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Sample records for primary root growth

  1. Exogenous nitrate induces root branching and inhibits primary root growth in Capsicum chinense Jacq.

    PubMed

    Celis-Arámburo, Teresita de Jesús; Carrillo-Pech, Mildred; Castro-Concha, Lizbeth A; Miranda-Ham, María de Lourdes; Martínez-Estévez, Manuel; Echevarría-Machado, Ileana

    2011-12-01

    The effects of nitrate (NO₃⁻) on the root system are complex and depend on several factors, such as the concentration available to the plant, endogenous nitrogen status and the sensitivity of the species. Though these effects have been widely documented on Arabidopsis and cereals, no reports are available in the Capsicum genus. In this paper, we have determined the effect of an exogenous in vitro application of this nutrient on root growth in habanero pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq.). Exposure to NO₃⁻ inhibited primary root growth in both, dose- and time-dependent manners. The highest inhibition was attained with 0.1 mM NO₃⁻ between the fourth and fifth days of treatment. Inhibition of primary root growth was observed by exposing the root to both homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions of the nutrient; in contrast, ammonium was not able to induce similar changes. NO₃⁻-induced inhibition of primary root growth was reversed by treating the roots with IAA or NPA, a polar auxin transport inhibitor. Heterogeneous NO₃⁻ application stimulated the formation and elongation of lateral roots in the segment where the nutrient was present, and this response was influenced by exogenous phytohormones. These results demonstrate that habanero pepper responds to NO₃⁻ in a similar fashion to other species with certain particular differences. Therefore, studies in this model could help to elucidate the mechanisms by which roots respond to NO₃⁻ in fluctuating soil environments.

  2. AtOPR3 specifically inhibits primary root growth in Arabidopsis under phosphate deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongyan; Pan, Xiaoying; Deng, Yuxia; Wu, Huamao; Liu, Pei; Li, Xuexian

    2016-01-01

    The primary root plays essential roles in root development, nutrient absorption, and root architectural establishment. Primary root growth is generally suppressed by phosphate (P) deficiency in A. thaliana; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely elusive to date. We found that AtOPR3 specifically inhibited primary root growth under P deficiency via suppressing root tip growth at the transcriptional level, revealing an important novel function of AtOPR3 in regulating primary root response to the nutrient stress. Importantly, AtOPR3 functioned to down-regulate primary root growth under P limitation mostly by its own, rather than depending on the Jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Further, AtOPR3 interacted with ethylene and gibberellin signaling pathways to regulate primary root growth upon P deficiency. In addition, the AtOPR3’s function in inhibiting primary root growth upon P limitation was also partially dependent on auxin polar transport. Together, our studies provide new insights into how AtOPR3, together with hormone signaling interactions, modulates primary root growth in coping with the environmental stress in Arabidopsis. PMID:27101793

  3. The key players of the primary root growth and development also function in lateral roots in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Huiyu; Jia, Yuebin; Niu, Tiantian; Yu, Qianqian; Ding, Zhaojun

    2014-05-01

    The core regulators which are required for primary root growth and development also function in lateral root development or lateral root stem cell niche maintenance. The primary root systems and the lateral root systems are the two important root systems which are vital to the survival of plants. Though the molecular mechanism of the growth and development of both the primary root systems and the lateral root systems have been extensively studied individually in Arabidopsis, there are not so much evidence to show that if both root systems share common regulatory mechanisms. AP2 family transcription factors such as PLT1 (PLETHORA1) and PLT2, GRAS family transcription factors such as SCR (SCARECROW) and SHR (SHORT ROOT) and WUSCHEL-RELATED HOMEOBOX transcription factor WOX5 have been extensively studied and found to be essential for primary root growth and development. In this study, through the expression pattern analysis and mutant examinations, we found that these core regulators also function in lateral root development or lateral root stem cell niche maintenance.

  4. Root growth

    Treesearch

    Terrell T. Baker; William H. Conner; B. Graeme Lockaby; Marianne K. Burke; John A. Stanturf

    2000-01-01

    While vegetation dynamics of forested floodplains have received considerable attention (Megonigal and others 1997, Mitch and Gosselink 1993), the highly dynamic fine root component of these ecosystems has been primarily ignored. Characterizing fine root growth is a challenging endeavor in any system, but the difficulties are particularly evident in forested floodplains...

  5. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in lanthanum-induced inhibition of primary root growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Yang; Wang, Ru-Ling; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Liang-Liang; Xu, Jin

    2016-11-01

    Although lanthanum (La) has been used as an agricultural plant growth stimulant for approximately 50 years, high concentrations are toxic to plants. Despite significant advances in recent years, the mechanisms underlying the effects of La on root system development remain unclear. Here, we report that a high concentration of La inhibits primary root (PR) elongation and induces lateral root (LR) development. La results in cell death in PR tips, thereby leading to the loss of meristematic cell division potential, stem cell niche activity, and auxin distribution in PR tips. Further analysis indicated that La induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-accumulation in PR tips. Reduction in ROS accumulation partially alleviated the inhibitory effects of La on PR elongation by improving cell survival in PR tips and thereby improving meristematic cell division potential and auxin distribution in PR tips. We also found ROS to be involved in La-induced endocytosis. Genetic analyses supported the described phenotype. Overall, our results indicate that La affects root growth, at least partially, by modulating ROS levels in roots to induce cell death in PR tips and subsequent auxin redistribution in roots, leading to remodeling of the root system architecture.

  6. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in lanthanum-induced inhibition of primary root growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang-Yang; Wang, Ru-Ling; Zhang, Ping; Sun, Liang-liang; Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Although lanthanum (La) has been used as an agricultural plant growth stimulant for approximately 50 years, high concentrations are toxic to plants. Despite significant advances in recent years, the mechanisms underlying the effects of La on root system development remain unclear. Here, we report that a high concentration of La inhibits primary root (PR) elongation and induces lateral root (LR) development. La results in cell death in PR tips, thereby leading to the loss of meristematic cell division potential, stem cell niche activity, and auxin distribution in PR tips. Further analysis indicated that La induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) over-accumulation in PR tips. Reduction in ROS accumulation partially alleviated the inhibitory effects of La on PR elongation by improving cell survival in PR tips and thereby improving meristematic cell division potential and auxin distribution in PR tips. We also found ROS to be involved in La-induced endocytosis. Genetic analyses supported the described phenotype. Overall, our results indicate that La affects root growth, at least partially, by modulating ROS levels in roots to induce cell death in PR tips and subsequent auxin redistribution in roots, leading to remodeling of the root system architecture. PMID:27811082

  7. Hydrogen sulfide toxicity inhibits primary root growth through the ROS-NO pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Luo, Qiong; Wang, Ruling; Xu, Jin

    2017-04-13

    High concentrations of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are toxic to plants and inhibit their growth. Previous research indicated that high concentrations of H2S modulate the root system architecture (RSA) by affecting auxin transport; however, the signaling pathway underlying this process remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an H2S donor, on primary root (PR) growth in Arabidopsis using pharmacological, physiological, and genetic approaches. H2S toxicity repressed PR growth by triggering a signal transduction pathway involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE 6 (MPK6) activation, and nitric oxide (NO) production. Respiratory burst oxidase homolog mutants and an NO synthase mutant were less sensitive to NaHS, suggesting that both ROS and NO mediate the inhibitory effects of H2S on PR growth. We found that exogenous H2S-activated ROS production was required for NO generation and that MPK6 mediated H2S-induced NO production. MPK6 was shown to function downstream of ROS and upstream of NO. Finally, we demonstrated that exogenous H2S repressed the distribution of auxin and reduced the meristematic cell division potential in root tips, and NO was involved in this process.

  8. Phosphorus and magnesium interactively modulate the elongation and directional growth of primary roots in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yaofang; Jin, Gulei; Li, Xin; Tang, Caixian; Zhang, Yongsong; Liang, Yongchao; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-01-01

    A balanced supply of essential nutrients is an important factor influencing root architecture in many plants, yet data related to the interactive effects of two nutrients on root growth are limited. Here, we investigated the interactive effect between phosphorus (P) and magnesium (Mg) on root growth of Arabidopsis grown in pH-buffered agar medium at different P and Mg levels. The results showed that elongation and deviation of primary roots were directly correlated with the amount of P added to the medium but could be modified by the Mg level, which was related to the root meristem activity and stem-cell division. High P enhanced while low P decreased the tip-focused fluorescence signal of auxin biosynthesis, transport, and redistribution during elongation of primary roots; these effects were greater under low Mg than under high Mg. The altered root growth in response to P and Mg supply was correlated with AUX1, PIN2, and PIN3 mRNA abundance and expression and the accumulation of the protein. Application of either auxin influx inhibitor or efflux inhibitor inhibited the elongation and increased the deviation angle of primary roots, and decreased auxin level in root tips. Furthermore, the auxin-transport mutants aux1-22 and eir1-1 displayed reduced root growth and increased the deviation angle. Our data suggest a profound effect of the combined supply of P and Mg on the development of root morphology in Arabidopsis through auxin signals that modulate the elongation and directional growth of primary root and the expression of root differentiation and development genes. PMID:25922494

  9. Phosphorus and magnesium interactively modulate the elongation and directional growth of primary roots in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yaofang; Jin, Gulei; Li, Xin; Tang, Caixian; Zhang, Yongsong; Liang, Yongchao; Yu, Jingquan

    2015-07-01

    A balanced supply of essential nutrients is an important factor influencing root architecture in many plants, yet data related to the interactive effects of two nutrients on root growth are limited. Here, we investigated the interactive effect between phosphorus (P) and magnesium (Mg) on root growth of Arabidopsis grown in pH-buffered agar medium at different P and Mg levels. The results showed that elongation and deviation of primary roots were directly correlated with the amount of P added to the medium but could be modified by the Mg level, which was related to the root meristem activity and stem-cell division. High P enhanced while low P decreased the tip-focused fluorescence signal of auxin biosynthesis, transport, and redistribution during elongation of primary roots; these effects were greater under low Mg than under high Mg. The altered root growth in response to P and Mg supply was correlated with AUX1, PIN2, and PIN3 mRNA abundance and expression and the accumulation of the protein. Application of either auxin influx inhibitor or efflux inhibitor inhibited the elongation and increased the deviation angle of primary roots, and decreased auxin level in root tips. Furthermore, the auxin-transport mutants aux1-22 and eir1-1 displayed reduced root growth and increased the deviation angle. Our data suggest a profound effect of the combined supply of P and Mg on the development of root morphology in Arabidopsis through auxin signals that modulate the elongation and directional growth of primary root and the expression of root differentiation and development genes.

