermally converted to ketones (e.g. acetone, methylethyl ketone, diethyl ketone) which are subsequently hydrogenated to mixed alcohols (e.g. isopropanol, isobutanol, isopentanol). Processing costs are estimated at $0.72/gallon of mixed alcohols making it potentially attractive for transportation fuels.

  12. Active Mixing in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chun-Hai; Tan, Jun-Jie; Ren, Deng-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Hua

    2010-11-01

    We investigate a minute magneto hydro-dynamic mixer with relatively rapid mixing enhancement experimentally and analytically. The mixer is fabricated with brass and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) layers. A secondary flow is generated by using the Lorentz force in the fluids. The efficiency of mixing is greatly improved due to the large increase of the contact area between two mixing fluids. The micro particle image velocimetry technique is employed to measure the fluid flow characteristics in the micro-channel. Numerical simulation is performed based on the theoretical model of the computational fluid dynamics and the electromagnetic field theory. The experimental results are in good agreement with the numerical results, which indicates that the mixing area is enlarged by the driving of Lorentz force and the mixing can be enhanced.

  13. Primary actinomycosis of hand

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Sanghamitra; Dash, Muktikesh; Turuk, Jyotirmayee; Sahu, Rani; Panda, Pritilata

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycosis is a chronic granulomatous suppurative disease having the propensity for extension to the contagious tissue with the formation of multiple discharging sinus tracts. Primary actinomycosis of extremity is a very uncommon clinical entity and is commonly considered as a soft-tissue infection. We report here, a case of primary actinomycosis of the upper extremity in a 24-year-old male who was treated successfully with surgical excision and extended period of antimicrobial treatment. PMID:25538911

  14. Primary headache disorders.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2013-07-01

    Primary headache disorders include migraine, tension-type headaches, and the trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs). "Primary" refers to a lack of clear underlying causative pathology, trauma, or systemic disease. The TACs include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing; hemicrania continua, although classified separately by the International Headache Society, shares many features of both migraine and the TACs. This article describes the features and treatment of these disorders.

  15. Treatment of primary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Elliott, W C

    1976-12-01

    Reports in the English language of the treatment of primary syphilis are reviewed. Except for benzathine penicillin, the efficacy of the currently recommended dosage schedules are documented only by Schroeter et al. Although these investigators reported generally acceptable failure rates, further study is necessary to determine: (1) if differences in efficacy exist among regimes; (2) if the current schedules are equally effective in both primary and secondary syphilis; and (3) if increased dosages reduce failure rates. PMID:1010777

  16. Primary biliary cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J; Ali, Ahmad H; Lindor, Keith D

    2015-10-17

    Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic cholestatic liver disease characterised by destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, leading to fibrosis and potential cirrhosis through resulting complications. The serological hallmark of primary biliary cirrhosis is the antimitochondrial antibody, a highly disease-specific antibody identified in about 95% of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis. These patients usually have fatigue and pruritus, both of which occur independently of disease severity. The typical course of primary biliary cirrhosis has changed substantially with the introduöction of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Several randomised placebo-controlled studies have shown that UDCA improves transplant-free survival in primary biliary cirrhosis. However, about 40% of patients do not have a biochemical response to UDCA and would benefit from new therapies. Liver transplantation is a life-saving surgery with excellent outcomes for those with decompensated cirrhosis. Meanwhile, research on nuclear receptor hormones has led to the development of exciting new potential treatments. This Seminar will review the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and natural history of primary biliary cirrhosis, discuss management of the disease and its sequelae, and introduce research on new therapeutic options. PMID:26364546

  17. Activating PI3Kδ mutations in a cohort of 669 patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Elgizouli, M; Lowe, D M; Speckmann, C; Schubert, D; Hülsdünker, J; Eskandarian, Z; Dudek, A; Schmitt-Graeff, A; Wanders, J; Jørgensen, S F; Fevang, B; Salzer, U; Nieters, A; Burns, S; Grimbacher, B

    2016-02-01

    The gene PIK3CD codes for the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ (PI3Kδ), and is expressed solely in leucocytes. Activating mutations of PIK3CD have been described to cause an autosomal dominant immunodeficiency that shares clinical features with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We screened a cohort of 669 molecularly undefined primary immunodeficiency patients for five reported mutations (four gain-of-function mutations in PIK3CD and a loss of function mutation in PIK3R1) using pyrosequencing. PIK3CD mutations were identified in three siblings diagnosed with CVID and two sporadic cases with a combined immunodeficiency (CID). The PIK3R1 mutation was not identified in the cohort. Our patients with activated PI3Kδ syndrome (APDS) showed a range of clinical and immunological findings, even within a single family, but shared a reduction in naive T cells. PIK3CD gain of function mutations are more likely to occur in patients with defective B and T cell responses and should be screened for in CVID and CID, but are less likely in patients with a pure B cell/hypogammaglobulinaemia phenotype. PMID:26437962

  18. What is primary care?

    PubMed

    1983-06-01

    This discussion of primary care directs attention to quality of care and the primary care team. Primary care is the care provided by the 1st person the patient sees who has been trained in health care. The answer to the question of who should provide primary care should be based on the tasks and responsibilities which must be met. These are: correct diagnosis as the precondition for treatment; appropriate treatment to restore maximum possible restoration of function; relief of pain and suffering and alleviation of anxieties associated with illness; appropriate referral for specialized diagnostic, treatment, and rehabilitation services; management responsibility for the overall health of the patient; preventive services, i.e., immunization, multiphasic screening for early detection, and preventive supervision; and health education and advice for health promotion, disease prevention, treatment and rehabilitation. The need for highly trained primary care practitioners is illustrated by a study conducted by Ciocco, Hunt, and Altman as part of the 1946 survey of group practice by the US Public Health Service. In each of 16 medical groups, they abstracted the records of 200 new patients to obtain data on the services received for a period of 14 days following admission. When they compared the 5 groups with the greatest average amount of hospital training of physicians with the 5 groups with the lowest amount, siginificant differences were found. There were more general examinations among patients of the groups in the high set, 46% against 36%, and there were fewer patients for whom no examination was recorded. Significant differences were also found in treatment between the high and low sets. The study implications were clear. The old style general practitioner can hardly be considered competent to provide a high quality of primary care, yet these were the primary care practitioners that the United Mine Workers Association (UMWA) medical care program encountered in the

  19. The Experiences of Pupils with SEN and Their Parents at the Stage of Pre-Transition from Primary to Post-Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Geraldine; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; McEnteggart, Ciara; Desmond, Deirdre; Vahey, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    The experiences of pupils with Special Educational Needs (SEN) and their parents at pre-transition from primary to post-primary school have received little attention in the literature. The current study investigated these experiences using a mixed methods approach within the Irish educational system. Thirty-two pupils with SEN and 42 parents of…

  20. Perceptions of Primary to Secondary School Transitions: Challenge or Threat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Erin; McMaugh, Anne; O'Sullivan, Kerry-Ann

    2012-01-01

    Primary to secondary school transition has been identified as a significant and stressful event for young adolescent students. Recent research has focused on individual aspects of coping with the challenges of transition in order to determine features that may act as protective or harmful factors. This study employs a mixed-method design to…

  1. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    coastal diffusion using image analysis. Applied Scientific Research 59,.191-204. 1998. [5] J.M. Redondo. Turbulent mixing in the Atmosphere and Ocean. Fluid Physics. 584-597. World Scientific. New York. 1994

  2. Fluid mixing in stratified gravity currents: the Prandtl mixing length.

    PubMed

    Odier, P; Chen, J; Rivera, M K; Ecke, R E

    2009-04-01

    Shear-induced vertical mixing in a stratified flow is a key ingredient of thermohaline circulation. We experimentally determine the vertical flux of momentum and density of a forced gravity current using high-resolution velocity and density measurements. A constant eddy-viscosity model provides a poor description of the physics of mixing, but a Prandtl mixing length model relating momentum and density fluxes to mean velocity and density gradients works well. For the average gradient Richardson number Ri(g) approximately 0.08 and a Taylor Reynolds number Re(lambda) approximately 100, the mixing lengths are fairly constant, about the same magnitude, comparable to the turbulent shear length. PMID:19392360

  3. Mapping the Mixed Methods–Mixed Research Synthesis Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Leeman, Jennifer; Crandell, Jamie L.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed methods–mixed research synthesis is a form of systematic review in which the findings of qualitative and quantitative studies are integrated via qualitative and/or quantitative methods. Although methodological advances have been made, efforts to differentiate research synthesis methods have been too focused on methods and not focused enough on the defining logics of research synthesis—each of which may be operationalized in different ways—or on the research findings themselves that are targeted for synthesis. The conduct of mixed methods–mixed research synthesis studies may more usefully be understood in terms of the logics of aggregation and configuration. Neither logic is preferable to the other nor tied exclusively to any one method or to any one side of the qualitative/quantitative binary. PMID:23066379

  4. The von Nardroff Color Mixing Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2005-12-01

    Ernest von Nardroff gave his name to the color mixing apparatus shown in Fig. 1. The basic idea behind this demonstration is to produce three beams of colored light that may be projected onto a white surface. If beams of red, blue, and green are overlapped to produce a figure like a three leaf clover or a Venn diagram, the region of complete overlap will appear white, and the three regions of overlap of two colors produce the three false primaries: yellow, magenta, and cyan. A straightforward technique is to use three slide projectors, each with a colored filter. Von Nardroff's apparatus, displayed at the educational exhibit of Erasmus Hall High School at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis in 1904, permits the use of only one projector.

