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Sample records for primary myelodysplastic syndromes

  1. A Primary Care Approach to Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Samiev, Djamshed; Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Armitage, Joel D.; Maness, Lori J

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are probably the most common hematologic malignancies in adults over the age of 60 and are a major source of morbidity and mortality among older age groups. Diagnosis and management of this chronic blood cancer has evolved significantly in recent years and there are Food and Drug Administration-approved therapies that can extend patients' life expectancy and improve quality of life. Primary care physicians (PCPs) are often involved in the process of diagnosis and follow-up of MDS patients, especially those in low-risk groups. They can therefore play an important role in improving patient care and quality of life by ensuring early referral and participating in supportive management. There is also a shortage of oncologists which increases the importance of the role of PCPs in management of MDS patients. In the face of limited resources, PCPs can improve access and quality of care in MDS patients. This article provides an overview of the common manifestations, diagnostic approaches, and therapeutic modalities of MDS for PCPs, with a focus on when to suspect MDS, when a referral is appropriate, and how to provide appropriate supportive care for patients diagnosed with MDS. PMID:24921029

  2. Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. ... anemia, or easy bleeding. Myelodysplastic syndromes often do ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic Syndromes)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  4. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  5. General Information about Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Myelo-proliferative Neoplasms Patient Myelodysplastic Syndromes Treatment Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Health Professional Myelodysplastic ...

  6. Infections in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Andréa; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are associated with a risk of severe infections. While neutropenia is likely to be the main predisposing factor, several other immune defects have been reported, including impaired neutrophil function, B-, T- and NK-cell defects and the possible consequences of iron overload due to red blood cell transfusions. The advanced age of most patients, their frequent comorbidities, and the fact that drugs such as hypomethylating agents and lenalidomide, which are effective in myelodysplastic syndromes but can transiently worsen neutropenia, may increase the risk of infection and their severity in this context. The majority of infections in myelodysplastic syndromes are bacterial, while the incidence of fungal infections is not well known and viral infections seem to be rare. No prophylactic measures against infections have demonstrated efficacy in myelodysplastic syndromes. However, pending more data, we propose here some recommendations for the management of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In the future, an important contribution can be made by prospective trials testing the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to infection in these patients, especially in the context of the new drugs available for myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:22733024

  7. Childhood myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Tathagata; Choudhry, V P

    2013-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) comprises of a heterogeneous group of bone marrow disorders resulting from a clonal stem cell defect characterised by cytopenias despite a relatively hypercellular marrow, ineffective hematopoiesis, morphological dysplasia in the marrow elements, no response to hematinics such as iron, B12 or folic acid and risk of progression to leukemia. Myelodysplastic syndrome in childhood is extremely rare and accounts for less than 5% of all hematopoietic neoplasms in children below the age of 14 y. The primary MDS in children, also known as de novo MDS differs from secondary MDS which generally follows congenital or acquired bone marrow (BM) failure syndromes as well as from therapy related MDS, commonly resulting from cytotoxic therapy. MDS associated with Down syndrome which accounts for approximately one-fourth of cases of childhood MDS is now considered a unique biologic entity synonymous with Down syndrome-related myeloid leukemia and is biologically distinct from other cases of childhood MDS. Refractory cytopenia of childhood (RCC) is the commonest type of MDS. Genetic changes predisposing to MDS in childhood remain largely obscure. Monosomy 7 is by-far the commonest cytogenetic abnormality associated with childhood MDS; however most cases of RCC show a normal karyotype. Complex cytogenetic abnormalities and trisomy 8 and trisomy 21 are also occasionally observed. The most effective and curative treatment is Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and this is particularly effective in children with the monosomy 7 genetic defect as well as those displaying complex karyotype abnormalities provided it is instituted early in the course of the disease.

  8. Thalidomide in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Chromothripsis: Basis of a Concurrent Unusual Association between Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Ghali, Wael

    2014-01-01

    A 20 year old male was initially diagnosed suffering from Primary ciliary dyskinesia with symptoms of bronchiectasis, severe frontal, maxillary and ethmoid sinus disease. At the age of 20, the patient was also diagnosed with Myelodysplastic syndrome requiring Bone marrow transplant due to the advanced stage at time of presentation. Primary ciliary dyskinesia and Myelodsyplastic syndrome are both rare clinical conditions found in the general population, especially in young adults. This rare combination of disorders has never been reported in literature to the best of the author's knowledge. The presence of an advanced cancer and a genetic abnormality due to two deletions occurring in two arms of the same chromosome can be explained on the base of chromothripsis. A number of evidences have been published in the literature, about multiple deletions in chromosome 5 and advanced stages of MDS being associated with chromothripsis however this is the first case report on two deletions in chromosome 7 giving rise to two different clinical entities requiring multiple modes of management. PMID:25254125

  10. Ibrutinib and Azacitidine for Treatment of Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  11. [Review of evidence of thalidomide and lenalidomide in different hematological diseases: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, primary amyloidosis, myelofibrosis and syndrome myelodysplastic].

    PubMed

    Jiménez Lozano, I; Juárez Jiménez, J C

    2013-01-01

    Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug approved by the AEMPS and the EMA, in combination with dexamethasone, for the treatment of multiple myeloma in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy. Moreover, it has recently been approved for the treatment of patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia due to low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes associated with an isolated deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality when other therapeutic options are insufficient or inadequate. It has also shown to be active in other hematologic and no hematologic diseases. Growing evidence of its use entails a challenge when situating the drug in a cost-effective way to treat these diseases. On this article we review the available evidence on the use of lenalidomide in the second line treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, primary amyloidosis and primary myelofibrosis, and in the first line treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and also the evidence of other immunomodulators. Different clinical practice guidelines and scientific evidence portals consider lenalidomide a valid alternative in the first-line treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, specially those with the deletion of 5q, and in second line for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, the available evidence of lenalidomide in the treatment of patients with primary amyloidosis and primary myelofibrosis is limited, ant thus is not considered as the first choice treatment. In any case, the treatment of choice should consider the safety profile in each patient, the previous treatments that has received and the own therapeutic protocols of each center.

  12. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Sarah A.; DiNardo, Courtney D.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA), dyskeratosis congenita (DC), Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA), and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS), hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA) and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes. PMID:27248996

  13. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-13

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia

  14. [Epigenetic dysregulation in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sashida, Goro; Iwama, Atsushi

    2015-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disease characterized by impaired hematopoiesis and an increased risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Various epigenetic regulators are mutated in MDS patients, indicating that accumulation of epigenetic alterations together with genetic alterations plays a crucial role in the development of MDS.

  15. Decitabine treatment could ameliorate primary iron-overload in myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Shucheng, Gu; Chunkang, Chang; Youshan, Zhao; Juan, Guo; Chengming, Fei; Xi, Zhang; Chao, Xiao; Xiao, Li

    2015-04-01

    In order to research how does hypomethylating agents ameliorate iron metabolism in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), we performed methylation-specific, polymerase chain reaction (MSP), bisulfate genomic sequencing polymerase chain reaction (BSP), quantitative real-time PCR and western blot of hemojuvelin (HJV) and ELISA assay for hepcidin before and after demethylating therapy (decitabine) to determine whether the change of HJV methylation status would have an influence on hepcidin expression. Eleven of 22 MDS patients achieved CR or PR according to IWG criteria (50%). HJV mRNA was induced in decitabine responders (p = .006 comparing pre/post decitabine treatment) but not in non-responders (p = .121). Similarly, hepcidin serum expression increased from 320.77 ± 34.8 μg/L to 366.77 ± 21.90 μg/L (p = .012) in responders but did not significantly change in non-responders (p = .058), while no difference of adjusted serum ferritin (ASF) was found. In conclusion, hypermethylation of HJV promoter region could silence the gene expression and demethylating therapy might ameliorate iron-overload through HJV demethylation.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of primary myelodysplastic syndromes in adults: recommendations from the European LeukemiaNet.

    PubMed

    Malcovati, Luca; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Adès, Lionel; Cermak, Jaroslav; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; Della Porta, Matteo G; Fenaux, Pierre; Gattermann, Norbert; Germing, Ulrich; Jansen, Joop H; Mittelman, Moshe; Mufti, Ghulam; Platzbecker, Uwe; Sanz, Guillermo F; Selleslag, Dominik; Skov-Holm, Mette; Stauder, Reinhard; Symeonidis, Argiris; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; de Witte, Theo; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-10-24

    Within the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) work package of the European LeukemiaNet, an Expert Panel was selected according to the framework elements of the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Program. A systematic review of the literature was performed that included indexed original papers, indexed reviews and educational papers, and abstracts of conference proceedings. Guidelines were developed on the basis of a list of patient- and therapy-oriented questions, and recommendations were formulated and ranked according to the supporting level of evidence. MDSs should be classified according to the 2008 World Health Organization criteria. An accurate risk assessment requires the evaluation of not only disease-related factors but also of those related to extrahematologic comorbidity. The assessment of individual risk enables the identification of fit patients with a poor prognosis who are candidates for up-front intensive treatments, primarily allogeneic stem cell transplantation. A high proportion of MDS patients are not eligible for potentially curative treatment because of advanced age and/or clinically relevant comorbidities and poor performance status. In these patients, the therapeutic intervention is aimed at preventing cytopenia-related morbidity and preserving quality of life. A number of new agents are being developed for which the available evidence is not sufficient to recommend routine use. The inclusion of patients into prospective clinical trials is strongly recommended.

  17. Differentiation Therapy With Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Thrombocytopenia

  18. Lenalidomide in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Immune Mechanisms in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Ørskov, Andreas Due; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Hadrup, Sine Reker; O’Connell, Casey; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a spectrum of diseases, characterized by debilitating cytopenias and a propensity of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed a range of mutations characteristic, but not specific, of MDS. Epidemiologically, autoimmune diseases are common in patients with MDS, fueling hypotheses of common etiological mechanisms. Both innate and adaptive immune pathways are overly active in the hematopoietic niche of MDS. Although supportive care, growth factors, and hypomethylating agents are the mainstay of MDS treatment, some patients—especially younger low-risk patients with HLA-DR15 tissue type—demonstrate impressive response rates after immunosuppressive therapy. This is in contrast to higher-risk MDS patients, where several immune activating treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, are in the pipeline. Thus, the dual role of immune mechanisms in MDS is challenging, and rigorous translational studies are needed to establish the value of immune manipulation as a treatment of MDS. PMID:27314337

  20. Immune Mechanisms in Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Ørskov, Andreas Due; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Hadrup, Sine Reker; O'Connell, Casey; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a spectrum of diseases, characterized by debilitating cytopenias and a propensity of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Comprehensive sequencing efforts have revealed a range of mutations characteristic, but not specific, of MDS. Epidemiologically, autoimmune diseases are common in patients with MDS, fueling hypotheses of common etiological mechanisms. Both innate and adaptive immune pathways are overly active in the hematopoietic niche of MDS. Although supportive care, growth factors, and hypomethylating agents are the mainstay of MDS treatment, some patients-especially younger low-risk patients with HLA-DR15 tissue type-demonstrate impressive response rates after immunosuppressive therapy. This is in contrast to higher-risk MDS patients, where several immune activating treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, are in the pipeline. Thus, the dual role of immune mechanisms in MDS is challenging, and rigorous translational studies are needed to establish the value of immune manipulation as a treatment of MDS. PMID:27314337

  1. What's New in Myelodysplastic Syndrome Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for myelodysplastic syndromes What`s new in myelodysplastic syndrome research and treatment? Genetics and ... research unfolds, it may be used to design new drugs or eventually in developing gene therapy. This ...

  2. What Are the Risk Factors for Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... surviving an atomic bomb blast or nuclear reactor accident) increases the risk of developing MDS. Long-term ... Myelodysplastic Syndrome? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Myelodysplastic Syndrome Talking With ...

  3. Mouse models of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Beachy, Sarah H.; Aplan, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Three general approaches have been used in an attempt to model myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in mice, including treatment with mutagens or carcinogens, xenotransplantation of human MDS cells, and genetic engineering of mouse hematopoietic cells. Xenotransplantation of cells from MDS patients has proved difficult, possibly due to the innate characteristics of the MDS clone and microenvironmental influences, including adverse effects of a host immune response. Genetic engineering of hematopoietic cells or mice has been accomplished by in vitro transfer of genes to mouse hematopoietic cells with subsequent transplantation into an irradiated host, or by modification of the mouse germline to generate mice with altered expression of genes of interest. A number of genes have been studied using these approaches, including RUNX1, Evi1, Npm1, SALL4B, NUP98-HOXD13, BCL2/NRAS, Arid4a, Polg and Dido. This review discusses the phenotypes observed in available mouse models for MDS with a concentration on a model that leads to aberrant expression of conserved homeobox (HOX) genes that are important regulators of normal hematopoiesis. Utilizing these models of MDS should allow a more complete understanding of the disease process and provide a platform for pre-clinical testing of therapeutic approaches. PMID:20359631

  4. New Treatments for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    D’Alò, Francesco; Greco, Mariangela; Criscuolo, Marianna; Voso, Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, significant advances have been made in the treatment of patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS). Although best supportive care continues to have an important role in the management of MDS, to date the therapeutic approach is diversified according to the IPSS risk group, karyotype, patient’s age, comorbidities, and compliance. Hematopoietic growth factors play a major role in lower risk MDS patients, and include high dose erithropoiesis stimulating agents and thrombopoietic receptor agonists. Standard supportive care should also include iron chelating therapy to reduce organ damage related to iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients. Biologic therapies have been introduced in MDS, as lenalidomide, which has been shown to induce transfusion independence in most lower risk MDS patients with del5q. Hypomethylating agents have shown efficacy in INT-2/high risk MDS patients, reducing the risk of leukemic transformation and increasing survival. Other agents under development for the treatment of MDS include histone deacetylase inhibitors, farnesyltransferase inhibitors, clofarabine and ezatiostat. PMID:21415972

  5. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  6. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation. PMID:26875020

  7. Autoimmune diseases and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Al Ali, Najla H; Kordasti, Shahram; Bart-Smith, Emily; Craig, Benjamin M; Padron, Eric; Zhang, Ling; Lancet, Jeffrey E; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier; List, Alan F; Mufti, Ghulam J; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2016-05-01

    Immune dysregulation and altered T-cell hemostasis play important roles in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Recent studies suggest an increased risk of MDS among patients with autoimmune diseases. Here, we investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases among MDS patients, comparing characteristics and outcomes in those with and without autoimmune diseases. From our study group of 1408 MDS patients, 391 (28%) had autoimmune disease, with hypothyroidism being the most common type, accounting for 44% (n = 171) of patients (12% among all MDS patients analyzed). Other autoimmune diseases with ≥5% prevalence included idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 12% (n = 46), rheumatoid arthritis in 10% (n = 41), and psoriasis in 7% (n = 28) of patients. Autoimmune diseases were more common in female MDS patients, those with RA or RCMD WHO subtype, and those who were less dependent on red blood cell transfusion. Median overall survival (OS) was 60 months (95% CI, 50-70) for patients with autoimmune diseases versus 45 months (95% CI, 40-49) for those without (log-rank test, P = 0.006). By multivariate analysis adjusting for revised IPSS and age >60 years, autoimmune diseases were a statistically significant independent factor for OS (HR 0.78; 95% CI, 0.66-0.92; P = 0.004). The rate of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation was 23% (n = 89) in MDS patients with autoimmune disease versus 30% (n = 301) in those without (P = 0.011). Patient groups did not differ in response to azacitidine or lenalidomide treatment. Autoimmune diseases are prevalent among MDS patients. MDS patients with autoimmune diseases have better OS and less AML transformation.

  8. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Prognostic value of trisomy 8 as a single anomaly and the influence of additional cytogenetic aberrations in primary myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Saumell, Sílvia; Florensa, Lourdes; Luño, Elisa; Sanzo, Carmen; Cañizo, Consuelo; Hernández, Jesus M; Cervera, José; Gallart, Miguel A; Carbonell, Félix; Collado, Rosa; Arenillas, Leonor; Pedro, Carme; Bargay, Joan; Nomdedeu, Benet; Xicoy, Blanca; Vallespí, Teresa; Raya, José M; Belloch, Luis; Sanz, Guillermo F; Solé, Francesc

    2012-11-01

    Trisomy 8 is the most common chromosomal gain in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), however, little is known about the features of MDS with isolated trisomy 8 and the influence of additional cytogenetic aberrations. We determined the characteristics and prognostic factors of 72 patients with trisomy 8 as a single anomaly and analysed also the impact of other aberrations added to trisomy 8 in another 62 patients. According to our study, MDS with isolated trisomy 8 was more frequent in men, with more than one cytopenia in most patients (62%) and having about 4% bone marrow blasts. The multivariate analysis demonstrated that platelet count and percentage bone marrow blasts had the strongest impact on overall survival (OS). The median OS for isolated trisomy 8, trisomy 8 plus one aberration (tr8 + 1), plus two (tr8 + 2) and plus three or more aberrations (tr8 + ≥3) was 34·3, 40, 23·4 and 5·8 months, respectively (P < 0·001). Trisomy 8 confers a poorer prognosis than a normal karyotype in MDS patients with ≥5% bone marrow blasts. This study supports the view that MDS with isolated trisomy 8 should be included in the intermediate cytogenetic risk group.

  10. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Version 2.2015

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Peter L.; Stone, Richard M.; Bejar, Rafael; Bennett, John M.; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Borate, Uma; De Castro, Carlos M.; Deeg, H. Joachim; DeZern, Amy E.; Fathi, Amir T.; Frankfurt, Olga; Gaensler, Karin; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Head, David; Klimek, Virginia; Komrokji, Rami; Kujawski, Lisa A.; Maness, Lori J.; O’Donnell, Margaret R.; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Scott, Bart; Shami, Paul J.; Stein, Brady L.; Westervelt, Peter; Wheeler, Benton; Shead, Dorothy A.; Smith, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders with a highly variable disease course that depends largely on risk factors. Risk evaluation is therefore a critical component of decision-making in the treatment of MDS. The development of newer treatments and the refinement of current treatment modalities are designed to improve patient outcomes and reduce side effects. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on the recent updates to the guidelines, which include the incorporation of a revised prognostic scoring system, addition of molecular abnormalities associated with MDS, and refinement of treatment options involving a discussion of cost of care. PMID:25736003

  12. Myelodysplastic syndromes, version 2.2015.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Peter L; Stone, Richard M; Bejar, Rafael; Bennett, John M; Bloomfield, Clara D; Borate, Uma; De Castro, Carlos M; Deeg, H Joachim; DeZern, Amy E; Fathi, Amir T; Frankfurt, Olga; Gaensler, Karin; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Head, David; Klimek, Virginia; Komrokji, Rami; Kujawski, Lisa A; Maness, Lori J; O'Donnell, Margaret R; Pollyea, Daniel A; Scott, Bart; Shami, Paul J; Stein, Brady L; Westervelt, Peter; Wheeler, Benton; Shead, Dorothy A; Smith, Courtney

    2015-03-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders with a highly variable disease course that depends largely on risk factors. Risk evaluation is therefore a critical component of decision-making in the treatment of MDS. The development of newer treatments and the refinement of current treatment modalities are designed to improve patient outcomes and reduce side effects. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on the recent updates to the guidelines, which include the incorporation of a revised prognostic scoring system, addition of molecular abnormalities associated with MDS, and refinement of treatment options involving a discussion of cost of care. PMID:25736003

  13. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Flow Cytometry in the Diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Szánthó, Eszter; Kappelmayer, János; Hevessy, Zsuzsa

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders. Their exact etiology is unknown. Myelodysplastic syndromes cause progressive bone marrow failure resulting in pancytopenia and refractory, transfusion-dependent anemia. One can observe typical morphological alterations in the erythroid, myeloid and/or megakaryocytic cell lineage. Blast counts may also be increased. The pathologic cells are genetically unstable, and a myelodysplastic syndrome might transform into acute myeloid leukemia. The overall survival of these diseases range between few months to around ten years. Correct diagnosis and accurate prognostic classification is essential. In the past decades several scoring systems were established beginning with the French-American-British classification to the most recent Revised International Prognostic Scoring System. In all of these classifications bone marrow morphology is still the most important factor, though nowadays the genetic aberrations and flow cytometry findings are also included. The diagnosis and prognostic classification of myelodysplastic syndromes remain a great challenge for hematologists.

  16. Iron Chelation Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Messa, Emanuela; Cilloni, Daniela; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous disorder of the hematopoietic stem cells, frequently characterized by anemia and transfusion dependency. In low-risk patients, transfusion dependency can be long lasting, leading to iron overload. Iron chelation therapy may be a therapeutic option for these patients, especially since the approval of oral iron chelators, which are easier to use and better accepted by the patients. The usefulness of iron chelation in MDS patients is still under debate, mainly because of the lack of solid prospective clinical trials that should take place in the future. This review aims to summarize what is currently known about the incidence and clinical consequences of iron overload in MDS patients and the state-of the-art of iron chelation therapy in this setting. We also give an overview of clinical guidelines for chelation in MDS published to date and some perspectives for the future. PMID:20672005

  17. New Comprehensive Cytogenetic Scoring System for Primary Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) and Oligoblastic Acute Myeloid Leukemia After MDS Derived From an International Database Merge

    PubMed Central

    Schanz, Julie; Tüchler, Heinz; Solé, Francesc; Mallo, Mar; Luño, Elisa; Cervera, José; Granada, Isabel; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Slovak, Marilyn L.; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Steidl, Christian; Fonatsch, Christa; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Valent, Peter; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Aul, Carlo; Lübbert, Michael; Stauder, Reinhard; Krieger, Otto; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Faderl, Stefan; Pierce, Sherry; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Bennett, John M.; Greenberg, Peter; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The karyotype is a strong independent prognostic factor in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Since the implementation of the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) in 1997, knowledge concerning the prognostic impact of abnormalities has increased substantially. The present study proposes a new and comprehensive cytogenetic scoring system based on an international data collection of 2,902 patients. Patients and Methods Patients were included from the German-Austrian MDS Study Group (n = 1,193), the International MDS Risk Analysis Workshop (n = 816), the Spanish Hematological Cytogenetics Working Group (n = 849), and the International Working Group on MDS Cytogenetics (n = 44) databases. Patients with primary MDS and oligoblastic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after MDS treated with supportive care only were evaluated for overall survival (OS) and AML evolution. Internal validation by bootstrap analysis and external validation in an independent patient cohort were performed to confirm the results. Results In total, 19 cytogenetic categories were defined, providing clear prognostic classification in 91% of all patients. The abnormalities were classified into five prognostic subgroups (P < .001): very good (median OS, 61 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.5; n = 81); good (49 months; HR, 1.0 [reference category]; n = 1,809); intermediate (26 months; HR, 1.6; n = 529); poor (16 months; HR, 2.6; n = 148); and very poor (6 months; HR, 4.2; n = 187). The internal and external validations confirmed the results of the score. Conclusion In conclusion, these data should contribute to the ongoing efforts to update the IPSS by refining the cytogenetic risk categories. PMID:22331955

  18. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Occurring in a Patient with Gorlin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mull, Jamie L; Madden, Lisa M; Bayliss, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurring in an African American boy with Gorlin syndrome with a novel PTCH1 mutation. Before developing MDS, the patient had been treated with chemotherapy and radiation for a medulloblastoma. He received a bone marrow transplant for the MDS and eventually died of treatment complications. Secondary hematologic malignancies are a known complication of certain chemotherapeutics, although whether a patient with Gorlin syndrome has a greater propensity for the development of such malignancies is unclear. PMID:27241746

  19. Azacitidine With or Without Lenalidomide or Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Higher-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-29

    Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-1; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  20. Prediction of 18-month survival in patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome. A regression model and scoring system based on the combination of chromosome findings and the Bournemouth score.

    PubMed

    Parlier, V; van Melle, G; Beris, P; Schmidt, P M; Tobler, A; Haller, E; Bellomo, M J

    1995-06-01

    The predictive potential of six selected factors was assessed in 72 patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis of survival at 18 months. Factors were age (above median of 69 years), dysplastic features in the three myeloid bone marrow cell lineages, presence of chromosome defects, all metaphases abnormal, double or complex chromosome defects (C23), and a Bournemouth score of 2, 3, or 4 (B234). In the multivariate approach, B234 and C23 proved to be significantly associated with a reduction in the survival probability. The similarity of the regression coefficients associated with these two factors means that they have about the same weight. Consequently, the model was simplified by counting the number of factors (0, 1, or 2) present in each patient, thus generating a scoring system called the Lausanne-Bournemouth score (LB score). The LB score combines the well-recognized and easy-to-use Bournemouth score (B score) with the chromosome defect complexity, C23 constituting an additional indicator of patient outcome. The predicted risk of death within 18 months calculated from the model is as follows: 7.1% (confidence interval: 1.7-24.8) for patients with an LB score of 0, 60.1% (44.7-73.8) for an LB score of 1, and 96.8% (84.5-99.4) for an LB score of 2. The scoring system presented here has several interesting features. The LB score may improve the predictive value of the B score, as it is able to recognize two prognostic groups in the intermediate risk category of patients with B scores of 2 or 3. It has also the ability to identify two distinct prognostic subclasses among RAEB and possibly CMML patients. In addition to its above-described usefulness in the prognostic evaluation, the LB score may bring new insights into the understanding of evolution patterns in MDS. We used the combination of the B score and chromosome complexity to define four classes which may be considered four possible states of

  1. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Minimal Residual Disease; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

  2. The molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have greatly illuminated the genomic landscape of the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and the pace of discovery is accelerating. The most common mutations found in MDS occur in genes involved in RNA splicing (including SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, and ZRSR2) and epigenetic modification (including TET2, ASXL1, and DNMT3A). The identification of spliceosome mutations in approximately half of all patients with MDS implicates abnormalities of RNA splicing, a pathway not previously known as a target for mutation, in the MDS pathogenesis. Several regulators of signal transduction (NRAS, JAK2) and transcription factors (RUNX1, TP53) are also frequently mutated in MDS. The complex patterns of associations between gene mutations identified have revealed epistatic interactions between spliceosome components and epigenetic modifiers in MDS. The cytogenetic abnormalities found in MDS are characterized by the loss of genetic material, whereas translocations are rare. The cytogenetic deletion maps of MDS (e.g., 5q-, 7q-, 20q-) provide us with circumstantial evidence for the presence of tumor suppressor genes. It is now recognized that haploinsufficiency (a gene dosage effect) resulting from gene deletions or inactivating mutations is an important disease mechanism in MDS. Haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal protein gene RPS14 plays a critical role in the development of anemia in the 5q- syndrome, and haploinsufficiency of CUX1 is important in some patients with MDS and AML with complete or partial loss of chromosome 7. Gene expression profiling has identified key deregulated genes and pathways and new prognostic gene signatures in MDS. Recent advances in the molecular pathogenesis of MDS are leading to new biological, clinical, and therapeutic insights.

  3. The molecular pathogenesis of the myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have greatly illuminated the genomic landscape of the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and the pace of discovery is accelerating. The most common mutations found in MDS occur in genes involved in RNA splicing (including SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, and ZRSR2) and epigenetic modification (including TET2, ASXL1, and DNMT3A). The identification of spliceosome mutations in approximately half of all patients with MDS implicates abnormalities of RNA splicing, a pathway not previously known as a target for mutation, in the MDS pathogenesis. Several regulators of signal transduction (NRAS, JAK2) and transcription factors (RUNX1, TP53) are also frequently mutated in MDS. The complex patterns of associations between gene mutations identified have revealed epistatic interactions between spliceosome components and epigenetic modifiers in MDS. The cytogenetic abnormalities found in MDS are characterized by the loss of genetic material, whereas translocations are rare. The cytogenetic deletion maps of MDS (e.g., 5q-, 7q-, 20q-) provide us with circumstantial evidence for the presence of tumor suppressor genes. It is now recognized that haploinsufficiency (a gene dosage effect) resulting from gene deletions or inactivating mutations is an important disease mechanism in MDS. Haploinsufficiency of the ribosomal protein gene RPS14 plays a critical role in the development of anemia in the 5q- syndrome, and haploinsufficiency of CUX1 is important in some patients with MDS and AML with complete or partial loss of chromosome 7. Gene expression profiling has identified key deregulated genes and pathways and new prognostic gene signatures in MDS. Recent advances in the molecular pathogenesis of MDS are leading to new biological, clinical, and therapeutic insights. PMID:25645650

  4. Causes of death in 2877 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nachtkamp, Kathrin; Stark, Romina; Strupp, Corinna; Kündgen, Andrea; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Aul, Carlo; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Germing, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes face a poor prognosis. The exact causes of death have not been described properly in the past. We performed a retrospective analysis of causes of death using data of 3792 patients in the Düsseldorf registry who have been followed up for a median time of 21 months. Medical files as well as death certificates were screened and primary care physicians were contacted. Death after AML evolution, infection, and bleeding was considered to be clearly disease-related. Further categories of causes of death were heart failure, other possibly disease-related reasons, such as hemochromatosis, disease-independent reasons as well as cases with unclear causes of death. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 71 years. At the time of analysis, 2877 patients (75.9 %) had deceased. In 1212 cases (42.1 %), the exact cause of death could not be ascertained. From 1665 patients with a clearly documented cause of death, 1388 patients (83.4 %) succumbed directly disease-related (AML (46.6 %), infection (27.0 %), bleeding (9.8 %)), whereas 277 patients (16.6 %) died for reasons not directly related with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), including 132 patients with cardiac failure, 77 non-disease-related reasons, 23 patients with solid tumors, and 45 patients with possibly disease-related causes like hemochromatosis. Correlation with IPSS, IPSS-R, and WPSS categories showed a proportional increase of disease-related causes of death with increasing IPSS/IPSS-R/WPSS risk category. Likewise, therapy-related MDS were associated with a higher percentage of disease-related causes of death than primary MDS. This reflects the increasing influence of the underlying disease on the cause of death with increasing aggressiveness of the disease.

  5. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-18

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  6. Immunological Derangement in Hypocellular Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Serio, B; Risitano, AM; Giudice, V; Montuori, N; Selleri, C

    2014-01-01

    Hypocellular or hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndromes (HMDS) are a distinct subgroup accounting for 10–15% of all MDS patients, that are characterized by the presence of bone marrow (BM) hypocellularity, various degree of dysmyelopoiesis and sometimes abnormal karyotype. Laboratory and clinical evidence suggest that HMDS share several immune-mediated pathogenic mechanisms with acquired idiopathic aplastic anemia (AA). Different immune-mediated mechanisms have been documented in the damage of marrow hematopoietic progenitors occurring in HMDS; they include oligoclonal expansion of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), polyclonal expansion of various subtypes of T helper lymphocytes, overexpression of FAS-L and of the TNF–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), underexpression of Flice-like inhibitory protein long isoform (FLIPL) in marrow cells as well as higher release of Th1 cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). It has also been documented that some HMDS patients have higher frequency of polymorphisms linked both to high production of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and transforming growth factor-β and to the inhibition of T-cell mediated immune responses such as interleukin-10, further suggesting that immune-mediated mechanisms similar to those seen in AA patients may also operate in HMDS. Clinically, the strongest evidence for immune–mediated hematopoietic suppression in some HMDS is the response to immunosuppression including mainly cyclosporine, anti-thymocyte globulin and/or cyclosporine, or alemtuzumab. Here we review all these immune mechanisms as well as the influence of this deranged cellular and humoral immunologic mileau on the initiation and possible progression of MDS. All these observations are pivotal not only for a better understanding of MDS pathophysiology, but also for their immediate clinical implications, eventually leading to the identification of MDS patients who may benefit from

  7. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Steensma, David P

    2016-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers the only potential cure for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, with current approaches to HCT, many older patients with comorbidities are poor HCT candidates, and treatment-related morbidity and mortality may offset benefit for patients with lower-risk disease. Consequently, selection of patients with MDS for HCT should take into consideration disease risk category including mutational status, HCT comorbidity index, functional status, donor options, and available institutional resources. Formal geriatric assessment may further guide use of HCT and, if HCT is chosen, selection of conditioning intensity. Patients with higher-risk MDS should be considered for HCT at the time of diagnosis, whereas expectant nontransplant management is more appropriate for those with lower-risk disease. A high blast burden at the time of HCT increases the risk of subsequent relapse; however, the role of pretransplant cytoreductive therapy and the regimen of choice remain controversial. Patients with MDS younger than 65 years and with an HCT comorbidity index ≤ 4 may benefit from more intense conditioning regimens. The presence of complex or monosomal karyotype or mutations in TP53, DNMT3A, or other genes identify patients with poorer outcomes following HCT. Patients with TP53 mutations have particularly poor survival, and should be enrolled in clinical trials whenever possible. Several important HCT studies are ongoing and will better define the role of HCT in MDS as well as the value of pretransplant cytoreductive therapy or post-transplant relapse-prevention strategies. Given the apparent underuse of HCT in eligible patients and low enrollment in MDS HCT clinical trials to date, timely referral of patients with MDS to such trials and HCT programs is critical. PMID:27621329

  8. Mutations of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): An update.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Bani Bandana; Kadam, N N

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of knowledge gained on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a heterogeneous pre-malignant disorder of hematopoietic stem cells, through sequencing of several pathway genes has unveiled molecular pathogenesis and its progression to AML. Evolution of phenotypic classification and risk-stratification based on peripheral cytopenias and blast count has moved to five-tier risk-groups solely concerning chromosomal aberrations. Increased frequency of complex abnormalities, which is associated with genetic instability, defines the subgroup of worst prognosis in MDS. However, the independent effect of monosomal karyotype remains controversial. Recent discoveries on mutations in RNA-splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1, U2AF2); DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2); chromatin modification (ASXL1, EZH2); transcription factor (TP53, RUNX1); signal transduction/kinases (FLT3, JAK2); RAS pathway (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11); cohesin complex (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21); DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL); and other pathway genes have given insights into the independent effects and interaction of co-occurrence of mutations on disease-phenotype. RNA-splicing and DNA methylation mutations appeared to occur early and are reported as 'founder' mutations in over 50% MDS patients. TET2 mutation, through altered DNA methylation, has been found to have independent prognostic response to hypomethylating agents. Moreover, presence of DNMT3A, TET2 and ASXL1 mutations in normal elderly individuals forms the basis of understanding that accumulation of somatic mutations may not cause direct disease-development; however, cooperation with other mutations in the genes that are frequently mutated in myeloid and other hematopoietic cancers might result in clonal expansion through self-renewal and/or proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Identification of small molecules as inhibitors of epigenetic mutations has opened avenues for tailoring targeted drug development. The

  9. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  10. Cytogenetic abnormalities and genomic copy number variations in EPO (7q22) and SEC-61(7p11) genes in primary myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Purvi; Korgaonkar, Seema; Shanmukhaiah, Chandrakala; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Vundinti, Babu Rao

    2016-07-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are heterogeneous clonal haematopoeitic stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective haematopoeisis, cytopenias and risk of progression to AML. We studied 150 MDS patients for cytogenetic aberrations and 60 patients with normal karyotype and 40 patients harboring cytogenetic abnormalities for copy number variations (CNVs). Cytogenetic abnormalities were detected in 46% of patients with a majority of patients harboring abnormalities of chromosome 7 and del (20q) at frequencies of 16% and 12% respectively. We explored the potential of quantitative multiplex PCR assay of short fluorescent fragments (QMPSF) to identify CNVs and correlated the findings with cytogenetic data and disease prognosis. CNVs (n=31) were detected in 28.3% of karyotypically normal and 23% patients with abnormal karyotype. Genetic losses or deletions (n=26) were more frequent than duplications (n=5). EPO (7q22) and SEC-61(7p11) emerged as new candidate genes susceptible to genetic losses with 57.7% deletions identified in regions on chromosome 7. The CNVs correlated with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) intermediate disease risk group. Our integrative cytogenetic and copy number variation study suggests that abnormalities of chromosome 7 are predominant in Indian population and that they may play a secondary role in disease progression and should be evaluated further for asserting their clinical significance and influence on disease prognosis.

  11. Cytogenetic abnormalities and genomic copy number variations in EPO (7q22) and SEC-61(7p11) genes in primary myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Purvi; Korgaonkar, Seema; Shanmukhaiah, Chandrakala; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Vundinti, Babu Rao

    2016-07-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are heterogeneous clonal haematopoeitic stem cell disorders characterized by ineffective haematopoeisis, cytopenias and risk of progression to AML. We studied 150 MDS patients for cytogenetic aberrations and 60 patients with normal karyotype and 40 patients harboring cytogenetic abnormalities for copy number variations (CNVs). Cytogenetic abnormalities were detected in 46% of patients with a majority of patients harboring abnormalities of chromosome 7 and del (20q) at frequencies of 16% and 12% respectively. We explored the potential of quantitative multiplex PCR assay of short fluorescent fragments (QMPSF) to identify CNVs and correlated the findings with cytogenetic data and disease prognosis. CNVs (n=31) were detected in 28.3% of karyotypically normal and 23% patients with abnormal karyotype. Genetic losses or deletions (n=26) were more frequent than duplications (n=5). EPO (7q22) and SEC-61(7p11) emerged as new candidate genes susceptible to genetic losses with 57.7% deletions identified in regions on chromosome 7. The CNVs correlated with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) intermediate disease risk group. Our integrative cytogenetic and copy number variation study suggests that abnormalities of chromosome 7 are predominant in Indian population and that they may play a secondary role in disease progression and should be evaluated further for asserting their clinical significance and influence on disease prognosis. PMID:27282568

  12. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Therapeutic approaches in myelofibrosis and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sochacki, Andrew L; Fischer, Melissa A; Savona, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of JAK2V617F a decade ago led to optimism for a rapidly developing treatment revolution in Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms. Unlike BCR–ABL, however, JAK2 was found to have a more heterogeneous role in carcinogenesis. Therefore, for years, development of new therapies was slow, despite standard treatment options that did not address the overwhelming symptom burden in patients with primary myelofibrosis (MF), post-essential thrombocythemia MF, post-polycythemia vera MF, and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) syndromes. JAK–STAT inhibitors have changed this, drastically ameliorating symptoms and ultimately beginning to show evidence of impact on survival. Now, the genetic foundations of myelofibrosis and MDS/MPN are rapidly being elucidated and contributing to targeted therapy development. This has been empowered through updated response criteria for MDS/MPN and refined prognostic scoring systems in these diseases. The aim of this article is to summarize concisely the current and rationally designed investigational therapeutics directed at JAK–STAT, hedgehog, PI3K–Akt, bone marrow fibrosis, telomerase, and rogue epigenetic signaling. The revolution in immunotherapy and novel treatments aimed at previously untargeted signaling pathways provides hope for considerable advancement in therapy options for those with chronic myeloid disease. PMID:27143923

  14. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; RAEB-1; RAEB-2; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  17. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  18. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-27

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts

  19. Tosedostat in Combination With Cytarabine or Decitabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Molecular dissection of the 5q deletion in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2011-01-01

    The 5q- syndrome is a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with a defined clinical phenotype associated with heterozygous deletions of Chromosome 5q. While no genes have been identified that undergo recurrent homozygous inactivation, functional studies have revealed individual genes that contribute to the clinical phenotype of MDS through haploinsufficient gene expression. Heterozygous loss of the RPS14 gene on 5q leads to activation of p53 in the erythroid lineage and the macrocytic anemia characteristic of the 5q- syndrome. The megakaryocytic and platelet phenotype of the 5q- syndrome has been attributed to heterozygous deletion of miR145 and miR146a. Murine models have implicated heterozygous loss of APC, EGR1, DIAPH1, and NPM1 in the pathophysiology of del(5q) MDS. These findings indicate that the phenotype of MDS patients with deletions of Chromosome 5q is due to haploinsufficiency of multiple genes. PMID:21943668

  1. Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Klepin, Heidi D

    2016-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are hematologic diseases that frequently affect older adults. Treatment is challenging. Management of older adults with MDS and AML needs to be individualized, accounting for both the heterogeneity of disease biology and patient characteristics, which can influence life expectancy and treatment tolerance. Clinical trials accounting for the heterogeneity of tumor biology and physiologic changes of aging are needed to define optimal standards of care. This article highlights key evidence related to the management of older adults with MDS and AML and highlights future directions for research.

  2. Myeloid sarcoma of the Gingiva with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Seong-Ho; Park, Gyeongsin; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this report is to present a case of myeloid sarcoma of the gingiva with myelodysplastic syndrome. A 52-year-old male diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome with skin lesions presented with gingival swelling and gingival redness involving the maxillary left second premolar and the maxillary left first molar. The patient was referred from the Department of Hematology for a biopsy of the lesion. Full-thickness flaps were elevated and inflamed, and neoplastic soft tissue was removed from a lesion and the samples sent for histopathologic analysis. Histopathologic results showed leukemic cell infiltration beneath the oral epithelium, and the specimen was positive for the leukocyte marker. The diagnosis was myeloid sarcoma. Uneventful healing was observed at 2-week follow-up, but relapse of the lesions with the hyperplastic and neoplastic tissue was noted at 4-week follow-up. Further follow-up or treatment could not be performed because the patient did not visit at the next follow-up. In conclusion, myeloid sarcoma should be a diagnosis option for gingival growth because it can involve intraoral lesion. In this report, a biopsy was performed due to referral considering the patient's medical history. Although myeloid sarcoma in the oral cavity is extremely rare, a small biopsy and consultation with a hematologist may be beneficial for patients and may provide a differential diagnosis. PMID:27310987

  3. Beyond the Niche: Myelodysplastic Syndrome Topobiology in the Laboratory and in the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Figueroa, Eugenia; Gratzinger, Dita

    2016-01-01

    We review the murine and human microenvironment and hematopoietic stem cell niche in the context of intact bone marrow architecture in man and mouse, both in normal and in myelodysplastic syndrome marrow. We propose that the complexity of the hematopoietic stem cell niche can usefully be approached in the context of its topobiology, and we provide a model that incorporates in vitro and in vivo models as well as in situ findings from intact human marrow to explain the changes seen in myelodysplastic syndrome patients. We highlight the clinical application of the study of the bone marrow microenvironment and its topobiology in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:27089321

  4. Pulmonary Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis as an Initial Presentation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Jae Hyung; Park, Sejin; Won, Chang Youn; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Yi, Seong Yoon; Park, Hye Kyeong; Chang, Sun Hee; Jung, Hoon; Lee, Sung-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Systemic vasculitis involving the lung is a rare manifestation of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and secondary vasculitis is considered to have poor prognosis. A 44-year-old man presented with fever and dyspnea of 1 month duration. A chest radiograph revealed bilateral multiple wedge shaped consolidations. In addition, the results of a percutaneous needle biopsy for non-resolving pneumonia were compatible with pulmonary vasculitis. Bone marrow biopsy was performed due to the persistence of unexplained anemia and the patient was diagnosed with MDS. We reported a case of secondary vasculitis presenting as non-resolving pneumonia, later diagnosed as paraneoplastic syndrome of undiagnosed MDS. The cytopenia and vasculitis improved after a short course of glucocorticoid treatment, and there was no recurrence despite the progression of underlying MDS. PMID:27790283

  5. Clinical management of myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm overlap syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Clara, Joseph A.; Sallman, David A.; Padron, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPNs) are a unique group of hematologic malignancies characterized by concomitant myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative features. According to the 2008 WHO classification, the category includes atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN-U), and the provisional entity refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis (RARS-T). Although diagnosis currently remains based on clinicopathologic features, the incorporation of next-generation platforms has allowed for the recent molecular characterization of these diseases which has revealed unique and complex mutational profiles that support their distinct biology and is anticipated to soon play an integral role in diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment. Future goals of research should include the development of disease-modifying therapies, and further genetic understanding of the category will likely form the foundation of these efforts. PMID:27807503

  6. Differential expression of ribosomal proteins in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Elizabeth B; Dueber, Julie C; Qualtieri, Julianne; Tedesco, Jason; Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Kim, Annette S

    2016-02-01

    Aberrations of ribosomal biogenesis have been implicated in several congenital bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Diamond-Blackfan anaemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome and Dyskeratosis Congenita. Recent studies have identified haploinsufficiency of RPS14 in the acquired bone marrow disease isolated 5q minus syndrome, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the expression of various proteins comprising the ribosomal subunits and other proteins enzymatically involved in the synthesis of the ribosome has not been explored in non-5q minus MDS. Furthermore, differences in the effects of these expression alterations among myeloid, erythroid and megakaryocyte lineages have not been well elucidated. We examined the expression of several proteins related to ribosomal biogenesis in bone marrow biopsy specimens from patients with MDS (5q minus patients excluded) and controls with no known myeloid disease. Specifically, we found that there is overexpression of RPS24, DKC1 and SBDS in MDS. This overexpression is in contrast to the haploinsufficiency identified in the congenital bone marrow failure syndromes and in acquired 5q minus MDS. Potential mechanisms for these differences and aetiology for these findings in MDS are discussed.

  7. Engineering mouse models with myelodysplastic syndrome human candidate genes; how relevant are they?

    PubMed Central

    Beurlet, Stephanie; Chomienne, Christine; Padua, Rose Ann

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent particularly challenging hematologic malignancies that arise from a large spectrum of genetic events resulting in a disease characterized by a range of different presentations and outcomes. Despite efforts to classify and identify the key genetic events, little improvement has been made in therapies that will increase patient survival. Animal models represent powerful tools to model and study human diseases and are useful pre-clinical platforms. In addition to enforced expression of candidate oncogenes, gene inactivation has allowed the consequences of the genetic effects of human myelodysplastic syndrome to be studied in mice. This review aims to examine the animal models expressing myelodysplastic syndrome-associated genes that are currently available and to highlight the most appropriate model to phenocopy myelodysplastic syndrome disease and its risk of transformation to acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:23065517

  8. Cytogenetic studies of Brazilian pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome cases: challenges and difficulties in a large and emerging country

    PubMed Central

    Velloso, E.D.R.P.; Chauffaille, M.L.; Peliçario, L.M.; Tanizawa, R.S.S.; Toledo, S.R.C.; Gaiolla, R.D.; Lopes, L.F.

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) are rare hematopoietic stem cell diseases affecting children. Cytogenetics plays an important role in the diagnosis of these diseases. We report here the experience of the Cytogenetic Subcommittee of the Brazilian Cooperative Group on Pediatric Myelodysplastic Syndromes (BCG-MDS-PED). We analyzed 168 cytogenetic studies performed in 23 different cytogenetic centers; 84 of these studies were performed in patients with confirmed MDS (primary MDS, secondary MDS, JMML, and acute myeloid leukemia/MDS+Down syndrome). Clonal abnormalities were found in 36.9% of the MDS cases and cytogenetic studies were important for the detection of constitutional diseases and for differential diagnosis with other myeloid neoplasms. These data show the importance of the Cooperative Group for continuing education in order to avoid a late or wrong diagnosis. PMID:23314345

  9. 5'-Azacitidine for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes after non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Salaroli, Adriano; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Martelli, Maurizio; D'Elia, Gianna Maria; Nanni, Mauro; Mauro, Francesca Romana; Alimena, Giuliana

    2011-10-01

    Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes are possible complications in patients treated for previous hematologic malignancies. Therapeutic strategies in these type of disorders are still not well defined: azacitidine has been recently approved for the treatment of higher risk myelodysplastic syndromes, but few data are published relating possible efficacy in therapy-related dysplastic disorders. We reported here 4 patients treated with azacitidine for therapy related dysplasia after chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  10. Chronic myelodysplastic syndrome (preleukemia) with the Philadelphia chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, D.G.; Richman, C.M.; Rowley, J.D.

    1980-08-01

    A patient with severe anemia, reticulocytopenia, and erythroid hyperplasia of the bone marrow developed fatal acute nonlymphocytic leukemia after 3 yr. A Philadelphia chromosome with the typical 9/22 translocation was identified by banding techniques in a small number of bone marrow cells throughout the preleukemic phase of the illness (14% to 38% of the metaphases) and during the acute transformation (50%). Granulocytic colony formation in vitro was abnormal in the preleukemic phase. The diagnosis of chronic granulocytic leukemia was excluded on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The identification of the Ph/sup 1/ chromosome in this form of chronic myelodysplastic syndrome (preleukemia) provides a new example of a hematologic disorder predisposing to acute leukemia in which this chromosomal abnormality occurs.

  11. Myelodysplastic syndrome: a review from University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Ng, S C; Kuperan, P; Bosco, J; Menaka, N

    1990-04-01

    Twenty patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) were diagnosed in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur over a 5 year period. They were subclassified using the French American British (FAB) criteria. 90% of the patients were above 40 years old and the sex ratio was about equal. The predominant presenting symptom was anaemia and there was paucity of physical signs at presentation. Patients with 'aggressive' subtypes of MDS i.e. refractory anaemia with excess blasts (RAEB), refractory anaemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEB(-)+) and chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) had more frequent thrombocytopenia and neutropenia and their marrow pictures frequently had dysmegakaryopoiesis and dysgranulopoiesis as compared to more the "benign" subtypes i.e. refractory anaemia (RA) and refractory leukaemic anaemia with ringed sideroblasts (RARS). Four patients had leukaemic transformation and all of them came from the 'aggressive' subtypes. The current views on treatment of MDS are discussed.

  12. Importance of Classical Morphology in the Diagnosis of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Invernizzi, Rosangela; Quaglia, Federica; Porta, Matteo Giovanni Della

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic, ineffective, clonal and neoplastic hematopoiesis. MDS represent a complex hematological problem: differences in disease presentation, progression and outcome have necessitated the use of classification systems to improve diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment selection. However, since a single biological or genetic reliable diagnostic marker has not yet been discovered for MDS, quantitative and qualitative dysplastic morphological alterations of bone marrow precursors and peripheral blood cells are still fundamental for diagnostic classification. In this paper, World Health Organization (WHO) classification refinements and current minimal diagnostic criteria proposed by expert panels are highlighted, and related problematic issues are discussed. The recommendations should facilitate diagnostic and prognostic evaluations in MDS and selection of patients for new effective targeted therapies. Although, in the future, morphology should be supplemented with new molecular techniques, the morphological approach, at least for the moment, is still the cornerstone for the diagnosis and classification of these disorders. PMID:25960863

  13. Laparoscopic splenectomy can induce significant improvement in hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gologan, R; Vasilescu, C; Dobrea, Camelia; Ostroveanu, Daniela; Georgescu, Daniela; Vasilache, Didona

    2007-01-01

    A 20 years old male patient was diagnosed as hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome (hMDS) - refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia in November 2002. He received packed blood cells, methylprednisolon and dexamethason but no persistent improvement and even worsening of the thrombocytopenia and the appearance of neutropenia were registered. Laparoscopic splenectomy has been performed in January 2003, when the platelets were approximately 15000/mm3, without intraoperative incidents. After splenectomy, no other therapy or transfusions have been applied and a slow but continuous improvement of the peripheral blood counts up to normal values has been noted. In the bone marrow, a notable increase of cellular density was registered after more than three years from splenectomy, with the persistence of the other morphological dysplastic features.

  14. [Molecular biology in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemias "smoldering"].

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Giovanni; Sartor, Chiara; Papayannidis, Cristina; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Paolini, Stefania; Clissa, Cristina; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Finelli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage characterized by peripheral cytopenias and frequent leukemic evolution. MDS differ for clinical presentation, disease behavior and progression and this is the reflection of remarkable variability at molecular level. To this moment disease diagnosis is still dependent on bone marrow morphology that, although high concordance rates among experts are reported, remains subjective. Karyotype analysis is mandatory but diagnosis may be difficult in presence of normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics. Standardized molecular markers are needed to better define diagnosis, prediction of disease progression and prognosis. Furthermore, a molecular biology analysis could provide an important therapeutic tool towards tailored therapy and new insights in the disease's biology.

  15. Myelodysplastic syndromes in Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, Daniil F; Sklyarenko, Lilia M; Koval, Stella V; Rodionova, Nataliia K; Zavelevich, Michael P; Ivanivskaya, Tetiana S; Poludnenko, Liudmyla Yu; Ukrainskaya, Nataliia I

    2015-10-01

    The studies of the recent decades posed the question of the association between radiation exposure and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). This association has been proved in secondary MDS originating upon exposure to chemotherapeutics and/or radiation therapy. The long-term study in Japanese atomic (A)-bomb survivors demonstrated the significant linear dose-response for MDS confirming the link between radiation exposure and this form of hematopoietic malignancies. All these findings provide the strong basis for studying MDS in the persons exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl disaster, especially those in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987. The data on MDS among Chernobyl clean-up workers (1986-1987) diagnosed in 1996-2012 at the reference laboratory of RE Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology are summarized. MDS cases were diagnosed in 23 persons (21 males and 2 females) having been exposed to radiation as clean-up workers of 1986-1987. Refractory anemia (RA) has been detected in 13, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS)-in 2, and refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-in 8 patients. The median age of those MDS patients was 62.0 years. In addition, 5 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were recorded in the group of Chernobyl clean-up workers with the median time of 14.8 years from 1986-1987 to diagnosis. The association between radiation exposure and MDS is discussed. The suggested life-long risk for myelodysplastic syndromes among A-bomb survivors in Japan highlights the importance of the continuing follow-up studies in the affected populations in the post-Chernobyl period. PMID:26208666

  16. Myelodysplastic syndromes in Chernobyl clean-up workers.

    PubMed

    Gluzman, Daniil F; Sklyarenko, Lilia M; Koval, Stella V; Rodionova, Nataliia K; Zavelevich, Michael P; Ivanivskaya, Tetiana S; Poludnenko, Liudmyla Yu; Ukrainskaya, Nataliia I

    2015-10-01

    The studies of the recent decades posed the question of the association between radiation exposure and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). This association has been proved in secondary MDS originating upon exposure to chemotherapeutics and/or radiation therapy. The long-term study in Japanese atomic (A)-bomb survivors demonstrated the significant linear dose-response for MDS confirming the link between radiation exposure and this form of hematopoietic malignancies. All these findings provide the strong basis for studying MDS in the persons exposed to radiation following the Chernobyl disaster, especially those in the cohort of Chernobyl clean-up workers of 1986-1987. The data on MDS among Chernobyl clean-up workers (1986-1987) diagnosed in 1996-2012 at the reference laboratory of RE Kavetsky Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology are summarized. MDS cases were diagnosed in 23 persons (21 males and 2 females) having been exposed to radiation as clean-up workers of 1986-1987. Refractory anemia (RA) has been detected in 13, refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS)-in 2, and refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB)-in 8 patients. The median age of those MDS patients was 62.0 years. In addition, 5 cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) were recorded in the group of Chernobyl clean-up workers with the median time of 14.8 years from 1986-1987 to diagnosis. The association between radiation exposure and MDS is discussed. The suggested life-long risk for myelodysplastic syndromes among A-bomb survivors in Japan highlights the importance of the continuing follow-up studies in the affected populations in the post-Chernobyl period.

  17. Myelodysplastic syndromes: pathogenesis, functional abnormalities, and clinical implications.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, A

    1985-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes represent a preleukaemic state in which a clonal abnormality of haemopoietic stem cell is characterised by a variety of phenotypic manifestations with varying degrees of ineffective haemopoiesis. This state probably develops as a sequence of events in which the earliest stages may be difficult to detect by conventional pathological techniques. The process is characterised by genetic changes leading to abnormal control of cell proliferation and differentiation. Expansion of an abnormal clone may be related to independence from normal growth factors, insensitivity to normal inhibitory factors, suppression of normal clonal growth, or changes in the immunological or nutritional condition of the host. The haematological picture is of peripheral blood cytopenias: a cellular bone marrow, and functional abnormalities of erythroid, myeloid, and megakaryocytic cells. In most cases marrow cells have an abnormal DNA content, often with disturbances of the cell cycle: an abnormal karyotype is common in premalignant clones. Growth abnormalities of erythroid or granulocyte-macrophage progenitors are common in marrow cultures, and lineage specific surface membrane markers indicate aberrations of differentiation. Progression of the disorder may occur through clonal expansion or through clonal evolution with a greater degree of malignancy. Current attempts to influence abnormal growth and differentiation have had only limited success. Clinical recognition of the syndrome depends on an acute awareness of the signs combined with the identification of clonal and functional abnormalities. PMID:2999194

  18. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total Body Irradiation Followed by a Donor Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Polycythemia Vera; Polycythemia Vera, Post-Polycythemic Myelofibrosis Phase; Primary Myelofibrosis; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  19. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of transfusional iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Karali, Vasiliki; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms derived from an abnormal multipotent progenitor cell, characterized by a hyperproliferative bone marrow, dysplasia of the cellular hemopoietic elements and ineffective erythropoiesis. Anemia is a common finding in myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and blood transfusions are the only therapeutic option in approximately 40% of cases. The most serious side effect of regular blood transfusion is iron overload. Currently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2 is routinely used to identify patients with myocardial iron overload and to guide chelation therapy, tailored to prevent iron toxicity in the heart. This is a major validated non-invasive measure of myocardial iron overloading and is superior to surrogates such as serum ferritin, liver iron, ventricular ejection fraction and tissue Doppler parameters. The indication for iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndrome patients is currently controversial. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance may offer an excellent non-invasive, diagnostic tool for iron overload assessment in myelodysplastic syndromes. Further studies are needed to establish the precise indications of chelation therapy and the clinical implications of this treatment on survival in myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:26190429

  20. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of transfusional iron overload in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Emmanouil; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Karali, Vasiliki; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Sfikakis, Petros P; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes represent a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic neoplasms derived from an abnormal multipotent progenitor cell, characterized by a hyperproliferative bone marrow, dysplasia of the cellular hemopoietic elements and ineffective erythropoiesis. Anemia is a common finding in myelodysplastic syndrome patients, and blood transfusions are the only therapeutic option in approximately 40% of cases. The most serious side effect of regular blood transfusion is iron overload. Currently, cardiovascular magnetic resonance using T2 is routinely used to identify patients with myocardial iron overload and to guide chelation therapy, tailored to prevent iron toxicity in the heart. This is a major validated non-invasive measure of myocardial iron overloading and is superior to surrogates such as serum ferritin, liver iron, ventricular ejection fraction and tissue Doppler parameters. The indication for iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndrome patients is currently controversial. However, cardiovascular magnetic resonance may offer an excellent non-invasive, diagnostic tool for iron overload assessment in myelodysplastic syndromes. Further studies are needed to establish the precise indications of chelation therapy and the clinical implications of this treatment on survival in myelodysplastic syndromes.

  1. Diagnostic flow cytometry for low-grade myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kiyoyuki

    2008-12-01

    It has long been considered that flow cytometry (FCM) has little role in clinical practice in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, recent advances in the analytical method and knowledge of MDS FCM are changing this stereotype. This paper reviews the concept and current status of FCM in the diagnosis of low-grade MDS. The diagnosis of low-grade MDS in the absence of ringed sideroblasts and chromosomal aberration is not always straightforward, and a report from a recent international working conference has proposed FCM as an adjunctive diagnostic test for such cases. Currently, only a limited number of laboratories are applying FCM to the diagnosis of MDS. Furthermore, standard analytical methods in FCM for MDS have not been established, and no single FCM parameter is sufficiently sensitive and specific to make the diagnosis of MDS. To establish MDS FCM as a widely accepted, dependable diagnostic tool, prospective studies should increase flow parameters that can be analysed reproducibly and determine their sensitivity and specificity, either alone or in combination. CD34+ cell-related parameters that are applicable for diagnosing low-grade MDS in many laboratories are introduced here.

  2. Clinical utility of lenalidomide in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abou Zahr, Abdallah; Saad Aldin, Ehab; Komrokji, Rami S; Zeidan, Amer M

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a heterogeneous group of acquired clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, paradoxical BM hypercellularity, ineffective hematopoiesis, and increased risk of leukemic transformation. Risk stratification, using different prognostic scores and markers, is at the core of MDS management. Deletion 5q [del(5q)] MDS is a distinct class of MDS characterized by the haploinsufficiency of specific genes, microRNAs, and proteins, which has been linked to increased sensitivity to the drug lenalidomide. Phase II and III clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lenalidomide in improving clinical outcomes of patients with del(5q) MDS, including reduction in red blood cell transfusion requirements and improvements in quality of life. Lenalidomide has also demonstrated some activity in non-del(5q) lower-risk MDS as well as higher-risk MDS, especially in combination with other agents. In this paper, we review the pathogenesis of del(5q) MDS, the proposed mechanisms of action of lenalidomide, the major clinical trials that documented the activity of lenalidomide in different MDS populations, potential predictors of benefit from the drug and suggested mechanisms of resistance, and the use of combination strategies to expand the clinical utility of lenalidomide in MDS. PMID:25565910

  3. Efficacy and safety of deferasirox in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Alimena, Giuliana

    2013-07-01

    Transfusion dependence in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients may lead to organ damage due to accumulation of non-transferrin-bound iron with consequent increased oxidative stress. Iron chelation has been reported in retrospective studies to improve overall survival in low-risk MDS patients, but this information needs to be validated in prospective trials. The oral iron chelator, deferasirox, has been shown to reduce serum ferritin levels in chelation naïve and pre-treated patients and to reduce labile plasma iron, independently from the efficacy on iron overload. Deferasirox is a potent NF-kB inhibitor, tested in vivo and on acute myeloid leukemia and MDS cell lines, and this effect may explain in part the phenomenon of hematological improvements reported in case reports and in different clinical trials. The drug has an acceptable safety profile, with the most common side effects reported being non-progressive change in serum creatinine level, gastrointestinal disturbances, and skin rash. In this review, we report the results of different studies testing safety and efficacy of deferasirox in MDS patients, side effects associated with the drug, and suggested management of iron overload.

  4. Clonal diversity of recurrently mutated genes in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Walter, MJ; Shen, D; Shao, J; Ding, L; White, BS; Kandoth, C; Miller, CA; Niu, B; McLellan, MD; Dees, ND; Fulton, R; Elliot, K; Heath, S; Grillot, M; Westervelt, P; Link, DC; DiPersio, JF; Mardis, E; Ley, TJ; Wilson, RK; Graubert, TA

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that most cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are clonally heterogeneous, with a founding clone and multiple subclones. It is not known whether specific gene mutations typically occur in founding clones or subclones. We screened a panel of 94 candidate genes in a cohort of 157 patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). This included 150 cases with samples obtained at MDS diagnosis and 15 cases with samples obtained at sAML transformation (8 were also analyzed at the MDS stage). We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to define the clonal architecture in eight sAML genomes and identified the range of variant allele frequencies (VAFs) for founding clone mutations. At least one mutation or cytogenetic abnormality was detected in 83% of the 150 MDS patients and 17 genes were significantly mutated (false discovery rate ≤0.05). Individual genes and patient samples displayed a wide range of VAFs for recurrently mutated genes, indicating that no single gene is exclusively mutated in the founding clone. The VAFs of recurrently mutated genes did not fully recapitulate the clonal architecture defined by WGS, suggesting that comprehensive sequencing may be required to accurately assess the clonal status of recurrently mutated genes in MDS. PMID:23443460

  5. Epidemiology and risk factors for infections in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, L R; Sekeres, M A; Shrestha, N K; Maciejewski, J P; Tiu, R V; Butler, R; Mossad, S B

    2013-12-01

    We conducted a case-control study to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for infections requiring hospitalization in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Of 497 patients identified, 103 patients developed 201 episodes of infection. The probability of acquiring an infection 1 year from date of MDS diagnosis was 15% (95% confidence interval [CI] 12-18%). Patients developing infections had decreased survival compared to those who did not (P = 0.007). Significant risk factors for infection were higher risk MDS (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.7-4.1, P < 0.0001), nadir absolute neutrophil count <500/mL (HR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2-2.7, P < 0.007), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.4-4.9, P < 0.003), history of other malignancy (HR 2.0, 95% CI = 1.3-3.1, P < 0.003), and autoimmune disease (HR 2.9, 95% CI = 1.4-6.0, P < 0.005). Age, nadir platelet count <20,000/mL, diabetes mellitus, and MDS treatment were not significant risk factors. Pneumonia was the most common infection, and bacteria the predominant pathogens. PMID:24010918

  6. Discovering Transcription and Splicing Networks in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Wen, Jianguo; Chang, Chung-che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    More and more transcription factors and their motifs have been reported and linked to specific gene expression levels. However, focusing only on transcription is not sufficient for mechanism research. Most genes, especially in eukaryotes, are alternatively spliced to different isoforms. Some of these isoforms increase the biodiversity of proteins. From this viewpoint, transcription and splicing are two of important mechanisms to modulate expression levels of isoforms. To integrate these two kinds of regulation, we built a linear regression model to select a subset of transcription factors and splicing factors for each co-expressed isoforms using least-angle regression approach. Then, we applied this method to investigate the mechanism of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a precursor lesion of acute myeloid leukemia. Results suggested that expression levels of most isoforms were regulated by a set of selected regulatory factors. Some of the detected factors, such as EGR1 and STAT family, are highly correlated with progression of MDS. We discovered that the splicing factor SRSF11 experienced alternative splicing switch, and in turn induced different amino acid sequences between MDS and controls. This splicing switch causes two different splicing mechanisms. Polymerase Chain Reaction experiments also confirmed that one of its isoforms was over-expressed in MDS. We analyzed the regulatory networks constructed from the co-expressed isoforms and their regulatory factors in MDS. Many of these networks were enriched in the herpes simplex infection pathway which involves many splicing factors, and pathways in cancers and acute or chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24244432

  7. Deficiency of pluripotent hemopoietic progenitor cells in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Geissler, K; Hinterberger, W; Jäger, U; Bettelheim, P; Neumann, E; Haas, O; Ambros, P; Chott, A; Radaszkiewicz, T; Lechner, K

    1988-07-01

    Pluripotent (CFU-MIX), erythroid (BFU-E) and granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitor cells were examined in bone marrow (BM) from 23 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Patients were grouped according to the FAB classification: Refractory anemia (RA), n = 3; RA with ring sideroblasts (RARS), n = 3; RA with excess of blasts (RAEB), n = 8; RA with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEBt), n = 7; chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), n = 2. In FAB groups RA, RARS, RAEB and RAEBt CFU-GM concentrations were normal or decreased but both CMML-patients had increased CFU-GM values. Abnormal cluster growth was observed in 9 of 23 MDS-patients. BFU-E colony formation was subnormal in all cases. Mixed-colony assay values were at the lower limit of controls in one patient and decreased in the remaining 22 MDS-patients. A similar growth pattern of hemopoietic progenitor cells was observed in 19 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL), who were studied for comparison. These data suggest a quantitative or qualitative/functional defect of the pluripotent progenitor cell compartment as the major cause for the cytopenia in MDS-patients.

