Science.gov

Sample records for primary proton beamline

  1. Modeling of the primary proton beamline of the Fermilab NuMI project

    SciTech Connect

    Sergei Striganov et al.

    2001-08-14

    The 120 GeV primary proton beamline for the NuMI-MINOS [1] experiment at Fermilab will transport one of the most intense high-energy beams ever constructed. in parallel operation with the Collider program, 80% of the intensity capability of the Fermilab Main Injector can be sent to NuMI. Radiation safety pertaining to residual activity, damage of equipment and irradiation of groundwater is a primary concern. A particular challenge is that this beam will be transported to and targeted in a cavern excavated in rock in an aquifer region. A model of the beamline, including transport elements and excavated enclosures, has been built in the radiation simulation program MARS. This model has been used to determine limits for allowable beam loss, and to study effects of instabilities and of various failure types. Some results obtained with this model are presented.

  2. A telescope proton recoil spectrometer for fast neutron beam-lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Nocente, M.; Ansell, S.; Frost, C. D.; Gorini, G.

    2015-07-01

    Fast neutron measurements were performed on the VESUVIO beam-line at the ISIS spallation source using a new telescope proton recoil spectrometer. Neutrons interact on a plastic target. Proton production is mainly due to elastic scattering on hydrogen nuclei and secondly due to interaction with carbon nuclei. Recoil protons are measured by a proton spectrometer, which uses in coincidence a 2.54 cm thick YAP scintillator and a 500μm thick silicon detector, measuring the full proton recoil energy and the partial deposited energy in transmission, respectively. Recoil proton spectroscopy measurements (up to Ep = 60MeV) have been interpreted by using Monte Carlo simulations of the beam-line. This instrument is of particular interest for the characterization of the ChipIr beam-line at ISIS, which was designed to feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for the irradiation of micro-electronics.

  3. Characterization of a mini-multileaf collimator in a proton beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Daartz, J.; Bangert, M.; Bussiere, M. R.; Engelsman, M.; Kooy, H. M.

    2009-05-15

    A mini-multileaf collimator (MMLC) was mounted as a field shaping collimator in a proton beamline at the Massachusetts General Hospital. The purpose is to evaluate the device's dosimetric and mechanical properties for the use in a proton beamline. For this evaluation, the authors compared MMLC and brass aperture shaped dose distributions with regard to lateral and depth dose properties. The lateral fall off is generally broader with the MMLC, with difference varying with proton range from 0.2 to 1.2 mm. Central axis depth dose curves did not show a difference in peak-to-entrance ratio, peak width, distal fall off, or range. Two-dimensional dose distributions to investigate the conformity of MMLC shaped doses show that the physical leaf width of {approx_equal}2.5 mm does not have a significant impact. All differences seen in dose distribution shaped by the MMLC versus brass apertures were shown to be clinically insignificant. Measured neutron doses of 0.03-0.13 mSv/Gy for a closed brass beam block (depending on range) are very low compared to the previously published data. Irradiation of the tungsten MMLC, however, produced 1.5-1.8 times more neutrons than brass apertures. Exposure of the staff resulting from activation of the device is below regulatory limits. The measurements established an equivalency between aperture and MMLC shaped dose distributions.

  4. MARS simulations of the NuMI primary beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Sergei I Striganov

    2004-05-18

    MARS is a Monte Carlo code for simulation of three-dimensional hadronic and electromagnetic cascades, muon and low-energy neutron transport in shielding and in accelerator and detector components in the energy range from a fraction of an eV up to 100 TeV. This report uses MARS to both transport the 120 GeV primary proton beam from the NuMI extraction Lambertsons through the NuMI Pre-target Hall and calculate the radiological effect of beam losses at various locations and for a variety of conditions. These results are used to: anticipate where beam losses will be significant; determine the level of activation of components; and calculate ground water activation and confirm adequacy of shielding. The results are presented in tables and figures along with drawings of the magnets as they were modeled in MARS. Details of the model elements are found in Appendix A. Further details of beam loss case studies are included in Appendix B.

  5. Future laser-accelerated proton beams at ELI-Beamlines as potential source of positron emitters for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, E.; Italiano, A.; Margarone, D.; Pagano, B.; Baldari, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-04-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of novel, fast and efficient, radiopharmaceutical methods of labeling. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility where a PW, 30 fs, 10 Hz laser system will be available. The production yields of several positron emitters were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account three possible scenarios of broad proton spectra expected, with maximum energies ranging from about 8 MeV to 100 MeV. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of radiopharmaceuticals exploiting modern fast and efficient labeling systems.

  6. Design of the LBNF Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, V.; Andrews, R.; Hylen, J.; Kobilarcik, T.; Krafczyk, G.; Marchinonni, A.; Moore, C. D.; Schlabach, P.; Tariq, S.

    2015-08-30

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) will utilize a beamline located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a wide band neutrino beam toward underground detectors placed at the SURF Facility in South Dakota, about 1,300 km away. The main elements of the facility are a primary proton beamline and a neutrino beamline. The primary proton beam (60-120 GeV) will be extracted from the MI-10 section of Fermilab’s Main Injector. Neutrinos are produced after the protons hit a solid target and produce mesons which are subsequently focused by magnetic horns into a 204 m long decay pipe where they decay into muons and neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account the physics goals, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial proton beam power is expected to be 1.2 MW; however, the facility is designed to be upgradeable to 2.4 MW. We discuss here the design status and the associated challenges as well as plans for improvements before baselining the facility.

  7. Design of the LBNE Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; Andrews, Richard; Hylen, James; Kobilarcik, Thomas; Marchionni, Alberto; Moore, Craig D.; Schlabach, Phil; Tariq, Salman

    2015-02-05

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a wide band beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota, about 1,300 km away. The main elements of the facility are a primary proton beamline and a neutrino beamline. The primary proton beam (60-120 GeV) will be extracted from the MI-10 section of Fermilab’s Main Injector. Neutrinos are produced after the protons hit a solid target and produce mesons which are sign selected and subsequently focused by a set of magnetic horns into a 204 m long decay pipe where they decay mostly into muons and neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account the physics goals, spacial and radiological constraints, and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~1.2 MW; however, the facility is designed to be upgradeable for 2.3 MW operation. We discuss here the status of the design and the associated challenges.

  8. Dosimetric properties of a proton beamline dedicated to the treatment of ocular disease

    SciTech Connect

    Slopsema, R. L. Mamalui, M.; Yeung, D.; Malyapa, R.; Li, Z.; Zhao, T.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: A commercial proton eyeline has been developed to treat ocular disease. Radiotherapy of intraocular lesions (e.g., uveal melanoma, age-related macular degeneration) requires sharp dose gradients to avoid critical structures like the macula and optic disc. A high dose rate is needed to limit patient gazing times during delivery of large fractional dose. Dose delivery needs to be accurate and predictable, not in the least because current treatment planning algorithms have limited dose modeling capabilities. The purpose of this paper is to determine the dosimetric properties of a new proton eyeline. These properties are compared to those of existing systems and evaluated in the context of the specific clinical requirements of ocular treatments. Methods: The eyeline is part of a high-energy, cyclotron-based proton therapy system. The energy at the entrance of the eyeline is 105 MeV. A range modulator (RM) wheel generates the spread-out Bragg peak, while a variable range shifter system adjusts the range and spreads the beam laterally. The range can be adjusted from 0.5 up to 3.4 g/cm{sup 2}; the modulation width can be varied in steps of 0.3 g/cm{sup 2} or less. Maximum field diameter is 2.5 cm. All fields can be delivered with a dose rate of 30 Gy/min or more. The eyeline is calibrated according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol using a cylindrical ionization chamber. Depth dose distributions and dose/MU are measured with a parallel-plate ionization chamber; lateral profiles with radiochromic film. The dose/MU is modeled as a function of range, modulation width, and instantaneous MU rate with fit parameters determined per option (RM wheel). Results: The distal fall-off of the spread-out Bragg peak is 0.3 g/cm{sup 2}, larger than for most existing systems. The lateral penumbra varies between 0.9 and 1.4 mm, except for fully modulated fields that have a larger penumbra at skin. The source-to-axis distance is found to be 169 cm. The dose/MU shows a strong dependence

  9. Neutrinos from the primary proton-proton fusion process in the Sun.

    PubMed

    2014-08-28

    In the core of the Sun, energy is released through sequences of nuclear reactions that convert hydrogen into helium. The primary reaction is thought to be the fusion of two protons with the emission of a low-energy neutrino. These so-called pp neutrinos constitute nearly the entirety of the solar neutrino flux, vastly outnumbering those emitted in the reactions that follow. Although solar neutrinos from secondary processes have been observed, proving the nuclear origin of the Sun's energy and contributing to the discovery of neutrino oscillations, those from proton-proton fusion have hitherto eluded direct detection. Here we report spectral observations of pp neutrinos, demonstrating that about 99 per cent of the power of the Sun, 3.84 × 10(33) ergs per second, is generated by the proton-proton fusion process. PMID:25164748

  10. Neutrinos from the primary proton-proton fusion process in the Sun.

    PubMed

    2014-08-28

    In the core of the Sun, energy is released through sequences of nuclear reactions that convert hydrogen into helium. The primary reaction is thought to be the fusion of two protons with the emission of a low-energy neutrino. These so-called pp neutrinos constitute nearly the entirety of the solar neutrino flux, vastly outnumbering those emitted in the reactions that follow. Although solar neutrinos from secondary processes have been observed, proving the nuclear origin of the Sun's energy and contributing to the discovery of neutrino oscillations, those from proton-proton fusion have hitherto eluded direct detection. Here we report spectral observations of pp neutrinos, demonstrating that about 99 per cent of the power of the Sun, 3.84 × 10(33) ergs per second, is generated by the proton-proton fusion process.

  11. Study of the production yields of 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O positron emitters from plasma-laser proton sources at ELI-Beamlines for labeling of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Ernesto; Italiano, Antonio; Margarone, Daniele; Pagano, Benedetta; Baldari, Sergio; Korn, Georg

    2016-03-01

    The development of novel compact PET radionuclide production systems is of great interest to promote the diffusion of PET diagnostics, especially in view of the continuous development of microfluidics labeling approaches. We studied the feasibility to produce clinically-relevant amounts of PET isotopes by means of laser-accelerated proton sources such that expected at the ELI-Beamlines facility. 18F, 11C, 13N and 15O production yields were calculated through the TALYS software, by taking into account the broad proton spectra expected. With the hypothesized proton fluencies, clinically-relevant amounts of radionuclides can be obtained, suitable to prepare single doses of 18F-, 11C- and 13N-labeled radiopharmaceuticals exploiting fast and efficient microfluidic labeling systems.

  12. Transport from the Recycler Ring to the Antiproton Source Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, M.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-14

    In the post-NOvA era, the protons are directly transported from the Booster ring to the Recycler ring rather than the Main Injector. For Mu2e and g-2 project, the Debuncher ring will be modified into a Delivery ring to deliver the protons to both Mu2e and g-2 experiments. Therefore, it requires the transport of protons from the Recycler Ring to the Delivery ring. A new transfer line from the Recycler ring to the P1 beamline will be constructed to transport proton beam from the Recycler Ring to existing Antiproton Source beamlines. This new beamline provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. This paper presents the Conceptual Design of this new beamline.

  13. Design and Simulation of the nuSTORM Pion Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Bross, A.

    2015-08-15

    The nuSTORM (neutrinos from STORed Muons) proposal presents a detailed design for a neutrino facility based on a muon storage ring, with muon decay in the production straight section of the ring providing well defined neutrino beams. The facility includes a primary high-energy proton beam line, a target station with pion production and collection, and a pion beamline for pion transportation and injection into a muon decay ring. The nuSTORM design uses “stochastic injection”, in which pions are directed by a chicane, referred to as the Orbit Combination Section (OCS), into the production straight section of the storage ring. Pions that decay within that straight section provide muons within the circulating acceptance of the ring. Furthermore, the design enables injection without kickers or a separate pion decay transport line. The beam line that the pions traverse before being extracted from the decay ring is referred to as the pion beamline. Our paper describes the design and simulation of the pion beamline, and includes full beam dynamics simulations of the system.

  14. Design and Simulation of the nuSTORM Pion Beamline

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, A.; Neuffer, D.; Bross, A.

    2015-08-15

    The nuSTORM (neutrinos from STORed Muons) proposal presents a detailed design for a neutrino facility based on a muon storage ring, with muon decay in the production straight section of the ring providing well defined neutrino beams. The facility includes a primary high-energy proton beam line, a target station with pion production and collection, and a pion beamline for pion transportation and injection into a muon decay ring. The nuSTORM design uses “stochastic injection”, in which pions are directed by a chicane, referred to as the Orbit Combination Section (OCS), into the production straight section of the storage ring. Pionsmore » that decay within that straight section provide muons within the circulating acceptance of the ring. Furthermore, the design enables injection without kickers or a separate pion decay transport line. The beam line that the pions traverse before being extracted from the decay ring is referred to as the pion beamline. Our paper describes the design and simulation of the pion beamline, and includes full beam dynamics simulations of the system.« less

  15. G4beamline

    SciTech Connect

    2011-05-24

    G4beamline is a single-particle-tracking simulation code based on the Geant4 toolkit. It is specifically optimized for the realistic evaluation of beam lines. It is especially useful for evaluating future muon facilities.

  16. Hutch for CSX Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Ed Haas

    2012-12-12

    NSLS-II will produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than NSLS. To keep people safe from intense x-rays in the new facility, special enclosures, called hutches, will surround particular sections of beamlines.

  17. Hutch for CSX Beamlines

    ScienceCinema

    Ed Haas

    2016-07-12

    NSLS-II will produce x-rays 10,000 times brighter than NSLS. To keep people safe from intense x-rays in the new facility, special enclosures, called hutches, will surround particular sections of beamlines.

  18. Design, Installation, and Initial Commissioning of the MTA Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Craig; Anderson, John; Garcia, Fernanda; Gerardi, Michael; Johnstone, Carol; Kobilarcik, Thomas; Kucera, Michael; Kufer, Mathew; Newhart, Duane; Rakhno, Igor; Vogel, Gregory; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    A new experimental area designed to develop, test and verify muon ionization cooling apparatus using the 400-MeV Fermilab Linac proton beam has been fully installed and is presently being commissioned. Initially, this area was used for cryogenic tests of liquid-hydrogen absorbers for the MUCOOL R&D program and, now, for high-power beam tests of absorbers, high-gradient rf cavities in the presence of magnetic fields (including gas-filled cavities), and other prototype muon-cooling apparatus. The experimental scenarios being developed for muon facilities involve collection, capture, and cooling of large-emittance, high-intensity muon beams--{approx}10{sup 13} muons, so that conclusive tests of the apparatus require full Linac beam, which is 1.6 x 10{sup 13} p/pulse. To support the muon cooling facility, this new primary beamline extracts and transports beam directly from the Linac to the test facility. The design concept for the MuCool facility is taken from an earlier proposal [1], but modifications were necessary to accommodate high-intensity beam, cryogenics, and the increased scale of the cooling experiments. Further, the line incorporates a specialized section and utilizes a different mode of operation to provide precision measurements of Linac beam parameters. This paper reports on the technical details of the MuCool beamline for both modes.

  19. The SLS optics beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, U.; Abela, R.; Betemps, R.; Blumer, H.; Frank, K.; Jaggi, A.; MacDowell A.A.; Padmore, H.A.; Schonherr, V.; Ulrich, J.; Walther, H.; Zelenika, S.; Zumbach, C.

    2006-05-20

    A multipurpose beamline for tests and developments in the field of x-ray optics and synchrotron radiation instrumentation in general is under construction at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) bending magnet X05DA. The beamline uses a newly developed UHV compatible, 100 mm thick, brazed CVD diamond vacuum window. The very compact cryogenically cooled channel cut Si(111) monochromator and bendable 1:1 toroidal focusing mirror at 7:75 m from the source point are installed inside the shielding tunnel. The beamline covers a photon energy range of about 6 to 17 keV.We expect 5x1011 photons=s within a 100 mu m spot and a resolving power of 1300. The monochromator and focusing mirror can be retracted independently for unfocused monochromatic and focused ''white'' light operation respectively.

  20. Terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin reveals correlated primary electron and proton transfer processes

    PubMed Central

    Groma, G. I.; Hebling, J.; Kozma, I. Z.; Váró, G.; Hauer, J.; Kuhl, J.; Riedle, E.

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics of electrogenic events associated with the different steps of the light-induced proton pump of bacteriorhodopsin is well studied in a wide range of time scales by direct electric methods. However, the investigation of the fundamental primary charge translocation phenomena taking place in the functional energy conversion process of this protein, and in other biomolecular assemblies using light energy, has remained experimentally unfeasible because of the lack of proper detection technique operating in the 0.1- to 20-THz region. Here, we show that extending the concept of the familiar Hertzian dipole emission into the extreme spatial and temporal range of intramolecular polarization processes provides an alternative way to study ultrafast electrogenic events on naturally ordered biological systems. Applying a relatively simple experimental arrangement based on this idea, we were able to observe light-induced coherent terahertz radiation from bacteriorhodopsin with femtosecond time resolution. The detected terahertz signal was analyzed by numerical simulation in the framework of different models for the elementary polarization processes. It was found that the principal component of the terahertz emission can be well described by excited-state intramolecular electron transfer within the retinal chromophore. An additional slower process is attributed to the earliest phase of the proton pump, probably occurring by the redistribution of a H bond near the retinal. The correlated electron and proton translocation supports the concept, assigning a functional role to the light-induced sudden polarization in retinal proteins. PMID:18456840

  1. Use of primary cell cultures to measure the late effects in the skins of rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.; Lett, J. T.

    Previous pilot investigations of the uses of primary cell cultures to study late damage in stem cells of the skin of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit and the rhesus monkey /1-3/, have been extended to individual monkeys exposed to 55 MeV protons. Protons of this energy have a larger range in tissue of (~2.6 cm) than the 32 MeV protons (~0.9 cm) to which the animals in our earlier studies had been exposed. Although the primary emphases in the current studies were improvement and simplification in the techniques and logistics of transportation of biopsies to a central analytical facility, comparison of the quantitative measurements obtained thus far for survival of stem cells in the skins from animals irradiated 21 years ago reveals that the effects of both proton energies are similar.

  2. Secure network for beamline control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, T.; Fukui, T.; Ishii, M.; Furukawa, Y.; Nakatani, T.; Matsushita, T.; Takeuchi, M.; Tanaka, R.; Ishikawa, T.

    2001-07-01

    In SPring-8, beamline control system is constructed with a highly available distributed network system. The socket based communication protocol is used for the beamline control mainly. Beamline users can control the equipment by sending simple control commands to a server process, which is running on a beamline-managing computer (Ohata et al., SPring-8 beamline control system, ICALEPCS'99, Trieste, Italy, 1999). At the beginning the network was based on the shared topology at all beamlines. Consequently, it has a risk for misapplication of the user's program to access different machines on the network system cross over beamlines. It is serious problem for the SPring-8 beamline control system, because all beamlines controlled with unified software interfaces. We introduced the switching technology and the firewalls to support network access control. Also the virtual networking (VLAN: IEEE 802.1Q) and the gigabit Ethernet technology (IEEE 802.3ab) are introduced. Thus the network security and the reliability are guaranteed at the higher level in SPring-8 beamline.

  3. Nomenclature of SLC Arc beamline components

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, J.; Weng, W.T.

    1986-04-10

    This note defines I and C formal names for beamline components in the Arc as specified in the TRANSPORT decks ARCN FINAL and ARCS FINAL of June 5, 1985. The formal name consists of three fields: the primary name, the zone and the unit number. The general principles and guidelines are explained in Reference 1. The rationale and the final resolutions of the naming conventions for the Arc are explained.

  4. Upgrades to the Fermilab NuMI beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Michael A.; Childress, Sam; Grossman, Nancy; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Marchionni, Alberto; McCluskey, Elaine; Moore, Craig Damon; Reilly, Robert; Tariq, Salman; Wehmann, Alan; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The NuMI beamline at Fermilab has been delivering high-intensity muon neutrino beams to the MINOS experiment since the spring of 2005. A total of 3.4 x 10{sup 20} protons has been delivered to the NuMI target and a maximum beam power of 320 kW has been achieved. An upgrade of the NuMI facility increasing the beam power capability to 700 kW is planned as part of the NOvA experiment. The plans for this upgrade are presented and the possibility of upgrading the NuMI beamline to handle 1.2 MW is considered.

  5. APS beamline standard components handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that most Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) members would like to concentrate on designing specialized equipment related to their scientific programs rather than on routine or standard beamline components. Thus, an effort is in progress at the APS to identify standard and modular components of APS beamlines. Identifying standard components is a nontrivial task because these components should support diverse beamline objectives. To assist with this effort, the APS has obtained advice and help from a Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee consisting of experts in beamline design, construction, and operation. The staff of the Experimental Facilities Division identified various components thought to be standard items for beamlines, regardless of the specific scientific objective of a particular beamline. A generic beamline layout formed the basis for this identification. This layout is based on a double-crystal monochromator as the first optical element, with the possibility of other elements to follow. Pre-engineering designs were then made of the identified standard components. The Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee has reviewed these designs and provided very useful input regarding the specifications of these components. We realize that there will be other configurations that may require special or modified components. This Handbook in its current version (1.1) contains descriptions, specifications, and pre-engineering design drawings of these standard components. In the future, the APS plans to add engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction.

  6. Proton-HZE-particle sequential dual-beam exposures increase anchorage-independent growth frequencies in primary human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangming; Bennett, Paula V; Cutter, Noelle C; Sutherland, Betsy M

    2006-09-01

    The radiation field in deep space contains high levels of high-energy protons and substantially lower levels of high-atomic-number, high-energy (HZE) particles. Calculations indicate that cellular nuclei of human space travelers will be hit during a 3-year Mars mission by approximately 400 protons and approximately 0.4 HZE particles. Thus most cells in astronauts will be hit by a proton(s) before being hit by an HZE particle. To investigate effects of dual ion irradiations on human cells, we irradiated primary human neonatal fibroblasts with protons (1 GeV/nucleon, 20 cGy) followed from 2.5 min to 48 h later by iron or titanium ions (1 GeV/nucleon, 20 cGy) and then measured clonogenic survival and frequency of anchorage-independent growth. This frequency depends on the interval between hydrogen- and iron-ion irradiation, with a critical window between 2.5 min and 1 h producing about three times more anchorage-independent colonies per survivor than expected from simple addition of the two ions separately. The hydrogen-titanium-ion dual-beam irradiation produced similar increases that persisted to approximately 6 h. At longer intervals, anchorage-independent growth frequencies were similar to those expected for additivity. However, irradiation of cells with either an iron or a titanium particle first followed by protons produced only additive levels. PMID:16953667

  7. Performance measurements at the SLS SIM beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, U.; Nolting, F.; Fraile Rodriguez, A.; Krempasky, J.; Quitmann, C.; Schmidt, T.; Spielmann, S.; Zimoch, D.

    2010-06-23

    The Surface/Interface: Microscopy beamline of the Swiss Light Source started operation in 2001. In 2007 the beamline has been significantly upgraded with a second refocusing section and a blazed grating optimized for high photon flux. Two Apple II type undulators with a plane grating monochromator using the collimated light scheme deliver photons with an energy from 90eV to about 2keV with variable polarization for the photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) as the primary user station. We measured a focus of (45x60) {mu}m({nu}xh) and a photon flux > 10{sup 12} photon/s for all gratings. Polarization switching within a few seconds is realized with the small bandpass of the monochromator and a slight detuning of the undulator.

  8. A modular optics design for the LBNE beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, John A.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Protons extracted from the Main Injector (MI) in the MI-60 straight section are transported 84 m through quadrupole Q106 in the NuMI stub, at which point two 6-3-120 vertical switching magnets, followed by three EPB vertical dipoles, steer the beam into the main body of the LBNE beamline. From Q106 in NuMI the LBNE beamline transports these protons 722.0 m to the LBNE target, located 41.77 m (137.0 ft) below the MI beamline center (BLC) elevation, on a trajectory aimed towards DUSEL. Bending is provided (predominantly) by 34 long (6 m) MI-style IDA/IDB and 8 short (4 m) IDC/IDD dipoles [through 48.36{sup o} horizontally and -5.844{sup o} (net) vertically]. Optical properties are defined by 49 quadrupoles (grouped functionally into 44 focusing centers) of the proven MI beamline-style 3Q60/3Q120 series. All focusing centers are equipped with redesigned MI-style IDS orbit correctors and dual-plane beam position monitors (BPM's). Ample space is available in each arc cell to accommodate ion pumps and diagnostic instrumentation. Parameters of the main magnets are listed in a table.

  9. PLS photoemission electron microscopy beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tai-Hee; Kim, Ki-jeong; Hwang, C. C.; Rah, S.; Park, C. Y.; Kim, Bongsoo

    2001-07-01

    The performance of a recently commissioned beamline at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) is described. The beamline, which is located at 4B1 at PLS, is a Varied Line Spacing (VLS) Plane Grating Monochromator (PGM) beamline. VLS PGM has become very popular because of the simple scanning mechanism and the fixed exit slit. The beamline which takes 3 mrad horizontal beam fan from bending magnet, covers the energy range 200-1000 eV for Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Magnetic Circular Dichroism (MCD) experiments. Simplicity of the optics and high flux with medium resolution were the design goals for these applications. The beamline consists of a horizontal focusing mirror, a vertical focusing mirror, VLS plane grating and exit slit. The source of PLS could be used as a virtual entrance slit because of its small size and stability. The flux and the resolution of the beamline at the experimental station have been measured using an ion chamber and a calibrated photodiode. Test images of PEEM from a standard sample were taken to illustrate the further performance of the beamline and PEEM station.

  10. Advanced light source vacuum policy and vacuum guidelines for beamlines and experiment endstations

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to: (1) Explain the ALS vacuum policy and specifications for beamlines and experiment endstations. (2) Provide guidelines related to ALS vacuum policy to assist in designing beamlines which are in accordance with ALS vacuum policy. This document supersedes LSBL-116. The Advanced Light Source is a third generation synchrotron radiation source whose beam lifetime depends on the quality of the vacuum in the storage ring and the connecting beamlines. The storage ring and most of the beamlines share a common vacuum and are operated under ultra-high-vacuum (UHV) conditions. All endstations and beamline equipment must be operated so as to avoid contamination of beamline components, and must include proper safeguards to protect the storage ring vacuum from an accidental break in the beamline or endstation vacuum systems. The primary gas load during operation is due to thermal desorption and electron/photon induced desorption of contaminants from the interior of the vacuum vessel and its components. The desorption rates are considerably higher for hydrocarbon contamination, thus considerable emphasis is placed on eliminating these sources of contaminants. All vacuum components in a beamline and endstation must meet the ALS vacuum specifications. The vacuum design of both beamlines and endstations must be approved by the ALS Beamline Review Committee (BRC) before vacuum connections to the storage ring are made. The vacuum design is first checked during the Beamline Design Review (BDR) held before construction of the beamline equipment begins. Any deviation from the ALS vacuum specifications must be approved by the BRC prior to installation of the equipment on the ALS floor. Any modification that is incorporated into a vacuum assembly without the written approval of the BRC is done at the user`s risk and may lead to rejection of the whole assembly.

  11. SPring-8 Structural Biology Beamlines / Automatic Beamline Operation at RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, Go; Hasegawa, Kazuya; Okazaki, Nobuo; Sakai, Hisanobu; Kumasaka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2007-01-19

    RIKEN Structural Genomics Beamlines (BL26B1 and BL26B2) at SPring-8 have been constructed for high throughput protein crystallography. The beamline operation is automated cooperating with the sample changer robot. The operation software provides a centralized control utilizing the client and server architecture. The sample management system with the networked database has been implemented to accept dry-shipped crystals from distant users.

  12. Receptor kinase-mediated control of primary active proton pumping at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Fuglsang, Anja T; Kristensen, Astrid; Cuin, Tracey A; Schulze, Waltraud X; Persson, Jörgen; Thuesen, Kristina H; Ytting, Cecilie K; Oehlenschlæger, Christian B; Mahmood, Khalid; Sondergaard, Teis E; Shabala, Sergey; Palmgren, Michael G

    2014-12-01

    Acidification of the cell wall space outside the plasma membrane is required for plant growth and is the result of proton extrusion by the plasma membrane-localized H+-ATPases. Here we show that the major plasma membrane proton pumps in Arabidopsis, AHA1 and AHA2, interact directly in vitro and in planta with PSY1R, a receptor kinase of the plasma membrane that serves as a receptor for the peptide growth hormone PSY1. The intracellular protein kinase domain of PSY1R phosphorylates AHA2/AHA1 at Thr-881, situated in the autoinhibitory region I of the C-terminal domain. When expressed in a yeast heterologous expression system, the introduction of a negative charge at this position caused pump activation. Application of PSY1 to plant seedlings induced rapid in planta phosphorylation at Thr-881, concomitant with an instantaneous increase in proton efflux from roots. The direct interaction between AHA2 and PSY1R observed might provide a general paradigm for regulation of plasma membrane proton transport by receptor kinases.

  13. Processing of very high energy proton events with using new method of searching for primary cosmic rays in Emulsion Chamber (on RUNJOB experiment data)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2013-02-01

    The primary proton tracks are identified in about half of events referred to proton ones in the Russian-Japanese balloon-born emulsion chamber RUNJOB experiment. Reprocessing of experimental data obtained in long-term exposure of RUNJOB-3B, 6A, 11A, 11B emulsion chambers (EC) with new method for searching of the primary cosmic particles leads to confirm that as well as earlier single charged primary tracks are not found in about half of events referred to the proton ones with energy E0 > 20 TeV and zenith angle tg(θ) <= 5. In this paper the new method for searching and tracing of the primary cosmic particles in EC's and characteristics of studied events (energy, angle, pass length of the primary particles until their interaction in EC) are presented.

  14. High power photon beamline elements in the LBL/SSRL/EXXON Beamline VI

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.

    1992-09-01

    Beamline VI is a wiggler-based, multi-kilowatt, intense synchrotron radiation beamline installed SPEAR. The thermal design parameters for this beamline are presented and then design considerations and construction descriptions are given for many of the high-power photon beamline elements.

  15. VESPERS: A Beamline for Combined XRF and XRD Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Renfei; Gerson, Andrea; Ice, Gene; Reininger, Ruben; Yates, Brian; McIntyre, Stewart

    2007-01-01

    VESPERS (VEry Sensitive Elemental and Structural Probe Employing Radiation from a Synchrotron) is a bending magnet beamline that is just beginning construction at the Canadian Light Source. The beamline has several novel design elements that are intended to increase its operating flexibility and availability to users. First, there is a requirement to deliver a microscopic beam with a variable bandwidth, thus enabling the generation of Laue diffraction patterns and high yield X-ray fluorescence spectra from the same region preferably simultaneously. Thus, the bandpass of the VESPERS monochromator can be readily changed to focus radiation into the same 2-4 micron diameter area that is either polychromatic or having a bandwidth of 10%, 1.6% or 0.01%. This allows the user to change the diffraction pattern to suit the complexity of the crystal and the spectral signal to noise ratio to suit the detection sensitivity required. Second, the beamline is designed to have two branches capable of operating simultaneously and virtually independently using the same primary optics. These design features are accomplished using four separate beams originating at four pinholes at the entry to the Primary Optical Enclosure. The compound focus design uses spherical mirrors to focus both polychromatic and pre-monochromatic beams onto the intermediate slits. A pair of bendable K-B mirrors in the experimental hutch is used to demagnify the beam further down to micron size. The photon energy of this beamline is 6-30 keV.

  16. Primary and secondary particle contributions to the depth dose distribution in a phantom shielded from solar flare and Van Allen protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, R. T.; Claiborne, H. C.; Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Calculations have been made using the nucleon-meson transport code NMTC to estimate the absorbed dose and dose equivalent distributions in astronauts inside space vehicles bombarded by solar flare and Van Allen protons. A spherical shell shield of specific radius and thickness with a 30-cm-diam. tissue ball at the geometric center was used to simulate the spacecraft-astronaut configuration. The absorbed dose and the dose equivalent from primary protons, secondary protons, heavy nuclei, charged pions, muons, photons, and positrons and electrons are given as a function of depth in the tissue phantom. Results are given for solar flare protons with a characteristic rigidity of 100 MV and for Van Allen protons in a 240-nautical-mile circular orbit at 30 degree inclination angle incident on both 20-g/sq cm-thick aluminum and polyethylene spherical shell shields.

  17. Beamline pulsing system for cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, Jouko; Gustafsson, Jouni; Kivikoski, Markku; Liukkonen, Esko; Nieminen, Veikko

    A beamline pulsing system for cyclotrons is presented. The function of this system is to modify the structure of a cyclotron ion beam guided to the desired research target by a beamline. In some in-beam experiments, an adjustment of the time structure of the beam is sometimes needed. This kind of situation occurs if, for example, the life time of the target material is longer than the period corresponding to the beam frequency. In this case, the frequency of the ion pulses hitting the target is 10-21 MHz depending on the frequency of the acceleration voltage. The adjustment of the ion beam pulse frequency is carried out by a beamline deflector. Deflection is achieved by feeding a high-amplitude (10-15 kV) RF-signal between the deflection plates positioned into the beamline. This signal is generated from the cyclotron reference signal by frequency division, phase adjustment and amplification. Simulation and test results indicate that the specified deflection signal level is achieved with 1 kW of RF-power.

  18. Target for the NuMI Neutrino Beam-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hylen, James

    1998-04-01

    The NUMI beam-line which will be built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory will produce a neutrino beam by striking a target with a 120 GeV proton beam, collecting the produced π^+ with a magnetic focusing system, and letting the pions decay as they travel down an evacuated pipe. The target must be able to withstand the projected beam intensity of 4x10^13 protons per 1 millisecond beam spill, with a repetition rate of 1.9 seconds. A long, thin, relatively low density target is the most efficient configuration for the neutrino beam line, as the required high energy pions can exit the sides of the target before re-interacting. The proton beam spot size will be of order 1 mm RMS. Graphite and Beryllium are being evaluated as potential target materials.

  19. First Infrared Predissociation Spectra of He-TAGGED Protonated Primary Alcohols at 4 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Alexander; Redlich, Britta; Oomens, J.; Asvany, Oskar; Brünken, Sandra; Jusko, Pavol; Thorwirth, Sven; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Cryogenic multipole ion traps have become popular devices in the development of sensitive action-spectroscopic techniques. The low ion temperature leads to enhanced spectral resolution, and less congested spectra. In the early 2000s, a 22-pole ion trap was coupled to the Free-Electron Laser for Infrared eXperiments (FELIX), yielding infrared Laser Induced Reaction (LIR) spectra of the molecular ions C_2H_2+ and CH_5+. This pioneering work showed the great opportunities combining cold mass-selected molecular ions with widely tunable broadband IR radiation. In the past year a cryogenic (T>3.9 K) 22-pole ion trap designed and built in Cologne (FELion) has been successfully coupled to FELIX, which in its current configuration provides continuously tunable infrared radiation from 3 μm to 150 μm, hence allowing to probe characteristic vibrational spectra in the so-called "fingerprint region" with a sufficient spectral energy density also allowing for multiple photon processes (IR-MPD). Here we present the first infrared predissociation spectra of He-tagged protonated methanol and ethanol (MeOH_2+/EtOH_2+) stored at 4 K. These vibrational spectra were recorded with both a commercial OPO and FELIX, covering a total spectral range from 3700 wn to 550 wn at a spectral resolution of a few wn. The H-O-H stretching and bending modes clearly distinguish the protonated alcohols from their neutral analoga. For EtOH_2+, also IR-MPD spectra of the bare ion could be recorded. The symmetric and antisymmetric H-O-H stretching bands at around 3 μm show no significant shift within the given spectral resolution in comparison to those recorded with He predissociation, indicating a rather small perturbation caused by the attached He. The vibrational bands were assigned using quantum-chemical calculations on different levels of theory. The computed frequencies correspond favorably to the experimental spectra. Subsequent high resolution measurements could lead to a better structural

  20. Wiggler-base Hard X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at CLS

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, D. T.; Chen, N.; Sheng, W.

    2007-01-19

    The CLS 06ID-1 Hard X-ray Micro-Analysis Beamline (HXMA) is a general purpose hard X-ray spectroscopy beamline (5 to 40 keV) designed to serve users in XAFS, diffraction and microprobe communities. The beamline uses the synchrotron radiation from a superconducting wiggler. The primary beamline optics include a 1.2 m water-cooled silicon collimating mirror (separate Rh and Pt coating stripes), a liquid nitrogen cooled double crystal monochromator (Kohzu CMJ-1) housing two crystal pairs (Si 111 and 220), and a 1.15 m long water-cooled silicon toroidal focusing mirror (separate Rh and Pt coating stripes). All mirrors are equipped with dynamical meridian benders. The experimental hutch hosts three experimental setups for XAFS, diffraction and microprobe, respectively. Primary design considerations and some commissioning results are discussed.

  1. ALS beamline design requirements: A guide for beamline designers

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This manual is written as a guide for researchers in designing beamlines and endstations acceptable for use at the ALS. It contains guidelines and policies related to personnel safety and equipment and vacuum protection. All equipment and procedures must ultimately satisfy the safety requirements set aside in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000) which is available from the ALS User Office or on the World WideWeb from the LBNL Homepage (http:// www.lbl.gov).

  2. The Generic Beamline Concept of the PETRA III Undulator Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, U.; Peters, H. B.; Roehlsberger, R.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.

    2007-01-19

    The conversion of the PETRA storage ring at DESY to a third generation synchrotron radiation light source poses a challenge to the design of the beam transport system. The total power in the white beam will be as high as 7.5kW in the case of the 5m long undulator at 100mA. The power density will be 476 W/mm2 at 20m from the source. Upgrades to a beam current of 200mA have to be accounted for in the design of the beamline components. For the beam transport between the undulator and the experimental hall, the design of a generic beamline is presented. It contains all elements which are needed to guide the beam to the experiment. This generic beamline consists of the estimated maximum of components for this purpose. Special experimental needs may reduce the number of proposed devices in the generic part and add special optical devices close to the experiment, e. g. strong focusing. The paper focuses on the girder concept for all major beam transport components and the collimating shutter system which has to deal with the high power density of the PETRA III undulators.

  3. First experimental research in low energy proton radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Yang, Guo-Jun; Li, Yi-Ding; Long, Ji-Dong; He, Xiao-Zhong; Zhang, Xiao-Ding; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Ma, Chao-Fan; Zhao, Liang-Chao; Yang, Xing-Lin; Zhang, Zhuo; Wang, Yuan; Pang, Jian; Li, Hong; Li, Wei-Feng; Zhou, Fu-Xin; Shi, Jin-Shui; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Li, Jin; Zhang, Lin-Wen; Deng, Jian-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Proton radiography is a new scatheless diagnostic tool providing a potential development direction for advanced hydrotesting. Recently a low energy proton radiography system has been developed at the Chinese Academy of Engineering Phyiscs (CAEP). This system has been designed to use an 11 MeV proton beam to radiograph thin static objects. This system consists of a proton cyclotron coupled to an imaging beamline, which is the first domestic beamline dedicated to proton radiography experiments. Via some demonstration experiments, the radiography system is confirmed to provide clear pictures with spatial resolution ~100 μm within 40 mm field-of-view.

  4. Particle therapy using carbon ions or protons as a definitive therapy for patients with primary sacral chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Demizu, Y; Jin, D; Hashimoto, N; Takagi, M; Terashima, K; Fujii, O; Niwa, Y; Akagi, T; Daimon, T; Hishikawa, Y; Abe, M; Murakami, M; Sasaki, R; Fuwa, N

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and toxicity of particle therapy using carbon ions or protons for primary sacral chordomas. Methods: We evaluated 23 patients with primary sacral chordoma treated with carbon ion therapy (CIT) or proton therapy (PT) between July 2005 and June 2011 at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Hyogo, Japan. The median patient age was 72 years. 14 patients were treated with 70.4 Gy equivalents (GyE) in 16 fractions and 9 were treated with 70.4 GyE in 32 fractions. CIT was used for 16 patients, and PT was used for 7 patients. Results: The median follow-up period was 38 months. At 3 years, local control (LC), overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for all patients were 94%, 83% and 68%, respectively. The log-rank test revealed that male sex was significantly related to better PFS ( p = 0.029). No other factors, including dose fractionation and ion type, were significant for LC, OS or PFS. In nine patients, ≥Grade 3 acute dermatitis was observed, and ≥Grade 3 late toxicities were observed in nine patients. The 32-fraction protocol reduced severe toxicities in both the acute and late phases compared with the 16-fraction protocol. Conclusion: Particle therapy for patients with sacral chordoma showed favourable LC and OS. Severe toxicities were successfully reduced by modifying the dose fractionation and treatment planning in the later treatment era. Thus, this therapeutic modality should be considered useful and safe. Advances in knowledge: This is the first study including both CIT and PT for sacral chordomas. PMID:24288399

  5. The Stepwise Protonation and Electron-Transfer Reduction of a Primary Copper-Dioxygen Adduct

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Ryan L.; Ginsbach, Jake W.; Cowley, Ryan E.; Qayyum, Munzarin F.; Himes, Richard A.; Siegler, Maxime A.; Moore, Cathy D.; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Solomon, Edward I.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The protonation-reduction of a dioxygen adduct with [LCuI][B(C6F5)4], cupric superoxo complex [LCuII(O2•−)]+ (1), (L=TMG3tren(1,1,1-tris[2-[N2-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidino)]ethyl]amine)), has been investigated. Trifluoroacetic acid (HOAcF) reversibly associates with the superoxo ligand in ([LCuII(O2•−)]+) in a 1:1 adduct [LCuII(O2•−)(HOAcF)]+ (2), as characterized by UV-visible, resonance Raman (rR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopies, along with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Chemical studies reveal that for the binding of HOAcF with 1 to give 2, Keq = 1.2×105 M−1 (−130 °C) and ΔH° = − 6.9(7) kcal/mol, ΔS° = − 26(4) cal/mol•K). Vibrational (rR) data reveal a significant increase (29 cm−1) in νO-O (= 1149 cm−1) compared to that known for [LCuII(O2•−)]+ (1). Along with results obtained from XAS and DFT calculations, hydrogen bonding of HOAcF to a superoxo O-atom in 2 is established. NMR spectroscopy of 2 at −120 °C in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran are also consistent with 1/HOAcF = 1:1 formulation 2 and that this complex possesses a triplet (S = 1) ground state electronic configuration, as previously determined for 1. The pre-equilibrium acid association to 1 is followed by outer-sphere electron-transfer reduction of 2 by decamethylferrocene (Me10Fc) or octamethylferrocene (Me8Fc), leading to the products H2O2, the corresponding ferrocenium salt and [LCuII(OAcF)]+. Second-order rate constants for electron transfer (ket) were determined to be 1365 M−1 s−1 (Me10Fc) and 225 M−1 s−1 (Me8Fc) at −80 °C. The (bio)chemical relevance of the proton-triggered reduction of the metal-bound dioxygen-derived fragment is discussed. PMID:24164682

  6. SPring-8 beamline control system.

    PubMed

    Ohata, T; Konishi, H; Kimura, H; Furukawa, Y; Tamasaku, K; Nakatani, T; Tanabe, T; Matsumoto, N; Ishii, M; Ishikawa, T

    1998-05-01

    The SPring-8 beamline control system is now taking part in the control of the insertion device (ID), front end, beam transportation channel and all interlock systems of the beamline: it will supply a highly standardized environment of apparatus control for collaborative researchers. In particular, ID operation is very important in a third-generation synchrotron light source facility. It is also very important to consider the security system because the ID is part of the storage ring and is therefore governed by the synchrotron ring control system. The progress of computer networking systems and the technology of security control require the development of a highly flexible control system. An interlock system that is independent of the control system has increased the reliability. For the beamline control system the so-called standard model concept has been adopted. VME-bus (VME) is used as the front-end control system and a UNIX workstation as the operator console. CPU boards of the VME-bus are RISC processor-based board computers operated by a LynxOS-based HP-RT real-time operating system. The workstation and the VME are linked to each other by a network, and form the distributed system. The HP 9000/700 series with HP-UX and the HP 9000/743rt series with HP-RT are used. All the controllable apparatus may be operated from any workstation. PMID:15263588

  7. Single proton counting at the RIKEN cell irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mäckel, V. Puttaraksa, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-08-15

    We present newly developed tapered capillaries with a scintillator window, which enable us to count single protons at the RIKEN cell irradiation setup. Their potential for performing single proton irradiation experiments at our beamline setup is demonstrated with CR39 samples, showing a single proton detection fidelity of 98%.

  8. Beamline 9.0.1 - a high-resolution undulator beamline for gas-phase spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bozek, J.D.; Heimann, P.A.; Mossessian, D.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.0.1 at the Advanced Light Source is an undulator beamline with a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) which provides very high resolution and flux over the photon energy range 20-320eV. The beamline has been used primarily by the atomic and molecular science community to conduct spectroscopy experiments using electron, ion and fluorescence photon detection. A description of the beamline and its performance will be provided in this abstract.

  9. Status of the LBNE Neutrino Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Papadimitriou, Vaia; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab to carry out a compelling research program in neutrino physics. The facility will aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed at the Homestake Mine in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector (60-120 GeV) hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined taking into account several factors including the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, spacial and radiological constraints and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be {approx}700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. We discuss here the status of the conceptual design and the associated challenges.

  10. Experimental feature in the primary-proton flux at energies above 10 TeV according to the results of searches for primary particles in nuclear emulsions exposed in the stratosphere (RUNJOB Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2008-02-15

    In the RUNJOB experiment, a long-term exposure of x-ray emulsion chambers in the stratosphere from 1995 to 1999 with the aim of studying the composition and spectra of primary cosmic particles in the energy range 10-1000 TeV per nucleon revealed about 50% proton tracks. The remaining events of the proton group did not feature any candidate for a track of a singly charged particle within the search region determined from measurements of the coordinates of background nuclei going close to the sought track. Methodological factors that could explain this experimental observation are considered. A possible physical reason associated with the presence of a neutral component in the flux of primary protons in the energy region above 10 TeV is also analyzed.

  11. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone.

  12. Induction of anchorage-independent growth in primary human cells exposed to protons or HZE ions separately or in dual exposures.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, B M; Cuomo, N C; Bennett, P V

    2005-10-01

    Travelers on space missions will be exposed to a complex radiation environment that includes protons and heavy charged particles. Since protons are present at much higher levels than are heavy ions, the most likely scenario for cellular radiation exposure will be proton exposure followed by a hit by a heavy ion. Although the effects of individual ion species on human cells are being investigated extensively, little is known about the effects of exposure to both radiation types. One useful measure of mammalian cell damage is induction of the ability to grow in a semi-solid agar medium highly inhibitory to the growth of normal human cells, termed neoplastic transformation. Using primary human cells, we evaluated induction of soft-agar growth and survival of cells exposed to protons only or to heavy charged particles (600 MeV/nucleon silicon) only as well as of cells exposed to protons followed after a 4-day interval by silicon ions. Both ions alone efficiently transformed the human cells to anchorage-independent growth. Initial experiments indicate that the dose responses for neoplastic transformation of cells exposed to protons and then after 4 days to silicon ions appear similar to that of cells exposed to silicon ions alone. PMID:16187755

  13. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    SciTech Connect

    Fedurin, M.; Jing, Y.; Stratakis, D.; Swinson, C.

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  14. Recent Major Improvements to the ALS Sector 5 MacromolecularCrystallography Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Simon A.; Glossinger, James; Smith-Baumann, Alexis; McKean, John P.; Trame, Christine; Dickert, Jeff; Rozales, Anthony; Dauz,Azer; Taylor, John; Zwart, Petrus; Duarte, Robert; Padmore, Howard; McDermott, Gerry; Adams, Paul

    2007-07-01

    Although the Advanced Light Source (ALS) was initially conceived primarily as a low energy (1.9GeV) 3rd generation source of VUV and soft x-ray radiation it was realized very early in the development of the facility that a multipole wiggler source coupled with high quality, (brightness preserving), optics would result in a beamline whose performance across the optimal energy range (5-15keV) for macromolecular crystallography (MX) would be comparable to, or even exceed, that of many existing crystallography beamlines at higher energy facilities. Hence, starting in 1996, a suite of three beamlines, branching off a single wiggler source, was constructed, which together formed the ALS Macromolecular Crystallography Facility. From the outset this facility was designed to cater equally to the needs of both academic and industrial users with a heavy emphasis placed on the development and introduction of high throughput crystallographic tools, techniques, and facilities--such as large area CCD detectors, robotic sample handling and automounting facilities, a service crystallography program, and a tightly integrated, centralized, and highly automated beamline control environment for users. This facility was immediately successful, with the primary Multiwavelength Anomalous Diffraction beamline (5.0.2) in particular rapidly becoming one of the foremost crystallographic facilities in the US--responsible for structures such as the 70S ribosome. This success in-turn triggered enormous growth of the ALS macromolecular crystallography community and spurred the development of five additional ALS MX beamlines all utilizing the newly developed superconducting bending magnets ('superbends') as sources. However in the years since the original Sector 5.0 beamlines were built the performance demands of macromolecular crystallography users have become ever more exacting; with growing emphasis placed on studying larger complexes, more difficult structures, weakly diffracting or smaller

  15. Diagnostic X-Multi-Axis Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A C

    2000-04-05

    Tomographic reconstruction of explosive events require time resolved multipal lines of sight. Considered here is a four (or eight) line of sight beam layout for a nominal 20 MeV 2000 Ampere 2 microsecond electron beam for generation of x-rays 0.9 to 5 meters from a given point, the ''firing point''. The requirement of a millimeter spatial x-ray source requires that the electron beam be delivered to the converter targets with sub-millimeter precision independent of small variations in beam energy and initial conditions. The 2 usec electron beam pulse allows for four bursts in each line, separated in time by about 500 microseconds. Each burst is divided by a electro-magnetic kicker into four (or eight) pulses, one for each beamline. The arrival time of the four (or eight) beam pulses at the x-ray target can be adjusted by the kicker timing and the sequence that the beams of each burst are switched into the different beamlines. There exists a simple conceptual path from a four beamline to a eight beamline upgrade. The eight line beamline is built up from seven unique types of sub-systems or ''blocks''. The beamline consists of 22 of these functional blocks and contains a total of 455 individual magnets, figure 1. The 22 blocks are inter-connected by a total of 30 straight line inter-block sections (IBS). Beamlines 1-4 are built from 12 blocks with conceptual layout structure shown in figure 2. Beamlines 5-8 are built with an additional 10 blocks with conceptual layout structure shown in figure 3. This beamline can be thought of as looking like a lollipop consisting of a 42 meter long stick leading to a 60 by 70 meter rectangular candy blob consisting of the eight lines of sight. The accelerator providing the electron beam is at the end of the stick and the firing point is at the center of the blob. The design allows for a two stage implementation. Beamlines 1-3 can be installed to provide a tomographic azimuthal resolution of 45 degrees. An upgrade can later be made

  16. RF deflector system for beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, J.; Gustafsson, J.; Kivikoski, M.; Liukkonen, E.; Nieminen, V.

    1999-06-01

    In some in-beam experiments, an adjustment of the time structure of the cyclotron ion beam guided to the desired research target by a beamline is sometimes needed. This situation occurs if, for example, the decay times of the reaction products are too short compared to the period corresponding to the beam frequency. In the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä the frequency of the ion pulses hitting the research target is 10-21 MHz depending on the frequency of the acceleration voltage. A RF deflector system was constructed to adjust the ion beam pulse frequency according to the respective requirements. A desired portion of the ion pulses are deflected by feeding a high-amplitude RF-signal between deflecting plates located into the beam line. The specified deflecting voltage amplitude of 10-15 kV is achieved with 1 kW of RF power.

  17. Real Beamline Optics from a Synthetic Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan Bodenstein,Michael Tiefenback,Yves Roblin

    2010-05-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab can be described as a series of concatenated beamlines. Methods used to measure the Twiss parameters in closed orbit machines are not applicable in such open ended systems. We are using properly selected sets of real orbits in the accelerator, as one would for numerical analysis. The evolution of these trajectories along the beamline models the behavior of a synthetic beam which deterministically supplements beam profile-based Twiss parameter measurements and optimizes the efficiency of beamline tuning. Examples will be presented alongside a description of the process.

  18. ELIMED, MEDical and multidisciplinary applications at ELI-Beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Anzalone, A.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Carpinelli, M.; Cuttone, G.; Cutroneo, M.; De Martinis, C.; Giove, D.; Korn, G.; Maggiore, M.; Manti, L.; Margarone, D.; Musumarra, A.; Perozziello, F. M.; Petrovic, I.; Pisciotta, P.; Renis, M.; Ristic-Fira, A.; Romano, F.; Romano, F. P.; Schettino, G.; Scuderi, V.; Torrisi, L.; Tramontana, A.; Tudisco, S.

    2014-04-01

    ELI-Beamlines is one of the pillars of the pan-European project ELI (Extreme Light Infrastructure). It will be an ultra high-intensity, high repetition-rate, femtosecond laser facility whose main goal is generation and applications of high-brightness X-ray sources and accelerated charged particles in different fields. Particular care will be devoted to the potential applicability of laser-driven ion beams for medical treatments of tumors. Indeed, such kind of beams show very interesting peculiarities and, moreover, laser-driven based accelerators can really represent a competitive alternative to conventional machines since they are expected to be more compact in size and less expensive. The ELIMED project was launched thanks to a collaboration established between FZU-ASCR (ELI-Beamlines) and INFN-LNS researchers. Several European institutes have already shown a great interest in the project aiming to explore the possibility to use laser-driven ion (mostly proton) beams for several applications with a particular regard for medical ones. To reach the project goal several tasks need to be fulfilled, starting from the optimization of laser-target interaction to dosimetric studies at the irradiation point at the end of a proper designed transport beam-line. Researchers from LNS have already developed and successfully tested a high-dispersive power Thomson Parabola Spectrometer, which is the first prototype of a more performing device to be used within the ELIMED project. Also a Magnetic Selection System able to produce a small pencil beam out of a wide energy distribution of ions produced in laser-target interaction has been realized and some preliminary work for its testing and characterization is in progress. In this contribution the status of the project will be reported together with a short description of the of the features of device recently developed.

  19. Microspectroscopy At Beamline 73 MAX-lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engdahl, Anders

    2010-02-01

    Presentation of some projects at the infrared microspectroscopy experimental station at beamline 73 MAX-lab. Among the subjects are found identification of organic residues in fossil material and examination of the chemistry in an old oak wood wreck.

  20. A Comparative Ab Initio Study of the Primary Hydration and Proton Dissociation of Various Imide and Sulfonic Acid Ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Clark II, Jeffrey K.; Paddison, Stephen J.; Eikerling, Michael; Dupuis, Michel; Zawodzinski, Jr., Thomas A.