  5. Mixed Layer Drift Revealed by Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Zhao, Yun-He; Esaias, Wayne E.; Campbell, Janet W.; Moore, Timothy; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the first time we are able to derive ocean currents using the wavelet algorithm for feature tracking from two different sensors (MODIS and SeaWiFS) on different satellites. Satellite ocean color data provide an important insight to the marine biosphere because of their capability to quantify certain fundamental properties (such as phytoplankton pigment concentration, marine primary production, etc.) on a global basis. The mixed layer drift can be derived because the ocean color signal bears information from a much larger depth (10 to 30 meters) as compared with the sea surface temperature data. Although the drifter data are very limited in the study area, the comparison shows a general agreement between drifter data and satellite tracking results, especially for the cases near the Gulf Stream boundary.

  6. Effects of ozone, ultraviolet and peracetic acid disinfection of a primary-treated municipal effluent on the immune system of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Hébert, N; Gagné, F; Cejka, P; Bouchard, B; Hausler, R; Cyr, D G; Blaise, C; Fournier, M

    2008-08-01

    Municipal sewage effluents are complex mixtures that are known to compromise the health condition of aquatic organisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impacts of various wastewater disinfection processes on the immune system of juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The trout were exposed to a primary-treated effluent for 28 days before and after one of each of the following treatments: ultraviolet (UV) radiation, ozonation and peracetic acid. Immune function was characterized in leucocytes from the anterior head kidney by the following three parameters: phagocytosis activity, natural cytotoxic cells (NCC) function and lymphocyte (B and T) proliferation assays. The results show that the fish mass to length ratio was significantly decreased for the primary-treated and all three disinfection processes. Exposure to the primary-treated effluent led to a significant increase in macrophage-related phagocytosis; the addition of a disinfection step was effective in removing this effect. Both unstimulated and mitogen-stimulated T lymphocyte proliferation in fish decreased dramatically in fish exposed to the ozonated effluent compared to fish exposed to either the primary-treated effluent or to aquarium water. Stimulation of T lymphocytes proliferation was observed with the peracetic acid treatment group. In conclusion, the disinfection strategy used can modify the immune system in fish at the level of T lymphocyte proliferation but was effective to remove the effects on phagocytosis activity.

  7. [Marketing mix in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing).

  8. Nanofluidic mixing via hybrid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Ziran; Li, Shunbo; Zhou, Bingpu; Hui, Yu Sanna; Shen, Rong; Wen, Weijia

    2014-10-20

    We report the design and fabrication of the nanofluidic mixer comprising hybrid hydrophobic/hydrophilic micro-patterns on the top and bottom walls of the nanochannel. The unique feature of such mixer is that, without any geometric structure inside the nanochannel, the mixing can be realized solely by the hybrid surfaces. Besides, the mixing length in nanomixer has been significantly shortened comparing to micromixer. We attribute the mixing achievement to be caused by the convection and chaotic flows of two fluids along the hybrid surface due to the large surface-to-volume ratio of the nanochannel.

  9. [Marketing mix in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing). PMID:26093140

  10. A new unsteady mixing model to predict NO(x) production during rapid mixing in a dual-stage combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh; Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Kerstein, Alan R.; Chen, J.-Y.

    1992-01-01

    An advanced gas turbine engine to power supersonic transport aircraft is currently under study. In addition to high combustion efficiency requirements, environmental concerns have placed stringent restrictions on the pollutant emissions from these engines. A dual-stage combustor with the potential for minimizing pollutants such as NO(x) emissions is undergoing experimental evaluation. A major technical issue in the design of this combustor is how to rapidly mix the hot, fuel-rich primary stage product with the secondary diluent air to obtain a fuel-lean mixture for combustion in the secondary stage. Numerical design studies using steady-state methods cannot account for the unsteady phenomena in the mixing region. Therefore, to evaluate the effect of unsteady mixing and combustion processes, a novel unsteady mixing model is demonstrated here. This model has been used in a stand-alone mode to study mixing and combustion in hydrogen-air nonpremixed jet flames. NO(x) production in these jet flames was also predicted. Comparison of the computed results with experimental data show good agreement thereby providing validation of the mixing model.

  11. Impacts of Mixing on Acceptable Indoor Air Quality in Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain I.

    2010-01-01

    Ventilation reduces occupant exposure to indoor contaminants by diluting or removing them. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, every zone will have different dilution rates and contaminant source strengths. The total ventilation rate is the most important factor in determining occupant exposure to given contaminant sources, but the zone-specific distribution of exhaust and supply air and the mixing of ventilation air can play significant roles. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of mixing depending on several factors such as air leakage, air distribution system, and contaminant source and occupant locations. Most U.S. and Canadian homes have central heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, which tend to mix the air; thus, the indoor air in different zones tends to be well mixed for significant fractions of the year. This article reports recent results of investigations to determine the impact of air mixing on exposures of residential occupants to prototypical contaminants of concern. We summarize existing literature and extend past analyses to determine the parameters than affect air mixing as well as the impacts of mixing on occupant exposure, and to draw conclusions that are relevant for standards development and for practitioners designing and installing home ventilation systems. The primary conclusion is that mixing will not substantially affect the mean indoor air quality across a broad population of occupants, homes, and ventilation systems, but it can reduce the number of occupants who are exposed to extreme pollutant levels. If the policy objective is to minimize the number of people exposed above a given pollutant threshold, some amount of mixing will be of net benefit even though it does not benefit average exposure. If the policy is to minimize exposure on average, then mixing air in homes is detrimental and should not be encouraged. We also conclude that most homes in the US have adequate mixing

  12. Space shuttle/food system study. Volume 2, Appendix F: Flight food and primary packaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The analysis and selection of food items and primary packaging, the development of menus, the nutritional analysis of diet, and the analyses of alternate food mixes and contingency foods is reported in terms of the overall food system design for space shuttle flight. Stowage weights and cubic volumes associated with each alternate mix were also evaluated.

  13. EVALUATING CONCENTRATION PROFILES DURING UNSTEADY MIXING

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Lawler, Bruce D.; Sundaram, S. K.; Baer, Ellen BK; Hatchell, Brian K.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Sande, Susan; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zuljevic, Nino

    2010-01-01

    Pulse jet mixing tests to suspend noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid were conducted at three geometric scales. To understand the solids suspension process an ultrasonic concentration probe was used to measure the concentration of solids in the cloud during a pulse at various elevations and radial positions. The data are being analyzed to provide a model for predicting concentration as a function of elevation. This paper presents a simple single frequency ultrasonic measurement application that demonstrates the ability of ultrasonic sensors to measure slurry concentration based on signal attenuation. Sensor calibration data show that ultrasonic signal attenuation is proportional to the applied frequency and to the slurry volume fraction. Real-time measurements of ultrasonic signal attenuation were used to track the process of slurry mixing using single sensors and sensor arrays. Comparison of means of the ultrasonic measurements with means obtained from discrete extractive measurements show that the distributions overlap and cannot be statistically distinguished. The real-time ultrasonic sensor can be used as a primary measurement method or to reduce reliance upon extractive methods to measure slurry density.

  14. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    MedlinePlus

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  15. Transition and mixing in layered stratified shear flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victoria; Caulfield, C. P.

    2001-11-01

    Flows with step-wise density distributions, i.e. well-mixed layers of fluid separated by narrow regions of high density gradient, are common in geophysics. We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at a moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. Linear stability theory predicts that the flow may be unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G. I. Taylor. We investigate the behaviour of these "Taylor waves" at finite amplitude through 3D nonlinear numerical simulations. We follow the development of primary and secondary instabilities which contribute to the eventual breakdown of the layered flow. In particular, we are interested in the mixing properties of the flow as it undergoes transition to small-scale disorder.