  8. Costs and quality of life in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Lucioni, Carlo; Finelli, Carlo; Mazzi, Silvio; Oliva, Esther N

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) encompass a range of myeloid neoplasms characterised by a defect in haematopoietic stem cell maturation, resulting in peripheral cytopenias. As a major consequence, most MDS patients become anaemic, so as to require red blood cell transfusions. To investigate the costs and the impact on quality of life (QOL) of MDS-separately in transfusion-independent (TI) and -dependent (TD) patients-a literature search was conducted. From Medline and Embase, 742 studies were identified, of which 17 were considered eligible. Total medical costs per patient/year range from $ 9,840 to $ 19,811 for the TI condition and from $ 29,608 to $ 51,066 in the TD condition, more than doubling when moving from the former condition to the latter. With regard to QOL, in the transition from TI to TD, QOL could be reduced by half depending on the studies. The TD condition negatively impacts on costs and the QOL of patients with MDS. Therapeutic strategies that reduce transfusion dependence may lead to broad benefits for patients and the community. PMID:23997987

  9. Diagnostic Utility of Flow Cytometry in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Aanei, Carmen Mariana; Picot, Tiphanie; Tavernier, Emmanuelle; Guyotat, Denis; Campos Catafal, Lydia

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are clonal disorders of hematopoiesis that exhibit heterogeneous clinical presentation and morphological findings, which complicates diagnosis, especially in early stages. Recently, refined definitions and standards in the diagnosis and treatment of MDS were proposed, but numerous questions remain. Multiparameter flow cytometry (MFC) is a helpful tool for the diagnostic workup of patients with suspected MDS, and various scores using MFC data have been developed. However, none of these methods have achieved the sensitivity that is required for a reassuring diagnosis in the absence of morphological abnormalities. One reason may be that each score evaluates one or two lineages without offering a broad view of the dysplastic process. The combination of two scores (e.g., Ogata and Red Score) improved the sensitivity from 50–60 to 88%, but the positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) must be improved. There are prominent differences between study groups when these scores are tested. Further research is needed to maximize the sensitivity of flow cytometric analysis in MDS. This review focuses on the application of flow cytometry for MDS diagnosis and discusses the advantages and limitations of different approaches. PMID:27446807

  10. Myelodysplastic Syndromes in the Elderly: Treatment Options and Personalized Management.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Sonja; Wiesinger, Petra; Stauder, Reinhard

    2015-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are typical diseases of the elderly, with a median age of 68-75 years at initial diagnosis. Demographic changes producing an increased proportion of elderly in our societies mean the incidence of MDS will rise dramatically. Considering the increasing number of treatment options, ranging from best supportive care to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), decision making is rather complex in this cohort of patients. Moreover, aspects of the aging process also have to be considered in therapy planning. Treatment of elderly MDS patients is dependent on the patient's individual risk and prognosis. Comorbidities play an essential role as predictors of survival and therapy tolerance. Age-adjusted models and the use of geriatric assessment scores are described as a basis for individualized treatment algorithms. Specific treatment recommendations for the different groups of patients are given. Currently available therapeutic agents, including supportive care, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), immune-modulating agents, hypomethylating agents, and HSCT are described in detail and discussed with a special focus on elderly MDS patients. The inclusion of elderly patients in clinical trials is of utmost importance to obtain data on efficacy and safety in this particular group of patients. Endpoints relevant for the elderly should be integrated, including maintenance of quality of life and functional activities as well as evaluation of use of healthcare resources.

  11. Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With High-Risk Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Genetic and epigenetic pathways in myelodysplastic syndromes: A brief overview.

    PubMed

    Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2015-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a highly heterogenous group of hematopoietic tumors, mainly due to variable clinical features and diverse set of cytogenetic, molecular genetic and epigenetic lesions. The major clinical features of MDS are ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenias, and an increased risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemias, which in turn is most likely determined by specific genetic abnormalities and other presenting hematologic features. The risk of developing MDS is relatively higher in some genetic syndromes such as Fanconi anemia and receipt of chemotherapy and radiation treatment. In recent years a significant progress has occurred and a vast literatures has become available including the spectrum of cytogenetic abnormalities, gene mutations relating to RNA splicing machinery, epigenetic regulation of gene expression and signaling pathways associated with MDS pathogenesis, which have provided opportunities to understand the molecular mechanisms as well as employ targeted therapeutic approaches to treat MDS. The cytogenetic abnormalities detected in MDS varies from a single abnormality to complex karyotype not easily amenable to conventional cytogenetic analysis. In such cases, array based high resolution genomic analysis detected abnormalities, which are diagnostic as well as prognostic. The most common driver gene mutations detected in patients with MDS include RNA splicing (SF3B1,SRSF2,U2F1,ZRSR2), DNA methylation (TET2,DNMT3A,IDH1/IDH2), chromatin modification (ASXL1,EZH2), transcription regulation (RUNX1,BCOR) and DNA repair control p53. A small subset of MDS arise due to deregulation of RAS pathway, mainly due to NRAS/KRAS/NF1 mutations. Identification of these mutations and pathways have provided opportunities for oncologists to target these patients with specific therapies. Several drugs which either target the spliceosome, oncogenic RAS signaling, or hypomethylating agents have been employed to successfully treat MDS

  13. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as an initial presentation of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jung; Yoon, Yong Joo

    2012-01-01

    This study reports an unusual case in which myelodysplastic syndrome presented bilateral sudden sensorineural hearing loss as the first symptom of the disease. The aural symptoms and signs such as tinnitus, dizziness, and hearing impairment of a hematologic disease are common. However, sudden hearing loss as the first manifestation of a hematologic disease is extremely rare. A 76-year-old woman presented with bilateral sudden hearing loss. The patient was found to have myelodysplastic syndrome during a workup for her hearing loss. Unfortunately, the patient's hearing loss did not improve after the medical treatment.

  15. Association between mitochondrial DNA haplogroup and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Langer, Erica; Hooten, Anthony J; Roesler, Michelle; Hirsch, Betsy; Nguyen, Phuong L; Cioc, Adina; Warlick, Erica; Ross, Julie A

    2016-09-01

    Polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are used to group individuals into haplogroups reflecting human global migration and are associated with multiple diseases, including cancer. Here, we evaluate the association between mtDNA haplogroup and risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Cases were identified by the Minnesota Cancer Surveillance System. Controls were identified through the Minnesota State driver's license/identification card list. Because haplogroup frequencies vary by race and ethnicity, we restricted analyses to non-Hispanic whites. We genotyped 15 mtSNPs that capture common European mitochondrial haplogroup variation. We used SAS v.9.3 (SAS Institute, Cary, NC) to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) overall and stratified by MDS subtype and IPSS-R risk category. We were able to classify 215 cases with confirmed MDS and 522 controls into one of the 11 common European haplogroups. Due to small sample sizes in some subgroups, we combined mt haplogroups into larger bins based on the haplogroup evolutionary tree, including HV (H + V), JT (J + T), IWX (I + W + X), UK (U + K), and Z for comparisons of cases and controls. Using haplogroup HV as the reference group, we found a statistically significant association between haplogroup JT and MDS (OR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.36, 0.92, P = 0.02). No statistically significant heterogeneity was observed in subgroup analyses. In this population-based study of MDS, we observed an association between mtDNA haplogroup JT and risk of MDS. While previously published studies provide biological plausibility for the observed association, further studies of the relationship between mtDNA variation and MDS are warranted in larger sample sizes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27121678

  16. Platelet apoptosis and agonist-mediated activation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Martín, M; de Paz, R; Jiménez-Yuste, V; Fernández Bello, I; García Arias Salgado, E; Alvarez, M T; Butta, N V

    2013-05-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have a defect in the differentiation of bone marrow multipotent progenitor cells. Thrombocytopenia in MDS patients may be due to premature megakaryocyte death, but platelet apoptotic mechanisms may also occur. This study aimed to study function and apoptotic state of platelets from MDS patients with different platelet count. Reticulated platelets, platelet activation, activated caspases and annexin-V binding were evaluated by flow cytometry. Pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins were determined by western blots and plasma thrombopoietin by ELISA. Microparticle-associated procoagulant activity and thrombin generation capacity of plasma were determined by an activity kit and calibrated automated thrombography, respectively. High plasma thrombopoietin levels and low immature circulating platelet count showed a pattern of hypoplastic thrombocytopenia in MDS patients. Platelets from MDS patients showed reduced activation capacity and more apoptosis signs than controls. Patients with the lowest platelet count showed less platelet activation and the highest extent of platelet apoptosis. On this basis, patients with thrombocytopenia should suffer more haemorrhagic episodes than is actually observed. Consequently, we tested whether there were some compensatory mechanisms to counteract their expected bleeding tendency. Microparticle-associated procoagulant activity was enhanced in MDS patients with thrombocytopenia, whereas their plasma thrombin generation capacity was similar to control group. This research shows a hypoplastic thrombocytopenia that platelets from MDS patients possess an impaired ability to be stimulated and more apoptosis markers than those from healthy controls, indicating that MDS is a stem cell disorder, and then, both number and function of progeny cells, might be affected. PMID:23407717

  17. Landscape of genetic lesions in 944 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Haferlach, T; Nagata, Y; Grossmann, V; Okuno, Y; Bacher, U; Nagae, G; Schnittger, S; Sanada, M; Kon, A; Alpermann, T; Yoshida, K; Roller, A; Nadarajah, N; Shiraishi, Y; Shiozawa, Y; Chiba, K; Tanaka, H; Koeffler, H P; Klein, H-U; Dugas, M; Aburatani, H; Kohlmann, A; Miyano, S; Haferlach, C; Kern, W; Ogawa, S

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing significantly contributed to diagnosis and prognostication in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We determined the biological and prognostic significance of genetic aberrations in MDS. In total, 944 patients with various MDS subtypes were screened for known/putative mutations/deletions in 104 genes using targeted deep sequencing and array-based genomic hybridization. In total, 845/944 patients (89.5%) harbored at least one mutation (median, 3 per patient; range, 0–12). Forty-seven genes were significantly mutated with TET2, SF3B1, ASXL1, SRSF2, DNMT3A, and RUNX1 mutated in >10% of cases. Many mutations were associated with higher risk groups and/or blast elevation. Survival was investigated in 875 patients. By univariate analysis, 25/48 genes (resulting from 47 genes tested significantly plus PRPF8) affected survival (P<0.05). The status of 14 genes combined with conventional factors revealed a novel prognostic model (‘Model-1') separating patients into four risk groups (‘low', ‘intermediate', ‘high', ‘very high risk') with 3-year survival of 95.2, 69.3, 32.8, and 5.3% (P<0.001). Subsequently, a ‘gene-only model' (‘Model-2') was constructed based on 14 genes also yielding four significant risk groups (P<0.001). Both models were reproducible in the validation cohort (n=175 patients; P<0.001 each). Thus, large-scale genetic and molecular profiling of multiple target genes is invaluable for subclassification and prognostication in MDS patients. PMID:24220272

  18. Landscape of genetic lesions in 944 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Haferlach, T; Nagata, Y; Grossmann, V; Okuno, Y; Bacher, U; Nagae, G; Schnittger, S; Sanada, M; Kon, A; Alpermann, T; Yoshida, K; Roller, A; Nadarajah, N; Shiraishi, Y; Shiozawa, Y; Chiba, K; Tanaka, H; Koeffler, H P; Klein, H-U; Dugas, M; Aburatani, H; Kohlmann, A; Miyano, S; Haferlach, C; Kern, W; Ogawa, S

    2014-02-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing significantly contributed to diagnosis and prognostication in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We determined the biological and prognostic significance of genetic aberrations in MDS. In total, 944 patients with various MDS subtypes were screened for known/putative mutations/deletions in 104 genes using targeted deep sequencing and array-based genomic hybridization. In total, 845/944 patients (89.5%) harbored at least one mutation (median, 3 per patient; range, 0-12). Forty-seven genes were significantly mutated with TET2, SF3B1, ASXL1, SRSF2, DNMT3A, and RUNX1 mutated in >10% of cases. Many mutations were associated with higher risk groups and/or blast elevation. Survival was investigated in 875 patients. By univariate analysis, 25/48 genes (resulting from 47 genes tested significantly plus PRPF8) affected survival (P<0.05). The status of 14 genes combined with conventional factors revealed a novel prognostic model ('Model-1') separating patients into four risk groups ('low', 'intermediate', 'high', 'very high risk') with 3-year survival of 95.2, 69.3, 32.8, and 5.3% (P<0.001). Subsequently, a 'gene-only model' ('Model-2') was constructed based on 14 genes also yielding four significant risk groups (P<0.001). Both models were reproducible in the validation cohort (n=175 patients; P<0.001 each). Thus, large-scale genetic and molecular profiling of multiple target genes is invaluable for subclassification and prognostication in MDS patients. PMID:24220272

  19. Sweet syndrome associated with myelodysplastic syndrome: report of a case. Review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Reina, Delia; Cerdà, Dacia; Roig, Daniel; Fíguls, Ramon; Villegas, M Luz; Corominas, Hèctor

    2013-01-01

    Sweet's syndrome or acute neutrophilic febrile dermatosis is a systemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by the appearance of skin lesions produced by a neutrophilic dermal infiltrate, fever and peripheral leukocytosis. It may be associated with hematologic diseases, including leukemia, with immune diseases as rheumatoid arthritis, or can occur in isolation. The myelodysplasias are hematological disorders characterized by one or more cytopenias secondary to bone marrow dysfunction. We present the case of a patient with Sweet's syndrome associated with myelodysplastic syndrome and treated with glucocorticoids who did not present a good clinical outcome. We discuss the different treatment of these diseases because in most cases glucocorticoids, which are the treatment of choice in Sweet's syndrome, may be insufficient.

  20. A prospective multicenter observational study of decitabine treatment in Korean patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Je-Hwan; Jang, Jun Ho; Park, Jinny; Park, Seonyang; Joo, Young-Don; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Kim, Hoon-Gu; Choi, Chul Won; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Park, Seong Kyu; Park, Eunkyung; Min, Yoo Hong

    2011-01-01

    Background Decitabine was evaluated for its efficacy and safety in Korean patients with myelodysplastic syndrome with IPSS score of 0.5 or over. Design and Methods Decitabine 20 mg/m2/day was given intravenously over one hour for five consecutive days every four weeks. The primary end point was overall response rate. Results A total of 101 patients were analyzed. The International Prognostic Scoring System risk category was Intermediate-2/High in 47.5%. A median of 5 courses (range 1–18) were delivered. The overall response rate was 55.4% (13 complete responses, one partial response, 23 marrow complete responses, and 19 hematologic improvements). Forty-eight patients (47.5%) showed some hematologic improvement. With a median follow-up duration of 478 days (range 69–595), median overall survival was 17.7 months. Patients who showed hematologic improvement had significantly longer overall survival than those who did not (19.2 vs. 15.9 months, P=0.006 by landmark analysis at six months). The difference in overall survival was evident in the Intermediate-2/High risk group but not in the Intermediate-1 risk group. The progression-free survival and acute myeloid leukemia-free survival were 61.9% and 77.9% at one year, respectively. Among 489 assessable treatment courses, there were 97 fever episodes requiring intravenous antimicrobials. Conclusions Decitabine treatment was feasible and effective in Korean patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and the overall survival was significantly longer in patients showing hematologic improvement. PMID:21659363

  1. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Bone Marrow Transplantation in Treating Children With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  3. Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Myelodysplastic syndromes: Contemporary review and how we treat.

    PubMed

    Gangat, Naseema; Patnaik, Mrinal M; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal stem cell disorders with an inherent tendency for leukemic transformation. Diagnosis is currently based on the presence of peripheral blood cytopenias, peripheral blood and bone marrow dysplasia/blasts, and clonal cytogenetic abnormalities. With the advent of next generation sequencing, recurrent somatic mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation (TET2, ASXL1, EZH2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), RNA splicing (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), DNA damage response (TP53), transcriptional regulation (RUNX1, BCOR, ETV6) and signal transduction (CBL, NRAS, JAK2) have been identified in MDS. Conventional prognostication is by the revised International prognostic scoring system (IPSS-R) with additional adverse prognosis conferred by presence of ASXL1, EZH2, or TP53 mutations. Currently Food and Drug administration (FDA)-approved drugs for the treatment of MDS are not curative and their effect on survival is limited; they include the hypomethylating agents (HMA) azacitidine and decitabine and lenalidomide for MDS with isolated del(5q). To date, allogeneic stem cell transplant (ASCT) remains the only treatment option for possible cure. Given the current lack of drugs with convincing evidence of favorable effect on survival, we consider ASCT as the treatment of choice for most patients with symptomatic disease, and especially for those with high-risk disease. For nontransplant candidates, participation in clinical trials is preferred over conventional therapy. There is not one right way of treatment for patients who are not candidates for either ASCT or clinical trials and palliative drugs of choice depend on the clinical problem, such as symptomatic anemia (ESAs, danazol, HMA), thrombocytopenia (HMA), or neutropenia (myeloid growth factors). Conversely, there is no controlled evidence to support the use of iron chelating agents in MDS. Going forward, we believe it is time to incorporate mutation information in

  5. Vorinostat, Cytarabine, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Myeloproliferative Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  6. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  8. Diagnosis and classification of myelodysplastic syndrome: International Working Group on Morphology of myelodysplastic syndrome (IWGM-MDS) consensus proposals for the definition and enumeration of myeloblasts and ring sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mufti, Ghulam J; Bennett, John M; Goasguen, Jean; Bain, Barbara J; Baumann, Irith; Brunning, Richard; Cazzola, Mario; Fenaux, Pierre; Germing, Ulrich; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Jinnai, Itsuro; Manabe, Atsushi; Matsuda, Akira; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Sanz, Guillermo; Tomonaga, Masao; Vallespi, Teresa; Yoshimi, Ayami

    2008-11-01

    The classification of myelodysplastic syndromes is based on the morphological criteria proposed by the French-American-British (FAB) and World Health Organization (WHO) groups. Accurate enumeration of blast cells, although essential for diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome and for assignment to prognostic groups, is often difficult, due to imprecise criteria for the morphological definition of blasts and promyelocytes. An International Working Group on Morphology of Myelodysplastic Syndrome (IWGM-MDS) of hematopathologists and hematologists expert in the field of myelodysplastic syndrome reviewed the morphological features of bone marrows from all subtypes of myelodysplastic syndrome and agreed on a set of recommendations, including recommendations for the definition and enumeration of blast cells and ring sideroblasts. It is recommended that (1) agranular or granular blast cells be defined (replacing the previous type I, II and III blasts), (2) dysplastic promyelocytes be distinguished from cytologically normal promyelocytes and from granular blast cells, (3) sufficient cells be counted to give a precise blast percentage, particularly at thresholds that are important for diagnosis or prognosis and (4) ring sideroblasts be defined as erythroblasts in which there are a minimum of 5 siderotic granules covering at least a third of the nuclear circumference. Clear definitions and a differential count of a sufficient number of cells is likely to improve precision in the diagnosis and classification of myelodysplastic syndrome. Recommendations should be applied in the context of the WHO classification. PMID:18838480

  9. Subcutaneous histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Srisuttiyakorn, Chutika; Reeve, Jennifer; Reddy, Swapna; Imaeda, Suguru; Lazova, Rossitza

    2014-05-01

    Subcutaneous histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome is a rare variant of histiocytoid Sweet’s syndrome (SS). We present a 68-year-old woman with subcutaneous histiocytoid SS in association with refractory myelodysplastic syndrome transformed to acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), status post induction chemotherapy and with persistent blasts (50%) in the bone marrow and blood, accompanied with neutropenia. The patient presented to the emergency room with fever and altered mental status. Clinical examination revealed approximately 20 scattered 0.5-2 cm, pink to pink-purple non-tender firm nodules on the legs and left arm. The differential diagnosis included Sweet’s syndrome (deep), leukemia cutis, infection, polyarteritis nodosa and erythema nodosum. Histopathologic examination of a biopsy from the left arm revealed a nodular infiltrate of neutrophils and histiocytoid mononuclear cells solely in the lobular compartment of the subcutaneous fat with focal areas of necrosis. Most cells in the infiltrate labeled with myeloperoxidase (MPO) including the histiocytoid cells. The cells were negative for CD34 and CD117. All special stains for microorganisms were negative. A diagnosis of subcutaneous histiocytoid SS was made. A subcutaneous histiocytoid SS should be suspected when a neutrophilic/histiocytoid panniculitis, occurring in the setting of myeloid disorders, is encountered and after exclusion of an infectious process and leukemia cutis.

  10. Targeted re-sequencing analysis of 25 genes commonly mutated in myeloid disorders in del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Mercado, Marta; Burns, Adam; Pellagatti, Andrea; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Germing, Ulrich; Agirre, Xabier; Prosper, Felipe; Aul, Carlo; Killick, Sally; Wainscoat, James S.; Schuh, Anna; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial deletion of chromosome 5q is the most common chromosomal abnormality in myelodysplastic syndromes. The catalogue of genes involved in the molecular pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes is rapidly expanding and next-generation sequencing technology allows detection of these mutations at great depth. Here we describe the design, validation and application of a targeted next-generation sequencing approach to simultaneously screen 25 genes mutated in myeloid malignancies. We used this method alongside single nucleotide polymorphism-array technology to characterize the mutational and cytogenetic profile of 43 cases of early or advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 29 mutations were detected in our cohort. Overall, 45% of early and 66.7% of advanced cases had at least one mutation. Genes with the highest mutation frequency among advanced cases were TP53 and ASXL1 (25% of patients each). These showed a lower mutation frequency in cases of 5q- syndrome (4.5% and 13.6%, respectively), suggesting a role in disease progression in del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. Fifty-two percent of mutations identified were in genes involved in epigenetic regulation (ASXL1, TET2, DNMT3A and JAK2). Six mutations had allele frequencies <20%, likely below the detection limit of traditional sequencing methods. Genomic array data showed that cases of advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome had a complex background of cytogenetic aberrations, often encompassing genes involved in myeloid disorders. Our study is the first to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of early and advanced del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes using next-generation sequencing technology on a large panel of genes frequently mutated in myeloid malignancies, further illuminating the molecular landscape of del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. PMID:23831921

  11. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelodysplastic syndromes: a prospective evaluation including mutational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Fernando; Robledo, Cristina; Izquierdo-García, Francisco Miguel; Suárez-Vilela, Dimas; Benito, Rocío; Fuertes, Marta; Insunza, Andrés; Barragán, Eva; del Rey, Mónica; de Morales, José María García-Ruiz; Tormo, Mar; Salido, Eduardo; Zamora, Lurdes; Pedro, Carmen; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Díez-Campelo, María; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Sanz, Guillermo F.; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María

    2016-01-01

    The biological and molecular events that underlie bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are poorly understood, and its prognostic role in the era of the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) is not yet fully determined. We have evaluated the clinical and biological events that underlie bone marrow fibrotic changes, as well as its prognostic role, in a well-characterized prospective patient cohort (n=77) of primary MDS patients. The degree of marrow fibrosis was linked to parameters of erythropoietic failure, marrow cellularity, p53 protein accumulation, WT1 gene expression, and serum levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10, but not to other covariates including the IPSS-R score. The presence of bone marrow fibrosis grade 2 or higher was associated with the presence of mutations in cohesin complex genes (31.5% vs. 5.4%, p=0.006). By contrast, mutations in CALR, JAK2, PDGFRA, PDGFRB, and TP53 were very rare. Survival analysis showed that marrow fibrosis grade 2 or higher was a relevant significant predictor for of overall survival, and independent of age, performance status, and IPSS-R score in multivariate analysis. PMID:27127180

  12. Bone marrow fibrosis in myelodysplastic syndromes: a prospective evaluation including mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fernando; Robledo, Cristina; Izquierdo-García, Francisco Miguel; Suárez-Vilela, Dimas; Benito, Rocío; Fuertes, Marta; Insunza, Andrés; Barragán, Eva; Del Rey, Mónica; García-Ruiz de Morales, José María; Tormo, Mar; Salido, Eduardo; Zamora, Lurdes; Pedro, Carmen; Sánchez-Del-Real, Javier; Díez-Campelo, María; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; Sanz, Guillermo F; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María

    2016-05-24

    The biological and molecular events that underlie bone marrow fibrosis in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are poorly understood, and its prognostic role in the era of the Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R) is not yet fully determined. We have evaluated the clinical and biological events that underlie bone marrow fibrotic changes, as well as its prognostic role, in a well-characterized prospective patient cohort (n=77) of primary MDS patients. The degree of marrow fibrosis was linked to parameters of erythropoietic failure, marrow cellularity, p53 protein accumulation, WT1 gene expression, and serum levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10, but not to other covariates including the IPSS-R score. The presence of bone marrow fibrosis grade 2 or higher was associated with the presence of mutations in cohesin complex genes (31.5% vs. 5.4%, p=0.006). By contrast, mutations in CALR, JAK2, PDGFRA, PDGFRB,and TP53 were very rare. Survival analysis showed that marrow fibrosis grade 2 or higher was a relevant significant predictor for of overall survival, and independent of age, performance status, and IPSS-R score in multivariate analysis. PMID:27127180

  13. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 criteria for myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Senent, Leonor; Arenillas, Leonor; Luño, Elisa; Ruiz, Juan C.; Sanz, Guillermo; Florensa, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    The reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is uncertain and its assessment was the major aim of this study. The different peripheral blood and bone marrow variables required for an adequate morphological classification were blindly evaluated by four cytomorphologists in samples from 50 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. The degree of agreement among observers was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient and the generalized kappa statistic for multiple raters. The degree of agreement for the percentages of blasts in bone marrow and peripheral blood, ring sideroblasts in bone marrow, and erythroid, granulocytic and megakaryocytic dysplastic cells was strong (P<0.001 in all instances). After stratifying the percentages according to the categories required for the assignment of World Health Organization subtypes, the degree of agreement was not statistically significant for cases with 5-9% blasts in bone marrow (P=0.07), 0.1-1% blasts in peripheral blood (P=0.47), or percentage of erythroid dysplastic cells (P=0.49). Finally, the interobserver concordance for World Health Organization-defined subtypes showed a moderate overall agreement (P<0.001), the reproducibility being lower for cases with refractory anemia with excess of blasts type 1 (P=0.05) and refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (P=0.09). In conclusion, the reproducibility of the World Health Organization 2008 classification for myelodysplastic syndromes is acceptable but the defining criteria for blast cells and features of erythroid dysplasia need to be refined. PMID:23065505

  15. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-29

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Loss of B cells and their precursors is the most constant feature of GATA-2 deficiency in childhood myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nováková, Michaela; Žaliová, Markéta; Suková, Martina; Wlodarski, Marcin; Janda, Aleš; Froňková, Eva; Campr, Vít; Lejhancová, Kateřina; Zapletal, Ondřej; Pospíšilová, Dagmar; Černá, Zdeňka; Kuhn, Tomáš; Švec, Peter; Pelková, Vendula; Zemanová, Zuzana; Kerndrup, Gitte; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; van der Velden, Vincent; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Kalina, Tomáš; Trka, Jan; Starý, Jan; Hrušák, Ondřej; Mejstříková, Ester

    2016-01-01

    GATA-2 deficiency was recently described as common cause of overlapping syndromes of immunodeficiency, lymphedema, familiar myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia. The aim of our study was to analyze bone marrow and peripheral blood samples of children with myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia to define prevalence of the GATA2 mutation and to assess whether mutations in GATA-2 transcription factor exhibit specific immunophenotypic features. The prevalence of a GATA2 mutation in a consecutively diagnosed cohort of children was 14% in advanced forms of myelodysplastic syndrome (refractory anemia with excess blasts, refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation, and myelodysplasia-related acute myeloid leukemia), 17% in refractory cytopenia of childhood, and 0% in aplastic anemia. In GATA-2-deficient cases, we found the most profound B-cell lymphopenia, including its progenitors in blood and bone marrow, which correlated with significantly diminished intronRSS-Kde recombination excision circles in comparison to other myelodysplastic syndrome/aplastic anemia cases. The other typical features of GATA-2 deficiency (monocytopenia and natural killer cell lymphopenia) were less discriminative. In conclusion, we suggest screening for GATA2 mutations in pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome, preferentially in patients with impaired B-cell homeostasis in bone marrow and peripheral blood (low number of progenitors, intronRSS-Kde recombination excision circles and naïve cells). PMID:27013649

  17. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Lenalidomide induces lipid raft assembly to enhance erythropoietin receptor signaling in myelodysplastic syndrome progenitors.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Kathy L; Basiorka, Ashley A; Johnson, Joseph O; Clark, Justine; Caceres, Gisela; Padron, Eric; Heaton, Ruth; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Wei, Sheng; Sokol, Lubomir; List, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Anemia remains the principal management challenge for patients with lower risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS). Despite appropriate cytokine production and cellular receptor display, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) signaling is impaired. We reported that EpoR signaling is dependent upon receptor localization within lipid raft microdomains, and that disruption of raft integrity abolishes signaling capacity. Here, we show that MDS erythroid progenitors display markedly diminished raft assembly and smaller raft aggregates compared to normal controls (p = 0.005, raft number; p = 0.023, raft size). Because lenalidomide triggers raft coalescence in T-lymphocytes promoting immune synapse formation, we assessed effects of lenalidomide on raft assembly in MDS erythroid precursors and UT7 cells. Lenalidomide treatment rapidly induced lipid raft formation accompanied by EpoR recruitment into raft fractions together with STAT5, JAK2, and Lyn kinase. The JAK2 phosphatase, CD45, a key negative regulator of EpoR signaling, was displaced from raft fractions. Lenalidomide treatment prior to Epo stimulation enhanced both JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation in UT7 and primary MDS erythroid progenitors, accompanied by increased STAT5 DNA binding in UT7 cells, and increased erythroid colony forming capacity in both UT7 and primary cells. Raft induction was associated with F-actin polymerization, which was blocked by Rho kinase inhibition. These data indicate that deficient raft integrity impairs EpoR signaling, and provides a novel strategy to enhance EpoR signal fidelity in non-del(5q) MDS.

  19. Multicentric study underlining the interest of adding CD5, CD7 and CD56 expression assessment to the flow cytometric Ogata score in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Valérie; Wagner-Ballon, Orianne; Guy, Julien; Morvan, Céline; Debord, Camille; Trimoreau, Franck; Benayoun, Emmanuel; Chapuis, Nicolas; Freynet, Nicolas; Rossi, Cédric; Mathis, Stéphanie; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Toma, Andréa; Béné, Marie C; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous recent publications have demonstrated interest in multiparameter flow cytometry in the investigation of myelodysplastic disorders, it is perceived by many laboratory hematologists as difficult and expensive, requiring a high level of expertise. We report a multicentric open real-life study aimed at evaluating the added value of the technically simple flow cytometry score described by the Ogata group for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 652 patients were recruited prospectively in four different centers: 346 myelodysplastic syndromes, 53 myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, and 253 controls. The Ogata score was assessed using CD45 and CD34 staining, with the addition of CD10 and CD19. Moreover, labeling of CD5, CD7 and CD56 for the evaluation of myeloid progenitors and monocytes was tested on a subset of 294 patients. On the whole series, the specificity of Ogata score reached 89%. Respective sensitivities were 54% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, 68% and 84% for type 1 and type 2 refractory anemia with excess of blasts, and 72% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. CD5 expression was poorly informative. When adding CD56 or CD7 labeling to the Ogata score, sensitivity rose to 66% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, to 89% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and to 97% for refractory anemia with excess of blasts. This large multicenter study confirms the feasibility of Ogata scoring in routine flow cytometry diagnosis but highlights its poor sensitivity in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. The addition of CD7 and CD56 in flow cytometry panels improves the sensitivity but more sophisticated panels would be more informative.

  20. Multicentric study underlining the interest of adding CD5, CD7 and CD56 expression assessment to the flow cytometric Ogata score in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Valérie; Wagner-Ballon, Orianne; Guy, Julien; Morvan, Céline; Debord, Camille; Trimoreau, Franck; Benayoun, Emmanuel; Chapuis, Nicolas; Freynet, Nicolas; Rossi, Cédric; Mathis, Stéphanie; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Toma, Andréa; Béné, Marie C; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous recent publications have demonstrated interest in multiparameter flow cytometry in the investigation of myelodysplastic disorders, it is perceived by many laboratory hematologists as difficult and expensive, requiring a high level of expertise. We report a multicentric open real-life study aimed at evaluating the added value of the technically simple flow cytometry score described by the Ogata group for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 652 patients were recruited prospectively in four different centers: 346 myelodysplastic syndromes, 53 myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, and 253 controls. The Ogata score was assessed using CD45 and CD34 staining, with the addition of CD10 and CD19. Moreover, labeling of CD5, CD7 and CD56 for the evaluation of myeloid progenitors and monocytes was tested on a subset of 294 patients. On the whole series, the specificity of Ogata score reached 89%. Respective sensitivities were 54% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, 68% and 84% for type 1 and type 2 refractory anemia with excess of blasts, and 72% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. CD5 expression was poorly informative. When adding CD56 or CD7 labeling to the Ogata score, sensitivity rose to 66% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, to 89% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and to 97% for refractory anemia with excess of blasts. This large multicenter study confirms the feasibility of Ogata scoring in routine flow cytometry diagnosis but highlights its poor sensitivity in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. The addition of CD7 and CD56 in flow cytometry panels improves the sensitivity but more sophisticated panels would be more informative. PMID:25637056

  1. Multicentric study underlining the interest of adding CD5, CD7 and CD56 expression assessment to the flow cytometric Ogata score in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Valérie; Wagner-Ballon, Orianne; Guy, Julien; Morvan, Céline; Debord, Camille; Trimoreau, Franck; Benayoun, Emmanuel; Chapuis, Nicolas; Freynet, Nicolas; Rossi, Cédric; Mathis, Stéphanie; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Toma, Andréa; Béné, Marie C.; Feuillard, Jean; Guérin, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous recent publications have demonstrated interest in multiparameter flow cytometry in the investigation of myelodysplastic disorders, it is perceived by many laboratory hematologists as difficult and expensive, requiring a high level of expertise. We report a multicentric open real-life study aimed at evaluating the added value of the technically simple flow cytometry score described by the Ogata group for the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 652 patients were recruited prospectively in four different centers: 346 myelodysplastic syndromes, 53 myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, and 253 controls. The Ogata score was assessed using CD45 and CD34 staining, with the addition of CD10 and CD19. Moreover, labeling of CD5, CD7 and CD56 for the evaluation of myeloid progenitors and monocytes was tested on a subset of 294 patients. On the whole series, the specificity of Ogata score reached 89%. Respective sensitivities were 54% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, 68% and 84% for type 1 and type 2 refractory anemia with excess of blasts, and 72% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. CD5 expression was poorly informative. When adding CD56 or CD7 labeling to the Ogata score, sensitivity rose to 66% for low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, to 89% for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and to 97% for refractory anemia with excess of blasts. This large multicenter study confirms the feasibility of Ogata scoring in routine flow cytometry diagnosis but highlights its poor sensitivity in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. The addition of CD7 and CD56 in flow cytometry panels improves the sensitivity but more sophisticated panels would be more informative. PMID:25637056

  2. Lack of objective response of myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia to decitabine after failure of azacitidine.

    PubMed

    Duong, Vu H; Bhatnagar, Bhavana; Zandberg, Dan P; Vannorsdall, Emily J; Tidwell, Michael L; Chen, Qing; Baer, Maria R

    2015-06-01

    The hypomethylating agents azacitidine and decitabine are standard therapy for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and are often used to treat patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) unlikely to benefit from cytotoxic chemotherapy. Switching hypomethylating agents after treatment failure is common, but this approach is not well studied. We retrospectively reviewed data on 25 patients with MDS, MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) or AML who were treated with decitabine after primary or secondary azacitidine failure at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center. Five patients with MDS or MDS/MPN achieved stable disease with decitabine, but no patient achieved complete or partial remission or hematologic improvement. Most patients discontinued therapy due to disease progression or death after a median of 2 cycles and median survival was 5.9 months after decitabine initiation. Based on our data, decitabine therapy after azacitidine failure is of little benefit beyond disease stabilization in some patients.

  3. Autoimmune Syndromes Presenting as a Paraneoplastic Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clinical Features, Course, Treatment and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Bradley T; Foltz, Lynda; Leitch, Heather A

    2016-05-10

    Autoimmune manifestations (AIM) are reported in up to 10-30% of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients; this association is not well defined. We present herein a retrospective chart review of single center MDS patients for AIM, a case discussion and a literature review. Of 252 MDS patients examined, 11 (4.4%) had AIM around MDS diagnosis. International Prognostic Scoring System scores were: low or intermediate (int)-1 (n=7); int-2 or high (n=4). AIM were: culture negative sepsis (n=7); inflammatory arthritis (n=3); vasculitis (n=4); sweats; pericarditis; polymyalgia rheumatica (n=2 each); mouth ulcers; pulmonary infiltrates; suspicion for Behcet's; polychondritis and undifferentiated (n=1 each). AIM treatment and outcome were: prednisone +/- steroid sparing agents, n=8, ongoing symptoms in 5; azacitidine (n=3), 2 resolved; and observation, n=1, ongoing symptoms. At a median follow up of 13 months, seven patients are alive. In summary, 4.4% of MDS patients presented with concomitant AIM. MDS should remain on the differential diagnosis of patients with inflammatory symptoms. PMID:27499837

  4. Prevalence, severity and correlates of fatigue in newly diagnosed patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Efficace, Fabio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Breccia, Massimo; Criscuolo, Marianna; Cottone, Francesco; Caocci, Giovanni; Bowen, David; Lübbert, Michael; Angelucci, Emanuele; Stauder, Reinhard; Selleslag, Dominik; Platzbecker, Uwe; Sanpaolo, Grazia; Jonasova, Anna; Buccisano, Francesco; Specchia, Giorgina; Palumbo, Giuseppe A; Niscola, Pasquale; Wan, Chonghua; Zhang, Huiyong; Fenu, Susanna; Klimek, Virginia; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Nguyen, Khanh; Mandelli, Franco

    2015-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate factors associated with fatigue severity in newly diagnosed patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). The secondary objectives were to assess symptom prevalence and to examine the relationships between fatigue, quality of life (QoL) and overall symptom burden in these patients. The analyses were conducted in 280 higher-risk MDS patients. Pre-treatment patient-reported fatigue was evaluated with the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT)-Fatigue scale and QoL was assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30). Female gender (P = 0·018), poor performance status (i.e., ECOG of 2-4) (P < 0·001) and lower levels of haemoglobin (Hb) (P = 0·026) were independently associated with higher fatigue severity. The three most prevalent symptoms were as follows: fatigue (92%), dyspnoea (63%) and pain (55%). Patients with higher levels of fatigue also had greater overall symptom burdens. The mean global QoL scores of patients with the highest versus those with the lowest levels of fatigue were 29·2 [standard deviation (SD), 18·3] and 69·0 (SD, 18·8), respectively and this difference was four times the magnitude of a clinically meaningful difference. Patient-reported fatigue severity revealed the effects of disease burden on overall QoL more accurately than did degree of anaemia. Special attention should be given to the female patients in the management of fatigue. PMID:25272332

  5. Frequent genomic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome with normal karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Tadayuki; Ogawa, Seishi; Dugas, Martin; Kawamata, Norihiko; Yamamoto, Go; Nannya, Yasuhito; Sanada, Masashi; Miller, Carl W.; Yung, Amanda; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia is a clonal hematopoietic malignant disease; about 45–50% of cases do not have detectable chromosomal abnormalities. Here, we identified hidden genomic alterations and novel disease-related regions in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome samples. Design and Methods Thirty-eight normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome samples were analyzed with high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray using a new algorithm: allele-specific copy-number analysis using anonymous references (AsCNAR). Expression of mRNA in these samples was determined by mRNA microarray analysis. Results Eighteen samples (49%) showed either one or more genomic abnormalities including duplication, deletion and copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity. Importantly, 12 patients (32%) had copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity, causing duplication of either mutant FLT3 (2 cases), JAK2 (1 case) or AML1/RUNX1 (1 case); and each had loss of the normal allele. Nine patients (24%) had small copy-number changes (< 10 Mb) including deletions of NF1, ETV6/TEL, CDKN2A and CDKN2B. Interestingly, mRNA microarray analysis showed a relationship between chromosomal changes and mRNA expression levels: loss or gain of chromosomes led, respectively, to either a decrease or increase of mRNA expression of genes in the region. Conclusions This study suggests that at least one half of cases of normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome have readily identifiable genomic abnormalities, as found by our analysis; the high frequency of copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity is especially notable. PMID:19144660

  6. Bendamustine Hydrochloride and Idarubicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. [Transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to atypical chronic myeloid leukemia in a female patient with acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Gritsaev, S V; Kostroma, I I; Zapreeva, I M; Shmidt, A V; Tiranova, S A; Balashova, V A; Martynkevich, I S; Chubukina, Zh V; Semenova, N Yu; Chechetkin, A V

    2016-01-01

    Secondary myeloid neoplasia may be a complication of intensive cytostatic therapy. The most common types of secondary neoplasias are acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. The development of secondary atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is an extremely rare phenomenon. The paper describes transformation of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome to aCML 6 months after its diagnosis. The development of aCML was accompanied by additional chromosomal aberration as monosomy of chromosome 17. No mutations in the JAK2, MPL, and CalR genes were detected. It is concluded that the clinical course of secondary myeloid neoplasias is variable.

  8. Myelodysplastic syndrome complicated by central diabetes insipidus and cerebral salt wasting syndrome with peculiar change in magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Sano, Soichi; Yamagami, Keiko; Morikawa, Takashi; Yoshioka, Katsunobu

    2010-01-01

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) could occurs in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), because of infiltration of leukemic cells into the neurohypophysis or some other reason and it is closely associated with abnormalities of chromosome 7. We report a case of MDS with abnormalities of chromosome 7, presenting as CDI followed by deterioration of polyuria and hyponatremia with a decreased extracellular fluid volume. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed symmetrically enhanced lesions in the hypothalamus. Fludrocortisone treatment normalized his serum sodium level and cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS) was suspected.

  9. Hyperostosis - an unusual radiographic presentation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome transformed to Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Arie; Lewis, Kristopher N.; Blackmon, Joshua M.; Manaloor, Elizabeth J.

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is also referred to non-lymphocytic leukemia in the literature. It comprises about 15% of the childhood leukemia. There are multiple subtypes of AML from M0-M7 with approximately 45% of the cases being M0–M2 and the remaining subtypes being rare. The definitive diagnosis relies on bone marrow biopsy showing bone marrow infiltration with leukemic cells. We describe a rare radiographic presentation of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) transformed to AML in an 8 month old boy who presented with a orbital wall fracture, periosteal reaction, and mixed lytic and sclerotic lesions. PMID:22470698

  10. Selection of Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Asmita; Anasetti, Claudio

    2016-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially curative option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Because MDS predominantly affects an older population, age-associated comorbidities can preclude patients from cure. HSCT is associated with the risk of morbidity and mortality; however, with safer conditioning regimens and improved supportive care, eligible patients with an appropriately matched donor can receive this therapy without exclusion by older age alone. We discuss the role of improved MDS prognostic scoring systems and molecular testing for selection for HSCT, and review the pre-HSCT tolerability assessment required for this advanced aged population. PMID:27521324

  11. Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome Is More Frequently Associated With Myelodysplastic Syndromes Than the Classical Neutrophilic Variant

    PubMed Central

    Ghoufi, Lisa; Ortonne, Nicolas; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Barhoumi, Walid; Begon, Edouard; Haioun, Corinne; Pautas, Cécile; Beckerich, Florence; Robin, Christine; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Cordonnier, Catherine; Chosidow, Olivier; Toma, Andréa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome (H-SS) is a histological variant of Sweet syndrome (SS) differing from classical neutrophilic SS (N-SS) by a dermal infiltrate mainly composed of lymphocytes and histiocytoid myeloperoxidase-positive cells. We aimed to report a large series of H-SS and compare the frequency and type of hematological malignancies associated to H-SS and N-SS. We included 62 patients with a coding histopathologic diagnosis of SS prospectively registered between 2005 and 2014 in the database of our Department of Pathology. Overall, 22 (35.5%) and 40 (64.5%) patients had a histological diagnosis of H-SS and N-SS, respectively. Median age, sex ratio, and cutaneous lesions were similar in the 2 groups. The frequency of extra-cutaneous manifestations was similar (50% vs 37.5%, P = 0.42). Recurrent forms were significantly more frequent in H-SS than in N-SS patients (21% vs 2.5%, P = 0.01). A hematological malignancy was diagnosed in 22 patients, 12 (55.5%) with H-SS and 10 (25%) with N-SS (P = 0.019). Hematological malignancy was of myeloid origin in 8/22 (36.3%) H-SS and 5/40 (12.5%) N-SS patients (P = 0.02), and of lymphoid origin without myeloid component in 4/22 (18.1%) H-SS and 4/40 (10%) N-SS patients (P = 0.35), respectively. One N-SS patient had a hematological malignancy of mixed (myeloid and lymphoid) phenotype. A myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) was diagnosed in 7/22 (31.8%) H-SS and 1/40 (2.5%) N-SS patients (P < 0.001). Hematological disease was diagnosed before (in 8 H-SS and 3 N-SS patients) or at the time of the occurrence of the cutaneous lesions (in 1 H-SS and 7 N-SS patients). However, in 3 H-SS patients, all with MDS, cutaneous lesions preceded the hematological disease by ≤6 months. In conclusion, H-SS was associated with MDS in one third of patients but also with lymphoid malignancies, and cutaneous lesions could precede the hematological diagnosis in patients with MDS. A complete hematological assessment is

  12. Impaired cytotoxicity associated with defective natural killer cell differentiation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Maryam; Manser, Angela R; Fröbel, Julia; Kündgen, Andrea; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Schönberg, Kathrin; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer; Gattermann, Norbert; Uhrberg, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Natural killer cells are well known to mediate anti-leukemic responses in myeloid leukemia but their role in myelodysplastic syndromes is not well understood. Here, in a cohort of newly diagnosed patients (n=75), widespread structural and functional natural killer cell defects were identified. One subgroup of patients (13%) had a selective deficiency of peripheral natural killer cells (count <10/mm(3) blood) with normal frequencies of T and natural killer-like T cells. Natural killer cell-deficient patients were predominantly found in high-risk subgroups and deficiency of these cells was significantly associated with poor prognosis. In the second subgroup, comprising the majority of patients (76%), natural killer cells were present but exhibited poor cytotoxicity. The defect was strongly associated with reduced levels of perforin and granzyme B. Notably, natural killer cell function and arming of cytotoxic granules could be fully reconstituted by in vitro stimulation. Further phenotypic analysis of these patients revealed an immature natural killer cell compartment that was biased towards CD56(bright) cells. The residual CD56(dim) cells exhibited a significant increase of the unlicensed NKG2A(-)KIR(-) subset and a striking reduction in complexity of the repertoire of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the widespread defects in natural killer cell function occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes are mostly due to either unsuccessful or inefficient generation of mature, functionally competent natural killer cells, which might contribute to disease progression through impaired immune surveillance.

  13. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  15. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  16. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  17. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Sirolimus and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia That is Recurrent or Not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Apparent expansion of CD34+ cells during the evolution of myelodysplastic syndromes to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Span, L F; Dar, S E; Shetty, V; Mundle, S D; Broady-Robinson, L; Alvi, S; Raymakers, R A; de Witte, T; Raza, A

    1998-11-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are highly proliferative bone marrow (BM) disorders where the primary lesion presumably affects a CD34+ early progenitor or stem cell. We investigated the proliferative characteristics of CD34+ cells of 33 untreated MDS patients (19 RA, 5 RARS, 7 RAEB, 2 RAEBt) and five patients with acute myeloid leukemia after MDS (sAML). All patients received a 1-h infusion of the thymidine analogue iodoor bromodeoxyuridine intravenously before a BM aspirate and biopsy was taken. A double-labeling immunohistochemistry technique by monoclonal anti-CD34 (QBend/10) and anti-IUdR/BrdU antibodies was developed and performed. By this technique we recognised CD34+ and CD34- cells actively engaged in DNA synthesis or not. As MDS evolves a significant increase occurred in the percentage of CD34+ cells of all myeloid cells (mean value: RA/RARS 1.67%; RAEB(t) 8.68%; sAML 23.83%) as well as in the percentage of proliferating CD34+ cells of all myeloid cells (RA/RARS 0.19%; RAEB(t) 0.43%; and sAML 3.30%). This was associated with a decreasing trend in the overall myeloid labeling index (LI: RA/RARS 25.8%, RAEB(t) 24.6% and sAML 21.5%). This decrease in overall myeloid LI is due to an exponential increase in the proportion of CD34+ cells of the proliferating compartment during MDS evolution (RA/RARS 0.35%, RAEB(t) 1.44% and sAML 11.98% of all S-phase cells). These CD34+ cells appeared to proliferate more slowly than their more mature CD34 negative counterparts, since we found a progressive increment in the mean total cell cycling time (Tc) of all myeloid cells during MDS progression (RA/RARS 39.8, RAEB(t) 45.2 and sAML 65.8 h). This study showed that during MDS evolution to sAML the CD34+ compartment develops a growth advantage leading to apparent expansion.

  20. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  1. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Myelodysplastic syndromes: recent progress in diagnosis and understanding of their pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kiyoyuki

    2006-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are common malignant disorders with a poor prognosis. MDS are a group of highly heterogeneous disorders but show certain universal findings including a high incidence in the elderly population, cytopenia, dysplastic myeloid cells, and frequent transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Until recently, the vast majority of MDS patients were treated with supportive therapy alone, such as transfusions. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) has the potential for cure, although due to the age and comorbidity of MDS patients, the role of allogeneic SCT in MDS has been limited. Recently, research in MDS has shown substantial advances that have deepened our understanding of MDS pathophysiology and changed our approach to MDS patients. This review touches on some recent developments in the diagnosis and pathophysiology of MDS.

  4. Toward resolving the unsettled role of iron chelation therapy in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Merkel, Drorit G; Nagler, Arnon

    2014-07-01

    Transfusion dependent low risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients, eventually develop iron overload. Iron toxicity, via oxidative stress, can damage cellular components and impact organ function. In thalassemia major patients, iron chelation therapy lowered iron levels with recovery of cardiac and liver functions and significant improvement in survival. Several noncontrolled studies show inferior survival in MDS patients with iron overload, including an increase in transplant-related mortality and infection risk while iron chelation appears to improve survival in both lower risk MDS patients and in stem cell transplant settings. Collated data are presented on the pathophysiological impact of iron overload; measuring techniques and chelating agents' therapy positive impact on hematological status and overall survival are discussed. Although suggested by retrospective analyses, the lack of clear prospective data of the beneficial effects of iron chelation on morbidity and survival, the role of iron chelation therapy in MDS patients remains controversial.

  5. [Myelodysplastic syndrome in the elderly: comprehensive geriatric assessment and therapeutic recommendations].

    PubMed

    López Arrieta, Jesús María; De Paz, Raquel; Altés, Albert; del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2012-02-18

    The onset of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is usually around the age of 70. Despite this, most clinical trials are restricted to younger subjects. Thus, the management of elderly patients with MDS is not always optimal. Physiologically, elderly patients show characteristics that differ from those of younger patients and that condition their pharmacological treatment. In this regard, the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) becomes particularly important. This document gathers conclusions from the 1(st) Meeting of Members of the Sociedad Española de Medicina Geriátrica and the Sociedad Española de Hematología y Hemoterapia, with the objective of proposing the establishment of CGA instruments to assist in the decision-making process of elderly patients with MDS. The results of this consensus document will focus on the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and management of adverse events in this age group.

  6. [Recent advances of studies on abnormal HOX gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and its molecular mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xin-Yan; Shao, Zong-Hong

    2015-02-01

    HOX gene encodes a group of homeodomain transcription factors which are highly conserved. The caudal-type homeobox (CDX) , ten-eleven translocation (TET) genes and polycomb group (PcG) , trithorax group (TrxG) proteins act as upstream regulators of HOX genes that manipulate the targeted gene expression through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The abnormal expression of HOX genes and their fusions contribute to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) pathogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation and NUP98-HOX translocation serve as molecular mediators of dysfunction in MDS which can be used for the evaluation of biology and therapy. This article provides an overview of recent advances of studies on HOX gene and its abnormal molecular mechanisms, as well as potential correlation with MDS. PMID:25687084

  7. There's risk, and then there's risk: The latest clinical prognostic risk stratification models in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Zeidan, Amer M; Komrokji, Rami S

    2013-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) include a diverse group of clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by progressive cytopenias and propensity for leukemic progression. The biologic heterogeneity that underlies MDS translates clinically in wide variations of clinical outcomes. Several prognostic schemes were developed to predict the natural course of MDS, counsel patients, and allow evidence-based, risk-adaptive implementation of therapeutic strategies. The prognostic schemes divide patients into subgroups with similar prognosis, but the extent to which the prognostic prediction applies to any individual patient is more variable. None of these instruments was designed to predict the clinical benefit in relation to any specific MDS therapy. The prognostic impact of molecular mutations is being more recognized and attempts at incorporating it into the current prognostic schemes are ongoing.

  8. Late effect of atomic bomb radiation on myeloid disorders: leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Leukemia was the first malignancy linked to radiation exposure in atomic bomb survivors. Clear evidence of the dose-dependent excess risk of three major types of leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia [AML], and chronic myeloid leukemia) was found, especially in people exposed at young ages. Such leukemia risks were at their highest in the late 1950s, and declined gradually thereafter over the past 50 years. Findings from recent risk analyses, however, suggest the persistence of AML risk even after 1990, and evidence of increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) due to atomic bomb radiation has recently been shown. High-risk MDS and forms involving complex chromosomal aberrations were found to be much more frequent in people exposed to higher radiation doses. These lines of epidemiological evidence suggest that the risk of radiation-induced hematological malignancies has persisted for six decades since the initial exposure.

  9. In-Silico Identification Of Micro-Loops In Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Dominik; Brandl, Miriam; Pham, Tuan D.; Chang, Chung-Che; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-06-01

    Micro-loops are regulatory network motifs that leverage transcriptional and posttranscriptional control to effectively regulate the transcriptome. In this paper a regulatory network for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDSs) was constructed from the literature and publicly available data sources. The network was filtered using data from deep-sequencing of small RNAs, exon and microarrays. Motif discovery showed that micro-loops might exist in MDS. We further used the identified micro-loops and performed basic network analysis to identify the known disease gene RUNX1/AML, as well as miRNA family hsa-mir-181. This suggested that the concept of micro-loops can be applied to enhance disease gene identification and biomarker discovery.

  10. Combining gene mutation with gene expression data improves outcome prediction in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gerstung, Moritz; Pellagatti, Andrea; Malcovati, Luca; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Porta, Matteo G Della; Jädersten, Martin; Dolatshad, Hamid; Verma, Amit; Cross, Nicholas C. P.; Vyas, Paresh; Killick, Sally; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Cazzola, Mario; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Campbell, Peter J.; Boultwood, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease, but two patients rarely have identical genotypes. Similarly, patients differ in their clinicopathological parameters, but how genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity are interconnected is not well understood. Here we build statistical models to disentangle the effect of 12 recurrently mutated genes and 4 cytogenetic alterations on gene expression, diagnostic clinical variables and outcome in 124 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. Overall, one or more genetic lesions correlate with expression levels of ~20% of all genes, explaining 20–65% of observed expression variability. Differential expression patterns vary between mutations and reflect the underlying biology, such as aberrant polycomb repression for ASXL1 and EZH2 mutations or perturbed gene dosage for copy-number changes. In predicting survival, genomic, transcriptomic and diagnostic clinical variables all have utility, with the largest contribution from the transcriptome. Similar observations are made on the TCGA acute myeloid leukaemia cohort, confirming the general trends reported here. PMID:25574665

  11. Potential Relationship between Inadequate Response to DNA Damage and Development of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Chen, Peishuai; Gu, Jian; Bishop, Alexander J. R.; Scott, Linda M.; Hasty, Paul; Rebel, Vivienne I.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the continuous regeneration of all types of blood cells, including themselves. To ensure the functional and genomic integrity of blood tissue, a network of regulatory pathways tightly controls the proliferative status of HSCs. Nevertheless, normal HSC aging is associated with a noticeable decline in regenerative potential and possible changes in other functions. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is an age-associated hematopoietic malignancy, characterized by abnormal blood cell maturation and a high propensity for leukemic transformation. It is furthermore thought to originate in a HSC and to be associated with the accrual of multiple genetic and epigenetic aberrations. This raises the question whether MDS is, in part, related to an inability to adequately cope with DNA damage. Here we discuss the various components of the cellular response to DNA damage. For each component, we evaluate related studies that may shed light on a potential relationship between MDS development and aberrant DNA damage response/repair. PMID:25569081

  12. MSI2 is required for maintaining activated myelodysplastic syndrome stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, James; Ho, Tzu-Chieh; Amin, Elianna; Xu, Haiming; Barlowe, Trevor S.; Perez, Alexendar R.; Durham, Benjamin H.; Tivnan, Patrick; Okabe, Rachel; Chow, Arthur; Vu, Ly; Park, Sun Mi; Prieto, Camila; Famulare, Christopher; Patel, Minal; Lengner, Christopher J.; Verma, Amit; Roboz, Gail; Guzman, Monica; Klimek, Virginia M.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Leslie, Christina; Nimer, Stephen D.; Kharas, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are driven by complex genetic and epigenetic alterations. The MSI2 RNA-binding protein has been demonstrated to have a role in acute myeloid leukaemia and stem cell function, but its role in MDS is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that elevated MSI2 expression correlates with poor survival in MDS. Conditional deletion of Msi2 in a mouse model of MDS results in a rapid loss of MDS haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and reverses the clinical features of MDS. Inversely, inducible overexpression of MSI2 drives myeloid disease progression. The MDS HSPCs remain dependent on MSI2 expression after disease initiation. Furthermore, MSI2 expression expands and maintains a more activated (G1) MDS HSPC. Gene expression profiling of HSPCs from the MSI2 MDS mice identifies a signature that correlates with poor survival in MDS patients. Overall, we identify a role for MSI2 in MDS representing a therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:26898884

  13. KRAS2 oncogene overexpression in myelodysplastic syndrome with translocation 5;12.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Boswell, H S; Heerema, N A; Nahreini, P; Lauer, R C; Antony, A C; Hoffman, R; Tricot, G J

    1988-10-01

    The factors that initiate and maintain the abnormal hematopoietic clone in the myelo-dysplastic syndromes (MDS) remain largely unknown. We describe a patient with MDS associated with an abnormal karyotype, 46,XY,t(5;12)(q31;p12). According to the FAB cooperative group classification, the patient was classified as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Because of the particular chromosomal translocation, the structure-function relationship of three genes relevant to the translocation breakpoints, CSF2, FMS, and KRAS2, was studied in bone marrow and peripheral blood lymphocytes in this patient. No major structural alterations were observed at these three genetic loci. Although the levels of expression of the CSF2 and FMS genes remained unaltered, the KRAS2 oncogene was overexpressed approximately six-fold in bone marrow cells from the MDS patient compared with normal donors. We postulate that the RAS oncogene activation may be instrumental in the genesis of MDS.

  14. Assessment of coagulation disorders and cancer procoagulant activity in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Chojnowski, K; Treliński, J; Wawrzyniak, E; Sobolewska, M; Mielicki, W

    2002-01-01

    Hemostatic disorders mainly due to thrombocytopenia represent an important clinical problem in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Much less is known about the possible coagulation abnormalities. Thirty patients with MDS were studied. Activity of cancer procoagulant (CP), concentrations of activation markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis such as thrombin-antithrombin complexes (TAT), prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2) and D-dimers (DD) as well as standard coagulation tests were determined. Coagulation abnormalities concerned mainly patients with RAEB and RAEB-t. In this group the mean values of TATand F1+2 concentrations were significantly higher than in control indicating chronic coagulation activation similar to that observed in acute leukemias. CP activity in MDS patients did not differ from the control group.

  15. Genetic analysis of TP53 in childhood myelodysplastic syndrome and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shoji; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Taira, Chiaki; Sano, Kenji; Tanaka-Yanagisawa, Miyuki; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Nakazawa, Yozo; Sakashita, Kazuo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Koike, Kenichi

    2011-12-01

    Among 9 children with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 18 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, one MDS patient with der(5;17)(p10;q10) exhibited deletion of the TP53 gene in one allele and mutation (410 T>A) in the other allele in myeloid and erythroid cells. Since the mutation was not detected in peripheral blood leukocytes 9 months before the diagnosis, biallelic somatic inactivation of the TP53 gene might play an important role in the occurrence of MDS. His poor outcome might be associated with resistance to chemotherapy/radiation of a minor clone with both TP53 gene alteration and MLL duplication that already existed at onset. PMID:21784522

  16. [Recent advances of studies on abnormal HOX gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and its molecular mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xin-Yan; Shao, Zong-Hong

    2015-02-01

    HOX gene encodes a group of homeodomain transcription factors which are highly conserved. The caudal-type homeobox (CDX) , ten-eleven translocation (TET) genes and polycomb group (PcG) , trithorax group (TrxG) proteins act as upstream regulators of HOX genes that manipulate the targeted gene expression through genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The abnormal expression of HOX genes and their fusions contribute to myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) pathogenesis. Aberrant DNA methylation and NUP98-HOX translocation serve as molecular mediators of dysfunction in MDS which can be used for the evaluation of biology and therapy. This article provides an overview of recent advances of studies on HOX gene and its abnormal molecular mechanisms, as well as potential correlation with MDS.

  17. Autonomous proliferation and bcl-2 expression involving haematopoietic cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Bincoletto, C.; Saad, S. T.; Soares da Silva, E.; Queiroz, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the autonomous proliferation, bcl-2 expression and number of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow of patients with confirmed diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Normal bone marrow cells obtained from donors of the Clinical Hospital of this university were used as a control. The autonomous proliferation, evaluated by clonal culture without exogenous growth factor, and the number of apoptotic cells in bone marrow kept for 10 days in liquid cultures at 37 degrees C and 5% carbon dioxide, were significantly greater in MDS patients than in control subjects (P = 0.001, Wilcoxon). However, bcl-2 expression, measured by immunocytochemistry, was significantly lower in MDS patients than in normal individuals (P = 0.002, Wilcoxon). These results suggest that the high proliferation activity in MDS patients may be counteracted by the high level of medullar cell death, which might be related to the lower bcl-2 expression. PMID:9744502

  18. Iron overload impairs proliferation of erythroid progenitors cells (BFU-E) from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Julia; Braulke, Friederike; Sinzig, Ursula; Wulf, Gerald; Maas, Jens Holger; Konietschke, Frank; Haase, Detlef

    2013-03-01

    In patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) iron overload caused by long-term red blood cell transfusions is an important factor for comorbidity especially in low-risk MDS. In this report we present the results of a comparative study based on colony formation assays of hematopoietic cells in MDS patients with and without iron overload. We demonstrate that iron overload suppresses the proliferation of erythroid progenitors cells (BFU-E), while the myeloid compartment (CFU-GM) was not found to be affected. Even patients with slightly elevated ferritin values show an impaired proliferation capacity in comparison to patients with normal ferritin levels. Furthermore, we show that this negative impact is reversible by sufficient iron chelation therapy.

  19. Myelodysplastic syndrome without ring sideroblasts and with Janus kinase 2 gene mutation: An unusual case report

    PubMed Central

    Ornellas, Maria Helena; De França Silva, Monique; Solza, Cristiana; De Lucena Gonçalves, Stella Beatriz Sampaio; Silva De Almeida, Liliane; De Paula Ayres-Silva, Jackline; Seixas, Taís Leite; Bastos, Elenice Ferreira; Liehr, Thomas; Alves, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cases comprise a heterogeneous group of hematological disorders that are characterized by impaired hematopoiesis, with cytopenias of different grades and risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. MDS may rarely be associated with thrombocytosis. In such cases, myelodysplasia and myeloproliferative disorders may overlap, making correct diagnosis difficult. We herein describe a case of MDS with thrombocytosis, Janus kinase 2 gene mutation-positive and Perls' staining-negative, which was initially classified as essential thrombocythemia (ET). This case highlights that MDS may be misdiagnosed as ET and inappropriate treatment may be initiated. Therefore, it is crucial to carefully combine all available data on morphology and immunophenotyping, and to perform the necessary molecular, cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses, in order to correctly diagnose this disease. PMID:27588186

  20. [A case of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome following chemotherapy for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Uemura, M; Kasamatsu, Y; Sawada, M; Takemura, S; Sugino, S; Kondou, M

    1992-10-01

    A case of secondary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following chemotherapy for lung cancer is reported. A 78-year-old man, with a smoking history of 20 cigarettes/day for 55 years, was incidentally, diagnosed as having stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the lung in 1987 during admission for transurethral resection of bladder cancer. He received combination chemotherapy of mitomycin C, vincristin, and cisplatin for his lung cancer between July and September 1988. His clinical course remained almost stable until October 1989, when his blood count showed severe anemia and thrombocytopenia. He was diagnosed as having secondary MDS induced by cytotoxic agents used for the treatment of lung cancer, based on the dysplastic findings of precursor cells in the bone marrow and the chromosome abnormality of 51XY, +8, +9, +21, 3p-, 5q-, +2mar. He died of infection with the progression of MDS in March 1990.

  1. Late effect of atomic bomb radiation on myeloid disorders: leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tsushima, Hideki; Iwanaga, Masako; Miyazaki, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Leukemia was the first malignancy linked to radiation exposure in atomic bomb survivors. Clear evidence of the dose-dependent excess risk of three major types of leukemia (acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia [AML], and chronic myeloid leukemia) was found, especially in people exposed at young ages. Such leukemia risks were at their highest in the late 1950s, and declined gradually thereafter over the past 50 years. Findings from recent risk analyses, however, suggest the persistence of AML risk even after 1990, and evidence of increased risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) due to atomic bomb radiation has recently been shown. High-risk MDS and forms involving complex chromosomal aberrations were found to be much more frequent in people exposed to higher radiation doses. These lines of epidemiological evidence suggest that the risk of radiation-induced hematological malignancies has persisted for six decades since the initial exposure. PMID:22370711

  2. Myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Koeffler, H P

    1996-04-01

    These two issues of the Seminars in Hematology will provide the physician the necessary knowledge to help make sense of this somewhat confusing array of diseases. The subdivisions of MDS reflect the precision of our techniques of dissection, with morphological and histochemical analyses forming the foundation to identify and subdivide MDS. Although steady refinement has occurred over the last half-century, the basic morphologic technique is unchanged. Cytogenetic analysis, which has been possible since the 1960s and 1970s, should be done at least at initial presentation in all patients to provide refinement of diagnosis and prognosis. FISH is not, at this time, useful as a screening technique. Although the 1990s is an era of rapidly growing knowledge and technical abilities in molecular biology, the use of these techniques in MDS is in its infancy. Very few genes have been identified which are altered in MDS, although many must exist. The molecular assays continue to be cumbersome and impractical to use in the clinical laboratory and remain the domain of the research scientist. Nevertheless, in the future, molecular biology will enable the internist to give each individual a clearer diagnosis and prognosis and may even provide targetted therapies of patients with MDS. At this time the center of management is good supportive care. Some patients, however, will benefit from special interventions, which include the use of growth factors, BMT, and in selected patients, aggressive chemotherapy. Induction of differentiation of the abnormal hematopoietic clone remains only a dream, although some of the differentiation agents may have applicability for their ability to induce apoptosis and prevent growth of the MDS clone of cells. Many of the major advances in our knowledge of cancer developed through the study of hematopoietic malignancy. A lot of these advances are due to the ease of obtaining the abnormal cells. MDS provides an excellent model for studying the progression of cells from their normal to preneoplastic and fully transformed states. A lucid understanding of this progression can form the paradigm for basic science to study neoplastic progression, and the molecular biology techniques used for these studies will be the basic tools used by hematologists and oncologists in the future. PMID:8722680

  3. Myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Koeffler, H P

    1996-04-01

    These two issues of the Seminars in Hematology will provide the physician the necessary knowledge to help make sense of this somewhat confusing array of diseases. The subdivisions of MDS reflect the precision of our techniques of dissection, with morphological and histochemical analyses forming the foundation to identify and subdivide MDS. Although steady refinement has occurred over the last half-century, the basic morphologic technique is unchanged. Cytogenetic analysis, which has been possible since the 1960s and 1970s, should be done at least at initial presentation in all patients to provide refinement of diagnosis and prognosis. FISH is not, at this time, useful as a screening technique. Although the 1990s is an era of rapidly growing knowledge and technical abilities in molecular biology, the use of these techniques in MDS is in its infancy. Very few genes have been identified which are altered in MDS, although many must exist. The molecular assays continue to be cumbersome and impractical to use in the clinical laboratory and remain the domain of the research scientist. Nevertheless, in the future, molecular biology will enable the internist to give each individual a clearer diagnosis and prognosis and may even provide targetted therapies of patients with MDS. At this time the center of management is good supportive care. Some patients, however, will benefit from special interventions, which include the use of growth factors, BMT, and in selected patients, aggressive chemotherapy. Induction of differentiation of the abnormal hematopoietic clone remains only a dream, although some of the differentiation agents may have applicability for their ability to induce apoptosis and prevent growth of the MDS clone of cells. Many of the major advances in our knowledge of cancer developed through the study of hematopoietic malignancy. A lot of these advances are due to the ease of obtaining the abnormal cells. MDS provides an excellent model for studying the progression of cells from their normal to preneoplastic and fully transformed states. A lucid understanding of this progression can form the paradigm for basic science to study neoplastic progression, and the molecular biology techniques used for these studies will be the basic tools used by hematologists and oncologists in the future.