  10. Responses of growth and primary metabolism of water-stressed barley roots to rehydration.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Richard C; Timlin, Dennis; Bailey, Bryan

    2012-05-01

    Barley seedlings were grown in pots in controlled environment chambers and progressive drought treatments were imposed 11 d after sowing. Soil water content decreased from 92 to 10% following 14 d without watering. Increases of biomass in shoots and roots slowed after 4 and 9 d of water stress, respectively. Thirty barley root metabolites were monitored in this study and 85% were significantly altered by drought. Sucrose, raffinose, glucose, fructose, maltose, malate, asparagine and proline increased and myo-inositol, glycerate, alanine, serine, glycine and glutamate decreased during drought. Primary metabolism was likely involved in various crucial processes during water stress including, osmotic adjustment, nitrogen sequestration and ammonia detoxification. Rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance recovered in 2 d and shoot growth commenced the 3rd day after rehydration. Root growth also exhibited a lag after rehydration but this was attributed to high nutrient concentrations during water stress. Malate and proline recovered within 1 d but serine was only partially reversed 6 d after rehydration. Malate, aspartate and raffinose decreased below well-watered, control levels following rehydration. Variation in the magnitude and time necessary for individual compounds to fully recover after rehydration suggested the complexity of metabolic processes initiated by re-watering. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  11. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  12. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize.

    PubMed

    Stinemetz, C L; Hasenstein, K H; Young, L M; Evans, M L

    1992-11-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  13. Effect of calmodulin antagonists on the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Young, L. M.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effect of calmodulin (CaM) antagonists applied at the root tip on root growth, gravity-induced root curvature, and the movement of calcium across the root tip and auxin (IAA) across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. All of the CaM antagonists used in these studies delayed gravity-induced curvature at a concentration (1 micromole) that did not affect root growth. Calmodulin antagonists (> or = 1 micromole) inhibited downward transport of label from 45Ca2+ across the caps of gravistimulated roots relative to the downward transport of 45Ca2+ in gravistimulated roots which were not treated with CaM antagonists. Application of CaM antagonists at the root tip (> or = 1 micromole) also decreased the relative downward movement of label from 3H-IAA applied to the upper side of the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. In general, tip application of antagonists inhibited neither the upward transport of 45Ca2+ in the root tip nor the upward movement of label from 3H-IAA in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Thus, roots treated with CaM antagonists > or = 1 micromole become less graviresponsive and exhibit reduced or even a reversal of downward polarity of calcium transport across the root tip and IAA transport across the elongation zone. The results indicate that calmodulin-regulated events play a role in root gravitropism.

  14. Growth of the Maize Primary Root at Low Water Potentials 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Robert E.; Hsiao, Theodore C.; Silk, Wendy Kuhn

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 × Mo17) seedlings growing in vermiculite at various water potentials exhibited substantial osmotic adjustment in the growing region. We have assessed quantitatively whether the osmotic adjustment was attributable to increased net solute deposition rates or to slower rates of water deposition associated with reduced volume expansion. Spatial distributions of total osmotica, soluble carbohydrates, potassium, and water were combined with published growth velocity distributions to calculate deposition rate profiles using the continuity equation. Low water potentials had no effect on the rate of total osmoticum deposition per unit length close to the apex, and caused decreased deposition rates in basal regions. However, rates of water deposition decreased more than osmoticum deposition. Consequently, osmoticum deposition rates per unit water volume were increased near the apex and osmotic potentials were lower throughout the growing region. Because the stressed roots were thinner, osmotic adjustment occurred without osmoticum accumulation per unit length. The effects of low water potential on hexose deposition were similar to those for total osmotica, and hexose made a major contribution to the osmotic adjustment in middle and basal regions. In contrast, potassium deposition decreased at low water potentials in close parallel with water deposition, and increases in potassium concentration were small. The results show that growth of the maize primary root at low water potentials involves a complex pattern of morphogenic and metabolic events. Although osmotic adjustment is largely the result of a greater inhibition of volume expansion and water deposition than solute deposition, the contrasting behavior of hexose and potassium deposition indicates that the adjustment is a highly regulated process. PMID:16667622

  15. AtrbohD and AtrbohF positively regulate abscisic acid-inhibited primary root growth by affecting Ca2+ signalling and auxin response of roots in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yiheng; Sun, Lirong; Song, Yalin; Wang, Limin; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Liyue; Liu, Bo; Li, Ning; Miao, Chen; Hao, Fushun

    2013-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF play an important role in abscisic acid (ABA)-inhibited primary root growth in Arabidopsis. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. In this study, the double mutant atrbohD1/F1 and atrbohD2/F2, in which both AtrbohD and AtrbohF were disrupted, were less sensitive to ABA suppression of root cell elongation than wild-type (WT) plants. Furthermore, the double mutants showed impaired ABA responses in roots, including ROS generation, cytosolic Ca(2+) increases, and activation of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channels compared with WT. Exogenous H2O2 can activate the Ca(2+) currents in roots of atrbohD1/F1. In addition, exogenous application of the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid effectively promoted ABA inhibition of root growth of the mutants relative to that of WT. The ABA-induced decreases in auxin sensitivity of the root tips were more pronounced in WT than in atrbohD1/F1. These findings suggest that both AtrbohD and AtrbohF are essential for ABA-promoted ROS production in roots. ROS activate Ca(2+) signalling and reduce auxin sensitivity of roots, thus positively regulating ABA-inhibited primary root growth in Arabidopsis.

  16. The influence of calcium and pH on growth in primary roots of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Hasenstein, K H; Evans, M L

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of Ca2+ and pH on root elongation in Zea mays L. cv. B73 x Missouri 17 and cv. Merit. Seedlings were raised to contain high levels of Ca2+ (HC, imbibed and raised in 10 mM CaCl2) or low levels of Ca2+ (LC, imbibed and raised in distilled water). In HC roots, lowering the pH (5 mM MES/Tris) from 6.5 to 4.5 resulted in strong, long-lasting growth promotion. Surprisingly, increasing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 also resulted in strong growth promotion. In LC roots acidification of the medium (pH 6.5 to 4.5) resulted in transient growth stimulation followed by a gradual decline in the growth rate toward zero. Exposure of LC roots to high pH (pH shift from 6.5 to 8.5) also promoted growth. Addition of EGTA resulted in strong growth promotion in both LC and HC roots. The ability of EGTA to stimulate growth appeared not to be related to H+ release from EGTA upon Ca2+ chelation since, 1) LC roots showed a strong and prolonged response to EGTA, but only a transient response to acid pH, and 2) promotion of growth by EGTA was observed in strongly buffered solutions. We also examined the pH dependence of the release of 45Ca2+ from roots of 3-day-old seedlings grown from grains imbibed in 45Ca2+. Release of 45Ca2+ from the root into agar blocks placed on the root surface was greater the more acidic the pH of the blocks. The results indicate that Ca2+ may be necessary for the acid growth response in roots.

  17. The influence of calcium and pH on growth in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of Ca2+ and pH on root elongation in Zea mays L. cv. B73 x Missouri 17 and cv. Merit. Seedlings were raised to contain high levels of Ca2+ (HC, imbibed and raised in 10 mM CaCl2) or low levels of Ca2+ (LC, imbibed and raised in distilled water). In HC roots, lowering the pH (5 mM MES/Tris) from 6.5 to 4.5 resulted in strong, long-lasting growth promotion. Surprisingly, increasing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 also resulted in strong growth promotion. In LC roots acidification of the medium (pH 6.5 to 4.5) resulted in transient growth stimulation followed by a gradual decline in the growth rate toward zero. Exposure of LC roots to high pH (pH shift from 6.5 to 8.5) also promoted growth. Addition of EGTA resulted in strong growth promotion in both LC and HC roots. The ability of EGTA to stimulate growth appeared not to be related to H+ release from EGTA upon Ca2+ chelation since, 1) LC roots showed a strong and prolonged response to EGTA, but only a transient response to acid pH, and 2) promotion of growth by EGTA was observed in strongly buffered solutions. We also examined the pH dependence of the release of 45Ca2+ from roots of 3-day-old seedlings grown from grains imbibed in 45Ca2+. Release of 45Ca2+ from the root into agar blocks placed on the root surface was greater the more acidic the pH of the blocks. The results indicate that Ca2+ may be necessary for the acid growth response in roots.

  18. The influence of calcium and pH on growth in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the interaction of Ca2+ and pH on root elongation in Zea mays L. cv. B73 x Missouri 17 and cv. Merit. Seedlings were raised to contain high levels of Ca2+ (HC, imbibed and raised in 10 mM CaCl2) or low levels of Ca2+ (LC, imbibed and raised in distilled water). In HC roots, lowering the pH (5 mM MES/Tris) from 6.5 to 4.5 resulted in strong, long-lasting growth promotion. Surprisingly, increasing the pH from 6.5 to 8.5 also resulted in strong growth promotion. In LC roots acidification of the medium (pH 6.5 to 4.5) resulted in transient growth stimulation followed by a gradual decline in the growth rate toward zero. Exposure of LC roots to high pH (pH shift from 6.5 to 8.5) also promoted growth. Addition of EGTA resulted in strong growth promotion in both LC and HC roots. The ability of EGTA to stimulate growth appeared not to be related to H+ release from EGTA upon Ca2+ chelation since, 1) LC roots showed a strong and prolonged response to EGTA, but only a transient response to acid pH, and 2) promotion of growth by EGTA was observed in strongly buffered solutions. We also examined the pH dependence of the release of 45Ca2+ from roots of 3-day-old seedlings grown from grains imbibed in 45Ca2+. Release of 45Ca2+ from the root into agar blocks placed on the root surface was greater the more acidic the pH of the blocks. The results indicate that Ca2+ may be necessary for the acid growth response in roots.