  16. Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

  17. Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

  18. Primary cutaneous nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Jiang, Guan; Lei, Tie-Chi

    2014-11-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare human infection due to ubiquitous soil born gram-positive, filametous aerobic bacteria. First signs are frequently cutaneous either as part of systemic infection disseminated to the skin, or as primary cutaneous inoculation. An 88 years old man presented with a 3-day history of red papules and pustules with pain on his forehead. The combination of the unusual clinical presentation, laboratory examinations, and a favorable response to co-trimoxazole therapy were consistent with a diagnosis of primary cuteneous nocardiosis. Early recognition and treatment of the disease will improve the cure rate. PMID:25518763

  19. Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma.

    PubMed

    Rifki Jai, S; Bouffetal, R; Chehab, F; Khaiz, D; Bouzidi, A

    2009-09-01

    Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystic tumors are extremely rare, and although their histopathogenesis is still uncertain, several theories have been proposed. Traditionally, transabdominal laparotomy and enucleation of the cyst is the treatment of choice. The anatomopathological examination of the mass is imperative in the fact to eliminate malignant lesions. We report the case of a 43-year-old woman, with primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystic tumor, revealed by an abdomino-pelvic mass. During laparotomy, a totality of the tumor was removed. The anatomopathologic study permitted the diagnosis.

  20. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  1. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  2. Crossflow Mixing of Noncircular Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liscinsky, D. S.; True, B.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of the isothermal mixing of a turbulent jet injected perpendicular to a uniform crossflow through several different types of sharp-edged orifices. Jet penetration and mixing was studied using planar Mie scattering to measure time-averaged mixture fraction distributions of circular, square, elliptical, and rectangular orifices of equal geometric area injected into a constant velocity crossflow. Hot-wire anemometry was also used to measure streamwise turbulence intensity distributions at several downstream planes. Mixing effectiveness was determined using (1) a spatial unmixedness parameter based on the variance of the mean jet concentration distributions and (2) by direct comparison of the planar distributions of concentration and of turbulence intensity. No significant difference in mixing performance was observed for the six configurations based on comparison of the mean properties.

  3. Modeling Mix in ICF Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Clark, D. S.; Chang, B.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2014-10-01

    The observation of ablator material mixing into the hot spot of ICF implosions correlates with reduced yield in National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments. Higher Z ablator material radiatively cools the central hot spot, inhibiting thermonuclear burn. This talk focuses on modeling a ``high-mix'' implosion from the NIC, where greater than 1000 ng of ablator material was inferred to have mixed into the hot spot. Standard post-shot modeling of this implosion does not predict the large amounts of ablator mix necessary to explain the data. Other issues are explored in this talk and sensitivity to the method of radiation transport is found. Compared with radiation diffusion, Sn transport can increase ablation front growth and alter the blow-off dynamics of capsule dust. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Is the tribimaximal mixing accidental?

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Mohammed; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2010-07-01

    The tribimaximal (TBM) mixing is not accidental if structures of the corresponding leptonic mass matrices follow immediately from certain (residual or broken) flavor symmetry. We develop a simple formalism which allows one to analyze effects of deviations of the lepton mixing from TBM on the structure of the neutrino mass matrix and on the underlying flavor symmetry. We show that possible deviations from the TBM mixing can lead to strong modifications of the mass matrix and strong violation of the TBM-mass relations. As a result, the mass matrix may have an 'anarchical' structure with random values of elements or it may have some symmetry that differs from the TBM symmetry. Interesting examples include matrices with texture zeros, matrices with certain 'flavor alignment' as well as hierarchical matrices with a two-component structure, where the dominant and subdominant contributions have different symmetries. This opens up new approaches to understanding the lepton mixing.

  5. Perspectives on dilution jet mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    A microcomputer code which displays 3-D oblique and 2-D plots of the temperature distribution downstream of jets mixing with a confined crossflow has been used to investigate the effects of varying the several independent flow and geometric parameters on the mixing. Temperature profiles calculated with this empirical model are presented to show the effects of orifice size and spacing, momentum flux ratio, density ratio, variable temperature mainstream, flow area convergence, orifice aspect ratio, and opposed and axially staged rows of jets.

  6. Parameterization of large-scale turbulent diffusion in the presence of both well-mixed and weakly mixed patchy layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, M. K.; Hocking, W. K.; Tarasick, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical diffusion and mixing of tracers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) are not uniform, but primarily occur due to patches of turbulence that are intermittent in time and space. The effective diffusivity of regions of patchy turbulence is related to statistical parameters describing the morphology of turbulent events, such as lifetime, number, width, depth and local diffusivity (i.e., diffusivity within the turbulent patch) of the patches. While this has been recognized in the literature, the primary focus has been on well-mixed layers, with few exceptions. In such cases the local diffusivity is irrelevant, but this is not true for weakly and partially mixed layers. Here, we use both theory and numerical simulations to consider the impact of intermediate and weakly mixed layers, in addition to well-mixed layers. Previous approaches have considered only one dimension (vertical), and only a small number of layers (often one at each time step), and have examined mixing of constituents. We consider a two-dimensional case, with multiple layers (10 and more, up to hundreds and even thousands), having well-defined, non-infinite, lengths and depths. We then provide new formulas to describe cases involving well-mixed layers which supersede earlier expressions. In addition, we look in detail at layers that are not well mixed, and, as an interesting variation on previous models, our procedure is based on tracking the dispersion of individual particles, which is quite different to the earlier approaches which looked at mixing of constituents. We develop an expression which allows determination of the degree of mixing, and show that layers used in some previous models were in fact not well mixed and so produced erroneous results. We then develop a generalized model based on two dimensional random-walk theory employing Rayleigh distributions which allows us to develop a universal formula for diffusion rates for multiple two-dimensional layers with

  7. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. D.; Rudman, M.; Lester, D. R.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations—such as shear banding or wall slip—creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems.

  8. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media.

    PubMed

    Smith, L D; Rudman, M; Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations-such as shear banding or wall slip-creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems. PMID:26931594

  9. Mixing Effect in Internal Blast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granholm, R. H.; Sandusky, H. W.

    2009-12-01

    Detonation product gases are usually assumed to be completely mixed with an existing atmosphere by the time a peak quasi-static pressure (Pqs) is reached within an enclosed internal blast environment. With incomplete mixing, however, comes a loss in pressure from unburned fuel as well as a previously unrecognized source of error: heat capacity of the gas increases substantially with temperature, providing an energy sink in regions of unmixed hot gas. Our objective was to look at the extent of mixing by measuring gas temperature at several locations within a blast chamber at the time of peak Pqs. We recorded ranges of up to 400° C depending on charge location within the chamber, which is presumed to affect turbulence and mixing. Losses in peak Pqs of up to 13% may be attributed to this mixing effect for 1-kg Pentolite charges in a 62-m3 chamber in the simple geometries tested. A reasonably accurate Pqs may be extracted from blast wave reverberations in a chamber, allowing a closer look at effects such as gas mixing and consistency among multiple gages. These results point to an explanation for missing energy and a better understanding of heat flow in internal blast.

  10. Mixing of nanosize particles by magnetically assisted impaction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicolone, James V.

    Nanoparticles and nanocomposites offer unique properties that arise from their small size, large surface area, and the interactions of phases at their interfaces, and are attractive for their potential to improve performance of drugs, biomaterials, catalysts and other high-value-added materials. However, a major problem in utilizing nanoparticles is that they often lose their high surface area due to grain growth. Creating nanostructured composites where two or more nanosized constituents are intimately mixed can prevent this loss in surface area, but in order to obtain homogeneous mixing, de-agglomeration of the individual nanoparticle constituents is necessary. Due to high surface area, nano-particles form very large, fractal agglomerates. The structure of these agglomerates can have a large agglomerate composed of sub-agglomerates (SA), which itself consists of primary agglomerates (PA), that contain chain or net like nano-particle structures; typically sub-micron size. Thus the final agglomerate has a hierarchical, fractal structure, and depending upon the forces applied, it could break down to a certain size scale. The agglomerates can be fairly porous and fragile or they could be quite dense, based on primary particle size and its surface energy. Thus depending upon the agglomerate strength at different length scales, one could achieve deagglomeration and subsequent mixing at varying length scale. A better understanding of this can have a major impact on the field of nano-structured materials; thus the long term objective of this project is to gain fundamental understanding of deagglomeration and mixing of nano-agglomerates. Dry mixing is in general not effective in achieving desired mixing at nanoscale, whereas wet mixing suffers from different disadvantages like nanomaterial of interest should be insoluble, has to wet the liquid, and involves additional steps of filtration and drying. This research examines the use of environmentally friendly a novel

  11. Mixed Waste Encapsulation in Polyester Resins. Treatment for Mixed Wastes Containing Salts. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference #1685