  4. Coalesced Multicentric Analysis of 2,351 Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes Indicates an Underestimation of Poor-Risk Cytogenetics of Myelodysplastic Syndromes in the International Prognostic Scoring System

    PubMed Central

    Schanz, Julie; Steidl, Christian; Fonatsch, Christa; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Nösslinger, Thomas; Tuechler, Heinz; Valent, Peter; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Aul, Carlo; Lübbert, Michael; Stauder, Reinhard; Krieger, Otto; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Detlef; Estey, Elihu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) remains the most commonly used system for risk classification in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs). The IPSS gives more weight to blast count than to cytogenetics. However, previous publications suggested that cytogenetics are underweighted in the IPSS. Here we investigate the prognostic impact of cytogenetic subgroups compared with that of bone marrow blast count in a large, multicentric, international patient cohort. Patients and Methods In total, 2,351 patients with MDS who have records in the German-Austrian and the MD Anderson Cancer Center databases were included and analyzed in univariate and multivariate models regarding overall survival and risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The data were analyzed separately for patients treated with supportive care without specific therapy, with AML-like chemotherapy, or with other therapy regimens (low-dose chemotherapy, demethylating agents, immune modulating agents, valproic acid, and cyclosporine). Results The prognostic impact of poor-risk cytogenetic findings (as defined by the IPSS classification) on overall survival was as unfavorable as an increased (> 20%) blast count. The hazard ratio (compared with an abnormal karyotype or a bone marrow blast count < 5%) was 3.3 for poor-risk cytogenetics, 4.8 for complex abnormalities harboring chromosomes 5 and/or 7, and 3.1 for a blast count of 21% to 30% (P < .01 for all categories). The predictive power of the IPSS cytogenetic subgroups was unaffected by type of therapy given. Conclusion The independent prognostic impact of poor-risk cytogenetics on overall survival is equivalent to the impact of high blast counts. This finding should be considered in the upcoming revision of the IPSS. PMID:21519021

  5. Prognostic impact of chromosomal translocations in myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia patients. A study by the spanish group of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Calvo, Xavier; Pereira, Arturo; Carrió, Anna; Solé, Francesc; Luño, Elisa; Cervera, José; Vallespí, Teresa; Muñoz, Concha; Gómez, Cándida; Arias, Amparo; Such, Esperanza; Sanz, Guillermo; Grau, Javier; Insunza, Andrés; Calasanz, María-José; Ardanaz, María-Teresa; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Azaceta, Gemma; Álvarez, Sara; Sánchez, Joaquín; Martín, María-Luisa; Bargay, Joan; Gómez, Valle; Cervero, Carlos-Javier; Allegue, María-José; Collado, Rosa; Campo, Elías; Esteve, Jordi; Nomdedeu, Benet; Costa, Dolors

    2016-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations are rare in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). With the exception of t(3q), translocations are not explicitly considered in the cytogenetic classification of the IPSS-R and their impact on disease progression and patient survival is unknown. The present study was aimed at determining the prognostic impact of translocations in the context of the cytogenetic classification of the IPSS-R. We evaluated 1,653 patients from the Spanish Registry of MDS diagnosed with MDS or CMML and an abnormal karyotype by conventional cytogenetic analysis. Translocations were identified in 168 patients (T group). Compared with the 1,485 patients with abnormal karyotype without translocations (non-T group), the T group had a larger proportion of patients with refractory anemia with excess of blasts and higher scores in both the cytogenetic and global IPSS-R. Translocations were associated with a significantly shorter survival and higher incidence of transformation into AML at univariate analysis but both features disappeared after multivariate adjustment for the IPSS-R cytogenetic category. Patients with single or double translocations other than t(3q) had an outcome similar to those in the non-T group in the intermediate cytogenetic risk category of the IPSS-R. In conclusion, the presence of translocations identifies a subgroup of MDS/CMML patients with a more aggressive clinical presentation that can be explained by a higher incidence of complex karyotypes. Single or double translocations other than t(3q) should be explicitly considered into the intermediate risk category of cytogenetic IPSS-R classification. PMID:26690722

  6. Prognostic impact of chromosomal translocations in myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia patients. A study by the spanish group of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Calvo, Xavier; Pereira, Arturo; Carrió, Anna; Solé, Francesc; Luño, Elisa; Cervera, José; Vallespí, Teresa; Muñoz, Concha; Gómez, Cándida; Arias, Amparo; Such, Esperanza; Sanz, Guillermo; Grau, Javier; Insunza, Andrés; Calasanz, María-José; Ardanaz, María-Teresa; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús-María; Azaceta, Gemma; Álvarez, Sara; Sánchez, Joaquín; Martín, María-Luisa; Bargay, Joan; Gómez, Valle; Cervero, Carlos-Javier; Allegue, María-José; Collado, Rosa; Campo, Elías; Esteve, Jordi; Nomdedeu, Benet; Costa, Dolors

    2016-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations are rare in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). With the exception of t(3q), translocations are not explicitly considered in the cytogenetic classification of the IPSS-R and their impact on disease progression and patient survival is unknown. The present study was aimed at determining the prognostic impact of translocations in the context of the cytogenetic classification of the IPSS-R. We evaluated 1,653 patients from the Spanish Registry of MDS diagnosed with MDS or CMML and an abnormal karyotype by conventional cytogenetic analysis. Translocations were identified in 168 patients (T group). Compared with the 1,485 patients with abnormal karyotype without translocations (non-T group), the T group had a larger proportion of patients with refractory anemia with excess of blasts and higher scores in both the cytogenetic and global IPSS-R. Translocations were associated with a significantly shorter survival and higher incidence of transformation into AML at univariate analysis but both features disappeared after multivariate adjustment for the IPSS-R cytogenetic category. Patients with single or double translocations other than t(3q) had an outcome similar to those in the non-T group in the intermediate cytogenetic risk category of the IPSS-R. In conclusion, the presence of translocations identifies a subgroup of MDS/CMML patients with a more aggressive clinical presentation that can be explained by a higher incidence of complex karyotypes. Single or double translocations other than t(3q) should be explicitly considered into the intermediate risk category of cytogenetic IPSS-R classification.

  7. Comparison of Intensive Chemotherapy and Hypomethylating Agents before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Study of the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    PubMed

    Potter, Victoria T; Iacobelli, Simona; van Biezen, Anja; Maertens, Johann; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Passweg, Jakob R; Yakhoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Tabrizi, Reza; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Chevallier, Patrice; Chalandon, Yves; Huynh, Anne; Cahn, Jean Yves; Ljungman, Per; Craddock, Charles; Lenhoff, Stig; Russell, N H; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Benedetto, Bruno; Meijer, Ellen; Mufti, G J; de Witte, Theo; Robin, Marie; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data set was used to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of hypomethylating therapy (HMA) compared with those of conventional chemotherapy (CC) before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 209 patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndromes. Median follow-up was 22.1 months and the median age of the group was 57.6 years with 37% of the population older than > 60 years. The majority of patients (59%) received reduced-intensity conditioning and 34% and 27% had intermediate-2 and high international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) scores. At time of HSCT, 32% of patients did not achieve complete remission (CR) and 13% had primary refractory disease. On univariate analysis, outcomes at 3 years were not significantly different between HMA and CC for overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM): OS (42% versus 35%), RFS (29% versus 31%), CIR (45% versus 40%), and NRM (26% versus 28%). Comparing characteristics of the groups, there were more patients < 55 years old, more patients in CR (68% versus 32%), and fewer patients with primary refractory disease in the CC group than in the HMA group (10% versus 19%, P < .001). Patients with primary refractory disease had worse outcomes than those in CR with regard to OS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 4.13; P = .001), RFS (HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.37 to 3.76; P = .001), and NRM (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.18 to 5.26; P = .016). In addition, an adverse effect of IPSS-R cytogenetic risk group was evident for RFS. In summary, outcomes after HSCT are similar for patients receiving HMA compared with those receiving CC, despite the higher proportion of patients with primary refractory disease in the HMA group. PMID:27264633

  8. Comparison of Intensive Chemotherapy and Hypomethylating Agents before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes: A Study of the Myelodysplastic Syndrome Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.

    PubMed

    Potter, Victoria T; Iacobelli, Simona; van Biezen, Anja; Maertens, Johann; Bourhis, Jean-Henri; Passweg, Jakob R; Yakhoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Tabrizi, Reza; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Chevallier, Patrice; Chalandon, Yves; Huynh, Anne; Cahn, Jean Yves; Ljungman, Per; Craddock, Charles; Lenhoff, Stig; Russell, N H; Fegueux, Nathalie; Socié, Gerard; Benedetto, Bruno; Meijer, Ellen; Mufti, G J; de Witte, Theo; Robin, Marie; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data set was used to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of hypomethylating therapy (HMA) compared with those of conventional chemotherapy (CC) before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 209 patients with advanced myelodysplastic syndromes. Median follow-up was 22.1 months and the median age of the group was 57.6 years with 37% of the population older than > 60 years. The majority of patients (59%) received reduced-intensity conditioning and 34% and 27% had intermediate-2 and high international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) scores. At time of HSCT, 32% of patients did not achieve complete remission (CR) and 13% had primary refractory disease. On univariate analysis, outcomes at 3 years were not significantly different between HMA and CC for overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and nonrelapse mortality (NRM): OS (42% versus 35%), RFS (29% versus 31%), CIR (45% versus 40%), and NRM (26% versus 28%). Comparing characteristics of the groups, there were more patients < 55 years old, more patients in CR (68% versus 32%), and fewer patients with primary refractory disease in the CC group than in the HMA group (10% versus 19%, P < .001). Patients with primary refractory disease had worse outcomes than those in CR with regard to OS (hazard ratio [HR], 2.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 4.13; P = .001), RFS (HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.37 to 3.76; P = .001), and NRM (HR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.18 to 5.26; P = .016). In addition, an adverse effect of IPSS-R cytogenetic risk group was evident for RFS. In summary, outcomes after HSCT are similar for patients receiving HMA compared with those receiving CC, despite the higher proportion of patients with primary refractory disease in the HMA group.

  9. Repair of a recurrent pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta in an atomic bomb survivor with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Reiji; Nakao, Yoshihisa; Okada, Takayuki; Johno, Hiroyuki; Enoki, Chiharu; Sumida, Tomohiko; Imamura, Hiroji

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of infective aortic pseudoaneurysms tends to be intractable and difficult to treat. We experienced a very rare case of a recurrent infective pseudoaneurysm in the ascending aorta that occurred after cardiac surgery in an atomic bomb survivor with myelodysplastic syndrome. The pseudoaneurysm was successfully repaired using a femoral artery autograft with an omentopexy and the patient recovered well without any recurrence. PMID:19583613

  10. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  11. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ring Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ring Sideroblasts

  13. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  14. The KDM2B- let-7b -EZH2 axis in myelodysplastic syndromes as a target for combined epigenetic therapy.

    PubMed

    Karoopongse, Ekapun; Yeung, Cecilia; Byon, John; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Holman, Zaneta J; Jiang, Peter Y Z; Yu, Qiang; Deeg, H Joachim; Marcondes, A Mario

    2014-01-01

    Both DNA and histone methylation are dysregulated in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Based on preliminary data we hypothesized that dysregulated interactions of KDM2B, let-7b and EZH2 signals lead to an aberrant epigenetic landscape. Gene expression in CD34+ cells from MDS marrows was analyzed by NanoString miR array and validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functions of KDM2B, let-7b and EZH2 were characterized in myeloid cell lines and in primary MDS cells. Let-7b levels were significantly higher, and KDM2B and EZH2 expression was lower in primary CD34+ MDS marrow cells (n = 44) than in healthy controls (n = 21; p<0.013, and p<0.0001, respectively). Overexpression of let-7b reduced EZH2 and KDM2B protein levels, and decreased cells in S-phase while increasing G0/G1 cells (p = 0.0005), accompanied by decreased H3K27me3 and cyclin D1. Silencing of KDM2B increased let-7b expression. Treatment with the cyclopentanyl analog of 3-deazaadenosine, DZNep, combined with the DNA hypomethylating agent 5-azacitidine, decreased levels of EZH2, suppressed methylation of di- and tri-methylated H3K27, and increased p16 expression, associated with cell proliferation. Thus, KDM2B, via let-7b/EZH2, promotes transcriptional repression. DZNep bypassed the inhibitory KDM2B/let-7b/EZH2 axis by preventing H3K27 methylation and reducing cell proliferation. DZNep might be able to enhance the therapeutic effects of DNA hypomethylating agents such as 5-azacitidine, currently considered standard therapy for patients with MDS. PMID:25225797

  15. A nationwide non-interventional epidemiological data registry on myelodysplastic syndromes in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Otrock, Zaher K; Chamseddine, Nabil; Salem, Ziad M; Wehbe, Tarek; Al-Ayoubi, Mouna; Dhaini, Moussa; Kattan, Joseph; Mokaddem, Walid; Nasr, Therese Abi; Jradi, Oussama; Farhat, Fadi S; Wehbe, Mahmoud; Haidar, Mohammad H; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Bitar, Nizar; Hajj, Mirna El; Kadri, Adel M; Kamar, Francois G; Yassine, Hanan; Khodr, Hassan; Taher, Ali T; Hakime, Noha; Mahfouz, Rami Ar; Serhal, Wassim; Bazarbachi, Ali; Farhat, Hussein Z

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, blood cells dysplasia, and increased risk for progression to acute leukemia.Physicians should be vigilant in diagnosing MDS and should be aware of the contemporary therapies that are always in progress. Most of the data on MDS epidemiology and management comes from developed countries. The incidence and features of MDS in the Arab countries, among them Lebanon, are not known. We undertook a nationwide epidemiological registry study of all newly diagnosed MDS cases through 2010-2011. Patients were referred by 21 hematologists/oncologists practicing in 17 hospitals and medical centers distributed across the entire country. 58 patients (29 males and 29 females) with confirmed MDS were included. The calculated incidence rate of MDS was 0.71 per 100,000 people. The median age at diagnosis was 73 years (range 16-86). The most common complaints on presentation were fatigue (70.7%), weakness (60.3%) and pallor (43.1%). Most patients were diagnosed as refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB; 36.2%) and refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD; 32.8%). This paper constitutes the first epidemiological report on the incidence and specific subtypes of MDS in Lebanon. PMID:27069756

  16. Haematopoietic cell transplantation for acute leukaemia and advanced myelodysplastic syndrome in Fanconi anaemia.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Richard; Wagner, John E; Hirsch, Betsy; DeFor, Todd E; Zierhut, Heather; MacMillan, Margaret L

    2014-02-01

    Acute leukaemia or advanced myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS ≥ 5% blasts) in Fanconi anaemia (FA) patients is associated with a poor prognosis. We report 21 FA patients with acute leukaemia or advanced MDS who underwent haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at the University of Minnesota between 1988 and 2011. Six patients had biallelic BRCA2 mutations. Eight patients received pre-transplant cytoreduction, with 3 achieving complete remission. HCT donor source included human leucocyte antigen-matched sibling (n = 2) or alternative donors (n = 19). Neutrophil engraftment was 95% for the entire cohort, and the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease was 19%. 5-year overall survival (OS) was 33%, with a relapse rate of 24%, with similar OS in patients with biallelic BRCA2 mutations. Our study supports the use of HCT in the treatment of FA patients with acute leukaemia or advanced MDS, however, the role of chemotherapy prior to HCT remains unclear for this population. FA patients with biallelic BRCA2 are unique and may benefit from higher dose chemotherapy relative to other complementation groups.

  17. A prospective, multicenter, observational study of long-term decitabine treatment in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong Hyun; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Je-Hwan; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Kim, Soo Jeong; Park, Sung Kyu; Do, Young Rok; Kim, Inho; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Won Sik; Yi, Hyeon Gyu; Joo, Young-Don; Choi, Chul Won; Kim, Suk Ran; Na, Sang Min; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-12-29

    This prospective observational study evaluated the efficacy and safety of long-term decitabine treatment in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine 20 mg/m(2)/day was administered intravenously for 5 consecutive days every 4 weeks to MDS patients in intermediate-1 or higher International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) risk categories. Active antimicrobial prophylaxis was given to prevent infectious complications. Overall response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and time to response were evaluated, as were adverse events. The final analysis included 132 patients. IPSS risk was intermediate-2/high in 34.9% patients. The patients received a median of 5 cycles, with responders receiving a median of 8 cycles (range, 2-30). ORR was 62.9% (complete response [CR], 36; partial response [PR], 3; marrow complete response [mCR], 19; and hematologic improvement, 25). Among responders, 39% showed first response at cycle 3 or later. OS at 2 years was 60.9%, with 17% progressing to acute myeloid leukemia. PFS at 2 years was 51.0%. Patients achieving mCR showed comparable survival outcomes to those with CR/PR. With active antibiotic prophylaxis, febrile neutropenia events occurred in 61 of 1,033 (6%) cycles. Long-term decitabine treatment with antibiotic prophylaxis showed favorable outcomes in MDS patients, and mCR predicted favorable survival outcomes.

  18. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y H; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS.

  19. A nationwide non-interventional epidemiological data registry on myelodysplastic syndromes in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Otrock, Zaher K; Chamseddine, Nabil; Salem, Ziad M; Wehbe, Tarek; Al-Ayoubi, Mouna; Dhaini, Moussa; Kattan, Joseph; Mokaddem, Walid; Nasr, Therese Abi; Jradi, Oussama; Farhat, Fadi S; Wehbe, Mahmoud; Haidar, Mohammad H; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Bitar, Nizar; Hajj, Mirna El; Kadri, Adel M; Kamar, Francois G; Yassine, Hanan; Khodr, Hassan; Taher, Ali T; Hakime, Noha; Mahfouz, Rami AR; Serhal, Wassim; Bazarbachi, Ali; Farhat, Hussein Z

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, blood cells dysplasia, and increased risk for progression to acute leukemia.Physicians should be vigilant in diagnosing MDS and should be aware of the contemporary therapies that are always in progress. Most of the data on MDS epidemiology and management comes from developed countries. The incidence and features of MDS in the Arab countries, among them Lebanon, are not known. We undertook a nationwide epidemiological registry study of all newly diagnosed MDS cases through 2010-2011. Patients were referred by 21 hematologists/oncologists practicing in 17 hospitals and medical centers distributed across the entire country. 58 patients (29 males and 29 females) with confirmed MDS were included. The calculated incidence rate of MDS was 0.71 per 100,000 people. The median age at diagnosis was 73 years (range 16-86). The most common complaints on presentation were fatigue (70.7%), weakness (60.3%) and pallor (43.1%). Most patients were diagnosed as refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB; 36.2%) and refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD; 32.8%). This paper constitutes the first epidemiological report on the incidence and specific subtypes of MDS in Lebanon. PMID:27069756

  20. [Point mutations of genes encoding proteins involvedin RNA splicing in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Barańska, Marta; Czerwińska-Rybak, Joanna; Gil, Lidia; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2015-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) constitute heterogeneous group of clonal disorders, characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenia and increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia development. Molecular mechanisms behind MDS have not been fully explained, however recent studies based on new technologies confirmed that epigenetic abnormalities and somatic mutation in the spliceasome machinery are crucial in pathogenesis of these diseases. Abnormal mRNA splicing (excision of intronic sequences from mRNA) has been found in over half of all MDS patients and resulted in accumulation of cytogenetical and molecular changes. The biological impact of splicing factor genes mutations has been evaluated only in a limited extend and current studies concentrate on analysis of MDS transcriptome. Molecular characteristic of classical and alternative splicing is presented in the paper, according to current knowledge. We review the most prominent findings from recent years concerning mutation in the spliceasome machinery with respect to MDS phenotype and disease prognosis. Perspectives in applying of novel diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities for myelodysplasia, based on spliceosome mutations identification are also presented.

  1. Survival benefits with transplantation in secondary AML evolving from myelodysplastic syndrome with hypomethylating treatment failure.

    PubMed

    Shin, S-H; Yahng, S-A; Yoon, J-H; Lee, S-E; Cho, B-S; Eom, K-S; Lee, S; Min, C-K; Kim, H-J; Cho, S-G; Kim, D-W; Lee, J-W; Min, W-S; Park, C-W; Kim, Y-J

    2013-05-01

    The prognosis for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome with hypomethylating treatment failure (MDS-HTF) has been known to be poor. However, the clinical outcomes and optimal treatment options for secondary AML evolving from MDS-HTF (sAML/MDS-HTF) are not well known. This retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes and influences of treatment options on survival in 46 consecutive patients with sAML/MDS-HTF. The median OS rates were 1.4 months in the best supportive care group (n=15) and 9.4 months in the active treatment group (n=31). One-year OS rates were 13.3% and 36.8%, respectively (P=0.001). Active treatment (P<0.001), lower BM blast (<33%) at sAML (P=0.007), non-poor NCCN (National Cancer Comprehensive Network) cytogenetics (P=0.001) and good performance status (ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group) 1) (P=0.024) were significant predictors affecting favorable OS in a multivariate analysis. Of the active treatment options, allo-SCT with prior chemotherapy (CTx) showed better OS compared with CTx only or SCT without CTx (P=0.019). Our analyses suggest that active treatment, particularly SCT following CTx, should be considered in patients with sAML/MDS-HTF if the patient is medically fit.

  2. 5-azacitidine efficacy and safety in patients aged >65 years with myelodysplastic syndromes outside clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Petrucci, Luigi; Mancini, Marco; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy and safety of azacitidine in elderly patients (aged >65 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) treated outside clinical trials are reported. Thirty-eight patients with MDS received azacitidine (75 mg/m(2), schedule 5+2 +2): seven patients were classified as having refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD), nine patients with refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) type 1, 18 patients with RAEB type 2 and four patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia type 2 (CMML-2). According to International Working Group (IWG) 2006 criteria, after the first four cycles we detected complete remission in seven patients (CR, 18%), improvement of bone marrow dysplasia and reduction of blast percentage in seven patients (partial response, 18%), stable disease in 20 patients (53%) and progression to acute leukemia in four patients (10%). Median overall survival for all patients treated was 16.4 months. Only mild non-hematologic toxicity was detected (grade 1-2 nausea and pruritus), whereas 55% of patients experienced hematologic side effects (25% grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia and 30% grade 3-4 neutropenia). Our results suggest that advanced age should not preclude effective treatment with azacitidine in non-selected elderly patients wih MDS.

  3. Outcomes for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tambaro, F P; Garcia-Manero, G; O'Brien, S M; Faderl, S H; Ferrajoli, A; Burger, J A; Pierce, S; Wang, X; Do, K-A; Kantarjian, H M; Keating, M J; Wierda, W G

    2016-02-01

    Acute leukemia (AL) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are uncommon in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We retrospectively identified 95 patients with CLL, also diagnosed with AL (n=38) or MDS (n=57), either concurrently (n=5) or subsequent (n=90) to CLL diagnosis and report their outcomes. Median number of CLL treatments prior to AL and MDS was 2 (0-9) and 1 (0-8), respectively; the most common regimen was purine analog combined with alkylating agent±CD20 monoclonal antibody. Twelve cases had no prior CLL treatment. Among 38 cases with AL, 33 had acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), 3 had acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL; 1 Philadelphia chromosome positive), 1 had biphenotypic and 1 had extramedullary (bladder) AML. Unfavorable AML karyotype was noted in 26, and intermediate risk in 7 patients. There was no association between survival from AL and number of prior CLL regimens or karyotype. Expression of CD7 on blasts was associated with shorter survival. Among MDS cases, all International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) were represented; karyotype was unfavorable in 36, intermediate in 6 and favorable in 12 patients; 10 experienced transformation to AML. Shorter survival from MDS correlated with higher risk IPSS, poor-risk karyotype and increased number of prior CLL treatments. Overall, outcomes for patients with CLL subsequently diagnosed with AL or MDS were very poor; AL/MDS occurred without prior CLL treatment. Effective therapies for these patients are desperately needed.

  4. Methylation of promoters of microRNAs and their host genes in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, Begum; Bosompem, Amma; Peng, Dunfa; Han, Leng; Smith, Emily; Kennedy, Mija E.; Alford, Catherine E.; Wu, Huiyun; Zhao, Zhongming; Mosse, Claudio A.; El-Rifai, Wael; Kim, Annette S.

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of hematopoietic malignancies characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis. Recently, we identified MDS-associated microRNAs (miRNAs) that are down-regulated in MDS. This study examines possible explanations for that observed down-regulation of miRNA expression in MDS. Since genomic losses are insufficient to explain the down-regulation of all our MDS-associated miRNAs, we explored other avenues. We demonstrate that these miRNAs are predominantly intragenic, and that, in many cases, they and their host genes are expressed in a similar pattern during myeloid maturation, suggesting their co-regulation. This co-regulation is further supported by the down-regulation of several of the host genes in MDS and increased methylation of the shared promoters of several miRNAs and their respective host genes. These studies identify a role of hypermethylation of miRNA promoters in the down-regulation of MDS-associated miRNAs, unifying research on miRNAs in MDS and epigenetic regulation in MDS into a common pathway. PMID:23547841

  5. Influence of functional polymorphisms in DNA repair genes of myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Howard Lopes; Soares Maia, Allan Rodrigo; Costa, Marília Braga; Farias, Izabelle Rocha; de Paula Borges, Daniela; de Oliveira, Roberta Taiane Germano; de Sousa, Juliana Cordeiro; Magalhães, Silvia Maria Meira; Pinheiro, Ronald Feitosa

    2016-09-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) malignances characterized by peripheral cytopenias and predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Several studies show that the MDS pathogenesis is a complex and heterogeneous process that involves multiple steps through a sequence of genetic lesions in the DNA which lead to functional changes in the cell and the emergence and subsequent evolution of pre-malignant clone. Double strand breaks (DSB) lesions are the most severe type of DNA damage in HSCs, which, if not properly repaired, might contribute to the development of chromosomal abnormalities, which in turn may lead to leukemia development. We assessed the mRNA expression levels of ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51, XRCC5, XRCC6 and LIG4 genes in bone marrow samples of 47 MDS patients in order to evaluate the association with functional polymorphisms rs228593, rs4793191, rs9567623, rs1801320, rs3835, rs2267437 and rs1805388, respectively, and try to detect clinical associations. We found that the rs228593, rs2267437 and rs1805388 functional polymorphisms probably alter the level of expression of the ATM, XRCC6 and LIG4 genes, respectively, being important in the maintenance of genomic instability in MDS. PMID:27497341

  6. Trisomy 8, a Cytogenetic Abnormality in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Is Constitutional or Not?

    PubMed

    Saumell, Sílvia; Solé, Francesc; Arenillas, Leonor; Montoro, Julia; Valcárcel, David; Pedro, Carme; Sanzo, Carmen; Luño, Elisa; Giménez, Teresa; Arnan, Montserrat; Pomares, Helena; De Paz, Raquel; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Jerez, Andrés; Martínez, Ana B; Sánchez-Castro, Judith; Rodríguez-Gambarte, Juan D; Raya, José M; Ríos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Espinet, Blanca; Florensa, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Isolated trisomy 8 is not considered presumptive evidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in cases without minimal morphological criteria. One reason given is that trisomy 8 (+8) can be found as a constitutional mosaicism (cT8M). We tried to clarify the incidence of cT8M in myeloid neoplasms, specifically in MDS, and the diagnostic value of isolated +8 in MDS. Twenty-two MDS and 10 other myeloid neoplasms carrying +8 were studied. Trisomy 8 was determined in peripheral blood by conventional cytogenetics (CC) and on granulocytes, CD3+ lymphocytes and oral mucosa cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In peripheral blood CC, +8 was seen in 4/32 patients. By FISH, only one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia showed +8 in all cell samples and was interpreted as a cT8M. In our series +8 was acquired in all MDS. Probably, once discarded cT8M by FISH from CD3+ lymphocytes and non-hematological cells, +8 should be considered with enough evidence to MDS.

  7. Phenotypic and Cytogenetic Characterization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, H. W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are vital in hematopoiesis. Whether BM-MSCs alter their characteristics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. We characterized MSCs of de novo MDS patients in Sri Lanka who have not been reported previously in the literature. We also analyzed MSCs derived from different MDS subtypes. MSCs were culture-expanded, characterized by flow cytometry, and induced towards osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Growth properties were determined using growth curves and population doubling times. Karyotyping and FISH were performed on MSCs. Cell morphology, differentiation potential, and CD marker expression of MDS-MSCs of all subtypes were comparable to those of control-MSCs. No significant growth differences were observed between control MSCs and MDS-MSCs of all subtypes (p > 0.05). 31% of MDS-MSCs had chromosomal aberrations (der(3),del(6q),del(7p), loss of chromosomes) whose BM karyotypes were normal. Highest percentage of karyotypic abnormalities was observed in RCMD-MSCs. Patients with abnormal BM karyotypes had no aberrant MSC clones. Results show that in spite of presence of genetically abnormal clones in MDS-MSC populations, in vitro phenotypic and growth characteristics of MSCs in MDS remain unchanged. Further, the occurrence of genetic abnormalities in BM-MSCs in MDS could be considered as an autonomous event from that of their hematopoietic counterparts. PMID:27660743

  8. Case Report: Myelodysplastic syndrome- associated myeloid sarcoma: an unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Emoke; Demian, Smaranda; Nagy, Elod

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma results from the extramedullary homing and proliferation of immature myeloid precursors. We present the timeline, events and diagnostic pitfalls related to a 66 year-old male patient's case, admitted to the Hematology Clinic for pancytopenia, fever, weight loss and fatigue. The severe cytopenia and the few blasts observed in his blood smear indicated a bone marrow biopsy. The bone marrow showed hypercellularity and multilineage dysplasia with the presence of 15% myeloblasts. After the biopsy, he promptly developed paraplegia and nuclear magnetic resonance revealed an epidural tumour which was then resected.In the epidural tumour mass blast-like, round cells were observed with a complex immunophenotype, characterized by myeloperoxidase, CD117, CD15, CD99, leucocyte common antigen positivity and a high Ki-67 proliferation index. Considering the main differential diagnostic issues, the final diagnosis was stated as myelodysplastic syndrome-associated myeloid sarcoma. The prognosis was unfavourable, the bone marrow was quickly invaded by proliferating blast cells, and despite chemotherapy attempts, the patient died.

  9. Case Report: Myelodysplastic syndrome- associated myeloid sarcoma: an unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Emoke; Demian, Smaranda; Nagy, Elod

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma results from the extramedullary homing and proliferation of immature myeloid precursors. We present the timeline, events and diagnostic pitfalls related to a 66 year-old male patient’s case, admitted to the Hematology Clinic for pancytopenia, fever, weight loss and fatigue. The severe cytopenia and the few blasts observed in his blood smear indicated a bone marrow biopsy. The bone marrow showed hypercellularity and multilineage dysplasia with the presence of 15% myeloblasts. After the biopsy, he promptly developed paraplegia and nuclear magnetic resonance revealed an epidural tumour which was then resected.In the epidural tumour mass blast-like, round cells were observed with a complex immunophenotype, characterized by myeloperoxidase, CD117, CD15, CD99, leucocyte common antigen positivity and a high Ki-67 proliferation index. Considering the main differential diagnostic issues, the final diagnosis was stated as myelodysplastic syndrome-associated myeloid sarcoma. The prognosis was unfavourable, the bone marrow was quickly invaded by proliferating blast cells, and despite chemotherapy attempts, the patient died. PMID:27019694

  10. Phenotypic and Cytogenetic Characterization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Goonasekera, H. W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are vital in hematopoiesis. Whether BM-MSCs alter their characteristics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. We characterized MSCs of de novo MDS patients in Sri Lanka who have not been reported previously in the literature. We also analyzed MSCs derived from different MDS subtypes. MSCs were culture-expanded, characterized by flow cytometry, and induced towards osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Growth properties were determined using growth curves and population doubling times. Karyotyping and FISH were performed on MSCs. Cell morphology, differentiation potential, and CD marker expression of MDS-MSCs of all subtypes were comparable to those of control-MSCs. No significant growth differences were observed between control MSCs and MDS-MSCs of all subtypes (p > 0.05). 31% of MDS-MSCs had chromosomal aberrations (der(3),del(6q),del(7p), loss of chromosomes) whose BM karyotypes were normal. Highest percentage of karyotypic abnormalities was observed in RCMD-MSCs. Patients with abnormal BM karyotypes had no aberrant MSC clones. Results show that in spite of presence of genetically abnormal clones in MDS-MSC populations, in vitro phenotypic and growth characteristics of MSCs in MDS remain unchanged. Further, the occurrence of genetic abnormalities in BM-MSCs in MDS could be considered as an autonomous event from that of their hematopoietic counterparts.

  11. Use of azacitidine for myelodysplastic syndromes: controversial issues and practical recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Jin; Jang, Jun Ho; Kwak, Jae-Yong; Lee, Je-Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Azacitidine is recommended for patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who are not eligible for intensive therapy or for patients with lower-risk MDS who have thrombocytopenia or neutropenia or have anemia that is unresponsive to other therapies. However, standard treatment with azacitidine has not been optimized and many issues about the use of azacitidine remain unresolved. The use of azacitidine is expanding rapidly, but limited comparative clinical trial data are available to (i) define the optimal use of azacitidine in patients with higher-risk MDS or around the time of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, (ii) identify those patients with lower-risk MDS who may benefit from treatment, and (iii) guide physicians on alternative therapies after treatment failure. Increasing evidence suggests that the clinical features, prognostic factors, and cytogenetic profiles of patients with MDS in Asia differ significantly from those of patients in Western countries, so the aim of this review is to summarize the evidence and provide practical recommendations on the use of azacitidine in patients with MDS in the Republic of Korea. Evidence considered in this review is based on published clinical data and on the clinical experience of an expert panel from the acute myeloid leukemia/MDS Working Party of the Korean Society of Hematology. PMID:23826577

  12. Mutational hierarchies in myelodysplastic syndromes dynamically adapt and evolve upon therapy response and failure.

    PubMed

    Mossner, Maximilian; Jann, Johann-Christoph; Wittig, Janina; Nolte, Florian; Fey, Stephanie; Nowak, Verena; Obländer, Julia; Pressler, Jovita; Palme, Iris; Xanthopoulos, Christina; Boch, Tobias; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Röhl, Henning; Witt, Stephanie H; Dukal, Helene; Klein, Corinna; Schmitt, Steffen; Gelß, Patrick; Platzbecker, Uwe; Balaian, Ekaterina; Fabarius, Alice; Blum, Helmut; Schulze, Torsten J; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Trumpp, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Medyouf, Hind; Nowak, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Clonal evolution is believed to be a main driver for progression of various types of cancer and implicated in facilitating resistance to drugs. However, the hierarchical organization of malignant clones in the hematopoiesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and its impact on response to drug therapy remain poorly understood. Using high-throughput sequencing of patient and xenografted cells, we evaluated the intratumoral heterogeneity (n= 54) and reconstructed mutational trajectories (n = 39) in patients suffering from MDS (n = 52) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia-1 (n = 2). We identified linear and also branching evolution paths and confirmed on a patient-specific level that somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators and RNA splicing genes frequently constitute isolated disease-initiating events. Using high-throughput exome- and/or deep-sequencing, we analyzed 103 chronologically acquired samples from 22 patients covering a cumulative observation time of 75 years MDS disease progression. Our data revealed highly dynamic shaping of complex oligoclonal architectures, specifically upon treatment with lenalidomide and other drugs. Despite initial clinical response to treatment, patients' marrow persistently remained clonal with rapid outgrowth of founder-, sub-, or even fully independent clones, indicating an increased dynamic rate of clonal turnover. The emergence and disappearance of specific clones frequently correlated with changes of clinical parameters, highlighting their distinct and far-reaching functional properties. Intriguingly, increasingly complex mutational trajectories are frequently accompanied by clinical progression during the course of disease. These data substantiate a need for regular broad molecular monitoring to guide clinical treatment decisions in MDS. PMID:27268087

  13. Treatment of pyoderma gangrenosum with thalidomide in a myelodysplastic syndrome case

    PubMed Central

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide may be used as a treatment option for pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Herein, we aimed to report a patient who was treated well with thalidomide and whose diagnosis was PG with MDS. A 61-year-old man with painless ecchymotic lesions in his right upper extremity was admitted to the hospital in Isparta, Turkey, in January 2015. The lesions were diagnosed as PG. In his anamnesis, it was found that he was diagnosed with MDS 6 years ago and had been treated with cyclosporine at 2×100 mg for 5 years, which was stopped in January 2015. Aspiration from liver lesion revealed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, so antituberculosis treatment was started. Bone marrow investigation revealed MDS-refractory anemia with excess blasts (7%). For lesions in bilateral upper extremities, thalidomide treatment was started at 50 mg/d. After 1 month from the initiation of thalidomide treatment, the lesions in upper extremities had disappeared. In the literature, there are some reports of patients with PG who were successfully treated with thalidomide. Our patient is a complicated case who simultaneously has MDS, PG, and tuberculosis infection. The reason for thalidomide usage in our patient was the need of immune modulation without immune suppression. Our patient has tolerated the drug well, and excellent response was obtained after 1 month of initiation of thalidomide treatment. To conclude, thalidomide is a very effective drug acting as an immune modulator, which is useful in the clinical management of both MDS and PG. PMID:27051318

  14. Distinct splicing signatures affect converged pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome patients carrying mutations in different splicing regulators.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinsong; Zhou, Bing; Thol, Felicitas; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Liang; Shao, Changwei; DeBoever, Christopher; Hou, Jiayi; Li, Hairi; Chaturvedi, Anuhar; Ganser, Arnold; Bejar, Rafael; Zhang, Dong-Er; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Heuser, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous myeloid disorders with prevalent mutations in several splicing factors, but the splicing programs linked to specific mutations or MDS in general remain to be systematically defined. We applied RASL-seq, a sensitive and cost-effective platform, to interrogate 5502 annotated splicing events in 169 samples from MDS patients or healthy individuals. We found that splicing signatures associated with normal hematopoietic lineages are largely related to cell signaling and differentiation programs, whereas MDS-linked signatures are primarily involved in cell cycle control and DNA damage responses. Despite the shared roles of affected splicing factors in the 3' splice site definition, mutations in U2AF1, SRSF2, and SF3B1 affect divergent splicing programs, and interestingly, the affected genes fall into converging cancer-related pathways. A risk score derived from 11 splicing events appears to be independently associated with an MDS prognosis and AML transformation, suggesting potential clinical relevance of altered splicing patterns in MDS. PMID:27492256

  15. ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Geoffrey T.; Knovich, Mary Ann; Savage, Rodney W.; Sane, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction and acute myeloid leukemia are rarely reported as concomitant conditions. The management of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in patients who have acute myeloid leukemia is challenging: the leukemia-related thrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, and systemic coagulopathy increase the risk of bleeding, and the administration of thrombolytic agents can be fatal. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who presented emergently with STEMI, myelodysplastic syndrome, and newly recognized acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Standard antiplatelet and anticoagulation therapy were contraindicated by the patient's thrombocytopenia and by his reported ecchymosis and gingival bleeding upon admission. He declined cardiac catheterization, was provided palliative care, and died 2 hours after hospital admission. We searched the English-language medical literature, found 8 relevant reports, and determined that the prognosis for patients with concomitant STEMI and acute myeloid leukemia is clearly worse than that for either individual condition. No guidelines exist to direct the management of STEMI and concomitant acute myeloid leukemia. In 2 reports, dual antiplatelet therapy, anticoagulation, and drug-eluting stent implantation were used without an increased risk of bleeding in the short term, even in the presence of thrombocytopenia. However, we think that a more conservative approach—balloon angioplasty with the provisional use of bare-metal stents—might be safer. Simultaneous chemotherapy for the acute myeloid leukemia is crucial. Older age seems to be a major risk factor: patients too frail for emergent treatment can die within hours or days. PMID:24808792

  16. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge.

  17. Case Report: Myelodysplastic syndrome- associated myeloid sarcoma: an unusual clinical presentation of a rare disease.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Emoke; Demian, Smaranda; Nagy, Elod

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma results from the extramedullary homing and proliferation of immature myeloid precursors. We present the timeline, events and diagnostic pitfalls related to a 66 year-old male patient's case, admitted to the Hematology Clinic for pancytopenia, fever, weight loss and fatigue. The severe cytopenia and the few blasts observed in his blood smear indicated a bone marrow biopsy. The bone marrow showed hypercellularity and multilineage dysplasia with the presence of 15% myeloblasts. After the biopsy, he promptly developed paraplegia and nuclear magnetic resonance revealed an epidural tumour which was then resected.In the epidural tumour mass blast-like, round cells were observed with a complex immunophenotype, characterized by myeloperoxidase, CD117, CD15, CD99, leucocyte common antigen positivity and a high Ki-67 proliferation index. Considering the main differential diagnostic issues, the final diagnosis was stated as myelodysplastic syndrome-associated myeloid sarcoma. The prognosis was unfavourable, the bone marrow was quickly invaded by proliferating blast cells, and despite chemotherapy attempts, the patient died. PMID:27019694

  18. The prevalence of chromosomal aberrations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes in China.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinyong; Chu, Yuxin; Song, Qibin; Yao, Yi; Yang, Weihong; Huang, Shiang

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the prevalence and distribution of diverse chromosomal aberrations associated with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in China. Bone marrow samples were collected from multiple cities in China. Metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were initially used to test chromosomal lesions. Affymetrix CytoScan 750 K genechip platform performed a genome-wide detection of chromosomal aberrations. Chromosomal gain was identified in 76 patients; the most prevalent was trisomy 8(17.9 %). New chromosomal gain was detected on chromosome 9, 19p, and X. Chromosomal loss was detected in 101 patients. The most frequent was loss 5q (21.0 %). Some loss and gain were not identified by MC or FISH but identified by genechip. UPD was solely identified by genechip in 51 patients; the most prevalent were UPD 7q (4.94 %) and UPD 17p (4.32 %). Furthermore, complex chromosomal aberrations were detected in 56 patients. In conclusion, Affymetrix CytoScan 750 K genechip was more precise than MC and FISH in detection of cryptic chromosomal aberrations relevant to MDS. Analysis of the prevalence and distribution of diverse chromosomal aberrations in China may improve strategies for MDS diagnosis and therapies. PMID:27225263

  19. SLC7A5 act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Song, Jing; Chen, Bobin; Xu, Xiaoping; Lin, Guowei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogenous group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by increased risk of leukemic transformation. This study identifies microRNAs(miRNA) and miRNA targets that might represent leukemic transformation markers for MDS. Methods Based on our previously established nested case-control study cohort of MDS patients, we chose paired patients to undergo Angilent 8 × 15K human miRNA microarrays. Target prediction analysis was administrated using targetscan 5.1 software. We further investigated the function of target gene in MDS cell line using siRNA method, including cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, cell cycle and electron microscope. Results Finally we screened a subset of 7 miRNAs to be significantly differentially expressed between the case (at the end of follow up with leukemic transformation) and control group (at the end of follow up without leukemic transformation). Target prediction analysis revealed SLC7A5 was the common target gene of these 7 miRNAs. Further study on the function of SLC7A5 gene in SKM-1 cell line showed that downregulation of SLC7A5 inhibited SKM-1 cells proliferation, increased apoptosis and caused cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 stage. Conclusion Our data indicate that SLC7A5 gene may act as a potential leukemic transformation target gene in MDS. PMID:26657287

  20. Current State of the Art: Management of Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Komrokji, Rami S

    2016-08-01

    The higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients, defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) as intermediate-2 or high-risk groups, compromise a third of MDS patients who have an expected survival of less than 1.5 years. Our ability to better define higher risk MDS improved with the proposal of new clinical risk models such as the revised IPSS and by integration of molecular data, including somatic gene mutations. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (AHSCT) remains the only curative option. In higher risk MDS patients, proceeding early with AHSCT is associated with maximum survival gain. The decision to pursue AHSCT is individualized according to disease risk, comorbidities, and functional status. The role of therapy before AHSCT remains controversial, and the role of post-AHSCT maintenance is evolving. Hypomethylating agents are the only medications that alter the natural history of the disease. Azacitidine is the only drug reported to improve overall survival in higher risk MDS patients. Appropriate use and assessment of response is key for assuring patients benefit of such limited options. Treatment after failure of hypomethylating agents is an unmet need. The role of detectable somatic gene mutations in prognosis and tailoring therapy continue to emerge.

  1. Minimal residual disease monitoring and preemptive immunotherapy in myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Dong; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Lan-Ping; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring and MRD-directed preemptive immunotherapy in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). MRD assessment consisted of Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) detection with PCR and leukemia-associated immunophenotypic pattern examination with multiparameter flow cytometry (FCM). Post-HSCT, 31 patients were positive for WT1, and 8, for FCM; positivity for WT1 (18.6 vs. 6.1 %, P = 0.040) or FCM (62.5 vs. 3.6 %, P < 0.001) indicated a higher 2-year relapse rate. Twenty-one patients met our combined criteria for MRD, and the presence of MRD was associated with a higher 2-year relapse rate (27.3 vs. 4.5 %, P = 0.003). Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) expression alone was not an appropriate MRD marker; however, it suggested that the MRD-positive patients may fail to respond to preemptive immunotherapy. In patients positive for both PRAME and MRD, the relapse rate was 60 % despite preemptive immunotherapy. Multivariate analysis confirmed the association between the increased relapse rate and positivity for both PRAME and MRD (hazard ratio = 42.8, P = 0.001). MRD monitoring predicted relapse in high-risk MDS post-HSCT patients, and PRAME- and MRD-positive patients did not benefit from preemptive immunotherapy.

  2. Functional evidence implicating chromosome 7q22 haploinsufficiency in myelodysplastic syndrome pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jasmine C; Weinfurtner, Kelley M; Alzamora, Maria del pilar; Kogan, Scott C; Burgess, Michael R; Zhang, Yan; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ma, Jing; Cheng, Jinjun; Chen, Shann-Ching; Ho, Theodore T; Flach, Johanna; Reynaud, Damien; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Downing, James R; Shannon, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome 7 deletions are highly prevalent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and likely contribute to aberrant growth through haploinsufficiency. We generated mice with a heterozygous germ line deletion of a 2-Mb interval of chromosome band 5A3 syntenic to a commonly deleted segment of human 7q22 and show that mutant hematopoietic cells exhibit cardinal features of MDS. Specifically, the long-term hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment is expanded in 5A3+/del mice, and the distribution of myeloid progenitors is altered. 5A3+/del HSCs are defective for lymphoid repopulating potential and show a myeloid lineage output bias. These cell autonomous abnormalities are exacerbated by physiologic aging and upon serial transplantation. The 5A3 deletion partially rescues defective repopulation in Gata2 mutant mice. 5A3+/del hematopoietic cells exhibit decreased expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and perturbed oxygen consumption. These studies provide the first functional data linking 7q22 deletions to MDS pathogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07839.001 PMID:26193121

  3. Lenalidomide for myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q): how long should it last?

    PubMed

    Vozella, Federico; Latagliata, Roberto; Carmosino, Ida; Volpicelli, Paola; Montagna, Chiara; Romano, Angela; Roberto, Amanda; Finsinger, Paola; Mancini, Marco; Breccia, Massimo; Oliva, Esther; Oliva, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Lenalidomide induces in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and del(5q) erythroid and cytogenetic response rates as high as 75% and 50%, respectively. It is still unclear, however, how long lenalidomide treatment should be continued and whether or not the drug could be interrupted. To assess the feasibility of lenalidomide discontinuation, we revised a cohort of 16 low-risk MDS patients with del(5q) treated at our institute in a phase II multicentric Italian study. Among the 12 responding patients, four discontinued lenalidomide while in complete response. All four patients needed during treatment a permanent lenalidomide reduction from 10 to 5 mg/day because of haematological toxicity (three patients) or grade 3 muscular and bone pain (one patient). At lenalidomide discontinuation after 16, 20, 27 and 20 months from the start, respectively, all four patients were in complete hematologic response and three forth in complete cytogenetic response. Three patients are still in response after 36, 30 and 20 months from lenalidomide discontinuation, respectively: The remaining patient relapsed after 20 months, and she is now receiving a new course of lenalidomide. In conclusion, long-lasting remissions are achievable in MDS patients with del(5q) in complete response after lenalidomide discontinuation. PMID:25950027

  4. Incidence of Myelodysplastic Syndrome in UK Petroleum Distribution and Oil Refinery Workers, 1995-2011.

    PubMed

    Sorahan, Tom; Mohammed, Nuredin

    2016-05-06

    The incidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) experienced by cohorts of 16,467 petroleum distribution workers and 28,554 oil refinery workers has been investigated. Study subjects were all those male employees first employed at one of 476 UK petroleum distribution centres or eight UK oil refineries in the period 1946-1974; all subjects had a minimum of twelve months employment with some employment after 1st January, 1951. Observed numbers (Obs) of MDS cases were compared with expectations based on national incidence rates for the period 1995-2011. The overall standardised registration ratio (SRR) was 73 (Obs = 17) in petroleum distribution workers for the age-range 15-84 years, and 77 (Obs = 21) for the age-range 15-99 years. The overall SRR was 81 (Obs = 29) in oil refinery workers for the age-range 15-84 years, and 83 (Obs = 36) for the age-range 15-99 years. More detailed analyses were carried out in terms of year of registration, period from hire, decade of hire, and duration of employment. The overall SRR findings did not provide clear evidence for the presence of an occupational cancer hazard, and provide no support for the hypothesis that low-level benzene exposure has an important effect on the risks of MDS.

  5. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y H; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  6. Somatic mutations identify a subgroup of aplastic anemia patients who progress to myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Jiang, Jie; Smith, Alexander E; Mohamedali, Azim M; Mian, Syed; Gandhi, Shreyans; Gaken, Joop; Czepulkowski, Barbara; Marsh, Judith C W; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2014-10-23

    The distinction between acquired aplastic anemia (AA) and hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome (hMDS) is often difficult, especially nonsevere AA. We postulated that somatic mutations are present in a subset of AA, and predict malignant transformation. From our database, we identified 150 AA patients with no morphological evidence of MDS, who had stored bone marrow (BM) and constitutional DNA. We excluded Fanconi anemia, mutations of telomere maintenance, and a family history of BM failure (BMF) or cancer. The initial cohort of 57 patients was screened for 835 known genes associated with BMF and myeloid cancer; a second cohort of 93 patients was screened for mutations in ASXL1, DNMT3A, BCOR, TET2, and MPL. Somatic mutations were detected in 19% of AA, and included ASXL1 (n = 12), DNMT3A (n = 8) and BCOR (n = 6). Patients with somatic mutations had a longer disease duration (37 vs 8 months, P < .04), and shorter telomere lengths (median length, 0.9 vs 1.1, P < .001), compared with patients without mutations. Somatic mutations in AA patients with a disease duration of >6 months were associated with a 40% risk of transformation to MDS (P < .0002). Nearly one-fifth of AA patients harbor mutations in genes typically seen in myeloid malignancies that predicted for later transformation to MDS. PMID:25139356

  7. BCOR and BCORL1 mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Damm, Frederik; Chesnais, Virginie; Nagata, Yasunobu; Yoshida, Kenichi; Scourzic, Laurianne; Okuno, Yusuke; Itzykson, Raphael; Sanada, Masashi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Gelsi-Boyer, Véronique; Renneville, Aline; Miyano, Satoru; Mori, Hiraku; Shih, Lee-Yung; Park, Sophie; Dreyfus, François; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Solary, Eric; Rose, Christian; Cheze, Stéphane; Prébet, Thomas; Vey, Norbert; Legentil, Marion; Duffourd, Yannis; de Botton, Stéphane; Preudhomme, Claude; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bernard, Olivier A; Ogawa, Seishi; Fontenay, Michaela; Kosmider, Olivier

    2013-10-31

    Patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) that rapidly progress to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain a challenge in disease management. Using whole-exome sequencing of an MDS patient, we identified a somatic mutation in the BCOR gene also mutated in AML. Sequencing of BCOR and related BCORL1 genes in a cohort of 354 MDS patients identified 4.2% and 0.8% of mutations respectively. BCOR mutations were associated with RUNX1 (P = .002) and DNMT3A mutations (P = .015). BCOR is also mutated in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia patients (7.4%) and BCORL1 in AML patients with myelodysplasia-related changes (9.1%). Using deep sequencing, we show that BCOR mutations arise after mutations affecting genes involved in splicing machinery or epigenetic regulation. In univariate analysis, BCOR mutations were associated with poor prognosis in MDS (overall survival [OS]: P = .013; cumulative incidence of AML transformation: P = .005). Multivariate analysis including age, International Prognostic Scoring System, transfusion dependency, and mutational status confirmed a significant inferior OS to patients with a BCOR mutation (hazard ratio, 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-8.1; P = .008). These data suggest that BCOR mutations define the clinical course rather than disease initiation. Despite infrequent mutations, BCOR analyses should be considered in risk stratification. PMID:24047651

  8. Impact of donor source on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Corey S.; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Atallah, Ehab; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Maziarz, Richard T.; Cortes, Jorge; Kalaycio, Matt E.; Horowitz, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched related donor (MRD) and matched unrelated donors (MUD) produces similar survival for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. Whether these results can be extended to patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is unknown. Therefore, analysis of post-HCT outcomes for MDS was performed. Outcomes of 701 adult MDS patients who underwent HCT between 2002 and 2006 were analyzed (MRD [n = 176], 8 of 8 HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 allele matched MUD [n = 413], 7 of 8 MUD [ n = 112]). Median age was 53 years (range, 22-78 years). In multivariate analyses, MRD HCT recipients had similar disease free survival (DFS) and survival rates compared with 8 of 8 MUD HCT recipients (relative risk [RR] 1.13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.42] and 1.24 [95% CI 0.98-1.56], respectively), and both MRD and 8 of 8 MUD had superior DFS (RR 1.47 [95% CI 1.10-1.96] and 1.29 [95% CI 1.00-1.66], respectively) and survival (RR 1.62 [95% CI 1.21-2.17] and 1.30 [95% CI 1.01-1.68], respectively) compared with 7 of 8 MUD HCT recipients. In patients with MDS, MRD remains the best stem cell source followed by 8 of 8 MUD. Transplantation from 7 of 8 MUD is associated with significantly poorer outcomes. PMID:23847196

  9. Optimal timing of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo G Della; Malcovati, Luca; Jackson, Christopher H; Pascutto, Cristiana; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Teresa van Lint, Maria; Falda, Michele; Bernardi, Massimo; Onida, Francesco; Guidi, Stefano; Iori, Anna Paola; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Angelucci, Emanuele; Oneto, Rosi; Ripamonti, Francesco; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bosi, Alberto; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the only curative treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but involves non-negligible morbidity and mortality. Registry studies have shown that advanced disease stage at transplantation is associated with inferior overall survival. To define the optimal timing of allogeneic HSCT, we carried out a decision analysis by studying 660 patients who received best supportive care and 449 subjects who underwent transplantation. Risk assessment was based on both the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the World Health Organization classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We used a continuous-time multistate Markov model to describe the natural history of disease and evaluate the effect of allogeneic HSCT on survival. This model estimated life expectancy from diagnosis according to treatment policy at different risk stages. Relative to supportive care, estimated life expectancy increased when transplantation was delayed from the initial stages until progression to intermediate-1 IPSS-risk or to intermediate WPSS-risk stage, and then decreased for higher risks. Modeling decision analysis on WPSS versus IPSS allowed better estimation of the optimal timing of transplantation. These observations indicate that allogeneic HSCT offers optimal survival benefits when the procedure is performed before MDS patients progress to advanced disease stages. Am. J. Hematol. 88:581–588, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23606215

  10. Pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes: an overview of molecular and non-molecular aspects of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Visconte, Valeria; Tiu, Ramon V.

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of clonal disorders arising from hematopoietic stem cells generally characterized by inefficient hematopoiesis, dysplasia in one or more myeloid cell lineages, and variable degrees of cytopenias. Most MDS patients are diagnosed in their late 60s to early 70s. The estimated incidence of MDS in the United States and in Europe are 4.3 and 1.8 per 100,000 individuals per year, respectively with lower rates reported in some Asian countries and less well estimated in other parts of the world. Evolution to acute myeloid leukemia can occur in 10-15% of MDS patients. Three drugs are currently approved for the treatment of patients with MDS: immunomodulatory agents (lenalidomide), and hypomethylating therapy [HMT (decitabine and 5-azacytidine)]. All patients will eventually lose their response to therapy, and the survival outcome of MDS patients is poor (median survival of 4.5 months) especially for patients who fail (refractory/relapsed) HMT. The only potential curative treatment for MDS is hematopoietic cell transplantation. Genomic/chromosomal instability and various mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis and prognosis of the disease. High throughput genetic technologies like single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis and next generation sequencing technologies have uncovered novel genetic alterations and increased our knowledge of MDS pathogenesis. We will review various genetic and non-genetic causes that are involved in the pathogenesis of MDS. PMID:25548754

  11. Proposal of criteria for dyserythropoiesis in the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobutaka; Matsuda, Akira; Jinnai, Itsuro; Ichimura, Takaya; Kayano, Hidekazu; Okamura, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Maho; Maeda, Tomoya; Hata, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Asou, Norio; Bessho, Masami; Tomonaga, Masao

    2016-02-01

    The percentage manifesting dysplasia in bone marrow needed to qualify as significant is ≥10 % in each lineage. However, detailed analyses of this threshold have not been reported. Here, we analyzed dyserythropoiesis (dysE) in 109 myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients with 21 immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)/12 hemolytic anemia (HA) patients as a control. In present study, mild megaloblastic erythroblasts were specifically named 'red cell with abnormal chromatin clumping (RCACC)'. RCACC ≥10 % in erythroblasts was observed in 29 % of ITP patients and 58 % of HA patients. The numbers of MDS patients with RCACC in erythroblasts <10, 10-19 and ≥20 % were 1, 3, and 105, respectively. We analyzed dysE criteria according to the WHO classification (original WHO dysE). Most of our MDS patients (98 %) had original WHO dysE ≥20 %. The ITP patients with original WHO dysE ≥10 % was 48 %, and there were no ITP patients had original WHO dysE ≥20 %. Sixty-seven percent of HA patients had original WHO dysE ≥10 %, and three patients (25 %) had original WHO dysE ≥20 %. Raising the threshold of the original WHO dysE from 10 to 20 or 30 % may provide more suitable criteria. If RCACC is not included in dysE criteria, we think that '10 %' is a suitable threshold for the determination of dyserythropoiesis. PMID:26608365

  12. Aberrant splicing of U12-type introns is the hallmark of ZRSR2 mutant myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Vikas; Kanojia, Deepika; Li, Jia; Okamoto, Ryoko; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Kohlmann, Alexander; Sanada, Masashi; Grossmann, Vera; Sundaresan, Janani; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Miyano, Satoru; Thol, Felicitas; Ganser, Arnold; Yang, Henry; Haferlach, Torsten; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the spliceosome gene ZRSR2 — located on the X chromosome — are associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). ZRSR2 is involved in the recognition of 3΄ splice site during the early stages of spliceosome assembly; however, its precise role in RNA splicing has remained unclear. Here, we characterize ZRSR2 as an essential component of the minor spliceosome (U12-dependent) assembly. shRNA mediated knockdown of ZRSR2 leads to impaired splicing of the U12-type introns, and RNA-Sequencing of MDS bone marrow reveals that loss of ZRSR2 activity causes increased mis-splicing. These splicing defects involve retention of the U12-type introns while splicing of the U2-type introns remain mostly unaffected. ZRSR2 deficient cells also exhibit reduced proliferation potential and distinct alterations in myeloid and erythroid differentiation in vitro. These data identify a specific role for ZRSR2 in RNA splicing and highlight dysregulated splicing of U12-type introns as a characteristic feature of ZRSR2 mutations in MDS. PMID:25586593

  13. Some aspects of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: advances and controversy

    PubMed Central

    Blau, Olga; Blau, Igor Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous group of myeloid disorders. MDS remains a disease of elderly patients; moreover, the incidence of high risk MDS is proportionally greater in elderly patients, with increased frequency of secondary acute myeloid leukemia, as well as adverse cytogenetic abnormalities. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a therapeutic approach with known curative potential for patients with MDS that allows the achievement of long-term disease control. Numerous controversies still exist regarding transplantation in MDS: timing of transplantation, disease status at transplantation and comorbidity, conditioning intensity, pretransplant therapy, and stem cell source. Various transplant modalities of different intensities and alternative donor sources are now in use. Current advances in transplant technology are allowing the consideration of older patients. This should result in a greater number of older patients benefiting from this potentially curative treatment modality. Despite advances in transplantation technology, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality associated with this approach. Nevertheless, with the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning and thereby reduced early mortality, transplant numbers in MDS patients have significantly increased. Moreover, recent new developments with innovative drugs, including hypomethylating agents, have extended the therapeutic alternatives for MDS patients. Hypomethylating agents allow the delay of allogeneic stem cell transplantation by serving as an effective and well-tolerated means to reduce disease burden. PMID:25506229

  14. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Myelodysplastic Syndrome: Implications on Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Harinder; Leung, Anskar Y. H.; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by cytopenia, ineffective hematopoiesis, and progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk cases. Conventional prognostication relies on clinicopathological parameters supplemented by cytogenetic information. However, recent studies have shown that genetic aberrations also have critical impacts on treatment outcome. Moreover, these genetic alterations may themselves be a target for treatment. The mutation landscape in MDS is shaped by gene aberrations involved in DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2), histone modification (ASXL1, EZH2), the RNA splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1/2), transcription (RUNX1, TP53, BCOR, PHF6, NCOR, CEBPA, GATA2), tyrosine kinase receptor signaling (JAK2, MPL, FLT3, GNAS, KIT), RAS pathways (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11), DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL), and cohesion complexes (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21). A detailed understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to transformation is critical for designing single-agent or combinatorial approaches in target therapy of MDS. PMID:27023522

  15. Epidemiology of myelodysplastic syndromes in a French general hospital of the Basque country.

    PubMed

    Bauduer, F; Ducout, L; Dastugue, N; Capdupuy, C; Renoux, M

    1998-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies concerning myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are rare. The estimated incidence varies between 1 and 12.6/100,000/year. The aim of this work was to compare our own experience with these data. Our general hospital represents a structure with 1197 beds which serves a population of 290,000 individuals (French Basques). Most of the inhabitants live in a rural environnement. Twenty percent of the population are aged over 65. During a 4-year period (1993-1996), 90 new cases of MDS were diagnosed on bone marrow studies in our laboratory. Among FAB subtypes refractory anemia (RA) represented 27 cases (31%), RA with ring sideroblasts (RARS): 21 (23%), RA with excess of blasts (RAEB) and in transformation (RAEB-t): 22 (24%), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML): 10 (11%). Ten cases were unclassifiable (11%). Therapy-related MDS were seen in 8 patients. The sex ratio was 1 and the mean age of the patients was 74.3 (range: 23-96), 37% of them being 80 years or older. The calculated incidence was 7.7/100,000/year for the entire cohort and 31.4/100,000/year for people over 65.

  16. Longitudinal Analysis of DNA Methylation in CD34+ Hematopoietic Progenitors in Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yan-Fung; Micklem, Chris N; Taguchi, Masataka; Itonaga, Hidehiro; Sawayama, Yasushi; Imanishi, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Yasushi; Jakt, Lars Martin

    2014-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a disorder of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that is often treated with DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) inhibitors (5-azacytidine [AZA], 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine), suggesting a role for DNA methylation in disease progression. How DNMT inhibition retards disease progression and how DNA methylation contributes to MDS remain unclear. We analyzed global DNA methylation in purified CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors from MDS patients undergoing multiple rounds of AZA treatment. Differential methylation between MDS phenotypes was observed primarily at developmental regulators not expressed within the hematopoietic compartment and was distinct from that observed between healthy hematopoietic cell types. After AZA treatment, we observed only limited DNA demethylation at sites that varied between patients. This suggests that a subset of the stem cell population is resistant to AZA and provides a basis for disease relapse. Using gene expression data from patient samples and an in vitro AZA treatment study, we identified differentially methylated genes that can be activated following treatment and that remain silent in the CD34+ stem cell compartment of high-risk MDS patients. Haploinsufficiency in mice of one of these genes (NR4A2) has been shown to lead to excessive HSC proliferation, and our data suggest that suppression of NR4A2 by DNA methylation may be involved in MDS progression.

  17. Expression patterns of chemokine receptors on circulating T cells from myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Sand, Kristoffer Evebø; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Mannsåker, Bård; Bruserud, Oystein; Kittang, Astrid Olsnes

    2013-02-01

    Chemokines and their receptors are involved in the recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. Recently, chemokine expression signatures have been reported to convey a prognostic value in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. In the present study, we investigated the chemokine receptor repertoire on fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes from 31 (22 low-risk and 9 high-risk) patients affected by MDS. Chemokine receptor expression was studied in defined T-cell subsets using eight-color flow cytometry. MDS patients exhibited quantitative differences in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations. In addition, T cells obtained from MDS patients expressed a chemokine receptor pattern suggesting a dominance of mature and activated T cells. This is illustrated by increased levels of CCR3, CCR5, CX3CR1 and/or by a decreased abundance of CCR7 in defined T-cell subsets. The T-cell subset distribution appears to differ between the peripheral blood and the bone marrow of MDS patients, suggesting a preferential recruitment of specific T-cell subsets to the latter compartment. Alteration in chemokine receptor expression can develop over time even in patients that are considered clinically stable. Elevated expression levels of CXCR4 by CD8(+) cells were associated with prolonged patient survival and reduced numbers of bone marrow blasts. We conclude that immunological abnormalities in MDS also involve chemokine receptors on different subsets of T cells, and that these changes may have a prognostic value.