    2012-03-29

    We compare the role of neighboring group substitutions on proton dissociation of hydrated acidic moieties suitable for proton exchange membranes through electronic structure calculations. Three pairs of ionomers containing similar electron withdrawing groups within the pair were chosen for the study: two fully fluorinated sulfonyl imides (CF3SO2NHSO2CF3 and CF3CF2SO2NHSO2CF3), two partially fluorinated sulfonyl imides (CH3SO2NHSO2CF3 and C6H5SO2NHSO2CF2CF3), and two aromatic sulfonic acid based material s (CH3C6H4SO3H and CH3 OC6 - H3OCH3C6H4SO3H). Fully optimized counterpoise (CP) corrected geometries were obtained for each ionomer fragment with the inclusion of water molecules at the B3LYP/6-311G** level of density functional theory. Spontaneous proton dissociation was observed upon addition of three water molecules in each system, and the transition to a solvent-separated ion pair occurred when four water molecules were introduced. No considerable quantitative or qualitative differences in proton dissociation, hydrogen bond networks formed, or water binding energies were found between systems containing similar electron withdrawing groups. Each of the sulfonyl imide ionomers exhibited qualitatively similar results regarding proton dissociation and separation. The fully fluorinated sulfonyl imides, however, showed a greater propensity to exist in dissociated and ion-pair separated states at low degrees of hydration than the partially fluorinated sulfonyl imides. This effect is due to the additional electron withdrawing groups providing charge stabilization as the dissociated proton migrates away from the imide anion.

  1. The New Structural Materials Science Beamlines BL8A and 8B at Photon Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, A.; Sugiyama, H.; Koyama, A.; Watanabe, K.

    2010-06-23

    BL8A and 8B are new beamlines for structural materials science at Photon Factory. The primary characteristics of both beamlines are similar. The incident beam is monochromatized by the Si(111) double-flat crystal monochromator and focused at the sample position by a Rh-coated bent cylindrical quartz mirror. The Weissenberg-camera-type imaging-plate (IP) diffractometers were installed. The X-ray diffraction experiments for structural studies of strongly correlated materials, such as transition metals, molecular conductors, endohedral fullerenes, nano-materials, etc, are conducted at these stations.

  2. Teaching the Fundamentals of Biological Research with Primary Literature: Learning from the Discovery of the Gastric Proton Pump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Lixin

    2011-01-01

    For the purpose of teaching collegians the fundamentals of biological research, literature explaining the discovery of the gastric proton pump was presented in a 50-min lecture. The presentation included detailed information pertaining to the discovery process. This study was chosen because it demonstrates the importance of having a broad range of…

  3. New SRC APPLE ll Variable Polarization Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    M Severson; M Bissen; M Fisher; G Rogers; R Reininger; M Green; D Eisert; B Tredinnick

    2011-12-31

    SRC has recently commissioned a new Varied Line-Spacing Plane Grating Monochromator (VLS-PGM) utilizing as its source a 1 m long APPLE II insertion device in short-straight-section 9 of the Aladdin storage ring. The insertion device reliably delivers horizontal, vertical, and right and left circularly polarized light to the beamline. Measurements from an in situ polarimeter can be used for undulator corrections to compensate for depolarizing effects of the beamline. The beamline has only three optical elements and covers the energy range from 11.1 to 270 eV using two varied line-spacing gratings. A plane mirror rotates to illuminate the gratings at the correct angle to cancel the defocus term at all photon energies. An exit slit and elliptical-toroid refocusing mirror complete the beamline. Using a 50 {mu}m exit slit, the beamline provides moderate to high resolution, with measured flux in the mid 10{sup 12} (photons/s/200 mA) range, and a spot size of 400 {mu}m horizontal by 30 {mu}m vertical.

  4. FLASH2 photon diagnostics and beamline concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, M.; Plönjes, E.

    2013-05-01

    FLASH2 is a major extention to the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY. An additional variable-gap undulator line in a new separate tunnel and a new experimental hall will turn FLASH into a multi-beamline FEL user facility. Years of experience as single user facility have high impact on the planned photon diagnostics. Online measurements of intensity, position, wavelength, wavefront, and pulse length are optimized as well as photon beam manipulation tools such as a gas absorber and filters. The beamline system will be set up to cover a wide wavelength range with beamlines capable to deliver down to 0.8 nm in the 5th harmonic and 1st harmonics in the water window to cover the user community's high intrest in this wavelength range. In addition, other beamlines will cover the longer wavelengths from 6 nm - 40 nm and beyond. Proven concepts like the optical laser pump-and-probe instrument are taken over from the current operation scheme in an established way. Permanent endstations with specialized beamline layouts are foreseen. Civil construction and installations in the new FLASH2 tunnel are on-going, first beam is expected for end of 2013, and a first user experiment is anticipated for summer 2014.

  5. National synchrotron light source user's manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines: Third edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.; White-DePace, S.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains information on the following topics: A Word on the Writing of Beamline Descriptions; Beamline Equipment Utilization for General Users; the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Storage Ring and Beamlines; VUV Beamline Descriptions--An Explanation; VUV Beamline Descriptions; X-Ray Storage Ring and Beamlines; X-Ray Beamline Descriptions--An Explanation; and X-Ray Beamline Descriptions.

  6. Characterization of CH3SO3H-doped PMMA/PVP blend-based proton-conducting polymer electrolytes and its application in primary battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambika, C.; Hirankumar, G.

    2016-02-01

    Various compositions of solid blend polymer electrolytes based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) complexed with methanesulfonic acid (MSA) as proton donor were prepared by solution casting technique. The complex nature of polymer blend with MSA was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Good thermal stability of PMMA/PVP blend polymer electrolyte was identified by thermogravimetric analysis. The surface morphology of the prepared electrolytes was studied through optical microscopy. Ion transport number was determined in the range of 0.93-0.97 for proton-conducting blend polymer electrolytes. The maximum conductivity value was calculated as 2.51 × 10-5 S/cm at 303 K for 14.04 mol% MSA-doped polymer electrolytes. Dielectric studies were also carried out. The electrochemical stability window of blend polymer electrolyte was found to be 1.82 V. Primary proton battery was fabricated with Zn + ZnSO4·7H2O/solid polymer electrolytes/MnO2. The discharge characteristics were studied at constant current drain of 5, 20 and 50 μA. The energy and power density were calculated as 0.27 W h kg-1 and 269.23 mW kg-1 for 20 μA of discharge, respectively.

  7. Assessment of radiation-induced second cancer risks in proton therapy and IMRT for organs inside the primary radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paganetti, Harald; Athar, Basit S.; Moteabbed, Maryam; Adams, Judith A.; Schneider, Uwe; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-10-01

    There is clinical evidence that second malignancies in radiation therapy occur mainly within the beam path, i.e. in the medium or high-dose region. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk for developing a radiation-induced tumor within the treated volume and to compare this risk for proton therapy and intensity-modulated photon therapy (IMRT). Instead of using data for specific patients we have created a representative scenario. Fully contoured age- and gender-specific whole body phantoms (4 year and 14 year old) were uploaded into a treatment planning system and tumor volumes were contoured based on patients treated for optic glioma and vertebral body Ewing's sarcoma. Treatment plans for IMRT and proton therapy treatments were generated. Lifetime attributable risks (LARs) for developing a second malignancy were calculated using a risk model considering cell kill, mutation, repopulation, as well as inhomogeneous organ doses. For standard fractionation schemes, the LAR for developing a second malignancy from radiation therapy alone was found to be up to 2.7% for a 4 year old optic glioma patient treated with IMRT considering a soft-tissue carcinoma risk model only. Sarcoma risks were found to be below 1% in all cases. For a 14 year old, risks were found to be about a factor of 2 lower. For Ewing's sarcoma cases the risks based on a sarcoma model were typically higher than the carcinoma risks, i.e. LAR up to 1.3% for soft-tissue sarcoma. In all cases, the risk from proton therapy turned out to be lower by at least a factor of 2 and up to a factor of 10. This is mainly due to lower total energy deposited in the patient when using proton beams. However, the comparison of a three-field and four-field proton plan also shows that the distribution of the dose, i.e. the particular treatment plan, plays a role. When using different fractionation schemes, the estimated risks roughly scale with the total dose difference in%. In conclusion, proton therapy can

  8. Status of the Dortmund TGM3-Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Westphal, C.; Dreiner, S.; Krause, M.

    2004-05-12

    The former TGM3 beamline at BESSYI was rebuilt at the DELTA storage ring, University of Dortmund, Germany. The beamline uses synchrotron radiation from a dipole bending magnet. The previous design of the beamline had to be adapted to an operation at DELTA. This included a motorized rotation of the first mirror, since that mirror is located within the radiation shield wall at DELTA. Also, further minor components had to be modified, adapted, or replaced. During the set-up at DELTA, previously known operation problems due to mechanical vibrations were eliminated by a complete new mounting of the optical components. The measured performance parameters at BESSYI are compared with calculated results for an operation at DELTA. The first commissioning experiments are currently carried out.

  9. nuSTORM Pion Beamline Design Update

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, A.; Bross, A.; Neuffer, D.; Lee, S. Y.

    2013-09-01

    A facility producing neutrinos from muons that decay in a racetrack ring can provide extremely well understood neutrino beams for oscillation physics and the search for sterile neutrinos. The “neutrinos from STORed Muons” (nuSTORM) facility based on this idea has been introduced by Bross, Neuffer et al. The design of the nuSTORM facility and the particle tracking have been presented in the paper of Liu, et al. This paper demonstrates the recent optimization results of the pion beamline, with G4beamline simulations. The optimum choice of pion beam center momentum, a new algorithm on fitting bivariate Gaussian distribution to the pion phase space data at the downstream side of the horn, and the comparison of the beamline performance with the optics designed based on Graphite and Inconel targets are also described.

  10. IR beamline at the Swiss Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ph, Lerch; L, Quaroni; J, Wambach; J, Schneider; B, Armstrong D.; D, Rossetti; L, Mueller F.; P, Peier; V, Schlott; L, Carroll; P, Friedli; H, Sigg; S, Stutz; M, Tran

    2012-05-01

    The infrared beamline at the Swiss light source uses dipole radiation and is designed to transport light to four experimental stations, A, B, C, D. Branch A is dedicated to far IR work in vacuum; branch B is a micro-spectrometer; branch C is dedicated to high resolution spectroscopy in the gas phase; branch D is a pump and probe set-up. This contribution describes the optical layout and provides a brief survey of currently available experimental stations. The beamline is in regular user operation since 2009.

  11. Simulation of the ATIC-2 Silicon Matrix for Protons and Helium GCR Primaries at 0.3, 10, and 25 TeV/Nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watts, J.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Chang, J.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha R. M.; Guzik, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    The energy deposition distribution for protons and helium galactic cosmic ray primaries at 0.3, 10, and 25 TeV/nucleon in the ATIC-2 silicon matrix detector are simulated with GEANT4. The GEANT3 geometrical model of ATIC developed by the University of Maryland was combined with a GEANT4 application developed for the Deep Space Test Bed (DSTB) detector package. The new code included relatively minor modifications to completely describe the ATIC materials and a more detailed model of the Silicon Matrix detector. For this analysis all particles were started as a unidirectional beam at a single point near the center of the Silicon Matrix front surface. The point was selected such that each primary passed through at least two of the overlapping silicon pixels.

  12. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 07: Monte Carlo Simulation of Primary Dose and PET Isotope Production for the TRIUMF Proton Therapy Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, C; Jirasek, A; Blackmore, E; Hoehr, C; Schaffer, P; Trinczek, M; Sossi, V

    2014-08-15

    Uveal melanoma is a rare and deadly tumour of the eye with primary metastases in the liver resulting in an 8% 2-year survival rate upon detection. Large growths, or those in close proximity to the optic nerve, pose a particular challenge to the commonly employed eye-sparing technique of eye-plaque brachytherapy. In these cases external beam charged particle therapy offers improved odds in avoiding catastrophic side effects such as neuropathy or blindness. Since 1995, the British Columbia Cancer Agency in partnership with the TRIUMF national laboratory have offered proton therapy in the treatment of difficult ocular tumors. Having seen 175 patients, yielding 80% globe preservation and 82% metastasis free survival as of 2010, this modality has proven to be highly effective. Despite this success, there have been few studies into the use of the world's largest cyclotron in patient care. Here we describe first efforts of modeling the TRIUMF dose delivery system using the FLUKA Monte Carlo package. Details on geometry, estimating beam parameters, measurement of primary dose and simulation of PET isotope production are discussed. Proton depth dose in both modulated and pristine beams is successfully simulated to sub-millimeter precision in range (within limits of measurement) and 2% agreement to measurement within in a treatment volume. With the goal of using PET signals for in vivo dosimetry (alignment), a first look at PET isotope depth distribution is presented — comparing favourably to a naive method of approximating simulated PET slice activity in a Lucite phantom.

  13. Jefferson Lab Hall A Beamline Instrumentation and Calibration for GMP experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Thir Narayan

    2015-10-01

    The nucleon electromagnetic form factors characterize the distributions of electric charge and magnetization current inside the nucleon and thus reflect the internal structure determined by Quantum Chromodynamics. The GMp experiment is a first experiment run in Hall A at Jefferson Lab after the upgrade to double the beam energy with the goal to precisely measure electron-proton elastic cross section in the Q2 range of 7 to 17 GeV2 with an accuracy of better than 2%; several time better than existing data at the highest Q2. In order to achieve this accuracy, a determination of the accumulated beam charge of better than 0.5% is required. The new 12 GeV beamline was commissioned during the spring of 2015, with the main instrumentation consisting of beam charge and position monitors. In this talk, the procedures and the results of the calibrations of these beamline components will be presented.

  14. Design, fabrication and test of the steering magnet for the KOMAC beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Bo-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    The Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) is operating a 100-MeV proton linac. The beamline facility of the KOMAC has both a 20-MeV beam and a 100-MeV beam for users. Steering magnets are added to the beamlines to adjust the position of the beam on the target. The uniformity and the harmonics of the magnetic field are computed by using the Poisson code, and the integrated magnetic field is computed by using the CST EM Studio. The designed magnets were fabricated, and the field's uniformity and the integrated field were measured. The designed and fabricated steering magnets were characterized, and the results are presented in this paper. The results are expected to improve the beam performance, in particular, accurate delivery to the target.

  15. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Dagenhart, William K.; Haselton, Halsey H.; Stirling, William L.; Whealton, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  16. Beamline smoothing of the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Zhao, S.

    1995-06-01

    This paper outlines a general beamline smoothing concept based on the use of First Principle Component analysis. Bean-dine smoothing is commonly used for the detection of blunders in the positioning of beam elements and to provide a smooth particle beam path with the fewest adjustments to individual beam components. It also provides the data for assessment of the achieved positioning quality.

  17. The APS beamline front end vacuum system

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, R.W.

    1993-10-15

    This report discusses the design of the vacuum system for the advanced photon source beamline front ends. Included in this report are discussions on: vacuum calculations, the differential pump; front end vacuum set points; cleaning methods and agents; and continuing and completed research and development.

  18. MSFC ESL Facility and Beamline Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. R.; Hyers, R. W.; Rathz, T. J.; Robinson, M. B.; Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Woo, G. L.; Fountain, G.; Huie, D.; Allen, T.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The poster presentation provides an overview of the MSFC ESL facility. The technical capabilities and accomplishments of the facility are summarized. Future plans including the development of a pressurized processing chamber and additional high-energy X-ray beamline studies are outlined.

  19. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Cortina Gil, E; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities.

  20. Precision Measurement of the Proton Flux in Primary Cosmic Rays from Rigidity 1 GV to 1.8 TV with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Aisa, D; Alpat, B; Alvino, A; Ambrosi, G; Andeen, K; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bigongiari, G; Bindi, V; Bizzaglia, S; Bizzarri, M; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Borsini, S; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Cascioli, V; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cerreta, D; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, H; Cheng, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Cortina Gil, E; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Di Masso, L; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Donnini, F; Du, W J; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Eline, A; Eppling, F J; Eronen, T; Fan, Y Y; Farnesini, L; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Fiasson, A; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Gillard, W; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guandalini, C; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Haas, D; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Kossakowski, R; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Levi, G; Li, H L; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Y; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, H; Lolli, M; Lomtadze, T; Lu, M J; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Müller, M; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Obermeier, A; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Papi, A; Pauluzzi, M; Pedreschi, E; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Piluso, A; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Postaci, E; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Sbarra, C; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Scolieri, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shan, Y H; Shi, J Y; Shi, X Y; Shi, Y M; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Spada, F; Spinella, F; Sun, W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, C P; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vaurynovich, S; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, R S; Wang, X; Wang, Z X; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xie, M; Xie, S; Xiong, R Q; Xin, G M; Xu, N S; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Ye, Q H; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, J H; Zhang, M T; Zhang, X B; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P; Zurbach, C

    2015-05-01

    A precise measurement of the proton flux in primary cosmic rays with rigidity (momentum/charge) from 1 GV to 1.8 TV is presented based on 300 million events. Knowledge of the rigidity dependence of the proton flux is important in understanding the origin, acceleration, and propagation of cosmic rays. We present the detailed variation with rigidity of the flux spectral index for the first time. The spectral index progressively hardens at high rigidities. PMID:25978222

  1. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) Slicing Undulator Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Heimann, P. A.; Glover, T. E.; Plate, D.; Brown, V. C.; Padmore, H. A.; Lee, H. J.; Schoenlein, R. W.

    2007-01-19

    A beamline optimized for the bunch slicing technique has been construction at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). This beamline includes an in-vacuum undulator, soft and hard x-ray beamlines and a femtosecond laser system. The soft x-ray beamline may operate in spectrometer mode, where an entire absorption spectrum is accumulated at one time, or in monochromator mode. The femtosecond laser system has a high repetition rate of 20 kHz to improve the average slicing flux. The performance of the soft x-ray branch of the ALS slicing undulator beamline will be presented.

  2. Human factors design for the BMIT biomedical beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. Denise; Wysokinski, Tomasz W.; Belev, George; Chapman, L. Dean

    2013-03-01

    Operation of a biomedical beamline poses a unique set of operational and instrumentation challenges for a synchrotron facility. From proper handling and care of live animals and animal tissues, to a user community drawn primarily from the medical and veterinary realms, the work of a biomedical beamline is unique when compared to other beamlines. At the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamlines at Canadian Light Source (CLS), operation of the beamlines is geared towards our user community of medical personnel, in addition to basic science researchers. Human factors considerations have been incorporated wherever possible on BMIT, including in the design of software and hardware, as well as ease-of-use features of beamline control stations and experiment hutches. Feedback from users continues to drive usability improvements to beamline operations.

  3. Proton Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... nucleus is surrounded by electrons. In proton therapy, beams of fast-moving protons are used to destroy ... atoms to release proton, neutron, and helium ion beams. In this highly specialized form of radiosurgery , proton ...

  4. Investigating the Cherenkov light lateral distribution function for primary proton and iron nuclei in extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rubaiee, A. A.; Hashim, U.; Al-Douri, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The lateral distribution function (LDF) of Cherenkov radiation in extensive air showers (EAS) was simulated by CORSIKA program for the conditions of Yakutsk Cherenkov array at the high energy range (1013-1016) eV for two primary particles (p and Fe) for different zenith angles. By depending on Breit-Wigner function for analyzing of Cherenkov light LDF, a parameterization of Cherenkov light LDF was reconstructed by depending on CORSIKA simulation as a function of primary energy. The comparison between the estimated Cherenkov light LDF with the LDF that measured on the Yakutsk EAS array gives the ability of particle identification that initiated the shower and determination of particle's energy around the knee region. The extrapolation of approximated Cherenkov light LDF for energies 20 and 30 PeV was obtained for primary particles (p and Fe).

  5. 1993 CAT workshop on beamline optical designs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    An Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) Workshop on Beamline Optical Designs was held at Argonne National Laboratory on July 26--27, 1993. The goal of this workshop was to bring together experts from various synchrotron sources to provide status reports on crystal, reflecting, and polarizing optics as a baseline for discussions of issues facing optical designers for CAT beamlines at the APS. Speakers from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the University of Chicago, the National Synchrotron Light Source, and the University of Manchester (England) described single- and double-crystal monochromators, mirrors, glass capillaries, and polarizing optics. Following these presentations, the 90 participants divided into three working groups: Crystal Optics Design, Reflecting Optics, and Optics for Polarization Studies. This volume contains copies of the presentation materials from all speakers, summaries of the three working groups, and a ``catalog`` of various monochromator designs.

  6. An Updated AP2 Beamline TURTLE Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, M.; O'Day, S.

    1991-08-23

    This note describes a TURTLE model of the AP2 beamline. This model was created by D. Johnson and improved by J. Hangst. The authors of this note have made additional improvements which reflect recent element and magnet setting changes. The magnet characteristics measurements and survey data compiled to update the model will be presented. A printout of the actual TURTLE deck may be found in appendix A.

  7. Beryllium window for an APS diagnostics beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Yang, B.X.; Sharma, Y.S.

    1997-09-01

    A beryllium (Be) window for an Advanced Photon Source (APS) diagnostics beamline has been designed and built. The window, which has a double concave axisymmetrical profile with a thickness of 0.5 mm at the center, receives 160 W/mm{sup 2} (7 GeV/100 mA stored beam) from an undulator beam. The window design as well as thermal and thermomechanical analyses, including thermal buckling of the Be window, are presented.

  8. Shielding Calculations for NSLS-II Beamlines.

    SciTech Connect

    Job,P.K.; Casey, W.R.

    2008-04-13

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is in the process of designing a new Electron Synchrotron for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. This facility, called the 'National Synchrotron Light Source II' (NSLS-II), will provide x-ray radiation of ultra-high brightness and exceptional spatial and energy resolution. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. The project scope includes the design, construction, installation, and commissioning of the following accelerators: a 200 MeV linac, a booster accelerator operating from 200 MeV to 3.0 GeV, the storage ring which stores 500 mA current of electrons at an energy of 3.0 GeV and 56 beamlines for experiments. It is planned to operate the facility primarily in a top-off mode, thereby maintaining the maximum variation in stored beam current to < 1%. Because of the very demanding requirements for beam emittance and synchrotron radiation brilliance, the beam life-time is expected to be quite low, on the order of 2 hours. Each of the 56 beamlines will be unique in terms of the source properties and configuration. The shielding designs for five representative beamlines are discussed in this paper.

  9. LUCIA, a microfocus soft XAS beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flank, A.-M.; Cauchon, G.; Lagarde, P.; Bac, S.; Janousch, M.; Wetter, R.; Dubuisson, J.-M.; Idir, M.; Langlois, F.; Moreno, T.; Vantelon, D.

    2006-05-01

    The beamline "LUCIA" (line for ultimate characterization by imaging and absorption) is a "tender" (0.8-8 keV) X-ray microprobe with capabilities for chemical speciation by micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS) and for elemental mapping by X-ray micro-fluorescence (μ-XRF). It allows the possibility to study heterogeneous samples at a micrometer scale and to combine these two element-specific and non-destructive techniques. A monochromatic beam of a few micrometer in size is incident on a sample which is mounted on a scanning x-y-z stage. μ-XRF shows the location of the elements, their relative abundances, and their association with other elements. One can take advantage of the monochromatic beam which allows separating out different elements by their absorption edges. After mapping the fluorescence, spots of interest can be analysed by XAS to determine the speciation (local chemistry, quantitative determination of the local geometric structure around the absorbing atom) of the elements and how they depend on the different components. Installed at first at the SLS of the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland), the LUCIA beamline will be transferred to SOLEIL by the beginning of 2008. The energy range offered by the beamline corresponds to the best performances of SLS and SOLEIL in terms of brightness. It allows XAS experiments at the K edge of elements ranging from Na to Fe, L edges from Ni to Gd, and M edges of rare earths and actinides.

  10. Primary events in the blue light sensor plant cryptochrome: intraprotein electron and proton transfer revealed by femtosecond spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Immeln, Dominik; Weigel, Alexander; Kottke, Tilman; Pérez Lustres, J Luis

    2012-08-01

    Photoreceptors are chromoproteins that undergo fast conversion from dark to signaling states upon light absorption by the chromophore. The signaling state starts signal transduction in vivo and elicits a biological response. Therefore, photoreceptors are ideally suited for analysis of protein activation by time-resolved spectroscopy. We focus on plant cryptochromes which are blue light sensors regulating the development and daily rhythm of plants. The signaling state of these flavoproteins is the neutral radical of the flavin chromophore. It forms on the microsecond time scale after light absorption by the oxidized state. We apply here femtosecond broad-band transient absorption to early stages of signaling-state formation in a plant cryptochrome from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Transient spectra show (i) subpicosecond decay of flavin-stimulated emission and (ii) further decay of signal until 100 ps delay with nearly constant spectral shape. The first decay (i) monitors electron transfer from a nearby tryptophan to the flavin and occurs with a time constant of τ(ET) = 0.4 ps. The second decay (ii) is analyzed by spectral decomposition and occurs with a characteristic time constant τ(1) = 31 ps. We reason that hole transport through a tryptophan triad to the protein surface and partial deprotonation of tryptophan cation radical hide behind τ(1). These processes are probably governed by vibrational cooling. Spectral decomposition is used together with anisotropy to obtain the relative orientation of flavin and the final electron donor. This narrows the number of possible electron donors down to two tryptophans. Structural analysis suggests that a set of histidines surrounding the terminal tryptophan may act as proton acceptor and thereby stabilize the radical pair on a 100 ps time scale.

  11. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS

    PubMed Central

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L.; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; LaMarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F.; Orville, Allen M.; Robinson, Howard H.; Roessler, Christian G.; Schneider, Dieter K.; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M.; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S.; Sweet, Robert M.; Berman, Lonny E.

    2014-01-01

    Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community. PMID:24763654

  12. Macromolecular crystallography beamline X25 at the NSLS.

    PubMed

    Héroux, Annie; Allaire, Marc; Buono, Richard; Cowan, Matthew L; Dvorak, Joseph; Flaks, Leon; Lamarra, Steven; Myers, Stuart F; Orville, Allen M; Robinson, Howard H; Roessler, Christian G; Schneider, Dieter K; Shea-McCarthy, Grace; Skinner, John M; Skinner, Michael; Soares, Alexei S; Sweet, Robert M; Berman, Lonny E

    2014-05-01

    Beamline X25 at the NSLS is one of the five beamlines dedicated to macromolecular crystallography operated by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Macromolecular Crystallography Research Resource group. This mini-gap insertion-device beamline has seen constant upgrades for the last seven years in order to achieve mini-beam capability down to 20 µm × 20 µm. All major components beginning with the radiation source, and continuing along the beamline and its experimental hutch, have changed to produce a state-of-the-art facility for the scientific community.

  13. Design of Beamline BL9 at Saga Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Tooru; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Kamada, Masao; Nishio, Mitsuhiro; Guo, Qixin; Masuda, Masataka; Motooka, Teruaki; Kondo, Yuzi; Hayashida, Kazuki; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Okajima, Toshihiro

    2007-01-19

    Saga Light Source (SAGA-LS), which has been constructed at Tosu city in Saga prefecture, is a compact synchrotron light source with storage electron energy of 1.4 GeV. A new beamline for the development of advanced materials and processing has been designed, and is now under construction at BL9 of SAGA-LS. This beamline is one of the three bending magnet beamlines (BL9, BL12, and BL15) constructed by Saga Prefectural Government. In this paper, we describe the design and the expected optical performance of the beamline BL9 at SAGA-LS.

  14. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R.; Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. |; Castro, J.R. ||

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  15. SASE3: soft x-ray beamline at European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Civita, Daniele; Gerasimova, Natalia; Sinn, Harald; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2014-09-01

    The European XFEL in Hamburg will be comprised of a linear accelerator and three Free-Electron-Laser beamlines (SASE1, SASE2 and SASE3) covering the energy range from 250 eV to 24 keV. It will provide up to 2700 pulses in trains of 600 microsecond duration at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. SASE3 beamline is the soft X-ray beamline (0.25 - 3 keV) and delivers photon pulses to SQS (Small Quantum System) and SCS (Spectroscopy & Coherent Scattering) experiments. The beamline is able to operate in both monochromatic and non-monochromatic mode. The latter provides the inherent FEL bandwidth at higher intensities. The beamline from photon source to experimental station is about 450 m long. The length of the beamline is related to the optics single-shotdamage issue. The almost diffraction-limited beam is propagated along the beamline with very long (up to 800 mm clear aperture), cooled (with eutectic bath) and super-polished (50 nrad RMS slope error and less than 3 nm PV residual height error) mirrors. The VLS-PG (variable line spacing - plane grating) monochromator covers the entire beamline energy range and its optical design is guided by the optimization of the energy resolving power, the minimization of the pulse broadening and the maximization of optics damage tolerance. Grating substrates are 530 mm long, eutectic cooled and present outstanding surface quality. The VLS parameters of the blazed profile are also a real challenge under manufacturing and measuring point of view. Adaptive optics in the horizontal (the second offset mirror) and vertical (monochromator premirror) plane are foreseen in the optical layout to increase the beamline tunability and to preserve the highly coherent beam properties. Beamline optical design, expected performance and also mechanical aspects of main beamline components are reported.

  16. APS beamline standard components handbook. Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that most Advanced Photon Source (APS) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) members would like to concentrate on designing specialized equipment related to their scientific programs rather than on routine or standard beamline components. Thus, an effort is in progress at the APS to identify standard and modular components of APS beamlines. Identifying standard components is a nontrivial task because these components should support diverse beamline objectives. To assist with this effort, the APS has obtained advice and help from a Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee consisting of experts in beamline design, construction, and operation. The staff of the Experimental Facilities Division identified various components thought to be standard items for beamlines, regardless of the specific scientific objective of a particular beamline. A generic beamline layout formed the basis for this identification. This layout is based on a double-crystal monochromator as the first optical element, with the possibility of other elements to follow. Pre-engineering designs were then made of the identified standard components. The Beamline Standardization and Modularization Committee has reviewed these designs and provided very useful input regarding the specifications of these components. We realize that there will be other configurations that may require special or modified components. This Handbook in its current version (1.1) contains descriptions, specifications, and pre-engineering design drawings of these standard components. In the future, the APS plans to add engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction.

  17. Functional description of APS beamline front ends

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzay, T.

    1993-02-01

    Traditional synchrotron sources were designed to produce bending magnet radiation and have proven to be an essential scientific tool. Currently, a new generation of synchrotron sources is being built that will be able to accommodate a large number of insertion device (ID) and high quality bending magnet (BM) sources. One example is the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory. The research and development effort at the APS is designed to fully develop the potential of this new generation of synchrotron sources. Of the 40 straight sections in the APS storage ring, 34 will be available for IDs. The remaining six sections are reserved for the storage ring hardware and diagnostics. Although the ring incorporates 80 BMs, only 40 of them can be used to extract radiation. The accelerator hardware shadows five of these 40 bending magnets, so the maximum number of BM sources on the lattice is 35. Generally, a photon beamline consists of four functional sections. The first section is the ID or the BM, which provides the radiation source. The second section, which is immediately outside the storage ring but inside a concrete shielding tunnel, is the front end, which is designed to control, define, and/or confine the x-ray beam. In the case of the APS, the front ends are designed to confine the photon beam. The third section, just outside the concrete shielding tunnel and on the experimental floor, is the first optics enclosure, which contains optics to filter and monochromatize the photon beam. The fourth section of a beamline consists of beam transports, additional optics, and experiment stations to do the scientific investigations. This document describes only the front ends of the APS beamlines.

  18. A Look at the AP2 Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Gollwitzer, Keith; /Fermilab

    2001-01-08

    Some recent work has been done to look at improvements of transporting beam from the Lithium Lens to the Debuncher. This work has been done using the beamline modeling tools developed by Dave McGinnis. These tools, console application P143 and optimization code running MAD repeatedly on the Beam Physics UNIX system, were first used to match the Twiss and dispersion parameters at the end of AP2 to the Debuncher. Imaginary trims were then added to AP2 to study where additional trims could be used to help with beam control in small aperture areas.

  19. Applications of bent cylindrical mirrors to x-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    Bent cylindrical mirrors are considered as substitutes for paraboloidal and ellipsoidal mirrors in x-ray beamlines. Analytic and raytracing studies are used to compare their optical performance with the corresponding ideal elements. Particular emphasis is placed on obtaining the practical limitations in the application of bent cylinders to typical beamline configurations.

  20. Medical research and multidisciplinary applications with laser-accelerated beams: the ELIMED netwotk at ELI-Beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, A.; Anzalone, A.; Candiano, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Korn, G.; Licciardello, T.; Maggiore, M.; Manti, L.; Margarone, D.; Musumarra, A.; Perozziello, F.; Pisciotta, P.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Romano, F. P.; Stancampiano, C.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Torrisi, L.; Tudisco, S.

    2014-04-01

    Laser accelerated proton beams represent nowadays an attractive alternative to the conventional ones and they have been proposed in different research fields. In particular, the interest has been focused in the possibility of replacing conventional accelerating machines with laser-based accelerators in order to develop a new concept of hadrontherapy facilities, which could result more compact and less expensive. With this background the ELIMED (ELIMED: ELI-Beamlines MEDical applications) research project has been launched by LNS-INFN researchers (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania, IT) and ASCR-FZU researchers (Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic-Fyzikální ústar, Prague, Cz), within the pan-European ELI-Beamlines facility framework. Its main purposes are the demonstration of future applications in hadrontherapy of optically accelerated protons and the realization of a laser-accelerated ion transport beamline for multidisciplinary applications. Several challenges, starting from laser-target interaction and beam transport development, up to dosimetric and radiobiological issues, need to be overcome in order to reach the final goals. The design and the realization of a preliminary beam handling and dosimetric system and of an advanced spectrometer for high energy (multi-MeV) laser-accelerated ion beams will be shortly presented in this work.

  1. G4beamline Particle Tracking in Matter Dominated Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    T.J. Roberts, K.B. Beard, S. Ahmed, D. Huang, D.M. Kaplan

    2011-03-01

    The G4beamline program is a useful and steadily improving tool to quickly and easily model beam lines and experimental equipment without user programming. It has both graphical and command-line user interfaces. Unlike most accelerator physics codes, it easily handles a wide range of materials and fields, being particularly well suited for the study of muon and neutrino facilities. As it is based on the Geant4 toolkit, G4beamline includes most of what is known about the interactions of particles with matter. We are continuing the development of G4beamline to facilitate its use by a larger set of beam line and accelerator developers. A major new feature is the calculation of space-charge effects. G4beamline is open source and freely available at http://g4beamline.muonsinc.com

  2. Beam characterization at the KAERI UED beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiniyaz, Sadiq; Kim, Hyun Woo; Baek, In-Hyung; Nam, Jinhee; Chae, MoonSik; Han, Byung-Heon; Gudkov, Boris; Jang, Kyu Ha; Park, Sunjeong; Jeong, Young Uk; Miginsky, Sergey; Vinokurov, Nikolay

    2016-09-01

    The UED (ultrafast electron diffraction) beamline of the KAERI's (the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's) WCI (World Class Institute) Center has been successfully commissioned. We have measured the beam emittance by using the quadrupole scan technique and the charge by using a novel measurement system we have developed. In the quadrupole scan, a larger drift distance between the quadrupole and the screen is preferred because it gives a better thin-lens approximation. A high bunch-charge beam, however, will undergo emittance growth in the long drift caused by the space-charge force. We present a method that mitigates this growth by introducing a quadrupole scan with a short drift and without using the thin-lens approximation. The quadrupole in this method is treated as a thick lens, and the emittance is extracted by using the thick-lens equations. Apart from being precise, our method can be readily applied without making any change to the beamline and has no need for a big drift space. For charge measurement, we have developed a system consisting of an in-air Faraday cup (FC) and a preamplifier. Tests performed utilizing 3.3-MeV electrons show that the system was able to measure bunches with pulse durations of tens of femtoseconds at 10 fC sensitivity.

  3. Diagnostics Beamline for the SRF Gun Project

    SciTech Connect

    T. Kamps; V. Durr; K. Goldammer; D. Kramer; P. Kuske; J. Kuszynski; D. Lipka; F. Marhauser; T. Quast; D. Richter; U. Lehnert; P. Michel; J. Teichert; P. Evtushenko; I. Will

    2005-08-22

    A superconducting radio-frequency photo electron injector (SRF gun) is currently under construction by a collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZR and MBI. The project aims at the design and setup of a CW SRF gun including a diagnostics beamline for the ELBE FEL and to address R&D issues on low emittance injectors for future light sources such as the BESSY FEL. Of critical importance for the injector performance is the control of the electron beam parameters. For this reason a compact diagnostics beamline is under development serving a multitude of operation settings ranging from low-charge (77pC), low-emittance (1 mm mrad) mode to high-charge (2.5nC) operation of the gun. For these operation modes beam dynamics simulations are resulting in boundary conditions for the beam instrumentation. Proven and mature technology is projected wherever possible, for example for current and beam position monitoring. The layout of the beam profile and emittance measurement systems is described. For the bunch length, which varies between 5 ps and 50 ps, two schemes using electro-optical sampling and Cherenkov radiation are detailed. The beam energy and energy spread is measured with a 180-degree spectrometer.

  4. Neutral beamline with improved ion energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jinchoon

    1984-01-01

    A neutral beamline employing direct energy recovery of unneutralized residual ions is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell, and thus improves the overall neutral beamline efficiency. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beam direction in the neutral izer exit region. The ions which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be loosely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell are reflected onto and collected at an interior wall of the neutralizer formed by the modified end geometry, and thus do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell. Electrons within the neutralizer are prevented from exiting the neutralizer end opening by the action of crossed fields drift (ExB) and are terminated to a collector collar around the downstream opening of the neutralizer. The correct combination of the extended neutralizer end structure and the magnet region is designed so as to maximize the exit of full energy ions and to contain the fractional energy ions.

  5. The mammography project at the SYRMEP beamline.

    PubMed

    Dreossi, D; Abrami, A; Arfelli, F; Bregant, P; Casarin, K; Chenda, V; Cova, M A; Longo, R; Menk, R-H; Quai, E; Quaia, E; Rigon, L; Rokvic, T; Sanabor, D; Tonutti, M; Tromba, G; Vascotto, A; Zanconati, F; Castelli, E

    2008-12-01

    A clinical program for X-ray phase contrast (PhC) mammography with synchrotron radiation (SR) has been started in March 2006 at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra, the SR facility in Trieste, Italy. The original beamline layout has been modified substantially and a clinical facility has been realized. In order to fulfill all security requirements, dedicated systems have been designed and implemented, following redundancy criteria and "fail safe" philosophy. Planar radiographic images are obtained by scanning simultaneously the patient and the detector through the stationary and laminar SR beam. In this first phase of the project a commercial screen-film system has been used as image receptor. Upon approval by the respective authorities, the mammography program is about half way to conclusion. Up to now about 50 patients have been examined. The patients are volunteers recruited by the radiologist after conventional examinations at the hospital resulted in an uncertain diagnosis. As an example one case of PhC SR mammography is shown and compared to conventional digital mammography. Preliminary analysis shows the high diagnostic quality of the PhC SR images that were acquired with equal or less delivered dose compared to the conventional ones. PMID:18617344

  6. Diagnostics for the LCLS Photoinjector Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Limborg-Deprey, C.; Dowell, D.; Schmerge, J.F.; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    Two spectrometers have been added to the LCLS photoinjector beamline. The first one will be located close to the exit of the Photoinjector RF gun. With this diagnostic, we will measure beam energy, energy spread (correlated and uncorrelated), possibly deleterious structure in the longitudinal phase space induced by longitudinal space charge force, and slice thermal emittance ... This extensive characterization of the 5MeV electron bunch will be made possible by combining this spectrometer with other diagnostics (YAG screens and Cerenkov Radiator). A second spectrometer located at the end of the beamline has been designed to characterize the 6 dimensional phase space of the 135MeV beam to be injected in the main accelerator. At that second spectrometer station, we will measure energy, energy spread (correlated and uncorrelated), longitudinal phase space, slice emittances ... Those last two measurements require using this spectrometer in combination with the transverse RF deflecting cavity and with the quadrupole scan emittance station. The designs of these two spectrometers have been supported by simulations from MAD and PARMELA.

  7. A heat transfer study for beamline components in high-power wiggler and undulator beamlines. Part I. Beam stops

    SciTech Connect

    Bedzyk, M. J.; Keeffe, M. J.; Schildkamp, W.; Shen, Q.

    1989-07-01

    The heat transfer capabilities of beam stops in CHESS wiggler and undulator beamlines is described. The thermal analysis for the design of these crucial in-vacuum beamline components is based on the use of a finite element analysis computer calculation and experimental heat loading tests.

  8. Antimicrobial agent triclosan is a proton ionophore uncoupler of mitochondria in living rat and human mast cells and in primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Weatherly, Lisa M; Shim, Juyoung; Hashmi, Hina N; Kennedy, Rachel H; Hess, Samuel T; Gosse, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial used widely in hospitals and personal care products, at ~10 mm. Human skin efficiently absorbs TCS. Mast cells are ubiquitous key players both in physiological processes and in disease, including asthma, cancer and autism. We previously showed that non-cytotoxic levels of TCS inhibit degranulation, the release of histamine and other mediators, from rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), and in this study, we replicate this finding in human mast cells (HMC-1.2). Our investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect led to the discovery that TCS disrupts adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in RBL-2H3 cells in glucose-free, galactose-containing media (95% confidence interval EC50 = 7.5-9.7 µm), without causing cytotoxicity. Using these same glucose-free conditions, 15 µm TCS dampens RBL-2H3 degranulation by 40%. The same ATP disruption was found with human HMC-1.2 cells (EC50 4.2-13.7 µm), NIH-3 T3 mouse fibroblasts (EC50 4.8-7.4 µm) and primary human keratinocytes (EC50 3.0-4.1 µm) all with no cytotoxicity. TCS increases oxygen consumption rate in RBL-2H3 cells. Known mitochondrial uncouplers (e.g., carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone) previously were found to inhibit mast cell function. TCS-methyl, which has a methyl group in place of the TCS ionizable proton, affects neither degranulation nor ATP production at non-cytotoxic doses. Thus, the effects of TCS on mast cell function are due to its proton ionophore structure. In addition, 5 µm TCS inhibits thapsigargin-stimulated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells: further evidence that TCS disrupts mast cell signaling. Our data indicate that TCS is a mitochondrial uncoupler, and TCS may affect numerous cell types and functions via this mechanism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26204821

  9. High-pressure beamline (PLANET) at the spallation neutron source, J-PARC (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagi, H.; Hattori, T.; Arima, H.; Utsumi, W. S.; Komatsu, K.; Nagai, T.; Yagi, T.

    2009-12-01

    Material and Life Science experimental Facility (MLF) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) will be one of the most powerful spallation neutron facilities in the world. The pulsed neutron source with a liquid Hg target is designed to be running at 25 Hz with a power of 1 MW. We have started the construction of the powder diffractometer dedicated to high-pressure experiments (PLANET) on BL-11. PLANET aims to study structures of hydrogen-bearing materials including dense hydrous minerals of the Earth’s deep interior, magmas and light element liquids. The instrument will realize diffraction and radiography experiments for powder and liquid/glass samples at high pressures up to 20 GPa and 2000 K using a large sized multi-anvil hydraulic press that can apply forces of ˜1500 ton. The instrument views a decoupled liquid H2 moderator with a cross section of 100 × 100 mm2. The primary and secondary fight paths are 25 m and 1.5 m, respectively. The 11.5-m-long supermirror guide with elliptical shape starts at a distance of 11.5 m from the moderator. Design of elliptical geometry is optimized by means of incorporating several different grade mirrors and linear approximation with planar guide in order to save cost for production without degradation of the intensity performance. The guide has a rectangular cross-section and consists of four walls coated with supermirror material. Sample is placed at 2 m from the guide exit. The 90° detectors will be installed at 1.5 m from the sample position. For the powder diffraction measurements using a multi-anvil press, an incident neutron beam passes through the vertical anvil gaps and irradiates the sample in the pressure medium. Diffracted neutrons go through the other anvil gaps at 90° direction. Half inch 3He linear position sensitive detectors with 600 mm length will be arranged horizontally and form these detector banks, which cover the scattering angle of 79° ≤ 2θ ≤ 101° and -35° ≤ Φ ≤ +35°. The

  10. Advanced beamline automation for biological crystallography experiments.

    PubMed

    Cork, Carl; O'Neill, James; Taylor, John; Earnest, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    An automated crystal-mounting/alignment system has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and has been installed on three of the protein-crystallography experimental stations at the Advanced Light Source (ALS); it is currently being implemented at synchrotron crystallography beamlines at CHESS, NSLS and the APS. The benefits to using an automounter system include (i) optimization of the use of synchrotron beam time, (ii) facilitation of advanced data-collection techniques, (iii) collection of higher quality data, (iv) reduction of the risk to crystals and (v) exploration of systematic studies of experimental protocols. Developments on the next-generation automounter with improvements in robustness, automated alignment and sample tracking are under way, with an end-to-end data-flow process being developed to allow remote data collection and monitoring. PMID:16855300

  11. Phase-space analysis and experimental results for secondary focusing at X-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Rong; Meron, Mati; Kujala, Naresh; Barrea, Raul A.

    2011-11-17

    Micro-focusing optical devices at synchrotron beamlines usually have a limited acceptance, but more flux can be intercepted if such optics are used to focus secondary sources created by the primary optics. Flux throughput can be maximized by placing the secondary focusing optics close to or exactly at the secondary source position. However, standard methods of beamline optics analysis, such as the lens equation or matching the mirror surface to an ellipse, work poorly when the source-to-optics distance is very short. In this paper the general characteristics of the focusing of beams with Gaussian profiles by a 'thin lens' are analysed under the paraxial approximation in phase space, concluding that the focusing of a beam with a short source-to-optics distance is distinct from imaging the source; slope errors are successfully included in all the formulas so that they can be used to calculate beamline focusing with good accuracy. A method is also introduced to use the thin-lens result to analyse the micro-focusing produced by an elliptically bent trapezoid-shaped Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror. The results of this analysis are in good agreement with ray-tracing simulations and are confirmed by the experimental results of the secondary focusing at the 18-ID Bio-CAT beamline (at the APS). The result of secondary focusing carried out at 18-ID using a single-bounce capillary can also be explained using this phase-space analysis. A discussion of the secondary focusing results is presented at the end of this paper.

  12. Primary proton and helium spectra in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, J. C.; Ogata, T.; Saito, T.; Holynski, R.; Jurak, A.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Parnell, T. A.; Jones, W. V.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of proton and helium spectra have been made in the energy range 10 to the 12th to 10 to the 14th eV. Large area thin emulsion calorimeters were used in the Japanese American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment balloon flight series. Power indices of the integral spectra for both nuclei are consistent with published data at lower energies. Absolute intensities are also consistent for helium and proton fluxes with extrapolations of previous data. No steepening of the proton spectrum is indicated.

  13. Commissioning of a microprobe-XRF beamline (BL-16) on Indus-2 synchrotron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, M. K.; Gupta, P.; Sinha, A. K.; Garg, C. K.; Singh, A. K.; Kane, S. R.; Garg, S. R.; Lodha, G. S.

    2012-06-01

    We report commissioning of the microprobe-XRF beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron source. The beamline has been recently made operational and is now open for the user's experiments. The beamline comprises of Si(111) double crystal monochromator and Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing optics. The beamline covers wide photon energy range of 4 - 20 keV using both collimated and micro-focused beam modes. The design details and the first commissioning results obtained using this beamline are presented.

  14. Commissioning of a microprobe-XRF beamline (BL-16) on Indus-2 synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, M. K.; Gupta, P.; Sinha, A. K.; Garg, C. K.; Singh, A. K.; Kane, S. R.; Garg, S. R.; Lodha, G. S.

    2012-06-05

    We report commissioning of the microprobe-XRF beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron source. The beamline has been recently made operational and is now open for the user's experiments. The beamline comprises of Si(111) double crystal monochromator and Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing optics. The beamline covers wide photon energy range of 4 - 20 keV using both collimated and micro-focused beam modes. The design details and the first commissioning results obtained using this beamline are presented.

  15. Design of a large acceptance, high efficiency energy selection system for the ELIMAIA beam-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, F.; Maggiore, M.; Andó, L.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Gallo, G.; Korn, G.; Leanza, R.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.

    2016-08-01

    A magnetic chicane based on four electromagnetic dipoles is going to be realized by INFN-LNS to be used as an Energy Selection System (ESS) for laser driven proton beams up to 300 MeV and C6+ up to 70 MeV/u. The system will provide, as output, ion beams with a contrallable energy spread varying from 5% up to 20% according to the aperture slit size. Moreover, it has a very wide acceptance in order to ensure a very high transmission efficiency and, in principle, it has been designed to be used also as an active energy modulator. This system is the core element of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and Multidisciplinary applications) beam transport, dosimetry and irradiation line that will be developed by INFN-LNS (It) and installed at the ELI-Beamlines facility in Prague (Cz). ELIMED will be the first user's open transport beam-line where a controlled laser-driven ion beam will be used for multidisciplinary research. The definition of well specified characteristics, both in terms of performance and field quality, of the magnetic chicane is crucial for the system realization, for the accurate study of the beam dynamics and for the proper matching with the Permanent Magnet Quadrupoles (PMQs) used as a collection system already designed. Here, the design of the magnetic chicane is described in details together with the adopted solutions in order to realize a robust system form the magnetic point of view. Moreover, the first preliminary transport simulations are also described showing the good performance of the whole beam line (PMQs+ESS).

  16. Proton therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... direction of the tumor. A machine called a synchrotron or cyclotron creates and speeds up the protons. ... redness in the radiation area, and temporary hair loss. AFTER THE PROCEDURE Following proton therapy, you should ...

  17. Proton radiography and tomography with application to proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Allinson, N M; Evans, P M

    2015-01-01

    Proton radiography and tomography have long promised benefit for proton therapy. Their first suggestion was in the early 1960s and the first published proton radiographs and CT images appeared in the late 1960s and 1970s, respectively. More than just providing anatomical images, proton transmission imaging provides the potential for the more accurate estimation of stopping-power ratio inside a patient and hence improved treatment planning and verification. With the recent explosion in growth of clinical proton therapy facilities, the time is perhaps ripe for the imaging modality to come to the fore. Yet many technical challenges remain to be solved before proton CT scanners become commonplace in the clinic. Research and development in this field is currently more active than at any time with several prototype designs emerging. This review introduces the principles of proton radiography and tomography, their historical developments, the raft of modern prototype systems and the primary design issues. PMID:26043157

  18. Enantioselective Protonation

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Justin T.; Hong, Allen Y.; Stoltz, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Enantioselective protonation is a common process in biosynthetic sequences. The decarboxylase and esterase enzymes that effect this valuable transformation are able to control both the steric environment around the proton acceptor (typically an enolate) and the proton donor (typically a thiol). Recently, several chemical methods to achieve enantioselective protonation have been developed by exploiting various means of enantiocontrol in different mechanisms. These laboratory transformations have proven useful for the preparation of a number of valuable organic compounds. PMID:20428461

  19. Moly99 Production Facility: Report on Beamline Components, Requirements, Costs

    SciTech Connect

    Bishofberger, Kip A.

    2015-12-23

    In FY14 we completed the design of the beam line for the linear accelerator production design concept. This design included a set of three bending magnets, quadrupole focusing magnets, and octopoles to flatten the beam on target. This design was generic and applicable to multiple different accelerators if necessary. In FY15 we built on that work to create specifications for the individual beam optic elements, including power supply requirements. This report captures the specification of beam line components with initial cost estimates for the NorthStar production facility.This report is organized as follows: The motivation of the beamline design is introduced briefly, along with renderings of the design. After that, a specific list is provided, which accounts for each beamline component, including part numbers and costs, to construct the beamline. After that, this report details the important sections of the beamline and individual components. A final summary and list of follow-on activities completes this report.

  20. Optical pseudomotors for soft x-ray beamlines.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, P; Sics, I; Sorrentino, A; Pereiro, E; Aballe, L; Foerster, M; Pérez-Dieste, V; Escudero, C; Nicolas, J

    2016-05-01

    Optical elements of soft x-ray beamlines usually have motorized translations and rotations that allow for the fine alignment of the beamline. This is to steer the photon beam at some positions and to correct the focus on slits or on sample. Generally, each degree of freedom of a mirror induces a change of several parameters of the beam. Inversely, several motions are required to actuate on a single optical parameter, keeping the others unchanged. We define optical pseudomotors as combinations of physical motions of the optical elements of a beamline, which allow modifying one optical parameter without affecting the others. We describe a method to obtain analytic relationships between physical motions of mirrors and the corresponding variations of the beam parameters. This method has been implemented and tested at two beamlines at ALBA, where it is used to control the focus of the photon beam and its position independently.

  1. A hard X-ray nanoprobe beamline for nanoscale microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Winarski, Robert P.; Holt, Martin V.; Rose, Volker; Fuesz, Peter; Carbaugh, Dean; Benson, Christa; Shu, Deming; Kline, David; Stephenson, G. Brian; McNulty, Ian; Maser, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline (or Nanoprobe Beamline) is an X-ray microscopy facility incorporating diffraction, fluorescence and full-field imaging capabilities designed and operated by the Center for Nanoscale Materials and the Advanced Photon Source at Sector 26 of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility was constructed to probe the nanoscale structure of biological, environmental and material sciences samples. The beamline provides intense focused X-rays to the Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (or Nanoprobe) which incorporates Fresnel zone plate optics and a precision laser sensing and control system. The beamline operates over X-ray energies from 3 to 30 keV, enabling studies of most elements in the periodic table, with a particular emphasis on imaging transition metals. PMID:23093770

  2. Synchrotron X-ray Optics Testing at Beamline 1-BM at the Advanced Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrander, Albert; Kujala, Naresh

    2014-03-01

    Beamline 1-BM at the Advanced Photon Source has been reconfigured, in part for testing of synchrotron optics with both monochromatic and white beams. Monochromatic energies between 6 and 30 keV are available. Primary agendas include both white beam and monochromatic beam topography, Talbot grating interferometry for measurement of coherence lengths and wavefronts, and micro-focusing. Recent examples will include topography of sapphire , tests of Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors, and tests of multilayer Laue lenses. Analyzers for Inelastic X-ray Scattering has also been characterized by two user groups. Supported from U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Contract No. DE-AC-02-06CH11357.