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex there are large inventories of homogeneous solid mixed wastes, such as treatment residues, fly ashes, and sludges that contain relatively high concentrations (greater than 15% by weight) of salts. The inherent solubility of nitrate, sulfate, and chloride salts makes traditional cement stabilization of these waste streams difficult, expensive, and challenging. Salts can effect the setting rate of cements and can react with cement hydration products to form expansive and cement damaging compounds. Many of these salt wastes are in a dry granular form and are the by-product of treating spent acidic and metal solutions used to recover and reformulate nuclear weapons materials over the past 50 years. At the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) alone, there is approximately 8,000 cubic meters of nitrate salts (potassium and sodium nitrate) stored above ground with an earthen cover. Current estimates indicate that over 200 million kg of contaminated salt wastes exist at various DOE sites. Continued primary treatment of waste water coupled with the use of mixed waste incinerators may generate an additional 5 million kg of salt-containing, mixed waste residues each year. One of the obvious treatment solutions for these salt-containing wastes is to immobilize the hazardous components to meet Environmental Protection Agency/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (EPA/RCRA) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR), thus rendering the mixed waste to a radioactive waste only classification. One proposed solution is to use thermal treatment via vitrification to immobilize the hazardous component and thereby substantially reduce the volume, as well as provide exceptional durability. However, these melter systems involve expensive capital apparatus with complicated off-gas systems. In addition, the vitrification of high salt waste may cause foaming and usually requires extensive development to specify glass

  12. Healthcare is primary.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation. PMID:26985402

  13. GMT primary mirror support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Charlie

    2014-07-01

    The GMT primary mirror support draws on the heritage developed for the 3.5 m, 6.5 m, and 8.4 m mirrors from the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. While similar in design philosophy and concept, each successive generation has incorporated refinements based on the experience gained from previous mirrors.

  14. Philosophy in Primary Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, John

    2012-01-01

    The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British primary schools. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education" Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on "Philosophy for Children in Transition", so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just mentioned. The result…

  15. Primary Premier for Belfast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author talks about the Association for Science Education (ASE) Primary Science Committee's (PSC) March 2009 meeting which was held in Belfast as guests of ASE Northern Ireland. To mark the auspicious occasion of a body that usually meets four times a year in the Hatfield HQ crossing the Irish Sea to be hosted by its Celtic cousins, a Lord…

  16. Primary Art Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton Unified School District 373, KS.

    GRADES OR AGES: Primary Grades. SUBJECT MATTER: Art. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide begins with a list of topics for art expression. The main body of the guide contains 15 color-coded sections on the following subjects: 1) mobiles and folded paper; 2) collage and photo montage; 3) square paper and mosaics; 4) wax paper and…

  17. Primary galvanic cell

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, P.; Coffey, J.P.; Wilson, J.W.

    1981-03-03

    A primary galvanic cell displaying superior leak-resistant characteristics is described. A molded battery container having one open end is sealed by an end cap having both insulating and conducting properties. An electrode, integrally affixed to the end cap and in electrical registry therewith, is disposed within the cell.

  18. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Seidel, J

    1985-08-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis is a disease caused by the free-living amebae of the genera Naegleria or Acanthamoeba. The clinical course may result in death a few days after presentation or it may be insidious, with progressive neurologic deterioration and death after a chronic course. This article describes the organisms involved, the clinical course, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. PMID:3895137

  19. Primary hepatic angiosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, P; Bhadana, U; Singh, R A K; Ahuja, A

    2015-09-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare, aggressive tumor; composed of spindle or pleomorphic cells that line, or grow into, the lumina of pre-existing vascular spaces like sinusoids and terminal hepatic venules; with only about 200 cases diagnosed annually worldwide but it is the most common primary malignant mesenchymal tumor of the liver in adults and accounts for 2% of all primary hepatic malignancies. HAS occurs in association with known chemical carcinogens, but 75% of the tumors have no known etiology. Patients present with vague symptoms like abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue or an abdominal mass. Hepatic angiosarcoma is usually multicentric and involves both lobes, entire liver may also found to be involved. CD31 is the most reliable marker. These tumors lack specific features on imaging, so, pathological diagnosis is necessary. There are no established treatment guidelines because of low frequency and aggressive nature of tumor, chemotherapy is only palliative, liver resection is indicated for solitary mass and liver transplant is contraindicated. The aim of this article is to comprehensively review all the available literature and to present detailed information and an update on primary hepatic angiosarcoma. PMID:26008857

  20. Multiple Primary Cancer Monograph

    Cancer.gov

    To identify groups of cancer survivors that are at increased risk for multiple primary cancers, investigators led an effort to provide the first comprehensive population-based analysis of the risk of subsequent cancer in the U.S., resulting in a monograph.

  1. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  2. [Primary retroperitoneal hydatidosis].

    PubMed

    Benejam Gual, J M; Rioja Sanz, C; Cuesta Presedo, J M; Gil Martínez, P; Bono Ariño, A; Rioja Sanz, L A

    1997-05-01

    Genitourinary involvement by the Echinococcus granulosus larvae (urinary hydatidosis) ranks third in order of frequency after liver and lung involvement. The finding of a primary hydatidic cyst with retroperitoneal location is an uncommon fact. This paper presents once case of this infrequent disease. A revision of the different etiopathogenic mechanisms, as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches is made.

  3. Healthcare is primary.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  4. Healthcare is primary

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2nd National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on “healthcare” in India. The theme of this conference was “Healthcare is Primary.” The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the “general health system” instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, “family medicine” (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation. PMID:26985402

  5. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ruchi; Singh, D K; Srivastava, A K; Bhargava, Anudita

    2008-12-01

    We report an 8 month-old infant with primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAME) due to Naegleria fowleri. The child was treated with amphotericin B, chloramphenicol and rifampicin for 3 weeks. PAME is an almost universally fatal condition with very few survivors till date. Our patient was one of the rare survivors who recovered after treatment and was discharged without any residual neurological deficit.

  6. Primary Keyboarding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Valery; And Others

    Beginning with a rationale for implementing a primary grade keyboarding course, this paper describes the implementation of such a course at the Bernardsville (New Jersey) Elementary School. The methods and procedures discussed include the essential concepts to consider when teaching keyboarding and the materials necessary to implement the program.…

  7. Primary Standards Laboratory report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) for the Department of Energy, Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL). This report summarizes metrology activities that received emphasis in the first half of 1990 and provides information pertinent to the operation of the DOE/AL system-wide Standards and Calibration Program.

  8. Numerical investigation on the mixing and combustion in supersonic ejecting flow of RBCC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. H.; He, G. Q.; He, H. Q.; Xu, S. L.

    3D mixing and reacting flows of five RBCC configurations in ejecting mode were investigated with numerical techniques and newly established mixing degree model. The effects of secondary combustion and geometry configuration on ejecting and mixing were analyzed in detail. It was concluded that: 1) The geometry configuration of RBCC affects the mixing process of rocket ejector mode greatly, in which the geometry structure of primary nozzle mainly determines the upstream mixing, while the geometry of flow path determines the downstream. 2) The secondary combustion can promote the thrust, but for different configuration, the promotion magnitude is different. 3) The key elements of thrust augmentation obtained by the improved configuration are higher mixing degree, positive pressure state and higher combustion efficiency.

  9. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  10. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen. PMID:12412967

  11. Mathematics Performance and Principal Effectiveness: A Case Study of Some Coastal Primary Schools in Sri Lanka

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egodawatte, Gunawardena

    2012-01-01

    This mixed method research study is situated in the school effectiveness research paradigm to examine the correlation between the effectiveness of urban, primary school principals and their students' performance in mathematics. Nine, urban, primary schools from Negombo, a coastal fishing area in Sri Lanka, were selected; their student achievements…

  12. Exploring the Effects of Classroom Culture on Primary Pre-Service Teachers' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altun, Taner

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to examine primary student teachers' (PSTs) perceptions about the effects of pre-formed classroom culture on their professional development. In the study, a mixed method approach was used. The study group consisted of 4th year student teachers who attend a primary teacher education program leading to a B.Ed. degree at the…

  13. Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a National Primary School HIV Intervention in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the impact of a primary-school HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper primary-school pupils in Kenya. A quasi-experimental mixed qualitative-quantitative pre- and 18-month post-design using 40 intervention and 40 matched control schools demonstrated significant…

  14. An Examination of Teachers' Ratings of Lesson Plans Using Digital Primary Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milman, Natalie B.; Bondie, Rhonda

    2012-01-01

    This mixed method study examined teachers' ratings of 37 field-tested social studies lesson plans that incorporated digital primary sources through a grant from the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources program for K-12 teachers. Each lesson, available in an online teaching materials collection, was field-tested and reviewed by at…

  15. Primary zone air proportioner

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, Edward N. G.