  18. Myelodysplastic Syndrome Revealed by Systems Immunology in a Melanoma Patient Undergoing Anti-PD-1 Therapy.

    PubMed

    Greenplate, Allison R; Johnson, Douglas B; Roussel, Mikael; Savona, Michael R; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Puzanov, Igor; Ferrell, P Brent; Irish, Jonathan M

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies aimed at blocking the interaction between programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and its ligands have shown impressive efficacy in a variety of malignancies and are generally well tolerated. Research has focused intensely on T cells and their interaction with cells within melanoma tumors, while relatively little is understood about the systems immunology of the cells in the blood during checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Longitudinal cytomic analysis using mass cytometry can characterize all the cells in a small sample of blood and has the potential to reveal key shifts in the cellular milieu occurring during treatment. We report a case of advanced melanoma in which mass cytometry detected abnormal myeloid cells resulting from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in the blood following treatment with an anti-PD-1 agent. Myeloid blasts comprised <1% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) 1 month after the start of treatment. Six months after starting therapy, myeloid blasts comprised 5% of PBMCs, and a bone marrow biopsy confirmed refractory anemia with excess blasts-2 (RAEB-2). Longitudinal mass cytometry immunophenotyping comprehensively characterized blast phenotype evolution and revealed elevated PD-1 expression on the surface of nonblast myeloid cells. These findings highlight the clinical significance of cytomic monitoring, indicate that the myeloid compartment should be monitored during checkpoint inhibitor therapy, and emphasize the value of systems immunology in medicine. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 474-80. ©2016 AACR.

  19. Testing the NKT cell hypothesis in lenalidomide-treated myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, A C; Neeson, P; Leeansyah, E; Tainton, K; Quach, H; Prince, H M; Godfrey, D I; Ritchie, D; Berzins, S P

    2010-03-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) comprises a group of clonal bone marrow disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and increased predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia. The causes of MDS remain poorly defined, but several studies have reported the NKT cell compartment of patients with MDS is deficient in number and functionally defective. In support of a central role for NKT cells, a pilot clinical study reported that lenalidomide (an approved treatment for MDS) increased NKT cell numbers in patients with MDS, and several in vitro studies showed lenalidomide specifically promoted NKT cell proliferation and cytokine production. We tested this in a much larger study and confirm a moderate in vitro augmentation of some NKT cell functions by lenalidomide, but find no impact on the NKT cell compartment of patients treated with lenalidomide, despite a consistently positive clinical response. We further show that the frequency and cytokine production of NKT cells is normal in patients with MDS before treatment and remains stable throughout 10 months of lenalidomide therapy. Collectively, our data challenge the concept that NKT cell defects contribute to the development of MDS, and show that a clinical response to lenalidomide is not dependent on modulation of NKT cell frequency or function.

  20. Functional evidence implicating chromosome 7q22 haploinsufficiency in myelodysplastic syndrome pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jasmine C; Weinfurtner, Kelley M; Alzamora, Maria Del Pilar; Kogan, Scott C; Burgess, Michael R; Zhang, Yan; Nakitandwe, Joy; Ma, Jing; Cheng, Jinjun; Chen, Shann-Ching; Ho, Theodore T; Flach, Johanna; Reynaud, Damien; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Downing, James R; Shannon, Kevin

    2015-07-20

    Chromosome 7 deletions are highly prevalent in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and likely contribute to aberrant growth through haploinsufficiency. We generated mice with a heterozygous germ line deletion of a 2-Mb interval of chromosome band 5A3 syntenic to a commonly deleted segment of human 7q22 and show that mutant hematopoietic cells exhibit cardinal features of MDS. Specifically, the long-term hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment is expanded in 5A3(+/del) mice, and the distribution of myeloid progenitors is altered. 5A3(+/del) HSCs are defective for lymphoid repopulating potential and show a myeloid lineage output bias. These cell autonomous abnormalities are exacerbated by physiologic aging and upon serial transplantation. The 5A3 deletion partially rescues defective repopulation in Gata2 mutant mice. 5A3(+/del) hematopoietic cells exhibit decreased expression of oxidative phosphorylation genes, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and perturbed oxygen consumption. These studies provide the first functional data linking 7q22 deletions to MDS pathogenesis.

  1. Trisomy 8, a Cytogenetic Abnormality in Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Is Constitutional or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Saumell, Sílvia; Solé, Francesc; Arenillas, Leonor; Montoro, Julia; Valcárcel, David; Pedro, Carme; Sanzo, Carmen; Luño, Elisa; Giménez, Teresa; Arnan, Montserrat; Pomares, Helena; De Paz, Raquel; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Jerez, Andrés; Martínez, Ana B.; Sánchez-Castro, Judith; Rodríguez-Gambarte, Juan D.; Raya, José M.; Ríos, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Espinet, Blanca; Florensa, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Isolated trisomy 8 is not considered presumptive evidence of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in cases without minimal morphological criteria. One reason given is that trisomy 8 (+8) can be found as a constitutional mosaicism (cT8M). We tried to clarify the incidence of cT8M in myeloid neoplasms, specifically in MDS, and the diagnostic value of isolated +8 in MDS. Twenty-two MDS and 10 other myeloid neoplasms carrying +8 were studied. Trisomy 8 was determined in peripheral blood by conventional cytogenetics (CC) and on granulocytes, CD3+ lymphocytes and oral mucosa cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In peripheral blood CC, +8 was seen in 4/32 patients. By FISH, only one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia showed +8 in all cell samples and was interpreted as a cT8M. In our series +8 was acquired in all MDS. Probably, once discarded cT8M by FISH from CD3+ lymphocytes and non-hematological cells, +8 should be considered with enough evidence to MDS. PMID:26066831

  2. A nationwide non-interventional epidemiological data registry on myelodysplastic syndromes in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Otrock, Zaher K; Chamseddine, Nabil; Salem, Ziad M; Wehbe, Tarek; Al-Ayoubi, Mouna; Dhaini, Moussa; Kattan, Joseph; Mokaddem, Walid; Nasr, Therese Abi; Jradi, Oussama; Farhat, Fadi S; Wehbe, Mahmoud; Haidar, Mohammad H; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Bitar, Nizar; Hajj, Mirna El; Kadri, Adel M; Kamar, Francois G; Yassine, Hanan; Khodr, Hassan; Taher, Ali T; Hakime, Noha; Mahfouz, Rami Ar; Serhal, Wassim; Bazarbachi, Ali; Farhat, Hussein Z

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, blood cells dysplasia, and increased risk for progression to acute leukemia.Physicians should be vigilant in diagnosing MDS and should be aware of the contemporary therapies that are always in progress. Most of the data on MDS epidemiology and management comes from developed countries. The incidence and features of MDS in the Arab countries, among them Lebanon, are not known. We undertook a nationwide epidemiological registry study of all newly diagnosed MDS cases through 2010-2011. Patients were referred by 21 hematologists/oncologists practicing in 17 hospitals and medical centers distributed across the entire country. 58 patients (29 males and 29 females) with confirmed MDS were included. The calculated incidence rate of MDS was 0.71 per 100,000 people. The median age at diagnosis was 73 years (range 16-86). The most common complaints on presentation were fatigue (70.7%), weakness (60.3%) and pallor (43.1%). Most patients were diagnosed as refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB; 36.2%) and refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD; 32.8%). This paper constitutes the first epidemiological report on the incidence and specific subtypes of MDS in Lebanon.

  3. The role of rHuEpo in low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Castoldi, Gianluigi

    2005-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of the haemopoietic stem cell characterized by peripheral cytopenias that are the result of abnormal haemopoietic differentiation and maturation. Approximately 90% of MDS patients present with anemia at the beginning or during the course of the disease and often require transfusions. The rationale for treating anemic MDS patients with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo), alone or in combination with other growth factors, is based on the possibility of overcoming the defective proliferation and maturation of erythroid precursors through the inhibition of bone marrow apoptosis, the enhancement of the differentiation of preleukemic progenitor cells or the stimulation of the growth of residual normal haematopoietic cells. Clinical trails have shown that rHuEpo, alone or in combination with recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, is a useful drug for the treatment of anemia in low-risk MDS patients, and the same trials have identified patients who are more likely to respond to maximize benefits, to minimize adverse effects, and to avoid misuse or abuse. However, further research is required to determine whether this treatment has any real impact on quality of life and on life expectancy, thus allowing recommendations to be made about rHuEpo use in MDS patients with a degree of certainty. PMID:16019526

  4. Gene Expression and Methylation Pattern in HRK Apoptotic Gene in Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zaker, Farhad; Amirizadeh, Naser; Nasiri, Nahid; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Mehrasa, Roya

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) are a clonal bone marrow (BM) disease characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, dysplastic maturation and progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Methylation silencing of HRK has been found in several human malignancies. In this study, we explored the association of HRK methylation status with its expression, clinical parameters and MDS subtypes in MDS patients. To study the methylation status of HRK gene, we applied Methylation Sensitive-High Resolution Melting Curve Analysis (MS-HRM) in MDS patients, as well as healthy controls and EpiTect®PCR Control DNA. Real time RT-PCR was used for gene expression analysis. Methylation frequency in promoter region of HRK in patient samples was 20.37%. Methylation of HRK was significantly related to transcriptional downregulation (P=0.023). The difference in frequency of hypermethylated HRK gene was significant between good (10%) and poor (71.42%) cytogenetic risk groups (P= 0.001), advanced stage MDS patients (66.66%) in comparison with early stage MDS patients (2.56%) (P= 0.00), higher- risk MDS group (61.53%) and lower- risk MDS group (7.31%) (P= 0.00). HRK hypermethylation was associated with advanced- stage MDS and downregulation of HRK gene may play a role in the progression of MDS. PMID:27478805

  5. Reduced DOCK4 expression leads to erythroid dysplasia in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sundaravel, Sriram; Duggan, Ryan; Bhagat, Tushar; Ebenezer, David L.; Liu, Hui; Yu, Yiting; Bartenstein, Matthias; Unnikrishnan, Madhu; Karmakar, Subhradip; Liu, Ting-Chun; Torregroza, Ingrid; Quenon, Thomas; Anastasi, John; McGraw, Kathy L.; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Yajnik, Vijay; Artz, Andrew; Le Beau, Michelle M.; Steidl, Ulrich; List, Alan F.; Evans, Todd; Verma, Amit; Wickrema, Amittha

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is the predominant clinical manifestation of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Loss or deletion of chromosome 7 is commonly seen in MDS and leads to a poor prognosis. However, the identity of functionally relevant, dysplasia-causing, genes on 7q remains unclear. Dedicator of cytokinesis 4 (DOCK4) is a GTPase exchange factor, and its gene maps to the commonly deleted 7q region. We demonstrate that DOCK4 is underexpressed in MDS bone marrow samples and that the reduced expression is associated with decreased overall survival in patients. We show that depletion of DOCK4 levels leads to erythroid cells with dysplastic morphology both in vivo and in vitro. We established a novel single-cell assay to quantify disrupted F-actin filament network in erythroblasts and demonstrate that reduced expression of DOCK4 leads to disruption of the actin filaments, resulting in erythroid dysplasia that phenocopies the red blood cell (RBC) defects seen in samples from MDS patients. Reexpression of DOCK4 in −7q MDS patient erythroblasts resulted in significant erythropoietic improvements. Mechanisms underlying F-actin disruption revealed that DOCK4 knockdown reduces ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) GTPase activation, leading to increased phosphorylation of the actin-stabilizing protein ADDUCIN in MDS samples. These data identify DOCK4 as a putative 7q gene whose reduced expression can lead to erythroid dysplasia. PMID:26578796

  6. Pexmetinib: A Novel Dual Inhibitor of Tie2 and p38 MAPK with Efficacy in Preclinical Models of Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bachegowda, Lohith; Morrone, Kerry; Winski, Shannon L; Mantzaris, Ioannis; Bartenstein, Matthias; Ramachandra, Nandini; Giricz, Orsi; Sukrithan, Vineeth; Nwankwo, George; Shahnaz, Samira; Bhagat, Tushar D; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Assal, Amer; Shastri, Aditi; Gordon-Mitchell, Shanisha; Pellagatti, Andrea; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Schinke, Carolina; Yu, Yiting; Guha, Chandan; Rizzi, James; Garrus, Jennifer; Brown, Suzy; Wollenberg, Lance; Hogeland, Grant; Wright, Dale; Munson, Mark; Rodriguez, Mareli; Gross, Stefan; Chantry, David; Zou, Yiyu; Platanias, Leonidas C; Burgess, Laurence E; Pradhan, Kith; Steidl, Ulrich; Verma, Amit

    2016-08-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) suppress normal hematopoietic activity in part by enabling a pathogenic inflammatory milieu in the bone marrow. In this report, we show that elevation of angiopoietin-1 in myelodysplastic CD34(+) stem-like cells is associated with higher risk disease and reduced overall survival in MDS and AML patients. Increased angiopoietin-1 expression was associated with a transcriptomic signature similar to known MDS/AML stem-like cell profiles. In seeking a small-molecule inhibitor of this pathway, we discovered and validated pexmetinib (ARRY-614), an inhibitor of the angiopoietin-1 receptor Tie-2, which was also found to inhibit the proinflammatory kinase p38 MAPK (which is overactivated in MDS). Pexmetinib inhibited leukemic proliferation, prevented activation of downstream effector kinases, and abrogated the effects of TNFα on healthy hematopoietic stem cells. Notably, treatment of primary MDS specimens with this compound stimulated hematopoiesis. Our results provide preclinical proof of concept for pexmetinib as a Tie-2/p38 MAPK dual inhibitor applicable to the treatment of MDS/AML. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4841-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27287719

  7. Certain Autoimmune Manifestations Are Associated With Distinctive Karyotypes and Outcomes in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jin; Park, Jin Kyun; Lee, Eun Young; Joo, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Lee, Eun Bong; Song, Yeong Wook; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune manifestations (AIMs) are common in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This study aimed to investigate whether AIMs are associated with a specific cytogenetic abnormalities and worse survival in patients with MDS. A total of 67 MDS patients with AIMs and 134 age- and sex-matched MDS patients without AIMs, all of whom received medical care at Seoul National University Hospital from January 2000 through July 2014, were enrolled. The clinical features, chromosomal abnormalities, and outcomes were examined. The effect of AIMs on mortality was estimated after adjusting for age, sex, and the International Prognostic Scoring System. The mean age (±SD) at the time of MDS diagnosis was 54.5 ± 17.1 years, and 44.8% of patients were male. Neutrophilic dermatosis (ND; Sweet syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum) was the most prevalent AIM (n = 24 36%]), followed by Behcet disease (10 [15%]), rheumatoid arthritis (9 [13%]), vasculitis (8 [12%]), myositis (3 [4%]), spondyloarthropathy (3 [4%]), and systemic lupus erythematous (2 [3%]). ND and vasculitis occurred at the time of MDS diagnosis, whereas other AIMs occurred years after MDS diagnosis. Deletion of 5q was associated with ND (P = 0.001), whereas trisomy 8 was associated with Behcet disease (P = 0.015). Strikingly, ND was associated with a 1.8-fold increase in mortality (95% CI 1.033–3.093; P = 0.038). Certain AIMs in MDS patients are associated with distinctive karyotypes and worse survival. A larger study is needed to confirm whether the presence of AIMs influences disease outcome in MDS. PMID:27043672

  8. A phase II study of AZD2171 (cediranib) in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mattison, Ryan; Jumonville, Alcee; Flynn, Patrick James; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Erlichman, Charles; Laplant, Betsy; Juckett, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) not fit for intensive treatment need novel therapy options. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor inhibition is one potential mechanism by which AML and MDS could be treated. The receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AZD2171 (cediranib) has activity against VEGF receptors KDR and FLT-1. This multicenter phase II study was designed to test cediranib's activity in patients with AML or high-risk MDS. The primary endpoint was confirmed disease response defined as a composite of complete remission, partial remission or hematologic improvement. The study enrolled 23 subjects in the AML cohort and 16 subjects in the MDS cohort. There were no confirmed responses in either group. Since the study met the stopping rule after the first stage of enrollment, the trial was closed to further accrual. Common adverse events in both cohorts included thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, fatigue, dyspnea, diarrhea, nausea and dehydration. PMID:25329007

  9. Blockade of BCL-2 proteins efficiently induces apoptosis in progenitor cells of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes patients.

    PubMed

    Jilg, S; Reidel, V; Müller-Thomas, C; König, J; Schauwecker, J; Höckendorf, U; Huberle, C; Gorka, O; Schmidt, B; Burgkart, R; Ruland, J; Kolb, H-J; Peschel, C; Oostendorp, R A J; Götze, K S; Jost, P J

    2016-01-01

    Deregulated apoptosis is an identifying feature of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Whereas apoptosis is increased in the bone marrow (BM) of low-risk MDS patients, progression to high-risk MDS correlates with an acquired resistance to apoptosis and an aberrant expression of BCL-2 proteins. To overcome the acquired apoptotic resistance in high-risk MDS, we investigated the induction of apoptosis by inhibition of pro-survival BCL-2 proteins using the BCL-2/-XL/-W inhibitor ABT-737 or the BCL-2-selective inhibitor ABT-199. We characterized a cohort of 124 primary human BM samples from MDS/secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML) patients and 57 healthy, age-matched controls. Inhibition of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins was specifically toxic for BM cells from high-risk MDS and sAML patients, whereas low-risk MDS or healthy controls remained unaffected. Notably, ABT-737 or ABT-199 treatment was capable of targeting the MDS stem/progenitor compartment in high-risk MDS/sAML samples as shown by the reduction in CD34(+) cells and the decreased colony-forming capacity. Elevated expression of MCL-1 conveyed resistance against both compounds. Protection by stromal cells only partially inhibited induction of apoptosis. Collectively, our data show that the apoptotic resistance observed in high-risk MDS/sAML cells can be overcome by the ABT-737 or ABT-199 treatment and implies that BH3 mimetics might delay disease progression in higher-risk MDS or sAML patients.

  10. Integrative analysis of next generation sequencing for small non-coding RNAs and transcriptional regulation in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDSS) are pre-leukemic disorders with increasing incident rates worldwide, but very limited treatment options. Little is known about small regulatory RNAs and how they contribute to pathogenesis, progression and transcriptome changes in MDS. Methods Patients' primary marrow cells were screened for short RNAs (RNA-seq) using next generation sequencing. Exon arrays from the same cells were used to profile gene expression and additional measures on 98 patients obtained. Integrative bioinformatics algorithms were proposed, and pathway and ontology analysis performed. Results In low-grade MDS, observations implied extensive post-transcriptional regulation via microRNAs (miRNA) and the recently discovered Piwi interacting RNAs (piRNA). Large expression differences were found for MDS-associated and novel miRNAs, including 48 sequences matching to miRNA star (miRNA*) motifs. The detected species were predicted to regulate disease stage specific molecular functions and pathways, including apoptosis and response to DNA damage. In high-grade MDS, results suggested extensive post-translation editing via transfer RNAs (tRNAs), providing a potential link for reduced apoptosis, a hallmark for this disease stage. Bioinformatics analysis confirmed important regulatory roles for MDS linked miRNAs and TFs, and strengthened the biological significance of miRNA*. The "RNA polymerase II promoters" were identified as the tightest controlled biological function. We suggest their control by a miRNA dominated feedback loop, which might be linked to the dramatically different miRNA amounts seen between low and high-grade MDS. Discussion The presented results provide novel findings that build a basis of further investigations of diagnostic biomarkers, targeted therapies and studies on MDS pathogenesis. PMID:21342535

  11. Efficacy of azacitidine compared with that of conventional care regimens in the treatment of higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes: a randomised, open-label, phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Fenaux, Pierre; Mufti, Ghulam J; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Santini, Valeria; Finelli, Carlo; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Schoch, Robert; Gattermann, Norbert; Sanz, Guillermo; List, Alan; Gore, Steven D; Seymour, John F; Bennett, John M; Byrd, John; Backstrom, Jay; Zimmerman, Linda; McKenzie, David; Beach, C L; Silverman, Lewis R

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Drug treatments for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes provide no survival advantage. In this trial, we aimed to assess the effect of azacitidine on overall survival compared with the three commonest conventional care regimens. Methods In a phase III, international, multicentre, controlled, parallel-group, open-label trial, patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes were randomly assigned one-to-one to receive azacitidine (75 mg/m² per day for 7 days every 28 days) or conventional care (best supportive care, low-dose cytarabine, or intensive chemotherapy as selected by investigators before randomisation). Patients were stratified by French–American–British and international prognostic scoring system classifications; randomisation was done with a block size of four. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Efficacy analyses were by intention to treat for all patients assigned to receive treatment. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00071799. Findings Between Feb 13, 2004, and Aug 7, 2006, 358 patients were randomly assigned to receive azacitidine (n=179) or conventional care regimens (n=179). Four patients in the azacitidine and 14 in the conventional care groups received no study drugs but were included in the intention-to-treat efficacy analysis. After a median follow-up of 21·1 months (IQR 15·1–26·9), median overall survival was 24·5 months (9·9–not reached) for the azacitidine group versus 15·0 months (5·6–24·1) for the conventional care group (hazard ratio 0·58; 95% CI 0·43–0·77; stratified log-rank p=0·0001). At last follow-up, 82 patients in the azacitidine group had died compared with 113 in the conventional care group. At 2 years, on the basis of Kaplan-Meier estimates, 50·8% (95% CI 42·1–58·8) of patients in the azacitidine group were alive compared with 26·2% (18·7–34·3) in the conventional care group (p<0·0001). Peripheral cytopenias were the most

  12. p53 protein expression independently predicts outcome in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q).

    PubMed

    Saft, Leonie; Karimi, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Mehran; Matolcsy, András; Mufti, Ghulam J; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Muus, Petra; Sanz, Guillermo; Mittelman, Moshe; Bowen, David; Porwit, Anna; Fu, Tommy; Backstrom, Jay; Fenaux, Pierre; MacBeth, Kyle J; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2014-06-01

    Del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System as low- or intermediate-1-risk (lower-risk) are considered to have an indolent course; however, recent data have identified a subgroup of these patients with more aggressive disease and poorer outcomes. Using deep sequencing technology, we previously demonstrated that 18% of patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes carry TP53 mutated subclones rendering them at higher risk of progression. In this study, bone marrow biopsies from 85 patients treated with lenalidomide in the MDS-004 clinical trial were retrospectively assessed for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry in association with outcome. Strong p53 expression in ≥ 1% of bone marrow progenitor cells, observed in 35% (30 of 85) of patients, was significantly associated with higher acute myeloid leukemia risk (P=0.0006), shorter overall survival (P=0.0175), and a lower cytogenetic response rate (P=0.009), but not with achievement or duration of 26-week transfusion independence response. In a multivariate analysis, p53-positive immunohistochemistry was the strongest independent predictor of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.0035). Pyrosequencing analysis of laser-microdissected cells with strong p53 expression confirmed the TP53 mutation, whereas cells with moderate expression predominantly had wild-type p53. This study validates p53 immunohistochemistry as a strong and clinically useful predictive tool in patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. This study was based on data from the MDS 004 trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00179621). PMID:24682512

  13. p53 protein expression independently predicts outcome in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q)

    PubMed Central

    Saft, Leonie; Karimi, Mohsen; Ghaderi, Mehran; Matolcsy, András; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Muus, Petra; Sanz, Guillermo; Mittelman, Moshe; Bowen, David; Porwit, Anna; Fu, Tommy; Backstrom, Jay; Fenaux, Pierre; MacBeth, Kyle J.; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes defined by the International Prognostic Scoring System as low- or intermediate-1-risk (lower-risk) are considered to have an indolent course; however, recent data have identified a subgroup of these patients with more aggressive disease and poorer outcomes. Using deep sequencing technology, we previously demonstrated that 18% of patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes carry TP53 mutated subclones rendering them at higher risk of progression. In this study, bone marrow biopsies from 85 patients treated with lenalidomide in the MDS-004 clinical trial were retrospectively assessed for p53 expression by immunohistochemistry in association with outcome. Strong p53 expression in ≥1% of bone marrow progenitor cells, observed in 35% (30 of 85) of patients, was significantly associated with higher acute myeloid leukemia risk (P=0.0006), shorter overall survival (P=0.0175), and a lower cytogenetic response rate (P=0.009), but not with achievement or duration of 26-week transfusion independence response. In a multivariate analysis, p53-positive immunohistochemistry was the strongest independent predictor of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.0035). Pyrosequencing analysis of laser-microdissected cells with strong p53 expression confirmed the TP53 mutation, whereas cells with moderate expression predominantly had wild-type p53. This study validates p53 immunohistochemistry as a strong and clinically useful predictive tool in patients with lower-risk del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes. This study was based on data from the MDS 004 trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00179621). PMID:24682512

  14. Patterns of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use among Medicare beneficiaries with myelodysplastic syndromes and consistency with clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, Amy J; Weiss, Sheila R; Baer, Maria R; Ke, Xuehua; Hendrick, Franklin; Zeidan, Amer; Gore, Steven D

    2013-06-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) are used commonly to reduce symptomatic anemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We assessed population-based patterns of ESA use relative to treatment guidelines using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries, with linked Medicare claims providing detailed treatment data from 2001 through 2005. The study found widespread use (62%) of ESA in Medicare beneficiaries with MDS. Similar ESA use rates regardless of risk status, low frequency (45%) of serum erythropoietin determination prior to ESA initiation, and high prevalence (60.4%) of short-duration ESA episodes suggest clinically important discrepancies between actual practice and guideline-recommended therapy.

  15. Patterns of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use among Medicare beneficiaries with myelodysplastic syndromes and consistency with clinical guidelines.

    PubMed

    Davidoff, Amy J; Weiss, Sheila R; Baer, Maria R; Ke, Xuehua; Hendrick, Franklin; Zeidan, Amer; Gore, Steven D

    2013-06-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) are used commonly to reduce symptomatic anemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We assessed population-based patterns of ESA use relative to treatment guidelines using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries, with linked Medicare claims providing detailed treatment data from 2001 through 2005. The study found widespread use (62%) of ESA in Medicare beneficiaries with MDS. Similar ESA use rates regardless of risk status, low frequency (45%) of serum erythropoietin determination prior to ESA initiation, and high prevalence (60.4%) of short-duration ESA episodes suggest clinically important discrepancies between actual practice and guideline-recommended therapy. PMID:23523473

  16. Detection of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and related bone marrow diseases, with emphasis on diagnostic pitfalls and caveats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sa A.; Pozdnyakova, Olga; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Stachurski, Dariusz; Anderson, Mary; Raza, Azra; Woda, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    Background The presence of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in the setting of aplastic anemia or myelodysplastic syndrome has been shown to have prognostic and therapeutic implications. However, the status of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in various categories of myelodysplastic syndrome and in other bone marrow disorders is not well-studied. Design and Methods By using multiparameter flow cytometry immunophenotypic analysis with antibodies specific for four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins (CD55, CD59, CD16, CD66b) and performing an aerolysin lysis confirmatory test in representative cases, we assessed the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes in 110 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, 15 with myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disease, 5 with idiopathic myelofibrosis and 6 with acute myeloid leukemia. Results Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-phenotype granulocytes were detected in nine patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndrome who showed clinicopathological features of bone marrow failure, similar to aplastic anemia. All paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-positive cases demonstrated loss of the four glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, with CD16−CD66b− clones being larger than those of CD55−CD59− (p<0.05). Altered glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expression secondary to granulocytic hypogranulation, immaturity, and/or immunophenotypic abnormalities was present in a substantial number of cases and diagnostically challenging. Conclusions These results show that routine screening for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria clones in patients with an intrinsic bone marrow disease who show no clinical evidence of hemolysis has an appreciable yield in patients with low grade myelodysplastic syndromes. The recognition of diagnostic caveats and pitfalls associated with the underlying intrinsic bone marrow disease is essential in interpreting paroxysmal nocturnal

  17. Maintenance Therapy with Decitabine after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myelogenous Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Iskra; Choi, Jaebok; Fiala, Mark A; Gao, Feng; Holt, Matthew; Cashen, Amanda F; Vij, Ravi; Abboud, Camille N; Stockerl-Goldstein, Keith E; Jacoby, Meghan A; Uy, Geoffrey L; Westervelt, Peter; DiPersio, John F

    2015-10-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent that irreversibly inhibits DNA methyltransferase I, inducing leukemic differentiation and re-expression of epigenetically silenced putative tumor antigens. We assessed safety and efficacy of decitabine maintenance after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Decitabine maintenance may help eradicate minimal residual disease, decrease the incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and facilitate a graft-versus-leukemia effect by enhancing the effect of T regulatory lymphocytes. Patients with AML/MDS in complete remission (CR) after allotransplantation started decitabine between day +50 and +100. We investigated 4 decitabine doses in cohorts of 4 patients: 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg/m(2)/day × 5 days every 6 weeks, for a maximum 8 cycles. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the maximum dose at which ≤ 25% of people experience dose-limiting toxicities during the first cycle of treatment. Twenty-four patients were enrolled and 22 were evaluable. All 4 dose levels were completed and no MTD was reached. Overall, decitabine maintenance was well tolerated. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicities were experienced by 75% of patients, including all patients treated at the highest dose level. Nine patients completed all 8 cycles and 8 of them remain in CR. Nine patients died from relapse (n = 4), infectious complications (n = 3), and GVHD (n = 2). Most occurrences of acute GVHD were mild and resolved without interruption of treatment; 1 patient died of acute gut GVHD. Decitabine maintenance did not clearly impact the rate of chronic GVHD. Although there was a trend of increased FOXP3 expression, results were not statistically significant. In conclusion, decitabine maintenance is associated with acceptable toxicities when given in the post-allotransplantation setting. Although the MTD was not reached, the dose of 10 mg/m(2) for 5 days every 6 weeks appeared to be the

  18. Influence of patient and provider characteristics on quality of care for the myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gregory A; Cronin, Angel M; Odejide, Oreofe O; Uno, Hajime; Stone, Richard M; Steensma, David P

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about quality of care for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), or patient and provider factors that influence quality. We identified Medicare enrollees diagnosed with MDS between 2006 and 2011, and analysed linked claims for performance on two widely-accepted quality measures: diagnostic bone marrow cytogenetic testing (diagnostic quality) and pre-treatment iron assessment for patients receiving an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA; treatment quality). A total of 4575 patients met the criteria for diagnostic quality measurement, and 3379 for treatment quality measurement. In the diagnostic cohort, 74% had a claim for marrow cytogenetic testing 3 months before to 3 months after diagnosis. In multivariate models, younger age (P < 0·001), treatment at a higher-volume MDS centre (P < 0·001), and claims for pancytopenia (P < 0·001) were all associated with higher levels of testing. A borderline result was observed for diagnostic year, with improvement over time (P = 0·06). In the treatment cohort, 56% had evidence of pre-ESA iron assessment, with higher rates for later years of diagnosis (P < 0·001), higher household income (P = 0·03), and those treated at higher-volume centres (P = 0·01). In this large cohort of patients with MDS, quality of care was suboptimal overall, but worse in several specific subgroups. These data suggest that targeted educational and/or process-focused interventions are warranted. PMID:26913376

  19. A calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway determines the response to lenalidomide in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Liu, Xiaona; Bolanos, Lyndsey; Barker, Brenden; Rigolino, Carmela; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Oliva, Esther N; Cuzzola, Maria; Grimes, H Leighton; Fontanillo, Celia; Komurov, Kakajan; MacBeth, Kyle; Starczynowski, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high response rates of individuals with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 5q (del(5q)) to treatment with lenalidomide (LEN) and the recent identification of cereblon (CRBN) as the molecular target of LEN, the cellular mechanism by which LEN eliminates MDS clones remains elusive. Here we performed an RNA interference screen to delineate gene regulatory networks that mediate LEN responsiveness in an MDS cell line, MDSL. We identified GPR68, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor that has been implicated in calcium metabolism, as the top candidate gene for modulating sensitivity to LEN. LEN induced GPR68 expression via IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), resulting in increased cytosolic calcium levels and activation of a calcium-dependent calpain, CAPN1, which were requisite steps for induction of apoptosis in MDS cells and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. In contrast, deletion of GPR68 or inhibition of calcium and calpain activation suppressed LEN-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, expression of calpastatin (CAST), an endogenous CAPN1 inhibitor that is encoded by a gene (CAST) deleted in del(5q) MDS, correlated with LEN responsiveness in patients with del(5q) MDS. Depletion of CAST restored responsiveness of LEN-resistant non-del(5q) MDS cells and AML cells, providing an explanation for the superior responses of patients with del(5q) MDS to LEN treatment. Our study describes a cellular mechanism by which LEN, acting through CRBN and IKZF1, has cytotoxic effects in MDS and AML that depend on a calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway. PMID:27294874

  20. Chromothripsis Is a Recurrent Genomic Abnormality in High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Abáigar, María; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Ramos, Fernando; Díez-Campelo, María; Hermosín, Lourdes; Sánchez-del-Real, Javier; Alonso, Jose M.; Cuello, Rebeca; Megido, Marta; Rodríguez, Juan N.; Martín-Núñez, Guillermo; Aguilar, Carlos; Vargas, Manuel; Martín, Ana A.; García, Juan L.; Kohlmann, Alexander; del Cañizo, M. Consuelo; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M.

    2016-01-01

    To explore novel genetic abnormalities occurring in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) through an integrative study combining array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) and next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a series of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) patients. 301 patients diagnosed with MDS (n = 240) or MDS/MPN (n = 61) were studied at the time of diagnosis. A genome-wide analysis of DNA copy number abnormalities was performed. In addition, a mutational analysis of DNMT3A, TET2, RUNX1, TP53 and BCOR genes was performed by NGS in selected cases. 285 abnormalities were identified in 71 patients (23.6%). Three high-risk MDS cases (1.2%) displayed chromothripsis involving exclusively chromosome 13 and affecting some cancer genes: FLT3, BRCA2 and RB1. All three cases carried TP53 mutations as revealed by NGS. Moreover, in the whole series, the integrative analysis of aCGH and NGS enabled the identification of cryptic recurrent deletions in 2p23.3 (DNMT3A; n = 2.8%), 4q24 (TET2; n = 10%) 17p13 (TP53; n = 8.5%), 21q22 (RUNX1; n = 7%), and Xp11.4 (BCOR; n = 2.8%), while mutations in the non-deleted allele where found only in DNMT3A (n = 1), TET2 (n = 3), and TP53 (n = 4). These cryptic abnormalities were detected mainly in patients with normal (45%) or non-informative (15%) karyotype by conventional cytogenetics, except for those with TP53 deletion and mutation (15%), which had a complex karyotype. In addition to well-known copy number defects, the presence of chromothripsis involving chromosome 13 was a novel recurrent change in high-risk MDS patients. Array CGH analysis revealed the presence of cryptic abnormalities in genomic regions where MDS-related genes, such as TET2, DNMT3A, RUNX1 and BCOR, are located. PMID:27741277

  1. Epigenetic control of NF-κB-dependent FAS gene transcription during progression of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ettou, Sandrine; Humbrecht, Catherine; Benet, Blandine; Billot, Katy; d'Allard, Diane; Mariot, Virginie; Goodhardt, Michele; Kosmider, Olivier; Mayeux, Patrick; Solary, Eric; Fontenay, Michaela

    2013-07-01

    The death domain containing TNF receptor 6 (CD95/Fas) is a direct target for the NF-κB transcription factor and is repressed in solid tumors such as colon carcinomas. Previously, we reported that the Fas death receptor, while overexpressed in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), becomes undetectable on CD34(+) progenitors when the disease progresses to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study determined the interplay between NF-κB and Fas during MDS progression. We first observed that Fas was induced by TNF-α in the HL60 cell line. In these cells, p65 (RELA) was associated with the FAS promoter, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway by an IKKα inhibitor (BAY11-7082) or lentiviral expression of a nondegradable mutant of IκBα (IκSR) blocked Fas expression. In contrast, TNF-α failed to induce Fas expression in the colon carcinoma cell line SW480, due to hypermethylation of the FAS promoter. Azacitidine rescued p65 binding on FAS promoter in vitro, and subsequently Fas expression in SW480 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway decreased the expression of Fas in MDS CD45(lo)CD34(+) bone marrow cells. However, despite the nuclear expression of p65, Fas was often low on CD45(lo)CD34(+) AML cells. TNF-α failed to stimulate its expression, while azacitidine efficiently rescued p65 binding and Fas reexpression. Overall, these data suggest that DNA methylation at NF-κB sites is responsible for FAS gene silencing. PMID:23604035

  2. Response to lenalidomide in myelodysplastic syndromes with del(5q): influence of cytogenetics and mutations.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Mar; Del Rey, Mónica; Ibáñez, Mariam; Calasanz, M José; Arenillas, Leonor; Larráyoz, M José; Pedro, Carmen; Jerez, Andrés; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Costa, Dolors; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Diez-Campelo, María; Lumbreras, Eva; González-Martínez, Teresa; Marugán, Isabel; Such, Esperanza; Cervera, José; Cigudosa, Juan C; Alvarez, Sara; Florensa, Lourdes; Hernández, Jesús M; Solé, Francesc

    2013-07-01

    Lenalidomide is an effective drug in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with isolated del(5q), although not all patients respond. Studies have suggested a role for TP53 mutations and karyotype complexity in disease progression and outcome. In order to assess the impact of complex karyotypes on treatment response and disease progression in 52 lenalidomide-treated patients with del(5q) MDS, conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CC), single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A), and genomic sequencing methods were used. SNP-A analysis (with control sample, lymphocytes CD3+, in 30 cases) revealed 5q losses in all cases. Other recurrent abnormalities were infrequent and were not associated with lenalidomide responsiveness. Low karyotype complexity (by CC) and a high baseline platelet count (>280 × 10(9) /l) were associated with the achievement of haematological response (P = 0·020, P = 0·013 respectively). Unmutated TP53 status showed a tendency for haematological response (P = 0·061). Complete cytogenetic response was not observed in any of the mutated TP53 cases. By multivariate analysis, the most important predictor for lenalidomide treatment failure was a platelet count <280 × 10(9) /l (Odds Ratio = 6·17, P = 0·040). This study reveals the importance of a low baseline platelet count, karyotypic complexity and TP53 mutational status for response to lenalidomide treatment. It supports the molecular study of TP53 in MDS patients treated with lenalidomide.

  3. Feedback signals in myelodysplastic syndromes: increased self-renewal of the malignant clone suppresses normal hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Walenda, Thomas; Stiehl, Thomas; Braun, Hanna; Fröbel, Julia; Ho, Anthony D; Schroeder, Thomas; Goecke, Tamme W; Rath, Björn; Germing, Ulrich; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are triggered by an aberrant hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). It is, however, unclear how this clone interferes with physiologic blood formation. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that the MDS clone impinges on feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and thereby suppresses normal hematopoiesis. Based on the theory that the MDS clone affects feedback signals for self-renewal and differentiation and hence suppresses normal hematopoiesis, we have developed a mathematical model to simulate different modifications in MDS-initiating cells and systemic feedback signals during disease development. These simulations revealed that the disease initiating cells must have higher self-renewal rates than normal HSCs to outcompete normal hematopoiesis. We assumed that self-renewal is the default pathway of stem and progenitor cells which is down-regulated by an increasing number of primitive cells in the bone marrow niche--including the premature MDS cells. Furthermore, the proliferative signal is up-regulated by cytopenia. Overall, our model is compatible with clinically observed MDS development, even though a single mutation scenario is unlikely for real disease progression which is usually associated with complex clonal hierarchy. For experimental validation of systemic feedback signals, we analyzed the impact of MDS patient derived serum on hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro: in fact, MDS serum slightly increased proliferation, whereas maintenance of primitive phenotype was reduced. However, MDS serum did not significantly affect colony forming unit (CFU) frequencies indicating that regulation of self-renewal may involve local signals from the niche. Taken together, we suggest that initial mutations in MDS particularly favor aberrant high self-renewal rates. Accumulation of primitive MDS cells in the bone marrow then interferes with feedback signals for normal hematopoiesis--which then results in cytopenia.

  4. Effect of lenalidomide treatment on clonal architecture of myelodysplastic syndromes without 5q deletion.

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Virginie; Renneville, Aline; Toma, Andrea; Lambert, Jérôme; Passet, Marie; Dumont, Florent; Chevret, Sylvie; Lejeune, Julie; Raimbault, Anna; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Rose, Christian; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Delaunay, Jacques; Solary, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Preudhomme, Claude; Kosmider, Olivier; Fontenay, Michaela

    2016-02-11

    Non-del(5q) transfusion-dependent low/intermediate-1 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients achieve an erythroid response with lenalidomide in 25% of cases. Addition of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent could improve response rate. The impact of recurrent somatic mutations identified in the diseased clone in response to lenalidomide and the drug's effects on clonal evolution remain unknown. We investigated recurrent mutations by next-generation sequencing in 94 non-del(5q) MDS patients randomized in the GFM-Len-Epo-08 clinical trial to lenalidomide or lenalidomide plus epoetin β. Clonal evolution was analyzed after 4 cycles of treatment in 42 cases and reanalyzed at later time points in 18 cases. The fate of clonal architecture of single CD34(+)CD38(-) hematopoietic stem cells was also determined in 5 cases. Mutation frequency was >10%: SF3B1 (74.5%), TET2 (45.7%), DNMT3A (20.2%), and ASXL1 (19.1%). Analysis of variant allele frequencies indicated a decrease of major mutations in 15 of 20 responders compared with 10 of 22 nonresponders after 4 cycles. The decrease in the variant allele frequency of major mutations was more significant in responders than in nonresponders (P < .001). Genotyping of single CD34(+)CD38(-) cell-derived colonies showed that the decrease in the size of dominant subclones could be associated with the rise of founding clones or of hematopoietic stem cells devoid of recurrent mutations. These effects remained transient, and disease escape was associated with the re-emergence of the dominant subclones. In conclusion, we show that, although the drug initially modulates the distribution of subclones, loss of treatment efficacy coincides with the re-expansion of the dominant subclone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01718379.

  5. Association of loss of heterozygosity with cytogenetic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, R F; Serio, F M; Silva, M R R; Briones, M R S; Chauffaille, M L L F

    2008-07-01

    Deletions on chromosomes 5 and 7 are frequently seen in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It is assumed that these deletions indicate loss of tumor suppressor genes on these chromosomes and until these tumor suppressor genes are identified, the functional consequences of these deletions and the molecular basis of these myeloid disorders cannot be completely understood. We evaluated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 44 patients (18 MDS and 26 AML, diagnosed according to WHO classification criteria) at diagnosis, using a four-microsatellite marker panel: an intragenic marker on the 7th intron of gene IRF-1 of the 5q31.1 region and three markers located inside the 7q31.1 region and correlated the LOH with karyotype abnormalities. The microsatellites chosen corresponded to chromosome regions frequently deleted in MDS/AML. The samples with Q (peak area) less than or equal to 0.50 were indicative of LOH. The percent of informative samples (i.e., heterozygous) for the intragenic microsatellite in gene IRF-1 and in loci D7S486, D7S515 and D7S522 were 66.6, 73.7, 75.5, and 48.8%, respectively. Cytogenetic abnormalities by G-banding were found in 36% (16/44) of the patients (2 of 18 MDS and 14 of 26 AML patients). We found a significantly positive association of the occurrence of LOH with abnormal karyotype (P < 0.05; chi-square test) and there were cases with LOH but the karyotype was normal (by G-banding). These data indicate that LOH in different microsatellite markers is possibly an event previous to chromosomal abnormalities in these myeloid neoplasias.

  6. A calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway determines the response to lenalidomide in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Liu, Xiaona; Bolanos, Lyndsey; Barker, Brenden; Rigolino, Carmela; Cortelezzi, Agostino; Oliva, Esther N; Cuzzola, Maria; Grimes, H Leighton; Fontanillo, Celia; Komurov, Kakajan; MacBeth, Kyle; Starczynowski, Daniel T

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high response rates of individuals with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 5q (del(5q)) to treatment with lenalidomide (LEN) and the recent identification of cereblon (CRBN) as the molecular target of LEN, the cellular mechanism by which LEN eliminates MDS clones remains elusive. Here we performed an RNA interference screen to delineate gene regulatory networks that mediate LEN responsiveness in an MDS cell line, MDSL. We identified GPR68, which encodes a G-protein-coupled receptor that has been implicated in calcium metabolism, as the top candidate gene for modulating sensitivity to LEN. LEN induced GPR68 expression via IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), resulting in increased cytosolic calcium levels and activation of a calcium-dependent calpain, CAPN1, which were requisite steps for induction of apoptosis in MDS cells and in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. In contrast, deletion of GPR68 or inhibition of calcium and calpain activation suppressed LEN-induced cytotoxicity. Moreover, expression of calpastatin (CAST), an endogenous CAPN1 inhibitor that is encoded by a gene (CAST) deleted in del(5q) MDS, correlated with LEN responsiveness in patients with del(5q) MDS. Depletion of CAST restored responsiveness of LEN-resistant non-del(5q) MDS cells and AML cells, providing an explanation for the superior responses of patients with del(5q) MDS to LEN treatment. Our study describes a cellular mechanism by which LEN, acting through CRBN and IKZF1, has cytotoxic effects in MDS and AML that depend on a calcium- and calpain-dependent pathway.

  7. Effect of lenalidomide treatment on clonal architecture of myelodysplastic syndromes without 5q deletion

    PubMed Central

    Chesnais, Virginie; Renneville, Aline; Toma, Andrea; Lambert, Jérôme; Passet, Marie; Dumont, Florent; Chevret, Sylvie; Lejeune, Julie; Raimbault, Anna; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Rose, Christian; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Delaunay, Jacques; Solary, Eric; Fenaux, Pierre; Dreyfus, François; Preudhomme, Claude; Kosmider, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Non-del(5q) transfusion-dependent low/intermediate-1 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients achieve an erythroid response with lenalidomide in 25% of cases. Addition of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent could improve response rate. The impact of recurrent somatic mutations identified in the diseased clone in response to lenalidomide and the drug’s effects on clonal evolution remain unknown. We investigated recurrent mutations by next-generation sequencing in 94 non-del(5q) MDS patients randomized in the GFM-Len-Epo-08 clinical trial to lenalidomide or lenalidomide plus epoetin β. Clonal evolution was analyzed after 4 cycles of treatment in 42 cases and reanalyzed at later time points in 18 cases. The fate of clonal architecture of single CD34+CD38− hematopoietic stem cells was also determined in 5 cases. Mutation frequency was >10%: SF3B1 (74.5%), TET2 (45.7%), DNMT3A (20.2%), and ASXL1 (19.1%). Analysis of variant allele frequencies indicated a decrease of major mutations in 15 of 20 responders compared with 10 of 22 nonresponders after 4 cycles. The decrease in the variant allele frequency of major mutations was more significant in responders than in nonresponders (P < .001). Genotyping of single CD34+CD38− cell–derived colonies showed that the decrease in the size of dominant subclones could be associated with the rise of founding clones or of hematopoietic stem cells devoid of recurrent mutations. These effects remained transient, and disease escape was associated with the re-emergence of the dominant subclones. In conclusion, we show that, although the drug initially modulates the distribution of subclones, loss of treatment efficacy coincides with the re-expansion of the dominant subclone. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01718379. PMID:26626993

  8. Effects of amifostine in a patient with an advanced-stage myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A; Kaufmann, C C; Binder, C; Wörmann, B; Haase, D

    2001-01-01

    We report on a 63-year-old man with myelodysplastic syndrome at the stage of a refractory anemia with an excess of blasts in transformation (MDS-RAEB-T), first diagnosed in December 1996. After a period of stability, with no need for transfusions, the MDS progressed into acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in August 1998 with the emergence of a cytogenetic abnormality (11q-). Two courses of chemotherapy were given, resulting in prolonged pancytopenia; however, no clearance of bone marrow (BM) blasts was achieved. At that time, severe infections and daily epistaxis occurred. Frequent transfusions of packed red blood cells (RBC) and platelets (2-3/week) were necessary. After 2 months of persisting severe pancytopenia, we started a therapy with amifostine: 4 x 250 mg intravenously (i.v.) weekly for 1 month, followed by a maintenance therapy with 500 mg once weekly. After 2 weeks of amifostine therapy, hematopoiesis began to improve. In the subsequent 2 months, the patient became completely independent of the platelet transfusions; the transfusion frequency of RBC was permanently reduced (2 RBC transfusions/month) and a significant decrease of BM blasts was achieved. After 30 weeks of amifostine therapy, the morphology of the MDS switched to a chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML)-like appearance, with continuously increasing leukocytes, so that we discontinued amifostine therapy for 1 month to exclude a possible side effect of amifostine. At that time, leukocytes further increased to 74,000/microl; thus, we decided to perform a cytoreductive chemotherapy (hydroxycarbamide) and continued weekly amifostine infusions. During 1 year of amifostine therapy, the patient had a good quality of life, with no need for hospitalization and a complete cytogenetic remission. We conclude that, in this case, amifostine had two effects: a significant improvement of impaired hematopoiesis and a slowing down of disease progression. Thus, amifostine might be a therapeutic option in older

  9. Targeting of the bone marrow microenvironment improves outcome in a murine model of myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Balderman, Sophia R.; Li, Allison J.; Hoffman, Corey M.; Frisch, Benjamin J.; Goodman, Alexandra N.; LaMere, Mark W.; Georger, Mary A.; Evans, Andrew G.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Becker, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro evidence suggests that the bone marrow microenvironment (BMME) is altered in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs). Here, we study the BMME in MDS in vivo using a transgenic murine model of MDS with hematopoietic expression of the translocation product NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13). This model exhibits a prolonged period of cytopenias prior to transformation to leukemia and is therefore ideal to interrogate the role of the BMME in MDS. In this model, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) were decreased in NHD13 mice by flow cytometric analysis. The reduction in the total phenotypic HSPC pool in NHD13 mice was confirmed functionally with transplantation assays. Marrow microenvironmental cellular components of the NHD13 BMME were found to be abnormal, including increases in endothelial cells and in dysfunctional mesenchymal and osteoblastic populations, whereas megakaryocytes were decreased. Both CC chemokine ligand 3 and vascular endothelial growth factor, previously shown to be increased in human MDS, were increased in NHD13 mice. To assess whether the BMME contributes to disease progression in NHD13 mice, we performed transplantation of NHD13 marrow into NHD13 mice or their wild-type (WT) littermates. WT recipients as compared with NHD13 recipients of NHD13 marrow had a lower rate of the combined outcome of progression to leukemia and death. Moreover, hematopoietic function was superior in a WT BMME as compared with an NHD13 BMME. Our data therefore demonstrate a contributory role of the BMME to disease progression in MDS and support a therapeutic strategy whereby manipulation of the MDS microenvironment may improve hematopoietic function and overall survival. PMID:26637787

  10. Effect of IL-7 and IL-15 on T cell phenotype in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wen; Ding, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Ren, Xiubao; Epling-Burnette, P.K.; Yang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant T cell phenotype is one of the characteristics of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In this study, we detected an increased concentration of IL-15 in the plasma of MDS patients (n = 20) compared with that in the plasma of healthy controls (n = 20). In MDS patients, reduced naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells [16.11 ± 6.56 vs. 24.11 ± 7.18 for CD4+ T cells (p < 0.001) and 13.15 ± 5.67 vs. 23.51 ± 6.25 for CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001)] were observed. The reduced naïve and increased effector memory T cells were significantly correlated with IL-15 plasma level. Then, the effect of IL-15 and IL-7 was tested in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from MDS were treated for 15 days with IL-15. This treatment significantly decreased naïve CD4+ (p < 0.001) and CD8+ (p < 0.001) T cells and correspondingly increased terminal memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001). Treatment with IL-7 increased naïve CD4+ (p < 0.05) and CD8+ (p < 0.001) T cells. Our results indicated that exposure to high levels of IL-15 may be involved in the T cell phenotype conversion observed in MDS. IL-7 may be one of the promising therapeutic candidates for recovering the effector immune compartment in MDS patients. PMID:27036031

  11. Epigenetic control of NF-κB-dependent FAS gene transcription during progression of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ettou, Sandrine; Humbrecht, Catherine; Benet, Blandine; Billot, Katy; d'Allard, Diane; Mariot, Virginie; Goodhardt, Michele; Kosmider, Olivier; Mayeux, Patrick; Solary, Eric; Fontenay, Michaela

    2013-07-01

    The death domain containing TNF receptor 6 (CD95/Fas) is a direct target for the NF-κB transcription factor and is repressed in solid tumors such as colon carcinomas. Previously, we reported that the Fas death receptor, while overexpressed in low-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), becomes undetectable on CD34(+) progenitors when the disease progresses to secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study determined the interplay between NF-κB and Fas during MDS progression. We first observed that Fas was induced by TNF-α in the HL60 cell line. In these cells, p65 (RELA) was associated with the FAS promoter, and inhibition of the NF-κB pathway by an IKKα inhibitor (BAY11-7082) or lentiviral expression of a nondegradable mutant of IκBα (IκSR) blocked Fas expression. In contrast, TNF-α failed to induce Fas expression in the colon carcinoma cell line SW480, due to hypermethylation of the FAS promoter. Azacitidine rescued p65 binding on FAS promoter in vitro, and subsequently Fas expression in SW480 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of the NF-κB pathway decreased the expression of Fas in MDS CD45(lo)CD34(+) bone marrow cells. However, despite the nuclear expression of p65, Fas was often low on CD45(lo)CD34(+) AML cells. TNF-α failed to stimulate its expression, while azacitidine efficiently rescued p65 binding and Fas reexpression. Overall, these data suggest that DNA methylation at NF-κB sites is responsible for FAS gene silencing.

  12. Vatalanib population pharmacokinetics in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: CALGB 10105 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Owzar, Kouros; Gupta, Pankaj; Larson, Richard A; Mulkey, Flora; Miller, Antonius A; Lewis, Lionel D; Hurd, David; Vij, Ravi; Ratain, Mark J; Murry, Daryl J

    2014-01-01

    Aims Vatalanib is an oral anti-angiogenesis agent that inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, which in patients showed auto induction of metabolism and variability in pharmacokinetic (PK) disposition. The objective was to characterize the population PK and time-dependent change in vatalanib clearance and assess exposure–toxicity relationship in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods This was an open-label phase II study of vatalanib in MDS patients receiving 750–1250 mg once daily in 28-day cycles. Serial blood samples were obtained and plasma vatalanib concentrations measured by HPLC. Population PK analysis was performed using nonmem 7.2 with FO estimation since FOCE failed. The final model was evaluated using goodness-of-fit plots, bootstrap analysis, and visual predictive check. Results Pharmacokinetic data were complete for 137 patients (86 M, 51 F), of median age 70 years (range 20–91). A one-compartment model with lagged first-order absorption and time-dependent change in oral clearance was fitted to the vatalanib plasma concentration versus time data. The population means for pre-induction and post-induction oral clearance were 24.1 l h–1 (range: 9.6–45.5) and 54.9 l h–1 (range: 39.8–75.6), respectively. The apparent oral clearance increased 2.3-fold, (range: 1.7–4.1-fold) from first dose to steady state. Our data did not identify a significant relationship of the predefined covariates with vatalanib pharmacokinetics, although power to detect such a relationship was limited. Conclusions Vatalanib pharmacokinetics were highly variable and the extent of auto induction was not determined to correlate with any of the pre-defined covariates. PMID:24838014

  13. SF3B1 haploinsufficiency leads to formation of ring sideroblasts in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Visconte, Valeria; Rogers, Heesun J; Singh, Jarnail; Barnard, John; Bupathi, Manoj; Traina, Fabiola; McMahon, James; Makishima, Hideki; Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna; Jerez, Andres; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Advani, Anjali S; Copelan, Edward; Koseki, Haruhiko; Isono, Kyoichi; Padgett, Richard A; Osman, Sami; Koide, Kazunori; O'Keefe, Christine; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Tiu, Ramon V

    2012-10-18

    Whole exome/genome sequencing has been fundamental in the identification of somatic mutations in the spliceosome machinery in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and other hematologic disorders. SF3B1, splicing factor 3b subunit 1 is mutated in 60%-80% of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) and RARS associated with thrombocytosis (RARS-T), 2 distinct subtypes of MDS and MDS/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDSs/MPNs). An idiosyncratic feature of RARS/RARS-T is the presence of abnormal sideroblasts characterized by iron overload in the mitochondria, called RS. Based on the high frequency of mutations of SF3B1 in RARS/RARS-T, we investigated the consequences of SF3B1 alterations. Ultrastructurally, SF3B1 mutants showed altered iron distribution characterized by coarse iron deposits compared with wild-type RARS patients by transmission electron microscopy. SF3B1 knockdown experiments in K562 cells resulted in down-regulation of U2-type intron-splicing by RT-PCR. RNA-sequencing analysis of SF3B1 mutants showed differentially used genes relevant in MDS pathogenesis, such as ASXL1, CBL, EZH, and RUNX families. A SF3B pharmacologic inhibitor, meayamycin, induced the formation of RS in healthy BM cells. Further, BM aspirates of Sf3b1 heterozygous knockout mice showed RS by Prussian blue. In conclusion, we report the first experimental evidence of the association between SF3B1 and RS phenotype. Our data suggest that SF3B1 haploinsufficiency leads to RS formation.

  14. Effect of IL-7 and IL-15 on T cell phenotype in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen; Ding, Tingting; Wu, Lei; Ren, Xiubao; Epling-Burnette, P K; Yang, Lili

    2016-05-10

    Aberrant T cell phenotype is one of the characteristics of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In this study, we detected an increased concentration of IL-15 in the plasma of MDS patients (n = 20) compared with that in the plasma of healthy controls (n = 20). In MDS patients, reduced naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells [16.11 ± 6.56 vs. 24.11 ± 7.18 for CD4+ T cells (p < 0.001) and 13.15 ± 5.67 vs. 23.51 ± 6.25 for CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001)] were observed. The reduced naïve and increased effector memory T cells were significantly correlated with IL-15 plasma level. Then, the effect of IL-15 and IL-7 was tested in vitro. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from MDS were treated for 15 days with IL-15. This treatment significantly decreased naïve CD4+ (p < 0.001) and CD8+ (p < 0.001) T cells and correspondingly increased terminal memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (p < 0.001). Treatment with IL-7 increased naïve CD4+ (p < 0.05) and CD8+ (p < 0.001) T cells. Our results indicated that exposure to high levels of IL-15 may be involved in the T cell phenotype conversion observed in MDS. IL-7 may be one of the promising therapeutic candidates for recovering the effector immune compartment in MDS patients.

  15. Molecular matching for Rh and K reduces red blood cell alloimmunisation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Guelsin, Gláucia A.S.; Rodrigues, Camila; Visentainer, Jeane E.L.; de Melo Campos, Paula; Traina, Fabíola; Gilli, Simone C.O.; Saad, Sara T.O.; Castilho, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Background Matching for Rh and K antigens has been used in an attempt to reduce antibody formation in patients receiving chronic transfusions but an extended phenotype matching including Fya and Jka antigens has also been recommended. The aim of this study was to identify an efficient transfusion protocol of genotype matching for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia. We also examined a possible association of HLA class II alleles with red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunisation. Materials and methods We evaluated 43 patients with MDS undergoing transfusion therapy with and without antibody formation. We investigated antigen-matched RBC units for ABO, D, C, c, E, e, K, Fya, Fyb, Jka, Jkb, S, s, Doa, Dob and Dia on the patients’ samples and on the donor units serologically matched for them based on their ABO, Rh and K phenotypes and presence of antibodies. We also determined the frequencies of HLA-DRB1 alleles in the alloimmunised and non-alloimmunised patients. Results Seventeen of the 43 patients had discrepancies or mismatches for multiple antigens between their genotype-predicted profile and the antigen profile of the units of blood serologically matched for them. We verified that 36.8% of patients had more than one RBC alloantibody and 10.5% of patients had autoantibodies. Although we were able to find a better match for the patients in our extended genotyped/phenotyped units, we verified that matching for Rh and K would be sufficient for most of the patients. We also observed an over-representation of the HLA-DRB1*13 allele in the non-alloimmunised group of patients with MDS. Discussion In our population molecular matching for C, c, E, e, K was able to reduce RBC alloimmunisation in MDS patients. An association of HLA-DRB1*13 and protection from RBC alloimmunisation should be confirmed. PMID:24960644

  16. Purification of Bone Marrow Clonal Cells from Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome via IGF-IR

    PubMed Central

    He, Qi; Chang, Chun-Kang; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Qing-Xia; Shi, Wen-Hui; Li, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Malignant clonal cells purification can greatly benefit basic and clinical studies in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this study, we investigated the potential of using type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) as a marker for purification of malignant bone marrow clonal cells from patients with MDS. The average percentage of IGF-IR expression in CD34+ bone marrow cells among 15 normal controls was 4.5%, 70% of which also express the erythroid lineage marker CD235a. This indicates that IGF-IR mainly express in erythropoiesis. The expression of IGF-IR in CD34+ cells of 55 MDS patients was significantly higher than that of cells from the normal controls (54.0 vs. 4.5%). Based on the pattern of IGF-IR expression in MDS patients and normal controls, sorting of IGF-IR-positive and removal of CD235a-positive erythroid lineage cells with combination of FISH detection were performed on MDS samples with chromosomal abnormalities. The percentage of malignant clonal cells significantly increased after sorting. The enrichment effect was more significant in clonal cells with a previous percentage lower than 50%. This enrichment effect was present in samples from patients with +8, 5q-/-5, 20q-/-20 or 7q-/-7 chromosomal abnormalities. These data suggest that IGF-IR can be used as a marker for MDS bone marrow clonal cells and using flow cytometry for positive IGF-IR sorting may effectively purify MDS clonal cells. PMID:26469401

  17. Clonality of the stem cell compartment during evolution of myelodysplastic syndromes and other bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tiu, R; Gondek, L; O'Keefe, C; Maciejewski, J P

    2007-08-01

    Clonal hematopoiesis, observed in certain forms of marrow failure including aplastic anemia (AA), may be due to stem cell depletion. Alternatively, oligoclonality may be a result of recruitment of a preexisting defective clone, such as in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In PNH, exogenous permissive factors may be required for dominance of the abnormal clone, while in MDS, stem cells undergo transformation steps leading to a growth advantage. Stem or multipotent progenitor cell involvement in PNH is evidenced by long-term persistence of a clonal defect and its presence in all blood cells. In MDS, some clonal aberrations may have a 'founder-effect' and additional defects are secondary. Metaphase cytogenetics measures the proportion of clonal cells within dividing progenitor but not mature cells. Owing to low resolution, lesions can be found in only approximately 50% of MDS patients. This shortcoming may be overcome by application of newer technologies such as comparative genomic hybridization and SNP array-based karyotyping (SNP-A). SNP-A facilitates identification of cryptic lesions in bone marrow failure patients with normal or abnormal cytogenetics and allows for detection of loss of heterozygosity as a result of uniparental disomy, a lesion frequently found in MDS.

  18. A randomized phase II trial of azacitidine +/− epoetin-β in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents

    PubMed Central

    Thépot, Sylvain; Ben Abdelali, Raouf; Chevret, Sylvie; Renneville, Aline; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Prébet, Thomas; Park, Sophie; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Guerci-Bresler, Agnes; Cheze, Stéphane; Tertian, Gérard; Choufi, Bachra; Legros, Laurence; Bastié, Jean Noel; Delaunay, Jacques; Chaury, Marie Pierre; Sanhes, Laurence; Wattel, Eric; Dreyfus, Francois; Vey, Norbert; Chermat, Fatiha; Preudhomme, Claude; Fenaux, Pierre; Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of azacitidine in patients with anemia and with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, if relapsing after or resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents, and the benefit of combining these agents to azacitidine in this setting are not well known. We prospectively compared the outcomes of patients, all of them having the characteristics of this subset of lower-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, if randomly treated with azacitidine alone or azacitidine combined with epoetin-β. High-resolution cytogenetics and gene mutation analysis were performed at entry. The primary study endpoint was the achievement of red blood cell transfusion independence after six cycles. Ninety-eight patients were randomised (49 in each arm). Median age was 72 years. In an intention to treat analysis, transfusion independence was obtained after 6 cycles in 16.3% versus 14.3% of patients in the azacitidine and azacitidine plus epoetin-β arms, respectively (P=1.00). Overall erythroid response rate (minor and major responses according to IWG 2000 criteria) was 34.7% vs. 24.5% in the azacitidine and azacitidine plus epoetin-β arms, respectively (P=0.38). Mutations of the SF3B1 gene were the only ones associated with a significant erythroid response, 29/59 (49%) versus 6/27 (22%) in SF3B1 mutated and unmutated patients, respectively, P=0.02. Detection of at least one “epigenetic mutation” and of an abnormal single nucleotide polymorphism array profile were the only factors associated with significantly poorer overall survival by multivariate analysis. The transfusion independence rate observed with azacitidine in this lower-risk population, but resistant to erythropoietic stimulating agents, was lower than expected, with no observed benefit of added epoetin, (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 01015352). PMID:27229713

  19. Iron overload-related heart failure in a patient with transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndrome reversed by intensive combined chelation therapy.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Valeria; Balocco, Manuela; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Derchi, Giorgio; Malcovati, Luca; Forni, Gian Luca

    2015-11-01

    Patients with transfusion-dependent myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have an increased risk of cardiac events, due to both chronic anemia and iron overload. Here, we report the recovery of cardiac function after an intensive iron chelation therapy in a MDS patient who had developed heart failure due to iron overload.

  20. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. Successful n-butyl cyanoacrylate embolization of a spontaneous rupture of the internal mammary artery in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Muradi, Akhmadu; Yamaguchi, Masato; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Okada, Takuya; Idoguchi, Koji; Sugimoto, Koji

    2014-03-01

    Hemomediastinum and hemothorax due to spontaneous internal mammary artery (IMA) rupture is extremely rare, and can be a life-threatening condition. We herein present, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of spontaneous IMA rupture complicating myelodysplastic syndrome, and the first case that was successfully treated by emergency trans-arterial embolization using n-butyl cyanoacrylate.