  3. Proton channel models

    PubMed Central

    Pupo, Amaury; Baez-Nieto, David; Martínez, Agustín; Latorre, Ramón; González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are integral membrane proteins with the capacity to permeate elementary particles in a voltage and pH dependent manner. These proteins have been found in several species and are involved in various physiological processes. Although their primary topology is known, lack of details regarding their structures in the open conformation has limited analyses toward a deeper understanding of the molecular determinants of their function and regulation. Consequently, the function-structure relationships have been inferred based on homology models. In the present work, we review the existing proton channel models, their assumptions, predictions and the experimental facts that support them. Modeling proton channels is not a trivial task due to the lack of a close homolog template. Hence, there are important differences between published models. This work attempts to critically review existing proton channel models toward the aim of contributing to a better understanding of the structural features of these proteins. PMID:24755912

  4. ALS beamlines for independent investigators: A summary of the capabilities and characteristics of beamlines at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    There are two mods of conducting research at the ALS: To work as a member of a participating research team (PRT). To work as a member of a participating research team (PRT); to work as an independent investigator; PRTs are responsible for building beamlines, end stations, and, in some cases, insertion devices. Thus, PRT members have privileged access to the ALS. Independent investigators will use beamline facilities made available by PRTs. The purpose of this handbook is to describe these facilities.

  5. Beamline Insertions Manager at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael C.

    2015-09-01

    The beam viewer system at Jefferson Lab provides operators and beam physicists with qualitative and quantitative information on the transverse electron beam properties. There are over 140 beam viewers installed on the 12 GeV CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes an upgrade consisting of replacing the EPICS-based system tasked with managing all viewers with a mixed system utilizing EPICS and high-level software. Most devices, particularly the beam viewers, cannot be safely inserted into the beam line during high-current beam operations. Software is partly responsible for protecting the machine from untimely insertions. The multiplicity of beam-blocking and beam-vulnerable devices motivates us to try a data-driven approach. The beamline insertions application components are centrally managed and configured through an object-oriented software framework created for this purpose. A rules-based engine tracks the configuration and status of every device, along with the beam status of the machine segment containing the device. The application uses this information to decide on which device actions are allowed at any given time.

  6. Ion Prostate Irradiation (IPI) – a pilot study to establish the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to physical characteristics, ions like protons or carbon ions can administer the dose to the target volume more efficiently than photons since the dose can be lowered at the surrounding normal tissue. Radiation biological considerations are based on the assumption that the α/β value for prostate cancer cells is 1.5 Gy, so that a biologically more effective dose could be administered due to hypofractionation without increasing risks of late effects of bladder (α/β = 4.0) and rectum (α/β = 3.9). Methods/Design The IPI study is a prospective randomized phase II study exploring the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique. The study is designed to enroll 92 patients with localized prostate cancer. Primary aim is the assessment of the safety and feasibility of the study treatment on the basis of incidence grade III and IV NCI-CTC-AE (v. 4.02) toxicity and/or the dropout of the patient from the planned therapy due to any reason. Secondary endpoints are PSA-progression free survival (PSA-PFS), overall survival (OS) and quality-of-life (QoL). Discussion This pilot study aims at the evaluation of the safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in prostate cancer patients in an active beam technique. Additionally, the safety results will be compared with Japanese results recently published for carbon ion irradiation. Due to the missing data of protons in this hypofractionated scheme, an in depth evaluation of the toxicity will be created to gain basic data for a following comparison study with carbon ion irradiation. Trial registration Clinical Trial Identifier: NCT01641185 (clinicaltrials.gov) PMID:24641841

  7. Diamond beamline I07: a beamline for surface and interface diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nicklin, Chris; Arnold, Tom; Rawle, Jonathan; Warne, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Beamline I07 at Diamond Light Source is dedicated to the study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces for a wide range of sample types, from soft matter to ultrahigh vacuum. The beamline operates in the energy range 8-30 keV and has two endstations. The first houses a 2+3 diffractometer, which acts as a versatile platform for grazing-incidence techniques including surface X-ray diffraction, grazing-incidence small- (and wide-) angle X-ray scattering, X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. A method for deflecting the X-rays (a double-crystal deflector) has been designed and incorporated into this endstation, extending the surfaces that can be studied to include structures formed on liquid surfaces or at liquid-liquid interfaces. The second experimental hutch contains a similar diffractometer with a large environmental chamber mounted on it, dedicated to in situ ultrahigh-vacuum studies. It houses a range of complementary surface science equipment including a scanning tunnelling microscope, low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ensuring that correlations between the different techniques can be performed on the same sample, in the same chamber. This endstation allows accurate determination of well ordered structures, measurement of growth behaviour during molecular beam epitaxy and has also been used to measure coherent X-ray diffraction from nanoparticles during alloying. PMID:27577783

  8. Diamond beamline I07: a beamline for surface and interface diffraction.

    PubMed

    Nicklin, Chris; Arnold, Tom; Rawle, Jonathan; Warne, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Beamline I07 at Diamond Light Source is dedicated to the study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces for a wide range of sample types, from soft matter to ultrahigh vacuum. The beamline operates in the energy range 8-30 keV and has two endstations. The first houses a 2+3 diffractometer, which acts as a versatile platform for grazing-incidence techniques including surface X-ray diffraction, grazing-incidence small- (and wide-) angle X-ray scattering, X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. A method for deflecting the X-rays (a double-crystal deflector) has been designed and incorporated into this endstation, extending the surfaces that can be studied to include structures formed on liquid surfaces or at liquid-liquid interfaces. The second experimental hutch contains a similar diffractometer with a large environmental chamber mounted on it, dedicated to in situ ultrahigh-vacuum studies. It houses a range of complementary surface science equipment including a scanning tunnelling microscope, low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ensuring that correlations between the different techniques can be performed on the same sample, in the same chamber. This endstation allows accurate determination of well ordered structures, measurement of growth behaviour during molecular beam epitaxy and has also been used to measure coherent X-ray diffraction from nanoparticles during alloying.

  9. Diamond beamline I07: a beamline for surface and interface diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Nicklin, Chris; Arnold, Tom; Rawle, Jonathan; Warne, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Beamline I07 at Diamond Light Source is dedicated to the study of the structure of surfaces and interfaces for a wide range of sample types, from soft matter to ultrahigh vacuum. The beamline operates in the energy range 8–30 keV and has two endstations. The first houses a 2+3 diffractometer, which acts as a versatile platform for grazing-incidence techniques including surface X-ray diffraction, grazing-incidence small- (and wide-) angle X-ray scattering, X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction. A method for deflecting the X-rays (a double-crystal deflector) has been designed and incorporated into this endstation, extending the surfaces that can be studied to include structures formed on liquid surfaces or at liquid–liquid interfaces. The second experimental hutch contains a similar diffractometer with a large environmental chamber mounted on it, dedicated to in situ ultrahigh-vacuum studies. It houses a range of complementary surface science equipment including a scanning tunnelling microscope, low-energy electron diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ensuring that correlations between the different techniques can be performed on the same sample, in the same chamber. This endstation allows accurate determination of well ordered structures, measurement of growth behaviour during molecular beam epitaxy and has also been used to measure coherent X-ray diffraction from nanoparticles during alloying. PMID:27577783

  10. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users’ Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center

    PubMed Central

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  11. Phase Space Generation for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams for External Users' Applications at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center.

    PubMed

    Tessonnier, Thomas; Marcelos, Tiago; Mairani, Andrea; Brons, Stephan; Parodi, Katia

    2015-01-01

    In the field of radiation therapy, accurate and robust dose calculation is required. For this purpose, precise modeling of the irradiation system and reliable computational platforms are needed. At the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT), the beamline has been already modeled in the FLUKA Monte Carlo (MC) code. However, this model was kept confidential for disclosure reasons and was not available for any external team. The main goal of this study was to create efficiently phase space (PS) files for proton and carbon ion beams, for all energies and foci available at HIT. PSs are representing the characteristics of each particle recorded (charge, mass, energy, coordinates, direction cosines, generation) at a certain position along the beam path. In order to achieve this goal, keeping a reasonable data size but maintaining the requested accuracy for the calculation, we developed a new approach of beam PS generation with the MC code FLUKA. The generated PSs were obtained using an infinitely narrow beam and recording the desired quantities after the last element of the beamline, with a discrimination of primaries or secondaries. In this way, a unique PS can be used for each energy to accommodate the different foci by combining the narrow-beam scenario with a random sampling of its theoretical Gaussian beam in vacuum. PS can also reproduce the different patterns from the delivery system, when properly combined with the beam scanning information. MC simulations using PS have been compared to simulations, including the full beamline geometry and have been found in very good agreement for several cases (depth dose distributions, lateral dose profiles), with relative dose differences below 0.5%. This approach has also been compared with measured data of ion beams with different energies and foci, resulting in a very satisfactory agreement. Hence, the proposed approach was able to fulfill the different requirements and has demonstrated its capability for application to

  12. X-ray Microscopy Beamlines at SSRF--Present Status and Future Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H.; Yu, X.; Tai, R.

    2011-09-09

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) is a 3.5-GeV third-generation light source. The facility has been open for user experiments since May, 2009. This high-brightness x-ray source is an ideal platform for x-ray microscopy. Presently, SSRF has three beamlines related to x-ray microscopy or imaging, namely the soft x-ray spectromicroscopy beamline (STXM), the hard x-ray microfocusing beamline, and the x-ray imaging beamline. The construction of SSRF phase-II beamlines will be carried out during 2011-2017. Seven additional beamlines for x-ray microscopy or imaging will be built.

  13. Proton Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, Uwe

    Proton therapy is one of the most rapidly developing new treatment technologies in radiation oncology. This treatment approach has — after roughly 40 years of technical developments — reached a mature state that allows a widespread clinical application. We therefore review the basic physical and radio-biological properties of proton beams. The main physical aspect is the elemental dose distribution arising from an infinitely narrow proton pencil beam. This includes the physics of proton stopping powers and the concept of CSDA range. Furthermore, the process of multiple Coulomb scattering is discussed for the lateral dose distribution. Next, the basic terms for the description of radio-biological properties of proton beams like LET and RBE are briefly introduced. Finally, the main concepts of modern proton dose delivery concepts are introduced before the standard method of inverse treatment planning for hadron therapy is presented.

  14. A beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Padmore, H.A.; Earnest, T.; Kim, S.H.; Thompson, A.C.; Robinson, A.L.

    1994-08-01

    A beamline for macromolecular crystallography has been designed for the ALS. The source will be a 37-pole wiggler with a, 2-T on-axis peak field. The wiggler will illuminate three beamlines, each accepting 3 mrad of horizontal aperture. The central beamline will primarily be used for multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion measurements in the wavelength range from 4 to 0.9 {angstrom}. The beamline optics will comprise a double-crystal monochromator with a collimating pre-mirror and a double-focusing mirror after the monochromator. The two side stations will be used for fixed-wavelength experiments within the wavelength range from 1.5 to 0.95 {angstrom}. The optics will consist of a conventional vertically focusing cylindrical mirror followed by an asymmetrically cut curved-crystal monochromator. This paper presents details of the optimization of the wiggler source for crystallography, gives a description of the beamline configuration, and discusses the reasons for the choices made.

  15. 08B1-1: an automated beamline for macromolecular crystallography experiments at the Canadian Light Source.

    PubMed

    Fodje, Michel; Grochulski, Pawel; Janzen, Kathryn; Labiuk, Shaunivan; Gorin, James; Berg, Russ

    2014-05-01

    Beamline 08B1-1 is a recently commissioned bending-magnet beamline at the Canadian Light Source. The beamline is designed for automation and remote access. Together with the undulator-based beamline 08ID-1, they constitute the Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility. This paper describes the design, specifications, hardware and software of beamline 08B1-1. A few scientific results using data obtained at the beamline will be highlighted.

  16. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  17. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, M.; Ali Cavasonza, L.; Alpat, B.; Ambrosi, G.; Arruda, L.; Attig, N.; Aupetit, S.; Azzarello, P.; Bachlechner, A.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Barrin, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Basara, L.; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S.; Battarbee, M.; Battiston, R.; Bazo, J.; Becker, U.; Behlmann, M.; Beischer, B.; Berdugo, J.; Bertucci, B.; Bindi, V.; Boella, G.; de Boer, W.; Bollweg, K.; Bonnivard, V.; Borgia, B.; Boschini, M. J.; Bourquin, M.; Bueno, E. F.; Burger, J.; Cadoux, F.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caroff, S.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cernuda, I.; Cervelli, F.; Chae, M. J.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, A. I.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Cheng, L.; Chou, H. Y.; Choumilov, E.; Choutko, V.; Chung, C. H.; Clark, C.; Clavero, R.; Coignet, G.; Consolandi, C.; Contin, A.; Corti, C.; Coste, B.; Creus, W.; Crispoltoni, M.; Cui, Z.; Dai, Y. M.; Delgado, C.; Della Torre, S.; Demirköz, M. B.; Derome, L.; Di Falco, S.; Dimiccoli, F.; Díaz, C.; von Doetinchem, P.; Dong, F.; Donnini, F.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Egorov, A.; Eline, A.; Eronen, T.; Feng, J.; Fiandrini, E.; Finch, E.; Fisher, P.; Formato, V.; Galaktionov, Y.; Gallucci, G.; García, B.; García-López, R. J.; Gargiulo, C.; Gast, H.; Gebauer, I.; Gervasi, M.; Ghelfi, A.; Giovacchini, F.; Goglov, P.; Gómez-Coral, D. M.; Gong, J.; Goy, C.; Grabski, V.; Grandi, D.; Graziani, M.; Guerri, I.; Guo, K. H.; Habiby, M.; Haino, S.; Han, K. C.; He, Z. H.; Heil, M.; Hoffman, J.; Hsieh, T. H.; Huang, H.; Huang, Z. C.; Huh, C.; Incagli, M.; Ionica, M.; Jang, W. Y.; Jinchi, H.; Kang, S. C.; Kanishev, K.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, K. S.; Kirn, Th.; Konak, C.; Kounina, O.; Kounine, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Krafczyk, M. S.; La Vacca, G.; Laudi, E.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, H. T.; Lee, S. C.; Leluc, C.; Li, H. S.; Li, J. Q.; Li, J. Q.; Li, Q.; Li, T. X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. H.; Li, Z. Y.; Lim, S.; Lin, C. H.; Lipari, P.; Lippert, T.; Liu, D.; Liu, Hu; Lu, S. Q.; Lu, Y. S.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Luo, F.; Luo, J. Z.; Lv, S. S.; Majka, R.; Mañá, C.; Marín, J.; Martin, T.; Martínez, G.; Masi, N.; Maurin, D.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meng, Q.; Mo, D. C.; Morescalchi, L.; Mott, P.; Nelson, T.; Ni, J. Q.; Nikonov, N.; Nozzoli, F.; Nunes, P.; Oliva, A.; Orcinha, M.; Palmonari, F.; Palomares, C.; Paniccia, M.; Pauluzzi, M.; Pensotti, S.; Pereira, R.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Pilo, F.; Pizzolotto, C.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Poireau, V.; Putze, A.; Quadrani, L.; Qi, X. M.; Qin, X.; Qu, Z. Y.; Räihä, T.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rapin, D.; Ricol, J. S.; Rodríguez, I.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rozhkov, A.; Rozza, D.; Sagdeev, R.; Sandweiss, J.; Saouter, P.; Schael, S.; Schmidt, S. M.; Schulz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Seo, E. S.; Shan, B. S.; Shi, J. Y.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Song, J. W.; Sun, W. H.; Tacconi, M.; Tang, X. W.; Tang, Z. C.; Tao, L.; Tescaro, D.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tomassetti, N.; Torsti, J.; Türkoǧlu, C.; Urban, T.; Vagelli, V.; Valente, E.; Vannini, C.; Valtonen, E.; Vázquez Acosta, M.; Vecchi, M.; Velasco, M.; Vialle, J. P.; Vitale, V.; Vitillo, S.; Wang, L. Q.; Wang, N. H.; Wang, Q. L.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, Z. X.; Wei, C. C.; Weng, Z. L.; Whitman, K.; Wienkenhöver, J.; Willenbrock, M.; Wu, H.; Wu, X.; Xia, X.; Xiong, R. Q.; Xu, W.; Yan, Q.; Yang, J.; Yang, M.; Yang, Y.; Yi, H.; Yu, Y. J.; Yu, Z. Q.; Zeissler, S.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J. H.; Zhang, S. D.; Zhang, S. W.; Zhang, Z.; Zheng, Z. M.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zhukov, V.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, N.; Zuccon, P.; AMS Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49 ×1 05 antiproton events and 2.42 ×1 09 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the antiproton p ¯, proton p , and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e- flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ˜60 to ˜500 GV , the (p ¯/p ), (p ¯/e+), and (p /e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  18. Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, M; Ali Cavasonza, L; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M J; Chang, Y H; Chen, A I; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Cheng, L; Chou, H Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K C; He, Z H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T H; Huang, H; Huang, Z C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G N; Kim, K S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H T; Lee, S C; Leluc, C; Li, H S; Li, J Q; Li, J Q; Li, Q; Li, T X; Li, W; Li, Z H; Li, Z Y; Lim, S; Lin, C H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S Q; Lu, Y S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J Z; Lv, S S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X M; Qin, X; Qu, Z Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E S; Shan, B S; Shi, J Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J W; Sun, W H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X W; Tang, Z C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L Q; Wang, N H; Wang, Q L; Wang, X; Wang, X Q; Wang, Z X; Wei, C C; Weng, Z L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y J; Yu, Z Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J H; Zhang, S D; Zhang, S W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z M; Zhu, Z Q; Zhuang, H L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-08-26

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×10^{5} antiproton events and 2.42×10^{9} proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p[over ¯], proton p, and positron e^{+} fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e^{-} flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p[over ¯]/p), (p[over ¯]/e^{+}), and (p/e^{+}) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos. PMID:27610839

  19. Far-Infrared Beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billinghurst, Brant E.; May, Tim E.

    2014-06-01

    The far-infrared beamline at the Canadian Light Source is a state of the art user facility, which offers significantly more far-infrared brightness than conventional globar sources. The infrared radiation is collected from a bending magnet through a 55 X 37 mrad2 port to a Bruker IFS 125 HR spectrometer, which is equipped with a nine compartment scanning arm, allowing it to achieve spectral resolution better than 0.001 cm-1. Currently the beamline can achieve signal to noise ratios up to 8 times that which can be achieved using a traditional thermal source. This talk will provide an overview of the the beamline, and the capabilities available to users, recent and planned improvements including the addition of a Glow Discharge cell and advances in Coherent Synchrotron Radiation. Furthermore, the process of acquiring access to the facility will be covered.

  20. Status and evolution of the ESRF beamline ID19

    SciTech Connect

    Weitkamp, Timm; Tafforeau, Paul; Boller, Elodie; Cloetens, Peter; Valade, Jean-Paul; Bernard, Pascal; Baruchel, Jose; Peyrin, Francoise; Helfen, Lukas

    2010-04-06

    The ESRF synchrotron beamline ID19, dedicated to full-field parallel-beam imaging techniques such as phase-contrast and absorption microtomography and X-ray topography, is one of the most versatile instruments of its kind. This paper presents key characteristics of ID19 in its present form, names examples for research and development performed on the beamline, and outlines the plans for an upgrade on the beamline in coming years, to adapt to the growing needs of the user community. The technical goals envisioned include an increase in available beam size and maximum photon energy, and a substantial increase in flux density for applications using beams of small and intermediate size.

  1. Status and evolution of the ESRF beamline ID19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitkamp, Timm; Tafforeau, Paul; Boller, Elodie; Cloetens, Peter; Valade, Jean-Paul; Bernard, Pascal; Peyrin, Françoise; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Helfen, Lukas; Baruchel, José

    2010-04-01

    The ESRF synchrotron beamline ID19, dedicated to full-field parallel-beam imaging techniques such as phase-contrast and absorption microtomography and X-ray topography, is one of the most versatile instruments of its kind. This paper presents key characteristics of ID19 in its present form, names examples for research and development performed on the beamline, and outlines the plans for an upgrade on the beamline in coming years, to adapt to the growing needs of the user community. The technical goals envisioned include an increase in available beam size and maximum photon energy, and a substantial increase in flux density for applications using beams of small and intermediate size.

  2. Distributed control of protein crystallography beamline 5.0 using CORBA

    SciTech Connect

    Timossi, Chris

    1999-09-24

    The Protein Crystallography Beamline at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source is a facility that is being used to solve the structure of proteins. The software that is being used to control this beamline uses Java for user interface applications which communicate via CORBA with workstations that control the beamline hardware. We describe the software architecture for the beamline and our experiences after two years of operation.

  3. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  4. APS beamline standard components handbook, Version 1. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, U.; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-02-01

    This Handbook in its current version (1.3) contains descriptions, specifications, and preliminary engineering design drawings for many of the standard components. The design status and schedules have been provided wherever possible. In the near future, the APS plans to update engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components and complete the Handbook. The completed version of this Handbook will become available to both the CATs and potential vendors. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction.

  5. The Materials Science beamline upgrade at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, P. R.; Meister, D.; Leake, S. J.; Lange, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Böge, M.; Calvi, M.; Cancellieri, C.; Casati, N.; Cervellino, A.; Chen, Q.; David, C.; Flechsig, U.; Gozzo, F.; Henrich, B.; Jäggi-Spielmann, S.; Jakob, B.; Kalichava, I.; Karvinen, P.; Krempasky, J.; Lüdeke, A.; Lüscher, R.; Maag, S.; Quitmann, C.; Reinle-Schmitt, M. L.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, B.; Streun, A.; Vartiainen, I.; Vitins, M.; Wang, X.; Wullschleger, R.

    2013-01-01

    The Materials Science beamline at the Swiss Light Source has been operational since 2001. In late 2010, the original wiggler source was replaced with a novel insertion device, which allows unprecedented access to high photon energies from an undulator installed in a medium-energy storage ring. In order to best exploit the increased brilliance of this new source, the entire front-end and optics had to be redesigned. In this work, the upgrade of the beamline is described in detail. The tone is didactic, from which it is hoped the reader can adapt the concepts and ideas to his or her needs. PMID:23955029

  6. Kinematic mounting systems for NSLS beamlines and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Oversluizen, T.; Stoeber, W.; Johnson, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for kinematically mounting equipment are well established, but applications at synchrotron radiation facilities are subject to constraints not always encountered in more traditional laboratory settings. Independent position adjustment of beamline components can have significant benefits in terms of minimizing time spent aligning, and maximizing time spent acquiring data. In this paper, we use examples taken from beamlines at the NSLS to demonstrate approaches for optimization of the reproducibility, stability, excursion, and set-up time for various situations. From our experience, we extract general principles which we hope will be useful for workers at other synchrotron radiation facilities. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Proton interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    Energetic proton beams may provide an attractive alternative when compared to electromagnetic and neutron beams for active interrogation of nuclear threats because: they have large fission cross sections, long mean free paths and high penetration, and proton beams can be manipulated with magnetic optics. We have measured time-dependent cross sections for delayed neutrons and gamma-rays using the 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for a set of bare and shielded targets. The results show significant signals from both unshielded and shielded nuclear materials. Results will be presented.

  8. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Benjamin S

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  9. Double-crystal monochromator as the first optical element in BESSRC-CAT beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Beno, M.A.; Ramanathan, M.

    1996-09-01

    The first optical element in the BESSRC-CAT beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source will be a monochromator, so that a standard design for this critical component is advantageous. The monochromator we have designed is a double-crystal, fixed-exit scheme with a constant offset designed for UHV operation, thereby allowing windowless operation of the beamlines. The crystals are mounted on a turntable with the first crystal at the center of rotation. A mechanical linkage is used to correctly position the second crystal and maintain a constant offset. The main drive for the rotary motion is provided by a vacuum-compatible Huber goniometer isolated from the main vacuum chamber. Rotary motion of the primary monochromator stage is accomplished by using two adjacent vacuum chambers connected only by the small annular opening around a hollow stainless steel shaft, which connects the Huber goniometer to the turntable on which the crystals are mounted. The design of the monochromator is such that it can accommodate both water and liquid nitrogen cooling for the crystal optics. The basic design for the monochromator linkage mechanism will be presented along with details of the monochromator chamber. The results of initial optical tests of the monochromator system using tilt sensors and a precision autocollimator will also be given. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-01

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  11. Beamline Control and Instrumentation System using Industrial Interface Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Enz, F.

    2010-06-23

    How should a beamline be designed, which satisfies the needs and requirements of scientists and is easy to build and operate? Today, most control and instrumentation systems for beamlines are based on scientific requirements. Scientific details of the beamline, e.g. vacuum and beam physics details; are usually extensively described. However, control system specifications are often reduced to few requirements, e.g. which beam-related device to use. Lots of these systems work perfectly from the physicist's point of view, but are hard to bring into service and operate and difficult to extend with additional equipment. To overcome this, the engineering company ENZ has developed components using industrial standard interfaces to guarantee high flexibility for equipment extension. Using special interface boards and galvanic isolation offers increased stability of motion control axes. This saves resources during commissioning and service. A control system was developed and installed at a Soft-X-ray beamline at ASP Melbourne. It is operated under EPICs on distributed embedded IOC's based on PC-hardware. Motion and vacuum systems, measurement devices, e.g. a Low-Current Monitor (LoCuM) for beam position monitoring, and parts of the equipment protection system were developed and most of them tested in cooperation with DELTA at the Technical University of Dortmund.

  12. A synchrotron beamline for delivering high purity vacuum ultraviolet photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavasso Filho, R. L.; Homen, M. G. P.; Fonseca, P. T.; Naves de Brito, A.

    2007-11-01

    We report on the current status and performance of the toroidal grating monochromator beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron). This beamline provides photons in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray regions from 12to330eV with three interchangeable gratings. We report on the improvement, which allows the possibility of choosing the light polarization degree from linear to almost circular. Here, we also describe the development of a new apparatus, namely, the mirror-inserted harmonic attenuator and calibrating-device with a long length (MIRHACLLE). All beamlines based on diffraction gratings suffer from the problem of high harmonics contaminations to some extent. The MIRHACLLE provides a way to efficiently suppress high harmonics from 25% to 1ppm in a grazing incidence bending magnet beamline. Its principle of operation relays on the absorption of the high energy photons in a gas phase region. It allows negligible high harmonics contamination for photon energies ranging from 12eV to the gas first ionization threshold, 21.6eV, in the case of neon. We also demonstrate the possibility to use this device for energy calibration and resolution evaluation together with any experiment needing its filtering capabilities. The device is also very cost effective compared to other filters presented previously in the literature.

  13. Nuclear resonant scattering beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mooney, T.M.; Toellner, T.; Sturhahn, W.

    1993-09-01

    The principal and engineering aspects of a dedicated synchrotron radiation beamline under construction at the Advanced Photon Source for nuclear resonant scattering purposes are explained. The expected performance in terms of isotopes to be studied, flux, and timing properties is discussed.

  14. Aberration analysis calculations for synchrotron radiation beamline design

    SciTech Connect

    McKinney, W.R.; Howells, M.; Padmore, H.A.

    1997-09-01

    The application of ray deviation calculations based on aberration coefficients for a single optical surface for the design of beamline optical systems is reviewed. A systematic development is presented which allows insight into which aberration may be causing the rays to deviate from perfect focus. A new development allowing analytical calculation of line shape is presented.

  15. The High Energy Materials Science Beamline (HEMS) at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schell, Norbert; King, Andrew; Beckmann, Felix; Ruhnau, Hans-Ulrich; Kirchhof, René; Kiehn, Rüdiger; Müller, Martin; Schreyer, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    The HEMS Beamline at the German high-brilliance synchrotron radiation storage ring PETRA III is fully tunable between 30 and 250 keV and optimized for sub-micrometer focusing. Approximately 70 % of the beamtime will be dedicated to Materials Research. Fundamental research will encompass metallurgy, physics and chemistry with first experiments planned for the investigation of the relationship between macroscopic and micro-structural properties of polycrystalline materials, grain-grain-interactions, and the development of smart materials or processes. For this purpose a 3D-microsctructure-mapper has been designed. Applied research for manufacturing process optimization will benefit from high flux in combination with ultra-fast detector systems allowing complex and highly dynamic in-situ studies of micro-structural transformations, e.g. during welding processes. The beamline infrastructure allows accommodation of large and heavy user provided equipment. Experiments targeting the industrial user community will be based on well established techniques with standardized evaluation, allowing full service measurements, e.g. for tomography and texture determination. The beamline consists of a five meter in-vacuum undulator, a general optics hutch, an in-house test facility and three independent experimental hutches working alternately, plus additional set-up and storage space for long-term experiments. HEMS is under commissioning as one of the first beamlines running at PETRA III.

  16. Canadian macromolecular crystallography facility: a suite of fully automated beamlines.

    PubMed

    Grochulski, Pawel; Fodje, Michel; Labiuk, Shaunivan; Gorin, James; Janzen, Kathryn; Berg, Russ

    2012-06-01

    The Canadian light source is a 2.9 GeV national synchrotron radiation facility located on the University of Saskatchewan campus in Saskatoon. The small-gap in-vacuum undulator illuminated beamline, 08ID-1, together with the bending magnet beamline, 08B1-1, constitute the Canadian Macromolecular Crystallography Facility (CMCF). The CMCF provides service to more than 50 Principal Investigators in Canada and the United States. Up to 25% of the beam time is devoted to commercial users and the general user program is guaranteed up to 55% of the useful beam time through a peer-review process. CMCF staff provides "Mail-In" crystallography service to users with the highest scored proposals. Both beamlines are equipped with very robust end-stations including on-axis visualization systems, Rayonix 300 CCD series detectors and Stanford-type robotic sample auto-mounters. MxDC, an in-house developed beamline control system, is integrated with a data processing module, AutoProcess, allowing full automation of data collection and data processing with minimal human intervention. Sample management and remote monitoring of experiments is enabled through interaction with a Laboratory Information Management System developed at the facility.

  17. The Nanoscience Beamline (I06) at Diamond Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Dhesi, S. S.; Cavill, S. A.; Potenza, A.; Marchetto, H.; Mott, R. A.; Steadman, P.; Peach, A.; Shepherd, E. L.; Ren, X.; Wagner, U. H.; Reininger, R.

    2010-06-23

    The Nanoscience beamline (I06) is one of seven Diamond Phase-I beamlines which has been operational since January 2007 delivering polarised soft x-rays, for a PhotoEmission Electron Microscope (PEEM) and branchline, in the energy range 80-2100 eV. The beamline is based on a collimated plane grating monochromator with sagittal focusing elements, utilising two APPLE II helical undulator sources, and has been designed for high flux density at the PEEM sample position. A {approx}5 {mu}m ({sigma}) diameter beam is focussed onto the sample in the PEEM allowing a range of experiments using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) as contrast mechanisms. The beamline is also equipped with a branchline housing a 6T superconducting magnet for XMCD and XMLD experiments. The magnet is designed to move on and off the branchline which allows a diverse range of experiments.

  18. Neutral beamline with improved ion-energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dagenhart, W.K.; Haselton, H.H.; Stirling, W.L.; Whealton, J.H.

    1981-04-13

    A neutral beamline generator with unneutralized ion energy recovery is provided which enhances the energy recovery of the full energy ion component of the beam exiting the neutralizer cell of the beamline. The unneutralized full energy ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected from the beam path and the electrons in the cell are blocked by a magnetic field applied transverse to the beamline in the cell exit region. The ions, which are generated at essentially ground potential and accelerated through the neutralizer cell by a negative acceleration voltage, are collected at ground potential. A neutralizer cell exit end region is provided which allows the magnetic and electric fields acting on the exiting ions to be closely coupled. As a result, the fractional energy ions exiting the cell with the full energy ions are reflected back into the gas cell. Thus, the fractional energy ions do not detract from the energy recovery efficiency of full energy ions exiting the cell which can reach the ground potential interior surfaces of the beamline housing.

  19. Beam Instrumentation of the PXIE LEBT Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    D'Arcy, R.; Hanna, B.; Prost, L.; Scarpine, v.; Shemyakin, A.

    2015-06-01

    The PXIE accelerator [1] is the front-end test stand of the proposed Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) [2] initiative: a CW-compatible pulsed H- superconducting RF linac upgrade to Fermilab’s injection system. The PXIE Ion Source and Low-Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) section are designed to create and transfer a 1-10 mA $H^{-}$ beam, in either pulsed (0.001–16 ms) or DC mode, from the ion source through to the injection point of the RFQ. This paper discusses the range of diagnostic tools – Allison-type Emittance Scanner, Faraday Cup, Toroid, DCCT, electrically isolated diaphragms – involved in the commissioning of the beam line and preparation of the beam for injection into the RFQ.

  20. Preliminary measurements on the new TOF system installed at the AMS beamline of INFN-LABEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, L.; Castelli, L.; Czelusniak, C.; Fedi, M. E.; Giuntini, L.; Liccioli, L.; Mandò, P. A.; Martini, M.; Mazzinghi, A.; Ruberto, C.; Schiavulli, L.; Sibilia, E.; Taccetti, F.

    2015-10-01

    A high resolution time of flight (TOF) system has been developed at LABEC, the 3 MV Tandem accelerator laboratory in Florence, in order to improve the sensitivity of AMS measurements on carbon samples with ultra-low concentration and also to measure other isotopes, such as 129I. The system can be employed to detect and identify residual interfering particles originated from the break-up of molecular isobars. The set-up has been specifically designed for low energy heavy ions: it consists of two identical time pick-off stations, each made up of a thin conductive foil and a Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) multiplier. The beamline is also equipped with a silicon detector, installed downstream the stop TOF station. In this paper the design of the new system and the implemented readout electronics are presented. The tests performed on the single time pick-off station are reported: they show that the maximum contribution to the timing resolution given by both the intrinsic MCP resolution and the electronics is ⩽500 ps (FWHM). For these tests, single particle pulsed beams of 2-5 MeV protons and 10 MeV 12C3+ ions, to simulate typical AMS conditions, were used. The preliminary TOF and TOF-E (TOF-energy) measurements performed with carbon beams after the installation of the new system on the AMS beam line are also discussed. These measurements were performed using the foil-MCP as the start stage and a silicon detector as the stop stage. The spectra acquired with carbon ions suggest the presence of a small residual background from neighboring masses reaching the end of the beamline with the same energy as the rare isotope.

  1. The INE-Beamline for actinide science at ANKA

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, J.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Kienzler, B.; Loeble, M.; Metz, V.; Steppert, M.; Vitova, T.; Geckeis, H.; Butorin, S.; Seibert, A.; Walther, C.

    2012-04-15

    Since its inauguration in 2005, the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA (KIT North Campus) provides dedicated instrumentation for x-ray spectroscopic characterization of actinide samples and other radioactive materials. R and D work at the beamline focuses on various aspects of nuclear waste disposal within INE's mission to provide the scientific basis for assessing long-term safety of a final nuclear waste repository. The INE-Beamline is accessible for the actinide and radiochemistry community through the ANKA proposal system and the European Union Integrated Infrastructure Initiative ACTINET-I3. Experiments with activities up to 1 x 10{sup +6} times the European exemption limit are feasible within a safe but flexible containment concept. Measurements with monochromatic radiation are performed at photon energies varying between {approx}2.1 keV (P K-edge) and {approx}25 keV (Pd K-edge), including the lanthanide L-edges and the actinide M- and L3-edges up to Cf. The close proximity of the INE-Beamline to INE controlled area labs offers infrastructure unique in Europe for the spectroscopic and microscopic characterization of actinide samples. The modular beamline design enables sufficient flexibility to adapt sample environments and detection systems to many scientific questions. The well-established bulk techniques x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy in transmission and fluorescence mode have been augmented by advanced methods using a microfocused beam, including (confocal) XAFS/x-ray fluorescence detection and a combination of (micro-)XAFS and (micro-)x-ray diffraction. Additional instrumentation for high energy-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy has been successfully developed and tested.

  2. Beamline 9.3.2 - a high-resolution, bend-magnet beamline with circular polarization capability

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.2 is a high resolution, SGM beamline on an ALS bending magnet with access to photon energies from 30-1500 eV. Features include circular polarization capability, a rotating chamber platform that allows switching between experiments without breaking vacuum, an active feedback system that keeps the beam centered on the entrance slit of the monochromator, and a bendable refocusing mirror. The beamline optics consist of horizontally and vertically focussing mirrors, a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) with movable entrance and exit slits, and a bendable refocussing mirror. In addition, a movable aperature has been installed just upstream of the vertically focussing mirror which can select the x-rays above or below the plane of the synchrotron storage ring, allowing the user to select circularly or linearly polarized light. Circularly polarized x-rays are used to study the magnetic properties of materials. Beamline 9.3.2 can supply left and right circularly polarized x-rays by a computer controlled aperture which may be placed above or below the plane of the synchrotron storage ring. The degree of linear and circular polarization has been measured and calibrated.

  3. Diamond monochromators for APS undulator-A beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Blasdell, R.C.; Assoufid, L.A.; Mills, D.M.

    1995-09-01

    There has been considerable interest in the use of diamonds in high heat load monochromators (HHLMs) in the last several years. The superb thermal and mechanical properties of single crystal diamonds serve to minimize distortions caused by a given thermal load, while the low x-ray absorption cross-section reduces both the total power deposited in the crystal as well as the peak (volumetric) power density. The primary obstacle for the widespread use of diamonds at present is a lack of ready availability of perfect single crystals of the desired size and orientation. Although it is possible to obtain near-perfect natural diamonds of the size and orientation required for use on an undulator beamline, the selection process is generally one of trial and error. Near perfect synthetic diamonds can currently be obtained in the minimum necessary size (typically 4-5 mm on a side). A collaborative agreement has been made between the staff of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), and the Super Photon Ring-8 GeV (SPring-8) to explore the use of diamonds as high heat load monochromators and is on-going. One of the avenues of research is to push for improved perfection and size of synthetic diamonds. Sumitomo Electric Corporation of Japan has agreed to work with staff from SPring-8 to grow [100] oriented perfect single crystal diamonds of 10 x 10 x 1 mm{sup 3} size by 1996/1997 (from which one could also cut pieces with the large face parallel to the (111) planes). They have taken the first step in producing an essentially perfect 4 x 4 x 1 mm{sup 3} type II diamond with less than 5 {mu}rad (1 arc second) strain (measured over the entire surface). The authors believe progress in the production of synthetic diamonds, as well as improvement in ties with suppliers of natural diamonds, should make available a relatively large number of high quality diamonds of moderate size within the next several years.

  4. Conceptual Design of a Dedicated SAXS Beamline at NSRRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D. G.; Tseng, P. C.; Tsang, K. L.; Jeng, U.; Chang, C. H.; Fung, H. S.; Liu, C. Y.; Chung, S. C.; Tang, M. T.; Song, Y. F.; Liang, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    A dedicated small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) beamline using a new X-ray source generated by an In-Acromat superconducting wiggler (IASW6) insertion device is under construction at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC). The IASW6 with peak magnetic field of 3.1 T, magnet period of 6.1 cm, and total length of 96 cm, can provide a photon flux ˜ 1012 - 1013photons/s/0.1%bw in the energy range of 5 - 23 keV. Taking the central 0.2 mard horizontal radiation fan from the source with a beam divergence of 200 and 392 μrad in the vertical and horizontal directions, respectively, the dedicated SAXS beamline is oriented for nano to meso-structural research in soft matter, including liquid crystals, macromolecular solutions, polymers, as well as in nanoparticles, ceramic, and alloys. The SAXS beamline adopts the design of the double-monochromator used in the beamline SIYBLS at ALS, which integrates a Si(111) double crystal monochromator (DCM) and a Mo/B4C double multilayer monochromator (DMM) into one cradle for fast exchange between the two monochrmators. Equipped with a collimating mirror (CM) and a toroidal focusing mirror (FM) with 1:1 focusing ratio, this beamline provides two types of SAXS measurements: high-Q resolution and high flux, by using either the DCM or DMM. The SAXS beamline also provides energy scan with an energy resolution from 1 to 10 eV for anomalous SAXS (ASAXS) measurements. A specially coated reflecting mirror is also installed after FM to provide a suitable photon beam for grazing incident SAXS of liquid surfaces. Ray tracing simulation results show that at 8 keV and with DCM, a high quality photon beam of beam size (0.5 mm) and beam divergence (± 50 μrad) with a flux of ˜ 1011 photons/s can be obtained for high-Q resolution SAXS measurement. The photon flux can be increased by one order of magnitude when the DMM is used; however, the beam size and divergence are both slightly increased.

  5. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  6. The ID23-2 structural biology microfocus beamline at the ESRF

    PubMed Central

    Flot, David; Mairs, Trevor; Giraud, Thierry; Guijarro, Matias; Lesourd, Marc; Rey, Vicente; van Brussel, Denis; Morawe, Christian; Borel, Christine; Hignette, Olivier; Chavanne, Joel; Nurizzo, Didier; McSweeney, Sean; Mitchell, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The first phase of the ESRF beamline ID23 to be constructed was ID23-1, a tunable MAD-capable beamline which opened to users in early 2004. The second phase of the beamline to be constructed is ID23-2, a monochromatic microfocus beamline dedicated to macromolecular crystallography experiments. Beamline ID23-2 makes use of well characterized optical elements: a single-bounce silicon (111) monochromator and two mirrors in Kirkpatrick–Baez geometry to focus the X-ray beam. A major design goal of the ID23-2 beamline is to provide a reliable, easy-to-use and routine microfocus beam. ID23-2 started operation in November 2005, as the first beamline dedicated to microfocus macromolecular crystallography. The beamline has taken the standard automated ESRF macromolecular crystallography environment (both hardware and software), allowing users of ID23-2 to be rapidly familiar with the microfocus environment. This paper describes the beamline design, the special considerations taken into account given the microfocus beam, and summarizes the results of the first years of the beamline operation. PMID:20029119

  7. The crystallography beamline I711 at MAX II.

    PubMed

    Cerenius, Y; Ståhl, K; Svensson, L A; Ursby, T; Oskarsson, A; Albertsson, J; Liljas, A

    2000-07-01

    A new X-ray crystallographic beamline is operational at the MAX II synchrotron in Lund. The beamline has been in regular use since August 1998 and is used both for macro- and small molecule diffraction as well as powder diffraction experiments. The radiation source is a 1.8 T multipole wiggler. The beam is focused vertically by a bendable mirror and horizontally by an asymmetrically cut Si(111) monochromator. The wavelength range is 0.8-1.55 A with a measured flux at 1 A of more than 10(11) photons s(-1) in 0.3 mm x 0.3 mm at the sample position. The station is currently equipped with a Mar345 imaging plate, a Bruker Smart 1000 area CCD detector and a Huber imaging-plate Guinier camera. An ADSC 210 area CCD detector is planned to be installed during 2000. PMID:16609196

  8. Compact Double Multilayer Monochromator for SAXS Beamline at PLS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S. N.; Kim, M. J.; Lee, C. S.; Kim, J. H.; Koo, C. J.

    2007-01-19

    The DMM (Double Multilayer Monochromator) is one of the most important components to increase the efficiency of experiments in SAXS beamline. The DMM of SAXS beamline was consisted of x, z stages to decrease the alignment error and 6 movement systems to raise efficiency of adjustment. To determine the type of 1st mirror holder, we simulated heat-transfer and structural analysis with ANSYS code and confirmed the deformation and slope error of the mirror face. With rocking width and weighted standard deviation, we found the optimized results in the mirror systems. To cope with the high precise alignment of pitch and roll direction, CMM and interferometer (HP 5529A) were used. This equipment was installed on Feb, 2006.

  9. Using the Fermilab proton source for a muon to electron conversion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Bogert, D.; DeJongh, F.; Geer, S.; McGinnis, D.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2006-11-01

    The Fermilab proton source is capable of providing 8 GeV protons for both the future long-baseline neutrino program (NuMI), and for a new program of low energy muon experiments. In particular, if the 8 GeV protons are rebunched and then slowly extracted into an external beamline, the resulting proton beam would be suitable for a muon-to-electron conversion experiment designed to improve on the existing sensitivity by three orders of magnitude. We describe a scheme for the required beam manipulations. The scheme uses the Accumulator for momentum stacking, and the Debuncher for bunching and slow extraction. This would permit simultaneous operation of the muon program with the future NuMI program, delivering 10{sup 20} protons per year at 8 GeV for the muon program at the cost of a modest ({approx}10%) reduction in the protons available to the neutrino program.

  10. The Proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canal, Carlos Garcia; Sassot, Rodolfo

    2003-10-01

    In this talk we present a collection of selected topics concerning the structure of the proton and the fundamental interactions as seen inside it. These topics have been thoroughly covered by high energy experiments with ever increasing precision in recent years and beautifully illustrate our present knowledge of the standard model.

  11. Proton Radiobiology

    PubMed Central

    Tommasino, Francesco; Durante, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak), the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation) are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE), protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed. PMID:25686476

  12. An Undulator-Wiggler Beamline for Spectromicroscopy at SRC

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, R.; De Stasio, G.; Bissen, M.; Severson, M.

    2004-05-12

    A high-flux medium-energy-resolution beamline based on an existing insertion device is being constructed at SRC. The insertion device will be operated as an undulator up to {approx}400 eV and as a wiggler at higher energies. The beamline will be dedicated mainly to X-ray PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (X-PEEM) and will cover the energy range 75-2000 eV. The most relevant requirement for high-resolution and high-sensitivity X-PEEM is a high flux density on the sample surface. This will allow spatial resolutions on the order of a few nanometers, and a minimum detection limit on the order of 10 parts per million, using the already existing Spectromicroscope for PHotoelectron Imaging of Nanostructures with X-rays (SPHINX). To maximize the flux at the sample position, the beamline does not include an entrance slit and has only three optical elements on the beam path: an ellipsoidal mirror, a variable-line-spacing plane grating, and a re-focusing ellipsoidal mirror. The first ellipsoidal mirror provides the converging light to one of the three gratings needed to cover the beamline energy range. The position of the fixed exit slit is at the focus of the ellipsoidal mirror when the grating is tuned to zero order. The second ellipsoidal mirror demagnifies the beam at the exit slit plane by a factor of two. More than 1012 photons/s are expected at the sample position between 100 and 1200 eV onto a spot having a FWHM of 25 {mu}m vertical and 70 {mu}m horizontal at a resolving power of {approx}1000.

  13. An Undulator-Wiggler Beamline for Spectromicroscopy at SRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, R.; De Stasio, G.; Bissen, M.; Severson, M.

    2004-05-01

    A high-flux medium-energy-resolution beamline based on an existing insertion device is being constructed at SRC. The insertion device will be operated as an undulator up to ˜400 eV and as a wiggler at higher energies. The beamline will be dedicated mainly to X-ray PhotoElectron Emission spectroMicroscopy (X-PEEM) and will cover the energy range 75-2000 eV. The most relevant requirement for high-resolution and high-sensitivity X-PEEM is a high flux density on the sample surface. This will allow spatial resolutions on the order of a few nanometers, and a minimum detection limit on the order of 10 parts per million, using the already existing Spectromicroscope for PHotoelectron Imaging of Nanostructures with X-rays (SPHINX). To maximize the flux at the sample position, the beamline does not include an entrance slit and has only three optical elements on the beam path: an ellipsoidal mirror, a variable-line-spacing plane grating, and a re-focusing ellipsoidal mirror. The first ellipsoidal mirror provides the converging light to one of the three gratings needed to cover the beamline energy range. The position of the fixed exit slit is at the focus of the ellipsoidal mirror when the grating is tuned to zero order. The second ellipsoidal mirror demagnifies the beam at the exit slit plane by a factor of two. More than 1012 photons/s are expected at the sample position between 100 and 1200 eV onto a spot having a FWHM of 25 μm vertical and 70 μm horizontal at a resolving power of ˜1000.

  14. The Soft X-ray Spectromicroscopy Beamline at SSRF

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Z.; Tai, R.; Wand, Y.; Yan, R.; Chen, M.; Wu, Y.; Chen, J.; Xue, S.; Xu, H.

    2011-09-09

    Commissioning of the soft x-ray spectromicroscopy beanmline at SSRF was formally started on Dec 26, 2008. Beamline performance has reached or surpassed the designing goals according to the measurements by domestic experts, especially for its high energy resolution and high spatial resolution. Since its first operation by users on May 6, 2009, tens of experiments have been conducted, and some preliminary exciting results have been acquired.

  15. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  16. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, M.; Jordan, I.; Wörner, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids.

  17. Construction status of CXI beamline at PAL-XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaehyun; Nam, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Sangsoo; Kim, Bongsoo; Ko, In Soo; Cho, Moohyun

    2015-05-01

    Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray Free Electron Laser (PAL-XFEL) is a research facility currently under construction. It will provide ultra-bright (assuming 1 X 1012 photons/pulse at 12.4 keV) and ultra-short (10-60 femtosecond) X-ray pulses. The CXI (Coherent X-ray Imaging) end-station, which will be constructed for hard X-ray beamline at the PAL-XFEL, is designed to deliver brilliant hard x-rays (2-20 keV) and to measure diffraction signals with forward scattering geometry, mainly. Not only will it offer imaging studies of biological, chemical and physical samples by the "diffract-before-destroy" technique, but will also be helpful in high field hard x-ray physics and material science. The scientific programs are currently aimed at serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) for macromolecular systems and coherent diffraction imaging for bio specimens and nano structures etc. In this paper, we describe the details of the beamline layout, X-ray focusing optics (Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror and Beryllium CRLs) and sample delivery system (liquid jet/LCP sample injector, fixed target system) that will be installed at the CXI beamline.

  18. MERLIN - A meV Resolution Beamline at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, Ruben; Bozek, John; Chuang, Y.-D.; Howells, Malcolm; Kelez, Nicholas; Prestemon, Soren; Marks, Steve; Warwick, Tony; Hussain, Zahid; Jozwiak, Chris; Lanzara, Alessandra; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2007-01-19

    An ultra-high resolution beamline is being constructed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) for the study of low energy excitations in strongly correlated systems with the use of high-resolution inelastic scattering and angle-resolved photoemission. This new beamline, given the acronym Merlin (for meV resolution line), will cover the energy range 10-150 eV. The monochromator has fixed entrance and exit slits and a plane mirror that can illuminate a spherical grating at the required angle of incidence (as in the SX-700 mechanism). The monochromator can be operated in two different modes. In the highest resolution mode, the energy scanning requires translating the monochromator chamber (total travel 1.1 m) as well as rotating the grating and the plane mirror in front of the grating. The resolution in this mode is practically determined by the slits width. In the second mode, the scanning requires rotating the grating and the plane mirror. This mode can be used to scan a few eV without a significant resolution loss. The source for the beamline is a 1.9 m long, 90 mm period quasi periodic EPU. The expected flux at the sample is higher than 1011 photons/s at a resolving power of 5 x 104 in the energy range 16-130 eV. A second set of gratings can be used to obtain higher flux at the expense of resolution.

  19. SIBYLS - A SAXS and protein crystallography beamline at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Trame, Christine; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Padmore, Howard A.; Cambie, Daniella; Domning, Edward E.; Duarte, Robert M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Holton, James M.; Frankel, Kenneth; Tsutakawa, Susan; Tsuruta, Hiro; Tainer, John A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2003-08-22

    The new Structurally Integrated BiologY for Life Sciences (SIBYLS) beamline at the Advanced Light Source will be dedicated to Macromolecular Crystallography (PX) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). SAXS will provide structural information of macromolecules in solutions and will complement high resolution PX studies on the same systems but in a crystalline state. The x-ray source is one of the 5 Tesla superbend dipoles recently installed at the ALS that allows for a hard x-ray program to be developed on the relatively low energy Advanced Light Source (ALS) ring (1.9 GeV). The beamline is equipped with fast interchangeable monochromator elements, consisting of either a pair of single Si(111) crystals for crystallography, or a pair of multilayers for the SAXS mode data collection (E/{Delta}E {approx} 1/110). Flux rates with Si(111) crystals for PX are measured as 2 x 10{sup 11} hv/sec/400 mA through a 100 {micro}m pinhole at 12.4 KeV. For SAXS the flux is up to 3 x 10{sup 13} photons/sec at 10 KeV with all apertures open when using the multilayer monochromator elements. The performance characteristics of this unique beamline will be described.

  20. ADLIB—A simple database framework for beamline codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottershead, C. Thomas

    1993-12-01

    There are many well developed codes available for beamline design and analysis. A significant fraction of each of these codes is devoted to processing its own unique input language for describing the problem. None of these large, complex, and powerful codes does everything. Adding a new bit of specialized physics can be a difficult task whose successful completion makes the code even larger and more complex. This paper describes an attempt to move in the opposite direction, toward a family of small, simple, single purpose physics and utility modules, linked by an open, portable, public domain database framework. These small specialized physics codes begin with the beamline parameters already loaded in the database, and accessible via the handful of subroutines that constitute ADLIB. Such codes are easier to write, and inherently organized in a manner suitable for incorporation in model based control system algorithms. Examples include programs for analyzing beamline misalignment sensitivities, for simulating and fitting beam steering data, and for translating among MARYLIE, TRANSPORT, and TRACE3D formats.

  1. Attosecond beamline with actively stabilized and spatially separated beam paths.

    PubMed

    Huppert, M; Jordan, I; Wörner, H J

    2015-12-01

    We describe a versatile and compact beamline for attosecond spectroscopy. The setup consists of a high-order harmonic source followed by a delay line that spatially separates and then recombines the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) and residual infrared (IR) pulses. The beamline introduces a controlled and actively stabilized delay between the XUV and IR pulses on the attosecond time scale. A new active-stabilization scheme combining a helium-neon-laser and a white-light interferometer minimizes fluctuations and allows to control delays accurately (26 as rms during 1.5 h) over long time scales. The high-order-harmonic-generation region is imaged via optical systems, independently for XUV and IR, into an interaction volume to perform pump-probe experiments. As a consequence of the spatial separation, the pulses can be independently manipulated in intensity, polarization, and frequency content. The beamline can be combined with a variety of detectors for measuring attosecond dynamics in gases, liquids, and solids. PMID:26724005

  2. The Imaging and Coherence Beamline I13 at Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, C.; Wagner, U.; Pesic, Z.

    2011-09-09

    The coherence and imaging beamline I13 is dedicated to hard x-ray imaging on the micro- and nano-lengthscale, performing microscopy either in direct or reciprocal space. For both, lens-based and lensless imaging, two independent stations will be operated in a separate building at a distance of 250 m from the source. The imaging branch will perform in-line phase contrast imaging and tomography over a large field of view in the 6- to 35-keV energy range. In addition, it will be possible to switch to full-field microscopy with 50-nm spatial resolution. Other microscopies will be developed according to the scientific needs. Resolution beyond the limitations given by the detector and x-ray optics will be achieved with techniques working in the far field. Coherent x-ray diffraction (CXRD) and other coherent diffraction imaging techniques such as ptychography will also be implemented on the same 'coherence' branch. The beamline hosts a number of innovative features such as the so-called 'mini-beta' layout for electron optics in the storage ring or new concepts for beamline instrumentation. The stations will be operational in 2011.

  3. New fast closing shutter for the PETRA III beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, U.; Hesse, M.; Müller, S.; Peters, H.-B.; Timmann, B.; Wengler, R.; Zink, H.