    1982-10-12

    An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

  16. Relating quark mixing neutrino mixing and {delta}{sub lep}

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S. M.; Chen Hengyu

    2013-05-23

    It is proposed that all flavor mixing is caused by the mixing of the three quark and lepton families with vectorlike fermions in 5+5-bar multiplets of SU(5). The entire 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 complex mass matrix of the neutrinos M{sub {nu}} is then found to have a simple expression in terms of two complex parameters and an overall scale. Thus, all the presently unknown neutrino parameters are predicted. The best fits are for {theta}{sub atm} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 40 Degree-Sign The leptonic Dirac CP phase is found to be somewhat greater than {pi}.

  17. Gastric flow and mixing studied using computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Pal, Anupam; Indireshkumar, Keshavamurthy; Schwizer, Werner; Abrahamsson, Bertil; Fried, Michael; Brasseur, James G

    2004-12-22

    The fed human stomach displays regular peristaltic contraction waves that originate in the proximal antrum and propagate to the pylorus. High-resolution concurrent manometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the stomach suggest a primary function of antral contraction wave (ACW) activity unrelated to gastric emptying. Detailed evaluation is difficult, however, in vivo. Here we analyse the role of ACW activity on intragastric fluid motions, pressure, and mixing with computer simulation. A two-dimensional computer model of the stomach was developed with the 'lattice-Boltzmann' numerical method from the laws of physics, and stomach geometry modelled from MRI. Time changes in gastric volume were specified to match global physiological rates of nutrient liquid emptying. The simulations predicted two basic fluid motions: retrograde 'jets' through ACWs, and circulatory flow between ACWs, both of which contribute to mixing. A well-defined 'zone of mixing', confined to the antrum, was created by the ACWs, with mixing motions enhanced by multiple and narrower ACWs. The simulations also predicted contraction-induced peristaltic pressure waves in the distal antrum consistent with manometric measurements, but with a much lower pressure amplitude than manometric data, indicating that manometric pressure amplitudes reflect direct contact of the catheter with the gastric wall. We conclude that the ACWs are central to gastric mixing, and may also play an indirect role in gastric emptying through local alterations in common cavity pressure. PMID:15615685

  18. [Particle dispersion by order motion in mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Troutt, T.R.

    1993-09-01

    Multiphase mixing in turbulent flows is a key element in many energy conversion and chemical processes. There is considerable need for improving the design and control of these processes. Free turbulent shear flows are the primary agents for particle mixing in these systems. Previous studies by this research group have shown that, if particle coupling effects are neglected, the organized vortex structures generated by these shear flows control the character of the particle mixing process. A coordinated experimental and numerical study is proposed to investigate the coupled effects of droplet mass and energy transfer on the turbulent multiphase mixing process in free shear flows. This study has important implications concerning the design of reacting flow systems. Experimental visualizations of the multiphase flow will be carried out using laser-sheet lighting and high speed photography. Local measurements of droplet size, velocity and concentration diagnostics, will be made with laser anemometry and phase Doppler diagnostics. Complementary analytical and numerical analyses will be carried out to assess the effect of coupling on vortex structure, stability and growth. The results of the proposed research will provide basic understanding concerning the coupled effects of particle concentration on the rate of multiphase mixing in turbulent flows. Information of this nature is essential to the improved designs of engineering systems with particulate or droplet flows.

  19. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azaiez, Jalel; Homsy, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    This work is a continuing effort to advance our understanding of the effects of polymer additives on the structures of the mixing layer. In anticipation of full nonlinear simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer, we examined in a first stage the linear stability of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. The results of this study show that, for a fluid described by the Oldroyd-B model, viscoelasticity reduces the instability of the inviscid mixing layer in a special limit where the ratio (We/Re) is of order 1 where We is the Weissenberg number, a measure of the elasticity of the flow, and Re is the Reynolds number. In the present study, we pursue this project with numerical simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. Our primary objective is to determine the effects of viscoelasticity on the roll-up structure. We also examine the origin of the numerical instabilities usually encountered in the simulations of non-Newtonian fluids.

  20. Mixing in massive stellar mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaburov, E.; Lombardi, J. C.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2008-01-01

    The early evolution of dense star clusters is possibly dominated by close interactions between stars, and physical collisions between stars may occur quite frequently. Simulating a stellar collision event can be an intensive numerical task, as detailed calculations of this process require hydrodynamic simulations in three dimensions. We present a computationally inexpensive method in which we approximate the merger process, including shock heating, hydrodynamic mixing and mass loss, with a simple algorithm based on conservation laws and a basic qualitative understanding of the hydrodynamics of stellar mergers. The algorithm relies on Archimedes' principle to dictate the distribution of the fluid in the stable equilibrium situation. We calibrate and apply the method to mergers of massive stars, as these are expected to occur in young and dense star clusters. We find that without the effects of microscopic mixing, the temperature and chemical composition profiles in a collision product can become double-valued functions of enclosed mass. Such an unphysical situation is mended by simulating microscopic mixing as a post-collision effect. In this way we find that head-on collisions between stars of the same spectral type result in substantial mixing, while mergers between stars of different spectral type, such as type B and O stars (~10 and ~40Msolar respectively), are subject to relatively little hydrodynamic mixing. Our algorithm has been implemented in an easy-to-use software package, which we have made publicly available for download.1

  1. Primary hyperparathyroidism and nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Calcifications in the kidneys may occur in the parenchyma (nephrocalcinosis), pelvis renis (nephrolithiasis) or ureters (ureterolithiasis). Several factors may protect against stone formation or promote precipitation of stones. Most stones contain calcium, and the hypercalciuria seen in primary hyperparathyroidism is a contributing factor to stone formation in the kidneys and urinary tract. In early case series, renal stone formation was frequent, whereas the proportion of patients with symptomatic renal stones has declined in recent years. However, a substantial proportion of patients presents with asymptomatic nephrocalcinosis or nephrolithiasis. Before diagnosis and treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism, renal stone events are more frequent than in the general population. However, even after surgical cure, an increased rate of renal stone events may be seen. This may to some extent be the result of stones or calcifications already present at the time of diagnosis or sequelae to prior stones such as infections or ureter strictures. PMID:25911000

  2. Primary hypertension in childhood.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Barbara S; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Weber, Nico; Bullo, Marina; Bianchetti, Mario G; Simonetti, Giacomo D

    2013-10-01

    There is growing concern about elevated blood pressure in children and adolescents, because of its association with the obesity epidemic. Moreover, cardiovascular function and blood pressure level are determined in childhood and track into adulthood. Primary hypertension in childhood is defined by persistent blood pressure values ≥ the 95th percentile and without a secondary cause. Preventable risk factors for elevated blood pressure in childhood are overweight, dietary habits, salt intake, sedentary lifestyle, poor sleep quality and passive smoking, whereas non-preventable risk factors include race, gender, genetic background, low birth weight, prematurity, and socioeconomic inequalities. Several different pathways are implicated in the development of primary hypertension, including obesity, insulin resistance, activation of the sympathetic nervous system, alterations in sodium homeostasis, renin-angiotensin system and altered vascular function. Prevention of adult cardiovascular disease should begin in childhood by regularly screening for high blood pressure, counseling for healthy lifestyle and avoiding preventable risk factors.

  3. Primary Retroperitoneal Mucinous Cystadenoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seok Youn; Han, Weon Cheol

    2016-02-01

    Mucinous cystadenomas and cystadenocarcinomas of the ovary are clinically and histopathologically well-established common tumors. However, primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystic tumors are extremely rare, and although their histopathogenesis is still uncertain, several theories have been proposed. Most authors suggest that they develop through mucinous metaplasia in a preexisting mesothelium-lined cyst. An accurate preoperative diagnosis of these tumors is difficult because no effective diagnostic measures have been established. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of this tumor may be fatal for the patient because of complications such as rupture, infection, and malignant transformation. We describe the case of a 31-year-old woman with abdominal pain and a palpable mass. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed a retroperitoneal cystic mass, which was resected successfully through laparoscopy. Histopathological examination of the resected mass confirmed the diagnosis of a primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 without any complications.

  4. Primary retroperitoneal mucinous cystadenoma.

    PubMed

    Abedalthagafi, Malak; Jackson, Patrick G; Ozdemirli, Metin

    2009-01-01

    Primary mucinous neoplasms of the retroperitoneum, including mucinous cystadenocarcinomas, mucinous borderline tumors, and mucinous cystadenomas are uncommon tumors found exclusively in women. Since the retroperitoneum does not contain mucinous epithelium, the origin, and histogenesis of these tumors remain unclear. It is speculated that these tumors can arise from teratomas, supernumerary ovaries, or mucinous metaplasia of the retroperitoneal mesothelium. We describe a case of a primary mucinous cystadenoma of the retroperitoneum in a 44 year-old female that presented as a palpable abdominal mass. There was no evidence of recurrence 16 months after complete laparoscopic excision of the tumor. The morphology and immunohistochemical analysis in this case support the hypothesis that mucinous metaplasia of the retroperitoneal mesothelium overlying a preceding inclusion cyst can give rise to retroperitoneal mucinous tumors.