  19. Maize HSP101 Plays Important Roles in Both Induced and Basal Thermotolerance and Primary Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Nieto-Sotelo, Jorge; Martínez, Luz María; Ponce, Georgina; Cassab, Gladys I.; Alagón, Alejandro; Meeley, Robert B.; Ribaut, Jean-Marcel; Yang, Runying

    2002-01-01

    HSP101 belongs to the ClpB protein subfamily whose members promote the renaturation of protein aggregates and are essential for the induction of thermotolerance. We found that maize HSP101 accumulated in mature kernels in the absence of heat stress. At optimal temperatures, HSP101 disappeared within the first 3 days after imbibition, although its levels increased in response to heat shock. In embryonic cells, HSP101 concentrated in the nucleus and in some nucleoli. Hsp101 maps near the umc132 and npi280 markers on chromosome 6. Five maize hsp101-m-::Mu1 alleles were isolated. Mutants were null for HSP101 and defective in both induced and basal thermotolerance. Moreover, during the first 3 days after imbibition, primary roots grew faster in the mutants at optimal temperature. Thus, HSP101 is a nucleus-localized protein that, in addition to its role in thermotolerance, negatively influences the growth rate of the primary root. HSP101 is dispensable for proper embryo and whole plant development in the absence of heat stress. PMID:12119379

  20. Touch modulates gravity sensing to regulate the growth of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Gilroy, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Plants must sense and respond to diverse stimuli to optimize the architecture of their root system for water and nutrient scavenging and anchorage. We have therefore analyzed how information from two of these stimuli, touch and gravity, are integrated to direct root growth. In Arabidopsis thaliana, touch stimulation provided by a glass barrier placed across the direction of growth caused the root to form a step-like growth habit with bends forming in the central and later the distal elongation zones. This response led to the main root axis growing parallel to, but not touching the obstacle, whilst the root cap maintained contact with the barrier. Removal of the graviperceptive columella cells of the root cap using laser ablation reduced the bending response of the distal elongation zone. Similarly, although the roots of the gravisensing impaired pgm1-1 mutant grew along the barrier at the same average angle as wild-type, this angle became more variable with time. These observations imply a constant gravitropic re-setting of the root tip response to touch stimulation from the barrier. In wild-type plants, transient touch stimulation of root cap cells, but not other regions of the root, inhibited both subsequent gravitropic growth and amyloplast sedimentation in the columella. Taken together, these results suggest that the cells of the root cap sense touch stimuli and their subsequent signaling acts on the columella cells to modulate their graviresponse. This interaction of touch and gravity signaling would then direct root growth to avoid obstacles in the soil while generally maintaining downward growth.

  1. Touch modulates gravity sensing to regulate the growth of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Gilroy, Simon

    2003-01-01

    Plants must sense and respond to diverse stimuli to optimize the architecture of their root system for water and nutrient scavenging and anchorage. We have therefore analyzed how information from two of these stimuli, touch and gravity, are integrated to direct root growth. In Arabidopsis thaliana, touch stimulation provided by a glass barrier placed across the direction of growth caused the root to form a step-like growth habit with bends forming in the central and later the distal elongation zones. This response led to the main root axis growing parallel to, but not touching the obstacle, whilst the root cap maintained contact with the barrier. Removal of the graviperceptive columella cells of the root cap using laser ablation reduced the bending response of the distal elongation zone. Similarly, although the roots of the gravisensing impaired pgm1-1 mutant grew along the barrier at the same average angle as wild-type, this angle became more variable with time. These observations imply a constant gravitropic re-setting of the root tip response to touch stimulation from the barrier. In wild-type plants, transient touch stimulation of root cap cells, but not other regions of the root, inhibited both subsequent gravitropic growth and amyloplast sedimentation in the columella. Taken together, these results suggest that the cells of the root cap sense touch stimuli and their subsequent signaling acts on the columella cells to modulate their graviresponse. This interaction of touch and gravity signaling would then direct root growth to avoid obstacles in the soil while generally maintaining downward growth.

  2. Growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Zea mays seedlings deficient in abscisic acid and gibberellic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Dickey, K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if gibberellic acid (GA) and/or abscisic acid (ABA) are necessary for graviresponsiveness by primary roots of Zea mays. To accomplish this objective we measured the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of seedlings in which the synthesis of ABA and GA was inhibited collectively and individually by genetic and chemical means. Roots of seedlings treated with Fluridone (an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) and Ancymidol (an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) were characterized by slower growth rates but not significantly different gravicultures as compared to untreated controls. Gravicurvatures of primary roots of d-5 mutants (having undetectable levels of GA) and vp-9 mutants (having undectable levels of ABA) were not significantly different from those of wild-type seedlings. Roots of seedlings in which the biosynthesis of ABA and GA was collectively inhibited were characterized by gravicurvatures not significantly different for those of controls. These results (1) indicate that drastic reductions in the amount of ABA and GA in Z. mays seedlings do not significantly alter root graviresponsiveness, (2) suggest that neither ABA nor GA is necessary for root gravicurvature, and (3) indicate that root gravicurvature is not necessarily proportional to root elongation.

  3. Growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Zea mays seedlings deficient in abscisic acid and gibberellic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Dickey, K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine if gibberellic acid (GA) and/or abscisic acid (ABA) are necessary for graviresponsiveness by primary roots of Zea mays. To accomplish this objective we measured the growth and graviresponsiveness of primary roots of seedlings in which the synthesis of ABA and GA was inhibited collectively and individually by genetic and chemical means. Roots of seedlings treated with Fluridone (an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis) and Ancymidol (an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis) were characterized by slower growth rates but not significantly different gravicultures as compared to untreated controls. Gravicurvatures of primary roots of d-5 mutants (having undetectable levels of GA) and vp-9 mutants (having undectable levels of ABA) were not significantly different from those of wild-type seedlings. Roots of seedlings in which the biosynthesis of ABA and GA was collectively inhibited were characterized by gravicurvatures not significantly different for those of controls. These results (1) indicate that drastic reductions in the amount of ABA and GA in Z. mays seedlings do not significantly alter root graviresponsiveness, (2) suggest that neither ABA nor GA is necessary for root gravicurvature, and (3) indicate that root gravicurvature is not necessarily proportional to root elongation.

  4. Ethylene is critical to the maintenance of primary root growth and Fe homeostasis under Fe stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangjie; Xu, Weifeng; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2015-04-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential microelement but is highly toxic when in excess. The response of plant roots to Fe toxicity and the nature of the regulatory pathways engaged are poorly understood. Here, we examined the response to excess Fe exposure in Arabidopsis wild type and ethylene mutants with a focus on primary root growth and the role of ethylene. We showed that excess Fe arrested primary root growth by decreasing both cell elongation and division, and principally resulteds from direct external Fe contact at the root tip. Pronounced ethylene, but not abscisic acid, evolution was associated with excess Fe exposure. Ethylene antagonists intensified root growth inhibition in the wild type, while the inhibition was significantly reduced in ethylene-overproduction mutants. We showed that ethylene plays a positive role in tissue Fe homeostasis, even in the absence of iron-plaque formation. Ethylene reduced Fe concentrations in the stele, xylem, and shoot. Furthermore, ethylene increased the expression of genes encoding Fe-sequestering ferritins. Additionally, ethylene significantly enhanced root K(+) status and upregulated K(+)-transporter (HAK5) expression. Our findings highlight the important role of ethylene in tissue Fe and K homeostasis and primary root growth under Fe stress in Arabidopsis.

  5. Ethylene is critical to the maintenance of primary root growth and Fe homeostasis under Fe stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangjie; Xu, Weifeng; Kronzucker, Herbert J.; Shi, Weiming

    2015-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential microelement but is highly toxic when in excess. The response of plant roots to Fe toxicity and the nature of the regulatory pathways engaged are poorly understood. Here, we examined the response to excess Fe exposure in Arabidopsis wild type and ethylene mutants with a focus on primary root growth and the role of ethylene. We showed that excess Fe arrested primary root growth by decreasing both cell elongation and division, and principally resulteds from direct external Fe contact at the root tip. Pronounced ethylene, but not abscisic acid, evolution was associated with excess Fe exposure. Ethylene antagonists intensified root growth inhibition in the wild type, while the inhibition was significantly reduced in ethylene-overproduction mutants. We showed that ethylene plays a positive role in tissue Fe homeostasis, even in the absence of iron-plaque formation. Ethylene reduced Fe concentrations in the stele, xylem, and shoot. Furthermore, ethylene increased the expression of genes encoding Fe-sequestering ferritins. Additionally, ethylene significantly enhanced root K+ status and upregulated K+-transporter (HAK5) expression. Our findings highlight the important role of ethylene in tissue Fe and K homeostasis and primary root growth under Fe stress in Arabidopsis. PMID:25711703

  6. Determinate primary root growth as an adaptation to aridity in Cactaceae: towards an understanding of the evolution and genetic control of the trait

    PubMed Central

    Shishkova, Svetlana; Las Peñas, María Laura; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Matvienko, Marta; Kozik, Alex; Montiel, Jesús; Patiño, Anallely; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Species of Cactaceae are well adapted to arid habitats. Determinate growth of the primary root, which involves early and complete root apical meristem (RAM) exhaustion and differentiation of cells at the root tip, has been reported for some Cactoideae species as a root adaptation to aridity. In this study, the primary root growth patterns of Cactaceae taxa from diverse habitats are classified as being determinate or indeterminate, and the molecular mechanisms underlying RAM maintenance in Cactaceae are explored. Genes that were induced in the primary root of Stenocereus gummosus before RAM exhaustion are identified. Methods Primary root growth was analysed in Cactaceae seedlings cultivated in vertically oriented Petri dishes. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified after reverse northern blots of clones from a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library. Key Results All species analysed from six tribes of the Cactoideae subfamily that inhabit arid and semi-arid regions exhibited determinate primary root growth. However, species from the Hylocereeae tribe, which inhabit mesic regions, exhibited mostly indeterminate primary root growth. Preliminary results suggest that seedlings of members of the Opuntioideae subfamily have mostly determinate primary root growth, whereas those of the Maihuenioideae and Pereskioideae subfamilies have mostly indeterminate primary root growth. Seven selected transcripts encoding homologues of heat stress transcription factor B4, histone deacetylase, fibrillarin, phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase, cytochrome P450 and gibberellin-regulated protein were upregulated in S. gummosus root tips during the initial growth phase. Conclusions Primary root growth in Cactoideae species matches their environment. The data imply that determinate growth of the primary root became fixed after separation of the Cactiodeae/Opuntioideae and Maihuenioideae/Pereskioideae lineages, and that the genetic regulation of

  7. Determinate primary root growth as an adaptation to aridity in Cactaceae: towards an understanding of the evolution and genetic control of the trait.