    2008-03-01

    The conversion of the PETRA storage ring at the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) to the third generation synchrotron radiation light source PETRAIII [1] poses a challenge to the design of the beamline transport system. One of these challenges is to supply 14 beamlines and experiments windowless with the extremely collimated undulator radiation from the storage ring. The windowless connection includes the risk of accidental venting of the storage ring by experiments connected to the beamlines. To stop the inrush of such an accidental venting fast closing shutter (FCS) systems with closing times in the 10msec range are mandatory. The strong radiation background in the storage ring tunnel requires the installation of all metal valves. A new small fast closing shutter with an aperture of 40mm fitting to the strong collimated undulator beams and with a closing time < 10msec was developed. The all metal sealing principle achieves leak rates smaller than 10mbarl/sec. This leak rate of the fast closing shutter combined with a standard all metal valve prevents venting of the storage ring and the beam time losses for all users. The mechanical and electronic layouts as well as first experiences with the new fast closing shutter system developed for PETRAIII are presented.

  4. Upgrade of SPring-8 Beamline Network with VLAN Technology over Gigabit Ethernet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Miho

    The beamline network system at SPring-8 consists of three LANs; a BL-LAN for beamline component control, a BL-USER-LAN for beamline experimental users and an OA-LAN for the information services. These LANs are interconnected by a firewall system. Since the network traffic and the number of beamlines have increased, we upgraded the backbone of BL-USER-LAN from Fast Ethernet to Gigabit Ethernet. And then, to establish the independency of a beamline and to raise flexibility of every beamline, we also introduced the IEEE802.1Q Virtual LAN (VLAN) technology into the BL-USER-LAN. We discuss here a future plan to build the firewall system with hardware load balancers.

  5. MARS, a new beamline for radioactive matter studies at SOLEIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Schlutig, Sandrine; Hermange, Hervé; Sitaud, Bruno

    2009-11-01

    MARS (Multi Analyses on Radioactive Samples) beamline is the hard X-ray bending magnet beamline dedicated to the study of radioactive matter of the new French synchrotron SOLEIL. The beamline, which has been built thanks to a close partnership and support by the CEA, has been designed to provide X-rays in the energy range of 3.5 keV to 35 keV. This allows to encompass M and L absorption edges of actinides, as well as K edges of transition metals (that are present in alloys and fuel claddings) up to heavy halogens, rare gases and alkalis (fission products in nuclear fuels). The MARS project aims to extend the possibilities of synchrotron based X-ray characterizations towards a wider variety of radioactive elements and a wider variety of techniques than what is currently available at other facilities. Thus, its specific and innovative infrastructure has been optimized in order to carry out analyses on materials with activities up to 18.5 GBq per sample for α and β emitters and 2 GBq for γ and n emitters. So, today, more than 70 different elements and more than 350 different isotopes have been proposed for studies on the beamline by the involved user community. The arrangement of the different elements in the optics hutch is based on an original scheme which permits to have two alternative optical configurations (monochromatic or dispersive) depending on the nature of experiments to be performed. At least three main techniques are progressively being proposed on the three complementary end-stations located in the experimental hutch: transmission and high resolution powder diffraction (TXRD and HRXRD), standard and dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS and EDXAS) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). In addition, by using the KB optics, a micro-focused beam will be available on the second station of the monochromatic branch. The beamline is currently under commissioning. The first two experimental stations, using the monochromatic branch, are scheduled to be

  6. Gas bremsstrahlung shielding calculation for first optic enclosure of ILSF medical beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigzadeh Jalali, H.; Salimi, E.; Rahighi, J.

    2016-10-01

    Gas bremsstrahlung is generated in high energy electron storage ring accompanies the synchrotron radiation into the beamlines and strike the various components of the beamline. In this paper, radiation shielding calculation for secondary gas bremsstrahlung is performed for the first optics enclosure (FOE) of medical beamline of the Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF). Dose equivalent rate (DER) calculation is accomplished using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. A comprehensive study of DER distribution at the back wall, sides and roof is given.

  7. HERMES: a soft X-ray beamline dedicated to X-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Belkhou, Rachid; Stanescu, Stefan; Swaraj, Sufal; Besson, Adrien; Ledoux, Milena; Hajlaoui, Mahdi; Dalle, Didier

    2015-07-01

    The HERMES beamline (High Efficiency and Resolution beamline dedicated to X-ray Microscopy and Electron Spectroscopy), built at Synchrotron SOLEIL (Saint-Auban, France), is dedicated to soft X-ray microscopy. The beamline combines two complementary microscopy methods: XPEEM (X-ray Photo Emitted Electron Microscopy) and STXM (Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy) with an aim to reach spatial resolution below 20 nm and to fully exploit the local spectroscopic capabilities of the two microscopes. The availability of the two methods within the same beamline enables the users to select the appropriate approach to study their specific case in terms of sample environment, spectroscopy methods, probing depth etc. In this paper a general description of the beamline and its design are presented. The performance and specifications of the beamline will be reviewed in detail. Moreover, the article is aiming to demonstrate how the beamline performances have been specifically optimized to fulfill the specific requirements of a soft X-ray microscopy beamline in terms of flux, resolution, beam size etc. Special attention has been dedicated to overcome some limiting and hindering problems that are usually encountered on soft X-ray beamlines such as carbon contamination, thermal stability and spectral purity.

  8. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified into primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and of gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance with wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C

  9. Primary and secondary biomass burning aerosols determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy during the 2008 EUCAARI campaign in the Po Valley (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paglione, M.; Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Hillamo, R.; Facchini, M. C.; Finessi, E.; Giulianelli, L.; Carbone, C.; Fuzzi, S.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Swietlicki, E.; Eriksson Stenström, K.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Massoli, P.; Canaragatna, M.; Worsnop, D.; Decesari, S.

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric organic aerosols are generally classified as primary and secondary (POA and SOA) according to their formation processes. An actual separation, however, is challenging when the timescales of emission and gas-to-particle formation overlap. The presence of SOA formation in biomass burning plumes leads to scientific questions about whether the oxidized fraction of biomass burning aerosol is rather of secondary or primary origin, as some studies would suggest, and about the chemical compositions of oxidized biomass burning POA and SOA. In this study, we apply nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the functional group composition of fresh and aged biomass burning aerosols during an intensive field campaign in the Po Valley, Italy. The campaign was part of the EUCAARI project and was held at the rural station of San Pietro Capofiume in spring 2008. Factor analysis applied to the set of NMR spectra was used to apportion the wood burning contribution and other organic carbon (OC) source contributions, including aliphatic amines. Our NMR results, referred to the polar, water-soluble fraction of OC, show that fresh wood burning particles are composed of polyols and aromatic compounds, with a sharp resemblance to wood burning POA produced in wood stoves, while aged samples are clearly depleted of alcohols and are enriched in aliphatic acids with a smaller contribution of aromatic compounds. The comparison with biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) determined by high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry (HR-TOF-AMS) at the site shows only a partial overlap between NMR BB-POA and AMS BBOA, which can be explained by either the inability of BBOA to capture all BB-POA composition, especially the alcohol fraction, or the fact that BBOA account for insoluble organic compounds unmeasured by the NMR. Therefore, an unambiguous composition for biomass burning POA could not be derived from this study, with NMR analysis indicating a higher O / C ratio

  10. Mechanical design and performance evaluation for plane grating monochromator in a soft X-ray microscopy beamline at SSRF.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xuepeng; Lu, Qipeng

    2015-01-01

    A new monochromator is designed to develop a high performance soft X-ray microscopy beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). But owing to its high resolving power and high accurate spectrum output, there exist many technical difficulties. In the paper presented, as two primary design targets for the monochromator, theoretical energy resolution and photon flux of the beamline are calculated. For wavelength scanning mechanism, primary factors affecting the rotary angle errors are presented, and the measuring results are 0.15'' and 0.17'' for plane mirror and plane grating, which means that it is possible to provide sufficient scanning precision to specific wavelength. For plane grating switching mechanism, the repeatabilities of roll, yaw and pitch angles are 0.08'', 0.12'' and 0.05'', which can guarantee the high accurate switch of the plane grating effectively. After debugging, the repeatability of light spot drift reaches to 0.7'', which further improves the performance of the monochromator. The commissioning results show that the energy resolving power is higher than 10000 at Ar L-edge, the photon flux is higher than 1 × 108 photons/sec/200 mA, and the spatial resolution is better than 30 nm, demonstrating that the monochromator performs very well and reaches theoretical predictions. PMID:26410653

  11. Mechanical design and performance evaluation for plane grating monochromator in a soft X-ray microscopy beamline at SSRF.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xuepeng; Lu, Qipeng

    2015-01-01

    A new monochromator is designed to develop a high performance soft X-ray microscopy beamline at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF). But owing to its high resolving power and high accurate spectrum output, there exist many technical difficulties. In the paper presented, as two primary design targets for the monochromator, theoretical energy resolution and photon flux of the beamline are calculated. For wavelength scanning mechanism, primary factors affecting the rotary angle errors are presented, and the measuring results are 0.15'' and 0.17'' for plane mirror and plane grating, which means that it is possible to provide sufficient scanning precision to specific wavelength. For plane grating switching mechanism, the repeatabilities of roll, yaw and pitch angles are 0.08'', 0.12'' and 0.05'', which can guarantee the high accurate switch of the plane grating effectively. After debugging, the repeatability of light spot drift reaches to 0.7'', which further improves the performance of the monochromator. The commissioning results show that the energy resolving power is higher than 10000 at Ar L-edge, the photon flux is higher than 1 × 108 photons/sec/200 mA, and the spatial resolution is better than 30 nm, demonstrating that the monochromator performs very well and reaches theoretical predictions.

  12. Petit-exposure at neutrino beamline (PEANUT)

    SciTech Connect

    Niwa, K.; /Nagoya U.

    2005-08-01

    from the primary neutrino interaction vertex, with their three dimensional slopes and momenta. It is also capable of electron identification with good e/{gamma} separation, due to its very fine segmentation. The OPERA ECC target modules are constructed as bricks of dimensions 12.5 x 10.0 x 7.5 cm{sup 3} in horizontal, vertical and along the beam axis. Each brick consists of series of 56 (1 mm thick) plates of passive material (lead or iron) alternated with emulsion films (43 {micro}m emulsion layer on both sides of a transparent 200 {micro}m thick plastic film). In preparation for OPERA we would like to expose the OPERA target modules to a beam of neutrinos. This will allow us to test many of our analysis procedures and techniques as well as to validate the simulation of neutrino interactions, both for the production of forward and backward particles. Although the HE (high energy) beam of NuMI would be a better match to the CNGS energy, data acquired with NuMI LE (low energy) beam would serve the same purpose, albeit more challenging. Given the high interaction rate from the NuMI beam, the test detector target mass can be kept low and additional detectors can easily be built around a small target. These measurements are not possible in the CNGS beam, since it has no short baseline hall.

  13. Proton scaling

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, Gregory H

    2009-01-01

    This note presents analytic estimates of the performance of proton beams in remote surveillance for nuclear materials. The analysis partitions the analysis into the eight steps used by a companion note: (1) Air scattering, (2) Neutron production in the ship and cargo, (3) Target detection probability, (4) Signal produced by target, (5) Attenuation of signal by ship and cargo, (6) Attenuation of signal by air, (7) Geometric dilution, and (8) Detector Efficiency. The above analyses indicate that the dominant air scattering and loss mechanisms for particle remote sensing are calculable with reliable and accepted tools. They make it clear that the conversion of proton beams into neutron sources rapidly goes to completion in all but thinnest targets, which means that proton interrogation is for all purposes executed by neutrons. Diffusion models and limiting approximations to them are simple and credible - apart from uncertainty over the cross sections to be used in them - and uncertainty over the structure of the vessels investigated. Multiplication is essentially unknown, in part because it depends on the details of the target and its shielding, which are unlikely to be known in advance. Attenuation of neutron fluxes on the way out are more complicated due to geometry, the spectrum of fission neutrons, and the details of their slowing down during egress. The attenuation by air is large but less uncertain. Detectors and technology are better known. The overall convolution of these effects lead to large but arguably tolerable levels of attenuation of input beams and output signals. That is particularly the case for small, mobile sensors, which can more than compensate for size with proximity to operate reliably while remaining below flux limits. Overall, the estimates used here appear to be of adequate accuracy for decisions. That assessment is strengthened by their agreement with companion calculations.

  14. The BALDER Beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klementiev, K.; Norén, K.; Carlson, S.; Sigfridsson Clauss, K. G. V.; Persson, I.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) includes well-established methods to study the local structure around the absorbing element - extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and the effective oxidation number or to quantitatively determine the speciation of an element in a complex matrix - X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The increased brilliance and intensities available at the new generation of synchrotron light sources makes it possible to study, in-situ and in-operando, much more dilute systems with relevance for natural systems, as well as the micro-scale variability and dynamics of chemical reactions on the millisecond time-scale. The design of the BALDER beamline at the MAX IV Laboratory 3 GeV ring has focused on a high flux of photons in a wide energy range, 2.4-40 keV, where the K-edge is covered for the elements S to La, and the L 3-edge for all elements heavier than Sb. The overall design of the beamline will allow large flexibility in energy range, beam size and data collection time. The other focus of the beamline design is the possibility to perform multi-technique analyses on samples. Development of sample environment requires focus on implementation of auxiliary methods in such a way that techniques like Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, UV-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and/or mass spectrometry can be performed simultaneously as the XAS study. It will be a flexible system where different instruments can be plugged in and out depending on the needs for the particular investigation. Many research areas will benefit from the properties of the wiggler based light source and the capabilities to perform in-situ and in-operando measurements, for example environmental and geochemical sciences, nuclear chemistry, catalysis, materials sciences, and cultural heritage.

  15. Mini-beam collimator enables microcrystallography experiments on standard beamlines

    PubMed Central

    Fischetti, Robert F.; Xu, Shenglan; Yoder, Derek W.; Becker, Michael; Nagarajan, Venugopalan; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Hilgart, Mark C.; Stepanov, Sergey; Makarov, Oleg; Smith, Janet L.

    2009-01-01

    The high-brilliance X-ray beams from undulator sources at third-generation synchrotron facilities are excellent tools for solving crystal structures of important and challenging biological macromolecules and complexes. However, many of the most important structural targets yield crystals that are too small or too inhomogeneous for a ‘standard’ beam from an undulator source, ∼25–50 µm (FWHM) in the vertical and 50–100 µm in the horizontal direction. Although many synchrotron facilities have microfocus beamlines for other applications, this capability for macromolecular crystallography was pioneered at ID-13 of the ESRF. The National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Cancer Institute Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) dual canted undulator beamlines at the APS deliver high-intensity focused beams with a minimum focal size of 20 µm × 65 µm at the sample position. To meet growing user demand for beams to study samples of 10 µm or less, a ‘mini-beam’ apparatus was developed that conditions the focused beam to either 5 µm or 10 µm (FWHM) diameter with high intensity. The mini-beam has a symmetric Gaussian shape in both the horizontal and vertical directions, and reduces the vertical divergence of the focused beam by 25%. Significant reduction in background was achieved by implementation of both forward- and back-scatter guards. A unique triple-collimator apparatus, which has been in routine use on both undulator beamlines since February 2008, allows users to rapidly interchange the focused beam and conditioned mini-beams of two sizes with a single mouse click. The device and the beam are stable over many hours of routine operation. The rapid-exchange capability has greatly facilitated sample screening and resulted in several structures that could not have been obtained with the larger focused beam. PMID:19240333

  16. Advanced Beamline Design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Prokop, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  17. Time-resolved neutron imaging at ANTARES cold neutron beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Dangendorf, V.; Tittelmeier, K.; Schillinger, B.; Schulz, M.; Lerche, M.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-07-01

    In non-destructive evaluation with X-rays light elements embedded in dense, heavy (or high-Z) matrices show little contrast and their structural details can hardly be revealed. Neutron radiography, on the other hand, provides a solution for those cases, in particular for hydrogenous materials, owing to the large neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and uncorrelated dependency of neutron cross section on the atomic number. The majority of neutron imaging experiments at the present time is conducted with static objects mainly due to the limited flux intensity of neutron beamline facilities and sometimes due to the limitations of the detectors. However, some applications require the studies of dynamic phenomena and can now be conducted at several high intensity beamlines such as the recently rebuilt ANTARES beam line at the FRM-II reactor. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of time resolved imaging for repetitive processes, where different phases of the process can be imaged simultaneously and integrated over multiple cycles. A fast MCP/Timepix neutron counting detector was used to image the water distribution within a model steam engine operating at 10 Hz frequency. Within <10 minutes integration the amount of water was measured as a function of cycle time with a sub-mm spatial resolution, thereby demonstrating the capabilities of time-resolved neutron radiography for the future applications. The neutron spectrum of the ANTARES beamline as well as transmission spectra of a Fe sample were also measured with the Time Of Flight (TOF) technique in combination with a high resolution beam chopper. The energy resolution of our setup was found to be ~ 0.8% at 5 meV and ~ 1.7% at 25 meV. The background level (most likely gammas and epithermal/fast neutrons) of the ANTARES beamline was also measured in our experiments and found to be on the scale of 3% when no filters are installed in the beam. Online supplementary data available from stacks.iop.org/jinst/10

  18. Implementation of the beamline controls at the Florence accelerator laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraresi, L.; Mirto, F. A.

    2008-05-01

    The new Tandetron accelerator in Florence, with many different beamlines, has required a new organization of all the control signals of the used equipment (slow control). We present our solution, which allows us the control of all the employed instruments simultaneously from a number of different workplaces. All of our equipment has been designed to be Ethernet based and this is the key to accomplish two very important requirements: simultaneous remote control from many computers and electrical isolation to achieve a lower noise level. The control of the instruments requires only one Ethernet network and no particular interfaces or drivers on the computers.

  19. Advanced beamline design for Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Christopher R.

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) at Fermilab is a new electron accelerator currently in the commissioning stage. In addition to testing superconducting accelerating cavities for future accelerators, it is foreseen to support a variety of Advanced Accelerator R&D (AARD) experiments. Producing the required electron bunches with the expected flexibility is challenging. The goal of this dissertation is to explore via numerical simulations new accelerator beamlines that can enable the advanced manipulation of electron bunches. The work especially includes the design of a low-energy bunch compressor and a study of transverse-to-longitudinal phase space exchangers.

  20. Proton uptake associated with the reduction of the primary quinone Q(A) influences the binding site of the secondary quinone Q(B) in Rhodopseudomonas viridis photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed

    Zachariae, U; Lancaster, C R

    2001-06-01

    Previously, two binding sites for the secondary quinone Q(B) in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodopseudomonas viridis were identified by X-ray crystallography, a 'proximal' binding site close to the non-heme iron, and a 'distal' site, displaced by 4.2 A along the path of the isoprenoid tail [C.R.D. Lancaster and H. Michel, Structure 5 (1997) 1339-1359]. The quinone ring planes in the two sites differ by roughly a 180 degrees rotation around the isoprenoid tail. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations, which support the theory of a spontaneous transfer of Q(B) between the distal site and the proximal site. In contrast to earlier computational studies on RCs, the molecular dynamics simulations of Q(B) migration resulted in a proximal Q(B) binding pattern identical to that of the crystallographic findings. Also, we demonstrate that the preference towards the proximal Q(B) location is not necessarily attributed to reduction of Q(B) to the semiquinone, but already to the preceding reduction of the primary quinone Q(A) and resulting protonation changes in the protein. Energy mapping of the Q(B) binding pocket indicates that the quinone ring rotation required for completion of the transfer between the two sites is improbable at the distal or proximal binding sites due to high potential barriers, but may be possible at a newly identified position near the distal binding site.

  1. The electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis microscopy beamline data acquisition system at ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gariazzo, C.; Krempaska, R.; Morrison, G. R.

    1996-07-01

    The electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) microscopy data acquisition system enables the user to control the imaging and spectroscopy modes of operation of the beamline ESCA microscopy at ELETTRA. It allows the user to integrate all experiment, beamline and machine operations in one single environment. The system also provides simple data analysis for both spectra and images data to guide further data acquisition.

  2. Plastique: A synchrotron radiation beamline for time resolved fluorescence in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Zema, N.; Antonangeli, F.; Savoia, A.; Parasassi, T.; Rosato, N.

    1991-06-01

    PLASTIQUE is the only synchrotron radiation beamline in the world that performs time resolved fluorescence experiments in frequency domain. These experiments are extremely valuable sources of information on the structure and dynamics of molecules. We describe the beamline and some initial data.

  3. Performance of IR-VUV normal incidence monochromator beamline at UVSOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, K.; Miura, H.; Nakagawa, H.; Shimoyama, I.; Nakagawa, K.; Okamura, H.; Nanba, T.; Hasumoto, M.; Kinoshita, T.

    2001-07-01

    The beamline BL7B at the UVSOR facility for solid-state spectroscopy has been opening for users after reconstruction. This beamline consists of a 3 m normal incidence monochromator and covers the spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet to the infrared region. The optical configuration and the performance, such as photon number, purity and resolving power, are reported.

  4. Electron cloud simulations of a proton storage ring using cold proton bunches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Y.; Holmes, J.; Lee, S. Y.; Macek, R.

    2008-02-01

    Using the ORBIT code we study the sensitivity of electron cloud properties with respect to different proton beam profiles, the secondary electron yield (SEY) parameter, and the proton loss rate. Our model uses a cold proton bunch to generate primary electrons and electromagnetic field for electron cloud dynamics. We study the dependence of the prompt and swept electron signals vs the bunch charge and the recovery of electron clouds after sweeping on the beam loss rate and the SEY. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data measured at the proton storage ring at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Our simulations indicate that the fractional proton loss rate in the field-free straight section may be an exponential function of proton beam charge and may also be lower than the averaged fractional proton loss rate over the whole ring.

  5. Performance of beamline 9.3.1 at the ALS: Flux and resolution measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Uehara, Y.; Fischer, G.; Kring, J.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the ALS is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range. This beamline is the first monochromatic hard x-ray beamline in the ALS, and designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, and preservation of the high brightness from the ALS. It consists of a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator and two toroidal mirrors which are positioned before and after the monochromator. The construction of the beamline was completed in December of 1995, with imperfect mirrors. In this report, the authors describe the experimental results of absolute flux measurements and x-ray absorption measurements of gases and solid samples using the present set of mirrors.

  6. The Protein Micro-Crystallography Beamlines for Targeted Protein Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Kunio; Yamamoto, Masaki; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    In order to collect proper diffraction data from outstanding micro-crystals, a brand-new data collection system should be designed to provide high signal-to noise ratio in diffraction images. SPring-8 and KEK-PF are currently developing two micro-beam beamlines for Targeted Proteins Research Program by MEXT of Japan. The program aims to reveal the structure and function of proteins that are difficult to solve but have great importance in both academic research and industrial application. At SPring-8, a new 1-micron beam beamline for protein micro-crystallography, RIKEN Targeted Proteins Beamline (BL32XU), is developed. At KEK-PF a new low energy micro-beam beamline, BL-1A, is dedicated for SAD micro-crystallography. The two beamlines will start operation in the end of 2010. The present status of the research and development for protein micro-crystallography will be presented.

  7. Commissioning and first results of scanning type EXAFS beamline (BL-09) at INDUS-2 synchrotron source

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K. Agrawal, A. Yadav, A. K. Nayak, C. Basu, S. Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.; Kane, S. R.; Garg, C. K.

    2014-04-24

    An Energy Scanning X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy beamline has recently been installed and commissioned at BL-09 bending magnet port of INDUS-2 synchrotron source, Indore. The beamline uses an UHV compatible fixed exit double crystal monochromator (DCM) with two Si (111) crystals. Two grazing incidence cylindrical mirrors are also used in this beamline; the pre-mirror is used as a collimating mirror while the post mirror is used for vertical focusing and higher harmonic rejection. In this beamline it is possible to carry out EXAFS measurements both in transmission and fluorescence mode on various types of samples, using Ionization chamber detectors and solid state drift detector respectively. In this paper, results from first experiments of the Energy Scanning EXAFS beamline are presented.

  8. NSLS transvenous coronary angiography beamline upgrade and advanced technology initiatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gmür, N. F.; Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W.; Thompson, A. C.; Lavender, W. M.; Scalia, K.; Malloy, N.; Mangano, J.; Jacob, J.

    1995-02-01

    Since October 1990, the coronary anatomies of a total of 16 patients (male and female) have been imaged at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) as part of the Dual Energy Digital Subtraction Transvenous Coronary Angiography research program. This program takes place in the Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF) on the X17B2 wiggler beamline. Encouraged by the success of the initial patient images, the NSLS has recently embarked on an ambitious upgrade effort. This effort covers all aspects of the X17B2 beamline and includes improved radiation shielding, a Laue monochromator assembly, a computer-controlled five motion patient scanning chair assembly, a fast low-noise image acquisition system, and a modularized patient safety system. These improvements will allow major advances in imaging patients based on ECG signal gating and multiple view imaging. Two advanced technology initiatives are underway with industrial collaborators. One will develop real-time image acquisition and display of the subtracted digital images. The second will develop a compact x-ray source of medical imaging. The source will be a linear electron accelerator creating characteristic radiation line emissions.

  9. Microfocusing at the PG1 beamline at FLASH

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Gerasimova, Natalia; Goderich, Rene; Mey, Tobias; Reininger, Ruben; Rubhausen, Michael; Siewert, Frank; Weigelt, Holger; Brenner, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    The Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) refocusing mirror system installed at the PG1 branch of the plane-grating monochromator beamline at the soft X-ray/XUV free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is designed to provide tight aberration-free focusing down to 4 µm × 6 µm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on the sample. Such a focal spot size is mandatory to achieve ultimate resolution and to guarantee best performance of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) off-axis parabolic double-monochromator Raman spectrometer permanently installed at the PG1 beamline as an experimental end-station. The vertical beam size on the sample of the Raman spectrometer, which operates without entrance slit, defines andmore » limits the energy resolution of the instrument which has an unprecedented design value of 2 meV for photon energies below 70 eV and about 15 meV for higher energies up to 200 eV. In order to reach the designed focal spot size of 4 µm FWHM (vertically) and to hold the highest spectrometer resolution, special fully motorized in-vacuum manipulators for the KB mirror holders have been developed and the optics have been aligned employing wavefront-sensing techniques as well as ablative imprints analysis. Lastly, aberrations like astigmatism were minimized. In this article the design and layout of the KB mirror manipulators, the alignment procedure as well as microfocus optimization results are presented.« less

  10. Microfocusing at the PG1 beamline at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Gerasimova, Natalia; Goderich, Rene; Mey, Tobias; Reininger, Ruben; Rubhausen, Michael; Siewert, Frank; Weigelt, Holger; Brenner, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    The Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) refocusing mirror system installed at the PG1 branch of the plane-grating monochromator beamline at the soft X-ray/XUV free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is designed to provide tight aberration-free focusing down to 4 µm × 6 µm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on the sample. Such a focal spot size is mandatory to achieve ultimate resolution and to guarantee best performance of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) off-axis parabolic double-monochromator Raman spectrometer permanently installed at the PG1 beamline as an experimental end-station. The vertical beam size on the sample of the Raman spectrometer, which operates without entrance slit, defines and limits the energy resolution of the instrument which has an unprecedented design value of 2 meV for photon energies below 70 eV and about 15 meV for higher energies up to 200 eV. In order to reach the designed focal spot size of 4 µm FWHM (vertically) and to hold the highest spectrometer resolution, special fully motorized in-vacuum manipulators for the KB mirror holders have been developed and the optics have been aligned employing wavefront-sensing techniques as well as ablative imprints analysis. Lastly, aberrations like astigmatism were minimized. In this article the design and layout of the KB mirror manipulators, the alignment procedure as well as microfocus optimization results are presented.

  11. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  12. NSLS transvenous coronary angiography beamline upgrade and advanced technology initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; Chapman, D.; Thomlinson, W.; Thompson, A.C.; Lavender, W.M.; Scalia, K.; Malloy, N.; Mangano, J.; Jacob, J.

    1994-11-01

    Since October 1990, the coronary anatomies of a total of 16 patients (male and female) have been imaged at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) as part of the Dual Energy Digital Subtraction Transvenous Coronary Angiography research program. This program takes place in the Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF) on the X17B2 wiggler beamline. Encouraged by the success of the initial patient images, the NSLS has recently embarked on an ambitious upgrade effort. This effort covers all aspects of the X17B2 beamline and includes improved radiation shielding, a Laue monochromator assembly, a computer-controlled 5 motion patient scanning chair assembly, a fast low-noise image acquisition system, and a modularized patient safety system. These improvements will allow major advances in imaging patients based on ECG signal gating and multiple view imaging. Two advanced technology initiatives are underway with industrial collaborators. One will develop real-time image acquisition and display of the subtracted digital images. The second will develop a compact x-ray source for medical imaging. The source will be a linear electron accelerator creating characteristic radiation line emissions.

  13. The Diamond Beamline I13L for Imaging and Coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, C.; Wagner, U.; Peach, A.; Singh, B.; Wilkin, G.; Jones, C.; Robinson, I. K.

    2010-06-23

    I13L is the first long beamline at Diamond dedicated to imaging and coherence. Two independent branches will operate in the energy range of 6-30 keV with spatial resolution on the micro- to nano-lengthscale. The Imaging branch is dedicated to imaging and tomography with In-line phase contrast and full-field microscopy on the micron to nano-length scale. Ultimate resolution will be achieved on the Coherence branch at I13L with imaging techniques in the reciprocal space. The experimental stations will be located about 250 m from the source, taking advantage of the coherence properties of the source. The beamline has some outstanding features such as the mini-beta layout of the storage ring's straight section. The optical layout is optimized for beam stability and high optical quality to preserve the coherent radiation. In the experimental stations several methods will be available, starting for the first user with in-line phase contrast imaging on the imaging branch and Coherent X-ray Diffraction (CXRD) on the coherence branch.

  14. Proton radiography to improve proton therapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsu, J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Van Goethem, M.-J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Klaver, T.; Visser, J.; Brandenburg, S.; Biegun, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The quality of cancer treatment with protons critically depends on an accurate prediction of the proton stopping powers for the tissues traversed by the protons. Today, treatment planning in proton radiotherapy is based on stopping power calculations from densities of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) images. This causes systematic uncertainties in the calculated proton range in a patient of typically 3-4%, but can become even 10% in bone regions [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]. This may lead to no dose in parts of the tumor and too high dose in healthy tissues [1]. A direct measurement of proton stopping powers with high-energy protons will allow reducing these uncertainties and will improve the quality of the treatment. Several studies have shown that a sufficiently accurate radiograph can be obtained by tracking individual protons traversing a phantom (patient) [4,6,10]. Our studies benefit from the gas-filled time projection chambers based on GridPix technology [2], developed at Nikhef, capable of tracking a single proton. A BaF2 crystal measuring the residual energy of protons was used. Proton radiographs of phantom consisting of different tissue-like materials were measured with a 30×30 mm2 150 MeV proton beam. Measurements were simulated with the Geant4 toolkit.First experimental and simulated energy radiographs are in very good agreement [3]. In this paper we focus on simulation studies of the proton scattering angle as it affects the position resolution of the proton energy loss radiograph. By selecting protons with a small scattering angle, the image quality can be improved significantly.

  15. Commissioning of the Spherical Grating Monochromator Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at the Canadian Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Regier, T.; Paulsen, J.; Wright, G.; Coulthard, I.; Tan, K.; Blyth, R. I. R.; Sham, T. K.

    2007-01-19

    The Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) is a Dragon type soft x-ray beamline designed to provide users at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) with monochromatic photons with energies between 250 and 2000 eV. Commissioning of the beamline began in the spring of 2005 and is expected to be completed in July 2006. Aspects of the commissioning process included the use of an object oriented approach to developing the beamline controls, the employment of a beam based alignment procedure and a large amount of user involvement. A description of the beamline and the commissioning techniques used is presented, along with examples of the beamline performance and capabilities.

  16. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron

    PubMed Central

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J.; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R.; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented. PMID:25537608

  17. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented.

  18. Shielding Design Aspects of SR Beamlines for 3-GeV And 8-GeV Class Synchrotron Radiation Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Yoshihiro; Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed; /SLAC

    2007-09-24

    Differences in synchrotron radiation beamline shielding design between the facilities of 3 GeV class and 8 GeV class are discussed with regard to SLAC SSRL and SPring-8 beamlines. Requirements of beamline shielding as well as the accelerator shielding depend on the stored electron energy, and here some factors in beamline shielding depending on the stored energy in particular, are clarified, namely the effect of build up, the effect of double scattering of photons at branch beamlines, and the spread of gas bremsstrahlung.

  19. Measurement of pion, kaon and proton production in proton-proton collisions at TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Molina, R. Alfaro; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Prado, C. Alves Garcia; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Pedrosa, F. Baltasar Dos Santos; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Camejo, A. Batista; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Martinez, H. Bello; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Diaz, L. Calero; Caliva, A.; Villar, E. Calvo; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castellanos, J. Castillo; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Sanchez, C. Ceballos; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Barroso, V. Chibante; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Balbastre, G. Conesa; Valle, Z. Conesa del; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Morales, Y. Corrales; Maldonado, I. Cortés; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Albino, R. Cruz; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; Caro, A. De; Cataldo, G. de; Cuveland, J. de; Falco, A. De; Gruttola, D. De; Marco, N. De; Pasquale, S. De; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Bari, D. Di; Mauro, A. Di; Nezza, P. Di; Corchero, M. A. Diaz; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Gimenez, D. Domenicis; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Téllez, A. Fernández; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Girard, M. Fusco; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Dziadus, E. Gladysz; Glässel, P.; Ramirez, A. Gomez; Zamora, P. González; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Corral, G. Herrera; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hilden, T. E.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hristov, P.; Huang, M.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Ionita, C.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jahnke, C.; Jang, H. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Bustamante, R. T. Jimenez; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kamin, J.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Uysal, A. Karasu; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Khan, K. H.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Köhler, M. K.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Meethaleveedu, G. Koyithatta; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugathasan, T.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Pointe, S. L. La; Rocca, P. La; Fernandes, C. Lagana; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, G. R.; Lee, S.; Legrand, I.; Lehnert, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; Monzón, I. León; Leoncino, M.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; Torres, E. López; Lowe, A.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Cervantes, I. Maldonado; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Blanco, J. Martin; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Pedreira, M. Martinez; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastroserio, A.; Masui, H.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Mcdonald, D.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Pérez, J. Mercado; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Minervini, L. M.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Zetina, L. Montaño; Montes, E.; Morando, M.; Godoy, D. A. Moreira De; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Müller, H.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Ohlson, A.; Okatan, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Silva, A. C. Oliveira Da; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Velasquez, A. Ortiz; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Pant, D.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Paul, B.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Costa, H. Pereira Da; Filho, E. Pereira De Oliveira; Peresunko, D.; Lara, C. E. Pérez; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Razazi, V.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reed, R. J.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rivetti, A.; Rocco, E.; Cahuantzi, M. Rodríguez; Manso, A. Rodriguez; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Montero, A. J. Rubio; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Castro, X. Sanchez; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Santagati, G.; Sarkar, D.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schulc, M.; Schuster, T.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Seeder, K. S.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Seo, J.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, N.; Shigaki, K.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B. C.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Spacek, M.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Stassinaki, M. Spyropoulou; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szabo, A.; Toledo, A. Szanto de; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Takahashi, J.; Tanaka, N.; Tangaro, M. A.; Takaki, J. D. Tapia; Peloni, A. Tarantola; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Muñoz, G. Tejeda; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Trogolo, S.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Palomo, L. Valencia; Vallero, S.; Maarel, J. Van Der; Hoorne, J. W. Van; Leeuwen, M. van; Vanat, T.; Vyvre, P. Vande; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Veldhoen, M.; Velure, A.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Limón, S. Vergara; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Baillie, O. Villalobos; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; Haller, B. von; Vorobyev, I.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, D.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Yaldo, C. G.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yang, H.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yurchenko, V.; Yushmanov, I.; Zaborowska, A.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zyzak, M.

    2015-05-01

    The measurement of primary , , and production at mid-rapidity ( 0.5) in proton-proton collisions at 7 TeV performed with a large ion collider experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC) is reported. Particle identification is performed using the specific ionisation energy-loss and time-of-flight information, the ring-imaging Cherenkov technique and the kink-topology identification of weak decays of charged kaons. Transverse momentum spectra are measured from 0.1 up to 3 GeV/ for pions, from 0.2 up to 6 GeV/ for kaons and from 0.3 up to 6 GeV/ for protons. The measured spectra and particle ratios are compared with quantum chromodynamics-inspired models, tuned to reproduce also the earlier measurements performed at the LHC. Furthermore, the integrated particle yields and ratios as well as the average transverse momenta are compared with results at lower collision energies.

  20. Undulator beamline of the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, B. E-mail: skycia@uoguelph.ca; Gomez, A.; Duffy, A.; Hallin, E.; Meyer, B.; Kycia, S. E-mail: skycia@uoguelph.ca

    2014-08-15

    The Brockhouse project at the Canadian Light Source plans the construction of three beamlines, two wiggler beamlines, and one undulator beamline, that will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering. In this work, we will describe the undulator beamline main components and performance parameters, obtained from ray tracing using XOP-SHADOW codes. The undulator beamline will operate from 4.95 to 21 keV, using a 20 mm period hybrid undulator placed upstream of the wiggler in the same straight section. The beamline optics design was developed in cooperation with the Brazilian Synchrotron - LNLS. The beamline will have a double crystal monochromator with the options of Si(111) or Si(311) crystal pairs followed by two mirrors in the KB configuration to focus the beam at the sample position. The high brilliance of the undulator source will produce a very high flux of ∼10{sup 13} photons/s and high energy resolution into a small focus of 170 μm horizontal and 20-60 μm vertical, depending on the optical configuration and energy chosen. Two multi-axis goniometer experimental stations with area detectors and analyzers are foreseen to enable diffraction, resonant and inelastic scattering experiments, and SAXS/WAXS experiments with high resolution and time resolving capabilities.

  1. The ID23-1 structural biology beamline at the ESRF.

    PubMed

    Nurizzo, Didier; Mairs, Trevor; Guijarro, Matias; Rey, Vicente; Meyer, Jens; Fajardo, Pablo; Chavanne, Joel; Biasci, Jean Claude; McSweeney, Sean; Mitchell, Edward

    2006-05-01

    The demand for access to macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beam time continues to increase. To meet this demand the ESRF has constructed a dual station beamline using a canted undulator system as the X-ray source. The first phase of the beamline to be constructed is ID23-1, a tunable MAD-capable station with a mini-focus X-ray beam. The beamline makes use of well characterized optical elements: a channel-cut monochromator with a high-precision toroidal mirror to focus the X-ray beam. The beamline has been conceived with the aim of providing high levels of automation to create an industrial-like environment for protein crystallography. A new software suite has been developed to permit reliable easy operation for the beamline users and beamline staff. High levels of diagnostics are built in to allow rapid trouble-shooting. These developments are now being exported to the ESRF macromolecular crystallography beamline complex and have been made in a modular fashion to facilitate transportability to other synchrotrons.

  2. The ELIMED transport and dosimetry beamline for laser-driven ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F.; Schillaci, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Scuderi, V.; Allegra, L.; Amato, A.; Amico, A.; Candiano, G.; De Luca, G.; Gallo, G.; Giordanengo, S.; Guarachi, L. Fanola; Korn, G.; Larosa, G.; Leanza, R.; Manna, R.; Marchese, V.; Marchetto, F.; Margarone, D.; Milluzzo, G.; Petringa, G.; Pipek, J.; Pulvirenti, S.; Rizzo, D.; Sacchi, R.; Salamone, S.; Sedita, M.; Vignati, A.

    2016-09-01

    A growing interest of the scientific community towards multidisciplinary applications of laser-driven beams has led to the development of several projects aiming to demonstrate the possible use of these beams for therapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, laser-accelerated particles differ from the conventional beams typically used for multiscipilinary and medical applications, due to the wide energy spread, the angular divergence and the extremely intense pulses. The peculiarities of optically accelerated beams led to develop new strategies and advanced techniques for transport, diagnostics and dosimetry of the accelerated particles. In this framework, the realization of the ELIMED (ELI-Beamlines MEDical and multidisciplinary applications) beamline, developed by INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy) and that will be installed in 2017 as a part of the ELIMAIA beamline at the ELI-Beamlines (Extreme Light Infrastructure Beamlines) facility in Prague, has the aim to investigate the feasibility of using laser-driven ion beams for multidisciplinary applications. In this contribution, an overview of the beamline along with a detailed description of the main transport elements as well as the detectors composing the final section of the beamline will be presented.

  3. The Optical Design of the PEP-II Injection Beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Fieguth, Ted

    2003-05-23

    The optical design of the PEP-II electron and positron Injection Beamlines is described. Use of the existing high power, low emittance beams available from the SLC damping rings require that pulsed extraction of 9.0 GeV electrons and 3.1 GeV positrons for injection into the PEP-II rings occur in the early sectors of the accelerator. More than 5 kilometers of new beam transport lines have been designed and are being constructed to bring these beams to their respective rings. The optical design maximizes the tolerance to errors especially to those contributing to beam size and position jitter. Secondly, the design minimizes costs by utilizing existing components or component designs and minimizing the number required. Here we discuss important attributes including choice of lattice, specification of error tolerances, including errors in construction, alignment, field errors, power supply stability, and orbit correction.

  4. Proton-Proton and Proton-Antiproton Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandale, Walter

    2015-02-01

    In the last five decades, proton-proton and proton-antiproton colliders have been the most powerful tools for high energy physics investigations. They have also deeply catalyzed innovation in accelerator physics and technology. Among the large number of proposed colliders, only four have really succeeded in becoming operational: the ISR, the SppbarS, the Tevatron and the LHC. Another hadron collider, RHIC, originally conceived for ion-ion collisions, has also been operated part-time with polarized protons. Although a vast literature documenting them is available, this paper is intended to provide a quick synthesis of their main features and key performance.

  5. Development of a Niobium Bellow for Beamline Connections

    SciTech Connect

    Larry Turlington; John Brawley; Robert Manus; Stephen Manning; Samuel Morgan; Gary Slack; Peter Kneisel

    2003-09-01

    Superconducting cavities in an accelerator assembly are usually connected at the beampipes by stainless steel bellows. They operate at an intermediate temperature, compensating for alignment tolerances on the cavity beamlines and for thermal contraction during cooldown to cryogenic temperatures. This transition from one cavity to the next in a cavity string is typically of the order of 3/2 wavelength along with approximately half a wavelength taken up by the bellows. If one could incorporate a niobium bellows in the beam pipe, this distance could be reduced by half a wave length. In the case of a big accelerator such as TESLA the overall cavity length for the accelerator could be reduced by roughly 10% or 2000 m. In terms of cost savings this would amount to several million dollars. Based on this estimate we have begun to develop a niobium bellows to be used on a 2.75 inch diameter beamline. It is made from 0.3 mm thick niobium sheet, rolled into a tube and secured by a longitudinal full penetration electron beam weld; the weld is made with a high speed a narrow, focused beam reducing the heat affected zone, thus limiting the grain growth, which could affect the formability. Subsequently, two convolutions have been pressed into this tube in a 2-stage process, using an external die and a polyurethane internal expander. Niobium cuffs and flanges were electron beam welded to the formed bellows, which facilitated leak testing and allowed some measurements of compression/expansion and bending. In this contribution the fabrication process and the subsequent mechanical and vacuum tests with the bellows will be described.

  6. Microfocusing at the PG1 beamline at FLASH

    PubMed Central

    Dziarzhytski, Siarhei; Gerasimova, Natalia; Goderich, Rene; Mey, Tobias; Reininger, Ruben; Rübhausen, Michael; Siewert, Frank; Weigelt, Holger; Brenner, Günter

    2016-01-01

    The Kirkpatrick–Baez (KB) refocusing mirror system installed at the PG1 branch of the plane-grating monochromator beamline at the soft X-ray/XUV free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH) is designed to provide tight aberration-free focusing down to 4 µm × 6 µm full width at half-maximum (FWHM) on the sample. Such a focal spot size is mandatory to achieve ultimate resolution and to guarantee best performance of the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) off-axis parabolic double-monochromator Raman spectrometer permanently installed at the PG1 beamline as an experimental end-station. The vertical beam size on the sample of the Raman spectrometer, which operates without entrance slit, defines and limits the energy resolution of the instrument which has an unprecedented design value of 2 meV for photon energies below 70 eV and about 15 meV for higher energies up to 200 eV. In order to reach the designed focal spot size of 4 µm FWHM (vertically) and to hold the highest spectrometer resolution, special fully motorized in-vacuum manipulators for the KB mirror holders have been developed and the optics have been aligned employing wavefront-sensing techniques as well as ablative imprints analysis. Aberrations like astigmatism were minimized. In this article the design and layout of the KB mirror manipulators, the alignment procedure as well as microfocus optimization results are presented. PMID:26698054

  7. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline at ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Ng, W.; Jones, G.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photo emission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy in argon along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  8. Design Concept and Performance of the Soft X-ray Beamline HiSOR-BL14

    SciTech Connect

    Sawada, M.; Namatame, H.; Yaji, K.; Nagira, M.; Kimura, A.; Taniguchi, M.

    2007-01-19

    The soft X-ray beamline HiSOR-BL14 has been constructed at Hiroshima Synchrotron Radiation Center, aimed at absorption spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy with linearly and circularly polarized light. The beamline layout is based on a Dragon-type design with a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet part of the HiSOR ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal angular acceptance and vertical one contribute to high photon flux and controllability of light polarization, respectively. Our performance test indicates that high resolving power has been achieved with sufficient photon flux to carry out spectroscopic experiments.

  9. Imaging in real and reciprocal space at the Diamond beamline I13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, C.; Wagner, U. H.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Bodey, A.; Parson, A.; García-Fernández, M.; De Fanis, A.; Pešić, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The Diamond Imaging and Coherence beamline I13 consists of two independent branchlines for imaging in real and reciprocal space. Different microscopies are available providing a range of spatial resolution from 5µm to potentially 5nm. The beamline operates in the energy range of 6-35keV covering different scientific areas such as biomedicine, materials science and geophysics. Several original devices have been developed at the beamline, such as the EXCALIBUR photon counting detector and the combined robot arms for coherent X-ray diffraction.

  10. Beamline stability measurements with a stretched wire system in the FFTB

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.; Salsberg, C.; Montag, C.

    1996-09-01

    Beamline stability is of great importance for future linear colliders where tolerances generally are in the micron to sub-micron range. A stretched wire system in the sealed FFTB tunnel at SLAC was used to monitor beamline motion with a sub-micron resolution. In future linear colliders low frequency changes of the beamline alignment (< 0.1 Hz) lead to untolerable quasistatical misalignments and betatron oscillations. Since it requires time to correct those errors, it is very important to determine how often corrections are needed. The authors present the measurements, discuss the systematics of the stretched wire system and compare the observations with the ATL-model for ground motion.

  11. Characterization of the new NSLS infrared microspectroscopy beamline U10B

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, G.L.

    1999-07-19

    The first of several new infrared beamlines, built on a modified bending magnet port of the NSLS VUV ring, is now operational for mid-infrared microspectroscopy. The port simultaneously delivers 40 mrad by 40 mrad to two separate beamlines and spectrometer endstations designated U10A and U10B. The latter is equipped with a scanning infrared microspectrometer. The combination of this instrument and high brightness synchrotron radiation makes diffraction-limited microspectroscopy practical. This paper describes the beamline's performance and presents quantitative information on the diffraction-limited resolution.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE NEW NSLS INFARED MICROSPECTROSCOPY BEAMLINE U10B.

    SciTech Connect

    CARR,G.L.

    1999-07-19

    The first of several new infrared beamlines, built on a modified bending magnet port of the NSLS VUV ring, is now operational for mid-infrared microspectroscopy. The port simultaneously delivers 40 mrad by 40 mrad to two separate beamlines and spectrometer endstations designated U10A and U10B. The latter is equipped with a scanning infrared microspectrometer. The combination of this instrument and high brightness synchrotron radiation makes diffraction-limited microspectroscopy practical. This paper describes the beamline's performance and presents quantitative information on the diffraction-limited resolution.

  13. Progress of projection computed tomography by upgrading of the beamline 37XU of SPring-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Yasuko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Uesugi, Kentaro; Miura, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Beamline 37XU at SPring-8 has been upgraded for nano-focusing applications. The length of the beamline has been extended to 80 m. By utilizing this length, the beamline has advantages for experiments such as X-ray focusing, X-ray microscopic imaging and X-ray computed tomography. Projection computed tomography measurements were carried out at experimental hutch 3 located 80 m from the light source. CT images of a microcapsule have been successfully obtained with a wide X-ray energy range.

  14. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  15. Nuclear collision processes around the Bragg peak in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Yuka; Date, Hiroyuki; Sutherland, Kenneth Lee; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    In the physical processes of proton interaction in bio-materials, most of the proton energy is transferred to electrons. Ionization and excitation occur most frequently around the Bragg peak region, where nuclear reactions also exist. In this study, we investigated the processes of energy deposition by considering interactions including the nuclear reactions between protons and water molecules by a Monte Carlo simulation for proton therapy. We estimated the number of particles produced by a variety of nuclear reactions, and we focused on the interaction in the low-energy region (below 1 MeV). Furthermore, we considered the charge-changing processes in the low-energy region (less than a few hundred keV). Finally, we evaluated the total dose and the contribution of primary protons and secondary particles through nuclear reactions to the absorbed dose. The results showed that the protons generate numerous neutrons via nuclear reactions. Particularly, neutrons with relatively low energies produce recoil protons by elastic collisions with the hydrogen atoms. Around the Bragg peak, low-energy primary protons (slowed-down protons) are prevalent, whereas recoil (secondary) protons gradually become dominant behind the distal falloff region of the Bragg peak. Therefore, around the Bragg peak, the main contribution to the absorbed dose is that of the primary protons (from 80 to 90%), whereas secondary protons created by primary proton-induced reactions contribute to the dose from 20 to 5%. Behind the distal endpoint of the Bragg peak, the absorbed dose is mainly due to the protons produced by (1)H(n, p), and the contribution of these is about 70%. PMID:20821107

  16. Proton Therapy - Accelerating Protons to Save Lives

    SciTech Connect

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2011-10-25

    In 1946, physicist Robert Wilson first suggested that protons could be used as a form of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer because of the sharp drop-off that occurs on the distal edge of the radiation dose. Research soon confirmed that high-energy protons were particularly suitable for treating tumors near critical structures, such as the heart and spinal column. The precision with which protons can be delivered means that more radiation can be deposited into the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue receives substantially less or, in some cases, no radiation. Since these times, particle accelerators have continuously been used in cancer therapy and today new facilities specifically designed for proton therapy are being built in many countries. Proton therapy has been hailed as a revolutionary cancer treatment, with higher cure rates and fewer side effects than traditional X-ray photon radiation therapy. Proton therapy is the modality of choice for treating certain small tumors of the eye, head or neck. Because it exposes less of the tissue surrounding a tumor to the dosage, proton therapy lowers the risk of secondary cancers later in life - especially important for young children. To date, over 80,000 patients worldwide have been treated with protons. Currently, there are nine proton radiation therapy facilities operating in the United States, one at the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute. An overview of the treatment technology and this new center will be presented.

  17. Forward production of charged pions with incident protons on nuclear targets at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Apollonio, M.; Chimenti, P.; Giannini, G.; Artamonov, A.; Giani, S.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Grant, A.; Grossheim, A.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Tcherniaev, E.; Tsukerman, I.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.; Bagulya, A.; Grichine, V.

    2009-09-15

    Measurements of the double-differential {pi}{sup {+-}} production cross section in the range of momentum 0.5{<=}p{<=}8.0 GeV/c and angle 0.025{<=}{theta}{<=}0.25 rad in collisions of protons on beryllium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, aluminum, copper, tin, tantalum, and lead are presented. The data were taken with the large-acceptance HAdRon Production (HARP) detector in the T9 beamline of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors. Thin targets of 5% of a nuclear interaction length were used. The tracking and identification of the produced particles were performed using the forward system of the HARP experiment. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/dp d{omega} mainly at four incident proton beam momenta (3, 5, 8, and 12 GeV/c). Measurements are compared with the GEANT4 and MARS Monte Carlo generators. A global parametrization is provided as an approximation of all the collected datasets, which can serve as a tool for quick yield estimates.

  18. Forward production of charged pions with incident protons on nuclear targets at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apollonio, M.; Artamonov, A.; Bagulya, A.; Barr, G.; Blondel, A.; Bobisut, F.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonesini, M.; Booth, C.; Borghi, S.; Bunyatov, S.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Catanesi, M. G.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Chimenti, P.; Coney, L.; Capua, E. Di; Dore, U.; Dumarchez, J.; Edgecock, R.; Ellis, M.; Ferri, F.; Gastaldi, U.; Giani, S.; Giannini, G.; Gibin, D.; Gilardoni, S.; Gorbunov, P.; Gößling, C.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; Grant, A.; Graulich, J. S.; Grégoire, G.; Grichine, V.; Grossheim, A.; Guglielmi, A.; Howlett, L.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Kayis-Topaksu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Kolev, D.; Krasnoperov, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Meurer, C.; Mezzetto, M.; Mills, G. B.; Morone, M. C.; Novella, P.; Orestano, D.; Palladino, V.; Panman, J.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pastore, F.; Piperov, S.; Polukhina, N.; Popov, B.; Prior, G.; Radicioni, E.; Schmitz, D.; Schroeter, R.; Serdiouk, V.; Skoro, G.; Sorel, M.; Tcherniaev, E.; Temnikov, P.; Tereschenko, V.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tsenov, R.; Tsukerman, I.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Wiebusch, C.; Zucchelli, P.

    2009-09-01

    Measurements of the double-differential π± production cross section in the range of momentum 0.5⩽p⩽8.0 GeV/c and angle 0.025⩽θ⩽0.25rad in collisions of protons on beryllium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, aluminum, copper, tin, tantalum, and lead are presented. The data were taken with the large-acceptance HAdRon Production (HARP) detector in the T9 beamline of the CERN Proton Synchrotron. Incident particles were identified by an elaborate system of beam detectors. Thin targets of 5% of a nuclear interaction length were used. The tracking and identification of the produced particles were performed using the forward system of the HARP experiment. Results are obtained for the double-differential cross sections d2σ/dpdΩ mainly at four incident proton beam momenta (3, 5, 8, and 12 GeV/c). Measurements are compared with the GEANT4 and MARS Monte Carlo generators. A global parametrization is provided as an approximation of all the collected datasets, which can serve as a tool for quick yield estimates.

  19. Analysis of difference spectra of protonated DNA: determination of degree of protonation of nitrogen bases and the fractions of disordered nucleotide pairs.