  5. Mixing of Supersonic Jets in a RBCC Strutjet Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, S.; Hawk, Clark W.; Bakker, P. G.; Parkinson, D.; Turner, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during take-off and low speed flight. A scale model of the Strutjet device was built and tested to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strut exit plane in simulated sea level take-off conditions. The Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic method has been employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point where the two jets meet, is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0 (the original design point), 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter at 8 locations downstream of the rocket nozzle exit. The results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the strut to a distance of about 18 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream (18"). These images show the turbine exhaust to be confined until a short distance downstream. The expansion into the ingested air is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and 1.5 and shows that mixing with this air would likely begin at a distance of 2" downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Of the pressure ratios tested in this research, 2.0 is the best value for delaying the mixing at the operating conditions considered.

  6. Effects of incomplete mixing on chemical reactions under flow heterogeneities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Lazaro; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Dentz, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of the mixing process in aquifers is of primary importance when assessing attenuation of pollutants. In aquifers different hydraulic and chemical properties can increase mixing and spreading of the transported species. Mixing processes control biogeochemical transformations such as precipitation/dissolution reactions or degradation reactions that are fast compared to mass transfer processes. Reactions are local phenomena that fluctuate at the pore scale, but predictions are often made at much larger scales. However, aquifer heterogeities are found at all scales and generates flow heterogeneities which creates complex concentration distributions that enhances mixing. In order to assess the impact of spatial flow heterogeneities at pore scale we study concentration profiles, gradients and reaction rates using a random walk particle tracking (RWPT) method and kernel density estimators to reconstruct concentrations and gradients in two setups. First, we focus on a irreversible bimolecular reaction A+B → C under homogeneous flow to distinguish phenomena of incomplete mixing of reactants from finite-size sampling effects. Second, we analise a fast reversible bimolecular chemical reaction A+B rightleftharpoons C in a laminar Poiseuille flow reactor to determine the difference between local and global reaction rates caused by the incomplete mixing under flow heterogeneities. Simulation results for the first setup differ from the analytical solution of the continuum scale advection-dispersion-reaction equation studied by Gramling et al. (2002), which results in an overstimation quantity of reaction product (C). In the second setup, results show that actual reaction rates are bigger than the obtained from artificially mixing the system by averaging the concentration vertically. - LITERATURE Gramling, C. M.,Harvey, C. F., Meigs, and L. C., (2002). Reactive transport in porous media: A comparison of model prediction with laboratory visualization, Environ. Sci

  7. Primary periungual leiyomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Rachadi, Hanane; Derrabi, Nora; Marnissi, Farida; Chiheb, Soumaya

    2016-01-01

    Primary superficial leiomyosarcoma is a very uncommon malignant tumor which occurs most commonly the lower limbs. We report one case of unusual topography of this tumor. An 81-year-old female patient presented with a 2 year history of a periungual tumor of the left index finger. The histopathological and immunohistochemical examination of a biopsy specimen was compatible with the diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma. There was no evidence of metastatic disease. An amputation of the index was performed. PMID:27617944

  8. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain.

  9. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Darby, C P; Conradi, S E; Holbrook, T W; Chatellier, C

    1979-10-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis a rapidly fatal CNS infection caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri. The disease is acquired by swimming in fresh water and is being recognized with increasing frequency. Results of early diagnosis and treatment with amphotericin and other drugs suggest therapeutic optimism. Epidemiological surveys have shown the organism to be commonly present in fresh-water lakes in the warmer parts of the world. Prompt recognition and treatment is vital. PMID:495593

  10. [Primary care in France].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-01-01

    The poor planning of health care professionals in Spain has led to an exodus of doctors leaving the country. France is one of the chosen countries for Spanish doctors to develop their professional career. The French health care system belongs to the Bismarck model. In this model, health care system is financed jointly by workers and employers through payroll deduction. The right to health care is linked to the job, and provision of services is done by sickness-funds controlled by the Government. Primary care in France is quite different from Spanish primary care. General practitioners are independent workers who have the right to set up a practice anywhere in France. This lack of regulation has generated a great problem of "medical desertification" with problems of health care access and inequalities in health. French doctors do not want to work in rural areas or outside cities because "they are not value for money". Medical salary is linked to professional activity. The role of doctors is to give punctual care. Team work team does not exist, and coordination between primary and secondary care is lacking. Access to diagnostic tests, hospitals and specialists is unlimited. Duplicity of services, adverse events and inefficiencies are the norm. Patients can freely choose their doctor, and they have a co-payment for visits and hospital care settings. Two years training is required to become a general practitioner. After that, continuing medical education is compulsory, but it is not regulated. Although the French medical Health System was named by the WHO in 2000 as the best health care system in the world, is it not that good. While primary care in Spain has room for improvement, there is a long way for France to be like Spain. PMID:26304179

  11. Primary Retroperitoneal Myxoid Liposarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Setsu, Nokitaka; Miyake, Mototaka; Wakai, Susumu; Nakatani, Fumihiko; Kobayashi, Eisuke; Chuman, Hirokazu; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Kawai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas (MLSs) are genetically defined by the presence of DDIT3 gene fusions and most commonly arise in the extremities of young adults. Whether MLSs develop primarily in the retroperitoneum is controversial, and a recent retrospective study found no molecularly confirmed examples. Because MLSs tend to metastasize to deep soft tissues, purported examples of primary retroperitoneal lesions might represent distant metastasis, most commonly from extremities. In addition, well-differentiated or dedifferentiated liposarcomas, which are characterized by MDM2 amplifications, may exhibit prominent myxoid changes and mimic MLSs. Here, we document 5 cases of MLSs that originated in the retroperitoneum that were identified through critical clinicopathologic reevaluation. These cases accounted for 2.3% of 214 primary retroperitoneal liposarcomas and 3.2% of 156 MLSs in our database. They occurred in 3 men and 2 women with a median age of 32 years. All tumors were localized to the retroperitoneum at presentation, and no patient developed extra-abdominal recurrences during the clinical course (median, 50 mo). All 5 cases exhibited at least focal classic histologic findings. All harbored DDIT3 gene rearrangements, and none harbored MDM2 amplifications according to fluorescence in situ hybridization. This study demonstrates that primary MLSs can occur in the retroperitoneum, albeit rarely, and can be accurately diagnosed through combined clinicopathologic and molecular analysis. PMID:27158758

  12. [Primary care in Sweden].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-09-01

    Sweden was one of the first European Union countries that saw the opportunity in the free movement of professionals. First offers for jobs were managed in 2000. Since then, a large number of professionals have taken the opportunity of a decent job and have moved from Spain to Sweden. The Swedish health care model belongs to the group of national health systems. The right to health care is linked to legal citizenship. Health is financed through regional taxes, but there is a compulsory co-payment regardless of the financial situation of the patient. The provision of health care is decentralised at a regional level, and there is a mixture of private and public medical centres. Primary care is similar to that in Spain. Health professionals work as a team with a division of tasks. Like in Spain, waiting lists and coordination between primary and specialised care are a great problem. Patients may register with any public or private primary care centre and hospital provider within their region. Access to diagnostic tests and specialists are restricted to those selected by specialists. Doctors are salaried and their job and salary depend on their experience, professional abilities and regional needs. Medicine is curative. General practitioners are the gateway to the system, but they do not act as gatekeeper. Hospitals offer a number of training post, and the access is through an interview. Continuing medical education is encouraged and financed by the health centre in order to increase its revenues.

  13. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  14. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  15. Primary care for refugees.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Barbara

    2011-02-15

    Over the past decade, at least 600,000 refugees from more than 60 different countries have been resettled in the United States. The personal history of a refugee is often marked by physical and emotional trauma. Although refugees come from many different countries and cultures, their shared pattern of experiences allows for some generalizations to be made about their health care needs and challenges. Before being accepted for resettlement in the United States, all refugees must pass an overseas medical screening examination, the purpose of which is to identify conditions that could result in ineligibility for admission to the United States. Primary care physicians have the opportunity to care for members of this unique population once they resettle. Refugees present to primary care physicians with a variety of health problems, including musculoskeletal and pain issues, mental and social health problems, infectious diseases, and longstanding undiagnosed chronic illnesses. Important infectious diseases to consider in the symptomatic patient include tuberculosis, parasites, and malaria. Health maintenance and immunizations should also be addressed. Language barriers, cross-cultural medicine issues, and low levels of health literacy provide additional challenges to caring for this population. The purpose of this article is to provide primary care physicians with a guide to some of the common issues that arise when caring for refugee patients.