    PubMed

    Shishkova, Svetlana; Las Peñas, María Laura; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Matvienko, Marta; Kozik, Alex; Montiel, Jesús; Patiño, Anallely; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2013-07-01

    Species of Cactaceae are well adapted to arid habitats. Determinate growth of the primary root, which involves early and complete root apical meristem (RAM) exhaustion and differentiation of cells at the root tip, has been reported for some Cactoideae species as a root adaptation to aridity. In this study, the primary root growth patterns of Cactaceae taxa from diverse habitats are classified as being determinate or indeterminate, and the molecular mechanisms underlying RAM maintenance in Cactaceae are explored. Genes that were induced in the primary root of Stenocereus gummosus before RAM exhaustion are identified. Primary root growth was analysed in Cactaceae seedlings cultivated in vertically oriented Petri dishes. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified after reverse northern blots of clones from a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library. All species analysed from six tribes of the Cactoideae subfamily that inhabit arid and semi-arid regions exhibited determinate primary root growth. However, species from the Hylocereeae tribe, which inhabit mesic regions, exhibited mostly indeterminate primary root growth. Preliminary results suggest that seedlings of members of the Opuntioideae subfamily have mostly determinate primary root growth, whereas those of the Maihuenioideae and Pereskioideae subfamilies have mostly indeterminate primary root growth. Seven selected transcripts encoding homologues of heat stress transcription factor B4, histone deacetylase, fibrillarin, phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase, cytochrome P450 and gibberellin-regulated protein were upregulated in S. gummosus root tips during the initial growth phase. Primary root growth in Cactoideae species matches their environment. The data imply that determinate growth of the primary root became fixed after separation of the Cactiodeae/Opuntioideae and Maihuenioideae/Pereskioideae lineages, and that the genetic regulation of RAM maintenance and its loss in Cactaceae is

  8. Developmentally distinct activities of the exocyst enable rapid cell elongation and determine meristem size during primary root growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Rex A; McInally, Samantha A; Fowler, John E

    2014-12-31

    Exocytosis is integral to root growth: trafficking components of systems that control growth (e.g., PIN auxin transport proteins) to the plasma membrane, and secreting materials that expand the cell wall to the apoplast. Spatiotemporal regulation of exocytosis in eukaryotes often involves the exocyst, an octameric complex that tethers selected secretory vesicles to specific sites on the plasma membrane and facilitates their exocytosis. We evaluated Arabidopsis lines with mutations in four exocyst components (SEC5, SEC8, EXO70A1 and EXO84B) to explore exocyst function in primary root growth. The mutants have root growth rates that are 82% to 11% of wild-type. Even in lines with the most severe defects, the organization of the quiescent center and tissue layers at the root tips appears similar to wild-type, although meristematic, transition, and elongation zones are shorter. Reduced cell production rates in the mutants are due to the shorter meristems, but not to lengthened cell cycles. Additionally, mutants demonstrate reduced anisotropic cell expansion in the elongation zone, but not the meristematic zone, resulting in shorter mature cells that are similar in shape to wild-type. As expected, hypersensitivity to brefeldin A links the mutant root growth defect to altered vesicular trafficking. Several experimental approaches (e.g., dose-response measurements, localization of signaling components) failed to identify aberrant auxin or brassinosteroid signaling as a primary driver for reduced root growth in exocyst mutants. The exocyst participates in two spatially distinct developmental processes, apparently by mechanisms not directly linked to auxin or brassinosteroid signaling pathways, to help establish root meristem size, and to facilitate rapid cell expansion in the elongation zone.

  9. Catechol, a major component of smoke, influences primary root growth and root hair elongation through reactive oxygen species-mediated redox signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Schoettner, Matthias; Xu, Shuqing; Paetz, Christian; Wilde, Julia; Baldwin, Ian T; Groten, Karin

    2017-03-01

    Nicotiana attenuata germinates from long-lived seedbanks in native soils after fires. Although smoke signals have been known to break seed dormancy, whether they also affect seedling establishment and root development remains unclear. In order to test this, seedlings were treated with smoke solutions. Seedlings responded in a dose-dependent manner with significantly increased primary root lengths, due mainly to longitudinal cell elongation, increased numbers of lateral roots and impaired root hair development. Bioassay-driven fractionations and NMR were used to identify catechol as the main active compound for the smoke-induced root phenotype. The transcriptome analysis revealed that mainly genes related to auxin biosynthesis and redox homeostasis were altered after catechol treatment. However, histochemical analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the inability of auxin applications to rescue the phenotype clearly indicated that highly localized changes in the root's redox-status, rather than in levels of auxin, are the primary effector. Moreover, H2 O2 application rescued the phenotype in a dose-dependent manner. Chemical cues in smoke not only initiate seed germination, but also influence seedling root growth; understanding how these cues work provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms by which plants adapt to post-fire environments.

  10. Comparative effects of auxin and abscisic acid on growth, hydrogen ion efflux and gravitropism in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, M. L.; Mulkey, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to test the idea that auxin action on root growth may be mediated by H(+) movement, the correlation of auxin action on growth and H(+) movement in roots was examined along with changes in H(+) efflux patterns associated with the asymmetric growth which occurs during gravitropism. The effects of indoleacetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (AbA) on growth, H(+) secretion, and gravitropism in roots were compared. Results show a close correlation existent between H(+) efflux and growth in maize roots. In intact roots there is strong H(+) efflux from the elongation zone. Growth-promoting concentrations of IAA stimulate H(+) efflux. During gravitropism the H(+) efflux from the elongation zone becomes asymmetric; the evidence indicates that auxin redistribution contributes to the development of acid efflux asymmetry. That AbA stimulates root growth is reflected in its ability to stimulate H(+) efflux from apical root segments.

  11. The Arabidopsis CDK inhibitor ICK3/KRP5 is rate limiting for primary root growth and promotes growth through cell elongation and endoreduplication.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bo; Nieuwland, Jeroen; Murray, James A H

    2013-02-01

    The coordination of plant cell division and expansion controls plant morphogenesis, development, and growth. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are not only key regulators of cell division but also play an important role in cell differentiation. In plants, CDK activity is modulated by the binding of INHIBITOR OF CDK/KIP-RELATED PROTEIN (ICK/KRP). Previously, ICK2/KRP2 has been shown to mediate auxin responses in lateral root initiation. Here are analysed the roles of all ICK/KRP genes in root growth. Analysis of ick/krp null-mutants revealed that only ick3/krp5 was affected in primary root growth. ICK3/KRP5 is strongly expressed in the root apical meristem (RAM), with lower expression in the expansion zone. ick3/krp5 roots grow more slowly than wildtype controls, and this results not from reduction of division in the proliferative region of the RAM but rather reduced expansion as cells exit the meristem. This leads to shorter final cell lengths in different tissues of the ick3/krp5 mutant root, particularly the epidermal non-hair cells, and this reduction in cell size correlates with reduced endoreduplication. Loss of ICK3/KRP5 also leads to delayed germination and in the mature embryo ICK3/KRP5 is specifically expressed in the transition zone between root and hypocotyl. Cells in the transition zone were smaller in the ick3/krp5 mutant, despite the absence of endoreduplication in the embryo suggesting a direct effect of ICK3/KRP5 on cell growth. It is concluded that ICK3/KRP5 is a positive regulator of both cell growth and endoreduplication.

  12. The Arabidopsis CDK inhibitor ICK3/KRP5 is rate limiting for primary root growth and promotes growth through cell elongation and endoreduplication

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bo; Nieuwland, Jeroen; Murray, James A. H.

    2013-01-01

    The coordination of plant cell division and expansion controls plant morphogenesis, development, and growth. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are not only key regulators of cell division but also play an important role in cell differentiation. In plants, CDK activity is modulated by the binding of INHIBITOR OF CDK/KIP-RELATED PROTEIN (ICK/KRP). Previously, ICK2/KRP2 has been shown to mediate auxin responses in lateral root initiation. Here are analysed the roles of all ICK/KRP genes in root growth. Analysis of ick/krp null-mutants revealed that only ick3/krp5 was affected in primary root growth. ICK3/KRP5 is strongly expressed in the root apical meristem (RAM), with lower expression in the expansion zone. ick3/krp5 roots grow more slowly than wildtype controls, and this results not from reduction of division in the proliferative region of the RAM but rather reduced expansion as cells exit the meristem. This leads to shorter final cell lengths in different tissues of the ick3/krp5 mutant root, particularly the epidermal non-hair cells, and this reduction in cell size correlates with reduced endoreduplication. Loss of ICK3/KRP5 also leads to delayed germination and in the mature embryo ICK3/KRP5 is specifically expressed in the transition zone between root and hypocotyl. Cells in the transition zone were smaller in the ick3/krp5 mutant, despite the absence of endoreduplication in the embryo suggesting a direct effect of ICK3/KRP5 on cell growth. It is concluded that ICK3/KRP5 is a positive regulator of both cell growth and endoreduplication. PMID:23440171

  13. Primary root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana is inhibited by the miR159 mediated repression of MYB33, MYB65 and MYB101.

    PubMed

    Xue, Tao; Liu, Zhenhua; Dai, Xuehuan; Xiang, Fengning

    2017-09-01

    Organ growth is a fundamental developmental process basing on cell proliferation and differentiation. The growth of the plant root is sustained by the activity of the root meristem, a process controlled in part by various transcription factors. Here, the miR159 has been identified as a post transcriptional repressor of root growth, on the basis that the mir159ab double mutant developed a larger meristem than did the wild type, and that it formed longer roots. In the mutant, the abundance of MYB33, MYB65 and MYB101 transcript was substantially increased. When MYB33, MYB65 and MYB101 were replaced by the miR159-resistant forms mMYB33, mMYB65 and mMYB101 respectively, the root meristem was similarly enlarged and the growth of the primary root enhanced. MYB65 activity promoted cell division in the root meristem by accelerating the cell cycle. The data suggest that miR159 acts as a key repressor of the primary root's growth, acting through its repression of MYB65 and consequent blocking of the cell cycle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Arabidopsis bZIP11 transcription factor links low-energy signalling to auxin-mediated control of primary root growth

    PubMed Central

    Weiste, Christoph; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Muralidhara, Prathibha; Ljung, Karin; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Plants have to tightly control their energy homeostasis to ensure survival and fitness under constantly changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is stringently required that energy-consuming stress-adaptation and growth-related processes are dynamically tuned according to the prevailing energy availability. The evolutionary conserved SUCROSE NON-FERMENTING1 RELATED KINASES1 (SnRK1) and the downstream group C/S1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) are well-characterised central players in plants’ low-energy management. Nevertheless, mechanistic insights into plant growth control under energy deprived conditions remains largely elusive. In this work, we disclose the novel function of the low-energy activated group S1 bZIP11-related TFs as regulators of auxin-mediated primary root growth. Whereas transgenic gain-of-function approaches of these bZIPs interfere with the activity of the root apical meristem and result in root growth repression, root growth of loss-of-function plants show a pronounced insensitivity to low-energy conditions. Based on ensuing molecular and biochemical analyses, we propose a mechanistic model, in which bZIP11-related TFs gain control over the root meristem by directly activating IAA3/SHY2 transcription. IAA3/SHY2 is a pivotal negative regulator of root growth, which has been demonstrated to efficiently repress transcription of major auxin transport facilitators of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) gene family, thereby restricting polar auxin transport to the root tip and in consequence auxin-driven primary root growth. Taken together, our results disclose the central low-energy activated SnRK1-C/S1-bZIP signalling module as gateway to integrate information on the plant’s energy status into root meristem control, thereby balancing plant growth and cellular energy resources. PMID:28158182

  15. The Arabidopsis bZIP11 transcription factor links low-energy signalling to auxin-mediated control of primary root growth.