    PubMed Central

    Smol'janinova, T I; Zhidkov, V A; Sokolov, G V

    1982-01-01

    The titration curves of nitrogen bases and fractions of disordered nucleotide pairs are obtained during DNA protonation. It is shown that purine bases are the first sites of the DNA double helix protonation. The cytosine protonation is due to proton-induced conformational transition within GC pairs with the sequence proton transfer from (N-7) of guanine to (N-3) of cytosine. Within DNA with unwound regions the bases are protonated in the following order: cytosine, adenine, guanine. It is shown that GC pairs are the primary centres in which the unwinding of protonated DNAs occurs. PMID:7079177

  20. Ion-proton pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, P. B.

    2016-07-01

    Evidence derived with minimal assumptions from existing published observations is presented to show that an ion-proton plasma is the source of radio-frequency emission in millisecond and in normal isolated pulsars. There is no primary involvement of electron-positron pairs. This conclusion has also been reached by studies of the plasma composition based on well-established particle-physics processes in neutron stars with positive polar-cap corotational charge density. This work has been published in a series of papers which are also summarized here. It is now confirmed by simple analyses of the observed radio-frequency characteristics, and its implications for the further study of neutron stars are outlined.

  1. Safety Analysis Report: X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.; Thomlinson, W.

    1990-02-01

    This report contains a safety analysis for the X17B2 beamline synchrotron medical research facility. Health hazards, risk assessment and building systems are discussed. Reference is made to transvenous coronary angiography. (LSP)

  2. Measurements from a Compact Cost-Effective Beamline for the THC14 PET Cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Dehnel, M. P.; Theroux, J.; Christensen, T.; Stewart, T. M.; Roeder, M.; Sirot, P.; Fasse, D.; Brasile, J. P.; Raoult, F.; Buckley, K.

    2009-03-10

    The THC14 PET Cyclotron produced by THALES specifies two compact cost-effective beamlines for high current PET radioisotope production. The design and development of the beamline system was reported previously in NIM B 261 (2007) pp 809-812. This paper describes the successful testing of this compact beamline at the first installation. A series of measurement data are presented starting from low current scintillator image data, higher current beam diagnostic data (baffles, collimators, targets) and finally a simultaneous dual beam run on Faraday Cups. The beamline system has proven to be a flexible and valuable tool for optimizing high current beam intensity distribution on target in a well-instrumented manner. This ability to tailor the beam characteristics for the target is particularly important as high power targets are developed which can handle very high beam currents.

  3. New Soft X-ray Beamline (BL10) at the SAGA Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, D.; Setoyama, H.; Okajima, T.

    2010-06-23

    A new soft X-ray beamline (BL10) at the SAGA Light Source (SAGA-LS) was constructed at the end of 2008. Commissioning of this new beamline started at the beginning of 2009. Synchrotron radiation from a variably polarizing undulator (APPLE-II) can be used in this beamline. The obtained light is monochromatized by a varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator with the variable included angle mechanism. Its designed resolving power and photon flux are 3,000-10,000 and 10{sup 12}-10{sup 9} photons/s at 300 mA, respectively. The performance test results were generally satisfactory. An overview of the optical design of the beamline and the current status of commissioning are reported.

  4. Upgrades to the XAFS2 beamline control system and to the endstation at the LNLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, S. J. A.; Mauricio, J. C.; Murari, J.; Beniz, D. B.; Piton, J. R.; Slepicka, H. H.; Falcão de Sousa, M.; Espíndola, A. M.; Levinsky, A. P. S.

    2016-05-01

    The XAFS2 is a general-purpose X-ray absorption beamline. It is the second one built at the LNLS. After approximately 7 years in operation this beamline has been substantially updated in order to improve its experimental possibilities. Recently arrived, a 4-circle Huber diffractometer has been incorporated to perform combined experiments. This collects XRD patterns with the XAFS. Through the development of a new sampling environment it is now also possible to perform these measurements in situ/operando conditions. Other upgrades include a complete remodelling of the beamline software and its control system. The following new systems are crucial for the next steps that are currently underway at the beamline, namely, (i) enabling remote access for users and (ii) the testing of QEXAFS measurements.

  5. Development of soft X-ray polarized light beamline on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation source

    SciTech Connect

    Phase, D. M. Gupta, Mukul Potdar, S. Behera, L. Sah, R. Gupta, Ajay

    2014-04-24

    This article describes the development of a soft x-ray beamline on a bending magnet source of Indus-2 storage ring (2.5 GeV) and some preliminary results of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements using the same. The beamline layout is based on a spherical grating monochromator. The beamline is able to accept synchrotron radiation from the bending magnet port BL-1 of the Indus-2 ring with a wide solid angle. The large horizontal and vertical angular acceptance contributes to high photon flux and selective polarization respectively. The complete beamline is tested for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) ∼ 10{sup −10} mbar. First absorption spectrum was obtained on HOPG graphite foil. Our performance test indicates that modest resolving power has been achieved with adequate photon flux to carry out various absorption experiments.

  6. Transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange beamline at the A0 photoinjector.

    SciTech Connect

    Fililler, R. P.; Edwards, D. A.; Koeth, T.; Harkay, K. C.; Kim, K.-J.; Edwards, H. T.; Accelerator Systems Division; Fermilab; Rutgers Univ.

    2007-08-01

    The FNAL A0 Photoinjector is being reconfigured to test the principal of transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange as proposed by Cornacchia and Emma, Kim and Sessler, and others. The ability to perform such an exchange could have major advantages to FELs by reducing the transverse emittance. Several schemes to carry out the exchange are possible and will be reported separately. At the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector we are constructing a beamline to demonstrate this transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange. This beamline will consist of a dogleg, a TM{sub 110} 5 cell copper cavity, and another dogleg. The beamline is designed to reuse the bunch compressor dipoles of the photoinjector, along with some existing diagnostics. Beamline layout and simulations are presented. Emittance dilution effects are also discussed.

  7. The beamline for the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y J; Fawley, W M; Lee, E P; Paul, A C; Westenkow, G

    1999-03-23

    During normal DARHT II operation, the beam exiting the accelerator will be well characterized by its nominal design parameters of 20-MeV, 2000-Amperes, 2-{micro}sec-pulse length, and 3 cm-mr unnormalized emittance. Normal operation will have the beam delivered to a beam dump via several DC magnets. A 2-way kicker magnet is used to deflect portions of the beam into the straight ahead beamline leading to either a diagnostic beamline or to the converter target beamline. During start up and or beam development periods, the beam exiting the accelerator may have parameters outside the acceptable range of values for normal operation. The Enge beamline must accommodate this range of unacceptable beam parameters, delivering the entire 80 KiloJoule of beam to the dump even though the energy, emittance, and/or match is outside the nominal design range.

  8. High-throughput Toroidal Grating Beamline for Photoelectron Spectroscopy at CAMD

    PubMed Central

    Kizilkaya, O; Jiles, R W; Patterson, M C; Thibodeaux, C A; Poliakoff, E D; Sprunger, P T; Kurtz, R L; Morikawa, E

    2016-01-01

    A 5 meter toroidal grating (5m-TGM) beamline has been commissioned to deliver 28 mrad of bending magnet radiation to an ultrahigh vacuum endstation chamber to facilitate angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The 5m-TGM beamline is equipped with Au-coated gratings with 300, 600 and 1200 lines/mm providing monochromatized synchrotron radiation in the energy ranges 25-70 eV, 50–120 eV and 100–240 eV, respectively. The beamline delivers excellent flux (~1014-1017 photons/sec/100mA) and a combined energy resolution of 189 meV for the beamline (at 1.0 mm slit opening) and HA-50 hemispherical analyzer was obtained at the Fermi level of polycrystalline gold crystal. Our preliminary photoelectron spectroscopy results of phenol adsorption on TiO2 (110) surface reveals the metal ion (Ti) oxidation. PMID:27134636

  9. A microprobe-XRF Beamline on Indus-2 Synchrotron Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, M. K.; Kane, S. R.; Sinha, A. K.; Garg, C. K.; Singh, A. K.; Gupta, P.; Garg, S. R.; Lodha, G. S.; Deb, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    A microfocus x-ray fluorescence (XRF) beamline has been setup on Indus-2 synchrotron light source. The beamline works in the x-ray energy range of 4-20 keV. The optics of the beamline comprises of a Si(111) double crystal monochromator for energy tunability and a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) based grazing incidence focusing optics. Microprobe XRF scanning over a region of the sample is possible using a 5-axis sample scanning stage. The beamline provides an energy resolution ~ 10-3 -10-4 with a photon flux density of the order of ~ 108 ph/sec./mm2/100mA for the collimated unfocused beam. Measured performance, various attractive features and some initial commissioning results are presented.

  10. New soft X-ray beamline BL07LSU at SPring-8

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Susumu; Senba, Yasunori; Tanaka, Takashi; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Hirono, Toko; Kimura, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masami; Miyawaki, Jun; Harasawa, Ayumi; Seike, Takamitsu; Takahashi, Sunao; Nariyama, Nobuteru; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Masao; Ohata, Toru; Furukawa, Yukito; Takeshita, Kunikazu; Goto, Shunji; Harada, Yoshihisa; Shin, Shik; Kitamura, Hideo; Kakizaki, Akito; Oshima, Masaharu; Matsuda, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    A new soft X-ray beamline, BL07LSU, has been constructed at SPring-8 to perform advanced soft X-ray spectroscopy for materials science. The beamline is designed to achieve high energy resolution (E/ΔE> 10000) and high photon flux [>1012 photons s−1 (0.01% bandwidth)−1] in the photon energy range 250–2000 eV with controllable polarization. To realise this state-of-the-art performance, a novel segmented cross undulator was developed and adopted as a light source. The details of the undulator light source and beamline monochromator design are described. The achieved performance of the beamline, such as the photon flux, energy resolution and the state of polarization, is reported. PMID:24562556

  11. The electron spectro-microscopy beamline at National Synchrotron Light Source II: A wide photon energy range, micro-focusing beamline for photoelectron spectro-microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Reininger, R.; Hulbert, S. L.; Chubar, O.; Vescovo, E.; Johnson, P. D.; Valla, T.; Sadowski, J. T.; Starr, D. E.

    2012-02-15

    A comprehensive optical design for a high-resolution, high-flux, wide-energy range, micro-focused beamline working in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray photon energy range is proposed. The beamline is to provide monochromatic radiation to three photoelectron microscopes: a full-field x-ray photoelectron emission microscope and two scanning instruments, one dedicated to angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy ({mu}-ARPES) and one for ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning photoelectron microscopy (AP-XPS/SPEM). Microfocusing is achieved with state of the art elliptical cylinders, obtaining a spot size of 1 {mu}m for ARPES and 0.5 {mu}m for AP-XPS/SPEM. A detailed ray tracing analysis quantitatively evaluates the overall beamline performances.

  12. A modified post damping ring bunch compressor beamline for the TESLA linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe R.-G. Piot; Winfried Decking

    2004-03-23

    We propose a modified bunch compressor beamline, downstream of the damping ring, for the TESLA linear collider. This modified beamline uses a third harmonic radio-frequency section based on the 3.9 GHz superconducting cavity under development at Fermilab. In our design the beam deceleration is about {approx}50 MeV instead of {approx}450 MeV in the original design proposed.

  13. Fundamental neutron physics beamline at the spallation neutron source at ORNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fomin, N.; Greene, G. L.; Allen, R. R.; Cianciolo, V.; Crawford, C.; Tito, T. M.; Huffman, P. R.; Iverson, E. B.; Mahurin, R.; Snow, W. M.

    2014-11-04

    In this paper, we describe the Fundamental Neutron Physics Beamline (FnPB) facility located at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The FnPB was designed for the conduct of experiments that investigate scientific issues in nuclear physics, particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology using a pulsed slow neutron beam. Finally, we present a detailed description of the design philosophy, beamline components, and measured fluxes of the polychromatic and monochromatic beams.

  14. The Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline at FERMI: optical layout and first commissioning

    PubMed Central

    Svetina, Cristian; Grazioli, Cesare; Mahne, Nicola; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Fava, Claudio; Zangrando, Marco; Gerusina, Simone; Alagia, Michele; Avaldi, Lorenzo; Cautero, Giuseppe; de Simone, Monica; Devetta, Michele; Di Fraia, Michele; Drabbels, Marcel; Feyer, Vitaliy; Finetti, Paola; Katzy, Raphael; Kivimäki, Antti; Lyamayev, Viktor; Mazza, Tommaso; Moise, Angelica; Möller, Thomas; O’Keeffe, Patrick; Ovcharenko, Yevheniy; Piseri, Paolo; Plekan, Oksana; Prince, Kevin C.; Sergo, Rudi; Stienkemeier, Frank; Stranges, Stefano; Coreno, Marcello; Callegari, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The Low Density Matter (LDM) beamline has been built as part of the FERMI free-electron laser (FEL) facility to serve the atomic, molecular and cluster physics community. After the commissioning phase, it received the first external users at the end of 2012. The design and characterization of the LDM photon transport system is described, detailing the optical components of the beamline. PMID:25931066

  15. MxCuBE: a synchrotron beamline control environment customized for macromolecular crystallography experiments.

    PubMed

    Gabadinho, José; Beteva, Antonia; Guijarro, Matias; Rey-Bakaikoa, Vicente; Spruce, Darren; Bowler, Matthew W; Brockhauser, Sandor; Flot, David; Gordon, Elspeth J; Hall, David R; Lavault, Bernard; McCarthy, Andrew A; McCarthy, Joanne; Mitchell, Edward; Monaco, Stéphanie; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Nurizzo, Didier; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Thibault, Xavier; Walsh, Martin A; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean M

    2010-09-01

    The design and features of a beamline control software system for macromolecular crystallography (MX) experiments developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. This system, MxCuBE, allows users to easily and simply interact with beamline hardware components and provides automated routines for common tasks in the operation of a synchrotron beamline dedicated to experiments in MX. Additional functionality is provided through intuitive interfaces that enable the assessment of the diffraction characteristics of samples, experiment planning, automatic data collection and the on-line collection and analysis of X-ray emission spectra. The software can be run in a tandem client-server mode that allows for remote control and relevant experimental parameters and results are automatically logged in a relational database, ISPyB. MxCuBE is modular, flexible and extensible and is currently deployed on eight macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the ESRF. Additionally, the software is installed at MAX-lab beamline I911-3 and at BESSY beamline BL14.1.

  16. Dosimetric impact of the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams at a ProBeam facility: comparison of measurements with TPS and MC calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würl, M.; Englbrecht, F.; Parodi, K.; Hillbrand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams, the dose output depends on the size of the irradiated field or volume. While this field size dependence has already been extensively investigated by measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for single pencil beams or monoenergetic fields, reports on the relevance of this effect for analytical dose calculation models are limited. Previous studies on this topic only exist for specific beamline designs. However, the amount of large-angle scattered primary and long-range secondary particles and thus the relevance of the low-dose envelope can considerably be influenced by the particular design of the treatment nozzle. In this work, we therefore addressed the field size dependence of the dose output at the commercially available ProBeam® beamline, which is being built in several facilities worldwide. We compared treatment planning dose calculations with ionization chamber (IC) measurements and MC simulations, using an experimentally validated FLUKA MC model of the scanning beamline. To this aim, monoenergetic square fields of three energies, as well as spherical target volumes were studied, including the investigation on the influence of the lateral spot spacing on the field size dependence. For the spherical target volumes, MC as well as analytical dose calculation were found in excellent agreement with the measurements in the center of the spread-out Bragg peak. In the plateau region, the treatment planning system (TPS) tended to overestimate the dose compared to MC calculations and IC measurements by up to almost 5% for the smallest investigated sphere and for small monoenergetic square fields. Narrower spot spacing slightly enhanced the field size dependence of the dose output. The deviations in the plateau dose were found to go in the clinically safe direction, i.e. the actual deposited dose outside the target was found to be lower than predicted by the TPS. Thus, the moderate overestimation of dose to

  17. Dosimetric impact of the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams at a ProBeam facility: comparison of measurements with TPS and MC calculations.

    PubMed

    Würl, M; Englbrecht, F; Parodi, K; Hillbrand, M

    2016-01-21

    Due to the low-dose envelope of scanned proton beams, the dose output depends on the size of the irradiated field or volume. While this field size dependence has already been extensively investigated by measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for single pencil beams or monoenergetic fields, reports on the relevance of this effect for analytical dose calculation models are limited. Previous studies on this topic only exist for specific beamline designs. However, the amount of large-angle scattered primary and long-range secondary particles and thus the relevance of the low-dose envelope can considerably be influenced by the particular design of the treatment nozzle. In this work, we therefore addressed the field size dependence of the dose output at the commercially available ProBeam(®) beamline, which is being built in several facilities worldwide. We compared treatment planning dose calculations with ionization chamber (IC) measurements and MC simulations, using an experimentally validated FLUKA MC model of the scanning beamline. To this aim, monoenergetic square fields of three energies, as well as spherical target volumes were studied, including the investigation on the influence of the lateral spot spacing on the field size dependence. For the spherical target volumes, MC as well as analytical dose calculation were found in excellent agreement with the measurements in the center of the spread-out Bragg peak. In the plateau region, the treatment planning system (TPS) tended to overestimate the dose compared to MC calculations and IC measurements by up to almost 5% for the smallest investigated sphere and for small monoenergetic square fields. Narrower spot spacing slightly enhanced the field size dependence of the dose output. The deviations in the plateau dose were found to go in the clinically safe direction, i.e. the actual deposited dose outside the target was found to be lower than predicted by the TPS. Thus, the moderate overestimation of dose to

  18. Predicting image blur in proton radiography: comparisons between measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    von Wittenau, A; Aufderheide, M B; Henderson, G L

    2010-05-07

    Given the cost and lead-times involved in high-energy proton radiography, it is prudent to model proposed radiographic experiments to see if the images predicted would return useful information. We recently modified our raytracing transmission radiography modeling code HADES to perform simplified Monte Carlo simulations of the transport of protons in a proton radiography beamline. Beamline objects include the initial diffuser, vacuum magnetic fields, windows, angle-selecting collimators, and objects described as distorted 2D (planar or cylindrical) meshes or as distorted 3D hexahedral meshes. We present an overview of the algorithms used for the modeling and code timings for simulations through typical 2D and 3D meshes. We next calculate expected changes in image blur as scattering materials are placed upstream and downstream of a resolution test object (a 3 mm thick sheet of tantalum, into which 0.4 mm wide slits have been cut), and as the current supplied to the focusing magnets is varied. We compare and contrast the resulting simulations with the results of measurements obtained at the 800 MeV Los Alamos LANSCE Line-C proton radiography facility.

  19. Predicting image blur in proton radiography: Comparisons between measurements and Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schach von Wittenau, Alexis E.; Aufderheide, Maurice; Henderson, Gary

    2011-10-01

    Given the cost and lead-times involved in high-energy proton radiography, it is prudent to model proposed radiographic experiments to see if the images predicted would return useful information. We recently modified our raytracing transmission radiography modeling code HADES to perform simplified Monte Carlo simulations of the transport of protons in a proton radiography beamline. Beamline objects include the initial diffuser, vacuum magnetic fields, windows, angle-selecting collimators, and objects described as distorted 2D (planar or cylindrical) meshes or as distorted 3D hexahedral meshes. We describe the algorithms used for simulations through typical 2D and 3D meshes. We calculate expected changes in image blur as scattering materials are placed upstream and downstream of a resolution test object (a 3 mm thick sheet of tantalum, into which 0.4 mm wide slits have been cut), and as the current supplied to the focusing magnets is varied. We compare and contrast the resulting simulations with the results of measurements obtained at the 800 MeV Los Alamos LANSCE Line-C proton radiography facility.

  20. Elastic proton-proton scattering at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Yip, K.

    2011-09-03

    Here we describe elastic proton+proton (p+p) scattering measurements at RHIC in p+p collisions with a special optics run of {beta}* {approx} 21 m at STAR, at the center-of-mass energy {radical}s = 200 GeV during the last week of the RHIC 2009 run. We present preliminary results of single and double spin asymmetries.

  1. What's In a Proton?

    ScienceCinema

    Brookhaven Lab

    2016-07-12

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  2. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  3. What's In a Proton?

    SciTech Connect

    Brookhaven Lab

    2009-07-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains that fundamental particles like protons are themselves made up of still smaller particles called quarks. He discusses how new particles are produced when quarks are liberated from protons...a process that can be observed

  4. Automatic sample Dewar for MX beam-line

    SciTech Connect

    Charignon, T.; Tanchon, J.; Trollier, T.; Ravex, A.; Theveneau, P.

    2014-01-29

    It is very common for crystals of large biological macromolecules to show considerable variation in quality of their diffraction. In order to increase the number of samples that are tested for diffraction quality before any full data collections at the ESRF*, an automatic sample Dewar has been implemented. Conception and performances of the Dewar are reported in this paper. The automatic sample Dewar has 240 samples capability with automatic loading/unloading ports. The storing Dewar is capable to work with robots and it can be integrated in a full automatic MX** beam-line. The samples are positioned in the front of the loading/unloading ports with and automatic rotating plate. A view port has been implemented for data matrix camera reading on each sample loaded in the Dewar. At last, the Dewar is insulated with polyurethane foam that keeps the liquid nitrogen consumption below 1.6 L/h. At last, the static insulation also makes vacuum equipment and maintenance unnecessary. This Dewar will be useful for increasing the number of samples tested in synchrotrons.

  5. Neutrino Flux Prediction for the NuMI Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Soplin, Leonidas Aliaga

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the neutrino flux in any conventional neutrino beam presents a challenge for the current and future short and long baseline neutrino experiments. The uncertainties associated with the production and attenuation of the hadrons in the beamline materials along with those associated with the beam optics have a big effect in the flux spectrum knowledge. For experiments like MINERvA, understanding the flux is crucial since it enters directly into every neutrino-nucleus cross-sections measurements. The foundation of this work is predicting the neutrino flux at MINERvA using dedicated measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus collisions and incorporating in-situ MINERvA data that can provide additional constraints. This work also includes the prospect for predicting the flux at other detectors like the NOvA Near detector. The procedure and conclusions of this thesis will have a big impact on future hadron production experiments and on determining the flux for the upcoming DUNE experiment.

  6. Neutrino Flux Prediction for the NuMI Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Aliaga Soplin, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the neutrino flux in any conventional neutrino beam presents a challenge for the current and future short and long baseline neutrino experiments. The uncertainties associated with the production and attenuation of the hadrons in the beamline materials along with those associated with the beam optics have a big effect in the flux spectrum knowledge. For experiments like MINERvA, understanding the flux is crucial since it enters directly into every neutrino-nucleus cross-sections measurements. The foundation of this work is predicting the neutrino flux at MINERvA using dedicated measurements of hadron production in hadron-nucleus collisions and incorporating in-situ MINERvA data that can provide additional constraints. This work also includes the prospect for predicting the flux at other detectors like the NOvA Near detector. The procedure and conclusions of this thesis will have a big impact on future hadron production experiments and on determining the fl ux for the upcoming DUNE experiment.

  7. Students on the Beamline: classroom, research, and discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patry, J.; Walker, T.

    2012-12-01

    High level research is mainly the focus of trained scientists who possess a science specific background. The Canadian Light Source outreach service has developed a two stage research immersion approach which brings together students, teachers, and renowned scientists: Students on the Beamline. The first stage offers a training session for teachers to develop their professional competencies in regards to authentic science research and the synchrotron facility. During the second stage, students from classrooms apply a research protocol of their own design with the help of their teacher and synchrotron scientists. During this presentation, we will first explain the professional approach of the training. In the second part, two experiments designed by students will be presented which are geophysically based so to speak: Study of the Meteoritic Melt Sheet of the Manicouagan Basin and Effects of Olivine on the capture of NOx. Results have shown that teachers bring in the classroom a more authentic and new experience in research application. As for the students, their unique research has contributed to the increase of our knowledge and a better understanding of the scientific inquiry process.Scientist and teacher working together on the synchrotron

  8. Improved monochromator design for high heat load beamlines at CHESS

    SciTech Connect

    Smolenski, K.; Pahl, R.; Doing, P.; Conolly, C.; Clark, B.; Ehen, J.; Shen, Q.

    1996-09-01

    The use of water-cooling channels in silicon x-ray monochromators for the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) high power wiggler beamlines has been studied by finite element analysis. The efficiency from channels of different dimensions, ranging from 25 mm to 2 mm width and 5 mm depth, has been calculated. The new crystals are designed to replace the indirect cooled monochromators currently used at CHESS wiggler stations. At typical operation parameters of 150 mA electron current at 5.3 GeV and a gap of 40 mm, the 24-pole wiggler at CHESS provides an x-ray beam with a total power of 2.7 kW at the monochromator. Procedures have been developed for fabrication of internally cooled crystals using a silver-glass dye attach paste. Tests of a new crystal with a conventional x-ray source revealed very small amounts of residual strain. Experiments with synchrotron radiation are scheduled in the near future. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Emittance measurements in Grumman 1 MeV beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Debiak, T.; Gammel, G.; Melnychuk, S.

    1992-12-01

    The emittance of a 30 keV H{sup {minus}} beam has been measured with an Allison type electrostatic analyser at two positions separated by 85 cm along the Grumman 1 MeV beamline LEBT at low currents (about 4 mA, no Cs{sub 2}O additive in the source) and at higher currents (10-15 mA, with Cs{sub 2}O additive in the source). No emittance growth was observed between the two positions, but, at the higher current level, the emittance was about 60% higher than at the low current level ({Sigma}{sub n},rms = .0045 {pi} cm-mrad vs. 0070 {pi} cm-mrad). Argon was then introduced up to a partial pressure of 4x10{sup {minus}5} torr, and the emittance decreased back to a range corresponding to that found at the lower currents. However, beam noise was observed at the downstream position, and there is evidence for a small amount of emittance growth (<20%) between the two positions.

  10. Optimized baffle and aperture placement in neutral beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, R.; Duffy, T.; Vetrovec, J.

    1983-11-23

    Most neutral beamlines contain an iron-core ion-bending magnet that requires shielding between the end of the neutralizer and this magnet. This shielding allows the gas pressure to drop prior to the beam entering the magnet and therefore reduces beam losses in this drift region. We have found that the beam losses can be reduced even further by eliminating the iron-core magnet and the magnetic shielding altogether. The required bending field can be supplied by current coils without the iron poles. In addition, placement of the baffles and apertures can affect the cold gas entering the plasma region and the losses in the neutral beam due to re-ionization. In our study we varied the placement of the baffles, which determine the amount of pumping in each chamber, and the apertures, which determine the beam loss. Our results indicate that a baffle/aperture configuration can be set for either minimum cold gas into the plasma region or minimum beam losses, but not both.

  11. Detectors Requirements for the ODIN Beamline at ESS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgano, Manuel; Lehmann, Eberhard; Strobl, Markus

    The upcoming high intensity pulsed spallationneutron source ESS, now in construction in Sweden, will provide unprecedented opportunities for neutron science worldwide. In particular, neutron imaging will benefit from the time structure of the source and its high brilliance. These features will unlock new opportunities at the imaging beamline ODIN, but only if suitable detectors are employed and, in some cases, upgraded. In this paper, we highlight the current state-of-the-art for neutron imaging detectors, pointing out that, while no single presently existing detector can fulfill all the requirements currently needed to exploit the source to its limits, the wide range of applications of ODIN can be successfully covered by a suite of current state-of-the-art detectors. Furthermore we speculate on improvements to the current detector technologies that would expand the range of the existing detectors and application range and we outline a strategy to have the best possible combined system for the foreseen day 1 operations of ODIN in 2019.

  12. Optimization of High-Energy Implanter Beamline Pumping

    SciTech Connect

    LaFontaine, Marvin; Pharand, Michel; Huang Yongzhang; Pokidov, Ilya; Ferrara, Joseph

    2006-11-13

    A high-energy implanter process chamber and its pumping configuration were designed to minimize the residual gas density in the endstation. A modified Nastran trade mark sign finite-element analysis (FEA) code was used to calculate the pressure distribution and gas flow within the process chamber. The modified FE method was readily applied to the internal geometry of the scan chamber, the corrector magnet waveguide, and the process chamber, which included the scan arm assembly, 300mm wafer, and plasma electron flood gun (PEF). Using the modified Nastran code, the gas flow and pressure distribution within the beamline geometry were calculated. The gas load consisted of H2, which is generated by photoresist (PR) outgassing from the 300mm wafer, and Xe from the plasma electron flood gun. Several pumping configurations were assessed, with each consisting of various locations and pumping capacities of vacuum pumps. The pressure distribution results for each configuration are presented, along with pumping efficiency results which are helpful in selecting the optimum pump configuration. The analysis results were compared to measured data, indicating a good correlation between the two.

  13. Proton: The Particle

    SciTech Connect

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10{sup 80}. Protons were created at 10{sup −6} –1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10{sup 10} years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10{sup 34} years; that is, the age of the universe is 10{sup −24}th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W{sup +}, W{sup −}, Z{sup 0}, and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  14. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter.

  15. Proton: the particle.

    PubMed

    Suit, Herman

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to review briefly the nature of protons: creation at the Big Bang, abundance, physical characteristics, internal components, and life span. Several particle discoveries by proton as the experimental tool are considered. Protons play important roles in science, medicine, and industry. This article was prompted by my experience in the curative treatment of cancer patients by protons and my interest in the nature of protons as particles. The latter has been stimulated by many discussions with particle physicists and reading related books and journals. Protons in our universe number ≈10(80). Protons were created at 10(-6) -1 second after the Big Bang at ≈1.37 × 10(10) years beforethe present. Proton life span has been experimentally determined to be ≥10(34) years; that is, the age of the universe is 10(-24)th of the minimum life span of a proton. The abundance of the elements is hydrogen, ≈74%; helium, ≈24%; and heavier atoms, ≈2%. Accordingly, protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the universe because ≈87% are protons. They are in each atom in our universe and thus involved in virtually every activity of matter in the visible universe, including life on our planet. Protons were discovered in 1919. In 1968, they were determined to be composed of even smaller particles, principally quarks and gluons. Protons have been the experimental tool in the discoveries of quarks (charm, bottom, and top), bosons (W(+), W(-), Z(0), and Higgs), antiprotons, and antineutrons. Industrial applications of protons are numerous and important. Additionally, protons are well appreciated in medicine for their role in radiation oncology and in magnetic resonance imaging. Protons are the dominant baryonic subatomic particle in the visible universe, comprising ≈87% of the particle mass. They are present in each atom of our universe and thus a participant in every activity involving matter. PMID:24074929

  16. Upgrade of beamline BL08B at Taiwan Light Source from a photon-BPM to a double-grating SGM beamline.

    PubMed

    Yuh, Jih Young; Lin, Shan Wei; Huang, Liang Jen; Fung, Hok Sum; Lee, Long Life; Chen, Yu Joung; Cheng, Chiu Ping; Chin, Yi Ying; Lin, Hong Ji

    2015-09-01

    During the last 20 years, beamline BL08B has been upgraded step by step from a photon beam-position monitor (BPM) to a testing beamline and a single-grating beamline that enables experiments to record X-ray photo-emission spectra (XPS) and X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) for research in solar physics, organic semiconductor materials and spinel oxides, with soft X-ray photon energies in the range 300-1000 eV. Demands for photon energy to extend to the extreme ultraviolet region for applications in nano-fabrication and topological thin films are increasing. The basic spherical-grating monochromator beamline was again upgraded by adding a second grating that delivers photons of energy from 80 to 420 eV. Four end-stations were designed for experiments with XPS, XAS, interstellar photoprocess systems (IPS) and extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) in the scheduled beam time. The data from these experiments show a large count rate in core levels probed and excellent statistics on background normalization in the L-edge adsorption spectrum. PMID:26289286

  17. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prall, Matthias; Durante, Marco; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, Phillipp M.; LaTessa, Ciara; Shestov, Less; Simoniello, P.; Danly, Christopher R.; et al

    2016-06-10

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allowsmore » imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. As a result, tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.« less

  18. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Prall, M; Durante, M; Berger, T; Przybyla, B; Graeff, C; Lang, P M; LaTessa, C; Shestov, L; Simoniello, P; Danly, C; Mariam, F; Merrill, F; Nedrow, P; Wilde, C; Varentsov, D

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  19. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; Latessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-06-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics.

  20. High-energy proton imaging for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Prall, M.; Durante, M.; Berger, T.; Przybyla, B.; Graeff, C.; Lang, P. M.; LaTessa, C.; Shestov, L.; Simoniello, P.; Danly, C.; Mariam, F.; Merrill, F.; Nedrow, P.; Wilde, C.; Varentsov, D.

    2016-01-01

    The charged particle community is looking for techniques exploiting proton interactions instead of X-ray absorption for creating images of human tissue. Due to multiple Coulomb scattering inside the measured object it has shown to be highly non-trivial to achieve sufficient spatial resolution. We present imaging of biological tissue with a proton microscope. This device relies on magnetic optics, distinguishing it from most published proton imaging methods. For these methods reducing the data acquisition time to a clinically acceptable level has turned out to be challenging. In a proton microscope, data acquisition and processing are much simpler. This device even allows imaging in real time. The primary medical application will be image guidance in proton radiosurgery. Proton images demonstrating the potential for this application are presented. Tomographic reconstructions are included to raise awareness of the possibility of high-resolution proton tomography using magneto-optics. PMID:27282667

  1. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bogomilov, M.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  2. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation. PMID:21499600

  3. Pyridine as proton acceptor in the concerted proton electron transfer oxidation of phenol.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Julien; Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2011-06-01

    Taking pyridine as a prototypal example of biologically important nitrogen bases involved in proton-coupled electron transfers, it is shown with the example of the photochemically triggered oxidation of phenol by Ru(III)(bpy)(3) that this proton acceptor partakes in a concerted pathway whose kinetic characteristics can be extracted from the overall kinetic response. The treatment of these data, implemented by the results of a parallel study carried out in heavy water, allowed the determination of the intrinsic kinetic characteristics of this proton acceptor. Comparison of the reorganization energies and of the pre-exponential factors previously derived for hydrogen phosphate and water (in water) as proton acceptors suggests that, in the case of pyridine, the proton charge is delocalized over a primary shell of water molecules firmly bound to the pyridinium cation.

  4. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Arbor, N; Dauvergne, D; Dedes, G; Létang, J M; Parodi, K; Quiñones, C T; Testa, E; Rit, S

    2015-10-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue's RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT.

  5. The size of the proton.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Randolf; Antognini, Aldo; Nez, François; Amaro, Fernando D; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Fernandes, Luis M P; Giesen, Adolf; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Knowles, Paul; Le Bigot, Eric-Olivier; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Dos Santos, Joaquim M F; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Kottmann, Franz

    2010-07-01

    The proton is the primary building block of the visible Universe, but many of its properties-such as its charge radius and its anomalous magnetic moment-are not well understood. The root-mean-square charge radius, r(p), has been determined with an accuracy of 2 per cent (at best) by electron-proton scattering experiments. The present most accurate value of r(p) (with an uncertainty of 1 per cent) is given by the CODATA compilation of physical constants. This value is based mainly on precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen and calculations of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (QED; refs 8, 9). The accuracy of r(p) as deduced from electron-proton scattering limits the testing of bound-state QED in atomic hydrogen as well as the determination of the Rydberg constant (currently the most accurately measured fundamental physical constant). An attractive means to improve the accuracy in the measurement of r(p) is provided by muonic hydrogen (a proton orbited by a negative muon); its much smaller Bohr radius compared to ordinary atomic hydrogen causes enhancement of effects related to the finite size of the proton. In particular, the Lamb shift (the energy difference between the 2S(1/2) and 2P(1/2) states) is affected by as much as 2 per cent. Here we use pulsed laser spectroscopy to measure a muonic Lamb shift of 49,881.88(76) GHz. On the basis of present calculations of fine and hyperfine splittings and QED terms, we find r(p) = 0.84184(67) fm, which differs by 5.0 standard deviations from the CODATA value of 0.8768(69) fm. Our result implies that either the Rydberg constant has to be shifted by -110 kHz/c (4.9 standard deviations), or the calculations of the QED effects in atomic hydrogen or muonic hydrogen atoms are insufficient. PMID:20613837

  6. Resolving electrons from protons in ATIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J.; Atic Team

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter ATIC experiment is designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection The possibility to identify high energy primary cosmic ray electrons in the presence of the background of cosmic ray protons has been studied by simulating nuclear-electromagnetic cascade showers using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation code The ATIC design consisting of a graphite target and an energy detection device a totally active calorimeter built up of 2 5 cm x 2 5 cm x 25 0 cm BGO scintillator bars gives sufficient information to distinguish electrons from protons While identifying about 80 of electrons as such only about 2 in 10 000 protons 150 GeV will mimic electrons In September of 1999 ATIC was exposed to high-energy electron and proton beams at the CERN H2 beam line and this data confirmed the electron detection capabilities of ATIC

  7. The spreading of a proton beam by the atmosphere.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnstone, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    A simplified approximate expression is analytically derived for the spreading by charge exchange of a fine proton beam precipitating into the atmosphere. It shows in a simple way the dependence of proton beam spreading on atmospheric structure, collision data, primary particle energy, and pitch angle.

  8. An analytical model of leakage neutron equivalent dose for passively-scattered proton radiotherapy and validation with measurements.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne; Farah, Jad

    2015-05-18

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose  at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation.

  9. Study of proton radioactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C.N.; Back, B.B.; Henderson, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    About a dozen nuclei are currently known to accomplish their radioactive decay by emitting a proton. These nuclei are situated far from the valley of stability, and mark the very limits of existence for proton-rich nuclei: the proton drip line. A new 39-ms proton radioactivity was observed following the bombardment of a {sup 96}Ru target by a beam of 420-MeV {sup 78}Kr. Using the double-sided Si strip detector implantation system at the FMA, a proton group having an energy of 1.05 MeV was observed, correlated with the implantation of ions having mass 167. The subsequent daughter decay was identified as {sup 166}Os by its characteristic alpha decay, and therefore the proton emitter is assigned to the {sup 167}Ir nucleus. Further analysis showed that a second weak proton group from the same nucleus is present, indicating an isomeric state. Two other proton emitters were discovered recently at the FMA: {sup 171}Au and {sup 185}Bi, which is the heaviest known proton radioactivity. The measured decay energies and half-lives will enable the angular momentum of the emitted protons to be determined, thus providing spectroscopic information on nuclei that are beyond the proton drip line. In addition, the decay energy yields the mass of the nucleus, providing a sensitive test of mass models in this extremely proton-rich region of the chart of the nuclides. Additional searches for proton emitters will be conducted in the future, in order to extend our knowledge of the location of the proton drip line.

  10. DESIGN OF VISIBLE DIAGNOSTIC BEAMLINE FOR NSLS2 STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, W.; Fernandes, H.; Hseuh, H.; Kosciuk, B.; Krinsky, S.; Singh, O.

    2011-03-28

    A visible synchrotron light monitor (SLM) beam line has been designed at the NSLS2 storage ring, using the bending magnet radiation. A retractable thin absorber will be placed in front of the first mirror to block the central x-rays. The first mirror will reflect the visible light through a vacuum window. The light is guided by three 6-inch diameter mirrors into the experiment hutch. In this paper, we will describe design work on various optical components in the beamline. The ultra high brightness NSLS-II storage ring is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It will have 3GeV, 500mA electron beam circulating in the 792m ring, with very low emittance (0.9nm.rad horizontal and 8pm.rad vertical). The ring is composed of 30 DBA cells with 15 fold symmetry. Three damping wigglers will be installed in long straight sections 8, 18 and 28 to lower the emittance. While electrons pass through the bending magnet, synchrotron radiation will be generated covering a wide spectrum. There are other insertion devices in the storage ring which will generate shorter wavelength radiation as well. Synchrotron radiation has been widely used as diagnostic tool to measure the transverse and longitudinal profile. Three synchrotron light beam lines dedicated for diagnostics are under design and construction for the NSLS-II storage ring: two x-ray beam lines (pinhole and CRL) with the source points from Cell 22 BM{_}A (first bending in the DBA cell) and Cell22 three-pole wiggler; the third beam line is using visible part of radiation from Cell 30 BM{_}B (second bending magnet from the cell). Our paper focuses on the design of the visible beam line - SLM.

  11. Numerical analysis of partially coherent radiation at soft x-ray beamline.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangyu; Xue, Chaofan; Yu, Huaina; Wang, Yong; Wu, Yanqing; Tai, Renzhong

    2015-11-16

    A new model for numerical analysis of partially coherent x-ray at synchrotron beamlines is presented. The model is based on statistical optics. Four-dimensional coherence function, Mutual Optical Intensity (MOI), is applied to describe the wavefront of the partially coherent light. The propagation of MOI through optical elements in the beamline is deduced with numerical calculation. The coherence of x-ray through beamlines can be acquired. We applied the model to analyze the coherence in the STXM beamline at SSRF, and got the coherence length of the beam at the endstation. To verify the theoretical results, the diffraction experiment of a single slit was performed and the diffraction pattern was simulated to get the coherence length, (31 ± 3.0) µm × (25 ± 2.1) µm (H × V), which had a good agreement with the theoretical results, (30.7 ± 0.6) µm × (31 ± 5.3) µm (H × V). The model is applicable to analyze the coherence in synchrotron beamlines.

  12. The vacuum ultraviolet beamline/endstations at NSRL dedicated to combustion research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongyue; Du, Xuewei; Yang, Jiuzhong; Wang, Yizun; Li, Chaoyang; Wei, Shen; Du, Liangliang; Li, Yuyang; Qi, Fei; Wang, Qiuping

    2016-07-01

    An undulator-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline (BL03U), intended for combustion chemistry studies, has been constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) in Hefei, China. The beamline is connected to the newly upgraded Hefei Light Source (HLS II), and could deliver photons in the 5-21 eV range, with a photon flux of 10(13) photons s(-1) at 10 eV when the beam current is 300 mA. The monochromator of the beamline is equipped with two gratings (200 lines mm(-1) and 400 lines mm(-1)) and its resolving power is 3900 at 7.3 eV for the 200 lines mm(-1) grating and 4200 at 14.6 eV for the 400 lines mm(-1) grating. The beamline serves three endstations which are designed for respective studies of premixed flame, fuel pyrolysis in flow reactor, and oxidation in jet-stirred reactor. Each endstation contains a reactor chamber, an ionization chamber where the molecular beam intersects with the VUV light, and a home-made reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The performance of the beamline and endstations with some preliminary results is presented here. The ability to detect reactive intermediates (e.g. H, O, OH and hydroperoxides) is advantageous in combustion chemistry research. PMID:27359154

  13. High resolution neutron imaging capabilities at BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; Morgano, M.; Panzner, T.; Lehmann, E.; Filgers, U.; Vallerga, J. V.; McPhate, J. B.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Feller, W. B.

    2015-06-01

    The cold neutron spectrum of the Beamline for neutron Optics and other Applications (BOA) at Paul Scherrer Institut enables high contrast neutron imaging because neutron cross sections for many materials increase with neutron wavelength. However, for many neutron imaging applications, spatial resolution can be as important as contrast. In this paper the neutron transmission imaging capabilities of an MCP/Timepix detector installed at the BOA beamline are presented, demonstrating the possibilities for studying sub-20 μm features in various samples. In addition to conventional neutron radiography and microtomography, the high degree of neutron polarization at the BOA beamline can be very attractive for imaging of magnetic fields, as demonstrated by our measurements. We also show that a collimated cold neutron beamline combined with a high resolution detector can produce image artifacts, (e.g. edge enhancements) due to neutron refraction and scattering. The results of our experiments indicate that the BOA beamline is a valuable addition to neutron imaging facilities, providing improved and sometimes unique capabilities for non-destructive studies with cold neutrons.

  14. Design of the Structural Biology Center beamlines at the APS (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Westrbrook, Edwin M.

    1996-09-01

    The Structural Biology Center-CAT will develop and operate a sector of the APS as a user facility for studies in macromolecular crystallography. The techniques applied will include multiple-energy anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing and polychromatic (Laue) data collection. Data will be recorded on a high resolution CCD-area detector. The SBC is constructing two beamlines, one for radiation from an undulator and one for radiation from a bending magnet. The x ray optics of both beamlines are designed to produce a highly demagnified image of the source in order to match the focal size with the sizes of the sample and the resolution element of the detector. Vertical focusing is achieved by a flat, cylindrically bent mirror. Horizontal focusing is achieved by sagittally bending the second crystal of a double crystal-monochromator. The double-crystal monochromators of both beamlines have a constant exit height output beam. On the undulator beamline, two double-crystal monochromators are installed in series—one with Si-111 crystals and the second with Si-220 crystals—in order to facilitate quick change between high flux and narrow bandwidth. For the heat-loaded first crystals, the liquid-nitrogen-cooled, thin-web design being developed by the APS has been adopted. On the bending magnet beamline, three crystals (Si-111, Si-220, Si-400) are mounted side-by-side on the first crystal stage and translated into the beam is required.

  15. CAT Guide and Beamline Directory. A key to APS Collaborative Access Teams

    SciTech Connect

    1999-07-08

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a national user facility for synchrotrons radiation research, is located at Argonne National Laboratory, approximately 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Illinois. The APS is considered a third-generation synchrotrons radiation facility (specifically designed to accommodate insertion devices to serve as radiation sources) and is one of three such facilities in the world. Currently, it is the most brilliant source in the United States for research in such diverse fields as biology, medicine, materials science, chemistry, geology, agriculture and soil science, physics, and manufacturing technology. Researchers use the APS either as members of Collaborative Access Teams (CATS) or as Independent Investigators (IIs). CATS are responsible for designing, building, and operating beamlines in one or more sectors, each sector consisting of an insertion-device (ID) beamline and a bending-magnet (BM) beamline. Each beamline is designed to accommodate a specific type of research program(s) and is optimized accordingly. CAT members are entitled to use 75% of the available beam time to pursue CAT research goals. The remaining 25% of the available beam time must be made available to IIs. This document was written to help prospective IIs determine which beamlines are suitable for their specific experiments.

  16. The vacuum ultraviolet beamline/endstations at NSRL dedicated to combustion research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhongyue; Du, Xuewei; Yang, Jiuzhong; Wang, Yizun; Li, Chaoyang; Wei, Shen; Du, Liangliang; Li, Yuyang; Qi, Fei; Wang, Qiuping

    2016-07-01

    An undulator-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) beamline (BL03U), intended for combustion chemistry studies, has been constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) in Hefei, China. The beamline is connected to the newly upgraded Hefei Light Source (HLS II), and could deliver photons in the 5-21 eV range, with a photon flux of 10(13) photons s(-1) at 10 eV when the beam current is 300 mA. The monochromator of the beamline is equipped with two gratings (200 lines mm(-1) and 400 lines mm(-1)) and its resolving power is 3900 at 7.3 eV for the 200 lines mm(-1) grating and 4200 at 14.6 eV for the 400 lines mm(-1) grating. The beamline serves three endstations which are designed for respective studies of premixed flame, fuel pyrolysis in flow reactor, and oxidation in jet-stirred reactor. Each endstation contains a reactor chamber, an ionization chamber where the molecular beam intersects with the VUV light, and a home-made reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The performance of the beamline and endstations with some preliminary results is presented here. The ability to detect reactive intermediates (e.g. H, O, OH and hydroperoxides) is advantageous in combustion chemistry research.

  17. Investigation of the heat handling capabilities of DIII-D neutral beamline internal components

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.C.; Baxi, C.B.; Hong, R.

    1993-10-01

    The current DIII-D neutral beam system is a nominal five second pulse length upgrade of a previous design rated for only 500 msec operation. While the ion sources are rated for 60 sec operation, in practice pulse lengths are limited both by the beamline internal components ability to handle the fraction of the power which is scraped off, and by the power supplies ability to provide pulse lengths of greater than 5 sec. This paper examines the capability of the existing DIII-D neutral beamline heat removing components both in terms of present and desired operating parameters. To date, at 2.5 MW per ion source, pulses are limited to 3.5 sec by beamline internal components, while at lower ratings of 2.0 MW per ion source, up to 5 sec pulses have been achieved. Recent advances and demonstration of the extraction of 3.5 MW per DIII-D ion source give an even wider window of operating conditions. A full series of beamline thermocouple data has been collected to determine the heat loading and implied surface temperatures for the various DIII-D neutral beamline internal components. These data will be presented along with an analysis of the needs for specific component upgrades, given a desire for 10 sec operation.

  18. Design of the X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline at the Taiwan Photon Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, S. H.; Yin, G. C.; Wang, D. J.; Chang, C. H.; Juang, J. M.; Huang, L. J.; Liu, C. Y.; Chang, C. F.; Chu, C. H.; Tang, M. T.

    2013-03-01

    The X-ray Nanoprobe (XNP) Beamline Project has been granted as one of the first seven beamlines at the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS). The XNP beamline and the associated instruments are designed to utilize the highly brilliant TPS light source for resolving the atomic, chemical and electronic structures of semiconductor-based devices with tens nm spatial resolution in tomographic and nondestructive manners. The beamline optics is deliberated to deliver focal spot around 40 nm with photon flux in the level of 1010 photons/sec. The stability of the focal position will be highly improved by operating the double crystal monochromator (DCM) in horizontally diffracting geometry, with minor sacrifice in energy resolution. The relative movement between sample and focusing optics is controlled by ultra-precise linear translational/flexure stages and monitored by laser interferometers. The end stations will provide conventional X-ray probes including, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL), and the emerging techniques, such as the Bragg-ptychography (BP) to overcome the spatial resolution set by the focusing optics. A novel scanning mechanism incorporating surface diffraction and BP for mapping the 3D interfacial strains is under development. The XNP beamline and associated instruments are expected to take the first synchrotron light by the end of 2015.

  19. Application of partially coherent wavefront propagation calculations for design of coherence-preserving synchrotron radiation beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubar, Oleg; Chu, Yong S.; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Yan, Hanfei

    2011-09-01

    Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) sources, such as NSLS-II and MAX-IV, will offer excellent opportunities for further development of experimental techniques exploiting X-ray coherence. However, even in these new SR sources, the radiation produced by relativistic electrons (in undulators, wigglers and bending magnets) will remain only partially coherent in the X-ray spectral range. "Extraction" of "coherent portion" of the radiation flux and its transport to sample without loss of coherence must be performed by dedicated SR beamlines, optimized for particular types of experiments. Detailed quantitative prediction of partially coherent X-ray beam properties at propagation through optical elements, which is required for the optimization of such beamlines, can only be obtained from accurate and efficient physical-optics based numerical simulations. Examples of such simulations, made for NSLS-II beamlines, using "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) computer code, are presented. Special attention is paid to the numerical analysis of the basic properties of partially coherent undulator radiation beam and its distinctions from the Gaussian beam. Performance characteristics of importance for particular beamlines, such as radiation spot size and flux at sample vs size of secondary source aperture for high-resolution microscopy beamlines, are predicted by the simulations.

  20. Noncoplanarity effects in proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Liou, M.K.; Timmermans, R.; Gibson, B.F.

    1998-10-01

    Noncoplanarity in proton-proton bremsstrahlung is investigated. Significant effects are observed for certain photon polar angles, {psi}{sub {gamma}}. Such noncoplanarity effects, not of dynamical origin, are possibly responsible for past disagreements between theory and experiment. The Harvard noncoplanar coordinate system, which avoids kinematic singularities in the cross section, is used in our calculations and is recommended for use in the analysis of experimental data. Alternative methods of presenting cross sections are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Neutron imaging options at the BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgano, M.; Peetermans, S.; Lehmann, E. H.; Panzner, T.; Filges, U.

    2014-08-01

    The BOA beamline at the Swiss spallation neutron source SINQ at Paul Scherrer Institut is a flexible instrument used mainly for testing novel techniques and devices for neutron scattering and optics, but, due to the large and relatively homogeneous field of view, it can be successfully used for experiments in the field of neutron imaging. The beamline allows also for the exploitation of advanced imaging concepts such as polarized neutron imaging and diffractive neutron imaging. In this paper we present the characterization of the BOA beamline in the light of its neutron imaging capabilities. We show also the different techniques that can be employed there as user-friendly plugins for non-standard neutron imaging experiments.

  2. Soft x-ray beamline BL7A at the UVSOR

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, T. ); Matsukawa, T. ); Naoe, S. ); Horigome, T.; Matsudo, O.; Watanabe, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A vacuum-compatible double-crystal monochromator with constant exit-beam height has been installed and operated for several years at beamline BL7A at the UVSOR facility at the Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Japan, The beamline is used both for the photons from a normal bending-magnet section and those from a 4 T superconducting three-pole horizontal wiggler. Various pairs of monochromator crystals are being used with sufficient intensity and signal to noise ratio of the output signal. Basic structure of the beamline, the mechanism of the monochromator, and some typical spectra of materials with absorption edges between 850 eV and 4 keV are reported.

  3. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-01-01

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the National Synchrotron Light Source) and the effects of these figure errors on two classes of soft x-ray beamlines are presented.

  4. High heat load crystal cooling strategies for an APS wiggler beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Beno, M.A.; Knapp, G.S.; Engbretson, M.

    1997-07-01

    High energy wigglers produce extremely high total powers. For example, the insertion device for one beamline of the Basic Energy Sciences Synchrotron Research Center (BESSRC) is an elliptical multipole wiggler (EMPW) which can generate circularly polarized X-rays on axis and produces a total power of {approximately}8 kW. This insertion device will be used to simultaneously provide x-rays to three branch lines, a branch equipped with a normal double crystal monochromator feeding a scattering and spectroscopy station, and two branches with single-bounce horizontally deflecting monochromators for Compton scattering and High Energy Diffraction. The crystal optics for this type of device require substantially different heat load solutions than those used for undulator beamlines. We will discuss how the beam is split and shared among the beamline branch lines and present the crystal cooling strategies employed for both the double-crystal monochromator and horizontally deflecting single-bounce monochromators.

  5. Light flux density threshold at which protein denaturation is induced by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamlines.

    PubMed

    Miles, A J; Janes, Robert W; Brown, A; Clarke, D T; Sutherland, J C; Tao, Y; Wallace, B A; Hoffmann, S V

    2008-07-01

    New high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines are providing important information for structural biology, but can potentially cause denaturation of the protein samples under investigation. This effect has been studied at the new CD1 dedicated SRCD beamline at ISA in Denmark, where radiation-induced thermal damage effects were observed, depending not only on the radiation flux but also on the focal spot size of the light. Comparisons with similar studies at other SRCD facilities worldwide has lead to the estimation of a flux density threshold under which SRCD beamlines should be operated when samples are to be exposed to low-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet radiation for extended periods of time.

  6. Optical Design of VLS-PGM Soft X-Ray Beamline on Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, T. T.; Modi, M. H.; Lodha, G. S.