  2. Comparison of genetic and clinical aspects in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes all with more than 50% of bone marrow erythropoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Claudia; Alpermann, Tamara; Kern, Wolfgang; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization separates acute erythroid leukemia (erythropoiesis in ≥50% of nucleated bone marrow cells; ≥20% myeloblasts of non-erythroid cells) from other entities with increased erythropoiesis – acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (≥20% myeloblasts of all nucleated cells) or myelodysplastic syndromes – and subdivides acute erythroid leukemia into erythroleukemia and pure erythroid leukemia subtypes. We aimed to investigate the biological/genetic justification for the different categories of myeloid malignancies with increased erythropoiesis (≥50% of bone marrow cells). Design and Methods We investigated 212 patients (aged 18.5–88.4 years) with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes characterized by 50% or more erythropoiesis: 108 had acute myeloid leukemia (77 with acute erythroid leukemia, corresponding to erythroid/myeloid erythroleukemia, 7 with pure erythroid leukemia, 24 with acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes) and 104 had myelodysplastic syndromes. Morphological and chromosome banding analyses were performed in all cases; subsets of cases were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and immunophenotyping. Results Unfavorable karyotypes were more frequent in patients with acute myeloid leukemia than in those with myelodysplastic syndromes (42.6% versus 13.5%; P<0.0001), but their frequency did not differ significantly between patients with acute erythroid leukemia (39.0%), pure erythroid leukemia (57.1%), and acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (50.0%). The incidence of molecular mutations did not differ significantly between the different categories. The 2-year overall survival rate was better for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes than for those with acute myeloid leukemia (P<0.0001), without significant differences across the different acute leukemia subtypes. The 2-year overall survival rate was worse in patients with

  3. Turner syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungmee; Kim, Yoo-Mi; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lee, Beom Hee; Yoon, Jong Ho; Jeong, Woon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Turner syndrome has multiple comorbidities such as osteoporosis, obesity, diabetes, hypothyroidism, and hypertension. As they are treatable conditions in Turner syndrome, early recognition and proper treatment should be needed. We report on a 23-year-old woman with Turner syndrome who presented with severe osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. Laboratory tests showed elevated levels of serum calcium and parathyroid hormone. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry showed severe osteopo-rosis (z score, -3.5). Ultrasound and 99mTc scintigraphy of parathyroid glands showed an adenoma in the right inferior gland. She was diagnosed with primary hyperparathyroidism due to an adenoma of the parathyroid gland. After excision of the adenoma, the patient's serum calcium and parathyroid hormone levels returned to normal. Although only a few cases of Turners syndrome with primary hyperparathyroidism have been reported, hyperparathyroidism should be considered in cases of Turner syndrome with severe osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. PMID:24904858

  4. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. [Clinical observation of decitabine-treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Wang, Quan-Shun; Han, Xiao-Ping; Huang, Wen-Rong; Jing, Yu; Wang, Shu-Hong; Zhang, Song-Song; Mei, Jun-Hui; Yu, Li

    2013-02-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the clinical efficiencies and adverse reactions of treating the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by using decitabine. The clinical data of 12 MDS and AML patients treated with decitabine were analyzed retrospectively. Among 12 patients there were 1 case of MDS-RA, 2 cases of MDS-RAEB-I, 3 cases of MDS-RAEB-II, 2 cases of AML-M4, 2 cases of AML-M5, 1 case of AML-M6 and 1 case of AML-M0. In decitabine chemotherapy program for 5 days (n = 8), decitabine 20 mg/(m(2)·d) × 5 days was applied, 4 weeks for 1 cycle; in program for 3 days (n = 2), decitabine 15 mg/m(2), once 8 h for 3 days, 6 weeks for 1 cycle; another program (n = 2), decitabine 20 mg/(m(2)·d) every other day for 5 times. For 1 patient achieved complete remission (CR) after treatment with decitabine, ID4 gene methylated level was detected by MS-PCR and ML-PCR before and after treatment. The results showed that 2 cases achieved CR, 1 case partial remission, 5 cases stable disease, 1 case progress of disease and 3 cases died. Disease control rate was 66.67% (8/12), the effective rate 25% (3/12). The average survival time was (11.5 ± 2.1) months. 1-year OS rate was 40%, 2-year OS rate was 16.7%. MS-PCR detection showed that the decitabine could significantly reduce the ID4 gene methylation level. It is concluded that decitabine can stabilize disease status of MDS patients, reduce blood transfusion dependence and improve the life quality of patients, and even some patients who transformed from MDS to leukemia achieved CR after treatment with decitabine. Decitabine can reduce the ID4 gene methylation level. The main adverse reaction of decitabine was myelosuppression, infection and so on. So the blood transfusions, antibiotics and other supportive treatments for these patients are needed. Most of patients well tolerate the adverse effects of decitabine after active symptomatic and supportive treatment. The efficacy and survival rate of

  6. Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Benzene Exposure Among Petroleum Workers: An International Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzene at high concentrations is known to cause acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but its relationship with other lymphohematopoietic (LH) cancers remains uncertain, particularly at low concentrations. In this pooled analysis, we examined the risk of five LH cancers relative to lower levels of benzene exposure in petroleum workers. Methods We updated three nested case–control studies from Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom with new incident LH cancers among petroleum distribution workers through December 31, 2006, and pooled 370 potential case subjects and 1587 matched LH cancer-free control subjects. Quantitative benzene exposure in parts per million (ppm) was blindly reconstructed using historical monitoring data, and exposure certainty was scored as high, medium, or low. Two hematopathologists assigned diagnoses and scored the certainty of diagnosis as high, medium, or low. Dose–response relationships were examined for five LH cancers, including the three most common leukemia cell-types (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia [CML], and chronic lymphoid leukemia [CLL]) and two myeloid tumors (myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS] and myeloproliferative disease [MPD]). Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using conditional logistic regression, controlling for age, sex, and time period. Results Cumulative benzene exposure showed a monotonic dose–response relationship with MDS (highest vs lowest tertile, >2.93 vs ≤0.348 ppm-years, OR = 4.33, 95% CI = 1.31 to 14.3). For peak benezene exposures (>3 ppm), the risk of MDS was increased in high and medium certainty diagnoses (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 6.32, 95% CI = 1.32 to 30.2) and in workers having the highest exposure certainty (peak exposure vs no peak exposure, OR = 5.74, 95% CI = 1.05 to 31.2). There was little evidence of dose–response relationships for AML, CLL, CML, or MPD. Conclusions Relatively low-level exposure to benzene experienced by petroleum

  7. The Systemic Profile of Soluble Immune Mediators in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Kittang, Astrid Olsnes; Sand, Kristoffer; Brenner, Annette Katharina; Rye, Kristin Paulsen; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are characterized by bone marrow failure due to disturbed bone marrow maturation. MDS is associated with increased risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and features of immunological dysregulation. Materials and methods: Serum levels of 47 soluble immune mediators were examined in samples derived from 49 MDS patients (35 low-risk and 14 high-risk) and 23 healthy adults. Our patients represent an unselected population-based cohort. The mediators included cytokines, soluble adhesion proteins, matrix metalloproteases, and tissue inhibitors of proteases. Levels were determined using Luminex assays. Patients were classified as low- and high-risk based on the international prognostic scoring system (IPSS) score. Results: When comparing the serum levels of single mediators the MDS patients showed a relatively wide variation range for several mediators compared with healthy adults, especially interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8/CXCL8, CCL3, and CCL4. The high-risk patients had lower levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF), cluster of differentiation 40 ligand (CD40L), CCL5, CCL11, CXCL5, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), MMP-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 (TIMP-2) compared with low-risk patients. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis visualized marked serum mediator profile differences between MDS patients; based on this analysis three patient subsets could be identified. The healthy adults were also included in this analysis and, as expected, they formed their own separate cluster, except for one outlier. Both low- and high-risk patients showed considerable heterogeneity with regard to serum profile, and this heterogeneity seems stable over time (one year follow-up). Finally, very few mediators differed between low- and high-risk patients, but hierarchical clustering based both on all mediators, as well as five selected mediators (EGF, CCL11, TIMP-2, MMP-1, and MMP-9) identified subsets of

  8. Recombinant human erythropoietin in very elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: results from a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tatarelli, Caterina; Piccioni, Anna Lina; Maurillo, Luca; Naso, Virginia; Battistini, Roberta; D'Andrea, Mariella; Criscuolo, Marianna; Nobile, Carolina; Villivà, Nicoletta; Mancini, Stefano; Neri, Benedetta; Breccia, Massimo; Fenu, Susanna; Buccisano, Francesco; Voso, Maria Teresa; Latagliata, Roberto; Aloe Spiriti, Maria Antonietta

    2014-08-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are common in elderly patients. Recombinant human erythro-poietin (rHuEPO) has been widely used to treat anemia in lower risk MDS patients, but few data are known about rHuEPO treatment in the very elderly patient group. In order to investigate the role of rHuEPO treatment in terms of response, overall survival (OS), and toxicity in a very elderly MDS patient group, 93 MDS patients treated with rHuEPO when aged ≥80 years were selected among MDS cases enrolled in a retrospective multicenter study by the cooperative group Gruppo Romano Mielodisplasie (GROM) from Jan 2002 to Dec 2010. At baseline, median age was 82.7 (range 80-99.1) with a median hemoglobin (Hb) level of 9 g/dl (range 6-10.8). The initial dose of rHuEPO was standard (epoetin alpha 40,000 IU/week or epoetin beta 30,000 IU/week) in 59 (63.4 %) patients or high in 34 (36.6 %) (epoetin alpha 80,000 IU/week) patients. We observed an erythroid response (ER) in 59 (63.4 %) patients. No thrombotic event was reported. Independent predictive factors for ER were low transfusion requirement before treatment (p = 0.004), ferritin <200 ng/ml (p = 0.017), Hb >8 g/dl (p = 0.034), and a high-dose rHuEPO treatment (p = 0.032). Median OS from rHuEPO start was 49.3 months (95 % CI 27.5-68.4) in responders versus 30.6 months (95 % CI 7.3-53.8) in resistant patients (p = 0.185). In conclusion, rHuEPO treatment is safe and effective also in the very elderly MDS patients. However, further larger studies are warranted to evaluate if EPO treatment could be worthwhile in terms of quality of life and cost-efficacy in very old patients. PMID:24647684

  9. Immunophenotypic characterization of myelopoiesis in early and late myelodysplastic syndromes: use of CD44 as an aid in early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Karmon, Yuval; Manaster, J; Chezar, J

    2002-08-15

    We investigated the possibility that myeloid cells from the bone marrow (BM) of myelodysplastic patients differ in their expression of CD44 antigen compared with expression of the antigen in normal controls. In addition, two triple-surface marker assays incorporating, respectively, CD44/CD33/CD66 and CD33/CD34/HLA-DR were used to evaluate the degree of myeloid maturation and assess the number of blasts in BM by flow cytometry. Patients with early-stage myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; RA [FAB classification]) have significantly decreased expression of CD44 on gated myeloid cells. In contrast, patients with late-stage MDS (RAEB and RAEB-T [FAB classification]) showed an elevated expression of CD44 and an increased number of CD34 blasts compared with early-stage MDS patients and normal controls. Late-stage MDS patients also had an increase in the immature myeloid compartment (CD66 weak expression) compared with early-stage MDS patients and normal controls. We have already included this assay as part of our MDS evaluation protocol alongside BM morphology and cytogenetics.

  10. Successful cord blood transplantation in a girl with monosomy 7 myelodysplastic syndrome and reduced numbers of B cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chien-Chung; Yang, Chao-Ping; Tsai, Ming Horng; Lee, Wen-I; Fang, En-Chen; Jaing, Tang-Her

    2010-05-01

    This report described unrelated umbilical cord blood transplantation for a 3-year-old girl with myelodysplastic syndrome and monosomy 7. The patient had a prolonged course characterized by recurrent infection and slowly progressive pancytopenia. She had reduced numbers of circulating B cells but no decline in immunoglobulin levels. Chemotherapy was not initially recommended because it was contraindicated due to intercurrent lower respiratory tract infection. After 10 months, the girl achieved hematologic remission after induction chemotherapy. The patient then underwent 2-loci HLA-mismatched unrelated donor cord blood transplantation. The time to neutrophil and platelet engraftment was 12 and 23 days post-transplantation, respectively. Acute graft-versus-host disease following transplantation was minimal. She was in continuing hematological remission with full donor chimerism 3 years after transplantation.

  11. The effect of decitabine dose modification and myelosuppression on response and survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cornelison, A Megan; Cortes, Jorge E; Ravandi, Farhad; Daver, Naval; Kadia, Tapan; Teng, Angela; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-02-01

    Myelosuppression in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is associated with the hypomethylating agent decitabine. A retrospective pooled analysis of two decitabine clinical trials in patients with MDS conducted Cox regression analyses of red blood cell or platelet dependence, myelosuppression, dose modification, cycle delay or dose reduction, and survival effects. In 182 patients, baseline platelet dependence was a predictor for dose modification, reduction or delay, and death (modification: p=0.006, hazard ratio [HR]=2.04; reduction/delay: p=0.011, HR=2.00; death: p=0.003, HR=1.94). Patients with dose modifications had significantly higher overall response rates versus those with none (22% vs. 10%; p=0.015). Patients with no dose modifications had faster progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) versus patients with dose modifications (p=0.004). Without dose modifications, patients tended to drop out due to disease progression or other reasons. Decitabine dose modifications on treatment may indicate response to treatment.

  12. Random-start controlled ovarian stimulation for emergency fertility preservation in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cai, H.; Shen, H.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports a case of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger in a young female with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who underwent fertility preservation using random-start controlled ovarian stimulation. This method involves the stimulation of the ovary regardless of a patient's menstrual-cycle phase. A review of the related literature is also provided. A 17-year-old patient was diagnosed with MDS and required initiation of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation within a maximum of 3 weeks and was in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle when the possibility of attempting preservation of fertility was presented to her. She opted for a random-start controlled ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins. With successful hemorrhagic prophylaxis, 17 oocytes were retrieved including 10 mature and 7 immature oocytes. Of the immature oocytes, 3 were successfully matured in vitro and a vitrification protocol was used to freeze the 13 mature oocytes. PMID:27191608

  13. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-09

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  14. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Nucleoli in cells of the granulopoietic proliferating compartment in patients suffering from the refractory anemia of the myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Smetana, K; Jirásková; Cermák, J

    2000-01-01

    Granulocytic precursors of the granulopoietic proliferating compartment (GPC) were investigated in patients suffering from refractory anemia (RA) of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) to provide an information on the number of nucleoli and incidence of main nucleolar types in these cells stained with the simple cytochemical procedure for the demonstration of RNA. The results demonstrated that the incidence of main nucleolar types in all stages of the granulopoietic proliferating compartment in RA patients of MDS generally did not differ in comparison with that of control patients without a disturbed granulopoiesis. In contrast, the number of nucleoli expressed by the values of the nucleolar coefficient in all stages of GPC in RA patients was significantly smaller than in control persons. In addition, the values of the nucleolar coefficient of myeloblasts in patients with RA of MDS were close to those in patients with acute myeloid leukemias.

  16. The clinical significance of activated lymphocytes in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: a single centre study of 131 patients.

    PubMed

    Meers, Stef; Vandenberghe, Peter; Boogaerts, Marc; Verhoef, Gregor; Delforge, Michel

    2008-07-01

    We studied the immune compartment in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. We show increased surface expression of activation markers (HLA-DR(+), CD57(+), CD28(-), CD62L(-)) on T lymphocytes in blood and bone marrow (n=131). T cell activation was not restricted to any relevant clinical subgroup (FAB, IPSS, cytogenetics) and did not correlate with blood counts or need for treatment. In vitro clonogenic growth of marrow mononuclear cells (n=18) was not influenced by T cells expressing these markers. In addition, using X-chromosome inactivation analysis (n=12) we demonstrate clonal involvement of NK and B cells in half of these patients. We conclude that although activated T lymphocytes can be found in MDS, their role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear in the majority of patients.

  17. Expansion of effector memory regulatory T cells represents a novel prognostic factor in lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Adam W; Sugimori, Chiharu; Komrokji, Rami S; Yang, Lili; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Paquette, Ronald; Loughran, Thomas P; List, Alan F; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2012-09-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are premalignant diseases characterized by cytopenias, myeloid dysplasia, immune dysregulation with association to autoimmunity, and variable risk for acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Studies of FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicate that the number and/or activation state may influence cancer progression in these patients. Focusing on patients with a lower risk for leukemia transformation, 18 (34.6%) of 52 patients studied displayed an altered Treg compartment compared with age-matched controls. Delineation of unique Treg subsets revealed that an increase in the absolute number of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)CD45RA(-)CD27(-) Tregs (effector memory Tregs [Treg(EM)]) was significantly associated with anemia (p = 0.046), reduced hemoglobin (p = 0.038), and blast counts ≥5% (p = 0.006). In healthy donors, this Treg(EM) population constitutes only 2% of all Tregs (one to six Tregs per microliter) in peripheral blood but, when isolated, exhibit greater suppressive activity in vitro. With a median follow-up of 3.1 y (range 2.7-4.9 y) from sample acquisition, increased numbers of Treg(EM) cells proved to have independent prognostic importance in survival estimates, suggesting that enumeration of this Treg subset may be a more reliable indicator of immunological escape than FOXP3(+) T cells as a whole. Based on multivariate analyses, Treg(EM) impacted survival independently from myeloblast characteristics, cytopenias, karyotype, and comorbidities. Based on these findings, Treg(EM) cell expansion may be synonymous with human Treg activation and indicate microenvironmental changes conducive to transformation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

  18. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  19. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-07-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Isolation and characterization of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells in 5q-deleted myelodysplastic syndromes: evidence for involvement at the hematopoietic stem cell level.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L; Astrand-Grundström, I; Arvidsson, I; Jacobsson, B; Hellström-Lindberg, E; Hast, R; Jacobsen, S E

    2000-09-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of clonal disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and frequent progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Within MDS, 5q- syndrome constitutes a distinct clinical entity characterized by an isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 (5q-), a relatively good prognosis, and infrequent transformation to acute leukemia. The cell of origin in 5q- syndrome as well as in other 5q-deleted MDS patients has not been established, but evidence for involvement of multiple myeloid (but not lymphoid) lineages has suggested that a myeloid-restricted progenitor rather than a pluripotent (lympho-myeloid) stem cell might be the primary target in most patients. Although in 9 patients no evidence of peripheral blood T-cell and only 1 case of B-cell involvement was found, the data herein support that 5q deletions occur in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with a combined lympho-myeloid potential. First, in all investigated patients a minimum of 94% of cells in the minor CD34(+)CD38(-) HSC compartment were 5q deleted as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Second, in 3 of 5 patients 5q aberrations were detected in a large fraction (25% to 90%) of purified CD34(+)CD19(+) pro-B cells. Furthermore, extensive functional characterization with regard to responsiveness to early-acting cytokines, long-term culture-initiating cells, and nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency repopulating cells supported that MDS HSCs in 5q-deleted patients are CD34(+)CD38(-), but inefficient at reconstituting hematopoiesis.

  1. Down-regulation of Dicer1 promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youshan; Wu, Dong; Fei, Chengming; Guo, Juan; Gu, Shuncheng; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been reported that mesenchymal stromal cells are unable to provide sufficient hematopoietic support in myelodysplastic syndrome, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we found that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome displayed a significant increase in senescence, as evidenced by their decreased proliferative capacity, flattened morphology and increased expression of SA-β-gal and p21. Senescent mesenchymal stromal cells from patients had decreased differentiation potential and decreased stem cell support capacity. Gene knockdown of Dicer1, which was down-regulated in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients, induced senescence. The differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities were significantly inhibited by Dicer1 knockdown. Overexpression of Dicer1 in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients reversed cellular senescence and enhanced stem cell properties. Furthermore, we identified reduced expression in the microRNA-17 family (miR-17-5p, miR-20a/b, miR-106a/b and miR-93) as a potential factor responsible for increased p21 expression, a key senescence mediator, in Dicer1 knockdown cells. Moreover, we found that miR-93 and miR-20a expression levels were significantly reduced in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients and miR-93/miR-20a gain of function resulted in a decrease of cellular senescence. Collectively, the results of our study show that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome are prone to senescence and that Dicer1 down-regulation promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells. Dicer1 down-regulation seems to contribute to the insufficient hematopoietic support capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

  2. Parameters detected by geriatric and quality of life assessment in 195 older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia are highly predictive for outcome.

    PubMed

    Deschler, Barbara; Ihorst, Gabriele; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; März, Eva; de Figuerido, Marcelo; Fritzsche, Kurt; Haas, Peter; Salih, Helmut R; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre; Lübbert, Michael

    2013-02-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia exemplify the complexity of treatment allocation in older patients as options range from best supportive care, non-intensive treatment (e.g. hypomethylating agents) to intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation. Novel metrics for non-disease variables are urgently needed to help define the best treatment for each older patient. We investigated the feasibility and prognostic value of geriatric/quality of life assessments aside from established disease-specific variables in 195 patients aged 60 years or over with myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia. These patients were grouped according to treatment intensity and assessed. Assessment consisted of eight instruments evaluating activities of daily living, depression, mental functioning, mobility, comorbidities, Karnofsky Index and quality of life. Patients with a median age of 71 years (range 60-87 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (n=63) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=132) were treated either with best supportive care (n=47), hypomethylating agents (n=73) or intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation (n=75). After selection of variables, pathological activities of daily living and quality of life/fatigue remained highly predictive for overall survival in the entire patient group beyond disease-related risk factors adverse cytogenetics and blast count of 20% or over. In 107 patients treated non-intensively activities of daily living of less than 100 (hazard ratio, HR 2.94), Karnofsky Index below 80 (HR 2.34) and quality of life/'fatigue' of 50 or over (HR 1.77) were significant prognosticators. Summation of adverse features revealed a high risk of death (HR 9.36). In-depth evaluation of older patients prior to individual treatment allocation is feasible and provides additional information to standard assessment. Patients aged 60 years or over with newly diagnosed myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia and

  3. The translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) without MLL gene rearrangement--a possible marker of good prognosis in myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Pavel; Lysak, Daniel; Vokurka, Samuel; Michalova, Kyra; Sarova, Iveta; Jonasova, Anna; Hruba, Martina; Rykovska, Anna; Subrt, Ivan

    2014-06-01

    The translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) is associated with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and has an overall frequency of approximately 1%. The outcome of MDS patients with this translocation is not clear until now, because most of the clinical data addressing the t(2;11)(p21;q23) has been collected without investigating the status of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. In this report, we present seven new patients with MDS diagnosis and the t(2;11)(p21;q23) in bone marrow cells; all of them without MLL gene rearrangement. They were found in two databases consisting of 1185 patients of two Czech institutions. These patients tended to be younger and showed a strong male predominance. A cytological and histological assessment of bone marrow at diagnosis revealed only mild MDS with marked dysplasia in megakaryopoiesis. Similar to other primary abnormalities in MDS (e.g. deletion of 11q), the t(2;11)(p21;q23) was frequently associated with deletion of 5q. Our results stress the common clinicopathological features of this entity and indicate that the t(2;11)(p21;q23) may be associated with a good prognosis for MDS patients (median survival 72 months).

  4. Genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism array-based karyotyping in myelodysplastic syndrome and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and its impact on treatment outcomes following decitabine treatment.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jun Ho; Huh, Jungwon; Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Kyoung Ha; Do, Young Rok; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Kim, Hawk; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Kim, TaeHyung; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2013-04-01

    Decitabine is a hypomethylating agent with proven clinical efficacy in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The current study analyzed the role of single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A)-based karyotyping in prediction of clinical outcome in MDS or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) patients following decitabine therapy. A total of 61 MDS/CMML patients treated with decitabine were evaluated with Genome-Wide Human SNP 6.0 Array using DNAs derived from marrow samples. The primary endpoint was the best response rate including complete (CR) and partial response (PR) with overall (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) as secondary endpoints. Best response was noted in 14 patients (26.4 %) out of 53 evaluated patients including 12 CR and two PR with median follow-up of 21.6 months. A total of 81 abnormal SNP lesions were found in 25 out of 61 patients (41.0 %). The patients carrying abnormal SNP lesions showed an inferior CR/PR rate (p = 0.002) and showed a trend of worse OS (p = 0.02 in univariate, p = 0.09 in multivariate) compared to those without SNP lesions, but not were associated with inferior EFS. The presence of abnormal SNP lesions in MDS was associated with adverse outcomes following decitabine therapy. Further study is strongly warranted to establish the role of SNP-A karyotyping in MDS. PMID:23262795

  5. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  6. A phase 1 clinical trial of vorinostat in combination with decitabine in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, Mark; Gojo, Ivana; Goldberg, Stuart L; Bredeson, Christopher; Kujawski, Lisa A; Yang, Allen; Marks, Peter; Frankel, Paul; Sun, Xing; Tosolini, Alessandra; Eid, Joseph E; Lubiniecki, Gregory M; Issa, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) may respond to treatment with epigenetic-modifying agents. Histone deacetylase inhibitors may synergize with hypomethylating agents. This phase 1 dose-escalation study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose, recommended phase 2 dose, safety and tolerability of vorinostat plus decitabine in patients with relapsed/refractory AML, newly-diagnosed AML, or intermediate- to high-grade MDS. Thirty-four patients received concurrent therapy with decitabine plus vorinostat and 37 received sequential therapy with decitabine followed by vorinostat. Twenty-nine patients had relapsed/refractory AML, 31 had untreated AML and 11 had MDS. The target maximum administered dose (MAD) of decitabine 20 mg/m(2) daily for 5 d plus vorinostat 400 mg/d for 14 d was achieved for concurrent and sequential schedules, with one dose-limiting toxicity (Grade 3 QTc prolongation) reported in the sequential arm. Common toxicities were haematological and gastrointestinal. Responses were observed more frequently at the MAD on the concurrent schedule compared with the sequential schedule in untreated AML (46% vs. 14%), relapsed/refractory AML (15% vs. 0%) and MDS (60% vs. 0%). Decitabine plus vorinostat given concurrently or sequentially appears to be safe and well-tolerated. Concurrent therapy shows promising clinical activity in AML or MDS, warranting further investigation.

  7. [Methylation of FHIT gene promoter region in DNA from plasma of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and demethylating effect of decitabine].

    PubMed

    Deng, Yin-Fen; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiu-Qun; Hu, Ming-Qiu; Dai, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Zhong; Xu, Yan-Li

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to detect the methylation status of FHIT gene promoter region in the DNA from plasma of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and to investigate the demethylating effect of decitabine. Methylation-specific PCR method was used to detect the methylation status of FHIT gene promoter region in the DNA from plasma of 4 patients with MDS before and after treatment with decitabine plus semis CAG therapy (among them, 1 case of newly diagnosed MDS, 3 cases progressed into acute leukemia). The results indicated that 3 cases were found to have an increased methylation in the promoter region. After treatment with decitabine plus semis CAG, increased methylation was reversed in 2 cases. In 4 cases, 2 cases displayed clinical response. It is concluded that FHIT gene hypermethylation is associated with MDS pathogenesis. Decitabine has demethylating effect on the FHIT gene hypermethylation of plasma from MDS patients. Detecting the methylation status of FHIT gene in DNA from plasma may play a role in MDS auxiliary diagnosis or prognosis.

  8. Platelet response during the second cycle of decitabine treatment predicts response and survival for myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Ae; Maeng, Chi Hoon; Kim, Moonjin; Kim, Sungmin; Jung, Chul Won; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-06-30

    Despite the efficacy of decitabine to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), there is a wide range of responses, and no definite predictive marker has been identified. This study aimed to describe the efficacy of decitabine and to identify potential predictors of response and survival in patients with MDS. We retrospectively analyzed clinical data of MDS patients at Samsung Medical Center between August 2008 and August 2011. The response assessment was conducted using the International Working Group (IWG) response criteria for MDS. We analyzed 101 MDS patients (total 613 cycles) who received decitabine for a median of four cycles. The overall response was 52.5% (n = 53/101). The median time to any response was two cycles with the median overall survival of 16.7 months. Patients who showed hematologic improvement had significantly longer survival than those who did not (9.8 vs. 22.9 months, p = 0.004). The difference in OS was evident in the Intermediate-2/High risk group (p = 0.002) but not in the Intermediate-1 risk group (p = 0.145). Multivariate analysis confirmed that platelet response (no platelet transfusions for at least 3 days) during the second cycle of treatment was an independent predictor for response, OS and Leukemia free survival. Based on the results of this study, for patients with hematological improvement, recovery of platelet count by the second cycle of therapy can be used as an early predictive marker of improved survival and an increased response rate.

  9. Comparison between decitabine and azacitidine for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome: a meta-analysis with 1,392 participants.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mixue; Jiang, Qi; Xie, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    The hypomethylating agents decitabine and azacitidine have been found to improve the outcome of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS); however, the clinical choice between them is controversial. Therefore, this meta-analysis was performed to compare the efficacy, toxicity, and survival advantage of decitabine and azacitidine in patients with MDS. Eleven trials with a total of 1392 patients with MDS (decitabine, n = 768; azacitidine, n = 624) were included for analysis. The pooled estimates of partial response, hematologic improvement, and overall response rates for azacitidine were significantly higher than for decitabine. There were no differences between these 2 drugs regarding complete response, red blood cell transfusion-independent rates, and grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicity. When compared with best supportive care, azacitidine significantly improved overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.69; 95% CI, 0.54-0.87) and time to acute myeloid leukemia transformation (HR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35-0.74). But these benefits were not found with decitabine. Among patients with higher risk (International Prognostic Scoring System value of 3) or older than 75 years, treatment with azacitidine was a favorable factor, whereas decitabine showed no advantage. Therefore, with higher overall response rates and better survival benefits, azacitidine is recommended as the first-line hypomethylating agent for MDS, especially in elderly patients or those with high risk.

  10. Clinical and cytogenetic features of 508 Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and comparison with those in Western countries.

    PubMed

    Chen, B; Zhao, W-L; Jin, J; Xue, Y-Q; Cheng, X; Chen, X-T; Cui, J; Chen, Z-M; Cao, Q; Yang, G; Yao, Y; Xia, H-L; Tong, J-H; Li, J-M; Chen, J; Xiong, S-M; Shen, Z-X; Waxman, S; Chen, Z; Chen, S-J

    2005-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and leukemia progression. Racial differences may exist on clinical pictures and the molecular events leading to MDS, which are heterogeneous. To better define the clinical and cytogenetic features in Chinese patients, a retrospective multicentric study was performed in 508 MDS cases. Compared with Western countries, Chinese patients showed younger age (median: 49 vs 65-73 years), lower percentages of RARS (2.8 vs 6.6-15.3%), and CMML (5.2 vs 11.7-30.6%). Cytogenetically, among 367 cases with evaluable data, abnormal karyotypes were found in 136 cases, including 56 numerical and 80 structural changes. Incidences of single chromosome 5 and 7 abnormalities were lower than those in Western countries (2.2 vs 17.8-42.5%). However, complex cytogenetic aberrations and chromosome translocations were frequently observed and related to poor prognosis. Both multiple chromosome deletions and translocations were detected in advanced subtypes (RAEB and RAEB-T). Analysis of 200 cases revealed a higher incidence of hepatitis-B-virus infection than that in non-MDS population (21.00 vs 9.75%). This study further confirmed: (1) different genetic/environmental backgrounds between Asian and Western MDS populations; (2) a strong predictive value of cytogenetic abnormalities on disease outcome and involvement of genomic instability in leukemia clone development. PMID:15759035

  11. Functional analysis of a chromosomal deletion associated with myelodysplastic syndromes using isogenic human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kotini, Andriana G; Chang, Chan-Jung; Boussaad, Ibrahim; Delrow, Jeffrey J; Dolezal, Emily K; Nagulapally, Abhinav B; Perna, Fabiana; Fishbein, Gregory A; Klimek, Virginia M; Hawkins, R David; Huangfu, Danwei; Murry, Charles E; Graubert, Timothy; Nimer, Stephen D; Papapetrou, Eirini P

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions associated with human diseases, such as cancer are common, but synteny issues complicate modeling of these deletions in mice. We use cellular reprogramming and genome engineering to functionally dissect the loss of chromosome 7q [del(7q)], a somatic cytogenetic abnormality present in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We derive del(7q)- and isogenic karyotypically normal induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from hematopoietic cells of MDS patients and show that the del(7q) iPSCs recapitulate disease-associated phenotypes, including impaired hematopoietic differentiation. These disease phenotypes are rescued by spontaneous dosage correction and can be reproduced in karyotypically normal cells by engineering hemizygosity of defined chr7q segments, in a 20 Mb region. We use a phenotype-rescue screen to identify candidate haploinsufficient genes that might mediate the del(7q)- hematopoietic defect. Our approach highlights the utility of human iPSCs both for functional mapping of disease-associated large-scale chromosomal deletions and for discovery of haploinsufficient genes. PMID:25798938

  12. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-04-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31-87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2-24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1-24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS. PMID:26442612

  13. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-04-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31-87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2-24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1-24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS.

  14. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog-Gli1 Pathway as a Potential New Therapeutic Strategy for Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jixue; Zhou, Zhigang; Wan, Liping; Tong, Yin; Qin, Youwen; Wang, Chun; Zhou, Kun

    2015-01-01

    The complex mechanistic array underlying the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is still unclear. Although dysregulations of different signaling pathways involved in MDS have been described, the identification of specific biomarkers and therapy targets remains an important task in order to establish novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we demonstrated that the Shh signaling pathway is active in MDS and correlated it with disease progression. Additionally, the knockdown of Gli1 significantly inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Gli1 silencing also induced apoptosis and G0/G1 phase arrest. Furthermore, Gli1 silencing enhanced the demethylating effect of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine on the p15 gene promoter and subsequently promoted its expression by inhibiting DNA methyltransferase 1(DNMT1). Our findings show that the Shh signaling pathway plays a role in the pathogenesis and disease progression of MDS, and proceeds by modulating DNA methylation. This pathway may prove to be a potential therapeutic target for enhancing the therapeutic effects of 5-azacytidine on malignant transformation of MDS. PMID:26317501

  15. Prognostic features of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes aged < 50 years: update of a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Finsinger, Paola; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Santopietro, Michelina; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Volpicelli, Paola; Petrucci, Luigi; Nanni, Mauro; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-12-01

    Fewer than 10% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are younger than 50 years. A series of 91 younger patients (median age 44 years with female prevalence) are reported and compared with elderly patients. Frequent karyotypic changes were trisomy 8 (9.8%) and monosomy 7 (5%). Twenty-three patients had occupational exposure to potential mutagens (benzene and solvents), with a male predominance, higher frequency of refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) (52%) and higher frequency of monosomy 7 (21.7%). At a median follow-up of 72 months, 22 patients (24%) evolved to acute leukemia, with higher frequency being observed among the exposed cohort (39% vs. 19% non-exposed). Unfavorable factors for overall survival were: age > 40 years, > 5% of blasts, trilinear bone marrow involvement and intermediate-high World Health Organization Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) risk. The present results suggest that younger MDS could be identified as a distinct subset. For patients belonging to the low/intermediate-I risk group, due to a low transformation rate, aggressive approaches should rarely be recommended.

  16. Quality of life and use of red cell transfusion in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pinchon, Deborah J; Stanworth, Simon J; Dorée, Carolyn; Brunskill, Susan; Norfolk, Derek R

    2009-10-01

    The main treatment for many patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) remains red cell transfusion to attenuate the symptoms of chronic anemia. Fatigue can reduce a patient's health related quality of life (HRQoL), but there is little understanding of the optimal use of transfusions to improve this. A systematic review was performed to identify and appraise publications reporting the use of HRQoL instruments in patients with MDS. A total of 17 separate studies were identified that used 14 HRQoL instruments, but only one MDS disease specific HRQoL instrument (QOL-E) was reported. Two well established HRQoL instruments were most often used in MDS research (variants of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30)). Several common problems were identified in the published literature including a lack of power calculations to detect clinically relevant changes, small sample sizes and significant attrition rates for completion of HRQoL assessments, all of which limit the strength of any conclusions. There is no consensus on the optimal transfusion regimen to improve HRQoL in transfusion-dependent MDS. Future research into HRQoL within MDS is a pressing requirement. Studies should focus on the domains that are of most clinical importance to the patient as well as traditional quantitative changes of hemoglobin concentration. PMID:19705430

  17. Efficacy and adverse events of azacitidine in the treatment of hemodialysis patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yoshihiro, Tomoyasu; Muta, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Kenichi; Shimamoto, Syo; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Ogawa, Ryosuke

    2016-08-01

    We describe two hemodialysis patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) treated with azacitidine. A 65-year-old woman (case 1) received azacitidine at 75 mg/m(2) for 7 days, and a 52-year-old man (case 2) with liver cirrhosis received a 70% dose of azacitidine. Both cases developed grade 4 cytopenia, but they achieved transfusion independence after 3 and 2 courses, and the durations of remission were 10 and 11 months, respectively. Case 1 had the complication of febrile neutropenia (FN) twice during the 1(st) and 2(nd) courses, but continued to receive azacitidine treatment thereafter. Case 2 developed infectious peritonitis during the sixth course, and azacitidine treatment was thus discontinued. After a 4-month treatment interruption, he became transfusion-dependent, and re-induction of azacitidine was successful. Of note, the course of case 1 was complicated by erythema nodosum on admission, which then disappeared after one course of azacitidine treatment. The mean durations of hospitalization were 17.5 and 23 days per course of azacitidine treatment, respectively. Though there are few reports of azacitidine treatment for hemodialysis patients with high-risk MDS, we advocate administering azacitidine to such patients, while paying close attention to the dose intensity of azacitidine and taking prompt action to manage infectious complications. PMID:27599416

  18. Genomic loss of EZH2 leads to epigenetic modifications and overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The role of EZH2 in cancer is complex and may vary depending on cancer type or stage. We examined the effect of altered EZH2 levels on H3K27 methylation, HOX gene expression, and malignant phenotype in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) cell lines and an in vivo xenograft model. We also studied links between EZH2 expression and prognosis in MDS patients. Patients with high-grade MDS exhibited lower levels of EZH2 expression than those with low-grade MDS. Low EZH2 expression was associated with high percentages of blasts, shorter survival, and increased transformation of MDS into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). MDS patients frequently had reductions in EZH2 copy number. EZH2 knockdown increased tumor growth capacity and reduced H3K27me3 levels in both MDS-derived leukemia cells and in a xenograft model. H3K27me3 levels were reduced and HOX gene cluster expression was increased in MDS patients. EZH2 knockdown also increased HOX gene cluster expression by reducing H3K27me3, and H3K27 demethylating agents increased HOX gene cluster expression in MDS-derived cell lines. These findings suggest genomic loss of EZH2 contributes to overexpression of the HOX gene clusters in MDS through epigenetic modifications. PMID:26812882

  19. Efficacy and safety of extended dosing schedules of CC-486 (oral azacitidine) in patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Manero, G; Gore, S D; Kambhampati, S; Scott, B; Tefferi, A; Cogle, C R; Edenfield, W J; Hetzer, J; Kumar, K; Laille, E; Shi, T; MacBeth, K J; Skikne, B

    2016-01-01

    CC-486, the oral formulation of azacitidine (AZA), is an epigenetic modifier and DNA methyltransferase inhibitor in clinical development for treatment of hematologic malignancies. CC-486 administered for 7 days per 28-day treatment cycle was evaluated in a phase 1 dose-finding study. AZA has a short plasma half-life and DNA incorporation is S-phase-restricted; extending CC-486 exposure may increase the number of AZA-affected diseased target cells and maximize therapeutic effects. Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) received 300 mg CC-486 once daily for 14 days (n=28) or 21 days (n=27) of repeated 28-day cycles. Median patient age was 72 years (range 31–87) and 75% of patients had International Prognostic Scoring System Intermediate-1 risk MDS. Median number of CC-486 treatment cycles was 7 (range 2–24) for the 14-day dosing schedule and 6 (1–24) for the 21-day schedule. Overall response (complete or partial remission, red blood cell (RBC) or platelet transfusion independence (TI), or hematologic improvement) (International Working Group 2006) was attained by 36% of patients receiving 14-day dosing and 41% receiving 21-day dosing. RBC TI rates were similar with both dosing schedules (31% and 38%, respectively). CC-486 was generally well-tolerated. Extended dosing schedules of oral CC-486 may provide effective long-term treatment for patients with lower-risk MDS. PMID:26442612

  20. Neutrophils from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: relationship between impairment of granular contents, complement receptors, functional activities and disease status.

    PubMed

    Moretti, S; Lanza, F; Spisani, S; Latorraca, A; Rigolin, G M; Giuliani, A L; Castoldi, G L; Traniello, S

    1994-05-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are stem cell disorders of clonal origin in which infections and leukemic transformation are quite frequent. Neutrophils from 28 patients with MDS were analysed by flow cytometry for the expression of the two complement receptors CR1 and CR3, the antigenic reactivity of some granule constituents--myeloperoxidase, lysozyme, elastase, lactoferrin--and functional activities, such as locomotion, respiratory burst and cytotoxicity. The results were correlated with the FAB disease subtypes, grouped as low risk (RA) and high risk patients (RAEB, RAEB-t, CMML) and with 30 healthy subjects. A significant reduction in the percentage of neutrophil CR1, CR3 positivity and chemotaxis induced by endotoxin-activated serum was detected in the high risk group when compared with the low risk group and healthy controls. Furthermore, the high risk group also showed a low amount of myeloperoxidase, elastase, lysozyme and superoxide anion, but both low and high risk groups displayed reduced cellular cytotoxicity in comparison with the control. This work indicates that MDS patients belonging to the more advanced FAB categories frequently show multiple abnormalities in the expression of neutrophil complement receptors, and granular components (> 3), as well as in cell functions, suggesting the possibility of using these phenotypic abnormalities in the monitoring of disease progression. PMID:8069192

  1. Application of iPS cells derived from congenital myelodysplastic syndrome for research of nomal hematopoesis and hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Hideaki

    2016-08-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are not only a valuable resource for regenerative medicine, but also a promising tool for disease modeling and drug discovery. Patient-specific iPSCs harboring disease-specific mutations are extremely useful for investigating disease mechanisms and novel treatment approaches. In the field of hematology, attempts to establish iPSCs from tumor cells such as those of leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were largely unsuccessful because proper reprogramming processes were hampered by their extensive genetic alterations. In contrast, congenital disorders caused by a single genetic mutation are ideal candidates for deriving iPSCs. We have been investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying leukemia and MDS by implementing iPSC technology. Familial platelet disorder (FPD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by thrombocytopenia and a high propensity for developing acute leukemia, which is caused by heterozygous mutation of RUNX1. We have successfully established iPSCs from three distinct FPD pedigrees and examined the responsible defect during hematopoietic development. This system will serve as a novel unprecedented platform for prospectively studying hematologic disorders using human cells. PMID:27599428

  2. Imprint of 5-azacytidine on the natural killer cell repertoire during systemic treatment for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sohlberg, Ebba; Pfefferle, Aline; Andersson, Sandra; Baumann, Bettina C; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Malmberg, Karl-Johan

    2015-10-27

    5-azacytidine (5-aza) is a hypomethylating agent approved for the treatment of high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). It is assumed to act by demethylating tumor suppressor genes and via direct cytotoxic effects on malignant cells. In vitro treatment with hypomethylating agents has profound effects on the expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like (KIR) receptors on natural killer (NK) cells, as these receptors are epigenetically regulated via methylation of the promoters. Here we investigated the influence of 5-aza on the NK-cell repertoire during cytokine-induced proliferation in vitro and homeostatic proliferation in vivo in patients with high-risk MDS. In vitro treatment of NK cells from both healthy donors and MDS patients with low doses of 5-aza led to a significant increase in expression of multiple KIRs, but only in cells that had undergone several rounds of cell division. Proliferating 5-aza exposed NK cells exhibited increased IFN-γ production and degranulation towards tumor target cells. MDS patients had lower proportions of educated KIR-expressing NK cells than healthy controls but after systemic treatment with 5-aza, an increased proportion of Ki-67+ NK cells expressed multiple KIRs suggesting uptake of 5-aza in cycling cells in vivo. Hence, these results suggest that systemic treatment with 5-aza may shape the NK cell repertoire, in particular during homeostatic proliferation, thereby boosting NK cell-mediated recognition of malignant cells.

  3. MicroRNA-205-5p is upregulated in myelodysplastic syndromes and induces cell proliferation via PTEN suppression.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sook Jin; Choi, In-Sun; Park, Geon; Moon, Dae-Soo; Choi, Ji-Seon; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Yoon, Soo-Young; Choi, Cheol Hee; Kang, Seong-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Micro (mi)RNA dysregulation is implicated in the development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Chromosomal abnormalities on 1q are frequently detected in Korean patients with MDS; however, how these are related to disease development is unknown. The present study compared the expression profiles of miRNAs encoded by chromosome 1q between 65 MDS patients and 11 controls. We found that miR-205-5p levels were 12.5 fold higher in the former (P=0.001). miR-205-5p level was increased in 44.7% of patients when an arbitrary 2(-ΔCt) cut-off value of 1.25 was used. miR-205-5p expression data were used to generate a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for miR-205-5p, for which the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.825 (95% confidence interval: 0.710-0.941; P=0.001). Moreover, transfection with a miR-205-5p mimic induced cell proliferation by inhibiting the expression of the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Our findings suggest that miR-205-5p upregulation contributes to MDS by suppressing PTEN and that miR-205-5p thus acts as an oncogene in hematopoietic cells. PMID:27379838

  4. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-10-27

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3-6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2-5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2-5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted.

  5. WPSS is a strong prognostic indicator for clinical outcome of allogeneic transplant for myelodysplastic syndrome in Southeast Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liyuan; Hao, Siguo; Diong, Colin; Goh, Yeow-Tee; Gopalakrishnan, Sathish; Ho, Aloysius; Hwang, William; Koh, Liang-Piu; Koh, Mickey; Lim, Zi-Yi; Loh, Yvonne; Poon, Michelle; Tan, Lip-Kun; Tan, Patrick; Linn, Yeh-Ching

    2015-05-01

    To better understand the predictive factors and improve clinical outcome of allogeneic transplant for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), we retrospectively analyzed the post-transplant outcome of 60 Southeast Asian patients with MDS. Multivariate analysis showed that WHO classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) significantly affect overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality (CINRM). Stratified by WPSS into very low/low, intermediate, high, and very high-risk categories, 3-year OS was 100, 61, 37, and 18% (p = 0.02); PFS was 100, 55, 32, and 18% (p = 0.014); CIR was 12, 24, 38, and 59% (p = 0.024); CINRM was 0, 6, 12, and 26% (p = 0.037), respectively. WHO classification, Revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R), IPSS-R-defined cytogenetic risk groups, donor gender, and acute and chronic graft vs host disease (GVHD) also influenced different aspects of transplant outcome. We found that WPSS is a powerful predictor of post-transplant outcome. WPSS provides an important model not only for prognostication but also for exploration of further post-transplant measures such as immunological maneuvers or novel therapy to improve the poor outcome of high-risk patients.

  6. Accuracy of physician assessment of treatment preferences and health status in elderly patients with higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Caocci, G; Voso, M T; Angelucci, E; Stauder, R; Cottone, F; Abel, G; Nguyen, K; Platzbecker, U; Beyne-Rauzy, O; Gaidano, G; Invernizzi, R; Molica, S; Criscuolo, M; Breccia, M; Lübbert, M; Sanpaolo, G; Buccisano, F; Ricco, A; Palumbo, G A; Niscola, P; Zhang, H; Fenu, S; La Nasa, G; Mandelli, F; Efficace, F

    2015-08-01

    Higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are rarely curable and have a poor prognosis. We investigated the accuracy of physicians' perception of patients' health status and the patients' preferences for involvement in treatment decisions. We examined 280 newly diagnosed higher-risk elderly MDS patients paired with their physicians. Survey tools included the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and the Control Preference Scale. Overall concordance was 49% for physician perception of patient preferences for involvement in treatment decisions. In 36.4% of comparisons there were minor differences and in 14.6% there were major differences. In 44.7% of the patients preferring a passive role, physicians perceived them as preferring an active or collaborative role. Absence of the patient's request for prognostic information (P=0.001) and judging the patient as having a poor health status (P=0.036) were factors independently associated with the physicians' attitude toward a lower degree of patient involvement in clinical decisions. Agreement on health status was found in 27.5% of cases. Physicians most frequently tended to overestimate health status of patients who reported low-level health status. The value of decision aid-tools in the challenging setting of higher-risk MDS should be investigated to further promote patient-centered care. PMID:26120100

  7. Two novel RUNX1 mutations in a patient with congenital thrombocytopenia that evolved into a high grade myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schmit, Jessica M.; Turner, Daniel J.; Hromas, Robert A.; Wingard, John R.; Brown, Randy A.; Li, Ying; Li, Marilyn M.; Slayton, William B.; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report two new RUNX1 mutations in one patient with congenital thrombocytopenia that transformed into a high grade myelodysplastic syndrome with myelomonocytic features. The first mutation was a nucleotide base substitution from guanine to adenine within exon 8, resulting in a nonsense mutation in the DNA-binding inhibitory domain of the Runx1 protein. This nonsense mutation is suspected a de novo germline mutation since both parents are negative for the mutation. The second mutation identified was an in-frame six nucleotide base pair insertion in exon 5 of the RUNX1 gene, which is predicted to result in an insertion in the DNA-binding runt homology domain (RHD). This mutation is believed to be a somatic mutation as it was mosaic before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation and disappeared after transplant. As no other genetic mutation was found using genetic screening, it is speculated that the combined effect of these two RUNX1 mutations may have exerted a stronger dominant negative effect than either RUNX1 mutation alone, thus leading to a myeloid malignancy. PMID:25893166

  8. Acute myeloid leukemia after myelodysplastic syndrome and failure of therapy with hypomethylating agents: an emerging entity with a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Ghanem, Hady; Huang, Xuelin; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O'Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stephan; Pierce, Sherry; Choi, Sangbum; Verstovsek, Srdan; Brandt, Mark; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the outcomes of 63 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) arising from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after hypomethylating agent failure. Their median age was 63 years. All 63 patients had received ≥ 1 salvage regimens for AML, and 35 patients (55%) had received ≥ 2. Of the 31 patients (49%) who had received high-dose cytarabine (HDAC) at first relapse, 2 (6%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (13%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 19%). Of the 32 patients (51%) who had received other treatments, including investigational agents, 4 (12%) achieved CR and 4 (12%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (overall response rate, 24%). The median response duration was 20 weeks. With a median follow-up of 42 months from the AML diagnosis, the median survival (21 weeks) was similar between the 2 groups. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 19% and 8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified low albumin, HDAC treatment, and platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L as independent adverse factors for CR and a platelet count < 50 × 10(9)/L and age > 65 years as independent adverse factors for survival. Thus, the outcome of AML evolving from MDS after hypomethylating agent failure is poor and not improved with HDAC. Novel therapies directed toward this emerging entity are urgently needed.

  9. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Failure of Therapy with Hypomethylating Agents: An Emerging Entity With a Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Ghanem, Hady; Huang, Xuelin; Ravandi, Farhad; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; O’Brien, Susan; Faderl, Stephan; Pierce, Sherry; Choi, Sangbum; Verstovsek, Srdan; Brandt, Mark; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2014-01-01

    We assessed outcome of 63 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) arising from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) failing hypomethylating agents (HMA). Median age was 63 years. All 63 patients received at least 1 salvage regimen for AML and 35 patients (55%) received 2 or more. Of the 31 patients (49%) who received high-dose cytarabine (HDAC) at first relapse, 2 (6%) achieved complete remission (CR) and 4 (13%) CR with incomplete platelet recovery (CRp) for an overall response rate (ORR) of 19%. Of the 32 patients (51%) who received other treatments including investigational agents, 4 (12%) achieved CR and 4 (12%) CRp, for an ORR of 24%. Median response duration was 20 weeks. With a median follow up of 42 months from AML diagnosis, median survival was similar between the 2 groups (21 weeks). The 1- and 2-year survival rates were 19% and 8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis identified low albumin, HDAC treatment, and platelet count <50×109/L as independent adverse factors for CR, and platelet count <50×109/L and age>65 years as independent adverse factors for survival. In conclusion, outcome of AML following MDS post HMA failure is poor, and not improved with HDAC. Novel therapies directed towards this emerging entity are urgently needed. PMID:24447728

  10. Distinctive microRNA expression profiles in CD34+ bone marrow cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dostalova Merkerova, Michaela; Krejcik, Zdenek; Votavova, Hana; Belickova, Monika; Vasikova, Alzbeta; Cermak, Jaroslav

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs functioning as regulators of hematopoiesis. Their differential expression patterns have been linked with various pathological processes originating from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, limited information is available regarding the role of miRNAs in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Using miRNA arrays, we measured expression of 1,145 miRNAs in CD34+ bone marrow cells obtained from 39 MDS and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) evolved from MDS patients, and compared them with those of six healthy donors. Differential miRNA expression was analyzed and a panel of upregulated (n=13) and downregulated (n=9) miRNAs were found (P<0.001) in MDS/AML patients. An increased expression of a large miRNA cluster mapped within the 14q32 locus was detected. Differences in miRNA expression of MDS subtypes showed a distinction between early and advanced MDS; an apparent dissimilarity was observed between RAEB-1 and RAEB-2 subtypes. In early MDS, we monitored upregulation of proapoptotic miR-34a, which may contribute to the increased apoptosis of HSCs. Patients with 5q deletion were characterized by decreased levels of miR-143* and miR-378 mapped within the commonly deleted region at 5q32. This is an early report describing differential expression in MDS CD34+ cells, likely reflecting their disease-specific regulation. PMID:21150891

  11. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D.; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3–6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2–5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2–5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted. PMID:26360778

  12. Validation of a flow cytometric scoring system as a prognostic indicator for posttransplantation outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Denise A.; Loken, Michael R.; Myerson, David; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2008-01-01

    A total of 152 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) receiving a first stem cell transplant had marrow cells prospectively analyzed to calculate the flow cytometric scoring system (FCSS) score. The FCSS scores were retrospectively compared with patient outcomes in both univariate and multivariate models. The cumulative incidence of posttransplantation relapse at 3 years was 15%, 10%, and 36% for patients with mild, moderate, and severe FCSS scores, respectively, with the hazard for relapse of 2.8 (P = .02) for severe scores in comparison to patients with mild or normal FCSS scores. In multivariate analyses, the FCSS score was associated with relapse even after accounting for International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) score or for marrow myeloblast percentage. Among patients with intermediate-1 risk by IPSS, severe FCSS scores were associated with an increased hazard of relapse (3.8; P = .02) compared with patients with normal/mild/moderate FCSS scores. Among patients with less than 5% marrow myeloblasts, myeloblast dyspoiesis was associated with an increased hazard of relapse (3.7; P = .02). This analysis confirmed that FCSS scores are predictive of posttransplantation outcomes in patients with MDS even after adjusting for risk factors such as marrow myeloblast percentage and IPSS score. PMID:18606877

  13. Naive T-cells in myelodysplastic syndrome display intrinsic human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Mailloux, A; Rollison, D E; Painter, J S; Maciejewski, J; Paquette, R L; Loughran, T P; McGraw, K; Makishima, H; Radhakrishnan, R; Wei, S; Ren, X; Komrokji, R; List, A F; Epling-Burnette, P K

    2013-04-01

    Telomeres are specialized structures providing chromosome integrity during cellular division along with protection against premature senescence and apoptosis. Accelerated telomere attrition in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) occurs by an undefined mechanism. Although the MDS clone originates within the myeloid compartment, T-lymphocytes display repertoire contraction and loss of naive T-cells. The replicative lifespan of T-cells is stringently regulated by telomerase activity. In MDS cases, we show that purified CD3+ T-cells have significantly shorter telomere length and reduced proliferative capacity upon stimulation compared with controls. To understand the mechanism, telomerase enzymatic activity and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), gene expression were compared in MDS cases (n=35) and healthy controls (n=42) within different T-cell compartments. Telomerase activity is greatest in naive T-cells illustrating the importance of telomere repair in homeostatic repertoire regulation. Compared with healthy controls, MDS cases had lower telomerase induction (P<0.0001) that correlated with significantly lower hTERT mRNA (P<0.0001), independent of age and disease stratification. hTERT mRNA deficiency affected naive but not memory T-cells, and telomere erosion in MDS occurred without evidence of an hTERT-promoter mutation, copy number variation or deletion. Telomerase insufficiency may undermine homeostatic control within the hematopoietic compartment and promote a change in the T-cell repertoire in MDS.

  14. Selective expansion of regulatory T cells during lenalidomide treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion 5q.

    PubMed

    Balaian, Ekaterina; Schuster, Claudia; Schönefeldt, Claudia; Germing, Ulrich; Haase, Detlef; Tuve, Sebastian; Ordemann, Rainer; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Oelschlaegel, Uta; Mohr, Brigitte; von Bonin, Malte; Platzbecker, Uwe; Wermke, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Lenalidomide (LEN) leads to erythroid improvement in the majority of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 (MDS-del(5q)). This effect is believed to be exerted via its immunomodulatory properties, although the precise nature is still incompletely understood. We prospectively performed immune profiling in the bone marrow and blood of MDS-del(5q) patients undergoing LEN therapy for a median of 6 cycles. Therapy with LEN led to a significant increase in the median absolute lymphocyte count (1.3-fold, p = 0.013) without changes in the distribution of the T helper cells within the entire compartment. In parallel, the frequency of Treg increased significantly during treatment both in the peripheral blood (5.0 vs. 9.6 %, p = 0.001) and bone marrow (3.4 vs. 8.1 %, p = 0.001). Surprisingly, LEN treatment led to a decrease in TGFbeta levels, both in the peripheral blood (4.9 vs. 2.3 ng/ml, p = 0.039) and bone marrow (4.5 vs. 0.8 ng/ml, p = 0.023). These changes were not associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory Th17 cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that LEN induces a shift in lymphocytic populations towards immunosuppression in MDS-del(5q) patients.

  15. TP53 and MDM2 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence survival in non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Sallman, David A.; Basiorka, Ashley A.; Irvine, Brittany A.; Zhang, Ling; Epling-Burnette, P.K.; Rollison, Dana E.; Mallo, Mar; Sokol, Lubomir; Solé, Francesc; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; List, Alan F.

    2015-01-01

    P53 is a key regulator of many cellular processes and is negatively regulated by the human homolog of murine double minute-2 (MDM2) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of either gene alone, and in combination, are linked to cancer susceptibility, disease progression, and therapy response. We analyzed the interaction of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in relationship to outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from 208 MDS cases. Utilizing a novel functional SNP scoring system ranging from +2 to −2 based on predicted p53 activity, we found statistically significant differences in overall survival (OS) (p = 0.02) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.02) in non-del(5q) MDS patients with low functional scores. In univariate analysis, only IPSS and the functional SNP score predicted OS and PFS in non-del(5q) patients. In multivariate analysis, the functional SNP score was independent of IPSS for OS and PFS. These data underscore the importance of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in MDS, and provide a novel scoring system independent of IPSS that is predictive for disease outcome. PMID:26416416

  16. Total Lymphoid Irradiatione—Antithymocyte Globulin Conditioning and Allogeneic Transplantation for Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jonathan; Chhabra, Saurabh; Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Lavori, Philip; Laport, Ginna G.; Arai, Sally; Johnston, Laura; Miklos, David B.; Shizuru, Judith A.; Weng, Wen-Kai; Negrin, Robert S.; Lowsky, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo HCT) is the only curative therapy for the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), but treatment toxicity has been a barrier to its more widespread use. The nonmyeloablative regimen of total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and antithymocyte globulin (ATG) permits the establishment of donor hematopoiesis necessary for the graft-versus-malignancy effect and is protective against acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), but it has minimal direct cytotoxicity against myeloid diseases. We explored the use of TLI-ATG conditioning to treat 61 patients with allo HCT for MDS (n = 32), therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (n = 15), MPN (n = 9), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (n = 5). The median age of all patients was 63 years (range, 50 to 73). The cumulative incidence of aGVHD grades II to IV was 14% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4% to 23%) and for grades III to IV, 4% (95% CI, 0 to 9%), and it did not differ between patients who received allografts from related or unrelated donors. The cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 100 days, 12 months, and 36 months was 0%, 7%, and 11%. Overall survival and progression-free survival were 41% (95% CI, 29% to 53%) and 35% (95% CI, 23% to 48%), respectively. The safety and tolerability of TLI-ATG, as exemplified by its low NRM, provides a foundation for further risk-adapted or prophylactic interventions to prevent disease progression. PMID:24607552

  17. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of TP53 for the detection of chromosome 17 abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castro, Judit; Marco-Betés, Víctor; Gómez-Arbonés, Xavier; García-Cerecedo, Tomás; López, Ricard; Talavera, Elisabeth; Fernández-Ruiz, Sara; Ademà, Vera; Marugan, Isabel; Luño, Elisa; Sanzo, Carmen; Vallespí, Teresa; Arenillas, Leonor; Marco Buades, Josefa; Batlle, Ana; Buño, Ismael; Martín Ramos, María Luisa; Blázquez Rios, Beatriz; Collado Nieto, Rosa; Vargas, Ma Teresa; González Martínez, Teresa; Sanz, Guillermo; Solé, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CC) detects chromosome 17 (chr17) abnormalities in 2% of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We used CC and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (LSI p53/17p13.1) to assess deletion of 17p in 531 patients with de novo MDS from the Spanish Group of Hematological Cytogenetics. FISH detected - 17 or 17p abnormalities in 13 cases (2.6%) in whom no 17p abnormalities were revealed by CC: 0.9% of patients with a normal karyotype, 0% in non-informative cytogenetics, 50% of patients with a chr17 abnormality without loss of 17p and 4.7% of cases with an abnormal karyotype not involving chr17. Our results suggest that applying FISH of 17p13 to identify the number of copies of the TP53 gene could be beneficial in patients with a complex karyotype. We recommend using FISH of 17p13 in young patients with a normal karyotype or non-informative cytogenetics, and always in isolated del(17p). PMID:25754580

  18. TP53 and MDM2 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence survival in non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Kathy L; Cluzeau, Thomas; Sallman, David A; Basiorka, Ashley A; Irvine, Brittany A; Zhang, Ling; Epling-Burnette, P K; Rollison, Dana E; Mallo, Mar; Sokol, Lubomir; Solé, Francesc; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; List, Alan F

    2015-10-27

    P53 is a key regulator of many cellular processes and is negatively regulated by the human homolog of murine double minute-2 (MDM2) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of either gene alone, and in combination, are linked to cancer susceptibility, disease progression, and therapy response. We analyzed the interaction of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in relationship to outcome in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Sanger sequencing was performed on DNA isolated from 208 MDS cases. Utilizing a novel functional SNP scoring system ranging from +2 to -2 based on predicted p53 activity, we found statistically significant differences in overall survival (OS) (p = 0.02) and progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.02) in non-del(5q) MDS patients with low functional scores. In univariate analysis, only IPSS and the functional SNP score predicted OS and PFS in non-del(5q) patients. In multivariate analysis, the functional SNP score was independent of IPSS for OS and PFS. These data underscore the importance of TP53 R72P and MDM2 SNP309 SNPs in MDS, and provide a novel scoring system independent of IPSS that is predictive for disease outcome. PMID:26416416

  19. The Proliferation Index of Specific Bone Marrow Cell Compartments from Myelodysplastic Syndromes Is Associated with the Diagnostic and Patient Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Matarraz, Sergio; Teodosio, Cristina; Fernandez, Carlos; Albors, Manuel; Jara-Acevedo, María; López, Antonio; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, María; Gutierrez, María Laura; Flores-Montero, Juan; Cerveró, Carlos; Pizarro-Perea, Marlies; Garrastazul, María Paz; Caballero, Gonzalo; Gutierrez, Oliver; Mendez, Guy Daniel; González-Silva, Manuel; Laranjeira, Paula; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal stem cell disorders which frequently show a hypercellular dysplastic bone marrow (BM) associated with inefficient hematopoiesis and peripheral cytopenias due to increased apoptosis and maturation blockades. Currently, little is known about the role of cell proliferation in compensating for the BM failure syndrome and in determining patient outcome. Here, we analyzed the proliferation index (PI) of different compartments of BM hematopoietic cells in 106 MDS patients compared to both normal/reactive BM (n = 94) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 30 cases) using multiparameter flow cytometry. Our results show abnormally increased overall BM proliferation profiles in MDS which significantly differ between early/low-risk and advanced/high-risk cases. Early/low-risk patients showed increased proliferation of non-lymphoid CD34+ precursors, maturing neutrophils and nucleated red blood cells (NRBC), while the PI of these compartments of BM precursors progressively fell below normal values towards AML levels in advanced/high-risk MDS. Decreased proliferation of non-lymphoid CD34+ and NRBC precursors was significantly associated with adverse disease features, shorter overall survival (OS) and transformation to AML, both in the whole series and when low- and high-risk MDS patients were separately considered, the PI of NRBC emerging as the most powerful independent predictor for OS and progression to AML. In conclusion, assessment of the PI of NRBC, and potentially also of other compartments of BM precursors (e.g.: myeloid CD34+ HPC), could significantly contribute to a better management of MDS. PMID:22952954

  20. Certain Autoimmune Manifestations Are Associated With Distinctive Karyotypes and Outcomes in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jin; Park, Jin Kyun; Lee, Eun Young; Joo, Sang Hyun; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Lee, Eun Bong; Song, Yeong Wook; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2016-03-01

    Autoimmune manifestations (AIMs) are common in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This study aimed to investigate whether AIMs are associated with a specific cytogenetic abnormalities and worse survival in patients with MDS. A total of 67 MDS patients with AIMs and 134 age- and sex-matched MDS patients without AIMs, all of whom received medical care at Seoul National University Hospital from January 2000 through July 2014, were enrolled. The clinical features, chromosomal abnormalities, and outcomes were examined. The effect of AIMs on mortality was estimated after adjusting for age, sex, and the International Prognostic Scoring System. The mean age (±SD) at the time of MDS diagnosis was 54.5 ± 17.1 years, and 44.8% of patients were male. Neutrophilic dermatosis (ND; Sweet syndrome and pyoderma gangrenosum) was the most prevalent AIM (n = 24 36%]), followed by Behcet disease (10 [15%]), rheumatoid arthritis (9 [13%]), vasculitis (8 [12%]), myositis (3 [4%]), spondyloarthropathy (3 [4%]), and systemic lupus erythematous (2 [3%]). ND and vasculitis occurred at the time of MDS diagnosis, whereas other AIMs occurred years after MDS diagnosis. Deletion of 5q was associated with ND (P = 0.001), whereas trisomy 8 was associated with Behcet disease (P = 0.015). Strikingly, ND was associated with a 1.8-fold increase in mortality (95% CI 1.033-3.093; P = 0.038). Certain AIMs in MDS patients are associated with distinctive karyotypes and worse survival. A larger study is needed to confirm whether the presence of AIMs influences disease outcome in MDS. PMID:27043672

  1. Busulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-26

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  3. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Daily practice management of myelodysplastic syndromes in France: data from 907 patients in a one-week cross-sectional study by the Groupe Francophone des Myélodysplasies

    PubMed Central

    Kelaidi, Charikleia; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Quesnel, Bruno; Guerci, Agnes; Dreyfus, François; Brechignac, Sabine; Berthou, Christian; Prebet, Thomas; Hicheri, Yosr; Hacini, Maya; Delaunay, Jacques; Gourin, Marie-Pierre; Camo, Jean-Marie; Zerazhi, Hacene; Taksin, Anne-Laure; Legros, Laurence; Choufi, Bachra; Fenaux, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Background There is little published information on the everyday clinical management of myelodysplastic syndromes in real world practice. Design and Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of all patients with myelodysplastic syndromes attending 74 French centers in a 1-week period for inpatient admission, day-hospital care or outpatient visits. Results Nine hundred and seven patients were included; 67.3% had lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (International Prognostic Scoring System: low or intermediate-1). Karyotype had been analyzed in 82.5% of the cases and was more often of intermediate or poor risk in patients under 65 years old compared with those who were older. Red blood cell transfusions accounted for as many as 31.4% of the admissions. Endogenous erythropoietin level was less than 500 IU/L in 88% of the patients tested. Erythroid stimulating agents had been or were being used in 36.8% of the lower risk patients, iron chelation in 31% of lower risk patients requiring red blood cell transfusions and lenalidomide in 41% of lower risk patients with del 5q. High-dose chemotherapy, hypomethylating agents, low dose cytarabine and allogeneic stem cell transplantation had been or were being used in 14.8%, 31.1%, 8.8% and 5.1%, respectively, of higher-risk patients. Conclusions Karyotype is now assessed in most patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, and patients under 65 years old may have more aggressive disease. Apart from erythroid-stimulating agents and, in higher-risk myelodysplastic syndromes, hypomethylating agents, specific treatments are used in a minority of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and red blood cell transfusions still represent the major reason for hospital admission. PMID:20015890

  5. Phase 2, single-arm trial to evaluate the effectiveness of darbepoetin alfa for correcting anaemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gabrilove, Janice; Paquette, Ronald; Lyons, Roger M; Mushtaq, Chaudhry; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Tomita, Dianne; Dreiling, Lyndah

    2008-01-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) often develop anaemia resulting in frequent transfusions and fatigue. Darbepoetin alfa is an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) approved for treating chemotherapy-induced anaemia. This single-arm, phase 2 study examined the efficacy of darbepoetin alfa 500 μg every 3 weeks (Q3W) for treating anaemia in low-risk MDS patients (after 6 weeks, poor responders received darbepoetin alfa 500 μg every 2 weeks). The primary end-point was the incidence of erythroid responses (International Working Group criteria) after 13 weeks of therapy. Secondary end-points included the incidence of erythroid responses at weeks 28 and 55, [or weeks 27 and 53 for dose escalations to every two weeks (Q2W)], and safety parameters. Analyses were stratified by the patient's previous ESA therapy status [ESA-naïve (n = 144) vs. prior ESA-treated (n = 62)]. After 13 weeks of therapy, 49% of ESA-naïve patients and 26% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved a major erythroid response. After 53/55 weeks, 59% of ESA-naïve patients and 34% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved a major erythroid response; 82% of ESA-naïve patients and 55% of prior ESA-treated patients achieved target haemoglobin of 110 g/l. Thromboembolic or related adverse events occurred in 2% of patients; no pulmonary embolisms were reported. In conclusion, darbepoetin alfa, 500 μg Q3W appeared well tolerated and increased haemoglobin levels in low-risk MDS patients. PMID:18540943

  6. Update on developments in the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): consensus statements and report from an expert workshop.