    PubMed

    Weiste, Christoph; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Selvanayagam, Jebasingh; Muralidhara, Prathibha; Fröschel, Christian; Novák, Ondřej; Ljung, Karin; Hanson, Johannes; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    Plants have to tightly control their energy homeostasis to ensure survival and fitness under constantly changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is stringently required that energy-consuming stress-adaptation and growth-related processes are dynamically tuned according to the prevailing energy availability. The evolutionary conserved SUCROSE NON-FERMENTING1 RELATED KINASES1 (SnRK1) and the downstream group C/S1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) are well-characterised central players in plants' low-energy management. Nevertheless, mechanistic insights into plant growth control under energy deprived conditions remains largely elusive. In this work, we disclose the novel function of the low-energy activated group S1 bZIP11-related TFs as regulators of auxin-mediated primary root growth. Whereas transgenic gain-of-function approaches of these bZIPs interfere with the activity of the root apical meristem and result in root growth repression, root growth of loss-of-function plants show a pronounced insensitivity to low-energy conditions. Based on ensuing molecular and biochemical analyses, we propose a mechanistic model, in which bZIP11-related TFs gain control over the root meristem by directly activating IAA3/SHY2 transcription. IAA3/SHY2 is a pivotal negative regulator of root growth, which has been demonstrated to efficiently repress transcription of major auxin transport facilitators of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) gene family, thereby restricting polar auxin transport to the root tip and in consequence auxin-driven primary root growth. Taken together, our results disclose the central low-energy activated SnRK1-C/S1-bZIP signalling module as gateway to integrate information on the plant's energy status into root meristem control, thereby balancing plant growth and cellular energy resources.

  16. Root hair sweet growth

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez, Silvia M; Iusem, Norberto D

    2011-01-01

    Root hairs are single cells specialized in the absorption of water and nutrients from the soil. Growing root hairs require intensive cell-wall changes to accommodate cell expansion at the apical end by a process known as tip or polarized growth. We have recently shown that cell wall glycoproteins such as extensins (EXTs) are essential components of the cell wall during polarized growth. Proline hydroxylation, an early posttranslational modification of cell wall EXTs that is catalyzed by prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs), defines the subsequent O-glycosylation sites in EXTs. Biochemical inhibition or genetic disruption of specific P4Hs resulted in the blockage of polarized growth in root hairs. Our results demonstrate that correct hydroxylation and also further O-glycosylation on EXTs are essential for cell-wall self-assembly and, hence, root hair elongation. The changes that O-glycosylated cell-wall proteins like EXTs undergo during cell growth represent a starting point to unravel the entire biochemical pathway involved in plant development. PMID:21918376

  17. Higher order Arabidopsis 14-3-3 mutants show 14-3-3 involvement in primary root growth both under control and abiotic stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    van Kleeff, P. J. M.; Jaspert, N.; Li, K. W.; Rauch, S.; Oecking, C.; de Boer, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis 14-3-3 proteins are a family of conserved proteins that interact with numerous partner proteins in a phospho-specific manner, and can affect the target proteins in a number of ways; e.g. modification of enzymatic activity. We isolated T-DNA insertion lines in six 14-3-3 genes within the non-epsilon group that phylogenetically group in three closely related gene pairs. In total, 6 single, 3 double, 12 triple, and 3 quadruple mutants were generated. The mutants were phenotyped for primary root growth on control plates: single and double mutants were indistinguishable from WT, whereas six triples and all quadruples showed a shorter primary root. In addition, length of the first epidermal cell with a visible root hair bulge (LEH) was used to determine primary root elongation on medium containing mannitol and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). This analysis showed clear differences depending on the stress and 14-3-3 gene combinations. Next to the phenotypic growth analyses, a 14-3-3 pull-down assay on roots treated with and without mannitol showed that mannitol stress strongly affects the 14-3-3 interactome. In conclusion, we show gene specificity and functional redundancy among 14-3-3 proteins in primary root elongation under control and under abiotic stress conditions and changes in the 14-3-3 interactome during the onset of stress adaptation. PMID:25189593

  18. [Effects nutrients on the seedlings root hair development and root growth of Poncirus trifoliata under hydroponics condition].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiu; Xia, Ren-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Shu, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Ahydroponics experiment was conducted to study the effects of nutrients (N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Mn) deficiency on the length of primary root, the number of lateral roots, and the root hair density, length, and diameter on the primary root and lateral roots of Poncirus trifoliata seedlings. Under the deficiency of each test nutrient, root hair could generate, but was mainly concentrated on the root base and fewer on the root tip. The root hair density on lateral roots was significantly larger than that on primary root, but the root hair length was in adverse. The deficiency of each test nutrient had greater effects on the growth and development of root hairs, with the root hair density on primary root varied from 55.0 to 174.3 mm(-2). As compared with the control, Ca deficiency induced the significant increase of root hair density and length on primary root, P deficiency promoted the root hair density and length on the base and middle part of primary root and on the lateral roots significantly, Fe deficiency increased the root hair density but decreased the root hair length on the tip of primary root significantly, K deficiency significantly decreased the root hair density, length, and diameter on primary root and lateral roots, whereas Mg deficiency increased the root hair length of primary root significantly. In all treatments of nutrient deficiency, the primary root had the similar growth rate, but, with the exceptions of N and Mg deficiency, the lateral roots exhibited shedding and regeneration.

  19. Cellular and molecular insight into the inhibition of primary root growth of Arabidopsis induced by peptaibols, a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei-Ling; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Li-Xia; Gong, Zhi-Ting; Li, Shuyu; Li, Chun-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Mei; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Song, Xiao-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well known biocontrol agents that produce a variety of antibiotics. Peptaibols are a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma Alamethicin, the most studied peptaibol, is reported as toxic to plants at certain concentrations, while the mechanisms involved are unclear. We illustrated the toxic mechanisms of peptaibols by studying the growth-inhibitory effect of Trichokonin VI (TK VI), a peptaibol from Trichoderma longibrachiatum SMF2, on Arabidopsis primary roots. TK VI inhibited root growth by suppressing cell division and cell elongation, and disrupting root stem cell niche maintenance. TK VI increased auxin content and disrupted auxin response gradients in root tips. Further, we screened the Arabidopsis TK VI-resistant mutant tkr1. tkr1 harbors a point mutation in GORK, which encodes gated outwardly rectifying K(+)channel proteins. This mutation alleviated TK VI-induced suppression of K(+)efflux in roots, thereby stabilizing the auxin gradient. The tkr1 mutant also resisted the phytotoxicity of alamethicin. Our results indicate that GORK channels play a key role in peptaibol-plant interaction and that there is an inter-relationship between GORK channels and maintenance of auxin homeostasis. The cellular and molecular insight into the peptaibol-induced inhibition of plant root growth advances our understanding of Trichoderma-plant interactions.

  20. Cellular and molecular insight into the inhibition of primary root growth of Arabidopsis induced by peptaibols, a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma spp.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Ling; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Wang, Li-Xia; Gong, Zhi-Ting; Li, Shuyu; Li, Chun-Long; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Mei; Li, Chuanyou; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Song, Xiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are well known biocontrol agents that produce a variety of antibiotics. Peptaibols are a class of linear peptide antibiotics mainly produced by Trichoderma. Alamethicin, the most studied peptaibol, is reported as toxic to plants at certain concentrations, while the mechanisms involved are unclear. We illustrated the toxic mechanisms of peptaibols by studying the growth-inhibitory effect of Trichokonin VI (TK VI), a peptaibol from Trichoderma longibrachiatum SMF2, on Arabidopsis primary roots. TK VI inhibited root growth by suppressing cell division and cell elongation, and disrupting root stem cell niche maintenance. TK VI increased auxin content and disrupted auxin response gradients in root tips. Further, we screened the Arabidopsis TK VI-resistant mutant tkr1. tkr1 harbors a point mutation in GORK, which encodes gated outwardly rectifying K+ channel proteins. This mutation alleviated TK VI-induced suppression of K+ efflux in roots, thereby stabilizing the auxin gradient. The tkr1 mutant also resisted the phytotoxicity of alamethicin. Our results indicate that GORK channels play a key role in peptaibol–plant interaction and that there is an inter-relationship between GORK channels and maintenance of auxin homeostasis. The cellular and molecular insight into the peptaibol-induced inhibition of plant root growth advances our understanding of Trichoderma–plant interactions. PMID:26850879

  1. Strigolactones Effects on Root Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltai, Hinanit

    2012-07-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) were defined as a new group of plant hormones that suppress lateral shoot branching. Our previous studies suggested SLs to be regulators of root development. SLs were shown to alter root architecture by regulating lateral root formation and to affect root hair elongation in Arabidopsis. Another important effect of SLs on root growth was shown to be associated with root directional growth. Supplementation of SLs to roots led to alterations in root directional growth, whereas associated mutants showed asymmetrical root growth, which was influenced by environmental factors. The regulation by SLs of root development was shown to be conducted via a cross talk of SLs with other plant hormones, including auxin. SLs were shown to regulate auxin transport, and to interfere with the activity of auxin-efflux carriers. Therefore, it might be that SLs are regulators of root directional growth as a result of their ability to regulated auxin transport. However, other evidences suggest a localized effect of SLs on cell division, which may not necessarily be associated with auxin efflux. These and other, recent hypothesis as to the SLs mode of action and the associated root perception and response to environmental factors will be discussed.