    2010-06-23

    The optical design of a soft x-ray beamline on the bending magnet of Indus-2 synchrotron source is presented. A Varied Line Spacing Plane Grating Monochromator (VLS-PGM) was adopted with Hettrick type optics. The VLS-PGM consists of a spherical mirror and three interchangeable gratings of line densities 1200 l/mm, 400 l/mm and 150 l/mm to efficiently cover the energy region 50-1500 eV. The VLS groove parameters were obtained by minimizing defocus aberration, coma and spherical aberration. The overall performance of the beamline was estimated by detailed raytracing calculations. The beamline design, results of the raytracing calculations and the expected performances are presented.

  7. Soft x-ray spectroscopy undulator beamline at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, K.J.; Xu, Z.; Moore, J.F.; Gluskin, E.

    1997-09-01

    Construction of the high-resolution soft x ray spectroscopy undulator beamline, 2ID-C, at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been completed. The beamline, one of two soft x ray beamlines at the APS, will cover the photon energy range from 500 to 3,000 eV, with a maximum resolving power between 7,000 and 14,000. The optical design is based on a spherical grating monochromator (SGM) giving both high resolution and high flux throughput. Photon flux is calculated to be approximately 10{sup 12}--10{sup 13} photons per second with a beam size of approximately 1 x 1 mm{sup 2} at the sample.

  8. A new group of eubacterial light-driven retinal-binding proton pumps with an unusual cytoplasmic proton donor.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew; Ljumovic, Milena; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Shibata, Yohei; Ito, Shota; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-12-01

    One of the main functions of microbial rhodopsins is outward-directed light-driven proton transport across the plasma membrane, which can provide sources of energy alternative to respiration and chlorophyll photosynthesis. Proton-pumping rhodopsins are found in Archaea (Halobacteria), multiple groups of Bacteria, numerous fungi, and some microscopic algae. An overwhelming majority of these proton pumps share the common transport mechanism, in which a proton from the retinal Schiff base is first transferred to the primary proton acceptor (normally an Asp) on the extracellular side of retinal. Next, reprotonation of the Schiff base from the cytoplasmic side is mediated by a carboxylic proton donor (Asp or Glu), which is located on helix C and is usually hydrogen-bonded to Thr or Ser on helix B. The only notable exception from this trend was recently found in Exiguobacterium, where the carboxylic proton donor is replaced by Lys. Here we describe a new group of efficient proteobacterial retinal-binding light-driven proton pumps which lack the carboxylic proton donor on helix C (most often replaced by Gly) but possess a unique His residue on helix B. We characterize the group spectroscopically and propose that this histidine forms a proton-donating complex compensating for the loss of the carboxylic proton donor.

  9. A new group of eubacterial light-driven retinal-binding proton pumps with an unusual cytoplasmic proton donor.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andrew; Ljumovic, Milena; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Shibata, Yohei; Ito, Shota; Inoue, Keiichi; Kandori, Hideki; Brown, Leonid S

    2015-12-01

    One of the main functions of microbial rhodopsins is outward-directed light-driven proton transport across the plasma membrane, which can provide sources of energy alternative to respiration and chlorophyll photosynthesis. Proton-pumping rhodopsins are found in Archaea (Halobacteria), multiple groups of Bacteria, numerous fungi, and some microscopic algae. An overwhelming majority of these proton pumps share the common transport mechanism, in which a proton from the retinal Schiff base is first transferred to the primary proton acceptor (normally an Asp) on the extracellular side of retinal. Next, reprotonation of the Schiff base from the cytoplasmic side is mediated by a carboxylic proton donor (Asp or Glu), which is located on helix C and is usually hydrogen-bonded to Thr or Ser on helix B. The only notable exception from this trend was recently found in Exiguobacterium, where the carboxylic proton donor is replaced by Lys. Here we describe a new group of efficient proteobacterial retinal-binding light-driven proton pumps which lack the carboxylic proton donor on helix C (most often replaced by Gly) but possess a unique His residue on helix B. We characterize the group spectroscopically and propose that this histidine forms a proton-donating complex compensating for the loss of the carboxylic proton donor. PMID:26260121

  10. High-brightness beamline for x-ray spectroscopy at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, R.C.C.; Jones, G.; Lindle, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range, designed to achieve the goals of high energy resolution, high flux, and high brightness at the sample. When completed later this year, it will be the first ALS monochromatic hard x-ray beamline, and its brightness will be an order of magnitude higher than presently available in this energy range. In addition, it will provide flux and resolution comparable to any other beamline now in operation. To achieve these goals, two technical improvements, relative to existing x-ray beamlines, were incorporated. First, a somewhat novel optical design for x-rays, in which matched toroidal mirrors are positioned before and after the double-crystal monochromator, was adopted. This configuration allows for high resolution by passing a collimated beam through the monochromator, and for high brightness by focusing the ALS source on the sample with unit magnification. Second, a new {open_quotes}Cowan type{close_quotes} double-crystal monochromator based on the design used at NSLS beamline X-24A was developed. The measured mechanical precision of this new monochromator shows significant improvement over existing designs, without using positional feedback available with piezoelectric devices. Such precision is essential because of the high brightness of the radiation and the long distance (12 m) from the source (sample) to the collimating (focusing) mirror. This combination of features will provide a bright, high resolution, and stable x-ray beam for use in the x-ray spectroscopy program at the ALS.

  11. The SEXTANTS beamline at SOLEIL: a new facility for elastic, inelastic and coherent scattering of soft X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchi, M.; Jaouen, N.; Popescu, H.; Gaudemer, R.; Tonnerre, J. M.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Hague, C. F.; Delmotte, A.; Dubuisson, J. M.; Cauchon, G.; Lagarde, B.; Polack, F.

    2013-03-01

    SEXTANTS is a new SOLEIL beamline dedicated to soft X-ray scattering techniques. The beamline, covering the 50-1700 eV energy range, features two Apple-II undulators for polarization control and a fixed-deviation monochromator. Two branch-lines host three end-stations for elastic, inelastic and coherent scattering experiments.

  12. The macromolecular crystallography beamlines at BESSY II of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin: Current status and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Uwe; Förster, Ronald; Hellmig, Michael; Huschmann, Franziska U.; Kastner, Alexandra; Malecki, Piotr; Pühringer, Sandra; Röwer, Martin; Sparta, Karine; Steffien, Michael; Ühlein, Monika; Wilk, Piotr; Weiss, Manfred S.

    2015-07-01

    For a little over a decade now, the Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) group at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has been operating three state-of-the-art synchrotron beamlines for MX at the BESSY II storage ring in Berlin. The three HZB-MX beamlines, BL14.1, BL14.2 and BL14.3, serve a stable and growing user community of currently more than 100 independent research groups from Berlin, Germany and Europe. Every year, the beamlines provide close to 200 days of MX-beamtime. Over time, the HZB-MX beamlines and endstations, in particular BL14.1, have been continually developed and upgraded and, since 2010, they operate as the most productive MX beamlines in Germany. The environment of the beamlines includes various ancillary equipment as well as additional facilities, such as office space adjacent to the beamlines, a sample preparation laboratory, a safety level 1 biology laboratory (HZB-MX BioLab) and all necessary computing resources. In this paper, the current status of the beamlines as well as the ongoing developments are described.

  13. Soft-x-ray and vacuum-ultraviolet beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source 700-MeV storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G.P.; Howells, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    We summarize the characteristics of the first beamlines which are being installed and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) 700 MeV storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We also give a progress report as of July 1982 on the early stages of beamline alignment and operation in which particular attention is paid to the 5 beamlines which NSLS has developed. The report describes in detail a novel method for beamline alignment which is of general application.

  14. Optimization of the soft x-ray transmission microscopy beamline at the ALBA light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Pereiro, Eva; Valcárcel, Ricardo; Ferrer, Salvador; Nicolas, Josep

    2013-09-01

    Mistral is the soft X-ray full field microscopy beamline at the ALBA light source. The beamline is designed to have large source acceptance and to provide constant magnification at the exit slit for photon energies between 270 and 2600 eV. The monochromator is a variation of the Petersen plane grating monochromator in which a variable line spacing grating is used to maintain the beam focused at the exit slit, independently of the fixed focus constant, and to cancel aberrations. We present the alignment strategy used to compensate errors of the optical elements, and report about the commissioning results.

  15. The 7BM beamline at the APS: a facility for time-resolved fluid dynamics measurements

    PubMed Central

    Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Christopher F.; Arms, Dohn; Dufresne, Eric M.; Gibson, Harold; Wang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, X-ray radiography has been used to probe the internal structure of dense sprays with microsecond time resolution and a spatial resolution of 15 µm even in high-pressure environments. Recently, the 7BM beamline at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) has been commissioned to focus on the needs of X-ray spray radiography measurements. The spatial resolution and X-ray intensity at this beamline represent a significant improvement over previous time-resolved X-ray radiography measurements at the APS. PMID:22713903

  16. APS beamline standard components handbook, Version 1.3. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, U.; Shu, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-02-01

    This Handbook in its current version (1.3) contains descriptions, specifications, and preliminary engineering design drawings for many of the standard components. The design status and schedules have been provided wherever possible. In the near future, the APS plans to update engineering drawings of identified standard beamline components and complete the Handbook. The completed version of this Handbook will become available to both the CATs and potential vendors. Use of standard components should result in major cost reductions for CATs in the areas of beamline design and construction.

  17. The X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy Beamline at the Australian Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Paterson, D.; Jonge, M. D. de; Howard, D. L.; Lewis, W.; McKinlay, J.; Starritt, A.; Kusel, M.; Ryan, C. G.; Kirkham, R.; Moorhead, G.; Siddons, D. P.

    2011-09-09

    A hard x-ray micro-nanoprobe has commenced operation at the Australian Synchrotron providing versatile x-ray fluorescence microscopy across an incident energy range from 4 to 25 keV. Two x-ray probes are used to collect {mu}-XRF and {mu}-XANES for elemental and chemical microanalysis: a Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror microprobe for micron resolution studies and a Fresnel zone plate nanoprobe capable of 60-nm resolution. Some unique aspects of the beamline design and operation are discussed. An advanced energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence detection scheme named Maia has been developed for the beamline, which enables ultrafast x-ray fluorescence microscopy.

  18. Analysis of the optical design of the NSLS-II coherent hard x-ray beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluerasu, Andrei; Chubar, Oleg; Kaznatcheev, Konstantine; Baltser, Jana; Wiegart, Lutz; Evans-Lutterodt, Kenneth; Carlucci-Dayton, Mary; Berman, Lonny

    2011-09-01

    Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the NSLS-II offer excellent opportunities for the development of experimental techniques exploiting x-ray coherence. Coherent light scattered by a heterogeneous sample produces a speckle pattern characteristic for the specific arrangement of the scatterers. This may vary over time, and the resultant intensity fluctuations can be measured and analyzed to provide information about the sample dynamics. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) extends the capability of dynamic light scattering to opaque and turbid samples and extends the measurements of time evolution to nanometer length scales. As a consequence XPCS became crucial in the study of dynamics in systems including, but not being limited to, colloids, polymers, complex fluids, surfaces and interfaces, phase ordering alloys, etc. In this paper we present the conceptual optical design and the theoretical performance of the Coherent Hard X-ray (CHX) beamline at NSLS-II, dedicated to XPCS and other coherent scattering techniques. For the optical design of this beamline, there is a tradeoff between the coherence needed to distinguish individual speckles and the phase acceptance (high intensity) required to measure fast dynamics with an adequate signal-to-noise level. As XPCS is a "photon hungry" technique, the beamline optimization requires maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured intensity-intensity autocorrelation function. The degree of coherence, as measured by a two-slit (Young) experiment, is used to characterize the speckle pattern visibilities. The beamline optimization strategy consists of maximization of the on-sample intensity while keeping the degree of coherence within the 0.1-0.5 range. The resulted design deviates substantially from an ad-hoc modification of a hard x-ray beamline for XPCS measurements. The CHX beamline will permit studies of complex systems and measurements of bulk dynamics down to the

  19. Analysis of the optical design of the NSLS-II Coherent Hard X-ray beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Fluerasu A.; Chubar, O.; Kaznatcheev, K.; Baltser, J.; Wiegart, Lutz; Evans-Lutterodt, K.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Berman, L.

    2011-08-21

    Ultra-low emittance third-generation synchrotron radiation sources such as the NSLS-II offer excellent opportunities for the development of experimental techniques exploiting x-ray coherence. Coherent light scattered by a heterogeneous sample produces a speckle pattern characteristic for the specific arrangement of the scatterers. This may vary over time, and the resultant intensity fluctuations can be measured and analyzed to provide information about the sample dynamics. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) extends the capability of dynamic light scattering to opaque and turbid samples and extends the measurements of time evolution to nanometer length scales. As a consequence XPCS became crucial in the study of dynamics in systems including, but not being limited to, colloids, polymers, complex fluids, surfaces and interfaces, phase ordering alloys, etc. In this paper we present the conceptual optical design and the theoretical performance of the Coherent Hard X-ray (CHX) beamline at NSLS-II, dedicated to XPCS and other coherent scattering techniques. For the optical design of this beamline, there is a tradeoff between the coherence needed to distinguish individual speckles and the phase acceptance (high intensity) required to measure fast dynamics with an adequate signal-to-noise level. As XPCS is a 'photon hungry' technique, the beamline optimization requires maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured intensity-intensity autocorrelation function. The degree of coherence, as measured by a two-slit (Young) experiment, is used to characterize the speckle pattern visibilities. The beamline optimization strategy consists of maximization of the on-sample intensity while keeping the degree of coherence within the 0.1-0.5 range. The resulted design deviates substantially from an ad-hoc modification of a hard x-ray beamline for XPCS measurements. The CHX beamline will permit studies of complex systems and measurements of bulk dynamics down to the

  20. Beamline BL-07 at Indus-2: a facility for microfabrication research.

    PubMed

    Dhamgaye, V P; Lodha, G S; Gowri Sankar, B; Kant, C

    2014-01-01

    The X-ray lithography beamline on Indus-2 is now operational, with two modes of operation. With a pair of X-ray mirrors it is possible to tune the energy spectrum between 1 and 20 keV with a controlled spectral bandwidth. In its 'no optics' mode, hard X-rays up to 40 keV are available. Features and performance of the beamline are presented along with some example structures. Structures fabricated include honeycomb structures in PMMA using a stainless steel stencil mask and a compound refractive X-ray lens using a polyimide-gold mask in SU-8. PMID:24365946

  1. New developments in high pressure x-ray spectroscopy beamline at High Pressure Collaborative Access Team

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y. M. Chow, P.; Boman, G.; Bai, L. G.; Rod, E.; Bommannavar, A.; Kenney-Benson, C.; Sinogeikin, S.; Shen, G. Y.

    2015-07-15

    The 16 ID-D (Insertion Device - D station) beamline of the High Pressure Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source is dedicated to high pressure research using X-ray spectroscopy techniques typically integrated with diamond anvil cells. The beamline provides X-rays of 4.5-37 keV, and current available techniques include X-ray emission spectroscopy, inelastic X-ray scattering, and nuclear resonant scattering. The recent developments include a canted undulator upgrade, 17-element analyzer array for inelastic X-ray scattering, and an emission spectrometer using a polycapillary half-lens. Recent development projects and future prospects are also discussed.

  2. Positron beam optics for the 2D-ACAR spectrometer at the NEPOMUC beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceeh, H.; Weber, J. A.; Hugenschmidt, C.; Leitner, M.; Boni, P.

    2014-04-01

    In the last year a conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer has been set up and brought to operation at TUM. Once the NEPOMUC beamline is extended to the new experimental hall at the research reactor FRM-II the conventional 2D-ACAR spectrometer will be upgraded with a second sample chamber in order to be integrated to the NEPOMUC beamline facility. This spectrometer will add a complete new quality to 2D-ACAR experiments as it allows to track the evolution of the electronic structure from the surface to the bulk. We present the design features of the positron beam optics and the sample environment.

  3. Neutron imaging experiments at E-12 beam-line of CIRUS

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Ashish; Kashyap, Yogesh; Shukla, Mayank; Sarkar, P. S.; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    Neutron imaging beam-line at E-12 beam port of CIRUS reactor India has been developed to implement Neutron tomography, phase contrast imaging and dynamic imaging techniques for various applications. Several experiments on these techniques have been carried out successfully. Neutron radiography and tomography has been used to study blisters formation in pressure tube along with many other applications. Similarly phase contrast imaging has been used to study its feasibility for better contrast in radiographic images. Dynamic imaging has been applied to study the melting of pure and impure lead under heat. In this paper we report the details of various experiments performed at this beam-line.

  4. Commissioning of Angle Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Beamline on Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A. K.; Sagdeo, Archna; Gupta, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, M. N.; Gupta, R. K.; Kane, S. R.; Deb, S. K.

    2011-07-15

    An Angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) beamline on bending magnet source of Indus-2 synchrotron (2.5 GeV, 300 mA) has been commissioned, for the study of single and polycrystalline samples. The beamline optics is based on vertically focusing Pt-coated pre and post mirrors and sagittal focusing Si (311) based double crystal monochromator. Experimental station consists of a six circle diffractometer equipped with scintillation detector and an image plate area detector for powder diffraction. XRD experiments have been performed to study single crystal and polycrystalline samples.

  5. Data acquisition and control software for XRD beamline at Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Sanjeev R.; Garg, C. K.; Sinha, A. K.

    2010-06-23

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) beamline is under commissioning on Indus-2 synchrotron radiation facility. The experimental setup of XRD beamline consists of a six-circle diffractometer and various detector systems such as scintillation detector, ionization chamber and image plate. The diffractometer can be controlled via EIA232 serial interface or Ethernet. Standard data acquisition software with a graphical user interface has been developed using LabVIEW. A firm safety and error handling scheme is implemented for failsafe operation of the experimental station. This paper describes in detail the data acquisition and control software for the experimental station.

  6. Correlated single-crystal electronic absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography at NSLS beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    Orville, A.M.; Buono, R.; Cowan, M.; Heroux, A.; Shea-McCarthy, G.; Schneider, D. K.; Skinner, J. M.; Skinner, M. J.; Stoner-Ma, D.; Sweet, R. M.

    2011-05-01

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  7. Note: Construction of x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption fine structure beamline at the Pohang Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik-Jae; Yu, Chung-Jong; Yun, Young-Duck; Lee, Chae-Soon; Seo, In Deuk; Kim, Hyo-Yun; Lee, Woul-Woo; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2010-02-15

    A new hard x-ray beamline, 10B KIST-PAL beamline (BL10B), has been designed and constructed at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea. The beamline, operated by Pohang Accelerator Laboratory-Korean Institute of Science and Technology consortium, is dedicated to x-ray scattering (XRS) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments. X rays with photon energies from 4.0 to 16.0 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a collimating mirror, a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, and a toroidal mirror. Basic experimental equipments for XAFS measurement, a high resolution diffractometry, an image plate detector system, and a hot stage have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, it is observed that BL10B beamline can perform XRS and XAFS measurements successfully.

  8. Correlated Single-Crystal Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at NSLS Beamline X26-C

    SciTech Connect

    A Orville; R Buono; M Cowan; A Heroux; G Shea-McCarthy; D Schneider; J Skinner; M Skinner; D Stoner-Ma; R Sweet

    2011-12-31

    The research philosophy and new capabilities installed at NSLS beamline X26-C to support electronic absorption and Raman spectroscopies coupled with X-ray diffraction are reviewed. This beamline is dedicated full time to multidisciplinary studies with goals that include revealing the relationship between the electronic and atomic structures in macromolecules. The beamline instrumentation has been fully integrated such that optical absorption spectra and X-ray diffraction images are interlaced. Therefore, optical changes induced by X-ray exposure can be correlated with X-ray diffraction data collection. The installation of Raman spectroscopy into the beamline is also briefly reviewed. Data are now routinely generated almost simultaneously from three complementary types of experiments from the same sample. The beamline is available now to the NSLS general user population.

  9. The M. D. Anderson proton therapy system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Alfred; Gillin, Michael; Bues, Martin; Zhu, X. Ronald; Suzuki, Kazumichi; Mohan, Radhe; Woo, Shiao; Lee, Andrew; Komaki, Ritsko; Cox, James; Hiramoto, Kazuo; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishida, Takayuki; Sasaki, Toshie; Matsuda, Koji

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe University of Texas M. D. Anderson proton therapy system (PTC-H) including the accelerator, beam transport, and treatment delivery systems, the functionality and clinical parameters for passive scattering and pencil beam scanning treatment modes, and the results of acceptance tests. Methods: The PTC-H has a synchrotron (70-250 MeV) and four treatment rooms. An overall control system manages the treatment, physics, and service modes of operation. An independent safety system ensures the safety of patients, staff, and equipment. Three treatment rooms have isocentric gantries and one room has two fixed horizontal beamlines, which include a large-field treatment nozzle, used primarily for prostate treatments, and a small-field treatment nozzle for ocular treatments. Two gantry treatment rooms and the fixed-beam treatment room have passive scattering nozzles. The third gantry has a pencil beam scanning nozzle for the delivery of intensity modulated proton treatments (IMPT) and single field uniform dose (SFUD) treatments. The PTC-H also has an experimental room with a fixed horizontal beamline and a passive scattering nozzle. The equipment described above was provided by Hitachi, Ltd. Treatment planning is performed using the Eclipse system from Varian Medical Systems and data management is handled by the MOSAIQ system from IMPAC Medical Systems, Inc. The large-field passive scattering nozzles use double scattering systems in which the first scatterers are physically integrated with the range modulation wheels. The proton beam is gated on the rotating range modulation wheels at gating angles designed to produce spread-out-Bragg peaks ranging in size from 2 to 16 g/cm{sup 2}. Field sizes of up to 25x25 cm{sup 2} can be achieved with the double scattering system. The IMPT delivery technique is discrete spot scanning, which has a maximum field size of 30x30 cm{sup 2}. Depth scanning is achieved by changing the energy

  10. Parametrized energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with kinetic energies down to 1 GeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    A new estimation of the interstellar proton spectrum is made in which the source term of primary protons is taken from shock acceleration theory and the cosmic ray propagation calculation is based on a proposed nonuniform galactic disk model.

  11. The Schwarzschild Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Haramein, Nassim

    2010-11-24

    We review our model of a proton that obeys the Schwarzschild condition. We find that only a very small percentage ({approx}10{sup -39}%) of the vacuum fluctuations available within a proton volume need be cohered and converted to mass-energy in order for the proton to meet the Schwarzschild condition. This proportion is equivalent to that between gravitation and the strong force where gravitation is thought to be {approx}10{sup -38} to 10{sup -40} weaker than the strong force. Gravitational attraction between two contiguous Schwarzschild protons can accommodate both nucleon and quark confinement. We calculate that two contiguous Schwarzschild protons would rotate at c and have a period of 10{sup -23} s and a frequency of 10{sup 22} Hz which is characteristic of the strong force interaction time and a close approximation of the gamma emission typically associated with nuclear decay. We include a scaling law and find that the Schwarzschild proton data point lies near the least squares trend line for organized matter. Using a semi-classical model, we find that a proton charge orbiting at a proton radius at c generates a good approximation to the measured anomalous magnetic moment.

  12. Electron-proton spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winckler, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An electron-proton spectrometer was designed to measure the geomagnetically trapped radiation in a geostationary orbit at 6.6 earth radii in the outer radiation belt. This instrument is to be flown on the Applications Technology Satellite-F (ATS-F). The electron-proton spectrometer consists of two permanent magnet surface barrier detector arrays and associated electronics capable of selecting and detecting electrons in three energy ranges: (1) 30-50 keV, (2) 150-200 keV, and (3) 500 keV and protons in three energy ranges. The electron-proton spectrometer has the capability of measuring the fluxes of electrons and protons in various directions with respect to the magnetic field lines running through the satellite. One magnet detector array system is implemented to scan between EME north and south through west, sampling the directional flux in 15 steps. The other magnet-detector array system is fixed looking toward EME east.

  13. Medical Applications: Proton Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppel, Cynthia

    2009-05-01

    Proton therapy is a highly advanced and precise form of radiation treatment for cancer. Due to the characteristic Bragg peak associated with ion energy deposition, proton therapy provides the radiation oncologist with an improved method of treatment localization within a patient, as compared with conventional radiation therapy using X-rays or electrons. Controlling disease and minimizing side effects are the twin aims of radiation treatment. Proton beams enhance the opportunity for both by facilitating maximal dose to tumor and minimal dose to surrounding tissue. In the United States, five proton radiotherapy centers currently treat cancer patients, with more in the construction phase. New facilities and enabling technologies abound. An overview of the treatment modality generally, as well as of the capabilities and research planned for the field and for the Hampton University Proton Therapy Institute in particular, will be presented.

  14. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm‑2s‑1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  15. Partially coherent wavefront propagation simulations for inelastic x-ray scattering beamline including crystal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.; Sutter, John P.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    Up to now simulation of perfect crystal optics in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) wave-optics computer code was not available, thus hindering the accurate modelling of synchrotron radiation beamlines containing optical components with multiple-crystal arrangements, such as double-crystal monochromators and high-energy-resolution monochromators. A new module has been developed for SRW for calculating dynamical diffraction from a perfect crystal in the Bragg case. We demonstrate its successful application to the modelling of partially-coherent undulator radiation propagating through the Inelastic X-ray Scattering (IXS) beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The IXS beamline contains a double-crystal and a multiple-crystal highenergy- resolution monochromator, as well as complex optics such as compound refractive lenses and Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors for the X-ray beam transport and shaping, which makes it an excellent case for benchmarking the new functionalities of the updated SRW codes. As a photon-hungry experimental technique, this case study for the IXS beamline is particularly valuable as it provides an accurate evaluation of the photon flux at the sample position, using the most advanced simulation methods and taking into account parameters of the electron beam, details of undulator source, and the crystal optics.

  16. Mass and charge overlaps in beamline implantation into compound semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Current, M. I.; Eddy, R.; Hudak, C.; Serfass, J.; Mount, G.

    2012-11-01

    Mass overlaps occurring as a result of extraction of ions from an arc discharge and gas collisions, producing molecular break up and charge exchange in the accelerator beamline, are examined for ion implantation into compound semiconductors. The effects of the choice of plasma gas elements for Be+ implants are examined as an example.

  17. The Structural Biology Center 19ID undulator beamline: facility specifications and protein crystallographic results

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Alkire, Randy W.; Evans, Gwyndaf; Rotella, Frank J.; Lazarski, Krzystof; Zhang, Rong-Guang; Ginell, Stephan L.; Duke, Norma; Naday, Istvan; Lazarz, Jack; Molitsky, Michael J.; Keefe, Lisa; Gonczy, John; Rock, Larry; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Walsh, Martin A.; Westbrook, Edwin; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The 19ID undulator beamline of the Structure Biology Center has been designed and built to take full advantage of the high flux, brilliance and quality of X-ray beams delivered by the Advanced Photon Source. The beamline optics are capable of delivering monochromatic X-rays with photon energies from 3.5 to 20 keV (3.5–0.6 Å wavelength) with fluxes up to 8–18 × 1012 photons s−1 (depending on photon energy) onto cryogenically cooled crystal samples. The size of the beam (full width at half-maximum) at the sample position can be varied from 2.2 mm × 1.0 mm (horizontal × vertical, unfocused) to 0.083 mm × 0.020 mm in its fully focused configuration. Specimen-to-detector distances of between 100 mm and 1500 mm can be used. The high flexibility, inherent in the design of the optics, coupled with a κ-geometry goniometer and beamline control software allows optimal strategies to be adopted in protein crystallographic experiments, thus maximizing the chances of their success. A large-area mosaic 3 × 3 CCD detector allows high-quality diffraction data to be measured rapidly to the crystal diffraction limits. The beamline layout and the X-ray optical and endstation components are described in detail, and the results of representative crystallographic experiments are presented. PMID:16371706

  18. Novel characteristics of VUV insertion device beamlines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T.; Heimann, P.

    1991-10-01

    The design of VUV beamlines for the Advanced Light Source is discussed. Features of the design serve to illustrate the careful attention required in order to preserve the performance of the low emittance ``third generation`` storage ring, operating with insertion devices. 11 refs.

  19. Novel characteristics of VUV insertion device beamlines at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, T.; Heimann, P.

    1991-10-01

    The design of VUV beamlines for the Advanced Light Source is discussed. Features of the design serve to illustrate the careful attention required in order to preserve the performance of the low emittance third generation'' storage ring, operating with insertion devices. 11 refs.

  20. Neutrinos from the NuMI beamline in the MiniBooNE detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis A.

    2006-07-11

    With the startup of the NuMI beamline early in 2005, the MiniBooNE detector has the unique opportunity to be the first user of an off-axis neutrino beam (110 mrad off-axis). MiniBooNE is assembling a rich sample of neutrino interactions from this source.

  1. Characteristics and performance of the Los Alamos VUV beamline at the NSLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, R. J.; Trela, W. J.; Michaud, F. D.; Southworth, S. H.; Alkire, R. W.; Roy, P.; Rothe, R.; Walsh, P. J.; Shinn, N.

    1988-04-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Los Alamos VUV synchrotron radiation beamline, U3C, on the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beamline uses separate function optics to collect and focus the horizontally and vertically diverging beam. The monochromator is a grazing incidence Rowland circle instrument of the extended grasshopper design (ERG). A postmonochromator refocusing mirror is used to focus or collimate the diverging beam from the monochromator. The beamline control and diagnostics systems are also discussed. Particular emphasis in the design has been placed on the reduction of stray and harmonic light. Higher order light is reduced by a grazing angle mirror low pass filter installed immediately downstream from the monochromator while stray light is reduced through the use of baffles and thin film filters. Also included in the line is a differential pumping section that permits gas phase and other experiments requiring pressures in the 10 -5 to 10 -4 Torr range to be coupled to the beamline.

  2. The multi-purpose hard X-ray beamline BL10 at the DELTA storage ring.

    PubMed

    Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D; Wagner, R; Szillat, S; Hüsecken, A K; Istomin, K; Pietsch, U; Frahm, Ronald

    2014-07-01

    The layout and the characteristics of the hard X-ray beamline BL10 at the superconducting asymmetric wiggler at the 1.5 GeV Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA are described. This beamline is equipped with a Si(111) channel-cut monochromator and is dedicated to X-ray studies in the spectral range from ∼4 keV to ∼16 keV photon energy. There are two different endstations available. While X-ray absorption studies in different detection modes (transmission, fluorescence, reflectivity) can be performed on a designated table, a six-axis kappa diffractometer is installed for X-ray scattering and reflectivity experiments. Different detector set-ups are integrated into the beamline control software, i.e. gas-filled ionization chambers, different photodiodes, as well as a Pilatus 2D-detector are permanently available. The performance of the beamline is illustrated by high-quality X-ray absorption spectra from several reference compounds. First applications include temperature-dependent EXAFS experiments from liquid-nitrogen temperature in a bath cryostat up to ∼660 K by using a dedicated furnace. Besides transmission measurements, fluorescence detection for dilute sample systems as well as surface-sensitive reflection-mode experiments are presented.

  3. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm-2s-1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  4. Thermal management for LLNL/UC/SSRL bending magnet beamline VIII at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, E.J.; Younger, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    All the important heat loads on the elements of Beamline VIII are cataloged. The principal elements are identified and their heat loads tabulated for various loading scenarios. The expected heat loads are those from normal operations including the anticipated performance improvements planned for the SPEAR ring and from abnormal operations due to positional perturbations of the electron beam. (LEW)

  5. Photostimulated phosphor based image plate detection system for HRVUV beamline at Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haris, K.; Singh, Param Jeet; Shastri, Aparna; Sunanda, K.; Babita, K.; Rao, S. V. N. Bhaskara; Ahmad, Shabbir; Tauheed, A.

    2014-12-01

    A high resolution vacuum ultraviolet (HRVUV) beamline based on a 6.65 m off-plane Eagle spectrometer is in operation at the Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source, RRCAT, Indore, India. To facilitate position sensitive detection and fast spectral recording, a new BaFBr:Eu2+ phosphor based image plate (IP) detection system interchangeable with the existing photomultiplier (PMT) scanning system has been installed on this beamline. VUV photoabsorption studies on Xe, O2, N2O and SO2 are carried out to evaluate the performance of the IP detection system. An FWHM of ~0.5 Å is achieved for the Xe atomic line at 1469.6 Å. Reproducibility of spectra is found to be within the experimental resolution. Compared to the PMT scanning system, the IP shows several advantages in terms of sensitivity, recording time and S/N ratio, which are highlighted in the paper. This is the first report of incorporation of an IP detection system in a VUV beamline using synchrotron radiation. Commissioning of the new detection system is expected to greatly enhance the utilization of the HRVUV beamline as a number of spectroscopic experiments which require fast recording times combined with a good signal to noise ratio are now feasible.

  6. TIME-RESOLVED INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY IN THE U121R BEAMLINE AT THE NSLS

    SciTech Connect

    CARR,G.L.; LAVEIGNE,J.D.; LOBO,R.P.S.M.; REITZE,D.H.; TANNER,D.B.

    1999-07-19

    A facility for performing time-resolved infrared spectroscopy has been developed at the NSLS, primarily at beamline U12IR. The pulsed IR light from the synchrotron is used to perform pump-probe spectroscopy. The authors present here a description of the facility and results for the relaxation of photoexcitations in both a semiconductor and superconductor.

  7. Paraxial SGM beamlines for coherence experiments at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Anthony I; Warwick, Anthony I; Howells, Malcolm

    2008-07-24

    Beamlines have been designed for coherence experiments at the ALS based on brightness preserving spherical grating monochromators. The operation is almost paraxial so that a very simple scheme can deliver the modest spectral resolution required, with just two focusing optics, one of which is the spherical grating.

  8. Proton-proton colliding beam facility ISABELLE

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, H

    1980-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the status of the ISABELLE construction project, which has the objective of building a 400 + 400 GeV proton colliding beam facility. The major technical features of the superconducting accelerators with their projected performance are described. Progress made so far, difficulties encountered, and the program until completion in 1986 is briefly reviewed.

  9. Focusing, collimation and flux throughput at the IMCA-CAT bending-magnet beamline at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Koshelev, Irina; Huang, Rong; Graber, Timothy; Meron, Mati; Muir, J Lewis; Lavender, William; Battaile, Kevin; Mulichak, Anne M; Keefe, Lisa J

    2009-09-01

    The IMCA-CAT bending-magnet beamline was upgraded with a collimating mirror in order to achieve the energy resolution required to conduct high-quality multi- and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD/SAD) experiments without sacrificing beamline flux throughput. Following the upgrade, the bending-magnet beamline achieves a flux of 8 x 10(11) photons s(-1) at 1 A wavelength, at a beamline aperture of 1.5 mrad (horizontal) x 86 microrad (vertical), with energy resolution (limited mostly by the intrinsic resolution of the monochromator optics) deltaE/E = 1.5 x 10(-4) (at 10 kV). The beamline operates in a dynamic range of 7.5-17.5 keV and delivers to the sample focused beam of size (FWHM) 240 microm (horizontally) x 160 microm (vertically). The performance of the 17-BM beamline optics and its deviation from ideally shaped optics is evaluated in the context of the requirements imposed by the needs of protein crystallography experiments. An assessment of flux losses is given in relation to the (geometric) properties of major beamline components.

  10. A comparison of three different ray trace programs for x-ray and infrared synchrotron beamline designs

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, S.C.; Jung, C.R.

    1997-07-01

    There are a number of ray trace programs currently used for the design of synchrotron beamlines. While several of these programs have been written and used mostly within the programmer`s institution, many have also been available to the general public. This paper discusses three such programs. One is a commercial product oriented for the general optical designer (not specifically for synchrotron beamlines). One is designed for synchrotron beamlines and is free with restricted availability. Finally, one is designed for synchrotron beamlines and is used primarily in one institution. The wealth of information from general optical materials and components catalogs is readily available in the commercial program for general optical designs. This makes the design of an infrared beamline easier from the standpoint of component selection. However, this program is not easily configured for synchrotron beamline designs, particularly for a bending magnet source. The synchrotron ray trace programs offer a variety of sources, but generally are not as easy to use from the standpoint of the user interface. This paper shows ray traces of the same beamline Optikwerks, SHADOW, and RAY, and compares the results.

  11. 7-GeV advanced photon source beamline initiative: Conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The DOE is building a new generation 6-7 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source known as the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. This facility, to be completed in FY 1996, can provide 70 x-ray sources of unprecedented brightness to meet the research needs of virtually all scientific disciplines and numerous technologies. The technological research capability of the APS in the areas of energy, communications and health will enable a new partnership between the DOE and US industry. Current funding for the APS will complete the current phase of construction so that scientists can begin their applications in FY 1996. Comprehensive utilization of the unique properties of APS beams will enable cutting-edge research not currently possible. It is now appropriate to plan to construct additional radiation sources and beamline standard components to meet the excess demands of the APS users. In this APS Beamline Initiative, 2.5-m-long insertion-device x-ray sources will be built on four straight sections of the APS storage ring, and an additional four bending-magnet sources will also be put in use. The front ends for these eight x-ray sources will be built to contain and safeguard access to these bright x-ray beams. In addition, funds will be provided to build standard beamline components to meet scientific and technological research demands of the Collaborative Access Teams. The Conceptual Design Report (CDR) for the APS Beamline Initiative describes the scope of all the above technical and conventional construction and provides a detailed cost and schedule for these activities. The document also describes the preconstruction R&D plans for the Beamline Initiative activities and provides the cost estimates for the required R&D.

  12. Nanoscopium: a Scanning Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline at Synchrotron Soleil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somogyi, A.; Polack, F.; Moreno, T.

    2010-06-01

    Nanoscopium is the single scanning hard X-ray nano-probe beamline planned at SOLEIL. This ˜155 m long beamline will fully exploit the high brilliance and coherence characteristics of the X-ray beam both for diffraction limited focusing and for contrast formation. It will offer the most advanced imaging techniques in multimodal mode and will be a research tool for a wide user community working in the fields of earth-, environmental-, and life-sciences. The different μ-μnano-probe techniques offered by the beamline will permit elemental mapping at trace (ppm) levels (scanning XRF), speciation mapping (XANES), phase gradient mapping (scanning differential phase contrast), and density-contrast based imaging of internal structures (coherent diffraction imaging) in the 30 nm to 1 μm spatial resolution range, also in "in situ conditions". Nanoscopium will cover the 5-20 keV energy range. The stability of the nanobeam will be ensured by horizontally reflecting beamline optics (a sagitally and a tangentially pre-focusing mirror, horizontally reflecting monochromators) in front of the overfilled secondary source. Trade-off between high energy resolution (ΔE/E˜10-4) and high flux (1011 ph/s with ΔE/E˜10-2) will be achieved by two interchangeable monochromators (a double crystal and a double multilayer one). KB mirror and FZP lenses will be used as focusing devices. The beamline is in the design and construction phase. It is foreseen to be open for users at the beginning of 2013.

  13. A Superconducting Linac Proton Driver at Fermilab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, G. William

    2004-05-01

    A proton driver has emerged as the leading candidate for Fermilab's next near-term accelerator project. The preferred technical solution is an 8 GeV superconducting linac based on technology developed for TESLA and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Its primary mission is to serve as a single-stage H- injector to prepare 2 MW "Super-Beams" for Neutrino experiments using the Fermilab Main Injector. The linac can also accelerate electrons, protons, and relativistic muons, permitting future applications such as a driver for an FEL, a long-pulse spallation source, the driver for an intense 8 GeV neutrino or kaon program, and potential applications to a neutrino factory or muon collider. The technical design of the 8 GeV linac, as well as the design of an alternative synchrotron based proton driver, will be described along with plans for project proposal and construction.

  14. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  15. MASSIF-1: a beamline dedicated to the fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, Matthew W.; Nurizzo, Didier; Barrett, Ray; Beteva, Antonia; Bodin, Marjolaine; Caserotto, Hugo; Delagenière, Solange; Dobias, Fabian; Flot, David; Giraud, Thierry; Guichard, Nicolas; Guijarro, Mattias; Lentini, Mario; Leonard, Gordon A.; McSweeney, Sean; Oskarsson, Marcus; Schmidt, Werner; Snigirev, Anatoli; von Stetten, David; Surr, John; Svensson, Olof; Theveneau, Pascal; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is an ESRF undulator beamline operating at a fixed wavelength of 0.969 Å (12.8 keV) that is dedicated to the completely automatic characterization of and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. The first of the ESRF Upgrade MASSIF beamlines to be commissioned, it has been open since September 2014, providing a unique automated data collection service to academic and industrial users. Here, the beamline characteristics and details of the new service are outlined. PMID:26524320

  16. MASSIF-1: a beamline dedicated to the fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Matthew W; Nurizzo, Didier; Barrett, Ray; Beteva, Antonia; Bodin, Marjolaine; Caserotto, Hugo; Delagenière, Solange; Dobias, Fabian; Flot, David; Giraud, Thierry; Guichard, Nicolas; Guijarro, Mattias; Lentini, Mario; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean; Oskarsson, Marcus; Schmidt, Werner; Snigirev, Anatoli; von Stetten, David; Surr, John; Svensson, Olof; Theveneau, Pascal; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is an ESRF undulator beamline operating at a fixed wavelength of 0.969 Å (12.8 keV) that is dedicated to the completely automatic characterization of and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. The first of the ESRF Upgrade MASSIF beamlines to be commissioned, it has been open since September 2014, providing a unique automated data collection service to academic and industrial users. Here, the beamline characteristics and details of the new service are outlined. PMID:26524320

  17. MASSIF-1: a beamline dedicated to the fully automatic characterization and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Bowler, Matthew W; Nurizzo, Didier; Barrett, Ray; Beteva, Antonia; Bodin, Marjolaine; Caserotto, Hugo; Delagenière, Solange; Dobias, Fabian; Flot, David; Giraud, Thierry; Guichard, Nicolas; Guijarro, Mattias; Lentini, Mario; Leonard, Gordon A; McSweeney, Sean; Oskarsson, Marcus; Schmidt, Werner; Snigirev, Anatoli; von Stetten, David; Surr, John; Svensson, Olof; Theveneau, Pascal; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    MASSIF-1 (ID30A-1) is an ESRF undulator beamline operating at a fixed wavelength of 0.969 Å (12.8 keV) that is dedicated to the completely automatic characterization of and data collection from crystals of biological macromolecules. The first of the ESRF Upgrade MASSIF beamlines to be commissioned, it has been open since September 2014, providing a unique automated data collection service to academic and industrial users. Here, the beamline characteristics and details of the new service are outlined.

  18. Strangeness in the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberg, Mary

    2014-03-01

    Both perturbative and non-perturbative mechanisms contribute to strangeness in the proton sea. We have developed a hybrid model in which non-perturbative contributions are calculated in a meson cloud model which expands the proton in terms of meson-baryon states, and perturbative contributions are calculated in a statistical model which expands the proton in terms of quark-gluon states. The perturbative contributions are represented in the parton distributions of the ``bare'' hadrons in the meson cloud. We compare our results to the recent experimental data of ATLAS and HERMES. This research has been supported in part by NSF Award 1205686.

  19. Are protons nonidentical fermions?

    SciTech Connect

    Mart, T.

    2014-09-25

    We briefly review the progress of our investigation on the electric (charge) radius of the proton. In order to explain the recently measured proton radius, which is significantly smaller than the standard CODATA value, we assume that the real protons radii are not identical, they are randomly distributed in a certain range. To obtain the measured radius we average the radii and fit both the mean radius and the range. By using an averaged dipole form factor we obtain the charge radius r{sub E} = 0.8333 fm, in accordance with the recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen.

  20. Apparatus for proton radiography

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An apparatus for effecting diagnostic proton radiography of patients in hospitals comprises a source of negative hydrogen ions, a synchrotron for accelerating the negative hydrogen ions to a predetermined energy, a plurality of stations for stripping extraction of a radiography beam of protons, means for sweeping the extracted beam to cover a target, and means for measuring the residual range, residual energy, or percentage transmission of protons that pass through the target. The combination of information identifying the position of the beam with information about particles traversing the subject and the back absorber is performed with the aid of a computer to provide a proton radiograph of the subject. In an alternate embodiment of the invention, a back absorber comprises a plurality of scintillators which are coupled to detectors.

  1. Limits of proton conductivity.

    PubMed

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter; Wohlfarth, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    Parasitic current seems to be the cause for the "highest proton conductivity" of a material reported to date. Kreuer and Wohlfarth verify this hypothesis by measuring the conductivity of the same materials after preparing them in a different way. They further explain the limits of proton conductivity and comment on the problems of determining the conductivity of small objects (e.g., whiskers, see picture).

  2. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  3. Proton transport by halorhodopsin

    SciTech Connect

    Varo, G.; Brown, L.S.; Needleman, R.

    1996-05-28

    In halorhodopsin from Natronobacterium pharaonis, a light-driven chloride pump, the chloride binding site also binds azide. When azide is bound at this location the retinal Schiff base transiently deprotonates after photoexcitation with light >530 nm, like in the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. As in the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin, pyranine detects the release of protons to the bulk. The subsequent reprotonation of the Schiff base is also dependent on azide, but with different kinetics that suggest a shuttling of protons from the surface as described earlier for halorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarium. The azide-dependent, bacteriorhodopsin-like photocycle results in active electrogenic proton transport in the cytoplasmic to extracellular direction, detected in cell envelope vesicle suspensions both with a potential-sensitive electrode and by measuring light-dependent pH change. We conclude that in halorhodopsin an azide bound to the extracellular side of the Schiff base, and another azide shuttling between the Schiff base and the cytoplasmic surface, fulfill the functions of Asp-85 and Asp-96, respectively, in bacteriorhodopsin. Thus, although halorhodopsin is normally a chloride ion pump, it evidently contains all structural requirements, except an internal proton acceptor and a donor, of a proton pump. This observation complements our earlier finding that when a chloride binding site was created in bacteriorhodopsin through replacement of Asp-85 with a threonine, that protein became a chloride ion pump. 52 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Expected thermal deformation and wavefront preservation of a cryogenic Si monochromator for Cornell ERL beamlines

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong; Bilderback, Donald H.; Finkelstein, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Cornell energy-recovery linac (ERL) beamlines will have higher power density and higher fractional coherence than those available at third-generation sources; therefore the capability of a monochromator for ERL beamlines has to be studied. A cryogenic Si monochromator is considered in this paper because the perfect atomic structure of Si crystal is needed to deliver highly coherent radiation. Since neither the total heat load nor the power density alone can determine the severity of crystal deformation, a metric called modified linear power density is used to gauge the thermal deformation. For all ERL undulator beamlines, crystal thermal deformation profiles are simulated using the finite-element analysis tool ANSYS, and wavefront propagations are simulated using Synchrotron Radiation Workshop. It is concluded that cryogenic Si monochromators will be suitable for ERL beamlines in general. PMID:24562557

  5. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    SciTech Connect

    Gmuer, N.F.

    1993-04-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  6. Expected thermal deformation and wavefront preservation of a cryogenic Si monochromator for Cornell ERL beamlines.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Bilderback, Donald H; Finkelstein, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    Cornell energy-recovery linac (ERL) beamlines will have higher power density and higher fractional coherence than those available at third-generation sources; therefore the capability of a monochromator for ERL beamlines has to be studied. A cryogenic Si monochromator is considered in this paper because the perfect atomic structure of Si crystal is needed to deliver highly coherent radiation. Since neither the total heat load nor the power density alone can determine the severity of crystal deformation, a metric called modified linear power density is used to gauge the thermal deformation. For all ERL undulator beamlines, crystal thermal deformation profiles are simulated using the finite-element analysis tool ANSYS, and wavefront propagations are simulated using Synchrotron Radiation Workshop. It is concluded that cryogenic Si monochromators will be suitable for ERL beamlines in general.

  7. [Proton generator of superhigh frequency].

    PubMed

    Liberman, E A; Eĭdus, V L

    1981-01-01

    Possible mechanism of superhigh frequency (10(10)-10(12) Hz) electromagnetic oscillation generation by an external proton in a system of hydrogen bonds of biomacromolecules is briefly discussed. The external proton in a proton channel deforms the potential profile of the proton of hydrogen bond in such a way, that there appears a possibility of the low frequency proton tunneling along the hydrogen bond. The interaction with the neighbouring bonds leads to further lowering of the generated frequency.

  8. Monte Carlo comparison of x-ray and proton CT for range calculations of proton therapy beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbor, N.; Dauvergne, D.; Dedes, G.; Létang, J. M.; Parodi, K.; Quiñones, C. T.; Testa, E.; Rit, S.

    2015-10-01

    Proton computed tomography (CT) has been described as a solution for imaging the proton stopping power of patient tissues, therefore reducing the uncertainty of the conversion of x-ray CT images to relative stopping power (RSP) maps and its associated margins. This study aimed to investigate this assertion under the assumption of ideal detection systems. We have developed a Monte Carlo framework to assess proton CT performances for the main steps of a proton therapy treatment planning, i.e. proton or x-ray CT imaging, conversion to RSP maps based on the calibration of a tissue phantom, and proton dose simulations. Irradiations of a computational phantom with pencil beams were simulated on various anatomical sites and the proton range was assessed on the reference, the proton CT-based and the x-ray CT-based material maps. Errors on the tissue’s RSP reconstructed from proton CT were found to be significantly smaller and less dependent on the tissue distribution. The imaging dose was also found to be much more uniform and conformal to the primary beam. The mean absolute deviation for range calculations based on x-ray CT varies from 0.18 to 2.01 mm depending on the localization, while it is smaller than 0.1 mm for proton CT. Under the assumption of a perfect detection system, proton range predictions based on proton CT are therefore both more accurate and more uniform than those based on x-ray CT.

  9. Guide to LIBXSIF, a Library for Parsing the Extended Standard Input Format of Accelerated Beamlines(LCC-0060)

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P

    2003-12-03

    We describe LIBXSIF, a standalone library for parsing the Extended Standard Input Format of accelerator beamlines. Included in the description are: documentation of user commands; full description of permitted accelerator elements and their attributes; the construction of beamline lists; the mechanics of adding LIBXSIF to an existing program; and ''under the hood'' details for users who wish to modify the library or are merely morbidly curious.

  10. 2-ps Hard X-Ray Streak Camera Measurements at Sector 7 Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Chollet, M.; Ahr, B.; Walko, D.A.; Rose-Petruck, C.; Adams, B.

    2011-08-02

    A hard X-ray streak camera capable of 2-ps time resolution is in operation at the Sector 7 beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. It is used for laser-pump, X-ray probe experiments using the Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser system installed on the beamline. This streak camera, combined with standardized and prealigned experimental setups, can perform time-resolved liquid-phase absorption spectroscopy, reflectivity, and diffraction experiments.

  11. On the feasibility of water calorimetry with scanned proton radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassowsky, M.; Pedroni, E.

    2005-11-01

    Water calorimetry is considered to be the most direct primary method to realize the physical quantity gray for absorbed dose to water. The Swiss Federal Office of Metrology and Accreditation (METAS) has routinely operated a water calorimeter as primary standard for photon radiation since 2001. Nowadays, cancer therapy with proton radiation has become increasingly important and is a well established method. In the framework of the ProScan project conducted by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), the spot-scanning technique is prepared for the subsequent application in hospitals, and adjusted to the recent findings of clinical research. In the absence of primary standards for proton radiation, the metrological traceability is assured by calibrating secondary standards in 60Co radiation and correcting with calculated beam quality correction factors. It is internationally recognized that the development of primary standards for proton radiation is highly desirable. In a common project of PSI and METAS, it is investigated whether a modified version of the water calorimeter in operation at METAS is suitable as primary standard for scanned proton radiation. A feasibility study has been conducted to investigate the linear energy transfer (LET) dependence of the heat defect and the influence of the time and space structure of the scanned beam on the homogeneity and stability of the temperature field in the water calorimeter. Simulations are validated against experimental data of the existing calorimeter used with photon radiation and extended to scanned proton radiation.

  12. Exotic Protonated Species Produced by UV-Induced Photofragmentation of a Protonated Dimer: Metastable Protonated Cinchonidine.

    PubMed

    Alata, Ivan; Scuderi, Debora; Lepere, Valeria; Steinmetz, Vincent; Gobert, Fabrice; Thiao-Layel, Loïc; Le Barbu-Debus, Katia; Zehnacker-Rentien, Anne

    2015-10-01

    A metastable protonated cinchona alkaloid was produced in the gas phase by UV-induced photodissociation (UVPD) of its protonated dimer in a Paul ion trap. The infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectrum of the molecular ion formed by UVPD was obtained and compared to DFT calculations to characterize its structure. The protonation site obtained thereby is not accessible by classical protonation ways. The protonated monomer directly formed in the ESI source or by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the dimer undergoes protonation at the most basic alkaloid nitrogen. In contrast, protonation occurs at the quinoline aromatic ring nitrogen in the UVPD-formed monomer. PMID:26347997

  13. Exotic Protonated Species Produced by UV-Induced Photofragmentation of a Protonated Dimer: Metastable Protonated Cinchonidine.

    PubMed

    Alata, Ivan; Scuderi, Debora; Lepere, Valeria; Steinmetz, Vincent; Gobert, Fabrice; Thiao-Layel, Loïc; Le Barbu-Debus, Katia; Zehnacker-Rentien, Anne

    2015-10-01

    A metastable protonated cinchona alkaloid was produced in the gas phase by UV-induced photodissociation (UVPD) of its protonated dimer in a Paul ion trap. The infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectrum of the molecular ion formed by UVPD was obtained and compared to DFT calculations to characterize its structure. The protonation site obtained thereby is not accessible by classical protonation ways. The protonated monomer directly formed in the ESI source or by collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the dimer undergoes protonation at the most basic alkaloid nitrogen. In contrast, protonation occurs at the quinoline aromatic ring nitrogen in the UVPD-formed monomer.

  14. PARALLEL MEASUREMENT AND MODELING OF TRANSPORT IN THE DARHT II BEAMLINE ON ETA II

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, F W; Raymond, B A; Falabella, S; Lee, B S; Richardson, R A; Weir, J T; Davis, H A; Schultze, M E

    2005-05-31

    To successfully tune the DARHT II transport beamline requires the close coupling of a model of the beam transport and the measurement of the beam observables as the beam conditions and magnet settings are varied. For the ETA II experiment using the DARHT II beamline components this was achieved using the SUICIDE (Simple User Interface Connecting to an Integrated Data Environment) data analysis environment and the FITS (Fully Integrated Transport Simulation) model. The SUICIDE environment has direct access to the experimental beam transport data at acquisition and the FITS predictions of the transport for immediate comparison. The FITS model is coupled into the control system where it can read magnet current settings for real time modeling. We find this integrated coupling is essential for model verification and the successful development of a tuning aid for the efficient convergence on a useable tune. We show the real time comparisons of simulation and experiment and explore the successes and limitations of this close coupled approach.

  15. Calibration and standards beamline 6.3.2 at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, J.H.; Gullikson, E.M.; Koike, M.