    PubMed

    Platzbecker, Uwe; Santini, Valeria; Mufti, Ghulam J; Haferlach, Claudia; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Park, Sophie; Solé, Francesc; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Haase, Detlef

    2012-03-01

    Several new treatments for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) have recently become available, or are in development. Patients who could benefit from active treatment must be effectively identified and followed up. Therefore, guidelines for the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of MDS need to be kept up to date with technological and scientific advances. An expert workshop was convened to review currently available and emerging diagnostic technologies and developments in prognostic classification systems, to ensure appropriate management of individual patients. The panel also provided suggestions to ensure adherence to guidelines and highlighted the mandatory requirement for cytogenetic evaluation in patients with MDS. PMID:22137318

  7. Parameters detected by geriatric and quality of life assessment in 195 older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia are highly predictive for outcome

    PubMed Central

    Deschler, Barbara; Ihorst, Gabriele; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; März, Eva; de Figuerido, Marcelo; Fritzsche, Kurt; Haas, Peter; Salih, Helmut R.; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre; Lübbert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia exemplify the complexity of treatment allocation in older patients as options range from best supportive care, non-intensive treatment (e.g. hypomethylating agents) to intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation. Novel metrics for non-disease variables are urgently needed to help define the best treatment for each older patient. We investigated the feasibility and prognostic value of geriatric/quality of life assessments aside from established disease-specific variables in 195 patients aged 60 years or over with myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia. These patients were grouped according to treatment intensity and assessed. Assessment consisted of eight instruments evaluating activities of daily living, depression, mental functioning, mobility, comorbidities, Karnofsky Index and quality of life. Patients with a median age of 71 years (range 60-87 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (n=63) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=132) were treated either with best supportive care (n=47), hypomethylating agents (n=73) or intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation (n=75). After selection of variables, pathological activities of daily living and quality of life/fatigue remained highly predictive for overall survival in the entire patient group beyond disease-related risk factors adverse cytogenetics and blast count of 20% or over. In 107 patients treated non-intensively activities of daily living of less than 100 (hazard ratio, HR 2.94), Karnofsky Index below 80 (HR 2.34) and quality of life/’fatigue’ of 50 or over (HR 1.77) were significant prognosticators. Summation of adverse features revealed a high risk of death (HR 9.36). In-depth evaluation of older patients prior to individual treatment allocation is feasible and provides additional information to standard assessment. Patients aged 60 years or over with newly diagnosed myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia and

  8. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, and/or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm With 10% Blasts or Higher

  9. Deferasirox treatment for myelodysplastic syndromes: "real-life" efficacy and safety in a single-institution patient population.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Finsinger, Paola; Loglisci, Giuseppina; Federico, Vincenzo; Santopietro, Michelina; Colafigli, Gioia; Petrucci, Luigi; Salaroli, Adriano; Serrao, Alessandra; Latagliata, Roberto; Alimena, Giuliana

    2012-09-01

    We here describe a single-institution experience on 40 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) consecutively treated with deferasirox at the dose of 10-30 mg/kg/day according to Consensus Guidelines on Iron Chelation Therapy, outside of clinical trials. Serum ferritin (SF) was measured monthly, and safety assessment included monitoring of adverse events during treatment and of liver and renal parameters. Median SF at baseline of the 40 patients was 2,878 ng/ml. Median dose of deferasirox was 1,125 mg/day. At a median follow-up of 12 months of treatment, there was a significant reduction in SF from baseline, the median value being 1,400 ng/ml (p = 0.001). Interruptions due to toxicity were recorded in 40 % of patients: most common adverse events were diarrhoea (five patients, 12.5 %) and skin rash (four patients, 10 %). Seven patients had increased serum creatinine values >33 % above baseline, but there were no progressive increases. Four patients (three refractory anaemia and one refractory anaemia with excess blasts type 1) had a reduction of transfusion requirement (from a median of 5 to 1 unit/month) according to International Working Group 2006 criteria, with mean Hb value increasing from 8.5 to 10.5 g/dl, and mean Hb improvement being 2 g/dl (p = 0.02). No increased toxicity was noted when deferasirox was used concomitantly with azacitidine (eight patients who were intermediate 2 International Prognostic Scoring System risk) or lenalidomide (two patients with del(5q)). In conclusion, the oral iron chelator deferasirox is effective and safe when used in MDS patients with transfusion requirement, also if administered concomitantly with other drugs.

  10. Radiolabeled antibodies directed at CD45 for conditioning prior to allogeneic transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Johnnie J.; Zeller, Jill

    2012-01-01

    While allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) may offer the best chance of cure for patients suffering from aggressive hematological malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndrome, successful outcomes for the subgroup of patients with high-risk disease remain disappointing and lag behind those of lower-risk patients. Because relatively high rates of relapse are an important contributor to these poor outcomes, efforts have explored approaches to increase the cytotoxic effects of treatment. Relapse rates have been shown to improve with the addition of increased doses of total body irradiation (TBI) and/or the introduction of additional chemotherapy to a HCT conditioning regimen. However, the increase in TBI dose and/or additional chemotherapy has also been associated with a significant increase in life-threatening toxicities, resulting in no change in overall survival. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been employed as an adjunct to HCT where targeted delivery of radiation may allow for further escalation of therapy to reduce relapse with minimal toxicity. In this review we describe these efforts, including the benefits of escalating the dose of radiation to sites of hematologic disease prior to HCT, the various cellular targets for antibody-mediated delivery of radiation, as well as the rationale for incorporation of various radionuclides such as alpha emitters and beta emitters into the preparative regimen prior to HCT. Lastly, newer novel approaches such as pretargeted RIT (PRIT) are described as a method to further increase delivery of targeted radiation to hematological tissues while sparing noninvolved organs. PMID:23556108

  11. Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis complicating myelodysplastic syndrome results in worsening of prognosis: a retrospective cohort study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (sPAP) is a very rare lung disorder comprising approximately 10% of cases of acquired PAP. Hematological disorders are the most common underlying conditions of sPAP, of which 74% of cases demonstrate myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). However, the impact of sPAP on the prognosis of underlying MDS remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether development of sPAP worsens the prognosis of MDS. Methods Thirty-one cases of sPAP and underlying MDS were retrospectively classified into mild and severe cases consisting of very low-/low-risk groups and intermediate-/high-/very high-risk groups at the time of diagnosis of MDS, according to the prognostic scoring system based on the World Health Organization classification. Next, we compared the characteristics, disease duration, cumulative survival, and prognostic factors of the groups. Results In contrast to previous reports on the prognosis of MDS, we found that the cumulative survival probability for mild MDS patients was similar to that in severe MDS patients. This is likely due to the poor prognosis of patients with mild MDS, whose 2-year survival rate was 46.2%. Notably, 75% and 62.5% of patients who died developed fatal infectious diseases and exacerbation of PAP, respectively, suggesting that the progression of PAP per se and/or PAP-associated infection contributed to poor prognosis. The use of corticosteroid therapy and a diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide of less than 44% were predictive of poor prognosis. Conclusion Development of sPAP during the course of MDS may be an important adverse risk factor in prognosis of patients with mild MDS. PMID:24597668

  12. Label-free imaging and identification of typical cells of acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vanna, R; Ronchi, P; Lenferink, A T M; Tresoldi, C; Morasso, C; Mehn, D; Bedoni, M; Picciolini, S; Terstappen, L W M M; Ciceri, F; Otto, C; Gramatica, F

    2015-02-21

    In clinical practice, the diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) start from the manual examination of stained smears of bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood (PB) by using an optical microscope. This step is subjective and scarcely reproducible. Therefore, the development of subjective and potentially automatable methods for the recognition of typical AML/MDS cells is necessary. Here we have used Raman spectroscopy for distinguishing myeloblasts, promyelocytes, abnormal promyelocytes and erhytroblasts, which have to be counted for a correct diagnosis and morphological classification of AML and MDS. BM samples from patients affected by four different AML subtypes, mostly characterized by the presence of the four subpopulations selected for this study, were analyzed. First, each cell was scanned by acquiring 4096 spectra, thus obtaining Raman images which demonstrate an accurate description of morphological features characteristic of each subpopulation. Raman imaging coupled with hierarchical cluster analysis permitted the automatic discrimination and localization of the nucleus, the cytoplasm, myeloperoxidase containing granules and haemoglobin. Second, the averaged Raman fingerprint of each cell was analysed by multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis) in order to study the typical vibrational features of each subpopulation and also for the automatic recognition of cells. The leave-one-out cross validation of a Raman-based classification model demonstrated the correct classification of myeloblasts, promyelocytes (normal/abnormal) and erhytroblasts with an accuracy of 100%. Normal and abnormal promyelocytes were distinguished with 95% accuracy. The overall classification accuracy considering the four subpopulations was 98%. This proof-of-concept study shows that Raman micro-spectroscopy could be a valid approach for developing label-free, objective and automatic

  13. Effect of androgen therapy and anemia on serum erythropoietin levels in patients with aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Piedras, J; Hernández, G; López-Karpovitch, X

    1998-02-01

    Immunoreactive serum erythropoietin (EPO) was measured in anemic and non-anemic patients with acquired non-severe aplastic anemia (AA; n = 22) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS; n = 31) receiving or not androgens to examine the effect of androgen therapy and anemia on EPO levels in these disorders. Soluble transferrin receptor (TfR) and absolute reticulocyte count (ARC) were also assayed in order to evaluate erythropoietic activity. AA and MDS patients were stratified for anemia and androgen treatment as follows: 12 untreated anemic patients; 17 anemic patients during androgen therapy; 14 non-anemic patients without any treatment (> 1 year); and 10 non-anemic patients on androgen therapy. Although EPO levels in non-anemic patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (n = 29) no statistically significant differences in Hb and EPO values were found between non-anemic patients receiving or not androgen therapy. In the linear regression analysis between Hb and log EPO concentration, no statistically significant differences in the slopes between untreated and androgen-treated anemic groups nor between both groups and patients with iron deficiency anemia (n = 23) were observed. However, the y intercept (log EPO) of regression line was significantly higher in androgen-treated anemic patients than in the androgen therapy-free anemic group. Serum TfR levels were higher in treated than in untreated anemic patients, whereas ARC was not different between both groups. These data seemingly indicate that (1) androgens at pharmacological doses do not increase serum EPO levels in non-anemic AA and MDS patients, and (2) in patients with AA and MDS, androgen-driven EPO stimulation is appreciably enhanced by anemia.

  14. The relationship of TP53 R72P polymorphism to disease outcome and TP53 mutation in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, K L; Zhang, L M; Rollison, D E; Basiorka, A A; Fulp, W; Rawal, B; Jerez, A; Billingsley, D L; Lin, H-Y; Kurtin, S E; Yoder, S; Zhang, Y; Guinta, K; Mallo, M; Solé, F; Calasanz, M J; Cervera, J; Such, E; González, T; Nevill, T J; Haferlach, T; Smith, A E; Kulasekararaj, A; Mufti, G; Karsan, A; Maciejewski, J P; Sokol, L; Epling-Burnette, P K; Wei, S; List, A F

    2015-01-01

    Nonsynonymous TP53 exon 4 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), R72P, is linked to cancer and mutagen susceptibility. R72P associations with specific cancer risk, particularly hematological malignancies, have been conflicting. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with chromosome 5q deletion is characterized by erythroid hypoplasia arising from lineage-specific p53 accumulation resulting from ribosomal insufficiency. We hypothesized that apoptotically diminished R72P C-allele may influence predisposition to del(5q) MDS. Bone marrow and blood DNA was sequenced from 705 MDS cases (333 del(5q), 372 non-del(5q)) and 157 controls. Genotype distribution did not significantly differ between del(5q) cases (12.6% CC, 38.1% CG, 49.2% GG), non-del(5q) cases (9.7% CC, 44.6% CG, 45.7% GG) and controls (7.6% CC, 37.6% CG, 54.8% GG) (P=0.13). Allele frequency did not differ between non-del(5q) and del(5q) cases (P=0.91) but trended towards increased C-allele frequency comparing non-del(5q) (P=0.08) and del(5q) (P=0.10) cases with controls. Median lenalidomide response duration increased proportionate to C-allele dosage in del(5q) patients (2.2 (CC), 1.3 (CG) and 0.89 years (GG)). Furthermore, C-allele homozygosity in del(5q) was associated with prolonged overall and progression-free survival and non-terminal interstitial deletions that excluded 5q34, whereas G-allele homozygozity was associated with inferior outcome and terminal deletions involving 5q34 (P=0.05). These findings comprise the largest MDS R72P SNP analysis. PMID:25768405

  15. The relationship of TP53 R72P polymorphism to disease outcome and TP53 mutation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    McGraw, K L; Zhang, L M; Rollison, D E; Basiorka, A A; Fulp, W; Rawal, B; Jerez, A; Billingsley, D L; Lin, H-Y; Kurtin, S E; Yoder, S; Zhang, Y; Guinta, K; Mallo, M; Solé, F; Calasanz, M J; Cervera, J; Such, E; González, T; Nevill, T J; Haferlach, T; Smith, A E; Kulasekararaj, A; Mufti, G; Karsan, A; Maciejewski, J P; Sokol, L; Epling-Burnette, P K; Wei, S; List, A F

    2015-01-01

    Nonsynonymous TP53 exon 4 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), R72P, is linked to cancer and mutagen susceptibility. R72P associations with specific cancer risk, particularly hematological malignancies, have been conflicting. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with chromosome 5q deletion is characterized by erythroid hypoplasia arising from lineage-specific p53 accumulation resulting from ribosomal insufficiency. We hypothesized that apoptotically diminished R72P C-allele may influence predisposition to del(5q) MDS. Bone marrow and blood DNA was sequenced from 705 MDS cases (333 del(5q), 372 non-del(5q)) and 157 controls. Genotype distribution did not significantly differ between del(5q) cases (12.6% CC, 38.1% CG, 49.2% GG), non-del(5q) cases (9.7% CC, 44.6% CG, 45.7% GG) and controls (7.6% CC, 37.6% CG, 54.8% GG) (P=0.13). Allele frequency did not differ between non-del(5q) and del(5q) cases (P=0.91) but trended towards increased C-allele frequency comparing non-del(5q) (P=0.08) and del(5q) (P=0.10) cases with controls. Median lenalidomide response duration increased proportionate to C-allele dosage in del(5q) patients (2.2 (CC), 1.3 (CG) and 0.89 years (GG)). Furthermore, C-allele homozygosity in del(5q) was associated with prolonged overall and progression-free survival and non-terminal interstitial deletions that excluded 5q34, whereas G-allele homozygozity was associated with inferior outcome and terminal deletions involving 5q34 (P=0.05). These findings comprise the largest MDS R72P SNP analysis. PMID:25768405

  16. An increase in hemoglobin, platelets and white blood cells levels by iron chelation as single treatment in multitransfused patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: clinical evidences and possible biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Voso, Maria Teresa; Aloe Spiriti, Maria Antonietta; Fenu, Susanna; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Tafuri, Agostino; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-05-01

    Iron chelation therapy can improve hematopoiesis in myelodysplastic syndromes. Only few studies showed hematologic improvement with deferoxamine, and the erythroid responses were correlated with good compliance to long-term treatment. Indeed, single-case reports and data from clinical trials testing the efficacy of deferasirox reported hematologic improvements with varying rates of response in different lineages. Overall, about 760 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with iron overload receiving deferasirox were included in six different studies, and an increase in hemoglobin level was reported to range from 6 to 44.5%, an increase in platelet count from 13 to 61%, and in neutrophil count from 3 to 76%. In all the published studies, hematologic improvements were not related to serum ferritin or to non-total binding iron changes; indeed, other pathways were indicated as possible pathogenetic mechanisms, such as decreased NF-kB activity, modulation of mTOR signalling, and reduced reactive oxygen species. The aims of this review are to provide all available information relating clinical and hematologic changes after chelation therapy and to discuss potential mechanisms involved in such responses.

  17. Cytogenetic follow-up by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization: implications for monitoring patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and deletion 5q treated with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Gudrun; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Büsche, Guntram; Hofmann, Winfried; Kreipe, Hans Heinrich; Fenaux, Pierre; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Schlegelberger, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    In patients with low and intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndrome and deletion 5q (del(5q)) treated with lenalidomide, monitoring of cytogenetic response is mandatory, since patients without cytogenetic response have a significantly increased risk of progression. Therefore, we have reviewed cytogenetic data of 302 patients. Patients were analyzed by karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. In 85 patients, del(5q) was only detected by karyotyping. In 8 patients undergoing karyotypic evolution, the del(5q) and additional chromosomal aberrations were only detected by karyotyping. In 3 patients, del(5q) was only detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization, but not by karyotyping due to a low number of metaphases. Karyotyping was significantly more sensitive than fluorescence in situ hybridization in detecting the del(5q) clone. In conclusion, to optimize therapy control of myelodysplastic syndrome patients with del(5q) treated with lenalidomide and to identify cytogenetic non-response or progression as early as possible, fluorescence in situ hybridization alone is inadequate for evaluation. Karyotyping must be performed to optimally evaluate response. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01099267 and NCT00179621) PMID:21109690

  18. An increase in hemoglobin, platelets and white blood cells levels by iron chelation as single treatment in multitransfused patients with myelodysplastic syndromes: clinical evidences and possible biological mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Voso, Maria Teresa; Aloe Spiriti, Maria Antonietta; Fenu, Susanna; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Tafuri, Agostino; Alimena, Giuliana

    2015-05-01

    Iron chelation therapy can improve hematopoiesis in myelodysplastic syndromes. Only few studies showed hematologic improvement with deferoxamine, and the erythroid responses were correlated with good compliance to long-term treatment. Indeed, single-case reports and data from clinical trials testing the efficacy of deferasirox reported hematologic improvements with varying rates of response in different lineages. Overall, about 760 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients with iron overload receiving deferasirox were included in six different studies, and an increase in hemoglobin level was reported to range from 6 to 44.5%, an increase in platelet count from 13 to 61%, and in neutrophil count from 3 to 76%. In all the published studies, hematologic improvements were not related to serum ferritin or to non-total binding iron changes; indeed, other pathways were indicated as possible pathogenetic mechanisms, such as decreased NF-kB activity, modulation of mTOR signalling, and reduced reactive oxygen species. The aims of this review are to provide all available information relating clinical and hematologic changes after chelation therapy and to discuss potential mechanisms involved in such responses. PMID:25743685

  19. Evolution of iron overload in patients with low-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: iron chelation therapy and organ complications.

    PubMed

    Remacha, Ángel F; Arrizabalaga, Beatriz; Villegas, Ana; Durán, María Soledad; Hermosín, Lourdes; de Paz, Raquel; Garcia, Marta; Diez Campelo, Maria; Sanz, Guillermo

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the evolution of iron overload, assessed by serum ferritin (SF), in transfusion-dependent lower risk patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), as well as to describe the occurrence of organ complications, and to analyze its relationship with iron chelation therapy. This observational retrospective study was conducted from March 2010 to March 2011 in 47 Spanish hospitals. A total of 263 patients with lower risk MDS (International Prognostic Scoring System [IPSS] low/intermediate-1 risk or Spanish Prognostic Index [SPI] 0-1 risk), transfusion-dependent, and who had received ≥10 packed red blood cells (PRBC) were included. At MDS diagnosis, patients received a mean of 2.8 ± 3.9 PRBC/month, and 8.7% of patients showed SF ≥1000 μg/L. Over the course of the disease, patients received a mean of 83.4 ± 83.3 PRBC, and 36.1% of patients presented SF ≥2500 μg/L. Cardiac, hepatic, endocrine, or arthropathy complications appeared/worsened in 20.2, 11.4, 9.9, and 3.8% of patients, respectively. According to investigator, iron overload was a main cause of hepatic (70.0%) and endocrine (26.9%) complications. A total of 96 (36.5%) patients received iron chelation therapy for ≥6 months, being deferasirox the most frequent first chelation treatment (71.9%). Chelation-treated patients showed longer overall survival (p < 0.001), leukemia-free survival (p = 0.007), and cardiac event-free survival (p = 0.017) than non-chelated patients. In multivariable analyses, age (p = 0.011), IPSS (p < 0.001), and chelation treatment (p = 0.015) were predictors for overall survival; IPSS (p = 0.014) and transfusion frequency (p = 0.001) for leukemia-free survival; and chelation treatment (p = 0.040) and Sorror comorbidity index (p = 0.039) for cardiac event-free survival. In conclusion, these results confirm the potential survival benefit of iron chelation therapy and provide additional evidence on the

  20. Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following adjuvant chemotherapy with and without granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Calip, Gregory S; Malmgren, Judith A; Lee, Wan-Ju; Schwartz, Stephen M; Kaplan, Henry G

    2015-11-01

    Risk of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) post-breast cancer treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF) is not fully characterized. Our objective was to estimate MDS/AML risk associated with specific breast cancer treatments. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women aged ≥66 years with stage I-III breast cancer between 2001 and 2009 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Women were classified as receiving treatment with radiation, chemotherapy, and/or G-CSF. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for MDS/AML risk. Among 56,251 breast cancer cases, 1.2 % developed MDS/AML during median follow-up of 3.2 years. 47.1 % of women received radiation and 14.3 % received chemotherapy. Compared to breast cancer cases treated with surgery alone, those treated with chemotherapy (HR = 1.38, 95 %-CI 0.98-1.93) and chemotherapy/radiation (HR = 1.77, 95 %-CI 1.25-2.51) had increased risk of MDS/AML, but not radiation alone (HR = 1.08, 95 % CI 0.86-1.36). Among chemotherapy regimens and G-CSF, MDS/AML risk was differentially associated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide-containing regimens (HR = 1.86, 95 %-CI 1.33-2.61) and filgrastim (HR = 1.47, 95 %-CI 1.05-2.06), but not pegfilgrastim (HR = 1.10, 95 %-CI 0.73-1.66). We observed increased MDS/AML risk among older breast cancer survivors treated with anthracycline/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy that was enhanced by G-CSF. Although small, this risk warrants consideration when determining adjuvant chemotherapy and neutropenia prophylaxis for breast cancer patients.

  1. Real-life use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in myelodysplastic syndromes: a "Gruppo Romano Mielodisplasie (GROM)" multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Buccisano, Francesco; Piccioni, Anna Lina; Nobile, Carolina; Criscuolo, Marianna; Niscola, Pasquale; Tatarelli, Caterina; Fianchi, Luana; Villivà, Nicoletta; Neri, Benedetta; Carmosino, Ida; Gumenyuk, Svitlana; Mancini, Stefano; Voso, Maria Teresa; Maurillo, Luca; Breccia, Massimo; Zini, Gina; Venditti, Adriano; Fenu, Susanna; Spiriti, Maria Antonietta Aloe; Latagliata, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The Gruppo Romano Mielodisplasie (GROM) conducted a retrospective study in 543 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in "real-life" clinical practice. The 40.000-UI/week erythropoietin (EPO)-alpha and 30.000-UI/week EPO-beta starting dose were defined "standard," and 80,000 UI/week EPO-alpha and 60.000 UI/week EPO-beta were defined "high." Response was defined according to International Working Group (IWG) 2006 criteria. At ESA's start, median age was 74.2 years (interquartile range (IR) 67.8-79.5) and median hemoglobin was 8.9 g/dl (IR 8.2-9.6). Median time from diagnosis to ESAs start was 3.8 months (IR 0.8-13.2). ESA starting dose was "standard" in 361 patients (66.5 %) and "high" in 182 patients (33.5 %). Erythroid response was observed in 82/185 (44.3 %) transfusion dependent (TD) patients as compared with 226/329 (68.6 %) transfusion independent (TI) ones (p < 0.001). At multivariate analysis, in TD patients, only endogenous EPO levels <50 mU/l were significant (p = 0.046), whereas in TI patients, high-dose ESAs (p < 0.001), abnormal creatinine levels (0.009), and endogenous EPO levels <50 mU/l (p = 0.014) were predictors of response. Responders showed a higher 5-year overall survival (OS) (57.8 vs. 32.2 %, p < 0.001) and leukemia-free survival (76.0 vs. 49.8 %, p < 0.001). At multivariable analysis for OS, response to ESA, low International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), no transfusion need, and female sex showed an independent favorable prognostic role. Our results confirm that treatment with ESAs is effective in a real-life MDS setting, particularly at high dose and in TI patients. Prospective studies are needed to define the optimal starting dose.

  2. Real-life use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in myelodysplastic syndromes: a "Gruppo Romano Mielodisplasie (GROM)" multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Buccisano, Francesco; Piccioni, Anna Lina; Nobile, Carolina; Criscuolo, Marianna; Niscola, Pasquale; Tatarelli, Caterina; Fianchi, Luana; Villivà, Nicoletta; Neri, Benedetta; Carmosino, Ida; Gumenyuk, Svitlana; Mancini, Stefano; Voso, Maria Teresa; Maurillo, Luca; Breccia, Massimo; Zini, Gina; Venditti, Adriano; Fenu, Susanna; Spiriti, Maria Antonietta Aloe; Latagliata, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    The Gruppo Romano Mielodisplasie (GROM) conducted a retrospective study in 543 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) to evaluate the safety and efficacy of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) in "real-life" clinical practice. The 40.000-UI/week erythropoietin (EPO)-alpha and 30.000-UI/week EPO-beta starting dose were defined "standard," and 80,000 UI/week EPO-alpha and 60.000 UI/week EPO-beta were defined "high." Response was defined according to International Working Group (IWG) 2006 criteria. At ESA's start, median age was 74.2 years (interquartile range (IR) 67.8-79.5) and median hemoglobin was 8.9 g/dl (IR 8.2-9.6). Median time from diagnosis to ESAs start was 3.8 months (IR 0.8-13.2). ESA starting dose was "standard" in 361 patients (66.5 %) and "high" in 182 patients (33.5 %). Erythroid response was observed in 82/185 (44.3 %) transfusion dependent (TD) patients as compared with 226/329 (68.6 %) transfusion independent (TI) ones (p < 0.001). At multivariate analysis, in TD patients, only endogenous EPO levels <50 mU/l were significant (p = 0.046), whereas in TI patients, high-dose ESAs (p < 0.001), abnormal creatinine levels (0.009), and endogenous EPO levels <50 mU/l (p = 0.014) were predictors of response. Responders showed a higher 5-year overall survival (OS) (57.8 vs. 32.2 %, p < 0.001) and leukemia-free survival (76.0 vs. 49.8 %, p < 0.001). At multivariable analysis for OS, response to ESA, low International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS), no transfusion need, and female sex showed an independent favorable prognostic role. Our results confirm that treatment with ESAs is effective in a real-life MDS setting, particularly at high dose and in TI patients. Prospective studies are needed to define the optimal starting dose. PMID:27091349

  3. Hydralazine and magnesium valproate as epigenetic treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome. Preliminary results of a phase-II trial.

    PubMed

    Candelaria, Myrna; Herrera, Aquileo; Labardini, Juan; González-Fierro, Aurora; Trejo-Becerril, Catalina; Taja-Chayeb, Lucía; Pérez-Cárdenas, Enrique; de la Cruz-Hernández, Erick; Arias-Bofill, Daymi; Vidal, Silvia; Cervera, Eduardo; Dueñas-Gonzalez, Alfonso

    2011-04-01

    Decitabine and azacitidine, two DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors, are the current standard of treatment for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are also being tested against MDS. Both drug classes synergize in their gene reactivating and anticancer activities. The combination of hydralazine and valproate (Transkrip®), a DNMT and HDAC inhibitor, respectively), has been developed as epigenetic therapy under the drug repositioning concept. To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of hydralazine and valproate against MDS, an open phase-II study for previously treated patients with MDS was conducted. The hydralazine dose was given according with the acetylator phenotype, and valproate was dosed at 30 mg/kg/day. Response was graded with International Working Group criteria. Toxicity was evaluated by the Common Toxemia Criteria-National Cancer Institute version 3 scale. From November 2007 to January 2010, 12 patients were included. Median age±SD was 53±19.78 years (range, 23-79 years); median time from diagnosis to inclusion in the study was 7.9 months (range 2.6-36.1 months). Median of previous treatment was 2 (range, 1-6). Refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia was diagnosed in ten cases, and refractory anemia with excess of blasts in two. Overall response was documented in six (50%) of 12 cases, including one CR, one PR, and four hematological improvements of the erythroid series. Two patients (16.6%) progressed to acute myeloid leukemia. Hemoglobin increased from 7.4 to 10.3 g/dL (in 13 weeks), neutrophils, from 1.1 to 2.0 (in 3 weeks), and platelets, from 66×10(9) to 72×10(9)/L (in 2 weeks). Transfusional requirements decreased from 2.3 to 0 U bi-monthly for red blood cells and from 0.5 to 0 U bi-monthly for platelets in responding patients. Main toxicities were mild, including somnolence and nausea. Preliminary results of this phase-II study suggest that the combination of hydralazine and valproate is a

  4. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  6. General Information about Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Myelodysplastic/ ...

  7. [Exploration of academic thoughts on treating myelodysplastic syndrome with combination of disease and syndrome by Prof. Ma Rou].

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Xu, Shu; Sun, Shu-zhen; Hu, Xiao-mei; Ma, Rou

    2013-03-01

    The diagnosis and treatment pattern using combination of disease and syndrome, fully developing the advantages of both traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine (WM) and being widely used clinically, has been constructed in the long history of TCM. Prof. MA Rou, as a hematology specialist of integrative medicine (IM), uses modern medical equipment to diagnose diseases and takes traditional Chinese medical methods to treat diseases. He is loyal to TCM sciences and refers to the advantages of WM. He holds the essence of MDS lies in toxic stasis according to its pathogenic features. He detoxifies and removes stasis using Qinghuang Powder. Meanwhile, according to patients' clinical manifestations, he summarized two common syndrome types, Pi-Shen yang deficiency syndrome and Gan-Shen yin deficiency syndrome. Better efficacy could be achieved by combining Chinese herbs for tonifying Pi-Shen. In recent years the application of Qinghuang Powder won some achievements in clinical study and experimental study, thus providing scientific reliance for Prof. MA Rou's academic thought on treating MDS.

  8. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. NF-kappaB inhibition sensitizes to starvation-induced cell death in high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fabre, C; Carvalho, G; Tasdemir, E; Braun, T; Adès, L; Grosjean, J; Boehrer, S; Métivier, D; Souquère, S; Pierron, G; Fenaux, P; Kroemer, G

    2007-06-14

    CD34(+) bone marrow blasts from high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients as well as MDS patient-derived cell lines (P39 and MOLM13) constitutively activate the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway and undergo apoptosis when NF-kappaB is inhibited. Here, we show that the combination of conventional chemotherapeutic agents (daunorubicin, mitoxantrone, 5-azacytidine or camptothecin) with the NF-kappaB inhibitor BAY11-7082 did not yield a synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, BAY11-7082 (which targets the NF-kappaB-activating I-kappaB kinase (IKK) complex) or knockdown of essential components of the NF-kappaB system (such as the IKK1 and IKK2 subunits of the IKK complex and the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB), by small interfering RNAs sensitized MDS cell lines to starvation-induced apoptosis. The combination of BAY11-7082 and nutrient depletion synergistically killed the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line U937 as well as primary CD34(+) bone marrow blasts from AML and high-risk MDS patients. The synergistic killing by BAY11-7082, combined with nutrient depletion, led to cell death accompanied by all hallmarks of apoptosis, including an early loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria, activation of caspase-3, phosphatidylserine exposure on the plasma membrane surface and nuclear chromatin condensation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm before cells underwent nuclear apoptosis. Nonetheless, cell death was neither inhibited by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk nor by knockdown of AIF or of essential components of the autophagy pathway (ATG5, ATG6/Beclin-1, ATG10, ATG12). In contrast, external supply of glucose, insulin or insulin-like growth factor-I could retard the cell death induced by BAY11-7082 combined with starvation. These results suggest that in MDS cells, NF-kappaB inhibition can

  10. Results of a randomized, double-blind study of romiplostim versus placebo in patients with low/intermediate-1–risk myelodysplastic syndrome and thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Mufti, Ghulam J; Fenaux, Pierre; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Szer, Jeffrey; Platzbecker, Uwe; Kuendgen, Andrea; Gaidano, Gianluca; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Hu, Kuolung; Woodard, Paul; Yang, Allen S; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Thrombocytopenia in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is associated with shortened survival and an increased risk of evolution to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, the authors evaluated the efficacy of romiplostim in patients who had thrombocytopenia with low-risk/intermediate-1–risk MDS. METHODS Patients who had thrombocytopenia with low-risk/intermediate-1–risk MDS (N = 250) were randomized 2:1 to receive romiplostim or placebo weekly for 58 weeks. RESULTS The primary endpoint— the number of clinically significant bleeding events (CSBEs) per patient—had a hazard ratio for romiplostim:placebo of 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.66-1.05; P = .13). CSBEs were reduced significantly in the romiplostim group for patients who had baseline platelet counts ≥20 × 109/L (P < .0001). For patients who had baseline platelet counts <20 × 109/L, there was no difference in the number of CSBEs, but the platelet transfusion rates were higher in the placebo group (P < .0001), which may have affected the overall CSBE results in this group with severe thrombocytopenia. The incidence of bleeding events was reduced significantly in the romiplostim group (relative risk, 0.92), as were protocol-defined platelet transfusions (relative risk, 0.77). Platelet response rates according to 2006 International Working Group criteria were higher for the group that received romiplostim (odds ratio, 15.6). On the basis of interim data, an independent data monitoring committee advised halting study drug because of concerns regarding excess blasts and AML rates with romiplostim (interim hazard ratio, 2.51). At 58 weeks, the AML rates were 6% in the romiplostim group and 4.9% in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-3.84), and the overall survival rates were similar. CONCLUSIONS Romiplostim treatment in patients with low-risk/intermediate-1–risk MDS increased platelet counts and decreased the number of

  11. [Pseudolymphoma in patients with primary Sjogren's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, M; Jórasz, I; Duda-Król, W; Polubiec, A

    2001-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is an inflammatory autoimmune disease affecting primarily the exocrine glands. In the abscence of other autoimmune diseases it is classified as primary Sjögren's syndrome. Patients with primary syndrome have about 40 times higher relative risk of developing lymphoma then normal population, which offers a possibility to study malignant transformation's mechanisms in these patients. In the study we report a case of a woman with pseudolymphoma. The clinical diagnose used to be based on symptoms of proliferate disease, quetionnable histological evaluation and good response to steroids. Nowadays, applying advanced molecular techniques make it possible to diagnose lymphoma in labial salivary biopsy much earlier. It allows recognizing an incipient lymphoma in a group of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Therefore so-called pseudolymphoma can usually be diagnosed as either benign or malignant lymphoproliferative lesions.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic monitoring from CD34+ peripheral blood cells in myelodysplastic syndromes: first results from a prospective multicenter German diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Braulke, Friederike; Jung, Klaus; Schanz, Julie; Götze, Katharina; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Bug, Gesine; Ottmann, Oliver; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A N; Stadler, Michael; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Schafhausen, Philippe; Lübbert, Michael; Schlenk, Richard F; Blau, Igor W; Ganster, Christina; Pfeiffer, Sebastian; Shirneshan, Katayoon; Metz, Michael; Detken, Sven; Seraphin, Jörg; Jentsch-Ullrich, Kathleen; Böhme, Angelika; Schmidt, Burkhard; Trümper, Lorenz; Haase, Detlef

    2013-08-01

    The gold standard of cytogenetic analysis in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is conventional chromosome banding (CCB) analysis of bone marrow (BM) metaphases. Most aberrations can also be detected by fluorescence-in situ-hybridization (FISH). For this prospective multicenter German diagnostic study (www.clinicaltrials.gov: #NCT01355913) 360 patients, as yet, were followed up to 3 years by sequential FISH analyses of immunomagnetically enriched CD34+ peripheral blood (PB) cells using comprehensive FISH probe panels, resulting in a total number of 19,516 FISH analyses. We demonstrate that CD34+ PB FISH correlates significantly with CCB analysis and represents a feasible method for a reliable non-invasive cytogenetic monitoring from PB.

  13. Myelodysplastic syndrome with a t(2;11)(p21;q23-24) and translocation breakpoint close to miR-125b-1.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Jim; Aamot, Hege Vangstein; Roberto, Roberta; Tjønnfjord, Geir E; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre

    2012-10-01

    The upregulation of oncogenes and the formation of fusion genes are commonly observed in hematological malignancies with recurring balanced translocations. However, in some malignancies exhibiting balanced chromosomal rearrangements, neither oncogene deregulation nor generation of fusion genes appears to be involved, suggesting that other mechanisms are at play. In the rare myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) containing a t(2;11)(p21;q23-24) translocation, breakpoints near a microRNA locus, miR-125b-1, in 11q24 have been suggested to be pathogenetically involved. Here we report the detailed mapping and sequencing of the breakpoint located only 2 kilobases from miR-125b-1 in an MDS patient with a t(2;11)(p21;q23-24).

  14. Relationship of race/ethnicity and survival after single umbilical cord blood transplantation for adults and children with leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Ballen, Karen K; Klein, John P; Pedersen, Tanya L; Bhatla, Deepika; Duerst, Reggie; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Lazarus, Hillard M; LeMaistre, Charles F; McCarthy, Phillip; Mehta, Paulette; Palmer, Jeanne; Setterholm, Michelle; Wingard, John R; Joffe, Steven; Parsons, Susan K; Switzer, Galen E; Lee, Stephanie J; Rizzo, J Douglas; Majhail, Navneet S

    2012-06-01

    The relationship of race/ethnicity with outcomes of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) is not well known. We analyzed the association between race/ethnicity and outcomes of unrelated single UCBT for leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Our retrospective cohort study consisted of 885 adults and children (612 whites, 145 blacks, and 128 Hispanics) who received unrelated single UCBT for leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes between 1995 and 2006 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. A 5-6/6 HLA-matched unit with a total nucleated cell count infused of ≥2.5 × 10(7)/kg was given to 40% white and 42% Hispanic, but only 21% black patients. Overall survival at 2 years was 44% for whites, 34% for blacks, and 46% for Hispanics (P = .008). In multivariate analysis adjusting for patient, disease, and treatment factors (including HLA match and cell dose), blacks had inferior overall survival (relative risk of death, 1.31; P = .02), whereas overall survival of Hispanics was similar (relative risk, 1.03; P = .81) to that of whites. For all patients, younger age, early-stage disease, use of units with higher cell dose, and performance status ≥80 were independent predictors of improved survival. Black patients and white patients infused with well-matched cords had comparable survival; similarly, black and white patients receiving units with adequate cell dose had similar survival. These results suggest that blacks have inferior survival to whites after single UCBT, but outcomes are improved when units with a higher cell dose are used.

  15. Measurement of secondary colony formation after 5 weeks in long-term cultures in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Kim, S; Selleri, C; Young, N S; Maciejewski, J P

    1998-08-01

    Pancytopenia is a frequent manifestation of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In the presence of an empty bone marrow, clinical distinction from aplastic anemia may be difficult. The hypoplastic marrow morphology seen in some cases of MDS raises questions about etiologic and pathophysiologic relationships between aplastic anemia and MDS. The goal of our study was to compare the degree of the hematopoietic failure in these diseases at the level of the most immature progenitor and stem cells that can be measured in vitro. In a systemic, prospective fashion, we have studied bone marrow (n = 45) and peripheral blood (n = 33) of patients with MDS for the number of long-term culture initiating cells (LTC-IC) in comparison to 17 normal controls and patients with new, untreated aplastic anemia (46 marrow; 62 blood samples). Due to the low numbers of cells available for the analysis, formal limiting dilution analysis could not be performed, instead secondary colony-forming cells (CFC) after 5 weeks of LTBMC were measured. As the number of these cells is proportional to the input number of LTC-IC, the number of secondary CFC per 10(6) mononuclear cells (MNC) initiating the LTBMC can be used as a measure of the content of immature stem cells in bone marrow and peripheral blood. The MDS group consisted of 34 RA, three RARS, eight RAEB and two RAEB-T patients with mean absolute neutrophil values of 1992, 1413, 1441, and 380 per mm3, respectively. The diagnosis was established based on bone marrow morphology and results of cytogenetic studies. In comparison to controls (147 +/- 38/10(6) MNC), significantly decreased numbers of bone marrow secondary CFC were found in MDS: in patients with RA and RARS, 21 +/- 7 secondary CFC per 10(6) bone marrow MNC (P < 0.001); patients with RAEB and RAEB-T: 39 +/- 12 CFC per 10(6) marrow MNC (P < 0.001). In all groups tested, the decrease in peripheral blood secondary CFC numbers was consistently less pronounced. In MDS patients with

  16. Types of Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACS Sites Bookstore ACS CAN Shop Cancer Atlas Global Health Finish the Fight Press Room Mobile Site Help Site Map Privacy Accessibility Terms of Use State Fundraising Notices Site Comments Better Business Bureau Health On The Net National Health Council © ...

  17. What Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... MDS is considered a type of cancer. Normal bone marrow Bone marrow is found inside certain bones, including the skull, ... are immune cells that are found in the bone marrow, the blood, and in lymph nodes. They make ...

  18. Recent advances in primary Sjogren's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Holdgate, Nicholas; St.Clair, E. Wiliam

    2016-01-01

    Primary Sjögren’s syndrome, a chronic inflammatory process, is among the most commonly occurring rheumatologic diseases. The clinical hallmark of this disease is exocrine gland dysfunction, resulting predominately in dry eyes and dry mouth. However, the disease often extends beyond the exocrine glands to seriously affect other organs systems, such as the lungs, kidneys, and nervous system. Moreover, patients with primary Sjögren’s syndrome develop non-Hodgkin’s B cell lymphoma at a substantially higher rate than the general population. New research has improved our understanding of disease mechanisms, with notable advances in our knowledge about the genetic susceptibility of disease, the molecular details of the chronic inflammatory response in the salivary glands, and the complex role of the type 1 interferon pathway. The pipeline of drugs under development for the treatment of primary Sjögren’s syndrome is enriched with novel biologics and small molecular entities targeting the pathogenic process. Herein, we summarize the latest advances in elucidating the pathogenesis of primary Sjögren’s syndrome and highlight new drugs in clinical development aiming to reverse the glandular dysfunction and favorably impact the systemic features of this disease. PMID:27347394

  19. Primary Sjogren syndrome: clinical and immunopathologic features.

    PubMed

    Fox, R I; Howell, F V; Bone, R C; Michelson, P

    1984-11-01

    Primary Sjogren syndrome is an autoimmune condition in which dry eyes (keratoconjunctivitis sicca) and dry mouth (xerostomia) result from lymphocytic infiltration of lacrimal and salivary glands. Clinical and laboratory features of 60 primary Sjogren syndrome patients seen at our clinic during the past three years are presented. These patients illustrate the wide spectrum of extraglandular features that may occur as a result of lymphoid infiltration of lung, kidney, skin, stomach, liver, and muscle. They further emphasize the difficulty in classifying a patient as primary or secondary Sjogren syndrome (ie, sicca symptoms associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, or scleroderma), particularly early in the disease course. As an initial step in understanding the pathogenesis, the lymphocytes that infiltrate the salivary glands and lymph nodes were characterized by using monoclonal antibodies that recognize distinct lymphocyte subsets and by using in vitro functional assays. These studies have demonstrated that affected tissues have infiltrates of T cells with helper/inducer activity and with a high frequency of "activation antigens." The immunohistologic techniques are useful in differentiating "benign" and "pseudolymphoma" lesions (both due predominantly to T cells) from non-Hodgkin lymphoma (usually due to B-cell infiltrates). Although there is no "cure" for primary Sjogren syndrome patient's symptoms may be significantly improved by measures aimed at prevention of ocular and dental complications and by the recognition of extraglandular features that may be amenable to specific treatment.

  20. Primary bone marrow oedema syndromes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    MRI scanning in patients with rheumatological conditions often shows bone marrow oedema, which can be secondary to inflammatory, degenerative, infective or malignant conditions but can also be primary. The latter condition is of uncertain aetiology and it is also uncertain whether it represents a stage in the progression to osteonecrosis in some patients. Patients with primary bone marrow oedema usually have lower limb pain, commonly the hip, knee, ankle or feet. The diagnosis is one of exclusion with the presence of typical MRI findings. Treatment is usually conservative and includes analgesics and staying off the affected limb. The natural history is that of gradual resolution of symptoms over a number of months. Evidence for medical treatment is limited, but open-label studies suggest bisphosphonates may help in the resolution of pain and improve radiological findings. Surgical decompression is usually used as a last resort.

  1. [Clinical efficacy of decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haplo-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen on elderly patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Dou, Li-Ping; Jing, Yu; Wang, Quan-Shun; Mei, Jun-Hui; Yu, Li

    2013-06-01

    This study was aimed to observe the clinical efficacy and adverse effects of decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haploid-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen on elderly patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Five elderly patients with MDS and AML were treated with decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen. Examinations on liver and renal function, electrocardiogram and bone marrow analysis were performed before and after treatment, and adverse effects were observed. The results indicated that after a course of treatment by decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haplo-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen, the total effective rate was 100%, and 4 patients (80%) achieved complete remission, 1 patient achieved partial remission. The dominant clinical adverse effect was bone marrow depression, the median time of neutrophil>0.5×10(9)/L and platelet>20×10(9)/L was 15 d and 16 d respectively for patients without previous MDS. It is concluded that decitabine plus improved CAG chemotherapy and haploid-identical donor peripheral lymphocyte infusion regimen may be effective with less adverse effects for elderly primary AML and high risk MDS patients, it is a promising therapeutic methods and worthy to deeply study.

  2. A phase 2, randomized, double-blind, multicenter study comparing siltuximab plus best supportive care (BSC) with placebo plus BSC in anemic patients with International Prognostic Scoring System low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Gartenberg, Gary; Steensma, David P; Schipperus, Martin R; Breems, Dimitri A; de Paz, Raquel; Valcárcel, David; Kranenburg, Britte; Reddy, Manjula; Komrokji, Rami S

    2014-09-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) may play an important role in the pathophysiology of anemia of inflammation associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). This double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 study assessed the efficacy and safety of siltuximab, a chimeric anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibody, in patients with low- and intermediate-1-risk MDS who require transfusions for MDS anemia. Patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to siltuximab 15 mg kg(-1) every 4 weeks + best supportive care (BSC) or placebo + BSC for 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was reduction in red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to treat MDS anemia, defined as ≥50% relative decrease and ≥2-unit absolute decrease in RBC transfusions. Fifty and 26 patients were randomized to the siltuximab and placebo groups, respectively. The study did not meet its prespecified hypothesis, with six (12%) patients in the siltuximab group and one (3.8%) in the placebo group having reductions in RBC transfusions (P = 0.271). At the time of the planned futility analysis, the prespecified cutoff criteria were not met, and the study was terminated early due to lack of efficacy. No unexpected safety findings were observed. In conclusion, compared to placebo, treatment with siltuximab did not reduce RBC transfusions in transfusion-dependent patients with low- and intermediate-1-risk MDS. Future studies might explore siltuximab in patients with less iron overload and with elevated IL-6 levels and/or using higher doses for MDS.

  3. Acquired somatic ATRX mutations in myelodysplastic syndrome associated with alpha thalassemia (ATMDS) convey a more severe hematologic phenotype than germline ATRX mutations.

    PubMed

    Steensma, David P; Higgs, Douglas R; Fisher, Chris A; Gibbons, Richard J

    2004-03-15

    Acquired somatic mutations in ATRX, an X-linked gene encoding a chromatin-associated protein, were recently identified in 4 patients with the rare subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) associated with thalassemia (ATMDS). Here we describe a series of novel point mutations in ATRX detected in archival DNA samples from marrow and/or blood of patients with ATMDS by use of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), a technique sensitive to low-level mosaicism. Two of the new mutations result in changes in amino acids altered in previously described pedigrees with germ line ATRX mutations (ATR-X syndrome), but the hematologic abnormalities were much more severe in the patients with ATMDS than in the corresponding constitutional cases. In one ATMDS case where DNA samples from several time points were available, the proportion of ATRX-mutant subclones correlated with changes in the amount of hemoglobin H. This study strengthens the link between acquired, somatic ATRX mutations and ATMDS, illustrates how molecular defects associated with MDS and other hematologic malignancies masked by somatic mosaicism may be detected by DHPLC, and shows that additional factors increase the severity of the hematologic phenotype of ATRX mutations in ATMDS.

  4. Lenalidomide for the Treatment of Low- or Intermediate-1-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes Associated with Deletion 5q Cytogenetic Abnormality: An Evidence Review of the NICE Submission from Celgene.

    PubMed

    Blommestein, Hedwig M; Armstrong, Nigel; Ryder, Steve; Deshpande, Sohan; Worthy, Gill; Noake, Caro; Riemsma, Rob; Kleijnen, Jos; Severens, Johan L; Al, Maiwenn J

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of lenalidomide (Celgene) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of the drug for treating adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd (KSR), in collaboration with Erasmus University Rotterdam, was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper describes the company's submission, the ERG review, and the NICE's subsequent decisions. The ERG reviewed the evidence for clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, as submitted by the manufacturer to the NICE. The ERG searched for relevant additional evidence and validated the manufacturer's decision analytic model to examine the robustness of the cost-effectiveness results. Clinical effectiveness was obtained from a three-arm, European, randomized, phase III trial among red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent patients with low-/intermediate-1-risk del5q31 MDS. The primary endpoint was RBC independence for ≥26 weeks, and was reached by a higher proportion of patients in the lenalidomide 10 and 5 mg groups compared with placebo (56.1 and 42.6 vs 5.9 %, respectively; both p < 0.001). The option of dose adjustments after 16 weeks due to dose-limiting toxicities or lack of response made long-term effectiveness estimates unreliable, e.g. overall survival (OS). The de novo model of the manufacturer included a Markov state-transition cost-utility model implemented in Microsoft Excel. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the manufacturer was £56,965. The ERG assessment indicated that the modeling structure represented the course of the disease; however, a few errors were identified and some of the input parameters were challenged. In response to the appraisal documentation, the company revised the economic model

  5. [Concomitant diseases in primary joint hypermobility syndrome].

    PubMed

    Skoumal, Martin; Haberhauer, Günther; Mayr, Hans

    2004-10-15

    The primary joint hypermobility syndrome (pJH) is an overlap disorder of connective-tissue dysplasias, which incorporates features seen in the Marfan syndromes (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDS), and osteogenesis imperfecta. Patients with pJH usually present arthralgia, back pain, soft-tissue lesions, recurrent joint dislocation, or subluxation. Extraarticular features may include, e. g., striae cutis, keratoconus, easy bruising, mitral valve prolapse, aortic incompetence, aneurysms, pneumothorax, hernia, urinary incontinence, and pelvic floor prolapse. Due to the high frequency of critical dissection and rupture, the early recognition of rare life-threatening complications such as dilatation of the aortic root and aneurysms is important. Therefore, patients (and their family members) with pJH should also be examined for life-threatening features seen in MFS and EDS. PMID:15490074

  6. [Comparison of clinical efficacy between decitabine combined with CAG regimen and CAG regimen alone in patients with intermediate to high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Ping; Wu, Wen-Zhong; Cui, Guo-Xing

    2014-10-01

    This study was purposed to compare the clinical efficacy and adverse reactions of low-dose decitabine combined with CAG regimen (aclarubicin, Ara-C, and G-CSF) and CAG regimen alone in intermediate to high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and evaluate the validity and efficacy of the former regimen as new treatment method of intermediate to high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes. A total of 12 patients with intermediate (IR) to high-risk (HR) MDS treated by low-dose decitabine combined with CAG regimen and 10 patients with IR to HR MDS treated by CAG regimen alone were evaluated after treatment of 1 cycle and at least after 2 cycles. The complete remission (CR) after 1 cycle, overall remission rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) between them were analyzed. The results showed that 9 patients treated by low-dose decitabine combined with CAG regimen achieved complete remission after 1 cycle, 2 patients achieved partial remission, 1 patient did not show reaction. The complete remission rate was 75.0% and overall response rate was 91.7%. The median time of disease free survival was 9 months (0-27 months). The median overall survival time was 16 months (3-28 months). 4 patients suffered from pulmonary infection after treatment and then were all cured after treatment with anti-infective therapy. The 5 patients treated by CAG regimen alone achieved complete remission,3 patients achieved partial remission, 2 patients showed non-reaction. The complete remission rate was 50.0% and overall response rate was 80.0%. The median time of disease free survival was 6 months(0-18 months). The median overall survival time was 13 months(3-31 months), 4 patients suffered from pulmonary infection, 1 patient suffered from enteric infection and 1 patient suffered from Escherichia coli septicemia after treatment, all of them becomed better after active treatment. Two groups of patients all had no serious adverse reactions, All patients could tolerate, no

  7. Long-term survival and late effects among one-year survivors of second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Christine N; Majhail, Navneet S; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A; Hayashi, Robert J; Hsu, Jack W; Kamble, Rammurti T; Kasow, Kimberly A; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M; Loren, Alison W; Marks, David I; Maziarz, Richard T; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A; Porter, David L; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A; Warwick, Anne B; Wood, William A; Yu, Lolie C; Jacobsohn, David A; Sorror, Mohamed L

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1 year or more after a second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant after disease relapse; among these, 325 were relapse free at 1 year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplantation in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least 1 year was 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status before second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission before second HCT, P < .01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults after second transplantation. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of nonrelapse mortality, followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least 1 of the studied late effects within 10 years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence, 22%) and cataracts (20%); in adults they were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease free for at least 1 year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and nonrelapse morbidity and mortality. Novel

  8. Long-term Survival and Late Effects among 1-year Survivors of Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Relapsed Acute Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Christine N.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Brazauskas, Ruta; Wang, Zhiwei; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Frangoul, Haydar A.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Hsu, Jack W.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kasow, Kimberly A.; Khera, Nandita; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Loren, Alison W.; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Mehta, Paulette; Myers, Kasiani C.; Norkin, Maxim; Pidala, Joseph A.; Porter, David L.; Reddy, Vijay; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Schouten, Harry C.; Steinberg, Amir; Wall, Donna A.; Warwick, Anne B.; Wood, William A.; Yu, Lolie C.; Jacobsohn, David A.; Sorror, Mohamed L.

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of patients who survived disease-free for 1-year or more following second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for relapsed acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes between 1980 and 2009. A total of 1285 patients received a second allogeneic transplant following disease relapse; among these 325 survived relapse-free at 1-year after the second HCT. The median time from first to second HCT was 17 and 24 months for children and adults, respectively. A myeloablative preparative regimen was used in the second transplant in 62% of children and 45% of adult patients. The overall 10-year conditional survival rates after second transplantation in this cohort of patients who had survived disease-free for at least one year were 55% in children and 39% in adults. Relapse was the leading cause of mortality (77% and 54% of deaths in children and adults, respectively). In multivariate analyses, only disease status prior to second HCT was significantly associated with higher risk for overall mortality (HR 1.71 for patients with disease not in complete remission prior to second HCT, P<0.01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed in 43% and 75% of children and adults following second transplant. Chronic GVHD was the leading cause of non-relapse mortality followed by organ failure and infection. The cumulative incidence of developing at least one of the studied late effects at 10-years after second HCT was 63% in children and 55% in adults. The most frequent late effects in children were growth disturbance (10-year cumulative incidence 22%) and cataracts (20%), and in adults were cataracts (20%) and avascular necrosis (13%). Among patients with acute leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes who receive a second allogeneic HCT for relapse and survive disease-free for at least 1-year, many can be expected to survive long term. However, they continue to be at risk for relapse and non-relapse morbidity and mortality. Novel approaches

  9. Fatal Nocardia farcinica Bacteremia Diagnosed by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in a Patient with Myelodysplastic Syndrome Treated with Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Amedeo; Guercini, Francesco; Cardaccia, Angela; Furbetta, Leone; Agnelli, Giancarlo; Bistoni, Francesco; Mencacci, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a Gram-positive weakly acid-fast filamentous saprophytic bacterium, an uncommon cause of human infections, acquired usually through the respiratory tract, often life-threatening, and associated with different clinical presentations. Predisposing conditions for N. farcinica infections include hematologic malignancies, treatment with corticosteroids, and any other condition of immunosuppression. Clinical and microbiological diagnoses of N. farcinica infections are troublesome, and the isolation and identification of the etiologic agent are difficult and time-consuming processes. We describe a case of fatal disseminated infection in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, treated with corticosteroids, in which N. farcinica has been isolated from blood culture and identified by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry. The patient died after 18 days of hospitalization in spite of triple antimicrobial therapy. Nocardia farcinica infection should be suspected in patients with history of malignancy, under corticosteroid therapy, suffering from subacute pulmonary infection,and who do not respond to conventional antimicrobial therapy. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry can be a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of nocardiosis. PMID:23690786

  10. A phase II study of decitabine and gemtuzumab ozogamicin in newly diagnosed and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Daver, N; Kantarjian, H; Ravandi, F; Estey, E; Wang, X; Garcia-Manero, G; Jabbour, E; Konopleva, M; O'Brien, S; Verstovsek, S; Kadia, T; Dinardo, C; Pierce, S; Huang, X; Pemmaraju, N; Diaz-Pines-Mateo, M; Cortes, J; Borthakur, G

    2016-02-01

    Decitabine may open the chromatin structure of leukemia cells making them accessible to the calicheamicin epitope of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO). A total of 110 patients (median age 70 years; range 27-89 years) were treated with decitabine and GO in a trial designed on model-based futility to accommodate subject heterogeneity: group 1: relapsed/refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with complete remission duration (CRD) <1 year (N=28, 25%); group 2: relapsed/refractory AML with CRD ⩾1 year (N=5, 5%); group 3: untreated AML unfit for intensive chemotherapy or untreated myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or untreated myelofibrosis (MF; N=57, 52%); and group 4: AML evolving from MDS or relapsed/refractory MDS or MF (N=20, 18%). Treatment consisted of decitabine 20 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days and GO 3 mg/m(2) on day 5. Post-induction therapy included five cycles of decitabine+GO followed by decitabine alone. Complete remission (CR)/CR with incomplete count recovery was achieved in 39 (35%) patients; group 1= 5/28 (17%), group 2=3/5 (60%), group 3=24/57 (42%) and group 4=7/20 (35%). The 8-week mortality in groups 3 and 4 was 16% and 10%, respectively. Common drug-related adverse events included nausea, mucositis and hemorrhage. Decitabine and GO improved the response rate but not overall survival compared with historical outcomes in untreated AML ⩾60 years.

  11. Lenalidomide as a disease-modifying agent in patients with del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes: linking mechanism of action to clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Mufti, Ghulam J; Fenaux, Pierre; Germing, Ulrich; List, Alan; MacBeth, Kyle J

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, del(5q), is the most prevalent cytogenetic abnormality in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In isolation, it is traditionally associated with favorable prognosis compared with other subtypes of MDS. However, owing to the inherent heterogeneity of the disease, prognosis for patients with del(5q) MDS is highly variable depending on the presence of factors such as additional chromosomal abnormalities, >5 % blasts in the bone marrow (BM), or transfusion dependence. Over recent years, the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in patients with del(5q) MDS. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease have suggested that lenalidomide targets aberrant signaling pathways caused by haplosufficiency of specific genes in a commonly deleted region on chromosome 5 (e.g., SPARC, RPS14, Cdc25C, and PP2A). As a result, the agent specifically targets del(5q) clones while also promoting erythropoiesis and repopulation of the bone marrow in normal cells. This review discusses recent developments in the understanding of the mechanism of action of lenalidomide, and how this underlies favorable outcomes in patients with del(5q) MDS. In addition, we discuss how improved understanding of the mechanism of disease will facilitate clinicians' ability to predict/monitor response and identify patients at risk of relapse. PMID:24018623

  12. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T; Li, Henry Y; Wood, Brent L; Scott, Bart L; Abkowitz, Janis L

    2016-05-11

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit-erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 μM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias.

  13. Outpatient bendamustine and idarubicin for upfront therapy of elderly acute myeloid leukaemia/myelodysplastic syndrome: a phase I/II study using an innovative statistical design.

    PubMed

    Lionberger, Jack M; Pagel, John M; Sandhu, Vicky K; Xie, Hu; Shadman, Mazyar; Mawad, Raya; Boehm, Alexandra; Dean, Carol; Shannon-Dorcy, Kathleen; Scott, Bart L; Deeg, Hans Joachim; Becker, Pamela S; Hendrie, Paul C; Walter, Roland B; Ostronoff, Fabiana; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Estey, Elihu H

    2014-08-01

    Combinations of agents may improve outcomes among elderly acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. We performed an adaptive phase I/II trial for newly-diagnosed AML or high-risk MDS patients aged ≥50 years using a Bayesian approach to determine whether 1 of 3 doses of bendamustine (45, 60, 75 mg/m(2) days 1-3), together with idarubicin (12 mg/m(2) days 1-2), might provide a complete response (CR) rate ≥40% with <30% grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity. We treated 39 patients (34 AML; five MDS with >10% marrow blasts; median age 73 years). None of the three bendamustine doses in combination with idarubicin met the required CR and toxicity rates; the 75 mg/m(2) dose because of excess toxicity (two of three patients) and the 60 mg/m(2) dose because of low efficacy (CR rate 10/33), although no grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicity was seen at this dose. Median survival was 7·2 months. All patients began treatment as outpatients but hospitalization was required in 90% (35/39). Although we did not find a dose of bendamustine combined with idarubicin that would provide a CR rate of >40% with acceptable toxicity, bendamustine may have activity in AML/MDS patients, suggesting its addition to other regimens may be warranted.

  14. Identification of a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband among patients with myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Asou, Hiroya; Matsui, Hirotaka; Ozaki, Yuko; Nagamachi, Akiko; Nakamura, Megumi; Aki, Daisuke; Inaba, Toshiya

    2009-05-29

    Monosomy 7 and interstitial deletions in the long arm of chromosome 7 (-7/7q-) is a common nonrandom chromosomal abnormality found frequently in myeloid disorders including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Using a short probe-based microarray comparative genomic hybridization (mCGH) technology, we identified a common microdeletion cluster in 7q21.3 subband, which is adjacent to 'hot deletion region' thus far identified by conventional methods. This common microdeletion cluster contains three poorly characterized genes; Samd9, Samd9L, and a putative gene LOC253012, which we named Miki. Gene copy number assessment of three genes by real-time PCR revealed heterozygous deletion of these three genes in adult patients with AML and MDS at high frequency, in addition to JMML patients. Miki locates to mitotic spindles and centrosomes and downregulation of Miki by RNA interference induced abnormalities in mitosis and nuclear morphology, similar to myelodysplasia. In addition, a recent report indicated Samd9 as a tumor suppressor. These findings indicate the usefulness of the short probe-based CGH to detect microdeletions. The three genes located to 7q21.3 would be candidates for myeloid tumor-suppressor genes on 7q.

  15. Effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor priming combined with low-dose cytarabine and homoharringtonine in higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Xia; Zhang, Wang-Gang; He, Ai-Li; Cao, Xin-Mei; Chen, Yin-Xia; Zhao, Wan-Hong; Yang, Yun; Wang, Jian-Li; Zhang, Peng-Yu; Gu, Liu-Fang

    2016-09-01

    As sensitization of leukemia cells with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) can enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy in myeloid malignancies, a pilot study was conducted in order to evaluate the effect of G-CSF priming combined with low-dose chemotherapy in patients with higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The regimen, G-HA, consisted of cytarabine (Ara-C) 7.5mg/m(2)/12h by subcutaneous injection, days 1-14, homoharringtonine (HHT) 1.5mg/m(2)/day by intravenous continuous infusion, days 1-14, and G-CSF 150mg/m(2)/day by subcutaneous injection, days 0-14. 56 patients were enrolled, 34 patients (61%, 95% confidence interval: 51.44-70.56%) achieved complete remission (CR). Median duration of neutropenia was 7days (ranging from 2 to 16days). Grade 1-2 nonhematologic toxicities were documented, including nausea and vomiting (5%), liver function abnormality (5%), and heart function abnormality (2%). No central nervous system toxicity was found. Mortality within the first 4 weeks was 4%. The G-HA regimen is effective in remission induction for higher risk MDS patients and well tolerated due to the acceptable toxicity in maintenance therapy in the patients who cannot undergo Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). PMID:27497340

  16. Lenalidomide as a disease-modifying agent in patients with del(5q) myelodysplastic syndromes: linking mechanism of action to clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Mufti, Ghulam J; Fenaux, Pierre; Germing, Ulrich; List, Alan; MacBeth, Kyle J

    2014-01-01

    Deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, del(5q), is the most prevalent cytogenetic abnormality in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In isolation, it is traditionally associated with favorable prognosis compared with other subtypes of MDS. However, owing to the inherent heterogeneity of the disease, prognosis for patients with del(5q) MDS is highly variable depending on the presence of factors such as additional chromosomal abnormalities, >5 % blasts in the bone marrow (BM), or transfusion dependence. Over recent years, the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in patients with del(5q) MDS. Advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease have suggested that lenalidomide targets aberrant signaling pathways caused by haplosufficiency of specific genes in a commonly deleted region on chromosome 5 (e.g., SPARC, RPS14, Cdc25C, and PP2A). As a result, the agent specifically targets del(5q) clones while also promoting erythropoiesis and repopulation of the bone marrow in normal cells. This review discusses recent developments in the understanding of the mechanism of action of lenalidomide, and how this underlies favorable outcomes in patients with del(5q) MDS. In addition, we discuss how improved understanding of the mechanism of disease will facilitate clinicians' ability to predict/monitor response and identify patients at risk of relapse.

  17. Whole-exome and targeted sequencing identify ROBO1 and ROBO2 mutations as progression-related drivers in myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Wu, Ling-Yun; Chang, Chun-Kang; He, Qi; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Li; Shi, Wen-Hui; Guo, Juan; Zhu, Yang; Zhao, You-Shan; Gu, Shu-Cheng; Fei, Cheng-Ming; Wu, Dong; Zhou, Li-Yu; Su, Ji-Ying; Song, Lu-Xi; Xiao, Chao; Li, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The progressive mechanism underlying myelodysplastic syndrome remains unknown. Here we identify ROBO1 and ROBO2 as novel progression-related somatic mutations using whole-exome and targeted sequencing in 6 of 16 (37.5%) paired MDS patients with disease progression. Further deep sequencing detects 20 (10.4%) patients with ROBO mutations in a cohort of 193 MDS patients. In addition, copy number loss and loss of heterogeneity (LOH) of ROBO1 and ROBO2 are frequently observed in patients with progression or carrying ROBO mutations. In in vitro experiments, overexpression of ROBO1 or ROBO2 produces anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in leukaemia cells. However, this effect was lost in ROBO mutants and ROBO-SLIT2 signalling is impaired. Multivariate analysis shows that ROBO mutations are independent factors for predicting poor survival. These findings demonstrate a novel contribution of ROBO mutations to the pathogenesis of MDS and highlight a key role for ROBO-SLIT2 signalling in MDS disease progression. PMID:26608094

  18. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T; Li, Henry Y; Wood, Brent L; Scott, Bart L; Abkowitz, Janis L

    2016-05-11

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit-erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 μM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias. PMID:27169803

  19. Monitoring of hematopoietic chimerism after transplantation for pediatric myelodysplastic syndrome: real-time or conventional short tandem repeat PCR in peripheral blood or bone marrow?