  2. Nonvascular, Symplasmic Diffusion of Sucrose Cannot Satisfy the Carbon Demands of Growth in the Primary Root Tip of Zea mays L.

    PubMed Central

    Bret-Harte, M. S.; Silk, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    Nonvascular, symplasmic transport of sucrose (Suc) was investigated theoretically in the primary root tip of maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 x Mo 17) seedlings. Symplasmic diffusion has been assumed to be the mechanism of transport of Suc to cells in the root apical meristem (R.T. Giaquinta, W. Lin, N.L. Sadler, V.R. Franceschi [1983] Plant Physiol 72: 362-367), which grow apical to the end of the phloem and must build all biomass with carbon supplied from the shoot or kernel. We derived an expression for the growth-sustaining Suc flux, which is the minimum longitudinal flux that would be required to meet the carbon demands of growth in the root apical meristem. We calculated this flux from data on root growth velocity, area, and biomass density, taking into account construction and maintenance respiration and the production of mucilage by the root cap. We then calculated the conductivity of the symplasmic pathway for diffusion, from anatomical data on cellular dimensions and the frequency and dimensions of plasmodesmata, and from two estimates of the diffusive conductance of a plasmodesma, derived from independent data. Then, the concentration gradients required to drive a growth-sustaining Suc flux by diffusion alone were calculated but were found not to be physiologically reasonable. We also calculated the hydraulic conductivity of the plasmodesmatal pathway and found that mass flow of Suc solution through plasmodesmata would also be insufficient, by itself, to satisfy the carbon demands of growth. However, much of the demand for water to cause cell expansion could be met by the water unloaded from the phloem while unloading Suc to satisfy the carbon demands of growth, and the hydraulic conductivity of plasmodesmata is high enough that much of that water could move symplasmically. Either our current understanding of plasmodesmatal ultrastructure and function is flawed, or alternative transport mechanisms must exist for Suc transport to the meristem. PMID:12232183

  3. A genotypic difference in primary root length is associated with the inhibitory role of transforming growth factor-beta receptor-interacting protein-1 on root meristem size in wheat.

    PubMed

    He, Xue; Fang, Jingjing; Li, Jingjuan; Qu, Baoyuan; Ren, Yongzhe; Ma, Wenying; Zhao, Xueqiang; Li, Bin; Wang, Daowen; Li, Zhensheng; Tong, Yiping

    2014-03-01

    Previously we identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) qTaLRO-B1 for primary root length (PRL) in wheat. Here we compare proteomics in the roots of the qTaLRO-B1 QTL isolines 178A, with short PRL and small meristem size, and 178B, with long PRL and large meristem size. A total of 16 differentially expressed proteins were identified: one, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta receptor-interacting protein-1 (TaTRIP1), was enriched in 178A, while various peroxidases (PODs) were more abundantly expressed in 178B. The 178A roots showed higher TaTRIP1 expression and lower levels of the unphosphorylated form of the brassinosteroid (BR) signaling component BZR1, lower expression of POD genes and reduced POD activity and accumulation of the superoxide anion O2(-) in the root elongation zone compared with the 178B roots. Low levels of 24-epibrassinolide increased POD gene expression and root meristem size, and rescued the short PRL phenotype of 178A. TaTRIP1 directly interacted with the BR receptor TaBRI1 of wheat. Moreover, overexpressing TaTRIP1 in Arabidopsis reduced the abundance of unphosphorylated BZR1 protein, altered the expression of BR-responsive genes, inhibited POD activity and accumulation of the O2(-) in the root tip and inhibited root meristem size. Our data suggested that TaTRIP1 is involved in BR signaling and inhibited root meristem size, possibly by reducing POD activity and accumulation of O2(-) in the root tip. We further demonstrated a negative correlation between the level of TaTRIP1 mRNA and PRL of landraces and modern wheat varieties, providing a valuable insight for better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying the genotypic differences in root morphology of wheat in the future. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Root Doctors as Providers of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, Van J.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians in primary care recognize that as many as 65 percent of the patients seen in their offices are there for psychological reasons. In any southern town with a moderate population of blacks, there are at least two “root doctors.” These root doctors have mastered the power of autosuggestion and are treating these patients with various forms of medication and psychological counseling. This paper updates the practicing physician on root doctors who practice primary care. PMID:6887277

  5. Temperature sensing by primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zea mays L. seedlings, grown on agar plates at 26 degrees C, reoriented the original vertical direction of their primary root when exposed to a thermal gradient applied perpendicular to the gravity vector. The magnitude and direction of curvature can not be explained simply by either a temperature or a humidity effect on root elongation. It is concluded that primary roots of maize sense temperature gradients in addition to sensing the gravitational force.

  6. Temperature sensing by primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poff, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    Zea mays L. seedlings, grown on agar plates at 26 degrees C, reoriented the original vertical direction of their primary root when exposed to a thermal gradient applied perpendicular to the gravity vector. The magnitude and direction of curvature can not be explained simply by either a temperature or a humidity effect on root elongation. It is concluded that primary roots of maize sense temperature gradients in addition to sensing the gravitational force.

  7. Underground tuning: quantitative regulation of root growth.

    PubMed

    Satbhai, Santosh B; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Plants display a high degree of phenotypic plasticity that allows them to tune their form and function to changing environments. The plant root system has evolved mechanisms to anchor the plant and to efficiently explore soils to forage for soil resources. Key to this is an enormous capacity for plasticity of multiple traits that shape the distribution of roots in the soil. Such root system architecture-related traits are determined by root growth rates, root growth direction, and root branching. In this review, we describe how the root system is constituted, and which mechanisms, pathways, and genes mainly regulate plasticity of the root system in response to environmental variation.

  8. Apical control, gravitropic signaling, and the growth of lateral roots in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Jack L.; Wolverton, Chris; Hangarter, Roger P.

    Most research on gravity responses in plants has focused on primary roots and shoots, which typically grow in a vertical orientation. However, the patterns of lateral organ growth, which generally have large effects on overall plant architecture, are such that the organs are typically not vertical. In lateral roots of Arabidopsis, growth is initially in a nearly horizontal orientation but changes to a near-vertical orientation as the lateral root develops. Although the non-vertical lateral roots are gravitropically competent, following gravitropic reorientation of seedlings, the lateral roots on the upper flank of the primary root have different growth patterns from those on the lower side of the primary root. The differences are in part dependent on reorientation of the primary root, suggesting that gravitropic signaling from the primary root also contributes to the control of lateral root growth. The hormone auxin appears to play a role in this signaling between the primary and lateral roots, as auxin transport inhibitors applied to the primary root affect lateral root growth. Also, lateral roots of pin3 mutants, which are impaired in polar auxin transport, have altered lateral root orientations. However, other signals from the primary root tip also play an important role in regulating lateral root growth.

  9. New theories of root growth modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, Magdalena; Schnepf, Andrea; Vanderborght, Jan; Huber, Katrin; Javaux, Mathieu; Bengough, A. Glyn; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    In dynamic root architecture models, root growth is represented by moving root tips whose line trajectory results in the creation of new root segments. Typically, the direction of root growth is calculated as the vector sum of various direction-affecting components. However, in our simulations this did not reproduce experimental observations of root growth in structured soil. We therefore developed a new approach to predict the root growth direction. In this approach we distinguish between, firstly, driving forces for root growth, i.e. the force exerted by the root which points in the direction of the previous root segment and gravitropism, and, secondly, the soil mechanical resistance to root growth or penetration resistance. The latter can be anisotropic, i.e. depending on the direction of growth, which leads to a difference between the direction of the driving force and the direction of the root tip movement. Anisotropy of penetration resistance can be caused either by microscale differences in soil structure or by macroscale features, including macropores. Anisotropy at the microscale is neglected in our model. To allow for this, we include a normally distributed random deflection angle α to the force which points in the direction of the previous root segment with zero mean and a standard deviation σ. The standard deviation σ is scaled, so that the deflection from the original root tip location does not depend on the spatial resolution of the root system model. Similarly to the water flow equation, the direction of the root tip movement corresponds to the water flux vector while the driving forces are related to the water potential gradient. The analogue of the hydraulic conductivity tensor is the root penetrability tensor. It is determined by the inverse of soil penetration resistance and describes the ease with which a root can penetrate the soil. By adapting the three dimensional soil and root water uptake model R-SWMS (Javaux et al., 2008) in this way

  10. Root growth, secondary root formation and root gravitropism in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. K.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ABA on root growth, secondary-root formation and root gravitropism in seedlings of Zea mays was investigated by using Fluridone-treated seedlings and a viviparous mutant, both of which lack carotenoids and ABA. Primary roots of seedlings grown in the presence of Fluridone grew significantly slower than those of control (i.e. untreated) roots. Elongation of Fluridone-treated roots was inhibited significantly by the exogenous application of 1 mM ABA. Exogenous application of 1 micromole and 1 nmole ABA had either no effect or only a slight stimulatory effect on root elongation, depending on the method of application. The absence of ABA in Fluridone-treated plants was not an important factor in secondary-root formation in seedlings less than 9-10 d old. However, ABA may suppress secondary-root formation in older seedlings, since 11-d-old control seedlings had significantly fewer secondary roots than Fluridone-treated seedlings. Roots of Fluridone-treated and control seedlings were graviresponsive. Similar data were obtained for vp-9 mutants of Z. mays, which are phenotypically identical to Fluridone-treated seedlings. These results indicate that ABA is necessary for neither secondary-root formation nor for positive gravitropism by primary roots.

  11. Root growth, secondary root formation and root gravitropism in carotenoid-deficient seedlings of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. K.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ABA on root growth, secondary-root formation and root gravitropism in seedlings of Zea mays was investigated by using Fluridone-treated seedlings and a viviparous mutant, both of which lack carotenoids and ABA. Primary roots of seedlings grown in the presence of Fluridone grew significantly slower than those of control (i.e. untreated) roots. Elongation of Fluridone-treated roots was inhibited significantly by the exogenous application of 1 mM ABA. Exogenous application of 1 micromole and 1 nmole ABA had either no effect or only a slight stimulatory effect on root elongation, depending on the method of application. The absence of ABA in Fluridone-treated plants was not an important factor in secondary-root formation in seedlings less than 9-10 d old. However, ABA may suppress secondary-root formation in older seedlings, since 11-d-old control seedlings had significantly fewer secondary roots than Fluridone-treated seedlings. Roots of Fluridone-treated and control seedlings were graviresponsive. Similar data were obtained for vp-9 mutants of Z. mays, which are phenotypically identical to Fluridone-treated seedlings. These results indicate that ABA is necessary for neither secondary-root formation nor for positive gravitropism by primary roots.