    1997-04-01

    More sophisticated optics for the x-ray, soft x-ray and far ultraviolet spectral regions being developed for synchrotron radiation research and many other applications, require accurate calibration and standards facilities for measuring reflectivity of mirrors and multilayer coatings, transmission of thin films, bandpass of multilayers, efficiency of gratings or detectors, etc. For this purpose beamline 6.3.2 was built at the ALS. Its energy coverage, versatility, simplicity and convenience also make it useful for a wide range of other experiments. The paper describes the components of this beamline, consisting of: a four jaw aperture; a horizontal focusing mirror; a monochromator; exit slit; vertical focusing mirror; mechanical and vacuum system; reflectometer; filter wheels; and data acquisition system.

  16. Directly water-cooled crystal development for SPring-8 bending magnet beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Kunikazu; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2007-09-01

    The directly water-cooled first crystal of the SPring-8 standard monochromator for bending magnet beamlines has been developed. Thanks to the bonding technique, the performance of the new crystal has been improved without decreasing the cooling efficiency. The finite element analyses show the deformation of the crystal by the hydraulic pressure and by the crystal clamping is negligible small, which were dominated for the previous crystal. Both Si(111) and Si(311) crystal were evaluated in SPring-8 beamlines, the deformation induced while the bonding process is comparable to the thermal deformation. and long-term endurance test shows the lifetime of the O-ring becomes long because they are not on the direct path of the SR beam. Although the overall performance is insufficient, much improvement was shown.

  17. Energy optimization of a regular macromolecular crystallography beamline for ultra-high-resolution crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Ginell, Stephan L.; Chen, Julian C.-H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a practical method for operating existing undulator synchrotron beamlines at photon energies considerably higher than their standard operating range is described and applied at beamline 19-ID of the Structural Biology Center at the Advanced Photon Source enabling operation at 30 keV. Adjustments to the undulator spectrum were critical to enhance the 30 keV flux while reducing the lower- and higher-energy harmonic contamination. A Pd-coated mirror and Al attenuators acted as effective low- and high-bandpass filters. The resulting flux at 30 keV, although significantly lower than with X-ray optics designed and optimized for this energy, allowed for accurate data collection on crystals of the small protein crambin to 0.38 Å resolution.

  18. In-vacuum sensors for the beamline components of the ITER neutral beam test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Sartori, E.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Veltri, P.

    2016-11-01

    Embedded sensors have been designed for installation on the components of the MITICA beamline, the prototype ITER neutral beam injector (Megavolt ITER Injector and Concept Advancement), to derive characteristics of the particle beam and to monitor the component conditions during operation for protection and thermal control. Along the beamline, the components interacting with the particle beam are the neutralizer, the residual ion dump, and the calorimeter. The design and the positioning of sensors on each component have been developed considering the expected beam-surface interaction including non-ideal and off-normal conditions. The arrangement of the following instrumentation is presented: thermal sensors, strain gages, electrostatic probes including secondary emission detectors, grounding shunt for electrical currents, and accelerometers.

  19. Energy optimization of a regular macromolecular crystallography beamline for ultra-high-resolution crystallography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rosenbaum, Gerd; Ginell, Stephan L.; Chen, Julian C.-H.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a practical method for operating existing undulator synchrotron beamlines at photon energies considerably higher than their standard operating range is described and applied at beamline 19-ID of the Structural Biology Center at the Advanced Photon Source enabling operation at 30 keV. Adjustments to the undulator spectrum were critical to enhance the 30 keV flux while reducing the lower- and higher-energy harmonic contamination. A Pd-coated mirror and Al attenuators acted as effective low- and high-bandpass filters. The resulting flux at 30 keV, although significantly lower than with X-ray optics designed and optimized for this energy, allowed for accuratemore » data collection on crystals of the small protein crambin to 0.38 Å resolution.« less

  20. A Superbend X-Ray Microdiffraction Beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, N.; Kunz, M.; Chen, K.; Celestre, R.S.; MacDowell, A.A.; Warwick, T.

    2009-03-10

    Beamline 12.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source is a newly commissioned beamline dedicated to x-ray microdiffraction. It operates in both monochromatic and polychromatic radiation mode. The facility uses a superconducting bending magnet source to deliver an X-ray spectrum ranging from 5 to 22 keV. The beam is focused down to {approx} 1 um size at the sample position using a pair of elliptically bent Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors enclosed in a vacuum box. The sample placed on high precision stages can be raster-scanned under the microbeam while a diffraction pattern is taken at each step. The arrays of diffraction patterns are then analyzed to derive distribution maps of phases, strain/stress and/or plastic deformation inside the sample.

  1. The PGM-Beamline at the Undulator U55 at DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, U.; Westphal, C.; Krause, M.; Schuermann, M.; Dreiner, S.; Follath, R.; Schaefers, F.

    2004-05-12

    A beamline for linearly polarized light radiation from an undulator is being commissioned at DELTA, an University synchrotron facility. The electron beam in the undulator as a radiation source is mapped by the first optical element onto an intermediate focus. Mirror M1 has a large acceptance angle in order to provide a stable performance if small electron beam displacements occur. The intermediate focus is demagnified onto the sample providing a focus spot size of 70 x 30{mu}m2. The PGM (Plane Grating Monochromator) based beamline works with collimated light allowing a flexible use of the monochromator. Depending on user demands, it can be operated by at high spectral resolution, high flux mode, or at high order suppression.

  2. Recent developments on techniques for differential phase imaging at the medical beamline of ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Pelliccia, D.; Cedola, A.; Astolfo, A.; Bukreeva, I.; Cardarelli, P.; Dreossi, D.; Lagomarsino, S.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Sodini, N.; Menk, R. H.

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade different phase contrast approaches have been exploited at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste, Italy. In particular special focus has been drawn to analyzer based imaging and the associated imaging theory and processing. Analyzer based Imaging (ABI) and Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) techniques have been successfully applied in several biomedical applications. Recently it has been suggested to translate the acquired knowledge in this field towards a Thomson Backscattering Source (TBS), which is presently under development at the Frascati National Laboratories of INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) in Rome, Italy. Such source is capable of producing intense and quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray beams. For the technical implementation of biomedical phase imaging at the TBS a grating interferometer for differential phase contrast imaging has been designed and successfully tested at SYRMEP beamline.

  3. A multipurpose monochromator for the BESSRC CAT beamlines at the APS X-ray facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Beno, M.A.; Cowan, P.L.

    1996-05-01

    The Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center Collaborative Access Team (BESSRC-CAT) is constructing x-ray beamlines at two sectors of the Advanced Photon Source facility. In most of the beamlines the first optical element will be a monochromator, so that a standard design for this critical component is advantageous. The mnochromator is a double crystal, fixed exit scheme with a constant offset designed for UHV windowless operation. In this design, the crystals are mounted on a turntable with the first crystal at the center of rotation. Mechanical linkages are used to correctly position the second crystal and maintain a constant offset. The authors report here the final test results achieved on an optical table with an autocollimator and the first measurements with x-rays from the bending magnet.

  4. Photon-beam stabilization systems for the MX2 beamline at LNLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfelici, Lucas; de Mattos, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    The MX2, a wiggler beamline dedicated to macromolecular crystallography, started routinely operating for users in 2007. Late in the commissioning phase, several experiments started to be conducted in order to characterize photon-beam stability. At that time, position movements of typically 150 μm per shift and severe energy drifts reaching 0.8 eV/h were observed at sample position, which would certainly spoil the MAD experiments. The severity of this scenario for a recently delivered beamline led us to install temperature sensors and inclinometers along the optical hutch, besides performing exhaustive tests to clarify the disturbance paths. To elucidate the main instability mechanisms, three control systems for beam stabilization were considered—position stabilization, ground motion canceling and, the most important of all, temperature control for the optical hutch. Results and perspectives are presented hereafter.

  5. Undulator beamline optimization with integrated chicanes for X-ray free-electron-laser facilities.

    PubMed

    Prat, Eduard; Calvi, Marco; Ganter, Romain; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    An optimization of the undulator layout of X-ray free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities based on placing small chicanes between the undulator modules is presented. The installation of magnetic chicanes offers the following benefits with respect to state-of-the-art FEL facilities: reduction of the required undulator length to achieve FEL saturation, improvement of the longitudinal coherence of the FEL pulses, and the ability to produce shorter FEL pulses with higher power levels. Numerical simulations performed for the soft X-ray beamline of the SwissFEL facility show that optimizing the advantages of the layout requires shorter undulator modules than the standard ones. This proposal allows a very compact undulator beamline that produces fully coherent FEL pulses and it makes possible new kinds of experiments that require very short and high-power FEL pulses. PMID:27359133

  6. Indus-2 X-ray lithography beamline for X-ray optics and material science applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dhamgaye, V. P. Lodha, G. S.

    2014-04-24

    X-ray lithography is an ideal technique by which high aspect ratio and high spatial resolution micro/nano structures are fabricated using X-rays from synchrotron radiation source. The technique has been used for fabricating optics (X-ray, visible and infrared), sensors and actuators, fluidics and photonics. A beamline for X-ray lithography is operational on Indus-2. The beamline offers wide lithographic window from 1-40keV photon energy and wide beam for producing microstructures in polymers upto size ∼100mm × 100mm. X-ray exposures are possible in air, vacuum and He gas environment. The air based exposures enables the X-ray irradiation of resist for lithography and also irradiation of biological and liquid samples.

  7. Surveying and optical tooling technologies combined to align a skewed beamline at the LAMPF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bauke, W.; Clark, D.A.; Trujillo, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Optical Tooling evolved from traditional surveying, and both technologies are sometimes used interchangeably in large industrial installations, since the instruments and their specialized adapters and supports complement each other well. A unique marriage of both technologies was accomplished in a novel application at LAMPF, the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility. LAMPF consists of a linear accelerator with multiple target systems, one of which had to be altered to accommodate a new beamline for a neutrino experiment. The new line was to be installed into a crowded beam tunnel and had to be skewed and tilted in compound angles to avoid existing equipment. In this paper we describe how Optical Tooling was used in conjunction with simple alignment and reference fixtures to set fiducials on the magnets and other mechanical components of the beamline, and how theodolites and sight levels were then adapted to align these components along the calculated skew planes. Design tolerances are compared with measured alignment results.

  8. New developments at the INE-Beamline for actinide research at ANKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendebach, B.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Rothe, J.; Vitova, T.

    2007-11-01

    The INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source Ångströmquelle Karlsruhe (ANKA) completed its first year of operation in October 2006. Experiments on radioactive samples with activities up to 10 6 times the limit of exemption at X-ray energies from around 2.1 keV (P K-edge) to 25 keV (Pd K-edge) are possible. Three recent instrumental developments at the Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE)-Beamline are presented: a Quick-XAFS mode of operating the Lemonnier-type monochromator in fixed exit for time-resolved experiments, total electron yield detection, and the use of one-dimensional compound refractive lenses, fabricated at the Institut für Mikrostrukturtechnik (IMT) at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), as a virtual slit for surface sensitive X-ray studies. Future upgrades for lowering the attainable energy, installing a microfocus option, and commissioning a cryostat for radioactive samples are planned.

  9. Vertical synchrotron radiation beamline for proximity X-ray lithography: Theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukreeva, Inna N.; Kozhevnikov, Igor V.

    1997-02-01

    The general physical principles of operation of the vertical beamline of synchrotron radiation (SR) intended for proximity X-ray lithography are considered. An optical system provides a deflection of the SR beam to the vertical plane, a cutoff of the hard X-rays, a uniform illumination of a wafer, a normal incidence of X-ray beam onto a mask, and a small enough divergency of the radiation. A vertical SR beamline makes it possible to circumvent the expensive development of vertical-plane displacement steppers and to use the conventional horizontal ones, to exclude the scanning of the SR beam across the mask and to reduce the requirements imposed on the accuracy of alignment of a gap between the mask and the wafer.

  10. Dedicated Max-Planck beamline for the in situ investigation of interfaces and thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Stierle, A.; Steinhaeuser, A.; Ruehm, A.; Renner, F.U.; Weigel, R.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.

    2004-12-01

    A dedicated beamline for the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung was recently taken into operation at the Angstroemquelle Karlsruhe (ANKA). Here we describe the layout of the beamline optics and the experimental end-station, consisting of a heavy duty multiple circle diffractometer. For both a new design was realized, combining a maximum flexibility in the beam properties [white, pink (focused) monochromatic, energy range 6-20 keV] with a special diffractometer for heavy sample environments up to 500 kg, that can be run in different geometrical modes. In addition the angular-reciprocal space transformations for the diffractometer in use are derived, which allows an operation of the instrument in the convenient six circle mode. As an example, results from surface x-ray diffraction on a Cu{sub 3}Au(111) single crystal are presented.

  11. Ultrahigh contrast from a frequency-doubled chirped-pulse-amplification beamline.

    PubMed

    Hillier, David; Danson, Colin; Duffield, Stuart; Egan, David; Elsmere, Stephen; Girling, Mark; Harvey, Ewan; Hopps, Nicholas; Norman, Michael; Parker, Stefan; Treadwell, Paul; Winter, David; Bett, Thomas

    2013-06-20

    This paper describes frequency-doubled operation of a high-energy chirped-pulse-amplification beamline. Efficient type-I second-harmonic generation was achieved using a 3 mm thick 320 mm aperture KDP crystal. Shots were fired at a range of energies achieving more than 100 J in a subpicosecond, 527 nm laser pulse with a power contrast of 10(14). PMID:23842168

  12. Fast continuous energy scan with dynamic coupling of the monochromator and undulator at the DEIMOS beamline.

    PubMed

    Joly, L; Otero, E; Choueikani, F; Marteau, F; Chapuis, L; Ohresser, P

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of X-ray absorption data recording, a fast scan method, the Turboscan, has been developed on the DEIMOS beamline at Synchrotron SOLEIL, consisting of a software-synchronized continuous motion of the monochromator and undulator motors. This process suppresses the time loss when waiting for the motors to reach their target positions, as well as software dead-time, while preserving excellent beam characteristics.

  13. Use of object-oriented techniques in a beam-line control system

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.R.; Rueden, W. von; Butler, H.; Yang, J.

    1994-12-31

    The authors describe the use of object-oriented programming in the control and data-acquisition system for the upgraded CERN neutrino beam-line. C++ in conjunction with Posix threads running under Lynx-OS have been used in several front-end PCs. These communicate using Remote Procedure Calls over ethernet with a workstation running the commercial supervisory package, FactoryLink.

  14. High-throughput beamline for attosecond pulses based on toroidal mirrors with microfocusing capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L.; Trabattoni, A.; Anumula, S.; Sansone, G.; Calegari, F.; Nisoli, M.

    2014-10-15

    We have developed a novel attosecond beamline designed for attosecond-pump/attosecond probe experiments. Microfocusing of the Extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation is obtained by using a coma-compensated optical configuration based on the use of three toroidal mirrors controlled by a genetic algorithm. Trains of attosecond pulses are generated with a measured peak intensity of about 3 × 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}.

  15. Pulse generation and preamplification for long pulse beamlines of Orion laser facility.

    PubMed

    Hillier, David I; Winter, David N; Hopps, Nicholas W

    2010-06-01

    We describe the pulse generation, shaping, and preamplification system for the nanosecond beamlines of the Orion laser facility. The system generates shaped laser pulses of up to approximately 1 J of 100 ps-5 ns duration with a programmable temporal profile. The laser has a 30th-power supergaussian spatial profile and is diffraction limited. The system is capable of imposing 2D smoothing by spectral dispersion upon the beam, which will produce a nonuniformity of 10% rms at the target.

  16. A soft x-ray beamline for quantitative nanotomography using ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Riessen, Grant A.; Junker, Mark; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-09-01

    Soft X-ray nanotomography using ptychography allows quantitative imaging of the internal structure of biological and materials samples with high sensitivity. In this work, we describe progress toward the implementation of an interferometer-controlled microscope located at a beamline that provides coherent ux over the photon energy range of 200 to 2000 eV. Recent experimental results are presented to illustrate the potential for two- and three-dimensional imaging at the nanoscale.

  17. Optimizing the Stark-decelerator beamline for the trapping of cold molecules using evolutionary strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilijamse, Joop J.; Kuepper, Jochen; Hoekstra, Steven; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Meijer, Gerard

    2006-06-15

    We demonstrate feedback control optimization for the Stark deceleration and trapping of neutral polar molecules using evolutionary strategies. In a Stark-decelerator beamline, pulsed electric fields are used to decelerate OH radicals and subsequently store them in an electrostatic trap. The efficiency of the deceleration and trapping process is determined by the exact timings of the applied electric field pulses. Automated optimization of these timings yields an increase of 40% of the number of trapped OH radicals.

  18. High-throughput beamline for attosecond pulses based on toroidal mirrors with microfocusing capabilities.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, F; Trabattoni, A; Anumula, S; Sansone, G; Calegari, F; Nisoli, M; Poletto, L

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a novel attosecond beamline designed for attosecond-pump/attosecond probe experiments. Microfocusing of the Extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation is obtained by using a coma-compensated optical configuration based on the use of three toroidal mirrors controlled by a genetic algorithm. Trains of attosecond pulses are generated with a measured peak intensity of about 3 × 10(11) W/cm(2).

  19. IR and THz Beamlines at the Metrology Light Source of the PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ralph; Hoehl, Arne; Klein, Roman; Serdyukov, Anton; Ulm, Gerhard; Feikes, Jörg; von Hartrott, Michael; Schade, Ulrich; Wüstefeld, Godehard

    2010-02-01

    The low-energy electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation source, is in user operation since April 2008. As a special option it provides coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the THz range when it is operated in a low-α mode with short electron bunches. At the MLS three beamlines dedicated to the use of IR and THz radiation were designed, built and commissioned.

  20. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  1. Studying Proton-Proton Collisions Using Pythia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotov, Adi

    2004-10-01

    At Brookhaven National Lab, the RHIC experiments are currently investigating, on a subatomic level, what happens when heavy ions collide at high speeds. This is done in order to create such high temperatures and densities that quarks are no longer bound to one another. This state of matter is called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). Evidence for the existence of the QGP may be the quenching of hadron jets, which occurs when the fast quarks or gluons lose so much energy in the hot, dense medium that they cannot survive. Then the jets of particles that these particles usually result in cannot be made. By studying the particle yield at high transverse momentum (Pt), one can probe what is happening to the jets created during collisions. Using Pythia, a standard model event generator based on the Lund String Model, we study jets of particles created when elementary protons collide. Then we know what should happen to jets at high transverse momentum transfer, when no QGP is present. Comparing the pt spectrum of jet partners generated by Pythia to RHIC results for proton-proton collisions shows that the two do in fact agree. This not only insures that the analysis of RHIC data is correct, but it also establishes a basis for comparison for Au-Au collisions. Comparing d+Au collision data to the Pythia Pt spectrum of jets with leading baryon and meson triggers, we found good agreement. Thus the jet production does not change drastically in nature in the presence of a cold nuclear medium.

  2. The materials science X-ray beamline BL8 at the DELTA storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Wagner, R.; Frahm, R.; Herdt, A.

    2010-06-23

    The instrumentation of the hard X-ray beamline BL8 at the 1.5 GeV Dortmund Electron Accelerator DELTA is described, and the properties of the X-ray optical elements are presented together with experimental data of different fields of research. The beamline, which makes use of the photons emitted by a superconducting asymmetric wiggler, is dedicated to X-ray studies--especially X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS)--in the spectral range from about 1 keV to ca. 25 keV photon energy using three different monochromators, namely YB{sub 66}(400), Si(111) and Si(311). The endstation comprises a 6-axis diffractometer that is capable of carrying heavy loads related to non-ambient sample environments such as high pressure cells, cryostats or even complete ultrahigh vacuum systems. X-ray absorption spectra from several reference compounds illustrate the performance of the beamline optics concerning e.g. energy range, energy resolution and beam stability. Fluorescence detection enables the investigation of dilute sample systems, and surface sensitive reflection mode experiments are possible for thin film studies.

  3. Time-Resolved Research at the Advanced Photon Source Beamline 7-ID

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric M.; Adams, Bernhard; Arms, Dohn A.; Chollet, Matthieu; Landahl, Eric C.; Li, Yuelin; Walko, Donald A.; Wang, Jin

    2010-08-02

    The Sector 7 undulator beamline (7-ID) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is dedicated to time-resolved x-ray research and is capable of ultrafast measurements on the order of 100 ps. Beamline 7-ID has a laser laboratory featuring a Ti:Sapphire system (average power of 2.5W, pulse duration <50 fs, repetition rate 1-5 kHz) that can be synchronized to the bunch pattern of the storage ring. The laser is deliverable to x-ray enclosures, which contain diffractometers, as well as motorized optical tables for table-top experiments. Beamline 7-ID has a single APS Undulator A and uses a diamond (111) double-crystal monochromator, providing good energy resolution over a range of 6-24 keV. Available optics include Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors to microfocus the x-ray beam. A variety of time-resolved diffraction and spectroscopy research is available at 7-ID, with experiments being done in the atomic, molecular, optical, chemistry, and solid state (bulk and surface) fields.

  4. Time-Resolved Research at the Advanced Photon Source Beamline 7-ID

    SciTech Connect

    Dufresne, Eric M.; Adams, Bernhard; Arms, Dohn A.; Chollet, Matthieu; Li, Yuelin; Walko, Donald A.; Wang Jin; Landahl, Eric C.

    2010-06-23

    The Sector 7 undulator beamline (7-ID) of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is dedicated to time-resolved x-ray research and is capable of ultrafast measurements on the order of 100 ps. Beamline 7-ID has a laser laboratory featuring a Ti:Sapphire system (average power of 2.5 W, pulse duration <50 fs, repetition rate 1-5 kHz) that can be synchronized to the bunch pattern of the storage ring. The laser is deliverable to x-ray enclosures, which contain diffractometers, as well as motorized optical tables for table-top experiments. Beamline 7-ID has a single APS Undulator A and uses a diamond (111) double-crystal monochromator, providing good energy resolution over a range of 6-24 keV. Available optics include Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors to microfocus the x-ray beam. A variety of time-resolved diffraction and spectroscopy research is available at 7-ID, with experiments being done in the atomic, molecular, optical, chemistry, and solid state (bulk and surface) fields.

  5. Upgraded ESRF BM29 beamline for SAXS on macromolecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Pernot, Petra; Round, Adam; Barrett, Ray; De Maria Antolinos, Alejandro; Gobbo, Alexandre; Gordon, Elspeth; Huet, Julien; Kieffer, Jerôme; Lentini, Mario; Mattenet, Muriel; Morawe, Christian; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Ohlsson, Staffan; Schmid, Werner; Surr, John; Theveneau, Pascal; Zerrad, Louiza; McSweeney, Sean

    2013-07-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements of proteins in solution are becoming increasingly popular with biochemists and structural biologists owing to the presence of dedicated high-throughput beamlines at synchrotron sources. As part of the ESRF Upgrade program a dedicated instrument for performing SAXS from biological macromolecules in solution (BioSAXS) has been installed at the renovated BM29 location. The optics hutch has been equipped with new optical components of which the two principal elements are a fixed-exit double multilayer monochromator and a 1.1 m-long toroidal mirror. These new dedicated optics give improved beam characteristics (compared with the previous set-up on ID14-3) regarding the energy tunability, flux and focusing at the detector plane leading to reduced parasitic scattering and an extended s-range. User experiments on the beamline have been successfully carried out since June 2012. A description of the new BioSAXS beamline and the set-up characteristics are presented together with examples of obtained data.

  6. Hard X-ray XAFS beamline, BL5S1, at AichiSR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabuchi, M.; Asakura, H.; Morimoto, H.; Watanabe, N.; Takeda, Y.

    2016-05-01

    A XAFS beamline, BL5S1, had been operated at Aichi Synchrotron Radiation Center, Japan since March 2013. The beamline was designed for the measurements in the energy range from 5 to 20 keV. The photon flux of 6 x 1010 at around 9 keV and beam spot size of 0.5 x 0.3 mm at sample position are as good as designed. For the standard transmission XAFS measurement, both of the step- and quick- scan modes are available. Energy resolution at around 9keV is good enough to discuss the energy shift of the order of 0.1 eV or higher even when the measurements are conducted in the quick-scan mode. With several kinds of detectors for fluorescence and/or CEY detection mode measurements, and various kinds of sample holders which are supported by the XAFS measurement software, users easily obtain spectra for their samples. Such a standard, well operated and easy to access XAFS beamline must be very important to broaden the base of the XAFS society further.

  7. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Alan M. M.; Paulson, C. C.; Peacock, M. A.; Reusch, M. F.

    1995-09-01

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.

  8. Beamlines at synchrotron radiation facilities: The link between the user and the machine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.D.; Hulbert, S.L.; Berman, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    At this point in time the literature is full of excellent review articles which describe the operating principles of optical systems for utilizing the unique radiation provided by synchrotron storage rings. In general, the perspective provided by this body of work is that of the end user-experimenter cum optics designer. Nominal design specifications of the accelerator are usually assumed, and the impact of operation in a performance envelope which may represent either degraded or enhanced machine performance is seldom considered. In this article, we have attempted to remove ourselves from this (our own usual) perspective and look instead at the beamline as a transfer function to map from the machine to the users experiment. We open first with an introduction to the perspective of the experimentalist, and some general considerations for the interaction of beamline hardware with the machine. We then discuss phase space representations of some common components of beamlines, and then treat some important classes of crystal and geometric optics in monochromators. We then close with a discussion of some of the common features of these optical systems, and the impact of the machine on user experiments.

  9. Characterization of a next-generation piezo bimorph X-ray mirror for synchrotron beamlines

    PubMed Central

    Alcock, Simon G.; Nistea, Ioana; Sutter, John P.; Sawhney, Kawal; Fermé, Jean-Jacques; Thellièr, Christophe; Peverini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Piezo bimorph mirrors are versatile active optics used on many synchrotron beamlines. However, many bimorphs suffer from the ‘junction effect’: a periodic deformation of the optical surface which causes major aberrations to the reflected X-ray beam. This effect is linked to the construction of such mirrors, where piezo ceramics are glued directly below the thin optical substrate. In order to address this problem, a next-generation bimorph with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was developed at Thales-SESO and optimized at Diamond Light Source. Using metrology feedback from the Diamond-NOM, the optical slope error was reduced to ∼0.5 µrad r.m.s. for a range of ellipses. To maximize usability, a novel holder was built to accommodate the substrate in any orientation. When replacing a first-generation bimorph on a synchrotron beamline, the new mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected X-ray beam. Most importantly, there was no evidence of the junction effect even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. It is hoped that this new design will reinvigorate the use of active bimorph optics at synchrotron and free-electron laser facilities to manipulate and correct X-ray wavefronts. PMID:25537582

  10. MagneDyn: the beamline for magneto dynamics studies at FERMI.

    PubMed

    Svetina, Cristian; Mahne, Nicola; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Caretta, Antonio; Casarin, Barbara; Dell'Angela, Martina; Malvestuto, Marco; Parmigiani, Fulvio; Zangrando, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The future Magneto Dynamics (MagneDyn) beamline will be devoted to study the electronic states and the local magnetic properties of excited and transient states of complex systems by means of the time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique. The beamline will use FERMI's high-energy source covering the wavelength range from 60 nm down to 1.3 nm. An on-line photon energy spectrometer will allow spectra to be measured with high resolution while delivering most of the beam to the end-stations. Downstream the beam will be possibly split and delayed, by means of a delay line, and then focused with a set of active Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. These mirrors will be able to focus the radiation in one of the two MagneDyn experimental chambers: the electromagnet end-station and the resonant inelastic X-ray scattering end-station. After an introduction of the MagneDyn scientific case, the layout will be discussed showing the expected performances of the beamline. PMID:26698050

  11. The HB-2D Polarized Neutron Development Beamline at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, Lowell; Hamilton, WA; Zhao, JK; Robertson, JL

    2016-09-01

    The Polarized Neutron Development beamline, recently commissioned at the HB-2D position on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, provides a tool for development and testing of polarizers, polarized neutron devices, and prototyping of polarized neutron techniques. With available monochromators including pyrolytic graphite and polarizing enriched Fe-57 (Si), the instrument has operated at 4.25 and 2.6 Å wavelengths, using crystal, supermirror, or He-3 polarizers and analyzers in various configurations. The Neutron Optics and Development Team has used the beamline for testing of He-3 polarizers for use at other HFIR and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) instruments, as well as a variety of flipper devices. Recently, we have acquired new supermirror polarizers which have improved the instrument performance. The team and collaborators also have continuing demonstration experiments of spin-echo focusing techniques, and plans to conduct polarized diffraction measurements. The beamline is also used to support a growing use of polarization techniques at present and future instruments at SNS and HFIR.

  12. Upgrades to the XRD1 beamline optics and endstation at the LNLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canova, H.; Fontoura, A.; Neuenschwander, R. T.; Diaz, B.; Rodella, C. B.

    2014-03-01

    XRD1 was the first X-ray diffraction beamline to be built at the LNLS and after approximately 12 years of operation it was substantially updated to improve beam stability, increase the reliability of the monochromator movement as well as provide an experimental hutch that would meet the demands of users. The improvements included the construction of an independent concrete slab below the mirror and monochromator to minimize the vibrations originating from the floor. In addition, the installation of new monochromator mechanisms as well as the replacement of the two Si(111) crystals were performed in order to attain higher precision, stability and reproducibility during operation. Moreover, the diffractometer was replaced by a 3-circle heavy duty diffractometer from Newport to collect XRD patterns primarily in capillary geometry. A robotic arm was installed for fast and automated replacement of samples as well as to secure a cryojet or a hot air blower in front of the sample during measurements. In addition, a housing equipped with 24 Mythen detectors was installed at the beamline allowing for extremely fast data acquisition. Another upgrade was the integration of motors and control systems from PXI National Instruments and Galil controllers with Phytron. These systems are crucial for the next upgrade that is underway at the beamline: enabling remote access for users to collect their measurements without the need to travel to the LNLS.

  13. Recent advances in software for beamline design, accelerator operations and personnel training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, George H.; Hill, Barrey W.; Martono, Hendy; Moore, John M.

    2000-03-01

    Accelerators are finding new applications in research, industry, medicine, as well as other fields, and there is a growing need for new tools to improve the productivity of scientists and engineers involved with these emerging accelerator applications. Several advances in computer software have been made that focus on meeting those needs. This paper summarizes recent work in the development of a unique software framework designed specifically to support the accelerator community: the Multi-Platform Shell for Particle Accelerator Related Codes (SPARC MP). SPARC MP includes a sophisticated beamline object model, an extensive library of GUI components, and supports a variety of particle optics codes and add-on tools. This framework has been used to create the Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab TM) family of software applications. PBO Lab has been used for beamline design, as a computer aid for teaching particle optics, and to support accelerator operations. Several popular charged particle optics programs, including MARYLIE, TRANSPORT, TURTLE and TRACE 3-D, have been integrated with a new version of PBO Lab. The modeling and simulation capabilities of these codes allow PBO Lab to support a wide spectrum of accelerator types. New external data interface tools are available to import beamline parameters from other sources, for example, to utilize magnet strengths generated by a control system. An overview of the new version of PBO Lab is presented.

  14. Characterization of a next-generation piezo bimorph X-ray mirror for synchrotron beamlines.

    PubMed

    Alcock, Simon G; Nistea, Ioana; Sutter, John P; Sawhney, Kawal; Fermé, Jean Jacques; Thellièr, Christophe; Peverini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Piezo bimorph mirrors are versatile active optics used on many synchrotron beamlines. However, many bimorphs suffer from the `junction effect': a periodic deformation of the optical surface which causes major aberrations to the reflected X-ray beam. This effect is linked to the construction of such mirrors, where piezo ceramics are glued directly below the thin optical substrate. In order to address this problem, a next-generation bimorph with piezos bonded to the side faces of a monolithic substrate was developed at Thales-SESO and optimized at Diamond Light Source. Using metrology feedback from the Diamond-NOM, the optical slope error was reduced to ∼ 0.5 µrad r.m.s. for a range of ellipses. To maximize usability, a novel holder was built to accommodate the substrate in any orientation. When replacing a first-generation bimorph on a synchrotron beamline, the new mirror significantly improved the size and shape of the reflected X-ray beam. Most importantly, there was no evidence of the junction effect even after eight months of continuous beamline usage. It is hoped that this new design will reinvigorate the use of active bimorph optics at synchrotron and free-electron laser facilities to manipulate and correct X-ray wavefronts.

  15. A beamline systems model for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, Alan M. M.; Paulson, C. C.; Peacock, M. A.; Reusch, M. F.

    1995-09-15

    A beamline systems code, that is being developed for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT) facility trade studies, is described. The overall program is a joint Grumman, G. H. Gillespie Associates (GHGA) and Los Alamos National Laboratory effort. The GHGA Accelerator Systems Model (ASM) has been adopted as the framework on which this effort is based. Relevant accelerator and beam transport models from earlier Grumman systems codes are being adapted to this framework. Preliminary physics and engineering models for each ADTT beamline component have been constructed. Examples noted include a Bridge Coupled Drift Tube Linac (BCDTL) and the accelerator thermal system. A decision has been made to confine the ASM framework principally to beamline modeling, while detailed target/blanket, balance-of-plant and facility costing analysis will be performed externally. An interfacing external balance-of-plant and facility costing model, which will permit the performance of iterative facility trade studies, is under separate development. An ABC (Accelerator Based Conversion) example is used to highlight the present models and capabilities.

  16. Thin conductive diamond films as beam intensity monitors for soft x-ray beamlines.

    PubMed

    Kummer, K; Fondacaro, A; Yakhou-Harris, F; Sessi, V; Pobedinskas, P; Janssens, S D; Haenen, K; Williams, O A; Hees, J; Brookes, N B

    2013-03-01

    Quantitative analysis of X-ray absorption and dichroism data requires knowledge of the beamline photon flux during the measurements. We show that thin conductive (B-doped) diamond thin films can be an alternative to the widely used gold meshes for monitoring the beam intensity of soft X-ray beamlines in situ. Limited by the carbon extended x-ray absorption fine structure oscillations, the diamond films become applicable beginning from about 600 eV photon energy, where the important transition metal edges and the rare-earth edges are found. The 100 nm and 250 nm thick free-standing diamond films were grown and tested against standard gold meshes in real-life dichroism experiments performed at beamline ID08 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France. Quantitative agreement was found between the two experimental data sets. The films feature an extremely high transmission of about 90% and, at the same time, yield a sufficiently strong and clean reference signal. Furthermore, the thin films do not affect the shape of the transmitted beam. X-rays passing mesh-type monitors are subject to diffraction effects, which widen the beam and become particularly disturbing for small beamsizes in the micrometer range. PMID:23556850

  17. Thin conductive diamond films as beam intensity monitors for soft x-ray beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Kummer, K.; Fondacaro, A.; Yakhou-Harris, F.; Sessi, V.; Brookes, N. B.; Pobedinskas, P.; Janssens, S. D.; Haenen, K.; Williams, O. A.; Hees, J.

    2013-03-15

    Quantitative analysis of X-ray absorption and dichroism data requires knowledge of the beamline photon flux during the measurements. We show that thin conductive (B-doped) diamond thin films can be an alternative to the widely used gold meshes for monitoring the beam intensity of soft X-ray beamlines in situ. Limited by the carbon extended x-ray absorption fine structure oscillations, the diamond films become applicable beginning from about 600 eV photon energy, where the important transition metal edges and the rare-earth edges are found. The 100 nm and 250 nm thick free-standing diamond films were grown and tested against standard gold meshes in real-life dichroism experiments performed at beamline ID08 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France. Quantitative agreement was found between the two experimental data sets. The films feature an extremely high transmission of about 90% and, at the same time, yield a sufficiently strong and clean reference signal. Furthermore, the thin films do not affect the shape of the transmitted beam. X-rays passing mesh-type monitors are subject to diffraction effects, which widen the beam and become particularly disturbing for small beamsizes in the micrometer range.

  18. Suite of three protein crystallography beamlines with single superconducting bend magnet as the source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Howells, Malcolm; McKinney, Wayne; Krupnick, James; Cambie, Daniella; Domning, Edward E; Duarte, Robert M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Cork, Carl W.; Earnest, Thomas N.; Dickert, Jeffery; Meigs, George; Ralston, Corie; Holton, James M.; Alber, Thomas; Berger, James M.; Agard, David A.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2004-08-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), three protein crystallography (PX) beamlines have been built that use as a source one of the three 6 Tesla single pole superconducting bending magnets (superbends) that were recently installed in the ring. The use of such single pole superconducting bend magnets enables the development of a hard x-ray program on a relatively low energy 1.9 GeV ring without taking up insertion device straight sections. The source is of relatively low power, but due to the small electron beam emittance, it has high brightness. X-ray optics are required to preserve the brightness and to match the illumination requirements for protein crystallography. This was achieved by means of a collimating premirror bent to a plane parabola, a double crystal monochromator followed by a toroidal mirror that focuses in the horizontal direction with a 2:1 demagnification. This optical arrangement partially balances aberrations from the collimating and toroidal mirrors such that a tight focused spot size is achieved. The optical properties of the beamline are an excellent match to those required by the small protein crystals that are typically measured. The design and performance of these new beamlines are described.

  19. Neutron and Proton Dosages in the Upper Atmosphere from Solar Flare Radiation.

    PubMed

    Flamm, E J; Lingenfelter, R E

    1964-06-26

    The radiation dosage from secondary neutrons as well as from primary and secondary protons in the earth's atmosphere during solar particle events is calculated as a function of the solar proton flux, atmospheric depth, and geomagnetic-cutoff rigidity. The dosage in rems from secondary neutrons exceeds the dosage from protons below 30 g/cm(2) of residual atmosphere. Neutron dosages in rads are less than the dosage from primary protons at all depths above 100 g/cm(2). The maximum neutron dose to travelers in supersonic aircraft during solar particle events of the magnitude observed during the last solar cycle would be of the order of I rem.

  20. High Temperature Protonic Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred; Berger, Marie-Helen; Sayir, Ali

    2007-01-01

    High Temperature Protonic Conductors (HTPC) with the perovskite structure are envisioned for electrochemical membrane applications such as H2 separation, H2 sensors and fuel cells. Successive membrane commercialization is dependent upon addressing issues with H2 permeation rate and environmental stability with CO2 and H2O. HTPC membranes are conventionally fabricated by solid-state sintering. Grain boundaries and the presence of intergranular second phases reduce the proton mobility by orders of magnitude than the bulk crystalline grain. To enhanced protonic mobility, alternative processing routes were evaluated. A laser melt modulation (LMM) process was utilized to fabricate bulk samples, while pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was utilized to fabricate thin film membranes . Sr3Ca(1+x)Nb(2-x)O9 and SrCe(1-x)Y(x)O3 bulk samples were fabricated by LMM. Thin film BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3 membranes were fabricated by PLD on porous substrates. Electron microscopy with chemical mapping was done to characterize the resultant microstructures. High temperature protonic conduction was measured by impedance spectroscopy in wet air or H2 environments. The results demonstrate the advantage of thin film membranes to thick membranes but also reveal the negative impact of defects or nanoscale domains on protonic conductivity.

  1. Proton charge extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stryker, Jesse R.; Miller, Gerald A.

    2016-01-01

    We examine how corrections to S -state energy levels En S in hydrogenic atoms due to the finite proton size are affected by moments of the proton charge distribution. The corrections to En S are computed moment by moment. The results demonstrate that the next-to-leading order term in the expansion is of order rp/aB times the size of the leading order term. Our analysis thus dispels any concern that the larger relative size of this term for muonic hydrogen versus electronic hydrogen might account for the current discrepancy of proton radius measurements extracted from the two systems. Furthermore, the next-to-leading order term in powers of rp/aB that we derive from a dipole proton form factor is proportional to , rather than , as would be expected from the scalar nature of the form factor. The dependence of the finite-size correction on and higher odd-power moments is shown to be a general result for any spherically symmetric proton charge distribution. A method for computing the moment expansion of the finite-size correction to arbitrary order is introduced and the results are tabulated for principal quantum numbers up to n =7 .

  2. DNA binding ability and hydrogen peroxide induced nuclease activity of a novel Cu(II) complex with malonate as the primary ligand and protonated 2-amino-4-picoline as the counterion.

    PubMed

    Saha, Biswarup; Islam, Md Maidul; Paul, Susmita; Samanta, Saheli; Ray, Shayoni; Santra, Chitta Ranjan; Ray Choudhury, Somnath; Dey, Biswajit; Das, Amrita; Ghosh, Somnath; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh; Karmakar, Parimal

    2010-05-01

    The DNA binding property of a Cu(II) complex, viz., [Cu(mal)(2)](picH)(2).2H(2)O, (mal)(2) = malonic acid, picH = protonated 2-amino-4-picoline, has been investigated in this study. The binding of this complex with plasmid and chromosomal DNA has been characterized by different biophysical techniques. From the absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies, it has been observed that the said copper complex binds strongly with pUC19 plasmid and CT DNA with a binding affinity of 2.368 x 10(3) and 4.0 x 10(3) M(-1), respectively, in 10 mM citrate-phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. Spectrofluorimetric studies reveal that the copper complex exhibits partial DNA intercalation as well as partial DNA minor groove binding properties. Consequently, in agarose gel electrophoresis study, it has been observed that the complex alone induces positive supercoiling in plasmid DNA while in the presence of H(2)O(2) it exhibits nuclease activity. The induction of the breakage in DNA backbone depends upon the relative concentrations of H(2)O(2) and copper complex followed by the time of incubation with DNA. Optical DNA melting study, isothermal titration calorimetry, and absorption spectroscopy have been used to characterize the nuclease activity of this complex in the presence of H(2)O(2). Further, (1)H NMR study indicates that Cu(II) in the complex is converted into the Cu(I) state by the reduction of H(2)O(2). Finally, agarose gel electrophoresis study with different radical scavengers concludes that the production of both hydroxyl radicals and reactive oxygen species is responsible for this nuclease activity. PMID:20380411

  3. Proton transfer in organic scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Dipankar

    This dissertation focuses on the fundamental understanding of the proton transfer process and translating the knowledge into design/development of new organic materials for efficient non-aqueous proton transport. For example, what controls the shuttling of a proton between two basic sites? a) Distance between two groups? or b) the basicity? c) What is the impact of protonation on molecular conformation when the basic sites are attached to rigid scaffolds? For this purpose, we developed several tunable proton sponges and studied proton transfer in these scaffolds theoretically as well as experimentally. Next we moved our attention to understand long-range proton conduction or proton transport. We introduced liquid crystalline (LC) proton conductor based on triphenylene molecule and established that activation energy barrier for proton transport is lower in the LC phase compared to the crystalline phase. Furthermore, we investigated the impact of several critical factors: the choice of the proton transferring groups, mobility of the charge carriers, intrinsic vs. extrinsic charge carrier concentrations and the molecular architectures on long-range proton transport. The outcome of this research will lead to a deeper understanding of non-aqueous proton transfer process and aid the design of next generation proton exchange membrane (PEM) for fuel cell.

  4. Proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems.

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, I T; Brown, M H; Skurray, R A

    1996-01-01

    Multidrug efflux systems display the ability to transport a variety of structurally unrelated drugs from a cell and consequently are capable of conferring resistance to a diverse range of chemotherapeutic agents. This review examines multidrug efflux systems which use the proton motive force to drive drug transport. These proteins are likely to operate as multidrug/proton antiporters and have been identified in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Such proton-dependent multidrug efflux proteins belong to three distinct families or superfamilies of transport proteins: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family, and the resistance/ nodulation/cell division (RND) family. The MFS consists of symporters, antiporters, and uniporters with either 12 or 14 transmembrane-spanning segments (TMS), and we show that within the MFS, three separate families include various multidrug/proton antiport proteins. The SMR family consists of proteins with four TMS, and the multidrug efflux proteins within this family are the smallest known secondary transporters. The RND family consists of 12-TMS transport proteins and includes a number of multidrug efflux proteins with particularly broad substrate specificity. In gram-negative bacteria, some multidrug efflux systems require two auxiliary constituents, which might enable drug transport to occur across both membranes of the cell envelope. These auxiliary constituents belong to the membrane fusion protein and the outer membrane factor families, respectively. This review examines in detail each of the characterized proton-linked multidrug efflux systems. The molecular basis of the broad substrate specificity of these transporters is discussed. The surprisingly wide distribution of multidrug efflux systems and their multiplicity in single organisms, with Escherichia coli, for instance, possessing at least nine proton-dependent multidrug efflux systems with overlapping specificities, is examined. We also

  5. Protons and how they are transported by proton pumps.

    PubMed

    Buch-Pedersen, M J; Pedersen, B P; Veierskov, B; Nissen, P; Palmgren, M G

    2009-01-01

    The very high mobility of protons in aqueous solutions demands special features of membrane proton transporters to sustain efficient yet regulated proton transport across biological membranes. By the use of the chemical energy of ATP, plasma-membrane-embedded ATPases extrude protons from cells of plants and fungi to generate electrochemical proton gradients. The recently published crystal structure of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase contributes to our knowledge about the mechanism of these essential enzymes. Taking the biochemical and structural data together, we are now able to describe the basic molecular components that allow the plasma membrane proton H(+)-ATPase to carry out proton transport against large membrane potentials. When divergent proton pumps such as the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, bacteriorhodopsin, and F(O)F(1) ATP synthase are compared, unifying mechanistic premises for biological proton pumps emerge. Most notably, the minimal pumping apparatus of all pumps consists of a central proton acceptor/donor, a positively charged residue to control pK(a) changes of the proton acceptor/donor, and bound water molecules to facilitate rapid proton transport along proton wires.

  6. Heavy ion linac as a high current proton beam injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Winfried; Adonin, Aleksey; Appel, Sabrina; Gerhard, Peter; Heilmann, Manuel; Heymach, Frank; Hollinger, Ralph; Vinzenz, Wolfgang; Vormann, Hartmut; Yaramyshev, Stepan

    2015-05-01

    A significant part of the experimental program at Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) is dedicated to pbar physics requiring a high number of cooled pbars per hour. The primary proton beam has to be provided by a 70 MeV proton linac followed by two synchrotrons. The new FAIR proton linac will deliver a pulsed proton beam of up to 35 mA of 36 μ s duration at a repetition rate of 4 Hz (maximum). The GSI heavy ion linac (UNILAC) is able to deliver world record uranium beam intensities for injection into the synchrotrons, but it is not suitable for FAIR relevant proton beam operation. In an advanced machine investigation program it could be shown that the UNILAC is able to provide for sufficient high intensities of CH3 beam, cracked (and stripped) in a supersonic nitrogen gas jet into protons and carbon ions. This advanced operational approach will result in up to 3 mA of proton intensity at a maximum beam energy of 20 MeV, 1 0 0 μ s pulse duration and a repetition rate of up to 2.7 Hz delivered to the synchrotron SIS18. Recent linac beam measurements will be presented, showing that the UNILAC is able to serve as a proton FAIR injector for the first time, while the performance is limited to 25% of the FAIR requirements.

  7. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    SciTech Connect

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  8. The physics of proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Zhang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The physics of proton therapy has advanced considerably since it was proposed in 1946. Today analytical equations and numerical simulation methods are available to predict and characterize many aspects of proton therapy. This article reviews the basic aspects of the physics of proton therapy, including proton interaction mechanisms, proton transport calculations, the determination of dose from therapeutic and stray radiations, and shielding design. The article discusses underlying processes as well as selected practical experimental and theoretical methods. We conclude by briefly speculating on possible future areas of research of relevance to the physics of proton therapy. PMID:25803097

  9. Shielding of relativistic protons.

    PubMed

    Bertucci, A; Durante, M; Gialanella, G; Grossi, G; Manti, L; Pugliese, M; Scampoli, P; Mancusi, D; Sihver, L; Rusek, A

    2007-06-01

    Protons are the most abundant element in the galactic cosmic radiation, and the energy spectrum peaks around 1 GeV. Shielding of relativistic protons is therefore a key problem in the radiation protection strategy of crewmembers involved in long-term missions in deep space. Hydrogen ions were accelerated up to 1 GeV at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York. The proton beam was also shielded with thick (about 20 g/cm2) blocks of lucite (PMMA) or aluminium (Al). We found that the dose rate was increased 40-60% by the shielding and decreased as a function of the distance along the axis. Simulations using the General-Purpose Particle and Heavy-Ion Transport code System (PHITS) show that the dose increase is mostly caused by secondary protons emitted by the target. The modified radiation field after the shield has been characterized for its biological effectiveness by measuring chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed just behind the shield block, or to the direct beam, in the dose range 0.5-3 Gy. Notwithstanding the increased dose per incident proton, the fraction of aberrant cells at the same dose in the sample position was not significantly modified by the shield. The PHITS code simulations show that, albeit secondary protons are slower than incident nuclei, the LET spectrum is still contained in the low-LET range (<10 keV/microm), which explains the approximately unitary value measured for the relative biological effectiveness. PMID:17256178

  10. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references.

  11. Proton-Proton Scattering at 105 Mev and 75 Mev

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Birge, R. W.; Kruse, U. E.; Ramsey, N. F.

    1951-01-31

    The scattering of protons by protons provides an important method for studying the nature of nuclear forces. Recent proton-proton scattering experiments at energies as high as thirty Mev{sup 1} have failed to show any appreciable contribution to the cross section from higher angular momentum states, but it is necessary to bring in tensor forces to explain the magnitude of the observed cross section.

  12. Analysis of the physical interactions of therapeutic proton beams in water with the use of Geant4 Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Morávek, Zdenek; Bogner, Ludwig

    2009-01-01

    The processes that occur when protons traverse a medium are investigated theoretically for a full therapeutic range of energies [20 MeV, 220 MeV]. The investigation is undertaken using the Geant4 toolkit for water medium. The beam is simulated only inside the phantom, effects of beamline are included in the overall beam properties as lateral width and momentum bandwidth. Every energy deposition is catalogued according to the particle and the process that caused it. The catalogued depositions are analysed statistically. There are only few important processes such as proton ionisation and nuclear scattering (elastic/inelastic) that constitute the main features of the energy distribution. At the same time processes concerning electrons are used very often without obvious effect to the result. Such processes can be therefore approximated in the simulation codes in order to improve the performance of the code. Neutron depositions are most important before the Bragg peak, still they are by an order of magnitude smaller than those of protons. In the region behind the Bragg peak only a small number of neutrons is created in the simulation and their energy contribution through secondary protons is by orders smaller than the effect of proton-produced secondary protons within the Bragg peak. Hence, the effects of neutrons created in the calculation volume can be neglected. PMID:19761094

  13. Resolving electrons from protons in ATIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Batkov, K. E.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunashingha, R. M.; Guzik, T. G.; Isbert, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kouznetsov, E. N.; Lin, Z. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Panov, A. D.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Seo, E. S.; Sokolskaya, N. V.; Watts, John W.; Wefel, J. P.; Wu, J.; Zatsepin, V. I.

    2008-08-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) experiment is designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. The possibility to identify high energy primary cosmic ray electrons in the presence of the ‘background’ of cosmic ray protons has been studied by simulating nuclear-electromagnetic cascade showers using the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation code. The ATIC design, consisting of a graphite target and an energy detection device, a totally active calorimeter built up of 2.5 cm × 2.5 cm × 25.0 cm BGO scintillator bars, gives sufficient information to distinguish electrons from protons. While identifying about 80% of electrons as such, only about 2 in 10,000 protons (@ 150 GeV) will mimic electrons. In September of 1999 ATIC was exposed to high-energy electron and proton beams at the CERN H2 beam line, and this data confirmed the electron detection capabilities of ATIC. From 2000-12-28 to 2001-01-13 ATIC was flown as a long duration balloon test flight from McMurdo, Antarctica, recording over 360 h of data and allowing electron separation to be confirmed in the flight data. In addition, ATIC electron detection capabilities can be checked by atmospheric gamma-ray observations.

  14. Predictions of diffractive cross sections in proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2013-04-15

    We review our pre-LHC predictions of the total, elastic, total-inelastic, and diffractive components of proton-proton cross sections at high energies, expressed in the form of unitarized expressions based on a special parton-model approach to diffraction employing inclusive proton parton distribution functions and QCD color factors and compare with recent LHC results.

  15. Chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes exposed to energetic protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, Megumi; George, Ms Kerry; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and are therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/µm. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy range the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction products such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are energy dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  16. Chromosome Aberration in Human Blood Lymphocytes Exposed to Energetic Protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; George, Kerry A.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2008-01-01

    During space flight, astronauts are exposed to a space radiation consisting of high-energy protons, high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei, as well as secondary particles that are generated when the primary particles penetrate the spacecraft shielding. Secondary particles have a higher LET value than primary protons and therefore expected to have a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To investigate this theory, we exposed human peripheral blood lymphocytes to protons with energies of 250 MeV, 800MeV, 2 GeV, or 2.5 GeV. LET values for these protons ranged from 0.4 to 0.2 keV/micrometer. and doses ranged from 0.2 to 3 Gy. Over this energy the probability of nuclear reaction leading to secondary radiation, and the multiplicity of reaction produces such as neutrons and mesons increases substantially. The effect of aluminum and polyethylene shielding was also assessed using the 2 GeV and 2.5GeV proton beams. After exposure lymphocytes were stimulated to divide and chromosomes were collected from cells in the first G2 and metaphase cell cycle after exposure using a chemical induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique. Dose response data for chromosome damage was analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting technique. Selected samples were also analyzed with multicolor FISH (mFISH) and multicolor banding FISH (mBAND) techniques. Data indicates that the dose response for simple-type exchanges is similar for proton and gamma exposure, whereas protons induce higher yields of complex exchanges that are LET dependent. RBE values will be presented for each proton energy, and the effects of shielding and possible cytogenetic signatures of proton exposure will be discussed.

  17. Optical Design in Phase-Space for the I13L X-Ray Imaging and Coherence Beamline at Diamond using XPHASY

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph

    2010-06-23

    I13L is a 250 m long beamline for imaging and coherent diffraction currently under construction at the Diamond Light Source. For modeling the beamline optics the phase-space based ray-tracing code XPHASY was developed, as general ray-tracing codes for x-rays do not easily allow studying the propagation of coherence along the beamline. In contrast to computational intensive wave-front propagation codes, which fully describe the propagation of a photon-beam along a beamline but obscure the impact of individual optical components onto the beamline performance, this code allows to quickly calculate the photon-beam propagation along the beamline and estimate the impact of individual components.In this paper we will discuss the optical design of the I13L coherence branch from the perspective of phase-space by using XPHASY. We will demonstrate how the phase-space representation of a photon-beam allows estimating the coherence length at any given position along the beamline. The impact of optical components on the coherence length and the effect of vibrations on the beamline performance will be discussed. The paper will demonstrate how the phase-space representation of photon-beams allows a more detailed insight into the optical performance of a coherence beamline than ray-tracing in real space.