    PubMed

    Willasch, Andre M; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Shayegi, Nona; Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Zabel, Marion; Lang, Peter; Kremens, Bernhard; Meisel, Roland; Strahm, Brigitte; Rossig, Claudia; Gruhn, Bernd; Klingebiel, Thomas; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Bader, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has been proposed as a highly sensitive method for monitoring hematopoietic chimerism and may serve as a surrogate marker for the detection of minimal residual disease minimal residual disease in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), until specific methods of detection become available. Because a systematic comparison of the clinical utility of qPCR with the gold standard short tandem repeat (STR)-PCR has not been reported, we retrospectively measured chimerism by qPCR in 54 children transplanted for MDS in a previous study. Results obtained by STR-PCR in the initial study served as comparison. Because the detection limit of qPCR was sufficiently low to detect an autologous background, we defined the sample as mixed chimera if the proportion of recipient-derived cells exceeded .5%. The true positive rates were 100% versus 80% (qPCR versus STR-PCR, not significant), and mixed chimerism in most cases was detected earlier by qPCR than by STR-PCR (median, 31 days) when chimerism was quantified concurrently in peripheral blood and bone marrow. Both methods revealed a substantial rate of false positives (22.7% versus 13.6%, not significant), indicating the importance of serial testing of chimerism to monitor its progression. Finally, we propose criteria for monitoring chimerism in pediatric MDS with regard to the subtypes, specimens, PCR method, and timing of sampling.

  20. RHAMM-R3 peptide vaccination in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and multiple myeloma elicits immunologic and clinical responses.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Michael; Schmitt, Anita; Rojewski, Markus T; Chen, Jinfei; Giannopoulos, Krzysztof; Fei, Fei; Yu, Yingzhe; Götz, Marlies; Heyduk, Marta; Ritter, Gerd; Speiser, Daniel E; Gnjatic, Sacha; Guillaume, Philippe; Ringhoffer, Mark; Schlenk, Richard F; Liebisch, Peter; Bunjes, Donald; Shiku, Hiroshi; Dohner, Hartmut; Greiner, Jochen

    2008-02-01

    The receptor for hyaluronic acid-mediated motility (RHAMM) is an antigen eliciting both humoral and cellular immune responses in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and multiple myeloma (MM). We initiated a phase 1 clinical trial vaccinating 10 patients with R3 (ILSLELMKL), a highly immunogenic CD8(+) T-cell epitope peptide derived from RHAMM. In 7 of 10 patients, we detected an increase of CD8(+)/HLA-A2/RHAMM R3 tetramer(+)/CD45RA(+)/CCR7(-)/CD27(-)/CD28(-) effector T cells in accordance with an increase of R3-specific CD8(+) T cells in enzyme linked immunospot (ELISpot) assays. In chromium release assays, a specific lysis of RHAMM-positive leukemic blasts was shown. Three of 6 patients with myeloid disorders (1/3 AML, 2/3 MDS) achieved clinical responses: one patient with AML and one with MDS showed a significant reduction of blasts in the bone marrow after the last vaccination. One patient with MDS no longer needed erythrocyte transfusions after 4 vaccinations. Two of 4 patients with MM showed a reduction of free light chain serum levels. Taken together, RHAMM-R3 peptide vaccination induced both immunologic and clinical responses, and therefore RHAMM constitutes a promising target for further immunotherapeutic approaches. This study is registered at http://ISRCTN.org as ISRCTN32763606 and is registered with EudraCT as 2005-001706-37. PMID:17978170

  1. T-cell receptor excision circle levels after allogeneic stem cell transplantation are predictive of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Uzunel, Mehmet; Sairafi, Darius; Remberger, Mats; Mattsson, Jonas; Uhlin, Michael

    2014-07-15

    In this retrospective study, 209 patients with malignant disease were analyzed for levels of T-cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) for the first 24 months after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. CD3(+) cells were separated by direct antibody-coupled magnetic beads, followed by DNA extraction according to a standard protocol. The δRec-ψJα signal joint TREC was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Patients were grouped based on malignant disease: chronic myeloid leukemia, chronic lymphatic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were further subdivided based on TREC levels below (low-TREC) or above (high-TREC) median at each time point. TREC levels were then correlated to relapse incidence and relapse-free survival (RFS). For patients with AML, low TREC levels 2 months post-transplantation were correlated to high relapse incidence at 5 years (P<0.05). In patients with chronic leukemia, high TREC levels were correlated with improved RFS (P<0.05). For patients with MDS, high TREC levels at 9 months post-transplantation were associated with higher RFS at 5 years (P<0.02) and lower relapse incidence (P<0.02). This study shows the potential use of TREC measurement in blood to predict relapse in patients with AML and MDS after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24617310

  2. A cytochemical note on nucleoli of granulocytic precursors and granulocytes in patients suffering from the refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) of the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

    PubMed

    Smetana, K; Jirásková, I; Malasková, V; Cermák, J

    2002-01-01

    Nucleoli were studied in the proliferation as well as maturation granulopoietic compartment in patients suffering from refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) of the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) by means of simple cytochemical procedures for the demonstration of nucleolar RNA and silver stained proteins of nucleolus organizer regions. Regardless of the procedure used for the nucleolar visualization, early stages of the granulopoietic compartment and particularly myeloblasts of RAEB patients were characterized by reduction of the nucleolar number expressed by the nucleolar coefficient the values of which resembled those described previously in acute myeloid leukemias. The reduced values of the nucleolar coefficient of these cells in silver stained specimens of RAEB patients were accompanied by a decreased number of clusters of silver stained particles representing interphasic silver stained nucleolus organizer regions (AgNORs). The reduction of these clusters was also described previously in leukemic cells. In addition, the differences in the values of the nucleolar coefficient of granulocytic precursors between specimens stained for RNA and those stained with the silver reaction might reflect changing composition and proportions of nucleolar components in the course of the granulocytic development.

  3. Caspase-3 activation by lysosomal enzymes in cytochrome c-independent apoptosis in myelodysplastic syndrome-derived cell line P39.

    PubMed

    Hishita, T; Tada-Oikawa, S; Tohyama, K; Miura, Y; Nishihara, T; Tohyama, Y; Yoshida, Y; Uchiyama, T; Kawanishi, S

    2001-04-01

    In most cases, apoptosis is considered to involve mitochondrial dysfunction with sequential release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, resulting in activation of caspase-3. However, we found that etoposide induced apoptosis in P39 cells, a myelodysplastic syndrome-derived cell line, without the release of cytochrome c. Furthermore, in etoposide-treated P39 cells, no changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi m) were detected by flow cytometry. Flow cytometry using a pH-sensitive probe demonstrated that lysosomal pH increased during early apoptosis in P39 cells treated with etoposide. A reduction in the ATP level preceded the elevation of lysosomal pH. In addition, specific inhibitors of vacuolar H+-ATPase induced apoptosis in P39 cells but not in HL60 cells. Although etoposide-induced activation of caspase-3 was followed by DNA ladder formation in P39 cells, E-64d, an inhibitor of lysosomal thiol proteases, specifically suppressed etoposide-induced activation of caspase-3. Western blotting analysis provided direct evidence for the involvement of a lysosomal enzyme, cathepsin L. These findings indicate that lysosomal dysfunction induced by a reduction in ATP results in leakage of lysosomal enzymes into the cytosolic compartment and that lysosomal enzyme(s) may be involved in activation of caspase-3 during apoptosis in P39 cells treated with etoposide.

  4. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B.; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T.; Li, Henry Y.; Wood, Brent L.; Scott, Bart L.; Abkowitz, Janis L.

    2016-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit–erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 mM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias. PMID:27169803

  5. Role of Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation in Older Patients With De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes: An International Collaborative Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Koreth, John; Pidala, Joseph; Perez, Waleska S.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Malcovati, Luca; Cazzola, Mario; Park, Sophie; Itzykson, Raphael; Ades, Lionel; Fenaux, Pierre; Jadersten, Martin; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Gale, Robert Peter; Beach, C.L.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Greenberg, Peter L.; Tallman, Martin S.; DiPersio, John F.; Bunjes, Donald; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Cutler, Corey

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal hematopoietic disorders that are more common in patients aged ≥ 60 years and are incurable with conventional therapies. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is potentially curative but has additional mortality risk. We evaluated RIC transplantation versus nontransplantation therapies in older patients with MDS stratified by International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) risk. Patients and Methods A Markov decision model with quality-of-life utility estimates for different MDS and transplantation states was assessed. Outcomes were life expectancy (LE) and quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE). A total of 514 patients with de novo MDS aged 60 to 70 years were evaluated. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, isolated 5q– syndrome, unclassifiable, and therapy-related MDS were excluded. Transplantation using T-cell depletion or HLA-mismatched or umbilical cord donors was also excluded. RIC transplantation (n = 132) stratified by IPSS risk was compared with best supportive care for patients with nonanemic low/intermediate-1 IPSS (n = 123), hematopoietic growth factors for patients with anemic low/intermediate-1 IPSS (n = 94), and hypomethylating agents for patients with intermediate-2/high IPSS (n = 165). Results For patients with low/intermediate-1 IPSS MDS, RIC transplantation LE was 38 months versus 77 months with nontransplantation approaches. QALE and sensitivity analysis did not favor RIC transplantation across plausible utility estimates. For intermediate-2/high IPSS MDS, RIC transplantation LE was 36 months versus 28 months for nontransplantation therapies. QALE and sensitivity analysis favored RIC transplantation across plausible utility estimates. Conclusion For patients with de novo MDS aged 60 to 70 years, favored treatments vary with IPSS risk. For low/intermediate-1 IPSS, nontransplantation approaches are preferred. For intermediate-2/high IPSS, RIC

  6. Multicenter biologic assignment trial comparing reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant to hypomethylating therapy or best supportive care in patients aged 50 to 75 with intermediate-2 and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network #1102 study rationale, design, and methods.

    PubMed

    Saber, Wael; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Sekeres, Mikkael; Logan, Brent; Lewis, Moira; Mendizabal, Adam; Leifer, Eric; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Horowitz, Mary M; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Cutler, Corey S

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made it possible to offer allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) to older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, the relative risks and benefits of alloHCT compared with novel nontransplant therapies continue to be the source of considerable uncertainty. We will perform a prospective biologic assignment trial to compare RIC alloHCT with nontransplant therapies based on donor availability. Primary outcome is 3-year overall survival. Secondary outcomes include leukemia-free survival, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. Four hundred patients will be enrolled over roughly 3 years. Planned subgroup analyses will evaluate key biologic questions, such as the impact of age and response to hypomethylating agents on treatment effects. Findings from this study potentially may set a new standard of care for older MDS patients who are considered candidates for alloHCT.

  7. [Mesenteric infarct in primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kurz, R; Eder, A; Buck, J; Heinkelein, J

    1997-09-01

    The mesenteric infarction is a rare but life threatening cause of acute abdomen. A 55-year-old woman was referred to the hospital because of acute mesenteric infarction and in the history claudication. In the absence of risk factors (atrial fibrillation, atherosclerosis, nicotin abusus) a postoperative work up was started to identify the cause of the arterial occlusions. A primary antiphospholipid-antibody syndrome was found. The patient is now receiving low-dose aspirin and anticoagulation therapy. The follow-up over now 14 months shows no further events. PMID:9432819

  8. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  9. Primary Frozen Shoulder Syndrome: Arthroscopic Capsular Release

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic adhesive capsulitis, or primary frozen shoulder syndrome, is a fairly common orthopaedic problem characterized by shoulder pain and loss of motion. In most cases, conservative treatment (6-month physical therapy program and intra-articular steroid injections) improves symptoms and restores shoulder motion. In refractory cases, arthroscopic capsular release is indicated. This surgical procedure carries several advantages over other treatment modalities. First, it provides precise and controlled release of the capsule and ligaments, reducing the risk of traumatic complications observed after forceful shoulder manipulation. Second, release of the capsule and the involved structures with a radiofrequency device delays healing, which prevents adhesion formation. Third, the technique is straightforward, and an oral postoperative steroid program decreases pain and allows for a pleasant early rehabilitation program. Fourth, the procedure is performed with the patient fully awake under an interscalene block, which boosts the patient's confidence and adherence to the physical therapy protocol. In patients with refractory primary frozen shoulder syndrome, arthroscopic capsular release emerges as a suitable option that leads to a faster and long-lasting recovery. PMID:26870652

  10. Phase 1-2a multicenter dose-escalation study of ezatiostat hydrochloride liposomes for injection (Telintra®, TLK199), a novel glutathione analog prodrug in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Azra; Galili, Naomi; Callander, Natalie; Ochoa, Leonel; Piro, Lawrence; Emanuel, Peter; Williams, Stephanie; Burris, Howard; Faderl, Stefan; Estrov, Zeev; Curtin, Peter; Larson, Richard A; Keck, James G; Jones, Marsha; Meng, Lisa; Brown, Gail L

    2009-01-01

    Background Ezatiostat hydrochloride liposomes for injection, a glutathione S-transferase P1-1 inhibitor, was evaluated in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The objectives were to determine the safety, pharmacokinetics, and hematologic improvement (HI) rate. Phase 1-2a testing of ezatiostat for the treatment of MDS was conducted in a multidose-escalation, multicenter study. Phase 1 patients received ezatiostat at 5 dose levels (50, 100, 200, 400 and 600 mg/m2) intravenously (IV) on days 1 to 5 of a 14-day cycle until MDS progression or unacceptable toxicity. In phase 2, ezatiostat was administered on 2 dose schedules: 600 mg/m2 IV on days 1 to 5 or days 1 to 3 of a 21-day treatment cycle. Results 54 patients with histologically confirmed MDS were enrolled. The most common adverse events were grade 1 or 2, respectively, chills (11%, 9%), back pain (15%, 2%), flushing (19%, 0%), nausea (15%, 0%), bone pain (6%, 6%), fatigue (0%, 13%), extremity pain (7%, 4%), dyspnea (9%, 4%), and diarrhea (7%, 4%) related to acute infusional hypersensitivity reactions. The concentration of the primary active metabolites increased proportionate to ezatiostat dosage. Trilineage responses were observed in 4 of 16 patients (25%) with trilineage cytopenia. Hematologic Improvement-Erythroid (HI-E) was observed in 9 of 38 patients (24%), HI-Neutrophil in 11 of 26 patients (42%) and HI-Platelet in 12 of 24 patients (50%). These responses were accompanied by improvement in clinical symptoms and reductions in transfusion requirements. Improvement in bone marrow maturation and cellularity was also observed. Conclusion Phase 2 studies of ezatiostat hydrochloride liposomes for injection in MDS are supported by the tolerability and HI responses observed. An oral formulation of ezatiostat hydrochloride tablets is also in phase 2 clinical development. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00035867 PMID:19439093

  11. Impact of aerobic exercise training during chemotherapy on cancer related cognitive impairments in patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome - Study protocol of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, P; Oberste, M; Bloch, W; Schenk, A; Joisten, N; Hartig, P; Wolf, F; Baumann, F T; Garthe, A; Hallek, M; Elter, T

    2016-07-01

    Cancer related cognitive impairments (CRCI) are frequently reported by patients prior to, during and after medical treatment. Although this cognitive decline severely affects patients' quality of life, little is known about effective treatments. Exercise programs represent a promising supportive strategy in this field. However, evidence is sparse and existing studies display methodological limitations. In the planned study, 83 men and women newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) will be randomized into one of three treatment groups. During 4weeks of induction chemotherapy with Anthracycline and Cytarabin patients allocated to exercise group will cycle 3×/week for 30min at moderate to vigorous intensity on an ergometer. Patients allocated to placebo group will receive a supervised myofascial release training (3×/week, approx. 30min) and patients at control group will get usual care. As primary endpoints a cognitive test battery will be conducted measuring performances depending on verbal/spatial memory and executive functioning. Secondary endpoints will be self-perceived cognitive functioning, as well as neurotrophic and inflammatory serum markers. All assessments will be conducted immediately after hospitalization and before chemotherapy is commenced, immediately before discharge of hospital after 4-5weeks as well as before continuing medical treatment 3-4weeks after discharge. This will be the first study investigating the impact of an aerobic exercise training on CRCI in AML/MDS patients. We hope that the study design and the state-of-the-art assessments will help to increase knowledge about CRCI in general and exercise as potential treatment option in this under investigated population. PMID:27261170

  12. Impact of aerobic exercise training during chemotherapy on cancer related cognitive impairments in patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome - Study protocol of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, P; Oberste, M; Bloch, W; Schenk, A; Joisten, N; Hartig, P; Wolf, F; Baumann, F T; Garthe, A; Hallek, M; Elter, T

    2016-07-01

    Cancer related cognitive impairments (CRCI) are frequently reported by patients prior to, during and after medical treatment. Although this cognitive decline severely affects patients' quality of life, little is known about effective treatments. Exercise programs represent a promising supportive strategy in this field. However, evidence is sparse and existing studies display methodological limitations. In the planned study, 83 men and women newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) will be randomized into one of three treatment groups. During 4weeks of induction chemotherapy with Anthracycline and Cytarabin patients allocated to exercise group will cycle 3×/week for 30min at moderate to vigorous intensity on an ergometer. Patients allocated to placebo group will receive a supervised myofascial release training (3×/week, approx. 30min) and patients at control group will get usual care. As primary endpoints a cognitive test battery will be conducted measuring performances depending on verbal/spatial memory and executive functioning. Secondary endpoints will be self-perceived cognitive functioning, as well as neurotrophic and inflammatory serum markers. All assessments will be conducted immediately after hospitalization and before chemotherapy is commenced, immediately before discharge of hospital after 4-5weeks as well as before continuing medical treatment 3-4weeks after discharge. This will be the first study investigating the impact of an aerobic exercise training on CRCI in AML/MDS patients. We hope that the study design and the state-of-the-art assessments will help to increase knowledge about CRCI in general and exercise as potential treatment option in this under investigated population.

  13. Dose-enhanced combined priming regimens for refractory acute myeloid leukemia and middle-and-high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome: a single-center, retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaorong; Wang, Jin; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Wanggang; Liu, Jie; Cao, Xingmei; He, Aili; Wang, Fangxia; Gu, Liufang; Lei, Bo; Wang, Jianli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess chemotherapeutic regimens for refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and middle-and-high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods Between 2004 and 2014, 44 patients with refractory AML and 36 patients with MDS were treated with new priming regimens (CHAG, CHTG, CHMG, or CTMG), and 77 patients with refractory AML and 52 patients with MDS were treated with conventional priming regimens (CHG or CAG). This was a single-center retrospective analysis of remission, adverse event, mortality, and survival. The capacity of clinical features (including the expression of co-stimulatory molecule B7.1 on tumor cells) to influence survival was assessed by multivariate Cox regression. Results Complete and partial remission rates (RRs) were significantly higher in AML patients treated with new regimens compared to conventional ones (68.2% vs 13.6%, P<0.05). Complete and partial remission were also significantly higher in patients with MDS treated with new regimens (55.6% vs 19.4%, P<0.05). However, although survival advantages were observed in the first year, the new regimens did not significantly improve 3-year overall survival (P>0.05). Patients administered the new regimens experienced more severe and sustained myelosuppression (P<0.05), but no severe adverse events or treatment-related deaths were observed. The rate of non-hematological side effects did not differ significantly between treatment regimens (P>0.05). Both RR and B7.1 expression were significantly higher in patients with AML-M2 and M5 (P<0.05). Conclusion The new priming regimens improved the RR, lowered the recurrence rate, and improved survival in AML and middle-and-high-risk MDS, without significantly increasing adverse events. PMID:27382304

  14. Downregulation of HO-1 promoted apoptosis induced by decitabine via increasing p15INK4B promoter demethylation in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ma, D; Fang, Q; Wang, P; Gao, R; Sun, J; Li, Y; Hu, X Y; Wang, J S

    2015-04-01

    Decitabine, which reverses hypermethylation of the p15(INK4B) gene in vitro, has been used to relieve cytopenias and blast excess in over 50% of patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this study, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was overexpressed in MDS cell line SKM-1, which was closely related to resistance to decitabine-induced apoptosis. We aimed to further investigate the role of HO-1 in apoptosis induced by low-dose decitabine in SKM-1 cells. Upregulation of HO-1 by transfecting it into SKM-1 cells with lentivirus vector promoted cell proliferation and protected them against apoptosis. In contrast, downregulation of HO-1 enhanced decitabine-induced apoptosis but reduced accumulation of the S phase in cell cycle. To explore the mechanism, the expressions of cell cycle-related proteins were detected after the cells were treated by decitabine in each group. p15(INK4B) and CDK4 were overexpressed in SKM-1 cells in which HO-1 was inhibited, and the expression-depending apoptosis was related to the caspase-3 pathway. Even though HO-1 was silenced, the apoptotic rate never increased as the caspase-3 pathway was blocked. It is well known that p15(INK4B) dominantly regulates the S phase of the cell cycle. p15(INK4B) was herein demethylated more evidently in the group of SKM-1 cells in which HO-1 was downregulated, as well as in the mononuclear cells of patients suffering from MDS. In the case of poor prognosis, the mRNA level of HO-1 was raised. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 indicated resistance to demethylation of p15(INK4B) induced by decitabine.

  15. Identification of microRNA-regulated pathways using an integration of microRNA-mRNA microarray and bioinformatics analysis in CD34+ cells of myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Yang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Liu, Li; Chang, Chun-Kang; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microRNA (miRNA) and targeted mRNA on signal transduction is not fully understood in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we tried to identify the miRNAs-regulated pathways through a combination of miRNA and mRNA microarray in CD34+ cells from MDS patients. We identified 34 differentially expressed miRNAs and 1783 mRNAs in MDS. 25 dysregulated miRNAs and 394 targeted mRNAs were screened by a combination of Pearson's correlation analysis and software prediction. Pathway analysis showed that several pathways such as Notch, PI3K/Akt might be regulated by those miRNA-mRNAs pairs. Through a combination of Pathway and miRNA-Gene or GO-Network analysis, miRNAs-regulated pathways, such as miR-195-5p/DLL1/Notch signaling pathway, were identified. Further qRT-PCR showed that miR-195-5p was up-regulated while DLL1 was down-regulated in patients with low-grade MDS compared with normal controls. Luciferase assay showed that DLL1 was a direct target of miR-195-5p. Overexpression of miR-195-5p led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced cell growth through inhibition of Notch signaling pathway. In conclusion, alteration expression of miRNAs and targeted mRNAs might have an important impact on cancer-related cellular pathways in MDS. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by miR-195-5p-DLL1 axis contributes to the excess apoptosis in low-grade MDS. PMID:27571714

  16. Disruption of SF3B1 results in deregulated expression and splicing of key genes and pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Dolatshad, H; Pellagatti, A; Fernandez-Mercado, M; Yip, B H; Malcovati, L; Attwood, M; Przychodzen, B; Sahgal, N; Kanapin, A A; Lockstone, H; Scifo, L; Vandenberghe, P; Papaemmanuil, E; Smith, C W J; Campbell, P J; Ogawa, S; Maciejewski, J P; Cazzola, M; Savage, K I; Boultwood, J

    2015-05-01

    The splicing factor SF3B1 is the most commonly mutated gene in the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), particularly in patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). We investigated the functional effects of SF3B1 disruption in myeloid cell lines: SF3B1 knockdown resulted in growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and impaired erythroid differentiation and deregulation of many genes and pathways, including cell cycle regulation and RNA processing. MDS is a disorder of the hematopoietic stem cell and we thus studied the transcriptome of CD34(+) cells from MDS patients with SF3B1 mutations using RNA sequencing. Genes significantly differentially expressed at the transcript and/or exon level in SF3B1 mutant compared with wild-type cases include genes that are involved in MDS pathogenesis (ASXL1 and CBL), iron homeostasis and mitochondrial metabolism (ALAS2, ABCB7 and SLC25A37) and RNA splicing/processing (PRPF8 and HNRNPD). Many genes regulated by a DNA damage-induced BRCA1-BCLAF1-SF3B1 protein complex showed differential expression/splicing in SF3B1 mutant cases. This is the first study to determine the target genes of SF3B1 mutation in MDS CD34(+) cells. Our data indicate that SF3B1 has a critical role in MDS by affecting the expression and splicing of genes involved in specific cellular processes/pathways, many of which are relevant to the known RARS pathophysiology, suggesting a causal link.

  17. [Distribution of abnormal cell clone with deletion of chromosome 20q in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Qin, Ling; Wang, Chun; Qin, You-Wen; Xie, Kuang-Cheng; Yan, Shi-Ke; Gao, Yan-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Rui; Zhao, Chu-Xian

    2008-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of abnormal clone in marrow cell lineages and apoptosis cells in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with deletion of chromosome 20q. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing myeloid precursors (CD15), erythroid precursors (GPA), T cells (CD3(+)CD56(-)CD16(-)), B cells (CD19), NK cells (CD3(-)CD56(+)CD16(+)) were used to sort bone marrow cells in a MDS patient with del (20q) by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Annexin V-FITC and PI were used to sort bone marrow Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells by FACS. The sorted positive cells were detected by interphase dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) using a LSI D20S108 probe (Spectrum Orange) and a Telvysion TM 20p probe (Spectrum Green). FACS and FISH analysis were also performed on the samples from 4 cases with normal karyotype. The results showed that the proportions of MDS clone in the myeloid and erythroid precursors were 70.50% and 93.33% respectively, in the RAEB-1 patient with del (20q) and were obviously higher than that in control group (5.39% and 6.17%). The proportions of abnormal clone in T, B and NK cells were 3.23%, 4.32% and 5.77% respectively and were less than that in control group (5.76%, 4.85%, 6.36%). The percentage of apoptotic cells in the bone marrow nucleated cells was 16.09%. The proportions of MDS clone in Annexin V(+)PI(-) and Annexin V(-)PI(-) cells were 32.48% and 70.11%, respectively. It is concluded that most myeloid and erythroid precursors are originated from the abnormal clone in MDS with del (20q). A little part of apoptotic cells are derived from the abnormal clone.

  18. HAG (Homoharringtonine, Cytarabine, G-CSF) Regimen for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Meta-Analysis with 2,314 Participants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Zhu, Jingjing; Zhu, Lixia; Zhou, De; Zheng, Yanlong; Yang, Xiudi; Zhu, Mingyu; Sun, Jianai; Xie, Wanzhuo; Ye, Xiujin

    2016-01-01

    Background In China, the combination of homoharringtonine, cytarabine, and G-CSF (HAG) has been extensively applied for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 2,314 patients (AML, n = 1754; MDS, n = 560) to determine the overall safety and efficacy of this regimen. Results The complete response (CR) rate of AML patients (53%) was significantly higher than that of MDS/transformed-AML patients (45%; P = 0.007). The CR rate of patients with newly diagnosed AML (62%) was significantly higher than in patients with relapsed/refractory AML (50%; P = 0.001). There were no significant difference in CR rates between elderly AML patients (54%) and all AML patients (P = 0.721). When compared with non-HAG regimens for AML/MDS induction therapy, the CR rate of patients treated with HAG was significantly higher than in treated with intensive chemotherapy (P = 0.000). No significant differences in CR rates were observed between patients treated with HAG and those treated with CAG (cytarabine, aclarubicin, G-CSF) regimens (P = 0.073). HAG regimen was well tolerated, with early death (ED) in 2%, grade IV myelosurrpression in 52% and infection in 50%. Reports of ED and rates of myelosuppression were reduced as compared with intensive chemotherapy (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion The HAG regimen is an effective and safe regimen for the treatment of AML and MDS, and appears to be more effective and better tolerated than intensive chemotherapy. Future randomized controlled trials and further meta-analyses are strongly needed to confirm its efficacy and safety, especially in comparison with intensive chemotherapy. PMID:27706258

  19. [The role of pre-transplant debulking treatment in patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Jordan; Damaj, Gandhi; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) remains unsatisfactory. Variable success in the correction of blood cytopenias, reduction of the proportion of marrow myeloblasts, and normalization of cytogenetics has been achieved with a variety of treatment strategies, including the use of immunosuppressive drugs, differentiating agents, conventional chemotherapy, and hypomethylating agents (HMAs) However, in general, responses have not been complete and have been of limited duration; prolongation of survival, if achieved, on average has been in the range of months. Currently, allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-SCT) remains the only approach with curative potential for patients with higher risk/advanced MDS. Yet, despite the beneficial effects of allo-SCT, post-transplant relapse is a major cause of failure. Debulking prior to transplant treatment in patients with MDS is a matter of debate. The achievement of complete remission (CR) before allo-SCT improves post-transplantation outcome, although it is not clear whether this reflects the selection of patients with more responsive disease or is related to a reduction in disease burden. Higher CR rates in patients with MDS are obtained with induction chemotherapy (ICT) than with hypomethylating agents (HMAs), although HMAs may be active in patients with complex karyotypes in whom ICT almost invariably fails. Furthermore, HMAs have a good toxicity profile compared with ICT and may therefore be considered especially in older patients and in patients with comorbidities. However, all interventions aimed at reducing disease burden before allo-SCT expose patients to the risk of complications, which may prevent them from undergoing transplantation. Therefore, up-front allo-SCT is an option, particularly for patients with life-threatening cytopenias. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, the main therapeutic approaches are discussed in this review.

  20. Low CD34 Dose is Associated with Poor Survival after Reduced Intensity Conditioning Allogeneic Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Törlén, Johan; Ringdén, Olle; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Batiwalla, Minoo; Chen, Junfang; Erkers, Tom; Ho, Vincent; Kebriaei, Partow; Keever-Taylor, Carolyn; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Laughlin, Mary J.; Lill, Michael; O’Brien, Tracey; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Rocha, Vanderson; Savani, Bipin N.; Szwajcer, David; Valcarcel, David; Eapen, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Reduced intensity conditioning/non-myeloablative conditioning regimens are increasingly used in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Reports have shown CD34+ dose to be important for transplant-outcome using myeloablative conditioning. The role of CD34+ dose of peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPC) has not been previously analyzed in a large population undergoing reduced intensity conditioning/non-myeloablative HCT. We studied 1,054 patients aged 45–75 years, with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) transplanted between 2002 and 2011. Results of multivariate analysis showed that PBPC from HLA-matched siblings containing <4 × 106 CD34+/kg were associated with higher non-relapse mortality (HR 2.03, p=0.001), overall mortality (HR 1.48, p=0.008), and lower neutrophil (OR 0.76, p=0.03) and platelet (OR 0.76, p=0.03) recovery. PBPC from unrelated donors with CD34+ dose <6 × 106 CD34+/kg were also associated with higher non-relapse (HR 1.38, p=0.02) and overall mortality (HR 1.20, p=0.05). In contrast to reports after myeloablative HCT, CD34+ dose did not affect relapse or graft-versus-host disease with either donor type. An upper cell dose limit was not associated with adverse outcomes. These data suggest that PBPC CD34+ dose >4 × 106 CD34+/kg and >6 × 106 CD34+/kg are optimal for HLA-matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT, respectively. PMID:24892261

  1. Disruption of SF3B1 results in deregulated expression and splicing of key genes and pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Dolatshad, H; Pellagatti, A; Fernandez-Mercado, M; Yip, B H; Malcovati, L; Attwood, M; Przychodzen, B; Sahgal, N; Kanapin, A A; Lockstone, H; Scifo, L; Vandenberghe, P; Papaemmanuil, E; Smith, C W J; Campbell, P J; Ogawa, S; Maciejewski, J P; Cazzola, M; Savage, K I; Boultwood, J

    2015-01-01

    The splicing factor SF3B1 is the most commonly mutated gene in the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), particularly in patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS). We investigated the functional effects of SF3B1 disruption in myeloid cell lines: SF3B1 knockdown resulted in growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and impaired erythroid differentiation and deregulation of many genes and pathways, including cell cycle regulation and RNA processing. MDS is a disorder of the hematopoietic stem cell and we thus studied the transcriptome of CD34+ cells from MDS patients with SF3B1 mutations using RNA sequencing. Genes significantly differentially expressed at the transcript and/or exon level in SF3B1 mutant compared with wild-type cases include genes that are involved in MDS pathogenesis (ASXL1 and CBL), iron homeostasis and mitochondrial metabolism (ALAS2, ABCB7 and SLC25A37) and RNA splicing/processing (PRPF8 and HNRNPD). Many genes regulated by a DNA damage-induced BRCA1–BCLAF1–SF3B1 protein complex showed differential expression/splicing in SF3B1 mutant cases. This is the first study to determine the target genes of SF3B1 mutation in MDS CD34+ cells. Our data indicate that SF3B1 has a critical role in MDS by affecting the expression and splicing of genes involved in specific cellular processes/pathways, many of which are relevant to the known RARS pathophysiology, suggesting a causal link. PMID:25428262

  2. Mixed T Lymphocyte Chimerism after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Transplantation Is Predictive for Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hans C; Saliba, Rima M; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Charafeddine, Yasmeen; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Alatrash, Gheath; Andersson, Borje S; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Ciurea, Stefan; Oran, Betul; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Chimerism testing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represents a promising tool for predicting disease relapse, although its precise role in this setting remains unclear. We investigated the predictive value of T lymphocyte chimerism analysis at 90 to 120 days after allo-HSCT in 378 patients with AML/MDS who underwent busulfan/fludarabine-based myeloablative preparative regimens. Of 265 (70%) patients with available T lymphocyte chimerism data, 43% of patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2) at the time of transplantation had complete (100%) donor T lymphocytes at day +90 to +120 compared with 60% of patients in the non-CR1/CR2 cohort (P = .005). In CR1/CR2 patients, donor T lymphocyte chimerism ≤ 85% at day +90 to +120 was associated with a higher frequency of 3-year disease progression (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18% to 46% versus 15%; 95% CI, 9% to 23%; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; P = .04). However, in the more advanced, non-CR1/CR2 cohort, mixed T lymphocyte chimerism was not associated with relapse (37%; 95% CI, 20% to 66% versus 34%; 95% CI, 25% to 47%; HR, 1.3; P = .60). These findings demonstrate that early T lymphocyte chimerism testing at day +90 to +120 is a useful approach for predicting AML/MDS disease recurrence in patients in CR1/CR2 at the time of transplantation. PMID:26183077

  3. Mixed T Lymphocyte Chimerism after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Transplantation Is Predictive for Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hans C; Saliba, Rima M; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Charafeddine, Yasmeen; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Alatrash, Gheath; Andersson, Borje S; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Ciurea, Stefan; Oran, Betul; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Chimerism testing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represents a promising tool for predicting disease relapse, although its precise role in this setting remains unclear. We investigated the predictive value of T lymphocyte chimerism analysis at 90 to 120 days after allo-HSCT in 378 patients with AML/MDS who underwent busulfan/fludarabine-based myeloablative preparative regimens. Of 265 (70%) patients with available T lymphocyte chimerism data, 43% of patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2) at the time of transplantation had complete (100%) donor T lymphocytes at day +90 to +120 compared with 60% of patients in the non-CR1/CR2 cohort (P = .005). In CR1/CR2 patients, donor T lymphocyte chimerism ≤ 85% at day +90 to +120 was associated with a higher frequency of 3-year disease progression (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18% to 46% versus 15%; 95% CI, 9% to 23%; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; P = .04). However, in the more advanced, non-CR1/CR2 cohort, mixed T lymphocyte chimerism was not associated with relapse (37%; 95% CI, 20% to 66% versus 34%; 95% CI, 25% to 47%; HR, 1.3; P = .60). These findings demonstrate that early T lymphocyte chimerism testing at day +90 to +120 is a useful approach for predicting AML/MDS disease recurrence in patients in CR1/CR2 at the time of transplantation.

  4. Curcumin reduces the expression of survivin, leading to enhancement of arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia stem-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yingjian; Weng, Guangyang; Fan, Jiaxin; Li, Zhangqiu; Wu, Jianwei; Li, Yuanming; Zheng, Rong; Xia, Pingfang; Guo, Kunyuan

    2016-01-01

    Low response, treatment-related complications and relapse due to the low sensitivity of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia stem cells (LSCs) or pre-LSCs to arsenic trioxide (ATO), represent the main problems following treatment with ATO alone in patients with MDS. To solve these problems, a chemosensitization agent can be applied to increase the susceptibility of these cells to ATO. Curcumin (CUR), which possesses a wide range of anticancer activities, is a commonly used chemosensitization agent for various types of tumors, including hematopoietic malignancies. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects and potential mechanisms in MDS-SKM-1 and leukemia stem-like KG1a cells treated with CUR and ATO alone or in combination. CUR and ATO exhibited growth inhibition detected by MTT assays and apoptosis analyzed by Annexin V/PI analyses in both SKM-1 and KG1a cells. Apoptosis of SKM-1 and KG1a cells determined by Annexin V/PI was significantly enhanced in the combination groups compared with the groups treated with either agent alone. Further evaluation was performed by western blotting for two hallmark markers of apoptosis, caspase-3 and cleaved-PARP. Co-treatment of the cells with CUR and ATO resulted in significant synergistic effects. In SKM-1 and KG1a cells, 31 and 13 proteins analyzed by protein array assays were modulated, respectively. Notably, survivin protein expression levels were downregulated in both cell lines treated with CUR alone and in combination with ATO, particularly in the latter case. Susceptibility to apoptosis was significantly increased in SKM-1 and KG1a cells treated with siRNA-survivin and ATO. These results suggested that CUR increased the sensitivity of SKM-1 and KG1a cells to ATO by downregulating the expression of survivin. PMID:27430728

  5. Identification of microRNA-regulated pathways using an integration of microRNA-mRNA microarray and bioinformatics analysis in CD34+ cells of myelodysplastic syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Yang; He, Qi; Wu, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Zheng; Shi, Wen-Hui; Liu, Li; Chang, Chun-Kang; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The effect of microRNA (miRNA) and targeted mRNA on signal transduction is not fully understood in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here, we tried to identify the miRNAs-regulated pathways through a combination of miRNA and mRNA microarray in CD34+ cells from MDS patients. We identified 34 differentially expressed miRNAs and 1783 mRNAs in MDS. 25 dysregulated miRNAs and 394 targeted mRNAs were screened by a combination of Pearson’s correlation analysis and software prediction. Pathway analysis showed that several pathways such as Notch, PI3K/Akt might be regulated by those miRNA-mRNAs pairs. Through a combination of Pathway and miRNA-Gene or GO-Network analysis, miRNAs-regulated pathways, such as miR-195-5p/DLL1/Notch signaling pathway, were identified. Further qRT-PCR showed that miR-195-5p was up-regulated while DLL1 was down-regulated in patients with low-grade MDS compared with normal controls. Luciferase assay showed that DLL1 was a direct target of miR-195-5p. Overexpression of miR-195-5p led to increased cell apoptosis and reduced cell growth through inhibition of Notch signaling pathway. In conclusion, alteration expression of miRNAs and targeted mRNAs might have an important impact on cancer-related cellular pathways in MDS. Inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by miR-195-5p-DLL1 axis contributes to the excess apoptosis in low-grade MDS. PMID:27571714

  6. Reduction of c-Fos via Overexpression of miR-34a Results in Enhancement of TNF- Production by LPS in Neutrophils from Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shikama, Yayoi; Cao, Meiwan; Ono, Tomoyuki; Feng, Xiaomin; Noji, Hideyoshi; Kimura, Hideo; Ogawa, Kazuei; Suzuki, Yuko; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kimura, Junko

    2016-01-01

    Although increased TNF-α has been considered to cause ineffective hematopoiesis in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the mechanisms of TNF-α elevation are not known. We recently found that c-Fos mRNA stabilization under translation-inhibiting stimuli was impaired in MDS-derived neutrophilic granulocytes. In the current study, we identified overexpression of c-Fos-targeting miR-34a and miR-155 as the cause of impairment. Expression levels of miR-34a but not miR-155 inversely correlated with ratios of c-Fos-positive cells in MDS-derived CD16+ neutrophils (r = -0.618, P<0.05), which were analyzed by flow cytometry. Among the seventeen patients, c-Fos was detectable in less than 60% of CD16+ cells in eight patients (Group A), while five (Group B) expressed c-Fos in more than 80% of CD16+ cells, which was consistent with the controls (88.6 ± 7.8%). Group A-derived granulocytes secreted more TNF-α in response to 1 μM LPS for 3 hours (735.4 ± 237.5 pg/mL) than Group B (143.5 ± 65.7 pg/mL, P<0.05) and healthy controls (150.8 ± 91.5 pg/mL, P<0.05). Knockdown of c-Fos in neutrophil-like differentiated HL60 increased the binding of NF-κB p65 to the promoter region of TNF-α DNA. Thus, c-Fos reduction via overexpression of miR-34a contributes to TNF-α overproduction under inflammatory stimuli in MDS. PMID:27513856

  7. Dyspoietic changes associated with hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma are not a manifestation of a myelodysplastic syndrome: analysis of 25 patients.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Mariko; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Tang, Guilin; Wang, Sa A; P Patel, Keyur; Routbort, Mark; Bhagat, Govind; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Chen, Weina; Muzzafar, Tariq; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Khoury, Joseph D; Daneshbod, Yahya; Davanlou, Masoud; Li, Shaoying; Young, Ken H; Miranda, Roberto N

    2016-04-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) is a rare T-cell lymphoma commonly associated with cytopenias. The pathogenesis of cytopenias in patients with HSTCL is not well defined, although the presence of dyspoietic hematopoietic cells and the common association with trisomy 8 raise the possibility of an associated myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In 25 bone marrow specimens involved by HSTCL, we systematically assessed for morphologic features of dyspoiesis and correlated the findings with peripheral cytopenia(s), cytogenetic findings, and detection of chromosome 8 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The median patient age was 33 years. One patient had a history of MDS diagnosed 1 year prior to the diagnosis of HSTCL. Thirteen (54%) patients had anemia less than 100 g/L, 10 (53%) of 19 had neutropenia less than 1.8 × 10(9)/L, and 15 (60%) had thrombocytopenia less than 100 × 10(9)/L. Dyspoietic features were identified in 1 to 3 hematopoietic cell lineages in 20 (80%) of 25 patients. Cytogenetic analysis identified trisomy 8 in 7 cases. Patients with trisomy 8 had a lower platelet count, but trisomy 8 was not associated with cytopenias, dyspoietic features, or cytogenetic abnormalities. Combined morphologic and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that trisomy 8 was restricted to the lymphoma cells, except in the 1 patient with a history of MDS. In conclusion, dyspoietic changes are common in the bone marrow of patients with HSTCL. These changes are not associated with cytopenias or chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that dyspoiesis in patients with HSTCL is not a manifestation of a MDS. PMID:26997444

  8. Expression of CDKN1C in the bone marrow of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and secondary acute myeloid leukemia is associated with poor survival after conventional chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Dietrich, Sascha; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Benner, Axel; Longerich, Thomas; Pellagatti, Andrea; Nanda, Kriti; Giese, Thomas; Germing, Ulrich; Baldus, Stefan; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Ho, Anthony D; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2016-09-15

    We tested the hypothesis that proliferative activity of hematopoietic stem cells has impact on survival in newly diagnosed patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML). RNA expression profiles of CD34(+) cells were analyzed in 125 MDS patients and compared to healthy controls. Prognostic impact on overall survival (OS) of mRNA proliferation signatures established for solid tumor cells was analyzed retrospectively. For validation on the protein level, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analyses in bone marrow (BM) biopsies were performed, and an independent cohort of 223 MDS and secondary AML patients was investigated. Lower proliferative activity correlated with the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1C (CDKN1C) and with shorter OS (p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, higher CDKN1C expression was associated with worse OS (p = 0.02). On the BM level, a total of 84 (38%) patients showed CDKN1C protein expression before start of treatment. Patient, disease and treatment characteristics did not differ between CDKN1C-positive and -negative patients. Positive CDKN1C BM status was associated with shorter OS in multivariable analysis (HR 1.54, p = 0.04). There was an interaction between CDKN1C BM status and subsequent treatment with negative impact on OS being most pronounced in patients receiving conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy (n = 83, 2-year OS 30% versus 58%, p = 0.002). In conclusion, low-proliferative phenotype and CDKN1C expression were associated with shorter OS. CDKN1C protein expression in the BM of newly diagnosed, treatment-naïve MDS and secondary AML patients was identified as a prognostic factor for poor survival in patients treated with antiproliferative chemotherapy. PMID:27170453

  9. Radiolabeled Anti-CD45 Antibody with Reduced-Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Transplantation for Younger Patients with Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mawad, Raya; Gooley, Ted A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Shields, Andrew T.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Storb, Rainer; Green, Damian J.; Maloney, David G.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Press, Oliver W.; Pagel, John M.

    2014-01-01

    We treated patients under age 50 years with 131I-anti-CD45 antibody combined with fludarabine and 2 Gy total body irradiation to create an improved hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) strategy for advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients. Fifteen patients received 332–1,561 mCi of 131I, delivering an average of 27 Gy to bone marrow, 84 Gy to spleen, and 21 Gy to liver. Although a maximum dose of 28 Gy was delivered to the liver, no dose-limiting toxicity was observed. Marrow doses were arbitrarily capped at 43 Gy to avoid radiation-induced stromal damage; however no graft failure or evidence of stromal damage was observed. Twelve patients (80%) developed Grade II graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), one patient developed Grade III GVHD, and no patients developed Grade IV GVHD during the first 100 days after HCT. Of the 12 patients with chronic GVHD data, 10 developed chronic GVHD, generally involving the skin and mouth. Six patients (40%) are surviving after a median of 5.0 years (range, 4.2 to 8.3 years). The estimated survival at 1 year was 73% among the 15 treated patients. Eight patients relapsed, 7 of whom subsequently died. The median time to relapse among these 8 patients was 54 days (range, 26 to 1364 days). No cases of non-relapse mortality were observed in the first year after transplant. However, two patients died in remission from complications of chronic GVHD and cardiomyopathy, at 18 months and 14 months after transplant, respectively. This study suggests that patients may tolerate myeloablative doses >28 Gy delivered to the liver using 131I-anti-CD45 antibody in addition to standard reduced intensity conditioning. Moreover, the arbitrary limit of 43 Gy to the marrow may be unnecessarily conservative, and continued escalation of targeted radioimmunotherapy doses may be feasible to further reduce relapse. PMID:24858425

  10. Interferon-α: A Potentially Effective Treatment for Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Lan-Ping; Wang, Yu; Yan, Chen-Hua; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2015-11-01

    In this prospective clinical study, the safety and efficacy of preemptive interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment were investigated and compared with preemptive donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) in patients who were minimal residual disease (MRD)-positive after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were eligible if they had acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome and were MRD-positive after HSCT. Patients who were able to receive DLI were assigned to a preemptive DLI group (n = 45); patients who could not or did not agree to receive DLI after HSCT received preemptive IFN-α. A total of 22 patients received preemptive IFN-α; the median treatment duration was 35 days (range, 4 to 180 days). Seven patients relapsed, and 1 patient died from severe pneumonia. The 1-year cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after intervention was 90.9% for the IFN-α group and 62.9% for the DLI group (P < .001). MRD status after preemptive intervention was comparable in the 2 groups, and the 1-year cumulative incidence of relapse after intervention was 27.3% for the IFN-α group and 35.6% for the DLI group (P = .514). The 1-year cumulative incidence of nonrelapse mortality after intervention was 4.5% for the IFN-α group and 4.4% for the DLI group (P = .985). The 1-year probability of disease-free survival after intervention was 68.2% for the IFN-α group and 60.0% for the DLI group (P = .517). In multivariate analysis, early-onset MRD, persistent MRD after intervention, and absence of cGVHD after intervention were significantly associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Thus, preemptive IFN-α may be a potential alternative for MRD-positive patients who cannot receive preemptive DLI after HSCT.

  11. Factors associated with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) among patients in a population-based study of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Smith, Angela R; Warlick, Erica D; Roesler, Michelle A; Poynter, Jenny N; Richardson, Michaela; Nguyen, Phuong; Cioc, Adina; Hirsch, Betsy; Ross, Julie A

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by dysplastic changes in the bone marrow, ineffective erythropoiesis, and an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia. Treatment planning for patients with MDS is a complex process, and we sought to better characterize hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) outcomes and the factors that play into decision-making regarding referral of adults with MDS for definitive therapy with HCT. Patients enrolled in a population-based study of MDS between April 2010 and January 2013 who underwent HCT within the first year after enrollment were included in this analysis. Age- and risk-matched MDS patient controls also enrolled during that time period were used as a comparison. Survival was significantly better in the HCT group (48 vs. 21 %, log-rank p value 0.009). Non-HCT patients were more likely to have comorbidities, and HCT patients were more likely to have a college degree and an income >$80,000. All three of these variables were independently associated with HCT, but none impacted survival. Patients with MDS in our study who underwent HCT had better survival than a comparable group of patients who did not undergo HCT. With refined treatment techniques, more patients may be able to be considered for this therapy. More work needs to be done to determine why education and income appear to impact the decision to pursue HCT, but these factors may impact referral to an academic center where aggressive therapy like HCT is more likely to be considered.

  12. Expression of PD-L1, PD-L2, PD-1 and CTLA4 in myelodysplastic syndromes is enhanced by treatment with hypomethylating agents.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Bueso-Ramos, C; DiNardo, C; Estecio, M R; Davanlou, M; Geng, Q-R; Fang, Z; Nguyen, M; Pierce, S; Wei, Y; Parmar, S; Cortes, J; Kantarjian, H; Garcia-Manero, G

    2014-06-01

    Blockade of immune checkpoints is emerging as a new form of anticancer therapy. We studied the expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1), PD-L2, programmed death 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) mRNA in CD34+ cells from myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients (N=124). Aberrant upregulation (⩾2-fold) was observed in 34, 14, 15 and 8% of the patients. Increased expression of these four genes was also observed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) (N=61). The relative expression of PD-L1 from PBMNC was significantly higher in MDS (P=0.018) and CMML (P=0.0128) compared with AML. By immunohistochemical analysis, PD-L1 protein expression was observed in MDS CD34+ cells, whereas stroma/non-blast cellular compartment was positive for PD-1. In a cohort of patients treated with epigenetic therapy, PD-L1, PD-L2, PD-1 and CTLA4 expression was upregulated. Patients resistant to therapy had relative higher increments in gene expression compared with patients who achieved response. Treatment of leukemia cells with decitabine resulted in a dose-dependent upregulation of above genes. Exposure to decitabine resulted in partial demethylation of PD-1 in leukemia cell lines and human samples. This study suggests that PD-1 signaling may be involved in MDS pathogenesis and resistance mechanisms to hypomethylating agents. Blockade of this pathway can be a potential therapy in MDS and AML.

  13. The t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) of myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia produces a novel fusion gene, NPM-MLF1.

    PubMed

    Yoneda-Kato, N; Look, A T; Kirstein, M N; Valentine, M B; Raimondi, S C; Cohen, K J; Carroll, A J; Morris, S W

    1996-01-18

    A t(3;5)(q25.1;q34) chromosomal translocation associated with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was found to rearrange part of the nucleophosmin (NPM) gene on chromosome 5 with sequences from a novel gene on chromosome 3. Chimeric transcripts expressed by these cells contain 5' NPM coding sequences fused in-frame to those of the new gene, which we named myelodysplasia/myeloid leukemia factor 1 (MLF1). RNA-based polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed identical NPM-MLF1 mRNA fusions in each of the three t(3;5)-positive cases of AML examined. The predicted MLF1 amino acid sequence lacked homology to previously characterized proteins and did not contain known functional motifs. Normal MLF1 transcripts were expressed in a variety of tissues, most abundantly in testis, ovary, skeletal muscle, heart, kidney and colon. Anti-MLF1 antibodies detected the wild-type 31 kDa protein in K562 and HEL erythroleukemia cell lines, but not in HL-60, U937 or KG-1 myeloid leukemia lines. By contrast, t(3;5)-positive leukemia cells expressed a 54 kDa NPM-MLF1 protein, but not normal MLF1. Immunostaining experiments indicated that MLF1 is normally located in the cytoplasm, whereas NPM-MLF1 is targeted to the nucleus, with highest levels in the nucleolus. The nuclear/nucleolar localization of NPM-MLF1 mirrors that of NPM, indicating that NPM trafficking signals direct MLF1 to an inappropriate cellular compartment in myeloid leukemia cells.

  14. Health, economic, and quality-of-life effects of erythropoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Nicole; Durieux, Pierre; Dubois, Stéphanie; Hemery, François; Lepage, Eric; Quarré, Marie-Catherine; Damaj, Gandhi; Giraudier, Stéphane; Guerci, Agnès; Laurent, Guy; Dombret, Hervé; Chomienne, Christine; Ribrag, Vincent; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Vekhoff, Anne; Maloisel, Frédéric; Navarro, Robert; Dreyfus, François; Fenaux, Pierre

    2004-07-15

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), anemia responds to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) alone and in combination with recombinant human granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (rHuGCSF) in 10% to 20% and in 35% to 40% of patients, respectively. We randomly divided 60 patients with low-grade anemic MDS and serum EPO levels lower than 500 IU/L (500 mU/mL) into 2 groups: rHuEPO + rHuG-CSF (arm A) and supportive care (arm B). After 12 weeks, those who had erythroid responses were given rHuEPO alone for 40 additional weeks. They were also given rHuG-CSF if they had relapses. A response was considered major if the hemoglobin (Hb) level was 115 g/L (11.5 g/dL) or higher and minor Hb increase was 15 g/L (1.5 g/dL) or more or if it remained stable without transfusion. Ten of 24 patients responded in arm A, and 0 of 26 responded in arm B (P =.01). Eight patients in arm A continued rHuEPO therapy alone, and 6 had relapses. Responses were always restored when rHuG-CSF was reintroduced. Mean direct costs per patient were 26,723 euros (arm A) and 8,746 euros (arm B). Quality of life was assessed with a Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Anemia (FACT-An) scale. Similar percentages of patients from both arms showed significant clinical improvement. rHuEPO plus rHuG-CSF led to responses in 41.7% of MDS patients. This treatment was expensive. No effect on quality of life was demonstrated.

  15. Frequency of del(12p) is commonly underestimated in myelodysplastic syndromes: Results from a German diagnostic study in comparison with an international control group.

    PubMed

    Braulke, Friederike; Müller-Thomas, Catharina; Götze, Katharina; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A N; Lübbert, Michael; Greenberg, Peter L; Bennett, John M; Solé, Francesc; Slovak, Marilyn L; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Le Beau, Michelle M; Tüchler, Heinz; Pfeilstöcker, Michael; Hildebrandt, Barbara; Aul, Carlo; Stauder, Reinhard; Valent, Peter; Fonatsch, Christa; Bacher, Ulrike; Trümper, Lorenz; Haase, Detlef; Schanz, Julie

    2015-12-01

    In myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), deletion of the short arm of chromosome 12 (del(12p)) is usually a small abnormality, rarely detected as a single aberration by chromosome banding analysis (CBA) of bone marrow metaphases. Del(12p) has been described in 0.6 to 5% of MDS patients at initial diagnosis and is associated with a good to intermediate prognosis as a sole anomaly according to current scoring systems. Here, we present the results of a systematic del(12p) testing in a German prospective diagnostic study (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01355913) on 367 MDS patients in whom CD34+ peripheral blood cells were analysed for the presence of del(12p) by sequential fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses. A cohort of 2,902 previously published MDS patients diagnosed by CBA served as control. We demonstrate that, using a sensitive FISH technique, 12p deletion occurs significantly more frequently in MDS than previously described (7.6% by CD34+ PB-FISH vs. 1.6% by CBA, P < 0.001) and is often associated with other aberrations (93% by CD34+ PB-FISH vs. 60% by CBA). Additionally, the detection rate can be increased by repeated analyses in a patient over time which is important for the patient´s prognosis to distinguish a sole anomaly from double or complex aberrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to screen for 12p deletions with a suitable probe for ETV6/TEL in 12p13. Our data suggest that the supplement of a probe for the detection of a 12p deletion to common FISH probe panels helps to avoid missing a del(12p), especially as part of more complex aberrations.

  16. Primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rischmueller, Maureen; Tieu, Joanna; Lester, Susan

    2016-02-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a relatively common autoimmune systemic rheumatic disease. In addition to sicca syndrome and swollen salivary glands, systemic features manifest in the majority of patients, and are severe in 15%, particularly affecting the joints, skin, lungs, and peripheral nervous system. A recent meta-analysis estimated a pooled relative risk of 13.76 for the development of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, particularly in pSS patients who have parotid enlargement, vasculitis, cryoglobulinemia, and antibodies to Ro and La. pSS is the underlying diagnosis in one-third of mothers of neonates affected by congenital heart block. The diagnosis of pSS is complex and requires a stepwise approach to evaluate symptoms of ocular and oral dryness, objective measures of lacrimal and salivary gland dysfunction, and evidence of autoimmunity with Ro/La autoantibodies and labial salivary gland biopsy. It is essential to eliminate other autoimmune diseases, as well as non-autoimmune causes of sicca syndrome, such as menopause, endocrine diseases, anticholinergic effects of drugs, and fibromyalgia, to delineate pSS patients who are at risk of systemic complications. Recent major advances in the diagnosis of pSS have been the development of classification criteria, which serve as a template for clinical diagnosis, and outcome measures for use in clinical trials and prospective patient cohorts. Clinical data and biological samples from longitudinal cohorts, embedded into clinical practice, will be essential to further improve the diagnosis and management of pSS, increase knowledge about the natural history of the disease, gain insights into its pathogenesis, and stratify patients according to their risk of systemic disease and NHL. At present, there is a gap in evidence regarding the role of structured protocols in the management of pSS. Recent recommendations for the management of sicca symptoms and clinical trials of disease-modifying therapy are discussed. PMID:27421224

  17. Myelodysplastic Syndrome with concomitant t(5;21)(q15;q22) and del(5)(q13q33): case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kasi Loknath Kumar, Anup; Weckbaugh, Brandon; Sirridge, Christopher; Woodroof, Janet; Persons, Diane; Kambhampati, Suman

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities lead to the development of hematologic malignancies such as Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS). Known chromosomal changes causing MDS include deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) also known as acute myeloid leukemia 1 protein (AML1), and very rarely fusion genes involving RUNX1 at t(5;21)(q15;q22). We present a case of a 71-year-old female with MDS, refractory anemia with excess blasts, type 1, with a combination of two cytogenetic abnormalities, specifically a concomitant translocation between chromosomes 5q15 and 21q22 and deletion of chromosome 5q13q33. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) using a probe for RUNX1 (AML1), localized to 21q22, showed three FISH signals for RUNX1, consistent with rearrangement of RUNX1. Therapy was started with Lenalidomide leading to normal blood counts. Most significantly, repeat cytogenetics revealed normal karyotype and resolution of deletion on the long arm of chromosome 5 and a t(5;21). FISH negative for deletion 5q. The results altogether meet criteria for a complete cytogenetic remission (CR). We report a new case of t(5;21)(q15;q22) involving the RUNX1 gene and del(5)(q13q33) in a MDS patient, a combination of chromosomal abnormalities heretofore not reported in the literature. RUNX1 rearrangement is usually associated with an adverse prognosis in AML and MDS. Deletions of 5q are typically associated with poor prognosis in AML, however it is usually associated with a favorable prognosis in MDS. Our patient responded very well to Lenalidomide therapy with achievement of CR. Lenalidomide is approved for treatment of anemia in low and intermediate risk MDS with del (5q), however based on a search of literature it seems that RUNX1 mutations are also more prominent in patients who have responded to Lenalidomide therapy. MDS is a genomically unstable disease. Hence, it is conceivable that our patient started with a 5q minus syndrome and then acquired the

  18. Using peripheral blood circulating DNAs to detect CpG global methylation status and genetic mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Iriyama, Chisako; Tomita, Akihiro; Hoshino, Hideaki; Adachi-Shirahata, Mizuho; Furukawa-Hibi, Yoko; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Circulating DNAs (CDs) can be used to detect genetic/epigenetic abnormalities in MDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Epigenetic changes can be detected more sensitively when using plasma DNA than PBMNC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutation ratio in CDs may reflect the ratio in stem cell population in bone marrow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using CDs can be a safer alternate strategy compared to bone marrow aspiration. -- Abstract: Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a hematopoietic stem cell disorder. Several genetic/epigenetic abnormalities are deeply associated with the pathogenesis of MDS. Although bone marrow (BM) aspiration is a common strategy to obtain MDS cells for evaluating their genetic/epigenetic abnormalities, BM aspiration is difficult to perform repeatedly to obtain serial samples because of pain and safety concerns. Here, we report that circulating cell-free DNAs from plasma and serum of patients with MDS can be used to detect genetic/epigenetic abnormalities. The plasma DNA concentration was found to be relatively high in patients with higher blast cell counts in BM, and accumulation of DNA fragments from mono-/di-nucleosomes was confirmed. Using serial peripheral blood (PB) samples from patients treated with hypomethylating agents, global methylation analysis using bisulfite pyrosequencing was performed at the specific CpG sites of the LINE-1 promoter. The results confirmed a decrease of the methylation percentage after treatment with azacitidine (days 3-9) using DNAs from plasma, serum, and PB mono-nuclear cells (PBMNC). Plasma DNA tends to show more rapid change at days 3 and 6 compared with serum DNA and PBMNC. Furthermore, the TET2 gene mutation in DNAs from plasma, serum, and BM cells was quantitated by pyrosequencing analysis. The existence ratio of mutated genes in plasma and serum DNA showed almost equivalent level with that in the CD34+/38- stem cell population in BM. These data suggest that genetic

  19. Genomic Copy Number Variations in the Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with del(5q) and/or -7/del(7q).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Kim, Young-Mi; Wang, Xianfu; Li, Yan; Lu, Xianglan; Sternenberger, Andrea R; Li, Shibo; Lee, Ji-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The most common chromosomal abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are -5/del(5q) and -7/del(7q). When -5/del(5q) and -7/del(7q) coexist in patients, a poor prognosis is typically associated. Given that -5/del(5q) and/or -7/del(7q) often are accompanied with additional recurrent chromosomal alterations, genetic change(s) on the accompanying chromosome(s) other than chromosomes 5 and 7 may be important factor(s) affecting leukemogenesis and disease prognosis. Using an integrated analysis of karyotype, FISH and array CGH results in this study, we evaluated the smallest region of overlap (SRO) of chromosomes 5 and 7 as well as copy number alterations (CNAs) on the other chromosomes. Moreover, the relationship between the CNAs and del(5q) and -7/del(7q) was investigated by categorizing the cases into three groups based on the abnormalities of chromosomes 5 and 7 [group I: cases only with del(5q), group II: cases only with -7/del(7q) and group III: concurrent del(5q) and del(7q) cases]. The overlapping SRO of chromosome 5 from groups I and III was 5q31.1-33.1 and of chromosome 7 from groups II and III was 7q31.31-q36.1. A total of 318 CNAs were observed; ~ 78.3% of them were identified on chromosomes other than chromosomes 5 and 7, which were defined as 'other CNAs'. Group III was a distinctive group carrying the most high number (HN) CNAs, cryptic CNAs and 'other CNAs'. The loss of TP53 was highly associated with del(5q). The loss of ETV6 was specifically associated with group III. These CNAs or genes may play a secondary role in disease progression and should be further evaluated for their clinical significance and influence on therapeutic approaches in patients with MDS/AML carrying del(5q) and/or -7/del(7q) in large-scale, patient population study. PMID:26392809

  20. Interobserver variance in myelodysplastic syndromes with less than 5 % bone marrow blasts: unilineage vs. multilineage dysplasia and reproducibility of the threshold of 2 % blasts.

    PubMed

    Font, Patricia; Loscertales, Javier; Soto, Carlos; Ricard, Pilar; Novas, Carolina Muñoz-; Martín-Clavero, Estela; López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Alonso, Luis; Callejas, Marta; Bermejo, Alfredo; Benavente, Celina; Ballesteros, Mónica; Cedena, Teresa; Calbacho, María; Urbina, Raquel; Villarrubia, Jesús; Gil, Santiago; Bellón, José María; Diez-Martin, José Luis; Villegas, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the reproducibility of the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), especially when multilineage dysplasia or excess of blasts are present. However, there are few data regarding the reproducibility of MDS with unilineage dysplasia. The revised International Prognostic Scoring System R-IPSS described two new morphological categories, distinguishing bone marrow (BM) blast cell count between 0-2 % and >2- < 5 %. This distinction is critical for establishing prognosis, but the reproducibility of this threshold is still not demonstrated. The objectives of our study were to explore the reliability of the 2008 WHO classification, regarding unilineage vs. multilineage dysplasia, by reviewing 110 cases previously diagnosed with MDS, and to study whether the threshold of ≤2 % BM blasts is reproducible among different observers. We used the same methodology as in our previous paper [Font et al. (2013) Ann Hematol 92:19-24], by encouraging investigators to include patients with <5 % BM blasts. Samples were collected from 11 hospitals and were evaluated by 11 morphologists. Each observer evaluated 20 samples, and each sample was analyzed independently by two morphologists. Discordance was observed in 36/108 suitable cases (33 %, kappa test 0.503). Diagnosis of MDS with unilineage dysplasia (refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD), refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) or unclassifiable MDS) was assessed in 33 patients, by either of the two observers. We combined this series with the cases with RCUD or RARS included in our 2013 paper, thus obtaining 50 cases with unilineage dysplasia by at least one of the observers. The whole series showed very low agreement regarding RCUD (5/23, 21 %) and RARS (5/28, 18 %). Regarding BM blast count, the threshold of ≤2 % was not reproducible (discordance rate 32/108 cases, kappa test 0.277). Our study shows that among MDS WHO 2008

  1. Interobserver variance in myelodysplastic syndromes with less than 5 % bone marrow blasts: unilineage vs. multilineage dysplasia and reproducibility of the threshold of 2 % blasts.