  12. Root morphological and proteomic responses to growth restriction in maize plants supplied with sufficient N.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huifeng; Li, Ke; Ding, Hong; Liao, Chengsong; Li, Xuexian; Yuan, Lixing; Li, Chunjian

    2011-07-01

    The primary objective of this study was to better understand how root morphological alteration stimulates N uptake in maize plants after root growth restriction, by investigating the changes in length and number of lateral roots, (15)NO(3)(-) influx, the expression level of the low-affinity Nitrate transporter ZmNrt1.1, and proteomic composition of primary roots. Maize seedlings were hydroponically cultured with three different types of root systems: an intact root system, embryonic roots only, or primary roots only. In spite of sufficient N supply, root growth restriction stimulated compensatory growth of remaining roots, as indicated by the increased lateral root number and root density. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in (15)NO(3)(-) influx between control and primary root plants; neither in ZmNrt1.1 expression levels in primary roots of different treatments. Our data suggested that increased N uptake by maize seedlings experiencing root growth restriction is attributed to root morphological adaptation, rather than explained by the variation in N uptake activity. Eight proteins were differentially accumulated in embryonic and primary root plants compared to control plants. These differentially accumulated proteins were closely related to signal transduction and increased root growth.

  13. Geoperception in primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae). III. A model to explain the differential georesponsiveness of primary and lateral roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. S.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Half-tipped primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris bend toward the side of the root on which the intact half tip remains. Therefore, tips of lateral and primary roots produce growth effectors capable of inducing gravicurvature. The asymmetrical placement of a tip of a lateral root onto a detipped primary root results in the root bending toward the side of the root onto which the tip was placed. That is, the lesser graviresponsiveness of lateral roots as compared with primary roots is not due to the inability of their caps to produce growth inhibitors. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of primary roots is positively correlated with the presence of columella tissues that are 3.8 times longer, 1.7 times wider, and 10.5 times more voluminous than the columellas of lateral roots. We propose that the lack of graviresponsiveness exhibited by lateral roots is due to the fact that they (i) produce smaller amounts of the inhibitor than primary (i.e., strongly graviresponsive) roots and (ii) are unable to redistribute the inhibitor so as to be able to create a concentration gradient sufficient to induce a pronounced gravitropic response.

  14. Geoperception in primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris (Fabaceae). III. A model to explain the differential georesponsiveness of primary and lateral roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ransom, J. S.; Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Half-tipped primary and lateral roots of Phaseolus vulgaris bend toward the side of the root on which the intact half tip remains. Therefore, tips of lateral and primary roots produce growth effectors capable of inducing gravicurvature. The asymmetrical placement of a tip of a lateral root onto a detipped primary root results in the root bending toward the side of the root onto which the tip was placed. That is, the lesser graviresponsiveness of lateral roots as compared with primary roots is not due to the inability of their caps to produce growth inhibitors. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of primary roots is positively correlated with the presence of columella tissues that are 3.8 times longer, 1.7 times wider, and 10.5 times more voluminous than the columellas of lateral roots. We propose that the lack of graviresponsiveness exhibited by lateral roots is due to the fact that they (i) produce smaller amounts of the inhibitor than primary (i.e., strongly graviresponsive) roots and (ii) are unable to redistribute the inhibitor so as to be able to create a concentration gradient sufficient to induce a pronounced gravitropic response.

  15. Jatropha curcas L. Root Structure and Growth in Diverse Soils

    PubMed Central

    Valdés-Rodríguez, Ofelia Andrea; Sánchez-Sánchez, Odilón; Pérez-Vázquez, Arturo; Caplan, Joshua S.; Danjon, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most biofuel species, Jatropha curcas has promise for use in marginal lands, but it may serve an additional role by stabilizing soils. We evaluated the growth and structural responsiveness of young J. curcas plants to diverse soil conditions. Soils included a sand, a sandy-loam, and a clay-loam from eastern Mexico. Growth and structural parameters were analyzed for shoots and roots, although the focus was the plasticity of the primary root system architecture (the taproot and four lateral roots). The sandy soil reduced the growth of both shoot and root systems significantly more than sandy-loam or clay-loam soils; there was particularly high plasticity in root and shoot thickness, as well as shoot length. However, the architecture of the primary root system did not vary with soil type; the departure of the primary root system from an index of perfect symmetry was 14 ± 5% (mean ± standard deviation). Although J. curcas developed more extensively in the sandy-loam and clay-loam soils than in sandy soil, it maintained a consistent root to shoot ratio and root system architecture across all types of soil. This strong genetic determination would make the species useful for soil stabilization purposes, even while being cultivated primarily for seed oil. PMID:23844412

  16. Regeneration of roots from callus reveals stability of the developmental program for determinate root growth in Sonoran Desert Cactaceae.

    PubMed

    Shishkova, Svetlana; García-Mendoza, Edith; Castillo-Díaz, Vicente; Moreno, Norma E; Arellano, Jesús; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2007-05-01

    In some Sonoran Desert Cactaceae the primary root has a determinate root growth: the cells of the root apical meristem undergo only a few cell division cycles and then differentiate. The determinate growth of primary roots in Cactaceae was found in plants cultivated under various growth conditions, and could not be reverted by any treatment tested. The mechanisms involved in root meristem maintenance and determinate root growth in plants remain poorly understood. In this study, we have shown that roots regenerated from the callus of two Cactaceae species, Stenocereus gummosus and Ferocactus peninsulae, have a determinate growth pattern, similar to that of the primary root. To demonstrate this, a protocol for root regeneration from callus was established. The determinate growth pattern of roots regenerated from callus suggests that the program of root development is very stable in these species. These findings will permit future analysis of the role of certain Cactaceae genes in the determinate pattern of root growth via the regeneration of transgenic roots from transformed calli.

  17. Growth, nitrogen uptake and flow in maize plants affected by root growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liangzheng; Niu, Junfang; Li, Chunjian; Zhang, Fusuo

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of a reduced maize root-system size on root growth and nitrogen (N) uptake and flow within plants. Restriction of shoot-borne root growth caused a strong decrease in the absorption of root: shoot dry weight ratio and a reduction in shoot growth. On the other hand, compensatory growth and an increased N uptake rate in the remaining roots were observed. Despite the limited long-distance transport pathway in the mesocotyl with restriction of shoot-borne root growth, N cycling within these plants was higher than those in control plants, implying that xylem and phloem flow velocities via the mesocotyl were considerably higher than in plants with an intact root system. The removal of the seminal roots in addition to restricting shoot-borne root development did not affect whole plant growth and N uptake, except for the stronger compensatory growth of the primary roots. Our results suggest that an adequate N supply to maize plant is maintained by compensatory growth of the remaining roots, increased N uptake rate and flow velocities within the xylem and phloem via the mesocotyl, and reduction in the shoot growth rate.

  18. Brassinosteroids Regulate Root Growth, Development, and Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhuoyun; Li, Jia

    2016-01-04

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are natural plant hormones critical for growth and development. BR deficient or signaling mutants show significantly shortened root phenotypes. However, for a long time, it was thought that these phenotypes were solely caused by reduced cell elongation in the mutant roots. Functions of BRs in regulating root development have been largely neglected. Nonetheless, recent detailed analyses, revealed that BRs are not only involved in root cell elongation but are also involved in many aspects of root development, such as maintenance of meristem size, root hair formation, lateral root initiation, gravitropic response, mycorrhiza formation, and nodulation in legume species. In this review, current findings on the functions of BRs in mediating root growth, development, and symbiosis are discussed.

  19. The Nitrate Transporter MtNPF6.8 (MtNRT1.3) Transports Abscisic Acid and Mediates Nitrate Regulation of Primary Root Growth in Medicago truncatula1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzaro, Anthoni; Clochard, Thibault; Cukier, Caroline; Bourdin, Céline; Juchaux, Marjorie; Montrichard, Françoise; Thany, Steeve; Raymond, Valérie; Planchet, Elisabeth; Morère-Le Paven, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Elongation of the primary root during postgermination of Medicago truncatula seedlings is a multigenic trait that is responsive to exogenous nitrate. A quantitative genetic approach suggested the involvement of the nitrate transporter MtNPF6.8 (for Medicago truncatula NITRATE TRANSPORTER1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER Family6.8) in the inhibition of primary root elongation by high exogenous nitrate. In this study, the inhibitory effect of nitrate on primary root elongation, via inhibition of elongation of root cortical cells, was abolished in npf6.8 knockdown lines. Accordingly, we propose that MtNPF6.8 mediates nitrate inhibitory effects on primary root growth in M. truncatula. pMtNPF6.8:GUS promoter-reporter gene fusion in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-generated transgenic roots showed the expression of MtNPF6.8 in the pericycle region of primary roots and lateral roots, and in lateral root primordia and tips. MtNPF6.8 expression was insensitive to auxin and was stimulated by abscisic acid (ABA), which restored the inhibitory effect of nitrate in npf6.8 knockdown lines. It is then proposed that ABA acts downstream of MtNPF6.8 in this nitrate signaling pathway. Furthermore, MtNPF6.8 was shown to transport ABA in Xenopus spp. oocytes, suggesting an additional role of MtNPF6.8 in ABA root-to-shoot translocation. 15NO3−-influx experiments showed that only the inducible component of the low-affinity transport system was affected in npf6.8 knockdown lines. This indicates that MtNPF6.8 is a major contributor to the inducible component of the low-affinity transport system. The short-term induction by nitrate of the expression of Nitrate Reductase1 (NR1) and NR2 (genes that encode two nitrate reductase isoforms) was greatly reduced in the npf6.8 knockdown lines, supporting a role of MtNPF6.8 in the primary nitrate response in M. truncatula. PMID:25367858

  20. An arginine decarboxylase gene PtADC from Poncirus trifoliata confers abiotic stress tolerance and promotes primary root growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Sun, Pei-Pei; Chen, Chun-Li; Wang, Yin; Fu, Xing-Zheng; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2011-05-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) is an important enzyme responsible for polyamine synthesis under stress conditions. In this study, the gene encoding ADC in Poncirus trifoliata (PtADC) was isolated and it existed as a single-copy member. Transcript levels of PtADC were up-regulated by low temperature and dehydration. Overexpression of PtADC in an Arabidopsis thaliana ADC mutant adc1-1 promoted putrescine synthesis in the transgenic line and the stomatal density was reverted to that in the wild type. The transgenic line showed enhanced resistance to high osmoticum, dehydration, long-term drought, and cold stress compared with the wild type and the mutant. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the transgenic line was appreciably decreased under the stresses, but ROS scavenging capacity was compromised when the transgenic plants were treated with the ADC inhibitor D-arginine prior to stress treatment. In addition, the transgenic line had longer roots than the wild type and the mutant under both normal and stressful conditions, consistent with larger cell number and length of the root meristematic zone. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PtADC is involved in tolerance to multiple stresses, and its function may be due, at least partly, to efficient ROS elimination and to its influence on root growth conducive to drought tolerance.