  18. P03, the microfocus and nanofocus X-ray scattering (MiNaXS) beamline of the PETRA III storage ring: the microfocus endstation.

    PubMed

    Buffet, Adeline; Rothkirch, André; Döhrmann, Ralph; Körstgens, Volker; Abul Kashem, Mottakin M; Perlich, Jan; Herzog, Gerd; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Gehrke, Rainer; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Roth, Stephan V

    2012-07-01

    The P03 beamline, also called the microfocus and nanofocus X-ray scattering (MiNaXS) beamline, exploits the excellent photon beam properties of the low-emittance source PETRA III to provide a microfocused/nanofocused beam with ultra-high intensity for time-resolved X-ray scattering experiments. The beamline has been designed to perform X-ray scattering in both transmission and reflection geometries. The microfocus endstation started user operation in May 2011. An overview of the beamline status and of some representative results highlighting the performance of the microfocus endstation at MiNaXS are given.

  19. Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data.

    1993-08-18

    Version 00 The Proton Nucleus Elastic Scattering Data file PNESD contains the numerical data and the related bibliography for the differential elastic cross sections, polarization and integral nonelastic cross sections for elastic proton-nucleus scattering.

  20. Proton therapy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chang, Joe Y.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation dose escalation and acceleration improves local control but also increases toxicity. Proton radiation is an emerging therapy for localized cancers that is being sought with increasing frequency by patients. Compared with photon therapy, proton therapy spares more critical structures due to its unique physics. The physical properties of a proton beam make it ideal for clinical applications. By modulating the Bragg peak of protons in energy and time, a conformal radiation dose with or without intensity modulation can be delivered to the target while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Thus, proton therapy is ideal when organ preservation is a priority. However, protons are more sensitive to organ motion and anatomy changes compared with photons. In this article, we review practical issues of proton therapy, describe its image-guided treatment planning and delivery, discuss clinical outcome for cancer patients, and suggest challenges and the future development of proton therapy. PMID:21527064

  1. The Search for Proton Decay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  2. Proton bunch compression strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Valeri; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    The paper discusses main limitations on the beam power and other machine parameters for a 4 MW proton driver for muon collider. The strongest limitation comes from a longitudinal microwave instability limiting the beam power to about 1 MW for an 8 GeV compressor ring.

  3. High Power Proton Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    This presentation will provide an overview of the capabilities and challenges of high intensity proton accelerators, such as J-PARC, Fermilab MI, SNS, ISIS, PSI, ESS (in the future) and others. The presentation will focus on lessons learned, new concepts, beam loss mechanisms and methods to mitigate them.

  4. Intensity modulated proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Kooy, H M; Grassberger, C

    2015-07-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed "pencil beams" of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak-the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range-combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose "painting" within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the highest level of

  5. Intensity modulated proton therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grassberger, C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) implies the electromagnetic spatial control of well-circumscribed “pencil beams” of protons of variable energy and intensity. Proton pencil beams take advantage of the charged-particle Bragg peak—the characteristic peak of dose at the end of range—combined with the modulation of pencil beam variables to create target-local modulations in dose that achieves the dose objectives. IMPT improves on X-ray intensity modulated beams (intensity modulated radiotherapy or volumetric modulated arc therapy) with dose modulation along the beam axis as well as lateral, in-field, dose modulation. The clinical practice of IMPT further improves the healthy tissue vs target dose differential in comparison with X-rays and thus allows increased target dose with dose reduction elsewhere. In addition, heavy-charged-particle beams allow for the modulation of biological effects, which is of active interest in combination with dose “painting” within a target. The clinical utilization of IMPT is actively pursued but technical, physical and clinical questions remain. Technical questions pertain to control processes for manipulating pencil beams from the creation of the proton beam to delivery within the patient within the accuracy requirement. Physical questions pertain to the interplay between the proton penetration and variations between planned and actual patient anatomical representation and the intrinsic uncertainty in tissue stopping powers (the measure of energy loss per unit distance). Clinical questions remain concerning the impact and management of the technical and physical questions within the context of the daily treatment delivery, the clinical benefit of IMPT and the biological response differential compared with X-rays against which clinical benefit will be judged. It is expected that IMPT will replace other modes of proton field delivery. Proton radiotherapy, since its first practice 50 years ago, always required the

  6. Secondary Neutron Doses to Pediatric Patients During Intracranial Proton Therapy: Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Energy Spectrum and its Organ Doses.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinnosuke; Koba, Yusuke; Kohno, Ryosuke; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Kai, Michiaki

    2016-04-01

    Proton therapy has the physical advantage of a Bragg peak that can provide a better dose distribution than conventional x-ray therapy. However, radiation exposure of normal tissues cannot be ignored because it is likely to increase the risk of secondary cancer. Evaluating secondary neutrons generated by the interaction of the proton beam with the treatment beam-line structure is necessary; thus, performing the optimization of radiation protection in proton therapy is required. In this research, the organ dose and energy spectrum were calculated from secondary neutrons using Monte Carlo simulations. The Monte Carlo code known as the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) was used to simulate the transport proton and its interaction with the treatment beam-line structure that modeled the double scattering body of the treatment nozzle at the National Cancer Center Hospital East. The doses of the organs in a hybrid computational phantom simulating a 5-y-old boy were calculated. In general, secondary neutron doses were found to decrease with increasing distance to the treatment field. Secondary neutron energy spectra were characterized by incident neutrons with three energy peaks: 1×10, 1, and 100 MeV. A block collimator and a patient collimator contributed significantly to organ doses. In particular, the secondary neutrons from the patient collimator were 30 times higher than those from the first scatter. These results suggested that proactive protection will be required in the design of the treatment beam-line structures and that organ doses from secondary neutrons may be able to be reduced. PMID:26910030

  7. Secondary Neutron Doses to Pediatric Patients During Intracranial Proton Therapy: Monte Carlo Simulation of the Neutron Energy Spectrum and its Organ Doses.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shinnosuke; Koba, Yusuke; Kohno, Ryosuke; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Kai, Michiaki

    2016-04-01

    Proton therapy has the physical advantage of a Bragg peak that can provide a better dose distribution than conventional x-ray therapy. However, radiation exposure of normal tissues cannot be ignored because it is likely to increase the risk of secondary cancer. Evaluating secondary neutrons generated by the interaction of the proton beam with the treatment beam-line structure is necessary; thus, performing the optimization of radiation protection in proton therapy is required. In this research, the organ dose and energy spectrum were calculated from secondary neutrons using Monte Carlo simulations. The Monte Carlo code known as the Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) was used to simulate the transport proton and its interaction with the treatment beam-line structure that modeled the double scattering body of the treatment nozzle at the National Cancer Center Hospital East. The doses of the organs in a hybrid computational phantom simulating a 5-y-old boy were calculated. In general, secondary neutron doses were found to decrease with increasing distance to the treatment field. Secondary neutron energy spectra were characterized by incident neutrons with three energy peaks: 1×10, 1, and 100 MeV. A block collimator and a patient collimator contributed significantly to organ doses. In particular, the secondary neutrons from the patient collimator were 30 times higher than those from the first scatter. These results suggested that proactive protection will be required in the design of the treatment beam-line structures and that organ doses from secondary neutrons may be able to be reduced.

  8. Acid secretion and proton conductance in human airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Horst; Widdicombe, Jonathan H; Illek, Beate

    2002-04-01

    Acid secretion and proton conductive pathways across primary human airway surface epithelial cultures were investigated with the pH stat method in Ussing chambers and by single cell patch clamping. Cultures showed a basal proton secretion of 0.17 +/- 0.04 micromol.h(-1).cm(-2), and mucosal pH equilibrated at 6.85 +/- 0.26. Addition of histamine or ATP to the mucosal medium increased proton secretion by 0.27 +/- 0.09 and 0.24 +/- 0.09 micromol.h(-1).cm(-2), respectively. Addition of mast cells to the mucosal medium of airway cultures similarly activated proton secretion. Stimulated proton secretion was similar in cultures bathed mucosally with either NaCl Ringer or ion-free mannitol solutions. Proton secretion was potently blocked by mucosal ZnCl(2) and was unaffected by mucosal bafilomycin A(1), Sch-28080, or ouabain. Mucosal amiloride blocked proton secretion in tissues that showed large amiloride-sensitive potentials. Proton secretion was sensitive to the application of transepithelial current and showed outward rectification. In whole cell patch-clamp recordings a strongly outward-rectifying, zinc-sensitive, depolarization-activated proton conductance was identified with an average chord conductance of 9.2 +/- 3.8 pS/pF (at 0 mV and a pH 5.3-to-pH 7.3 gradient). We suggest that inflammatory processes activate proton secretion by the airway epithelium and acidify the airway surface liquid.

  9. Measurement of ion profiles in TFTR neutral beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O`Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-02-01

    A technique is described whereby the ion dumps inside the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand were used to measure thermal profiles of the full-, half-, and third-energy ions. 136 thermocouples were installed on the full-energy ion dump, allowing full beam contours. Additional linear arrays across the widths of the half- and third-energy ion dumps provided a measure of the shape, in the direction parallel to the grid rails, of the half- and third-energy ions, and, hence, of the molecular ions extracted from the source. As a result of these measurements it was found that the magnet was more weakly focusing, by a factor of two, than expected, explaining past overheating of the full-energy ion dump. Hollow profiles on the half- and third-energy ion dumps were observed, suggesting that extraction of D{sub 2}+ and D{sub 3}+ are primarily from the edge of the ion source. If extraction of half-energy ions is from the edge of the accelerator, a divergence parallel to the grid rails of 0.6{degrees}{plus_minus}0.1{degrees} results. It is postulated that a nonuniform gas profile near the accelerator is the cause of the hollow partial-energy ion profiles; the pressure being depressed over the accelerator by particles passing through this highly transparent structure. Primary electrons reaching the accelerator produce nonuniform densities of D{sub 2}+ through the ionization of this across the full-energy dump was examined as a means of reducing the power density. By unbalancing the current in the two coils of the magnet, on a shot by shot basis, by up to 2:1 ratio, it was possible to move the centerline of the full-energy ion beam sideways by {approximately}12.5 cm. The adoption of such a technique, with a ramp of the coil imbalance from 2:1 to 1:2 over a beam pulse, could reduce the power density by a factor of {ge}1.5.

  10. Measurement of ion profiles in TFTR neutral beamlines

    SciTech Connect

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; O'Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1992-02-01

    A technique is described whereby the ion dumps inside the TFTR Neutral Beam Test Stand were used to measure thermal profiles of the full-, half-, and third-energy ions. 136 thermocouples were installed on the full-energy ion dump, allowing full beam contours. Additional linear arrays across the widths of the half- and third-energy ion dumps provided a measure of the shape, in the direction parallel to the grid rails, of the half- and third-energy ions, and, hence, of the molecular ions extracted from the source. As a result of these measurements it was found that the magnet was more weakly focusing, by a factor of two, than expected, explaining past overheating of the full-energy ion dump. Hollow profiles on the half- and third-energy ion dumps were observed, suggesting that extraction of D{sub 2}+ and D{sub 3}+ are primarily from the edge of the ion source. If extraction of half-energy ions is from the edge of the accelerator, a divergence parallel to the grid rails of 0.6{degrees}{plus minus}0.1{degrees} results. It is postulated that a nonuniform gas profile near the accelerator is the cause of the hollow partial-energy ion profiles; the pressure being depressed over the accelerator by particles passing through this highly transparent structure. Primary electrons reaching the accelerator produce nonuniform densities of D{sub 2}+ through the ionization of this across the full-energy dump was examined as a means of reducing the power density. By unbalancing the current in the two coils of the magnet, on a shot by shot basis, by up to 2:1 ratio, it was possible to move the centerline of the full-energy ion beam sideways by {approximately}12.5 cm. The adoption of such a technique, with a ramp of the coil imbalance from 2:1 to 1:2 over a beam pulse, could reduce the power density by a factor of {ge}1.5.

  11. Executive summary of major NuMI lessons learned: a review of relevant meetings of Fermilab's DUSEL Beamline Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Mike; Appel, Jeffrey A.; Bogert, Dixon; Childress, Sam; Cossairt, Don; Griffing, William; Grossman, Nancy; Harding, David; Hylen, Jim; Kuchler, Vic; Laughton, Chris; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /LBL, Berkeley

    2009-05-01

    We have gained tremendous experience with the NuMI Project on what was a new level of neutrino beams from a high power proton source. We expect to build on that experience for any new long baseline neutrino beam. In particular, we have learned about some things which have worked well and/or where the experience is fairly directly applicable to the next project (e.g., similar civil construction issues including: tunneling, service buildings, outfitting, and potential claims/legal issues). Some things might be done very differently (e.g., decay pipe, windows, target, beam dump, and precision of power supply control/monitoring). The NuMI experience does lead to identification of critical items for any future such project, and what issues it will be important to address. The DUSEL Beamline Working Group established at Fermilab has been meeting weekly to collect and discuss information from that NuMI experience. This document attempts to assemble much of that information in one place. In this Executive Summary, we group relevant discussion of some of the major issues and lessons learned under seven categories: (1) Differences Between the NuMI Project and Any Next Project; (2) The Process of Starting Up the Project; (3) Decision and Review Processes; (4) ES&H: Environment, Safety, and Health; (5) Local Community Buy-In; (6) Transition from Project Status to Operation; and (7) Some Lessons on Technical Elements. We concentrate here on internal project management issues, including technical areas that require special attention. We cannot ignore, however, two major external management problems that plagued the NuMI project. The first problem was the top-down imposition of an unrealistic combination of scope, cost, and schedule. This situation was partially corrected by a rebaselining. However, the full, desirable scope was never achievable. The second problem was a crippling shortage of resources. Critical early design work could not be done in a timely fashion, leading to

  12. Exploring universality of transversity in proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radici, Marco; Ricci, Alessandro M.; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Mukherjee, Asmita

    2016-08-01

    We consider the azimuthal correlations of charged hadron pairs with large total transverse momentum and small relative momentum, produced in proton-proton collisions with one transversely polarized proton. One of these correlations directly probes the chiral-odd transversity parton distribution in connection with a chiral-odd interference fragmentation function. We present predictions for this observable based on previous extractions of transversity (from charged pion pair production in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering) and of the interference fragmentation function (from the production of back-to-back charged pion pairs in electron-positron annihilations). All analyses are performed in the framework of collinear factorization. We compare our predictions to the recent data on proton-proton collisions released by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and we find them reasonably compatible. This comparison confirms for the first time the predicted role of transversity in proton-proton collisions, and it allows us to test its universality.

  13. Proton beam radiotherapy of uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Damato, Bertil; Kacperek, Andrzej; Errington, Doug; Heimann, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy of uveal melanoma can be administered as primary treatment, as salvage therapy for recurrent tumor, and as neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgical resection. The physical properties of proton beams make it possible to deliver high-doses of radiation to the tumor with relative sparing of adjacent tissues. This form of therapy is effective for a wider range of uveal melanoma than any other modality, providing exceptionally-high rates of local tumor control. This is particularly the case with diffuse iris melanomas, many of which are unresectable. The chances of survival, ocular conservation, visual preservation and avoidance of iatrogenic morbidity depend greatly on the tumor size, location and extent. When treating any side-effects and/or complications, it is helpful to consider whether these are the result of collateral damage or persistence of the irradiated tumor (‘toxic tumor syndrome’). PMID:24227980

  14. Mini-beam collimator enables micro-crystallography experiments on standard beamlines.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischetti, R. F.; Xu, S.; Yoder, D. W.; Becker, M.; Venugopalan, N.; Sanishvili, R.; Hilgart, M. C.; Stepanov, S.; Makarov, O.; Smith, J. L.; Biosciences Division

    2009-01-01

    The high-brilliance X-ray beams from undulator sources at third-generation synchrotron facilities are excellent tools for solving crystal structures of important and challenging biological macromolecules and complexes. However, many of the most important structural targets yield crystals that are too small or too inhomogeneous for a 'standard' beam from an undulator source, 25-50 {micro}m (FWHM) in the vertical and 50-100 {micro}m in the horizontal direction. Although many synchrotron facilities have microfocus beamlines for other applications, this capability for macromolecular crystallography was pioneered at ID-13 of the ESRF. The National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Cancer Institute Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA-CAT) dual canted undulator beamlines at the APS deliver high-intensity focused beams with a minimum focal size of 20 {micro}m x 65 {micro}m at the sample position. To meet growing user demand for beams to study samples of 10 {micro}m or less, a 'mini-beam' apparatus was developed that conditions the focused beam to either 5 {micro}m or 10 {micro}m (FWHM) diameter with high intensity. The mini-beam has a symmetric Gaussian shape in both the horizontal and vertical directions, and reduces the vertical divergence of the focused beam by 25%. Significant reduction in background was achieved by implementation of both forward- and back-scatter guards. A unique triple-collimator apparatus, which has been in routine use on both undulator beamlines since February 2008, allows users to rapidly interchange the focused beam and conditioned mini-beams of two sizes with a single mouse click. The device and the beam are stable over many hours of routine operation. The rapid-exchange capability has greatly facilitated sample screening and resulted in several structures that could not have been obtained with the larger focused beam.

  15. D3, the new diffractometer for the macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Martin R.; Pradervand, Claude; Thominet, Vincent; Schneider, Roman; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Grunder, Marcel; Gabadinho, Jose; Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Tomizaki, Takashi; Schneider, Jörg; Mayer, Aline; Curtin, Adrian; Olieric, Vincent; Frommherz, Uli; Kotrle, Goran; Welte, Jörg; Wang, Xinyu; Maag, Stephan; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Wang, Meitian

    2014-01-01

    A new diffractometer for microcrystallography has been developed for the three macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the Swiss Light Source. Building upon and critically extending previous developments realised for the high-resolution endstations of the two undulator beamlines X06SA and X10SA, as well as the super-bend dipole beamline X06DA, the new diffractometer was designed to the following core design goals. (i) Redesign of the goniometer to a sub-micrometer peak-to-peak cylinder of confusion for the horizontal single axis. Crystal sizes down to at least 5 µm and advanced sample-rastering and scanning modes are supported. In addition, it can accommodate the new multi-axis goniometer PRIGo (Parallel Robotics Inspired Goniometer). (ii) A rapid-change beam-shaping element system with aperture sizes down to a minimum of 10 µm for microcrystallography measurements. (iii) Integration of the on-axis microspectrophotometer MS3 for microscopic sample imaging with 1 µm image resolution. Its multi-mode optical spectroscopy module is always online and supports in situ UV/Vis absorption, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. (iv) High stability of the sample environment by a mineral cast support construction and by close containment of the cryo-stream. Further features are the support for in situ crystallization plate screening and a minimal achievable detector distance of 120 mm for the Pilatus 6M, 2M and the macromolecular crystallography group’s planned future area detector Eiger 16M. PMID:24562555

  16. Electron- and positron-proton elastic scattering in CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    L.B. Weinstein

    2009-08-01

    There is a significant disagreement between measurements of the proton electric form factor, G{sup p}{sub E}, using Rosenbluth separations and polarization transfer. This disagreement, if not explained, could pose a fundamental challenge to our understanding of electron scattering or proton structure. Two-photon exchange (TPE) processes, although not fully calculable, are the most likely explanation of this disagreement. We will definitively test this assertion by comparing the electron-proton and positron-proton elastic scattering cross section in the Jefferson Lab CLAS. We will make a mixed identical electron and positron tertiary beam by passing a 5.5 GeV primary electron beam through a radiator to make a photon beam and then passing the photon beam through a converter to make electron-positron pairs. Measuring the elastic cross sections simultaneously using identical lepton beams should significantly reduce systematic uncertainties.

  17. Pulse generation and preamplification for long pulse beamlines of Orion laser facility.

    PubMed

    Hillier, David I; Winter, David N; Hopps, Nicholas W

    2010-06-01

    We describe the pulse generation, shaping, and preamplification system for the nanosecond beamlines of the Orion laser facility. The system generates shaped laser pulses of up to approximately 1 J of 100 ps-5 ns duration with a programmable temporal profile. The laser has a 30th-power supergaussian spatial profile and is diffraction limited. The system is capable of imposing 2D smoothing by spectral dispersion upon the beam, which will produce a nonuniformity of 10% rms at the target. PMID:20517369

  18. SYNCH: A program for design and analysis of synchrotrons and beamlines -- user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.A.; Kenney, A.S.; Courant, E.D.; Russell, A.D.; Syphers, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    SYNCH is a computer program for use in the design and analysis of synchrotrons, storage rings, and beamlines. It has a large repertoire of commands that can be accessed in a flexible way. The input statements and the results of the calculations they invoke are saved in an internal database so that this information may be shared by other statements. SYNCH is the first accelerator program to organize its input in the form of a language. The statements, which resemble sentences, provide a natural way of describing lattices and invoking relevant calculations. The organization of the program is modular, so that it has been possible to expand its capabilities progressively.

  19. The New X-Ray Lithography Beamline BL1 At DELTA

    SciTech Connect

    Lietz, D.; Paulus, M.; Sternemann, C.; Berges, U.; Hippert, B.; Tolan, M.

    2010-06-23

    Lithography using synchrotron radiation in the x-ray regime provides a powerful method to produce mechanical components of sub-millimeter size with a very good quality for microtechnological applications. In recent years the demand for x-ray lithography beamtime for industrial production of microparts increased rapidly resulting in the development of new experimental endstations at synchrotron radiation sources dedicated for the production of micromechanical devices. We present in this work the layout of the new x-ray lithography beamline BL1 at the synchrotron radiation source DELTA in Dortmund and discuss first results of exposure tests.

  20. The Stanford Automated Mounter: Pushing the limits of sample exchange at the SSRL macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Russi, Silvia; Song, Jinhu; McPhillips, Scott E.; Cohen, Aina E.

    2016-02-24

    The Stanford Automated Mounter System, a system for mounting and dismounting cryo-cooled crystals, has been upgraded to increase the throughput of samples on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. This upgrade speeds up robot maneuvers, reduces the heating/drying cycles, pre-fetches samples and adds an air-knife to remove frost from the gripper arms. As a result, sample pin exchange during automated crystal quality screening now takes about 25 s, five times faster than before this upgrade.

  1. FXI: a full-field imaging beamline at NSLS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wah-Keat; Reininger, Ruben; Loo, William; Gambella, Richard; O'Hara, Steven; Chu, Yong S.; Zhong, Zhong; Wang, Jun

    2015-09-01

    The Full-field X-ray Imaging (FXI) beamline at the NSLS-II is designed for optimum performance of a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM). When complete, FXI will enable the TXM to obtain individual 2D projection images at 30 nm spatial resolution and up to 40 microns field of view (FOV) with exposure times of < 50 ms per image. A complete 3D nanotomography data set should take less than 1 minute. This will open opportunities for many real-time in-operando studies.

  2. Justification for the development of a bending magnet beamline at sector 10 at the APS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division

    2006-09-18

    The long-planned and much-needed merger of EnviroCAT into the Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MR-CAT) will provide dedicated state-of-the-art facilities that are critical to research on a broad range of issues in environmental sciences. These CATs will focus on developing a bending magnet (BM) beamline for x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and micro x-ray analysis of environmental samples through integration with existing insertion device (ID) capabilities in XAFS, micro x-ray analysis, and x-ray scattering. In addition, the expanded MR-CAT will serve as the hub of personnel and laboratory infrastructure support for molecular environmental science and biogeochemical science at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). In conjunction with the merger of EnviroCAT into MR-CAT, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will become a member institution of MR-CAT, joining the present members (University of Notre Dame, Illinois Institute of Technology, University of Florida, British Petroleum, and Argonne's Chemical Engineering and Biosciences Division). The motivation for blending capabilities meeting the needs of EnviroCAT users into the MR-CAT facilities is the explosion of synchrotron-radiation-based research in the field known as molecular environmental science (MES). This research is driven largely by the need to remediate contaminated environmental materials and to understand the scientific foundations that govern contaminant transport in the environment. Synchrotron radiation is playing a crucial role in solving environmental science problems by offering x-ray-based analytical techniques for detailed molecular- and atomic-level studies of these systems. This document focuses on the scientific justification for developing a specific type of BM beamline capability at Sector 10 for XAFS and micro x-ray analysis to support the growing MES community. However, the modification of Sector 10 will meet other future needs by providing (1) an existing undulator

  3. The Stanford Automated Mounter: pushing the limits of sample exchange at the SSRL macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    PubMed Central

    Russi, Silvia; Song, Jinhu; McPhillips, Scott E.; Cohen, Aina E.

    2016-01-01

    The Stanford Automated Mounter System, a system for mounting and dismounting cryo-cooled crystals, has been upgraded to increase the throughput of samples on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. This upgrade speeds up robot maneuvers, reduces the heating/drying cycles, pre-fetches samples and adds an air-knife to remove frost from the gripper arms. Sample pin exchange during automated crystal quality screening now takes about 25 s, five times faster than before this upgrade. PMID:27047309

  4. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-06-22

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field.

  5. CDApps: integrated software for experimental planning and data processing at beamline B23, Diamond Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Rohanah; Benning, Kristian; Javorfi, Tamas; Longo, Edoardo; Rudd, Timothy R.; Pulford, Bill; Siligardi, Giuliano

    2015-01-01

    The B23 Circular Dichroism beamline at Diamond Light Source has been operational since 2009 and has seen visits from more than 200 user groups, who have generated large amounts of data. Based on the experience of overseeing the users’ progress at B23, four key areas requiring the most assistance are identified: planning of experiments and note-keeping; designing titration experiments; processing and analysis of the collected data; and production of experimental reports. To streamline these processes an integrated software package has been developed and made available for the users. The subsequent article summarizes the main features of the software. PMID:25723950

  6. Magnetic shielding of an electron beamline in a hadron accelerator enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Kroc, T.K.; Schmidt, C.W.; Shemyakin, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    The Fermilab Electron Cooling Project requires the operation of a 4.34 MeV electron beam in the same enclosure that houses the 120, 150 GeV Main Injector. Effective shielding of the magnetic fields from the ramped electrical busses and local static fields is necessary to maintain the high beam quality and recirculation efficiency required by the electron cooling system. This paper discusses the operational tolerances and the design of the beamline shielding, bus design, and bus shielding as well as experimental results from the prototype and final installation.

  7. Target and orbit feedback simulations of a muSR beamline at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    MacKay, W. W.; Fischer, W.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pile, P.

    2015-05-03

    Well-polarized positive surface muons are a tool to measure the magnetic properties of materials since the precession rate of the spin can be determined from the observation of the positron directions when the muons decay. The use of the AGS complex at BNL has been explored for a muSR facility previously. Here we report simulations of a beamline with a target inside a solenoidal field, and of an orbit feed-back system with single muon beam positioning monitors based on technology available today

  8. Synchrotron total reflection X-ray fluorescence at BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, M. K. Singh, A. K. Das, Gangadhar Chowdhury, Anupam Lodha, G. S.

    2014-04-24

    Determination of ultra trace elements is important in many disciplines both in basic and applied sciences. Numerous applications show their importance in medical science, environmental science, materials science, food processing and semiconductor industries and in maintaining the quality control of ultra pure chemicals and reagents. We report commissioning of a synchrotron based total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) facility on the BL-16 microfocus beamline of Indus-2. This paper describes the performance of the BL-16 TXRF spectrometer and the detailed description of its capabilities through examples of measured results.

  9. Analysis of order contamination from toroidal grating monochromator of Indus-1 reflectivity beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R. K.; Modi, Mohammed H.; Lodha, G. S.

    2012-06-05

    The synchrotron radiation spectra of toroidal grating monochromators (TGM) often contaminated by significant amounts of higher orders. Quantitative estimation of order contamination is essential in order to perform quantitative spectroscopy measurements. At Indus-1 reflectivity beamline higher order contaminations from TGM monochromator are experimentally determined using a reflection grating analyzer. It is found that the order contamination in wavelength range of 50-200 A is less than 15%. Use of edge filters reduces the order contamination level below 5% in this wavelength range.

  10. Achieving Vibration Stability of the NSLS-II Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Chu, Y. S.; Broadbent, A.; Nazaretski, E.; Margulies, L.; Dyling, O.; Shen, Q.; Fallier, M.

    2011-09-09

    The hard x-ray nanoprobe (HXN) beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) requires high levels of stability in order to achieve the desired instrument resolution. To ensure that the design of the endstation helps meet the stringent criteria and that natural and cultural vibration is mitigated both passively and actively, a comprehensive study complimentary to the design process has been undertaken. Vibration sources that have the potential to disrupt sensitive experiments such as wind, traffic, and NSLS II operating systems have been studied using state-of-the-art simulations and an array of field data. Further, final stage vibration isolation principles have been explored.

  11. X-ray Experiments for Students at the SLS Optics Beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Flechsig, U.; Jaggi, A.; Krempasky, J.; Oberta, P.; Spielmann, S.; Veen, J. F. van der; Als-Nielsen, J.

    2010-06-23

    We present a X-ray training course for students. The course covers fundamental properties of synchrotron radiation and basic techniques like scattering and absorption. We prepared ten experiments together with a tutorial. The whole course takes about a week. A first student group from the University of Copenhagen passed the course in June 2009. The experiments were performed at the optics beamline of the Swiss Light Source which can be part-time allocated for training purposes. Two experiments are described in more detail: scattering from a hanging drop of water turning into ice and measurement of the power of a pink synchrotron beam using a simple calorimeter.

  12. Proton transfer at carbon.

    PubMed

    Richard, J P; Amyes, T L

    2001-12-01

    The viability of living systems requires that C--H bonds of biological molecules be stable in water, but that there also be a mechanism for shortening the timescale for their heterolytic cleavage through enzymatic catalysis of a variety of catabolic and metabolic reactions. An understanding of the mechanism of enzymatic catalysis of proton transfer at carbon requires the integration of results of studies to determine the structure of the enzyme-substrate complex with model studies on the mechanism for the non-enzymatic reaction in water, and the effect of the local protein environment on the stability of the transition state for this reaction. A common theme is the importance of electrostatic interactions in providing stabilization of bound carbanion intermediates of enzyme-catalyzed proton-transfer reactions.

  13. Proton therapy in the clinic.

    PubMed

    DeLaney, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    The clinical advantage for proton radiotherapy over photon approaches is the marked reduction in integral dose to the patient, due to the absence of exit dose beyond the proton Bragg peak. The integral dose with protons is approximately 60% lower than that with any external beam photon technique. Pediatric patients, because of their developing normal tissues and anticipated length of remaining life, are likely to have the maximum clinical gain with the use of protons. Proton therapy may also allow treatment of some adult tumors to much more effective doses, because of normal tissue sparing distal to the tumor. Currently, the most commonly available proton treatment technology uses 3D conformal approaches based on (a) distal range modulation, (b) passive scattering of the proton beam in its x- and y-axes, and (c) lateral beam-shaping. It is anticipated that magnetic pencil beam scanning will become the dominant mode of proton delivery in the future, which will lower neutron scatter associated with passively scattered beam lines, reduce the need for expensive beam-shaping devices, and allow intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy. Proton treatment plans are more sensitive to variations in tumor size and normal tissue changes over the course of treatment than photon plans, and it is expected that adaptive radiation therapy will be increasingly important for proton therapy as well. While impressive treatment results have been reported with protons, their cost is higher than for photon IMRT. Hence, protons should ideally be employed for anatomic sites and tumors not well treated with photons. While protons appear cost-effective for pediatric tumors, their cost-effectiveness for treatment of some adult tumors, such as prostate cancer, is uncertain. Comparative studies have been proposed or are in progress to more rigorously assess their value for a variety of sites. The utility of proton therapy will be enhanced by technological developments that reduce its cost

  14. Microdosimetry of proton and carbon ions

    SciTech Connect

    Liamsuwan, Thiansin; Hultqvist, Martha; Lindborg, Lennart; Nikjoo, Hooshang; Uehara, Shuzo

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate microdosimetry properties of 160 MeV/u protons and 290 MeV/u{sup 12}C ion beams in small volumes of diameters 10–100 nm. Methods: Energy distributions of primary particles and nuclear fragments in the beams were calculated from simulations with the general purpose code SHIELD-HIT, while energy depositions by monoenergetic ions in nanometer volumes were obtained from the event-by-event Monte Carlo track structure ion code PITS99 coupled with the electron track structure code KURBUC. Results: The results are presented for frequencies of energy depositions in cylindrical targets of diameters 10–100 nm, dose distributionsyd(y) in lineal energy y, and dose-mean lineal energies y{sup ¯}{sub D}. For monoenergetic ions, the y{sup ¯}{sub D} was found to increase with an increasing target size for high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions, but decrease with an increasing target size for low-LET ions. Compared to the depth dose profile of the ion beams, the maximum of the y{sup ¯}{sub D} depth profile for the 160 MeV proton beam was located at ∼0.5 cm behind the Bragg peak maximum, while the y{sup ¯}{sub D} peak of the 290 MeV/u {sup 12}C beam coincided well with the peak of the absorbed dose profile. Differences between the y{sup ¯}{sub D} and dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LET{sub D}) were large in the proton beam for both target volumes studied, and in the {sup 12}C beam for the 10 nm diameter cylindrical volumes. The y{sup ¯}{sub D} determined for 100 nm diameter cylindrical volumes in the {sup 12}C beam was approximately equal to the LET{sub D}. The contributions from secondary particles to the y{sup ¯}{sub D} of the beams are presented, including the contributions from secondary protons in the proton beam and from fragments with atomic number Z = 1–6 in the {sup 12}C beam. Conclusions: The present investigation provides an insight into differences in energy depositions in subcellular-size volumes when irradiated by proton and

  15. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    SciTech Connect

    Marc-André Pleier

    2010-05-05

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world’s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC’s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  16. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  17. Smashing Protons to Smithereens

    ScienceCinema

    Marc-André Pleier

    2016-07-12

    Pleier discusses the extraordinary research taking place at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world’s newest, biggest, and highest energy particle accelerator located at CERN. Pleier is one of hundreds of researchers from around the world working on ATLAS, a seven-story particle detector positioned at a point where the LHC’s oppositely circulating beams of protons slam into one another head-on.

  18. DEIMOS: A beamline dedicated to dichroism measurements in the 350–2500 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Ohresser, P. Otero, E.; Choueikani, F.; Chen, K.; Stanescu, S.; Deschamps, F.; Moreno, T.; Polack, F.; Lagarde, B.; Daguerre, J.-P.; Marteau, F.; Scheurer, F.; Joly, L.; Muller, B.; Kappler, J.-P.; Bunau, O.; Sainctavit, Ph.

    2014-01-15

    The DEIMOS (Dichroism Experimental Installation for Magneto-Optical Spectroscopy) beamline was part of the second phase of the beamline development at French Synchrotron SOLEIL (Source Optimisée de Lumière à Energie Intermédiaire du LURE) and opened to users in March 2011. It delivers polarized soft x-rays to perform x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and x-ray linear dichroism in the energy range 350–2500 eV. The beamline has been optimized for stability and reproducibility in terms of photon flux and photon energy. The main end-station consists in a cryo-magnet with 2 split coils providing a 7 T magnetic field along the beam or 2 T perpendicular to the beam with a controllable temperature on the sample from 370 K down to 1.5 K.

  19. DEIMOS: a beamline dedicated to dichroism measurements in the 350-2500 eV energy range.

    PubMed

    Ohresser, P; Otero, E; Choueikani, F; Chen, K; Stanescu, S; Deschamps, F; Moreno, T; Polack, F; Lagarde, B; Daguerre, J-P; Marteau, F; Scheurer, F; Joly, L; Kappler, J-P; Muller, B; Bunau, O; Sainctavit, Ph

    2014-01-01

    The DEIMOS (Dichroism Experimental Installation for Magneto-Optical Spectroscopy) beamline was part of the second phase of the beamline development at French Synchrotron SOLEIL (Source Optimisée de Lumière à Energie Intermédiaire du LURE) and opened to users in March 2011. It delivers polarized soft x-rays to perform x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and x-ray linear dichroism in the energy range 350-2500 eV. The beamline has been optimized for stability and reproducibility in terms of photon flux and photon energy. The main end-station consists in a cryo-magnet with 2 split coils providing a 7 T magnetic field along the beam or 2 T perpendicular to the beam with a controllable temperature on the sample from 370 K down to 1.5 K.

  20. Development and applications of rectangular box-type explosively bonded structures for high-heat-load beamline components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, D.; Chang, J.; Kuzay, T. M.; Brasher, D. G.

    2001-07-01

    Explosive bonding technology is a good choice to join dissimilar materials, such as 304L stainless steel and GlidCop AL-15, and is used extensively in making the advanced photon source (APS) high-heat-load beamline and front-end components. It is a bonding method in which the controlled energy of a detonating explosive is used to create a metallurgical bond between two or more similar or dissimilar materials. In recent years, special explosive bonding units with rectangular box-type joints were developed for the APS new high-heat-load beamline components. Based on this new technique, the box form of the component could be built in two halves first, then welded together. Therefore, beamline designers have more freedom to optimize the cooling surface geometry.

  1. In crystallo optical spectroscopy (icOS) as a complementary tool on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines of the ESRF

    PubMed Central

    von Stetten, David; Giraud, Thierry; Carpentier, Philippe; Sever, Franc; Terrien, Maxime; Dobias, Fabien; Juers, Douglas H.; Flot, David; Mueller-Dieckmann, Christoph; Leonard, Gordon A.; de Sanctis, Daniele; Royant, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of structural data obtained by X-ray crystallo­graphy benefits from information obtained from complementary techniques, especially as applied to the crystals themselves. As a consequence, optical spectroscopies in structural biology have become instrumental in assessing the relevance and context of many crystallographic results. Since the year 2000, it has been possible to record such data adjacent to, or directly on, the Structural Biology Group beamlines of the ESRF. A core laboratory featuring various spectrometers, named the Cryobench, is now in its third version and houses portable devices that can be directly mounted on beamlines. This paper reports the current status of the Cryobench, which is now located on the MAD beamline ID29 and is thus called the ID29S-Cryobench (where S stands for ‘spectroscopy’). It also reviews the diverse experiments that can be performed at the Cryobench, highlighting the various scientific questions that can be addressed. PMID:25615856

  2. Photon transport of the superradiant TeraFERMI THz beamline at the FERMI free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Svetina, Cristian; Mahne, Nicola; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Perucchi, Andrea; Di Pietro, Paola; Lupi, Stefano; Schmidt, Bernhard; Zangrando, Marco

    2016-01-01

    TeraFERMI is the new terahertz (THz) beamline for pump-probe studies on the femtosecond time-scale, under construction at the FERMI free-electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. The beamline will take advantage of the coherent radiation emitted by the spent electrons from the FEL undulators, before being dumped. This will result in short, coherent, high-power THz pulses to be used as a pump beam, in order to modulate structural properties of matter, thereby inducing phase transitions. The TeraFERMI beamline collects THz radiation in the undulator hall and guides it along a beam pipe which is approximately 30 m long, extending across the safety hutch and two shielding walls. Here the optical design, which will allow the efficient transport of the emitted THz radiation in the experimental hall, is presented. PMID:26698051

  3. Parallel-beam imaging at the ESRF beamline ID19: current status and plans for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitkamp, T.; Tafforeau, P.; Boller, E.; Cloetens, P.; Valade, J.-P.; Bernard, P.; Peyrin, F.; Ludwig, W.; Helfen, L.; Baruchel, J.

    2010-06-01

    The ESRF synchrotron beamline ID19, dedicated to full-field parallel-beam imaging techniques such as phase-contrast and absorption microtomography and X-ray topography, is one of the most versatile instruments of its kind. This paper presents key characteristics of ID19 in its present form, names examples for research and development performed on the beamline, and outlines the plans for an upgrade on the beamline in coming years, to adapt to the growing needs of the user community. The technical goals envisioned include an increase in available beam size and maximum photon energy, and a substantial increase in flux density for applications using beams of small and intermediate size.

  4. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-10-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  5. Polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Makdisi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The approval for construction of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a potential opportunity to collide polarized proton beams at energies up to 500 GeV in the center of mass and high luminosities approaching 2 {times} 10{sup 32}/cm{sup 2}/sec. This capability is enhanced by the fact that the AGS has already accelerated polarized protons and relies on the newly completed Accumulator/Booster for providing the required polarized proton intensity and a system of spin rotators (Siberian snakes) to retain the polarization. The RHIC Spin Collaboration was formed and submitted a Letter of Intent to construct this polarized collider capability and utilize its physics opportunities. In this presentation, I will discuss the plans to upgrade the AGS, the proposed layout of the RHIC siberian snakes, and timetables. The physics focus is the measurement of the spin dependent parton distributions with such accessible probes including high p(t) jets, direct photons, and Drell Yan. The attainable sensitivities and the progress that has been reached in defining the detector requirements will be outlined.

  6. Pion, Kaon, Proton and Antiproton Production in Proton-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusive pion, kaon, proton, and antiproton production from proton-proton collisions is studied at a variety of proton energies. Various available parameterizations of Lorentz-invariant differential cross sections as a function of transverse momentum and rapidity are compared with experimental data. The Badhwar and Alper parameterizations are moderately satisfactory for charged pion production. The Badhwar parameterization provides the best fit for charged kaon production. For proton production, the Alper parameterization is best, and for antiproton production the Carey parameterization works best. However, no parameterization is able to fully account for all the data.

  7. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton radioactivity of 94Ag.

    PubMed

    Mukha, Ivan; Roeckl, Ernst; Batist, Leonid; Blazhev, Andrey; Döring, Joachim; Grawe, Hubert; Grigorenko, Leonid; Huyse, Mark; Janas, Zenon; Kirchner, Reinhard; La Commara, Marco; Mazzocchi, Chiara; Tabor, Sam L; Van Duppen, Piet

    2006-01-19

    The stability and spontaneous decay of naturally occurring atomic nuclei have been much studied ever since Becquerel discovered natural radioactivity in 1896. In 1960, proton-rich nuclei with an odd or an even atomic number Z were predicted to decay through one- and two-proton radioactivity, respectively. The experimental observation of one-proton radioactivity was first reported in 1982, and two-proton radioactivity has now also been detected by experimentally studying the decay properties of 45Fe (refs 3, 4) and 54Zn (ref. 5). Here we report proton-proton correlations observed during the radioactive decay of a spinning long-lived state of the lightest known isotope of silver, 94Ag, which is known to undergo one-proton decay. We infer from these correlations that the long-lived state must also decay through simultaneous two-proton emission, making 94Ag the first nucleus to exhibit one- as well as two-proton radioactivity. We attribute the two-proton emission behaviour and the unexpectedly large probability for this decay mechanism to a very large deformation of the parent nucleus into a prolate (cigar-like) shape, which facilitates emission of protons either from the same or from opposite ends of the 'cigar'.

  8. Facilitating best practices in collecting anomalous scattering data for de novo structure solution at the ESRF Structural Biology Beamlines

    PubMed Central

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Oscarsson, Marcus; Popov, Alexander; Svensson, Olof; Leonard, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    The constant evolution of synchrotron structural biology beamlines, the viability of screening protein crystals for a wide range of heavy-atom derivatives, the advent of efficient protein labelling and the availability of automatic data-processing and structure-solution pipelines have combined to make de novo structure solution in macromolecular crystallography a less arduous task. Nevertheless, the collection of diffraction data of sufficient quality for experimental phasing is still a difficult and crucial step. Here, some examples of good data-collection practice for projects requiring experimental phasing are presented and recent developments at the ESRF Structural Biology beamlines that have facilitated these are illustrated. PMID:26960128

  9. Facilitating best practices in collecting anomalous scattering data for de novo structure solution at the ESRF Structural Biology Beamlines.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Oscarsson, Marcus; Popov, Alexander; Svensson, Olof; Leonard, Gordon

    2016-03-01

    The constant evolution of synchrotron structural biology beamlines, the viability of screening protein crystals for a wide range of heavy-atom derivatives, the advent of efficient protein labelling and the availability of automatic data-processing and structure-solution pipelines have combined to make de novo structure solution in macromolecular crystallography a less arduous task. Nevertheless, the collection of diffraction data of sufficient quality for experimental phasing is still a difficult and crucial step. Here, some examples of good data-collection practice for projects requiring experimental phasing are presented and recent developments at the ESRF Structural Biology beamlines that have facilitated these are illustrated.

  10. Mechanical Design of a Spherical Grating Monochromator for the Microspectroscopy Beamline PolLux at the Swiss Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Henein, Simon; Frommherz, Ulrich; Betemps, Robin; Kalt, Herbert; Ellenberger, Urs; Flechsig, Uwe; Raabe, Joerg

    2007-01-19

    This paper describes a new monochromator design for a bending magnet beamline of the Swiss Light Source synchrotron facility. The beamline optics is based on a horizontally deflecting spherical grating monochromator (SGM) with two gratings at a constant deviation angle. It covers a photon energy range from 200 eV to 1000 eV. This paper concentrates on the original flexure-based mechanisms with partially parallel kinematics invented and designed for this monochromator, as well as on the lessons learned from the assembly and testing of the system.

  11. Off-axis dose equivalent due to secondary neutrons from uniform scanning proton beams during proton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Islam, M R; Collums, T L; Zheng, Y; Monson, J; Benton, E R

    2013-11-21

    The production of secondary neutrons is an undesirable byproduct of proton therapy and it is important to quantify the contribution from secondary neutrons to patient dose received outside the treatment volume. The purpose of this study is to investigate the off-axis dose equivalent from secondary neutrons experimentally using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD) at ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK. In this experiment, we placed several layers of CR-39 PNTD laterally outside the treatment volume inside a phantom and in air at various depths and angles with respect to the primary beam axis. Three different proton beams with max energies of 78, 162 and 226 MeV and 4 cm modulation width, a 5 cm diameter brass aperture, and a small snout located 38 cm from isocenter were used for the entire experiment. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed based on the experimental setup using a simplified snout configuration and the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The measured ratio of secondary neutron dose equivalent to therapeutic primary proton dose (H/D) ranged from 0.3 ± 0.08 mSv Gy−1 for 78 MeV proton beam to 37.4 ± 2.42 mSv Gy−1 for 226 MeV proton beam. Both experiment and simulation showed a similar decreasing trend in dose equivalent with distance to the central axis and the magnitude varied by a factor of about 2 in most locations. H/D was found to increase as the energy of the primary proton beam increased and higher H/D was observed at 135° compared to 45° and 90°. The overall higher H/D in air indicates the predominance of external neutrons produced in the nozzle rather than inside the body.

  12. Factors for converting dose measured in polystyrene phantoms to dose reported in water phantoms for incident proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Moyers, M. F.; Vatnitsky, A. S.; Vatnitsky, S. M.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: Previous dosimetry protocols allowed calibrations of proton beamline dose monitors to be performed in plastic phantoms. Nevertheless, dose determinations were referenced to absorbed dose-to-muscle or absorbed dose-to-water. The IAEA Code of Practice TRS 398 recommended that dose calibrations be performed with ionization chambers only in water phantoms because plastic-to-water dose conversion factors were not available with sufficient accuracy at the time of its writing. These factors are necessary, however, to evaluate the difference in doses delivered to patients if switching from calibration in plastic to a protocol that only allows calibration in water. Methods: This work measured polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors for this purpose. Uncertainties in the results due to temperature, geometry, and chamber effects were minimized by using special experimental set-up procedures. The measurements were validated by Monte Carlo simulations. Results: At the peak of non-range-modulated beams, measured polystyrene-to-water factors ranged from 1.015 to 1.024 for beams with ranges from 36 to 315 mm. For beams with the same ranges and medium sized modulations, the factors ranged from 1.005 to 1.019. The measured results were used to generate tables of polystyrene-to-water dose conversion factors. Conclusions: The dose conversion factors can be used at clinical proton facilities to support beamline and patient specific dose per monitor unit calibrations performed in polystyrene phantoms.

  13. The life science X-ray scattering beamline at NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    DiFabio, Jonathan; Yang, Lin; Chodankar, Shirish; Pjerov, Sal; Jakoncic, Jean; Lucas, Michael; Krywka, Christina; Graziano, Vito

    2015-09-30

    We report the current development status of the High Brightness X-ray Scattering for Life Sciences (or Life Science X-ray Scattering, LiX) beamline at the NSLS-II facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. This instrument will operate in the x-ray energy range of 2.1-18 keV, provide variable beam sizes from 1 micron to ~0.5 mm, and support user experiments in three scientific areas: (1) high-throughput solution scattering, in-line size exclusion chromatography and flow mixers-based time-resolved solution scattering of biological macro-molecules, (2) diffraction from single- and multi-layered lipid membranes, and (3) scattering-based scanning probe imaging of biological tissues. In order to satisfy the beam stability required for these experiments and to switch rapidly between different types of experiments, we have adopted a secondary source with refractive lenses for secondary focusing, a detector system consisting of three Pilatus detectors, and specialized experimental modules that can be quickly exchanged and each dedicated to a defined set of experiments. The construction of this beamline is on schedule for completion in September 2015. User experiments are expected to start in Spring 2016.

  14. The life science X-ray scattering beamline at NSLS-II

    DOE PAGESBeta

    DiFabio, Jonathan; Yang, Lin; Chodankar, Shirish; Pjerov, Sal; Jakoncic, Jean; Lucas, Michael; Krywka, Christina; Graziano, Vito

    2015-09-30

    We report the current development status of the High Brightness X-ray Scattering for Life Sciences (or Life Science X-ray Scattering, LiX) beamline at the NSLS-II facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory. This instrument will operate in the x-ray energy range of 2.1-18 keV, provide variable beam sizes from 1 micron to ~0.5 mm, and support user experiments in three scientific areas: (1) high-throughput solution scattering, in-line size exclusion chromatography and flow mixers-based time-resolved solution scattering of biological macro-molecules, (2) diffraction from single- and multi-layered lipid membranes, and (3) scattering-based scanning probe imaging of biological tissues. In order to satisfy the beammore » stability required for these experiments and to switch rapidly between different types of experiments, we have adopted a secondary source with refractive lenses for secondary focusing, a detector system consisting of three Pilatus detectors, and specialized experimental modules that can be quickly exchanged and each dedicated to a defined set of experiments. The construction of this beamline is on schedule for completion in September 2015. User experiments are expected to start in Spring 2016.« less

  15. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Birkl, Gerhard; Andelkovic, Zoran; Vogel, Manuel; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan

    2015-11-15

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles’ beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar{sup 13+}) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  16. Low-cycle-fatigue behavior of copper materials and their use in synchrotron beamline components

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Nian, T.; Ryding, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1993-09-01

    The third generation synchrotron facilities such as the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source Project (APS) generate x-ray beams with very high heat loads and heat flux levels. The front-end and beamline components are required to sustain total heat loads of 5 to 15 kW and heat flux levels exceeding 400 W/mm{sup 2}. Grazing geometry and enhanced heat transfer techniques are used in the design of such components to reduce heat flux levels below the 30 W/mm{sup 2} level, which is sustainable by the special copper materials routinely used in the component design. Although the resulting maximum surface temperatures can be sustained, the structural stresses and the fatigue issues remain viable concerns for the copper, particularly under brazing or bonding of the parts. Brazing and bonding are almost always utilized in the design of the components, and the drastically lowered yield stress of the annealed copper subjected to bonding temperatures above 400{degree}C is a real concern. Such materials with reduced post-bonding stress levels easily reach yield point under thermal stresses during ordinary use on the beamline. The resulting plastic deformation in each load cycle may cause low-cycle-fatigue problems. The two common copper materials are OFHC and Glidcop. This paper critically reviews the available literature for low-cycle-fatigue properties, of OFHC at the elevated temperatures typically found in synchrotron operations.

  17. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar13+) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections.

  18. Non-destructive single-pass low-noise detection of ions in a beamline.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan; Murböck, Tobias; Andelkovic, Zoran; Birkl, Gerhard; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried; Stahl, Stefan; Vogel, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    We have conceived, built, and operated a device for the non-destructive single-pass detection of charged particles in a beamline. The detector is based on the non-resonant pick-up and subsequent low-noise amplification of the image charges induced in a cylindrical electrode surrounding the particles' beam path. The first stage of the amplification electronics is designed to be operated from room temperature down to liquid helium temperature. The device represents a non-destructive charge counter as well as a sensitive timing circuit. We present the concept and design details of the device. We have characterized its performance and show measurements with low-energy highly charged ions (such as Ar(13+)) passing through one of the electrodes of a cylindrical Penning trap. This work demonstrates a novel approach of non-destructive, low noise detection of charged particles which is, depending on the bunch structure, suitable, e.g., for ion traps, low-energy beamlines or accelerator transfer sections. PMID:26628124

  19. New Beamlines For Protein Crystallography At The EMBL-Outstation Hamburg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, C.; Gehrmann, T.; Jahn, D.; Ristau, U.; Robrahn, B.; Siambanis, T.

    2004-05-01

    Three new beamlines for Protein Crystallography were built up on a bending magnet fan of the DORIS III storage ring. A 10 mrad wide fan of white Synchrotron Radiation (SR) is evenly distributed among 3 individual stations: X12, a central, wavelength-tunable station intended for anomalous scattering experiments (MAD) and fixed wavelength, high intensity stations symmetrically on either side. The fixed wavelength beamlines X11 & X13 comprise triangular, asymmetrically cut Si (111) monochromators as horizontally focusing optical elements. The tunable station is based on a fixed-exit, horizontally focusing double crystal monochromator system. Vertical focusing is achieved on all three lines by trapezoidal shaped, continuous Rh-coated mirrors which can be dynamically bent. In all three lines the X-ray beam can be examined at various points on its way through the optical system by removable screens and PIN-diode based intensity monitors. Purpose built crystallographic end-stations complete the set-up. The design of individual components and their performance will be described.

  20. Application of Goubau Surface Wave Transmission Line for Improved Bench Testing of Diagnostic Beamline Elements

    SciTech Connect

    John Musson, Keith Cole, Sheldon Rubin

    2009-05-01

    In-air test fixtures for beamline elements typically utilize an X-Y positioning stage, and a wire antenna excited by an RF source. In most cases, the antenna contains a standing wave, and is useful only for coarse alignment measurements in CW mode. A surface-wave (SW) based transmission line permits RF energy to be launched on the wire, travel through the beamline component, and then be absorbed in a load. Since SW transmission lines employ travelling waves, the RF energy can be made to resemble the electron beam, limited only by ohmic losses and dispersion. Although lossy coaxial systems are also a consideration, the diameter of the coax introduces large uncertainties in centroid location. A SW wire is easily constructed out of 200 micron magnet wire, which more accurately approximates the physical profile of the electron beam. Benefits of this test fixture include accurate field mapping, absolute calibration for given beam currents, Z-axis independence, and temporal response measurements of sub-nanosecond pulse structures. Descriptions of the surface wave launching technique, transmission line, and instrumentation are presented, along with measurement data.