    PubMed

    Font, Patricia; Loscertales, Javier; Soto, Carlos; Ricard, Pilar; Novas, Carolina Muñoz-; Martín-Clavero, Estela; López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Alonso, Luis; Callejas, Marta; Bermejo, Alfredo; Benavente, Celina; Ballesteros, Mónica; Cedena, Teresa; Calbacho, María; Urbina, Raquel; Villarrubia, Jesús; Gil, Santiago; Bellón, José María; Diez-Martin, José Luis; Villegas, Ana

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the reproducibility of the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), especially when multilineage dysplasia or excess of blasts are present. However, there are few data regarding the reproducibility of MDS with unilineage dysplasia. The revised International Prognostic Scoring System R-IPSS described two new morphological categories, distinguishing bone marrow (BM) blast cell count between 0-2 % and >2- < 5 %. This distinction is critical for establishing prognosis, but the reproducibility of this threshold is still not demonstrated. The objectives of our study were to explore the reliability of the 2008 WHO classification, regarding unilineage vs. multilineage dysplasia, by reviewing 110 cases previously diagnosed with MDS, and to study whether the threshold of ≤2 % BM blasts is reproducible among different observers. We used the same methodology as in our previous paper [Font et al. (2013) Ann Hematol 92:19-24], by encouraging investigators to include patients with <5 % BM blasts. Samples were collected from 11 hospitals and were evaluated by 11 morphologists. Each observer evaluated 20 samples, and each sample was analyzed independently by two morphologists. Discordance was observed in 36/108 suitable cases (33 %, kappa test 0.503). Diagnosis of MDS with unilineage dysplasia (refractory cytopenia with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD), refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) or unclassifiable MDS) was assessed in 33 patients, by either of the two observers. We combined this series with the cases with RCUD or RARS included in our 2013 paper, thus obtaining 50 cases with unilineage dysplasia by at least one of the observers. The whole series showed very low agreement regarding RCUD (5/23, 21 %) and RARS (5/28, 18 %). Regarding BM blast count, the threshold of ≤2 % was not reproducible (discordance rate 32/108 cases, kappa test 0.277). Our study shows that among MDS WHO 2008

  2. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and dyserythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Scurlock, Deven; Ostler, Daniel; Nguyen, Andy; Wahed, Amer

    2005-05-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome or chondroectodermal dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a variable spectrum of clinical findings. Classical EVC syndrome comprises a tetrad of clinical manifestations of chondrodystrophy, polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cardiac defects. In several case reports, dysplasia involving other organs has also been identified. Hematologic abnormalities have been rarely reported in patients with EVC syndrome. Here, we report a case of a 3-year-old Hispanic boy with EVC syndrome and marked dyserythropoiesis. The dyserythropoiesis may be part of an isolated myelodysplastic change or a primary myelodysplastic syndrome and likely represents an unusual EVC syndrome association. To our knowledge, this association has not been previously reported.

  3. Danazol-induced peliosis hepatis accompanied by disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome transformed from aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Yasuhiro; Kiyasu, Junichi; Utsunomiya, Hayato; Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Choi, Ilseung; Suehiro, Youko; Aratake, Yoshifusa; Abe, Yasunobu

    2016-08-01

    Peliosis hepatis (PH) is a condition involving benign tumors pathologically characterized by multiple blood-filled cavities, mostly affecting the liver and spleen. Androgenic-steroids are widely used in patients with bone marrow failure syndromes (e.g.: aplastic anemia) and these patients are at increased risk of developing PH. Although patients with PH are generally asymptomatic, PH can progress to liver failure and even fatal spontaneous intraabdominal hemorrhage. Therefore, early diagnosis is critical in order to prevent life-threatening complications of PH. We herein report a patient with PH which had been treated with danazol, who presented with liver dysfunction and multiple hepatic lesions on imaging studies at the time of diagnosis. Although the patient presented with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), a bone marrow biopsy revealed no evidence of leukemic transformation. The patient was diagnosed as having danazol-induced PH, and these abnormalities spontaneously resolved after the discontinuation of danazol. PH is one of the most important complications of long-term administration of androgenic-steroids. Although the mechanisms remain unclear, the multiple blood-filled cavities characteristic of PH may be responsible for the development of DIC. Therefore, monitoring of coagulation markers might also be a key strategy for early diagnosis of PH. PMID:27599419

  4. The hENT1 and DCK genes underlie the decitabine response in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Geng, Suxia; Weng, Jianyu; Deng, Chengxin; Lu, Zesheng; Luo, Chengwei; Du, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Decitabine is approved for the treatment of MDS, but resistance to this agent is common. To determine the mechanisms underlying decitabine resistance, we measured the mRNA expression of metabolism (hENT1, DCK, CDA) and apoptosis (BCL2L10) genes and found that the hENT1 mRNA level was significantly higher in response compared with non-response patients (P=0.004). Furthermore, the DCK level was significantly reduced for relapse (P=0.012) compared with those with continued marrow CR (P=0.222). These findings indicate that the decitabine metabolic pathway affects its therapeutic effects, lower hENT1 expression may induce primary resistance and down-regulated DCK expression may be related to secondary resistance.

  5. [Sequential treatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) and human recombinant erythropoietin (rH-EPO) in anemia of a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome and high blood transfusion requirements)].

    PubMed

    Borbolla-Escoboza, J R; González-Avante, C M; López-Hernández, M A; Flores-Chapa, J D; Collados-Larumbe, M T

    1997-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) classified as Refractory Anemia with our Excess blasts, who suffered from high transfusional requirements and who did not respond to the administrations of B12 vitamin, folates, danazol, low dose cytarabine or recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). The patient was administered two cytokines: granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) followed by rHuEPO. The patient remained transfusion free for more than 4 months until his death from causes not related to MDS or the therapy he received. It is the opinion of the authors that the initial G-CSF administration stimulated the early erythroid precursors, making them capable of finishing their maturation when rHuEPO was administered. We believe that this could be a useful therapeutic measure in the treatment of patients with MDS and high transfusional requirements.

  6. How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... studies These tests are another way to find chromosome and gene abnormalities. An example of this is fluorescent in situ hybridization – more commonly called FISH. In FISH, specific gene sequences are ... area of a chromosome or even a certain translocation. An advantage of ...

  7. How Are Myelodysplastic Syndromes Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... scored on a scale from zero to 2) Chromosome abnormalities (scored from zero to 1) The patient’s blood ... type of MDS based on the WHO classification Chromosome abnormalities Whether or not the patient requires blood transfusions ...

  8. Aplastic Anemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Phone: 202–776–0544 Fax: 202–776–0545 Internet: www.hematology.org Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation ... Fax: 301–279–7205 Email: help@aamds.org Internet: www.aamds.org Iron Disorders Institute P.O. ...

  9. Oral mucosal manifestations in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and dry mouth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olewicz-Gawlik, Anna; Polańska, Adriana; Nowak-Gabryel, Michalina; Kocięcki, Jarosław; Witmanowski, Henryk; Sokalski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction One of the most important symptoms of Sjögren syndrome is xerostomia. The oral cavity deprived of saliva and its natural lubricative, protective and antibacterial properties is prone to a number of unfavourable consequences. Aim To present the most important lesions on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome and in dry mouth syndrome. Material and methods The study group comprised 55 patients including 52 women and 3 men aged 20–72 years (average: 28.25 years). Results Basing on the accepted criteria, primary Sjögren syndrome was diagnosed in 22 (40%) patients, secondary Sjögren syndrome in 18 (32.7%) patients, and dry mouth syndrome in 15 (27.27%) patients. The physical examination and the examination of the mouth were performed and history was elicited from every patient. Conclusions The most common pathologies appearing on the oral mucosa in primary and secondary Sjögren syndrome are angular cheilitis, cheilitis, increased lip dryness as well as non-specific ulcerations, aphthae and aphthoid conditions. PMID:26985175

  10. Managing irritable bowel syndrome in primary care.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    The classic symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are abdominal pain, bloating and some form of bowel dysfunction. The pain is typically colicky in nature and can occur at any site although most commonly it is on the left side. The abdomen feels flat in the morning and then gradually becomes more bloated as the day progresses reaching a peak by late afternoon or evening. It then subsides again over night. Traditionally IBS is divided into diarrhoea, constipation or alternating subtypes. IBS patients frequently complain of one or more non-colonic symptoms, these include constant lethargy, low backache, nausea, bladder symptoms suggestive of an irritable bladder, chest pain and dyspareunia in women. The traditional view that IBS is a largely psychological condition is no longer tenable. Rectal bleeding, a family history of malignancy and a short history in IBS should always be treated with suspicion. Both pain and bowel dysfunction are often made worse by eating. It is recommended that a coeliac screening test is undertaken to rule out this condition. Other routine tests should include inflammatory markers such as CRP or ESR. Calprotectin is a marker for leukocytes in the stools and detects gastrointestinal inflammation. A negative test almost certainly rules out inflammatory bowel disease, especially in conjunction with a normal CRP. Fermentable carbohydrates can have a detrimental effect on IBS and this has led to the introduction of the low FODMAP diet.

  11. [Burnout syndrome in primary health care professionals].

    PubMed

    Martins, Leonardo Fernandes; Laport, Tamires Jordão; Menezes, Vinicius de Paula; Medeiros, Priscila Bonfante; Ronzani, Telmo Mota

    2014-12-01

    Burnout is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and low occupational performance, which may occur among health professionals. This article evaluates burnout among workers in Primary Health Care (PHC) in three small towns in the Zona da Mata Mineira. The study analyzes associations by logistic regression between burnout, socioeconomic, and demographic aspects of work. A total of 149 professionals were selected, 107 of these responded to all questionnaires. To measure burnout, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used and to characterize the professional, a questionnaire assessing three different issues - namely individual and sociodemographic aspects and team area coverage - was used. 101 professionals were classified with positive indication for burnout. The variables present in the backward stepwise logistic regression model positively associated with indicative of burnout were: being younger than the population average (> 29.5 years) and use of drugs, including sedatives, tranquilizers and sleeping pills. The results contribute to the identification of factors associated with burnout and therefore highlight the need for more detailed investigation. PMID:25388182

  12. Primary Cutaneous Nocardiosis in a Patient With Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing; Tang, Jin; Lu, Zeyuan; Wang, Niansong; Gao, Xuping; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nocardia infection is not common in clinical practice and most cases occur as an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of primary cutaneous nocardiosis characterized by multiple subcutaneous abscesses due to Nocardia brasiliensis in a patient with nephrotic syndrome undergoing long-term corticosteroid therapy. The patient was diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome 9 months ago, and mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis was confirmed by renal biopsy. Subsequently, his renal disease was stable under low-dose methylprednisolone (8 mg/d). All of the pus cultures, which were aspirated from 5 different complete abscesses, presented Nocardia. Gene sequencing confirmed that they were all N. brasiliensis. The patient was cured by surgical drainage and a combination of linezolid and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole. The case highlights that even during the period of maintenance therapy with low-dose corticosteroid agents, an opportunistic infection still could occur in patients with nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26817885

  13. Factors influencing outcome in de novo myelodysplastic syndromes treated by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation: a long-term study of 71 patients Société Française de Greffe de Moelle.

    PubMed

    Sutton, L; Chastang, C; Ribaud, P; Jouet, J P; Kuentz, M; Attal, M; Reiffers, J; Tigaud, J M; Rio, B; Dauriac, C; Legros, M; Dreyfus, F; Lioure, B; Troussard, X; Milpied, N; Witz, F; Oriol, P; Cahn, J Y; Michallet, M; Gluckman, E; Ifrah, N; Pico, J L; Vilmer, E; Leblond, V

    1996-07-01

    We report on 71 consecutive patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes referred to physicians belonging to the Société française de greffe de moelle from 1982 through 1991 and transplanted with marrow from HLA-identical siblings. There were 16 cases of refractory anemia, 27 of refractory anemia with excess of blast cells, and 28 of refractory anemia with excess of blast cells in transformation. Seventeen patients had received cytoreductive chemotherapy before the graft. The disease progressed in 17 patients between diagnosis and grafting. Twenty-three patients are alive with a median follow-up of 6 years, whereas 24 died from relapse and 24 from transplant-related complications. Kaplan-Meier estimates of event-free survival, relapse and transplant-related mortality at 7 years were 32%, 48%, and 39%, respectively. The log-rank test and Cox's model revealed better outcome among young patients, patients in an early stage of the French-American-British (FAB) classification or with a low percentage of marrow blasts before transplantation, patients who did not undergo cytoreductive chemotherapy before transplantation, and patients conditioned with total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide. The high rate of relapse in advanced FAB stages has led us to graft patients earlier in the course of the disease, and we are currently conducting a multicenter, randomized study to determine the value of intensive chemotherapy before grafting in patients with an excess of marrow blasts.

  14. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  15. Efficacy and toxicity of decitabine versus CHG regimen (low-dose cytarabine, homoharringtonine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) in patients with higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang; Xu, Feng; He, Qi; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Zheng; Su, Jiying; Zhou, Liyu; Song, Luxi; Chao, Xiao; Zhao, Youshan

    2016-01-01

    Decitabine and CHG regimen (low-dose cytarabine and homoharringtonine with G-CSF) have been used for treating higher risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). In this study, we retrospectively compared the efficacy and toxicity of the two regimens in 132 MDS patients. Complete remission (CR) was not significantly different between the groups (27.1% with decitabine vs. 30.6% with CHG, p = 0.657). The CR rate with decitabine (58.8%) was significantly higher than that with CHG (7.7%) (p = 0.007) among the patients with poor karyotypes. Five of 23 (21.7%) patients who failed to respond to decitabine achieved CR with CHG, while one of two patients achieved CR with decitabine after failure with CHG. Overall and relapse-free survival were not different between the groups. In conclusion, both decitabine and CHG regimen are effective for higher risk MDS; there is no cross resistance between the regimens. Decitabine might be a better choice for patients with poor karyotypes.

  16. Updated recommendations on the management of gastrointestinal disturbances during iron chelation therapy with Deferasirox in transfusion dependent patients with myelodysplastic syndrome - Emphasis on optimized dosing schedules and new formulations.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Florian; Angelucci, Emanuele; Breccia, Massimo; Gattermann, Norbert; Santini, Valeria; Vey, Norbert; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are oligoclonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral cytopenias with anemias being the most prevalent feature. The majority of patients will depend on regular transfusions of packed red blood cells (PRBC) during the course of the disease. Particularly patients with MDS and low risk for transformation into acute myeloid leukemia and low risk of early death will receive PRBC transfusions on a regular basis, which puts them at high risk for transfusional iron overload. Transfusion dependence has been associated with negative impact on organ function and reduced life expectancy. Recently, several retrospective but also some prospective studies have indicated, that transfusion dependent patients with MDS might benefit from consequent iron chelation with regard to morbidity and mortality. However, low treatment adherence due to adverse events mainly gastrointestinal in nature is an important obstacle in achieving sufficient iron chelation in MDS patients. Here, we will summarize and discuss the existing data on Deferasirox in low risk MDS published so far and provide recommendations for optimal management of gastrointestinal adverse events during iron chelation aiming at improving treatment compliance and, hence, sufficiently removing excess iron from the patients.

  17. Clinical significance of previously cryptic copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome determined using combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analyses.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jin Ok; Seo, Eul Ju; Lee, Seong Wook; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-07-01

    The combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray (CGH+SNP microarray) platform can simultaneously detect copy number alterations (CNA) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Eighteen children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n=15) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=3) were studied using CGH+SNP microarray to evaluate the clinical significance of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. CGH+SNP microarray revealed CNAs at 14 regions in 9 patients, while metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis detected CNAs in 11 regions in 8 patients. Using CGH+SNP microarray, LOHs>10 Mb involving terminal regions or the whole chromosome were detected in 3 of 18 patients (17%). CGH+SNP microarray revealed cryptic LOHs with or without CNAs in 3 of 5 patients with normal karyotypes. CGH+SNP microarray detected additional cryptic CNAs (n=2) and LOHs (n=5) in 6 of 13 patients with abnormal MC. In total, 9 patients demonstrated additional aberrations, including CNAs (n=3) and/or LOHs (n=8). Three of 15 patients with AML and terminal LOH>10 Mb demonstrated a significantly inferior relapse-free survival rate (P=0.041). This study demonstrates that CGH+SNP microarray can simultaneously detect previously cryptic CNAs and LOH, which may demonstrate prognostic implications.

  18. High Expression of Human Homologue of Murine Double Minute 4 and the Short Splicing Variant, HDM4-S, in Bone Marrow in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Han, Xin; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Zhang, Yu Helen; You, M James; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E

    2016-08-01

    The human homologue of murine double minute 2 (HDM2) and HDM4 negatively regulate p53. HDM4 has not been assessed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). We examined the expression of HDM4 and the short splicing variant, HDM4-S, in bone marrow samples obtained from 85 and 23 patients with AML and MDS, respectively, and 18 negative tumor staging bone marrow samples (used as the control). Immunohistochemical staining showed that HDM4 was overexpressed in 78 AML cases (92%) and 12 MDS cases (52%) compared with 1 stressed bone marrow sample (6%). Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis of 8 AML and 11 low-grade (LG)-MDS cases confirmed that HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA expression were also elevated in all AML cases. HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA expression was elevated in 3 (27%) and 10 (91%) LG-MDS cases, respectively. HDM4 and HDM4-S mRNA levels were higher in those with AML than in those with LG-MDS. In leukemia cell lines, HEL and U937 predominantly expressed HDM4-S. In contrast, NALM6 expressed HDM4 and HDM4-S. Downregulation of HDM4 expression by treatment with small interfering RNA in NALM6 and HEL cells induced p21 expression but not increased apoptotic activity. Our results indicate that HDM4 is a potential therapeutic target in patients with AML or MDS. PMID:27155969

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with 131I–anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gooley, Theodore A.; Rajendran, Joseph; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Matthews, Dana C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, Paul J.; Storb, Rainer F.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 131I–anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with 131I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3+ and CD33+ cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of 131I-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177. PMID:19786617

  20. Updated recommendations on the management of gastrointestinal disturbances during iron chelation therapy with Deferasirox in transfusion dependent patients with myelodysplastic syndrome - Emphasis on optimized dosing schedules and new formulations.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Florian; Angelucci, Emanuele; Breccia, Massimo; Gattermann, Norbert; Santini, Valeria; Vey, Norbert; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are oligoclonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral cytopenias with anemias being the most prevalent feature. The majority of patients will depend on regular transfusions of packed red blood cells (PRBC) during the course of the disease. Particularly patients with MDS and low risk for transformation into acute myeloid leukemia and low risk of early death will receive PRBC transfusions on a regular basis, which puts them at high risk for transfusional iron overload. Transfusion dependence has been associated with negative impact on organ function and reduced life expectancy. Recently, several retrospective but also some prospective studies have indicated, that transfusion dependent patients with MDS might benefit from consequent iron chelation with regard to morbidity and mortality. However, low treatment adherence due to adverse events mainly gastrointestinal in nature is an important obstacle in achieving sufficient iron chelation in MDS patients. Here, we will summarize and discuss the existing data on Deferasirox in low risk MDS published so far and provide recommendations for optimal management of gastrointestinal adverse events during iron chelation aiming at improving treatment compliance and, hence, sufficiently removing excess iron from the patients. PMID:26293555

  1. Health-Related Quality of Life, Treatment Satisfaction, Adherence and Persistence in β-Thalassemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patients with Iron Overload Receiving Deferasirox: Results from the EPIC Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Porter, John; Bowden, Donald K.; Economou, Marina; Troncy, Jacques; Ganser, Arnold; Habr, Dany; Martin, Nicolas; Gater, Adam; Rofail, Diana; Abetz-Webb, Linda; Lau, Helen; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of iron overload using deferoxamine (DFO) is associated with significant deficits in patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and low treatment satisfaction. The current article presents patient-reported HRQOL, satisfaction, adherence, and persistence data from β-thalassemia (n = 274) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients (n = 168) patients participating in the Evaluation of Patients' Iron Chelation with Exjade (EPIC) study (NCT00171821); a large-scale 1-year, phase IIIb study investigating the efficacy and safety of the once-daily oral iron chelator, deferasirox. HRQOL and satisfaction, adherence, and persistence to iron chelation therapy (ICT) data were collected at baseline and end of study using the Medical Outcomes Short-Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36v2) and the Satisfaction with ICT Questionnaire (SICT). Compared to age-matched norms, β-thalassemia and MDS patients reported lower SF-36 domain scores at baseline. Low levels of treatment satisfaction, adherence, and persistence were also observed. HRQOL improved following treatment with deferasirox, particularly among β-thalassemia patients. Furthermore, patients reported high levels of satisfaction with deferasirox at end of study and greater ICT adherence, and persistence. Findings suggest deferasirox improves HRQOL, treatment satisfaction, adherence, and persistence with ICT in β-thalassemia and MDS patients. Improving such outcomes is an important long-term goal for patients with iron overload. PMID:22924125

  2. Validation of WHO classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) for myelodysplastic syndromes and comparison with the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A study of the International Working Group for Prognosis in Myelodysplasia (IWG-PM).

    PubMed

    Della Porta, M G; Tuechler, H; Malcovati, L; Schanz, J; Sanz, G; Garcia-Manero, G; Solé, F; Bennett, J M; Bowen, D; Fenaux, P; Dreyfus, F; Kantarjian, H; Kuendgen, A; Levis, A; Cermak, J; Fonatsch, C; Le Beau, M M; Slovak, M L; Krieger, O; Luebbert, M; Maciejewski, J; Magalhaes, S M M; Miyazaki, Y; Pfeilstöcker, M; Sekeres, M A; Sperr, W R; Stauder, R; Tauro, S; Valent, P; Vallespi, T; van de Loosdrecht, A A; Germing, U; Haase, D; Greenberg, P L; Cazzola, M

    2015-07-01

    A risk-adapted treatment strategy is mandatory for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We refined the World Health Organization (WHO)-classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS) by determining the impact of the newer clinical and cytogenetic features, and we compared its prognostic power to that of the revised International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). A population of 5326 untreated MDS was considered. We analyzed single WPSS parameters and confirmed that the WHO classification and severe anemia provide important prognostic information in MDS. A strong correlation was found between the WPSS including the new cytogenetic risk stratification and WPSS adopting original criteria. We then compared WPSS with the IPSS-R prognostic system. A highly significant correlation was found between the WPSS and IPSS-R risk classifications. Discrepancies did occur among lower-risk patients in whom the number of dysplastic hematopoietic lineages as assessed by morphology did not reflect the severity of peripheral blood cytopenias and/or increased marrow blast count. Moreover, severe anemia has higher prognostic weight in the WPSS versus IPSS-R model. Overall, both systems well represent the prognostic risk of MDS patients defined by WHO morphologic criteria. This study provides relevant in formation for the implementation of risk-adapted strategies in MDS. PMID:25721895

  3. Primary autoimmune myelofibrosis: definition of a distinct clinicopathologic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pullarkat, Vinod; Bass, Randall D; Gong, Jerald Z; Feinstein, Donald I; Brynes, Russell K

    2003-01-01

    Myelofibrosis is characterized by reticulin fibrosis of the bone marrow with resulting features of myelophthisis. Besides hematopoietic malignancies and other neoplasms involving the bone marrow, myelofibrosis has been described in association with autoimmune disorders, especially systemic lupus erythematosus. We describe the clinicopathologic features of a primary form of autoimmune myelofibrosis (AIMF) in patients who do not have systemic lupus erythematosus or another well-defined autoimmune syndrome. Absence of marked splenomegaly, peripheral blood cytopenias with mild teardrop poikilocytosis and leukoerythroblastosis, bone marrow lymphoid aggregates, and presence of autoantibodies are some of the salient features of primary AIMF. AIMF should especially be differentiated from chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis, a neoplastic myeloproliferative disease. Primary AIMF appears to have an excellent prognosis, with all patients reported in this series responding to a short course of corticosteroid therapy. PMID:12508261

  4. A novel Fryns "Anophthalmia-plus" syndrome associated with primary hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Akalin, I; Senses, D A; Ilgin-Ruhi, H; Misirlioğlu, E; Yalçiner, M; Cetinkaya, E; Fryns, J P; Tükün, A

    2005-01-01

    A novel Fryns "anophthalmla-plus" syndrome associated with primary hypothyroidism: Here, we report a newborn male with "anophthalmia-plus" syndrome and primary congenital hypothyroidism. To our knowledge this is the first case of 'anophthalmia-plus' syndrome associated with congenital hypothyroidism in the literature up to date.

  5. Chediak-Higashi syndrome and premature exfoliation of primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Karla Mayra; Canela, Alfredo Hiram Carrillo; Ortega, Adriana Oliveira Lira; Tintel, Claudia; Bönecker, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    The Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare hereditary fatal disease, if not treated. These changes are associated with various diseases and syndromes that mainly cause periodontal disease and thus the premature loss of teeth. This paper describes the monitoring of premature loss of primary teeth that began when the child was 5 years old. On presentation his teeth were mobile and there was a history of gingival bleeding. Panoramic radiography revealed generalized and severe bone loss, and the teeth showed no bony support enough for their stability. Blood test was ordered to assess the overall health of the child and giant cells with cytoplasmic granules were found, confirming the diagnosis of CHS. The management of periodontal disease focused on the control of infection and bacterial plaque by mechanical and chemical methods.

  6. Retinotopically defined primary visual cortex in Williams syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Rosanna K.; Kippenhan, J. Shane; Japee, Shruti; Kohn, Philip; Mervis, Carolyn B.; Saad, Ziad S.; Morris, Colleen A.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Williams syndrome, caused by a hemizygous microdeletion on chromosome 7q11.23, is characterized by severe impairment in visuospatial construction. To examine potential contributions of early visual processing to this cognitive problem, we functionally mapped the size and neuroanatomical variability of primary visual cortex (V1) in high-functioning adults with Williams syndrome and age- and IQ-matched control participants from the general population by using fMRI-based retinotopic mapping and cortical surface models generated from high-resolution structural MRI. Visual stimulation, consisting of rotating hemicircles and expanding rings, was used to retinotopically define early visual processing areas. V1 boundaries based on computed phase and field sign maps were used to calculate the functional area of V1. Neuroanatomical variability was assessed by computing overlap maps of V1 location for each group on standardized cortical surfaces, and non-parametric permutation test methods were used for statistical inference. V1 did not differ in size between groups, although its anatomical boundaries were more variable in the group with Williams syndrome. V1 overlap maps showed that the average centres of gravity for the two groups were similarly located near the fundus of the calcarine fissure, ∼25 mm away from the most posterior aspect of the occipital lobe. In summary, our functional definition of V1 size and location indicates that recruitment of primary visual cortex is grossly normal in Williams syndrome, consistent with the notion that neural abnormalities underlying visuospatial construction arise at later stages in the visual processing hierarchy. PMID:19255058

  7. Azacitidine and Sonidegib or Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-25

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Detection of an activated JAK3 variant and a Xq26.3 microdeletion causing loss of PHF6 and miR-424 expression in myelodysplastic syndromes by combined targeted next generation sequencing and SNP array analysis.

    PubMed

    Kunze, Kristin; Gamerdinger, Ulrike; Leßig-Owlanj, Jacqueline; Sorokina, Marina; Brobeil, Alexander; Tur, Mehmet Kemal; Blau, Wolfgang; Burchardt, Alexander; Käbisch, Andreas; Schliesser, Georg; Kiehl, Michael; Rosenwald, Andreas; Rummel, Mathias; Grimminger, Friedrich; Hain, Torsten; Chakraborty, Trinad; Bräuninger, Andreas; Gattenlöhner, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and progression to acute leukemia. In patients ineligible for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, azacitidine is the only treatment shown to prolong survival. However, with the availability of a growing compendium of cancer biomarkers and related drugs, analysis of relevant genetic alterations for individual MDS patients might become part of routine evaluation. Therefore and in order to cover the entire bone marrow microenvironment involved in the pathogenesis of MDS, SNP array analysis and targeted next generation sequencing (tNGS) for the mostly therapy relevant 46 onco- and tumor-suppressor genes were performed on bone marrow biopsies from 29 MDS patients. In addition to the detection of mutations known to be associated with MDS in NRAS, KRAS, MPL, NPM1, IDH1, PTPN11, APC and MET, single nucleotide variants so far unrelated to MDS in STK11 (n=1), KDR (n=3), ATM (n=1) and JAK3 (n=2) were identified. Moreover, a recurrent microdeletion was detected in Xq26.3 (n=2), causing loss of PHF6 expression, a potential tumor suppressor gene, and the miR-424, which is involved in the development of acute myeloid leukemia. Finally, combined genetic aberrations affecting the VEGF/VEGFR pathway were found in the majority of cases demonstrating the diversity of mutations affecting different nodes of a particular signaling network as an intrinsic feature in MDS patients. We conclude that combined SNP array analyses and tNGS can identify established and novel therapy relevant genomic aberrations in MDS patients and track them in a clinical setting for individual therapy selection.

  9. Outcomes in RBC transfusion-dependent patients with Low-/Intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes with isolated deletion 5q treated with lenalidomide: a subset analysis from the MDS-004 study

    PubMed Central

    Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Mufti, Ghulam J; Mittelman, Moshe; Sanz, Guillermo; Platzbecker, Uwe; Muus, Petra; Selleslag, Dominik; Beyne-Rauzy, Odile; te Boekhorst, Peter; del Cañizo, Consuelo; Guerci-Bresler, Agnès; Nilsson, Lars; Lübbert, Michael; Quesnel, Bruno; Ganser, Arnold; Bowen, David; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Göhring, Gudrun; Fu, Tommy; Benettaib, Bouchra; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Fenaux, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objective A subset analysis of the randomised, phase 3, MDS-004 study to evaluate outcomes in patients with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS)-defined Low-/Intermediate (Int)-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with isolated del(5q). Methods Patients received lenalidomide 10 mg/d (days 1–21; n = 47) or 5 mg/d (days 1–28; n = 43) on 28-d cycles or placebo (n = 45). From the placebo and lenalidomide 5 mg groups, 84% and 58% of patients, respectively, crossed over to lenalidomide 5 or 10 mg at 16 wk, respectively. Results Rates of red blood cell-transfusion independence (RBC-TI) ≥182 d were higher in the lenalidomide 10 mg (57.4%; P < 0.0001) and 5 mg (37.2%; P = 0.0001) groups vs. placebo (2.2%). Cytogenetic response rates (major + minor responses) were 56.8% (P < 0.0001), 23.1% (P = 0.0299) and 0%, respectively. Two-year cumulative risk of acute myeloid leukaemia progression was 12.6%, 17.4% and 16.7% in the lenalidomide 10 mg, 5 mg, and placebo groups, respectively. In a 6-month landmark analysis, overall survival was longer in lenalidomide-treated patients with RBC-TI ≥182 d vs. non-responders (P = 0.0072). The most common grade 3–4 adverse event was myelosuppression. Conclusions These data support the clinical benefits and acceptable safety profile of lenalidomide in transfusion-dependent patients with IPSS-defined Low-/Int-1-risk MDS with isolated del(5q). PMID:24813620

  10. Long-Term Outcomes after Treatment with Clofarabine ± Fludarabine with Once-Daily Intravenous Busulfan as Pretransplant Conditioning Therapy for Advanced Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alatrash, Gheath; Thall, Peter F; Valdez, Benigno C; Fox, Patricia S; Ning, Jing; Garber, Haven R; Janbey, Selma; Worth, Laura L; Popat, Uday; Hosing, Chitra; Alousi, Amin M; Kebriaei, Partow; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Jones, Roy B; de Lima, Marcos; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Champlin, Richard E; Andersson, Borje S

    2016-10-01

    Pretransplant conditioning regimens critically determine outcomes in the setting of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). The use of nucleoside analogs such as fludarabine (Flu) in combination with i.v. busulfan (Bu) has been shown to be highly effective as a pretransplant conditioning regimen in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Because leukemia relapse remains the leading cause of death after allo-SCT, we studied whether clofarabine (Clo), a nucleoside analog with potent antileukemia activity, can be used to complement Flu. In a preliminary report, we previously showed the safety and efficacy of Clo ± Flu with i.v. Bu in 51 patients with high-risk AML, CML, and MDS. The study has now been completed, and we present long-term follow-up data on the entire 70-patient population, which included 49 (70%), 8 (11%), and 13 (19%) patients with AML, MDS, and CML, respectively. Thirteen patients (19%) were in complete remission, and 41 patients (59%) received matched unrelated donor grafts. Engraftment was achieved in all patients. Sixty-three patients (90%) achieved complete remission. There were no deaths reported at day +30, and the 100-day nonrelapse mortality rate was 4% (n = 3). Thirty-one percent of patients (n = 22) developed grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease, and the median overall survival and progression-free survival times were 2.4 years and .9 years, respectively. Our results confirm the safety and overall and progression-free survival advantage of the arms with higher Clo doses and lower Flu doses, which was most prominent in the AML/MDS group.

  11. Characterizing a neurodegenerative syndrome: primary progressive apraxia of speech

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Joseph R.; Strand, Edythe A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Senjem, Matthew L.; Master, Ankit V.; Lowe, Val J.; Jack, Clifford R.; Whitwell, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    and increased mean diffusivity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus, particularly the premotor components. Statistical parametric mapping of the [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scans revealed focal hypometabolism of superior lateral premotor cortex and supplementary motor area, although there was some variability across subjects noted with CortexID analysis. [11C]-Pittsburg compound B positron emission tomography binding was increased in only one of the 12 subjects, although it was unclear whether the increase was actually related to the primary progressive apraxia of speech. A syndrome characterized by progressive pure apraxia of speech clearly exists, with a neuroanatomic correlate of superior lateral premotor and supplementary motor atrophy, making this syndrome distinct from primary progressive aphasia. PMID:22382356

  12. The primary vascular dysregulation syndrome: implications for eye diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Vascular dysregulation refers to the regulation of blood flow that is not adapted to the needs of the respective tissue. We distinguish primary vascular dysregulation (PVD, formerly called vasospastic syndrome) and secondary vascular dysregulation (SVD). Subjects with PVD tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, increased pain sensitivity, prolonged sleep onset time, altered gene expression in the lymphocytes, signs of oxidative stress, slightly increased endothelin-1 plasma level, low body mass index and often diffuse and fluctuating visual field defects. Coldness, emotional or mechanical stress and starving can provoke symptoms. Virtually all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. In subjects with PVD, retinal vessels are stiffer and more irregular, and both neurovascular coupling and autoregulation capacity are reduced while retinal venous pressure is often increased. Subjects with PVD have increased risk for normal-tension glaucoma, optic nerve compartment syndrome, central serous choroidopathy, Susac syndrome, retinal artery and vein occlusions and anterior ischaemic neuropathy without atherosclerosis. Further characteristics are their weaker blood–brain and blood-retinal barriers and the higher prevalence of optic disc haemorrhages and activated astrocytes. Subjects with PVD tend to suffer more often from tinnitus, muscle cramps, migraine with aura and silent myocardial ischaemic and are at greater risk for altitude sickness. While the main cause of vascular dysregulation is vascular endotheliopathy, dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system is also involved. In contrast, SVD occurs in the context of other diseases such as multiple sclerosis, retrobulbar neuritis, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia and giant cell arteritis. Taking into consideration the high prevalence of PVD in the population and potentially linked pathologies, in the current article, the authors provide

  13. Clinical and Genetic Aspects of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia / Kartagener Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Margaret W.; Pittman, Jessica E.; Carson, Johnny L.; Ferkol, Thomas W.; Dell, Sharon D.; Davis, Stephanie D.; Knowles, Michael R.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia. Most of the disease-causing mutations identified to date involve the heavy (DNAH5) or intermediate (DNAI1) chain dynein genes in ciliary outer dynein arms, although a few mutations have been noted in other genes. Clinical molecular genetic testing for PCD is available for the most common mutations. The respiratory manifestations of PCD (chronic bronchitis leading to bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis and chronic otitis media) reflect impaired mucociliary clearance owing to defective axonemal structure. Ciliary ultrastructural analysis in most patients (>80%) reveals defective dynein arms, although defects in other axonemal components have also been observed. Approximately 50% of PCD patients have laterality defects (including situs inversus totalis and, less commonly, heterotaxy and congenital heart disease), reflecting dysfunction of embryological nodal cilia. Male infertility is common and reflects defects in sperm tail axonemes. Most PCD patients have a history of neonatal respiratory distress, suggesting that motile cilia play a role in fluid clearance during the transition from a fetal to neonatal lung. Ciliopathies involving sensory cilia, including autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease, Bardet-Biedl syndrome, and Alstrom syndrome, may have chronic respiratory symptoms and even bronchiectasis suggesting clinical overlap with PCD. PMID:19606528

  14. Sudden infant death syndrome: a possible primary cause.

    PubMed

    Richardson, B A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that poisoning by phosphines, arsines and stibines might be the primary cause of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) was investigated. Most mattress materials contain phosphorus or antimony compounds as fire retardant additives. Mattress materials in areas affected by the warmth and perspiration of the sleeping infant were found to be naturally infected by the fungus Scopulariopsis brevicaulis which is thought to be capable of generating phosphines, arsines and stibines from materials containing phosphorus, arsenic or antimony compounds. These gases may cause anticholinesterase poisoning and cardiac failure in infants, but contributory factors include the prone sleeping position and overwrapping. In England and Wales, the progressive increase in SIDS between 1951 and 1988 seems to be related to increasing use of phosphorus and antimony compounds as fire retardents in cot mattresses.

  15. [Primary Cardiac Angiosarcoma with Superior Vena Cava Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Naohiro; Shiomi, Daisuke; Kaki, Nobuaki; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is rare and its prognosis very poor. A 34-year-old woman complained of facial edema and dyspnea. Echocardiography, chest computed tomography scan and chest magnetic resonance imaging showed a huge tumor arising in the right atrium. Surgical excision of the tumor was performed for the purpose of relieving superior vena cava syndrome and making diagnosis of the tumor. The right atrial wall, including the tumor, was resected and reconstructed with Gore Tex patch under cardiopulmonary bypass. The tumor was diagnosed as angiosarcoma. Doxorubicin hydrochloride/ifosfamide were used to treat postoperative cardiac recurrence and lung metastasis. These drugs were effective to a certain degree, but she died of brain metastasis of the tumor in the 14th postoperative month. PMID:27220927

  16. Cognitive-behavioral intervention for juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walco, G A; Ilowite, N T

    1992-10-01

    Seven girls between 8.6 and 17.7 years of age were treated for symptoms of juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome (JPFS) using cognitive-behavioral techniques (progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery) aimed at reducing pain and facilitating sleep, as well as strategies aimed at increasing mastery over the pain and improving mood. Patients satisfying diagnostic criteria for JPFS based on the presence of chronic diffuse musculoskeletal pain lasting at least 3 months (mean = 9.4, SD = 8.28) and a minimum of 5 characteristic soft tissue trigger and/or tender points with absence of synovitis, were referred for intervention. Results indicated that in the majority of patients, such techniques were effective in reducing pain and facilitating improved functioning. PMID:1464878

  17. [Primary empty sella syndrome. Observations on 71 cases].

    PubMed

    Bianconcini, G; Bragagni, G; Bianconcini, M

    1999-02-01

    Primary empty sella syndrome (ESS) is an anatomo-radiological picture characterized by the presence of an arachnoid herniation filled with liquor that compresses the pituitary against the sellar wall. ESS occurs particularly in obese, hypertensive, cephalgic women, it is often asymptomatic but it may be associated with ophthalmologic, neurologic and sometime non-characterizing endocrine disorders. We report here 71 cases of primary ESS observed and assessed during the last fourteen years. The following endocrinological diagnostic procedures were carried out: hormonal (RIA) basal profile: FT3, FT4, TSH, PRL, ACTH, FSH, LH, 8.00 a.m. and p.m. cortisolemia, Aldo, PRA, DHEA-S, FTe, E2, P, PTH, CT, and calcemia and phosphoremia; provocative tests: TRH, GnRH, insulin hypoglycemia, etc.; inhibition tests: "overnight" and high dose dexamethasone. Clinical, radiological (skull radiographs, CT and/or MRI) and ophthalmologic (fundus, visual fields) assessment were made. We found principally cephalgia (52/71: 73.2%), hypertension (42/71: 59.1%), obesity (47/71: 66.1%). But we found especially mental disorders (57/71: 80.2%), in our knowledge not previously reported in the literature, as anxiety or dysthymic disorders with behavioural disturbances (chiefly oral compulsion). We found endocrinopathies in 36/71 (50.7%), isolated or coexisting in some patients: hyperPRL (14%), hypopituitarism (10.4%), hypogonadism (7%), diabetes insipidus (2.8%), hyperACTH (1.4%), hypoGH (15.4%), pituitary adenomas (8.4%). Several hypothalamic illness show a clinical picture including mental disorders and obesity. The Authors hypothesize that the ESS may be a "new" hypothalamic syndrome (compression/stretching on hypophysis and/or hypophyseal stalk by arachnoidocele; disorder of some hormones and neurotransmitters as leptin, neuropeptide Y, orexins, POMC-derived peptides, etc).

  18. Liver transplantation in a patient with primary antiphospholipid syndrome and Budd-Chiari syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Tatiana M; Seredavkina, Natalia V; Satybaldyeva, Maria A; Nasonov, Evgeniy L; Reshetnyak, Vasiliy I

    2015-01-01

    The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an acquired thrombophilic disorder in which autoantibodies are produced to a variety of phospholipids determinants of cell membranes or phospholipid binding proteins. There are few reports about association between antiphospholipid antibodies and development of Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS). We report the case of BCS development in young Russian male with primary APS. The patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation on August 26, 2012. At present time his state is good, the blood flow in the liver restored and its function is not impaired. We report about the first time the successful use of dabigatran etexilate for prolonged anticoagulation therapy in APS patient with BCS. In addition patient is managed with immunosuppressive drugs. PMID:26380049

  19. Benzene exposure--an experimental machinery for induction of myelodysplastic syndrome: stem cell and stem cell niche analysis in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Das, Madhurima; Chaudhuri, Samaresh; Law, Sujata

    2012-01-01

    Human epidemiologic studies of highly exposed occupational cohorts have demonstrated that inhalation/exposure to benzene can cause several blood disorders, like non-lymphocytic leukemia, pre leukemic stage, aplastic anemia, and other related syndromes collectively considered as bone marrow failure syndromes. Like many other agents [e.g. chemotherapeutics etc] benzene selects the bone marrow as an important target but the exact location and the mechanism of damage is yet unexplored. The present study aimed at delineating benzene induced myelodysplasia and related disorders in an experimental mouse model with a view to assessing the clinical hazards in human at a comparable event. The observations made so far documented some quantitative and qualitative changes in the bone marrow population, especially involving the hematopoietic stem cells and related microenvironment, their immune responsiveness and survival fate of the cells at that particular event. The observations furnished that benzene following occupational exposure can be hazardous by way of HSC mediated dysfunction and, the microenvironmental studies conducted in some details indicated that the damage may be in the bone marrow stem cell niche. Furthermore, some data collected showed an increased death rate of bone marrow cells and associated abnormalities in receptor expression of adhesion molecules and related growth factors. Culminating the above data the study reveals that Benzene may cause target damage in the bone marrow stem cell niche [BM SC niche] both structurally and functionally, with the resultant disease expression as in MDS.

  20. Central nervous system involvement in primary Sjogren`s syndrome manifesting as multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Yao; Zhao, Teng; Zhou, Chun-Kui

    2014-04-01

    Central nervous system symptoms in patients with primary Sjogren`s syndrome are rare. They can present as extraglandular manifestations and require a differential diagnosis from multiple sclerosis. Due to a variety of presentations, Sjogren`s syndrome with neurologic involvement may be difficult to diagnose. Here, we report a case of a 75-year-old woman who was first diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2010, but who was subsequently diagnosed with primary Sjogren`s syndrome 2 years later after showing signs of atypical neurologic manifestations. Therefore, primary Sjogren`s syndrome should be suspected in patients who present with atypical clinical and radiologic neurologic manifestations.

  1. Primary Care for Adults with Down Syndrome: Adherence to Preventive Healthcare Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, K. M.; Taylor, L. C.; Davis, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to significant medical improvements, persons with Down syndrome now live well into adulthood. Consequently, primary care for adults with Down syndrome needs to incorporate routine care with screening for condition-specific comorbidities. This study seeks to evaluate the adherence of primary care physicians to age- and…

  2. [Dyshemopoietic anemias (AD) (myelodysplastic syndromes). Retrospective analysis of 40 cases from the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INNSZ)].

    PubMed

    Lobato-Mendizábal, E; Labardini-Méndez, J; Gallardo-Rincón, D

    1989-01-01

    40 patients with DMPS were studied and diagnosed at the INNSZ during 1980-1985. Eighteen were males and twenty two females; age average of 55.7 years (17-82), with 72.5% over 50 years old. Their distribution according to the FAB classification was: 55% type I, 10% type II, 27.5% type III, 2.5% type IV and 5% type V. All of them had an anemic syndrome and 47.5% had bled, 52.5% had pancytopenia; there was anemia and thrombocytopenia in 32.5%, anemia and leukopenia in 7.5%, and anemia only in 7.5%. The bone marrow was normocellular in 42.5%, hypercellular in 40% and hypocellular in 17.5%, 45% of the patients survived; 22% achieved a complete remission (CR) and 9 patients (22.5%) died of causes related to DMPS. The rest was lost to follow up.

  3. TEL gene is involved in myelodysplastic syndromes with either the typical t(5;12)(q33;p13) translocation or its variant t(10;12)(q24;p13).

    PubMed

    Wlodarska, I; Mecucci, C; Marynen, P; Guo, C; Franckx, D; La Starza, R; Aventin, A; Bosly, A; Martelli, M F; Cassiman, J J

    1995-05-15

    A t(5;12)(q33;p13) translocation is a recurrent chromosome abnormality in a subgroup of myeloid malignancies with features of both myeloproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs). The molecular consequence of a t(5;12) is a fusion between the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-B gene on chromosome 5 and a novel ETS-like gene, TEL, on chromosome 12. We report on three patients with a t(5;12)(q33;p13) diagnosed as chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, and one case of a t(10;12)(q24;p13) in a progressive MDS, with eosinophilia and monocytosis. Involvement of the TEL gene in these chromosome translocations was investigated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with cosmid probes containing selectively the 5' end or 3' end of TEL. Hybridization of these cosmids to the der(5)/der(10) or a der(12), respectively, demonstrated a rearrangement of TEL in both translocations, showing that the t(10;12) is a variant translocation of the t(5;12). Cloning of the fusion cDNA of one case of t(5;12) showed that the breakpoint occurred at the RNA level at exactly the same position as reported by Golub et al (Cell 77:307, 1994). In addition, the TEL gene on chromosome 12 could be localized between two probes previously mapped to 12p13, namely PRB1 and D12S178, leading to a better definition of the position of TEL in this chromosome region. Moreover, in the case involving chromosome 10, the breakpoint occurred between cKTN206 and cKTN312/LYT-10 at 10q24. Clinicohematological data in these studies as well as the restriction mapping of chromosomal breakpoints strongly suggest that (1) common features in MDSs involving the TEL gene are monocytosis and eosinophilia, (2) chromosomes other than no. 5 may be involved and at least a t(10;12)(q24;p13) variant chromosome translocation does exist in these MDSs, and (3) both standard and variant 12p/TEL translocations may be identified by FISH with appropriate probes.

  4. Mouse models of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Seok; Gauna, Adrienne E.; Cha, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by immune cell infiltration and progressive injury to the salivary and lacrimal glands. As a consequence, patients with SjS develop xerostomia (dry mouth) and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (dry eyes). SjS is the third most common rheumatic autoimmune disorder, affecting 4 million Americans with over 90% of patients being female. Current diagnostic criteria for SjS frequently utilize histological examinations of minor salivary glands for immune cell foci, serology for autoantibodies, and dry eye evaluation by corneal or conjunctival staining. SjS can be classified as primary or secondary SjS, depending on whether it occurs alone or in association with other systemic rheumatic conditions, respectively. Clinical manifestations typically become apparent when the disease is relatively advanced in SjS patients, which poses a challenge for early diagnosis and treatment of SjS. Therefore, SjS mouse models, because of their close resemblance to the human SjS, have been extremely valuable to identify early disease markers and to investigate underlying biological and immunological dysregulations. However, it is important to bear in mind that no single mouse model has duplicated all aspects of SjS pathogenesis and clinical features, mainly due to the multifactorial etiology of SjS that includes numerous susceptibility genes and environmental factors. As such, various mouse models have been developed in the field to try to recapitulate SjS. In this review, we focus on recent mouse models of primary SjS and describe them under three categories of spontaneous, genetically engineered, and experimentally induced development of SjS-like disease. In addition, we discuss future perspectives of SjS mouse models highlighting pros and cons of utilizing mouse models and demands for improved models. PMID:25777752

  5. Treatment of primary Sjögren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Saraux, Alain; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie

    2016-08-01

    Primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) is a progressive autoimmune disease characterized by sicca and systemic manifestations. In this Review, we summarize the available data on topical and systemic medications, according to clinical signs and disease activity, and we describe the ongoing studies using biologic drugs in the treatment of pSS. Expanding knowledge about the epidemiology, classification criteria, systemic activity scoring (ESSDAI) and patient-reported outcomes (ESSPRI) is driving active research. Treatment decisions are based on the evaluation of symptoms and extraglandular manifestations. Symptomatic treatment is usually appropriate, whereas systemic treatment is reserved for systemic manifestations. Sicca is managed by education, environment modification, elimination of contingent offending drugs, artificial tears, secretagogues and treatments for complications. Mild systemic signs such as fatigue are treated by exercise. Pain can require short-term moderate-dose glucocorticoid therapy and, in some cases, disease-modifying drugs. Severe and acute systemic manifestations indicate treatment with glucocorticoids and/or immunosuppressant drugs. The role for biologic agents is promising, but no double-blind randomized controlled trials (RCTs) proving the efficacy of these drugs are available. Targets for new treatments directed against the immunopathological mechanisms of pSS include epithelial cells, T cells, B-cell overactivity, the interferon signature, proinflammatory cytokines, ectopic germinal centre formation, chemokines involved in lymphoid cell homing, and epigenetic modifications. PMID:27411907

  6. A randomized controlled trial comparing darbepoetin alfa doses in red blood cell transfusion-dependent patients with low- or intermediate-1 risk myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Ho; Harada, Hironori; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Shimazaki, Ryutaro; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Sawada, Kenichi; Mitani, Kinuko

    2015-10-01

    Darbepoetin alfa (DA) is a standard treatment for anemia in lower-risk MDS. However, to date there has been no comparative study to investigate the initial dosage. We, thus, conducted a randomized controlled trial to elucidate the optimal initial dosage of DA. International Prognostic Scoring System low or intermediate-1 risk MDS patients with hemoglobin levels ≤9.0 g/dL, serum erythropoietin levels ≤500 mIU/mL, and red blood cell transfusion dependency were enrolled. Patients were randomized to receive DA either at 60, 120, or 240 μg/week for 16 weeks followed by continuous administration with dose adjustment up to 48 weeks. Of 17, 18, and 15 patients in the 60, 120, and 240 μg DA groups included in the efficacy analysis, 64.7, 44.4, and 66.7 %, respectively, achieved the primary endpoint (major or minor erythroid response), while 17.6, 16.7, and 33.3 % achieved major erythroid responses in the initial 16-week period. No clinically significant safety concerns were identified. DA reduced the transfusion requirements effectively and safely in transfusion-dependent, lower-risk MDS patients. Given the highest achievement rate of the major erythroid response in the 240 μg group and the absence of dose-dependent adverse events, 240 μg weekly is the optimal initial dosage. PMID:26323997

  7. Two patients with atypical low triiodothyronine syndrome: primary deiodinase abnormalities?

    PubMed Central

    Tevaarwerk, Gerald J M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Low triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations in the presence of normal thyroxine (T4) and TSH levels, referred to as the low T3 syndrome (LT3S), are common. LT3S may be caused by starvation, various non-thyroidal illnesses (NTIs) and some medications. Reverse T3 (rT3) concentrations are elevated in the more severely ill, and they characteristically fail to respond to exogenous levothyroxine (l-T4) therapy. The biochemical abnormalities have been explained on the basis of altered peripheral deiodinase activities. Herein, we report on two patients with hypothyroid symptoms who on testing were found to have LT3S. They were atypical clinically in not having LT3S due to any of the usual causes, had no increased rT3 concentrations, and had a normal negative TSH feedback response to l-T4. One (patient 1) had previously been diagnosed with Hashimoto's autoimmune primary hypothyroidism and was on l-T4 therapy. Both had T4 concentrations in the reference range. TSH levels were elevated in patient 1 and in the reference range in patient 2. Starting or increasing l-T4 doses resulted in no clinical improvement and no increase in T3 levels in spite of a marked increase in T4 levels. It is suggested that in the absence of the usual causes, lack of elevated rT3 levels, response to treatment and intact negative TSH feedback these two patients differ from the usual secondary causes of decreases in deiodinase activity. It is speculated that they may represent primary alterations in deiodinase enzymes possibly due to genetic variations in the deiodinase-encoding genes. Learning points LT3S is commonly found secondary to starvation, NTIs and use of some medications.Low T3 levels are the result of alterations in the activity of deiodinase enzymes.LT3S without the usual causes may represent a primary disturbance in deiodinase activity. PMID:24683478

  8. Primary Sjogren's Syndrome Presenting as Acute Interstitial Pneumonitis/Hamman-Rich Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Humayun, Mohammad; Haider, Iqbal; Ayub, Maimoona; Shah, Zakir; Ajmal, Fahad

    2016-01-01

    A previously well, 45-year-old Pakistani lady was admitted to the medical unit on-call of Khyber Teaching Hospital (KTH) Peshawar with a 5-day history of fever, productive cough with copious mucoid sputum, dyspnea, and pleuritic chest pain. She also complained of dry eyes, mouth, and vagina. Her chest X-ray showed diffuse alveolar shadowing and arterial gas analysis confirmed type 1 respiratory failure. Over the next few days, she deteriorated rapidly making an urgent transfer to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) necessary, where she was mechanically ventilated. An HRCT followed by bronchoscopic biopsies made a diagnosis of acute interstitial pneumonitis (AIP), formerly known as Hamman-Rich syndrome. She also turned out to be positive for both anti-SS-A/Ro and anti-SS-B/La antibodies along with a positive Schirmer's test and lower lip biopsy. She received intravenous steroids and supportive care. The patient had a complete recovery after approximately three weeks' stay in the hospital with lung function returning back to normal. This is most probably the first ever case of primary Sjogren syndrome (pSjS) presenting as AIP, recovering completely in less than a month time.

  9. Relationship between primary restless legs syndrome and migraine with aura.

    PubMed

    Acar, Bilgehan Atılgan; Acar, Türkan; Alagöz, Aybala Neslihan; Karacan, Alper; Varım, Ceyhun; Uyanık, Mehmet Şevki; Kaya, Tezcan; Akdemir, Ramazan

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the prevalence and characteristics of definite migraine in primary restless legs syndrome (pRLS) patients and matched control patients (CPs) were investigated. We evaluated 63 consecutive adult pRLS patients and 141 age- and sex-matched controls in this case-control study. The diagnosis of migraine and its subtypes were defined based on The International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. Only those with "definite" migraine were included in the study. The mean age of 63 adult pRLS patients (15 men and 48 women) who participated in the study was 49.4 years. A total of 27 patients (42.9%) had definite migraine. Of these migraineurs, seven (11.1%) were without aura and 20 (31.8%) were with aura. The mean age of the 141 matched CPs was 48.7 years. A total of 32 CPs (22.7%) experienced migraine. Among these 32 migraineurs, 28 (19.9%) were without aura and four (2.8%) were with aura. Migraine and migraine with aura were significantly more common in pRLS patients than in CPs. pRLS patients with migraine were more anxious and experienced a shorter duration of RLS symptoms than pRLS patients without migraine. Migraineurs in the pRLS group tended to have high scores for severity of migraine headache by Visual Analog Scale score and high levels of disability by Migraine Disability Assessment grading than those in the control group. pRLS patients showed a positive association with definite migraine headaches. In contrast to results highlighted in recent studies, we found a strong link between migraine with aura and pRLS.

  10. Relationship between primary restless legs syndrome and migraine with aura.

    PubMed

    Acar, Bilgehan Atılgan; Acar, Türkan; Alagöz, Aybala Neslihan; Karacan, Alper; Varım, Ceyhun; Uyanık, Mehmet Şevki; Kaya, Tezcan; Akdemir, Ramazan

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the prevalence and characteristics of definite migraine in primary restless legs syndrome (pRLS) patients and matched control patients (CPs) were investigated. We evaluated 63 consecutive adult pRLS patients and 141 age- and sex-matched controls in this case-control study. The diagnosis of migraine and its subtypes were defined based on The International Classification of Headache Disorders-II. Only those with "definite" migraine were included in the study. The mean age of 63 adult pRLS patients (15 men and 48 women) who participated in the study was 49.4 years. A total of 27 patients (42.9%) had definite migraine. Of these migraineurs, seven (11.1%) were without aura and 20 (31.8%) were with aura. The mean age of the 141 matched CPs was 48.7 years. A total of 32 CPs (22.7%) experienced migraine. Among these 32 migraineurs, 28 (19.9%) were without aura and four (2.8%) were with aura. Migraine and migraine with aura were significantly more common in pRLS patients than in CPs. pRLS patients with migraine were more anxious and experienced a shorter duration of RLS symptoms than pRLS patients without migraine. Migraineurs in the pRLS group tended to have high scores for severity of migraine headache by Visual Analog Scale score and high levels of disability by Migraine Disability Assessment grading than those in the control group. pRLS patients showed a positive association with definite migraine headaches. In contrast to results highlighted in recent studies, we found a strong link between migraine with aura and pRLS. PMID:27523456

  11. Nutrition: A Primary Therapy in Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Typpo, Katri

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential component of intensive care management of children with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and is linked to patient outcomes. One out of every two children in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) will develop malnutrition or have worsening of baseline malnutrition and present with specific micronutrient deficiencies. Early and adequate enteral nutrition (EN) is associated with improved 60-day survival after pediatric critical illness, and, yet, despite early EN guidelines, critically ill children receive on average only 55% of goal calories by PICU day 10. Inadequate delivery of EN is due to perceived feeding intolerance, reluctance to enterally feed children with hemodynamic instability, and fluid restriction. Underlying each of these factors is large practice variation between providers and across institutions for initiation, advancement, and maintenance of EN. Strategies to improve early initiation and advancement and to maintain delivery of EN are needed to improve morbidity and mortality from pediatric ARDS. Both, over and underfeeding, prolong duration of mechanical ventilation in children and worsen other organ function such that precise calorie goals are needed. The gut is thought to act as a “motor” of organ dysfunction, and emerging data regarding the role of intestinal barrier functions and the intestinal microbiome on organ dysfunction and outcomes of critical illness present exciting opportunities to improve patient outcomes. Nutrition should be considered a primary rather than supportive therapy for pediatric ARDS. Precise nutritional therapies, which are titrated and targeted to preservation of intestinal barrier function, prevention of intestinal dysbiosis, preservation of lean body mass, and blunting of the systemic inflammatory response, offer great potential for improving outcomes of pediatric ARDS. In this review, we examine the current evidence regarding dose, route, and timing of nutrition

  12. Dengue shock syndrome in an American traveler with primary dengue 3 infection.

    PubMed

    Morens, D M; Sather, G E; Gubler, D J; Rammohan, M; Woodall, J P

    1987-03-01

    A previously reported case of childhood dengue shock syndrome in an American traveler to India was investigated serologically. The original studies neither indicated the infecting serotype nor proved primary or secondary infection. However, BHK suspension PRNT of 6-year convalescent serum now indicates that the child had primary dengue type 3 infection. Dengue, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and dengue shock syndrome are potential hazards for American travelers and American residents of dengue-receptive areas.

  13. CT findings of thoracic manifestations of primary Sjögren syndrome: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Ryoko; Kondo, Tetsuya; Hirai, Tetsuyoshi; Kamochi, Noriyuki; Yakushiji, Mai; Yamasaki, Fumio; Irie, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Primary Sjögren syndrome is an immune-mediated exocrinopathy characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the salivary and lacrimal glands. Various systemic extraglandular disorders are associated with primary Sjögren syndrome, and the thorax is commonly affected. The pulmonary manifestations of primary Sjögren syndrome may be categorized as airway abnormalities, interstitial pneumonias, and lymphoproliferative disorders; in each category, bronchiectasis or centrilobular nodules, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonia are common. These manifestations do not usually occur in isolation; they are concomitantly seen with other types of lesions. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and amyloidosis are key components of lymphoproliferative disorders, and MALT lymphoma should always be considered because its morphologic characteristics are similar to those of benign lymphoproliferative disorders. Amyloidosis is rare but important because it carries a risk for underlying MALT lymphoma or plasmacytoma, and it may lead to hemoptysis during biopsy. In addition, thin-walled air cysts are characteristic of primary Sjögren syndrome, irrespective of the main pulmonary manifestations. Lymphadenopathy and multilocular thymic cysts may be seen in the mediastinum. During the follow-up period, there is a risk for acute exacerbation of interstitial pneumonia and development of malignant lymphoma. Often, primary Sjögren syndrome is subclinical, but there are various underlying risks. Thus, imaging findings are important. In addition to the various types of interstitial pneumonia and airway abnormalities, air cysts and mediastinal manifestations may help diagnose primary Sjögren syndrome.

  14. Do We Know What Causes Myelodysplastic Syndromes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in some forms of leukemia and MDS. Another chromosome abnormality that can be seen in MDS is called ... chromosome is lost, or deleted. Another type of chromosome abnormality is called a duplication . This means there is ...

  15. [Copper deficiency anemia morphologically mimicking myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Taku; Mori, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takayuki; Morita, Shinya; Kono, Hidaka; Nakagawa, Ken; Mitsuhasi, Takayuki; Murata, Mitsuru; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2014-03-01

    A 64-year-old man underwent kidney transplantation for progressive chronic renal failure which had developed 8 years after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. Because of post-operative complications, he had been placed on intravenous hyperalimentation. Three months after the transplantation, anemia rapidly progressed (hemoglobin, 7.9 g/dl). The proportion of reticulocytes was 0.2%, but white blood cell and platelet counts remained within normal ranges. Serum iron, vitamin B12, and folate levels were normal. Bone marrow examination showed the presence of ringed sideroblasts and cytoplasmic vacuoles in a fraction of erythroid cells. Megakaryocytes were adequate in number with normal morphology. Although the findings were consistent with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts according to the WHO classification, cytoplasmic vacuolations were also observed in myeloid cells, suggesting copper deficiency. Indeed, serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels were found to be low (33 μg/dl and 11 mg/dl, respectively), and oral copper supplementation at a daily dose of 1 mg was initiated. There was a prompt increase in reticulocytes, and the hemoglobin level was normalized within one month, in response to this regimen. In progressive anemia cases with ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, copper deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  16. Etanercept in Treating Young Patients With Idiopathic Pneumonia Syndrome After Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Disseminated Neuroblastoma; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pulmonary Complications; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Wilms Tumor and Other Childhood Kidney Tumors; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  17. Neurological Disorders in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tobón, Gabriel J.; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Youinou, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Sjögren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by an autoimmune exocrinopathy involving mainly salivary and lacrimal glands. The histopathological hallmark is periductal lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands, resulting in loss of their secretory function. Several systemic manifestations may be found in patients with Sjögren's syndrome including neurological disorders. Neurological involvement ranges from 0 to 70% among various series and may present with central nervous system and/or peripheral nervous system involvement. This paper endeavors to review the main clinical neurological manifestations in Sjögren syndrome, the physiopathology, and their therapeutic response. PMID:22474573

  18. Histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome in a patient with myelodsyplastic syndrome: report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, Michael M; Riahi, Ryan R; Rosen, Les B; Soine, Erik J

    2016-01-01

    The neutrophilic dermatoses are a group of disorders characterized by skin lesions for which histological examination reveals intense epidermal and/or dermal inflammatory infiltrates composed primarily of neutrophils without evidence of infection. The myelodysplastic syndromes consist of a heterogeneous group of malignant hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplastic and inadequate blood cell production with a variable risk of transformation to acute leukemia. Rarely, histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome occurring in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome has been described. We present a case of a 66-year-old woman with a history of myelodysplastic syndrome who developed histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome. We also review the literature and characterize patients with myelodysplastic syndrome who have developed histiocytoid Sweet's syndrome.

  19. Factors Associated with the Effective Inclusion of Primary-Aged Pupils with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sam; Farrell, Peter; Davis, Pauline

    2004-01-01

    It is increasingly common for pupils with Down's syndrome to be offered places in mainstream primary schools. However, there is still much to learn about the impact of these placements upon children and classrooms. Recently the Nuffield Foundation funded a two-year research project exploring the inclusion of primary-aged pupils with Down's…

  20. Primary and Reversible Pisa Syndrome in Juvenile Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E.; Pradilla, Gustavo; del Rosario Zambrano, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report a case of Pisa syndrome in a patient with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, who had never been exposed to psychotropic medications. Methods A 26 years-old, Colombian, male patient, was referred because he had cognitive abnormalities, gait disturbances and urinary incontinence. This patient also displayed pleurothotonos. Neurofunctional evaluation of sensory and motor integration at peripheral and central nervous system levels were done. Results Pisa syndrome disappeared after spinal tap drainage with further gait, balance and behavioral improvement. A brainstem-thalamocortical deregulation of the central sensory and motor programming, due to the chaotic enlargement of brain ventricles was thought to be the pathophysiological mechanism underlying this case. Conclusion NPH must not be longer considered as an exclusive geriatric disorder. Further, uncommon movement disorders may appear with this disorder, which should be carefully approached to avoid iatrogenic and deleterious pharmacological interventions. PMID:23794788

  1. Subacute sensory neuronopathy secondary to dorsal root ganglionitis in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malinow, K; Yannakakis, G D; Glusman, S M; Edlow, D W; Griffin, J; Pestronk, A; Powell, D L; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Eidelman, B H; Medsger, T A

    1986-10-01

    Sensory neuropathies, particularly trigeminal neuropathy, have been recognized as neurological complications of Sjögren's syndrome, but the pathogenesis has not been established. We describe a woman with primary Sjögren's syndrome who developed a progressive debilitating subacute sensory neuronopathy. Results of electrophysiological studies were consistent with involvement of the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. A thoracic dorsal root ganglion biopsy showed lymphocytic infiltration and degeneration of ganglion cells. We believe that this is the first description of biopsy-documented dorsal root ganglionitis in a subacute sensory neuronopathy associated with Sjögren's syndrome and that the finding suggests an immunopathogenic basis.

  2. Algorithms for the diagnosis and treatment of restless legs syndrome in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological disorder with a lifetime prevalence of 3-10%. in European studies. However, the diagnosis of RLS in primary care remains low and mistreatment is common. Methods The current article reports on the considerations of RLS diagnosis and management that were made during a European Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (EURLSSG)-sponsored task force consisting of experts and primary care practioners. The task force sought to develop a better understanding of barriers to diagnosis in primary care practice and overcome these barriers with diagnostic and treatment algorithms. Results The barriers to diagnosis identified by the task force include the presentation of symptoms, the language used to describe them, the actual term "restless legs syndrome" and difficulties in the differential diagnosis of RLS. Conclusion The EURLSSG task force reached a consensus and agreed on the diagnostic and treatment algorithms published here. PMID:21352569

  3. Postconcussive Syndrome Following Sports-related Concussion: A Treatment Overview for Primary Care Physicians.

    PubMed

    Moran, Byron; Tadikonda, Prathima; Sneed, Kevin B; Hummel, Michelle; Guiteau, Sergio; Coris, Eric E

    2015-09-01

    Postconcussive syndrome is an increasingly recognized outcome of sports-related concussion (SRC), characterized by a constellation of poorly defined symptoms. Treatment of PCS is significantly different from that of SRC alone. Primary care physicians often are the first to evaluate these patients, but some are unfamiliar with the available therapeutic approaches. This review provides an overview of the pathophysiology of SRC and descriptions of both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options to allow primary care physicians to provide evidence-based care to patients experiencing postconcussive syndrome. PMID:26332481

  4. Primary immunodeficiency update I: Syndromes associated with eczematous dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Pichard, Dominique C.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Cowen, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the availability of powerful molecular techniques has accelerated the pace of discovery of several new primary immunodeficiencies (PID) and revealed the biologic basis of other established PID. These genetic advances, in turn, have facilitated more precise phenotyping of associated skin and systemic manifestations and provide a unique opportunity to better understand the