  16. The effect of Prandtl number on mixing in low Reynolds number Kelvin-Helmholtz billows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, M.; Seymour, B. R.; Lawrence, G. A.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of Prandtl number on mixing in temporally evolving Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities at low to moderate Reynolds numbers is studied through direct numerical simulation. We distinguish between the mixing induced by the primary billow and the mixing generated by three-dimensional motions by performing each simulation in two and three dimensions. The results indicate that the time evolution of the rate of two- and three-dimensional mixing through different stages of the life cycle of KH flow is significantly influenced by the Prandtl number. As the Prandtl number increases, the final amount of mixing increases for Reynolds that are too low to support active three-dimensional motions. This trend is the opposite in sufficiently high Reynolds number KH flows that can overcome viscous effects and develop significant three-dimensional instabilities. While the mixing generated in the two-dimensional flows, uniform in the span-wise direction, is not significantly dependent on the Prandtl number, the turbulent mixing induced by three-dimensional motions is a function of the Prandtl number. We observe a steady increase in the total amount of mixing for buoyancy Reynolds numbers above 7, consistent with the results of Shih et al. ["Parameterization of turbulent fluxes and scales using homogeneous sheared stably stratified turbulence simulations," J. Fluid Mech. 525, 193-214 (2005)]. Both maximum instantaneous and cumulative mixing efficiencies exhibit a decreasing trend with increasing Prandtl number. We compare the dependence of the mixing efficiency on Prandtl number to previous studies.

  17. Isospin Mixing in MAGNESIUM-24.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Charles David

    The (beta)-(gamma) circular polarization correlation asymmetry was measured for the pure Gamow-Teller decay of ('28)Al, for the pure Fermi decay of ('14)O and for the mixed decay of the ('24)Al 4('+) ground state to the 8.437 MeV, 4('+) state in ('24)Mg. The expected results were obtained for the pure Gamow-Teller and Fermi decays. From the results of the ('24)Al decay the isospin mixing of the 8.437 MeV, 4('+) state and the 9.515 MeV, 4('+) analog state in ('24)Mg was determined. The charge dependent matrix element mixing these two states was determined to be -95 (+OR-) 36 keV. This is the largest charge dependent matrix element observed in (beta) decay to date. This large value has not been completely explained and suggests the existence of a (DELTA)T = 1 nuclear force.

  18. Turbulent mix experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G.; Schneider, M.; Frerking, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities produce material mixing that can significantly degrade weapons performance. We investigate the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities in the turbulent regime in two experimental venues. RM experiments are conducted on the Nova laser with strong radiatively driven shocks (Mach > 20) in planar, two fluid targets. Interfacial perturbations are imposed with single sinusoidal modes to test linear theory and with three dimensional (3D) random modes to produce turbulent mix. RT experiments are conducted on a new facility, the Linear Electric Motor (LEM), in which macroscopic fluids are accelerated with arbitrary temporal profiles. This allows detailed diagnosis of the turbulence over a wide range of conditions. The Nova experiments study the high compression regime whereas the LEM experiments are incompressible. The results are compared to hydrodynamic simulations with the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code (CALE). The goal is to develop and test engineering models of mix.

  19. [Primary care in the United Kingdom].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sagrado, T

    2016-03-01

    The inadequate planning of health professionals in Spain has boosted the way out of doctors overseas. The United Kingdom is one of the countries chosen by Spanish doctors to develop their job. The National Health Service is a health system similar to the Spanish one. Health care services are financing mainly through taxes. The right to health care is linked to the citizen condition. The provision of health care is a mix-up of public and private enterprises. Primary Care is much closed to Spanish Primary Care. Doctors are "self-employed like" professionals. They can set their surgeries in a free area previously designed by the government. They have the right to make their own team and to manage their own budget. Medical salary is linked to professional capability and curriculum vitae. The main role of a General Practitioner is the prevention. Team work and coordination within primary and specialised care is more developed than in Spain. The access to diagnostic tests and to the specialist is controlled through waiting lists. General Practitioners work as gate-keepers. Patients may choose freely their doctor and consultations and hospital care are free at the point of use. Within the United Kingdom there are also health regions with problems due to inequalities to access and to treatment. There is a training path and the access to it is by Curricula. The number of training jobs is regulated by the local needs. Continuing education is compulsory and strictly regulated local and nationally. The National Health Service was the example for the Spanish health reform in 1986. While Spanish Primary health care is of quality, the efficiency of the health system would improve if staff in Primary Care settings were managed in a similar way to the British's.

  20. Nonideal Rayleigh–Taylor mixing

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyunkyung; Iwerks, Justin; Glimm, James; Sharp, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Rayleigh–Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical), which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale invariant formulation, and nonideal (i.e., experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We interpret mathematical theories of existence and nonuniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations; in other words, indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as nonunique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, in the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to play a role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing in different proportions in these two different contexts. PMID:20615983

  1. Nonideal Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David Howland; Lin, Hyun K; Iwerks, Justin G; Gliman, James G

    2009-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic Instability, which occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical) which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale Invariant formulation, and non Ideal (i.e. experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We Interpret mathematical theories of existence and non-uniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations, in other words indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as non unique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, In the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and PrandtJ numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength Initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to playa role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing In different proportions In these two different contexts.

  2. Further evidence for mixed emotions.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeff T; McGraw, A Peter

    2011-06-01

    Emotion theorists have long debated whether valence, which ranges from pleasant to unpleasant states, is an irreducible aspect of the experience of emotion or whether positivity and negativity are separable in experience. If valence is irreducible, it follows that people cannot feel happy and sad at the same time. Conversely, if positivity and negativity are separable, people may be able to experience such mixed emotions. The authors tested several alternative interpretations for prior evidence that happiness and sadness can co-occur in bittersweet situations (i.e., those containing both pleasant and unpleasant aspects). One possibility is that subjects who reported mixed emotions merely vacillated between happiness and sadness. The authors tested this hypothesis in Studies 1-3 by asking subjects to complete online continuous measures of happiness and sadness. Subjects reported more simultaneously mixed emotions during a bittersweet film clip than during a control clip. Another possibility is that subjects in earlier studies reported mixed emotions only because they were explicitly asked whether they felt happy and sad. The authors tested this hypothesis in Studies 4-6 with open-ended measures of emotion. Subjects were more likely to report mixed emotions after the bittersweet clip than the control clip. Both patterns occurred even when subjects were told that they were not expected to report mixed emotions (Studies 2 and 5) and among subjects who did not previously believe that people could simultaneously feel happy and sad (Studies 3 and 6). These results provide further evidence that positivity and negativity are separable in experience.

  3. Nonideal Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, H.; Glimm, J.; Iwerks, J.; Sharp, D.H.

    2010-08-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor mixing is a classical hydrodynamic instability that occurs when a light fluid pushes against a heavy fluid. The two main sources of nonideal behavior in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing are regularizations (physical and numerical), which produce deviations from a pure Euler equation, scale invariant formulation, and nonideal (i.e., experimental) initial conditions. The Kolmogorov theory of turbulence predicts stirring at all length scales for the Euler fluid equations without regularization. We interpret mathematical theories of existence and nonuniqueness in this context, and we provide numerical evidence for dependence of the RT mixing rate on nonideal regularizations; in other words, indeterminacy when modeled by Euler equations. Operationally, indeterminacy shows up as nonunique solutions for RT mixing, parametrized by Schmidt and Prandtl numbers, in the large Reynolds number (Euler equation) limit. Verification and validation evidence is presented for the large eddy simulation algorithm used here. Mesh convergence depends on breaking the nonuniqueness with explicit use of the laminar Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and their turbulent counterparts, defined in terms of subgrid scale models. The dependence of the mixing rate on the Schmidt and Prandtl numbers and other physical parameters will be illustrated. We demonstrate numerically the influence of initial conditions on the mixing rate. Both the dominant short wavelength initial conditions and long wavelength perturbations are observed to play a role. By examination of two classes of experiments, we observe the absence of a single universal explanation, with long and short wavelength initial conditions, and the various physical and numerical regularizations contributing in different proportions in these two different contexts.

  4. Mixe de Tlahuitoltepec, Oaxaca (Mixe of Tlahuitoltepec, Oaxaca).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mexico Coll. (Mexico City)

    This document is one of 17 volumes on indigenous Mexican languages and is the result of a project undertaken by the Archivo de Lenguas Indigenas de Mexico. This volume contains information on Mixe, an indigenous language of Mexico spoken in Tlahuitoltepec, in the state of Oaxaca. The objective of collecting such a representative sampling of the…

  5. Use and abuse of mixing models (MixSIAR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/MethodsCharacterizing trophic links in food webs is a fundamental ecological question. In our efforts to quantify energy flow through food webs, ecologists have increasingly used mixing models to analyze biological tracer data, often from stable isotopes. Whil...

  6. Bs Mixing at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of B{sub s} mesons. B{sub s} Mixing is the most important analysis within the B Physics program of both experiments. In this paper they summarize the most recent results on this topic from both D0 and CDF experiments. There were very important updates in both experiments after his last talk, hence the organizers warmly recommended me to include the latest available results on B{sub s} mixing, instead of what he presents there.

  7. Turbulent mixing condensation nucleus counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavliev, Rashid

    The construction and operating principles of the Turbulent Mixing Condensation Nucleus Counter (TM CNC) are described. Estimations based on the semiempirical theory of turbulent jets and the classical theory of nucleation and growth show the possibility of detecting particles as small as 2.5 nm without the interference of homogeneous nucleation. This conclusion was confirmed experimentally during the International Workshop on Intercomparison of Condensation Nuclei and Aerosol Particle Counters (Vienna, Austria). Number concentration, measured by the Turbulent Mixing CNC and other participating instruments, is found to be essentially equal.

  8. Mixed ternary heterojunction solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wen S.; Stewart, John M.

    1992-08-25

    A thin film heterojunction solar cell and a method of making it has a p-type layer of mixed ternary I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductor material in contact with an n-type layer of mixed binary II-VI semiconductor material. The p-type semiconductor material includes a low resistivity copper-rich region adjacent the back metal contact of the cell and a composition gradient providing a minority carrier mirror that improves the photovoltaic performance of the cell. The p-type semiconductor material preferably is CuInGaSe.sub.2 or CuIn(SSe).sub.2.

  9. Metastasizing mixed tumor of salivary glands. A clinicopathologic and flow cytometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wenig, B M; Hitchcock, C L; Ellis, G L; Gnepp, D R

    1992-09-01

    Among salivary gland neoplasms are a group of rare tumors that are histologically identical to benign mixed tumors that inexplicably metastasize; they have been called metastasizing mixed tumor (MZMT) of salivary glands. We report the clinicopathologic features and flow cytometric findings for 11 cases of MZMT. At the time of discovery of metastatic disease, the patients, six women and five men, ranged in age from 20 to 83 years. Primary sites of involvement included the parotid gland (eight cases), submandibular gland (two cases), and the nasal septum (one case). With one exception, all the patients had at least a single recurrences of their primary mixed tumor, but two or more recurrences were the norm before development of metastatic foci. The metastases were discovered from six to 52 years following the occurrence of the primary tumor. Metastatic deposits were identified in bone, lung, regional lymph nodes, skin, kidney, retroperitoneum, oral cavity, pharynx, calvarium, and central nervous system. The metastases either occurred simultaneously with an episode of recurrent mixed tumor (n = 5) or from 5 to 29 years after a recurrence (n = 6). The treatment of the primary, recurrent, and metastatic neoplasms was surgical excision. Follow-up, ranging from 8 months to 16 years following the diagnosis of MZMT, revealed seven patients to be alive without disease (64%) and two dead of causes unrelated to metastatic disease (18%). Two patients (18%) died as a direct result of metastatic tumor at 3 and 2 years after metastasis of their mixed tumors. Flow cytometric analysis revealed a diploid DNA cell population in the primary and/or metastatic tumors in nine cases. Aneuploid DNA cell content was identified in two of the cases. DNA ploidy levels and cell proliferation rates were compared with those of conventional benign mixed tumors and also with malignant mixed tumors. Retrospective analysis of histologic parameters (mitotic rate, cellular pleomorphism, infiltrative

  10. On the quantification of mixing in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Ali; Xu, Jie

    2014-10-01

    Methods for quantifying mixing in microfluidics have varied largely in the past, and various indices have been employed to represent the extent of mixing. Mixing between two or more colored liquids is usually quantified using simple mathematical functions operated over a sequence of images. The function, usually termed mixing indices, involves a measure of standard deviation. Here, we first review some mixing indices and then experimentally verify the index most representative of a mixing event. It is observed that the relative mixing index is not affected by the lighting conditions, unlike other known mixing indices. Based on this finding, the use of a relative mixing index is advocated for further use in the lab-on-a-chip community for quantifying mixing events.

  11. Bayesian stable isotope mixing models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we review recent advances in Stable Isotope Mixing Models (SIMMs) and place them into an over-arching Bayesian statistical framework which allows for several useful extensions. SIMMs are used to quantify the proportional contributions of various sources to a mixtur...

  12. The Mystery of Neutrino Mixings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altarelli, Guido

    2013-07-01

    In the last years we have learnt a lot about neutrino masses and mixings. Neutrinos are not all massless but their masses are very small. Probably masses are small because neutrinos are Majorana particles with masses inversely proportional to the large scale M of lepton number (L) violation, which turns out to be compatible with the GUT scale. We have understood that there is no contradiction between large neutrino mixings and small quark mixings, even in the context of GUTs and that neutrino masses fit well in the SUSY GUT picture. Out of equilibrium decays with CP and L violation of heavy RH neutrinos can produce a B-L asymmetry, then converted near the weak scale by instantons into an amount of B asymmetry compatible with observations (baryogenesis via leptogenesis). It appears that active neutrinos are not a significant component of Dark Matter in the Universe. A long list of models have been formulated over the years to understand neutrino masses and mixings. With the continuous improvement of the data most of the models have been discarded by experiment. The surviving models still span a wide range going from a maximum of symmetry, with discrete non-abelian flavour groups, to the opposite extreme of anarchy.

  13. Mixing and transport. [Water pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, P.J.W.

    1982-06-01

    The mixing and transport of water pollution is the subject of this literature review with 110 references. The environmental transport of pollutants is examined in streams, rivers, reservoirs, ponds, estuaries, salt marshes and coastal waters. The dynamics of fluid flow, and the physical properties of jets, plumes, and stratified fluids are discussed. (KRM)

  14. Tribimaximal mixing from small groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parattu, Krishna Mohan; Wingerter, Akın

    2011-07-01

    Current experimental data on the neutrino parameters are in good agreement with tribimaximal mixing and may indicate the presence of an underlying family symmetry. For 76 flavor groups, we perform a systematic scan for models: The particle content is that of the standard model plus up to three flavon fields, and the effective Lagrangian contains all terms of mass dimension ≤6. We find that 44 groups can accommodate models that are consistent with experiment at 3σ, and 38 groups can have models that are tribimaximal. For A4×Z3, T7, and T13 we look at correlations between the mixing angles and make a prediction for θ13 that will be testable in the near future. We present the details of a model with θ12=33.9°, θ23=40.9°, θ13=5.1° to show that the recent tentative hints of a nonzero θ13 can easily be accommodated. The smallest group for which we find tribimaximal mixing is T7. We argue that T7 and T13 are as suited to produce tribimaximal mixing as A4 and should therefore be considered on equal footing. In the appendixes, we present some new mathematical methods and results that may prove useful for future model building efforts.

  15. Simple rheology of mixed proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mixing different proteins to form strong gel networks for food applications may create synergistic increases in viscoelasticity that cannot be achieved with a single protein. In this study, small amplitude oscillatory shear analyses were used to investigate the rheology of calcium caseinate (CC), e...

  16. Reductant injection and mixing system

    DOEpatents

    Reeves, Matt; Henry, Cary A.; Ruth, Michael J.

    2016-02-16

    A gaseous reductant injection and mixing system is described herein. The system includes an injector for injecting a gaseous reductant into an exhaust gas stream, and a mixer attached to a surface of the injector. The injector includes a plurality of apertures through which the gaseous reductant is injected into an exhaust gas stream. The mixer includes a plurality of fluid deflecting elements.

  17. VLSI mixed signal processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, A.; Premkumar, A. B.

    1993-01-01

    An economical and efficient VLSI implementation of a mixed signal processing system (MSP) is presented in this paper. The MSP concept is investigated and the functional blocks of the proposed MSP are described. The requirements of each of the blocks are discussed in detail. A sample application using active acoustic cancellation technique is described to demonstrate the power of the MSP approach.

  18. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  19. Colour Mixing Based on Daylight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Colour science is based on the sensation of monochromatic light. In contrast to that, surface colours are caused by reflection of wide sections of the daylight spectrum. Non-spectral colours like magenta and purple appear homologous to colours with spectral hue, if the approach of mixing monochromatic light is abandoned. It is shown that a large…

  20. Racially Mixed People in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root, Maria P. P., Ed.

    This book offers a comprehensive look at the social and psychological adjustment of multiracial people, models for identity development, contemporary immigration and marriage patterns, and methodological issues involved in conducting research with mixed-race people, all in the context of America's multiracial past and present. The following 26…