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics and lunisolar tidal acceleration.

    PubMed

    Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Klingele, Emile; Barlow, Peter

    2012-07-01

    • All living organisms on Earth are continually exposed to diurnal variations in the gravitational tidal force due to the Sun and Moon. • Elongation of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings maintained at a constant temperature was monitored for periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging. The time-course of the half-hourly elongation rates exhibited an oscillation which was maintained when the roots were placed in the free-running condition of continuous illumination. • Correlation between the root growth kinetics collected from seedlings initially raised under several light protocols but whose roots were subsequently in the free-running condition and the lunisolar tidal profiles enabled us to identify that the latter is the probable exogenous determinant of the rhythmic variation in root elongation rate. Similar observations and correlations using roots of Arabidopsis starch mutants suggest a central function of starch metabolism in the response to the lunisolar tide. The periodicity of the lunisolar tidal signal and the concomitant adjustments in root growth rate indicate that an exogenous timer exists for the modulation of root growth and development. • We propose that, in addition to the sensitivity to Earthly 1G gravity, which is inherent to all animals and plants, there is another type of responsiveness which is attuned to the natural diurnal variations of the lunisolar tidal force.

  2. Inducing gravitropic curvature of primary roots of Zea mays cv Ageotropic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Evans, M. L.; Fondren, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of the mutant 'Ageotropic' cultivar of Zea mays are nonresponsive to gravity. Their root caps secrete little or no mucilage and touch the root only at the extreme apex. A gap separates the cap and root at the periphery of the cap. Applying mucilage from normal roots or substances with a consistency similar to that of mucilage to tips of mutant roots causes these roots to become strongly graviresponsive. Gravicurvature stops when these substances are removed. Caps of some mutants secrete small amounts of mucilage and are graviresponsive. These results indicate that (a) the lack of graviresponsiveness in the mutant results from disrupting the transport pathway between the cap and root, (b) movement of the growth-modifying signal from the cap to the root occurs via an apoplastic pathway, and (c) mucilage is necessary for normal communication between the root cap and root in Zea mays cv Ageotropic.

  3. Inducing gravitropic curvature of primary roots of Zea mays cv Ageotropic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Evans, M. L.; Fondren, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of the mutant 'Ageotropic' cultivar of Zea mays are nonresponsive to gravity. Their root caps secrete little or no mucilage and touch the root only at the extreme apex. A gap separates the cap and root at the periphery of the cap. Applying mucilage from normal roots or substances with a consistency similar to that of mucilage to tips of mutant roots causes these roots to become strongly graviresponsive. Gravicurvature stops when these substances are removed. Caps of some mutants secrete small amounts of mucilage and are graviresponsive. These results indicate that (a) the lack of graviresponsiveness in the mutant results from disrupting the transport pathway between the cap and root, (b) movement of the growth-modifying signal from the cap to the root occurs via an apoplastic pathway, and (c) mucilage is necessary for normal communication between the root cap and root in Zea mays cv Ageotropic.

  4. Comparative assessment of the polypeptide profiles from lateral and primary roots of Phaseolus vulgaris L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westberg, J.; Odom, W. R.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    In Phaseolus vulgaris, primary roots show gravitational sensitivity soon after emerging from the seed. In contrast, lateral roots are agravitropic during early development, and become gravitropic after several cm growth. Primary and lateral root tissues were examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, coupled with western blotting techniques, to compare proteins which may contribute to the acquisition of gravitational sensitivity. Root tips and zones of cell elongation were compared for each root type, using immunological probes for calmodulin, alpha-actin, alpha-tubulin, and proteins of the plastid envelope. Lateral roots contained qualitatively less calmodulin, and showed a slightly different pattern of actin-related epitope proteins, than did primary root tissues, suggesting that polypeptide differences may contribute to the gravitational sensitivity which these root types express.

  5. Comparative assessment of the polypeptide profiles from lateral and primary roots of Phaseolus vulgaris L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westberg, J.; Odom, W. R.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    In Phaseolus vulgaris, primary roots show gravitational sensitivity soon after emerging from the seed. In contrast, lateral roots are agravitropic during early development, and become gravitropic after several cm growth. Primary and lateral root tissues were examined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, coupled with western blotting techniques, to compare proteins which may contribute to the acquisition of gravitational sensitivity. Root tips and zones of cell elongation were compared for each root type, using immunological probes for calmodulin, alpha-actin, alpha-tubulin, and proteins of the plastid envelope. Lateral roots contained qualitatively less calmodulin, and showed a slightly different pattern of actin-related epitope proteins, than did primary root tissues, suggesting that polypeptide differences may contribute to the gravitational sensitivity which these root types express.

  6. Response of millet and sorghum to a varying water supply around the primary and nodal roots.

    PubMed

    Rostamza, M; Richards, R A; Watt, M

    2013-07-01

    Cereals have two root systems. The primary system originates from the embryo when the seed germinates and can support the plant until it produces grain. The nodal system can emerge from stem nodes throughout the plant's life; its value for yield is unclear and depends on the environment. The aim of this study was to test the role of nodal roots of sorghum and millet in plant growth in response to variation in soil moisture. Sorghum and millet were chosen as both are adapted to dry conditions. Sorghum and millet were grown in a split-pot system that allowed the primary and nodal roots to be watered separately. When primary and nodal roots were watered (12 % soil water content; SWC), millet nodal roots were seven times longer than those of sorghum and six times longer than millet plants in dry treatments, mainly from an 8-fold increase in branch root length. When soil was allowed to dry in both compartments, millet nodal roots responded and grew 20 % longer branch roots than in the well-watered control. Sorghum nodal roots were unchanged. When only primary roots received water, nodal roots of both species emerged and elongated into extremely dry soil (0.6-1.5 % SWC), possibly with phloem-delivered water from the primary roots in the moist inner pot. Nodal roots were thick, short, branchless and vertical, indicating a tropism that was more pronounced in millet. Total nodal root length increased in both species when the dry soil was covered with plastic, suggesting that stubble retention or leaf mulching could facilitate nodal roots reaching deeper moist layers in dry climates. Greater nodal root length in millet than in sorghum was associated with increased shoot biomass, water uptake and water use efficiency (shoot mass per water). Millet had a more plastic response than sorghum to moisture around the nodal roots due to (1) faster growth and progression through ontogeny for earlier nodal root branch length and (2) partitioning to nodal root length from primary roots

  7. Stochastic roots of growth phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; De Siena, S.; Giorno, V.

    2014-05-01

    We show that the Gompertz equation describes the evolution in time of the median of a geometric stochastic process. Therefore, we induce that the process itself generates the growth. This result allows us further to exploit a stochastic variational principle to take account of self-regulation of growth through feedback of relative density variations. The conceptually well defined framework so introduced shows its usefulness by suggesting a form of control of growth by exploiting external actions.

  8. Chapter 16. Fine-root Growth Response

    SciTech Connect

    J. Devereux Joslin; Mark H. Wolfe

    2002-07-31

    As part of a multiyear study to evaluate the affects of altered water inputs to an upland forest many aspects of tree growth physiology were studied. Chapter 16 of this book deals with fine root growth as studied over a 7 year period using a variety of methods. This chapter summarizes the results and conclusions from those efforts.

  9. Tomato root growth, gravitropism, and lateral development: correlation with auxin transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, G. K.; Haworth, P.

    1994-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) roots were analyzed during growth on agar plates. Growth of these roots was inhibited by the auxin transport inhibitors naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and semicarbazone derivative I (SCB-1). The effect of auxin transport inhibitors on root gravitropism was analyzed by measurement of the angle of gravitropic curvature after the roots were reoriented 90 degrees from the vertical. NPA and SCB-1 abolished both the response of these roots to gravity and the formation of lateral roots, with SCB-1 being the more effective at inhibition. Auxins also inhibited root growth. Both auxins tested has a slight effect on the gravity response, but this effect is probably indirect, since auxins reduced the growth rate. Auxins also stimulated lateral root growth at concentration where primary root growth was inhibited. When roots were treated with both IAA and NPA simultaneously, a cumulative inhibition of root growth was found. When both compounds were applied together, analysis of gravitropism and lateral root formation indicated that the dominant effect was exerted by auxin transport inhibitors. Together, these data suggest a model for the role of auxin transport in controlling both primary and lateral root growth.

  10. Tomato root growth, gravitropism, and lateral development: correlation with auxin transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, G. K.; Haworth, P.

    1994-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) roots were analyzed during growth on agar plates. Growth of these roots was inhibited by the auxin transport inhibitors naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and semicarbazone derivative I (SCB-1). The effect of auxin transport inhibitors on root gravitropism was analyzed by measurement of the angle of gravitropic curvature after the roots were reoriented 90 degrees from the vertical. NPA and SCB-1 abolished both the response of these roots to gravity and the formation of lateral roots, with SCB-1 being the more effective at inhibition. Auxins also inhibited root growth. Both auxins tested has a slight effect on the gravity response, but this effect is probably indirect, since auxins reduced the growth rate. Auxins also stimulated lateral root growth at concentration where primary root growth was inhibited. When roots were treated with both IAA and NPA simultaneously, a cumulative inhibition of root growth was found. When both compounds were applied together, analysis of gravitropism and lateral root formation indicated that the dominant effect was exerted by auxin transport inhibitors. Together, these data suggest a model for the role of auxin transport in controlling both primary and lateral root growth.

  11. Effect of lead on root growth.

    PubMed

    Fahr, Mouna; Laplaze, Laurent; Bendaou, Najib; Hocher, Valerie; Mzibri, Mohamed El; Bogusz, Didier; Smouni, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminant in soils. It is highly toxic to living organisms. Pb has no biological function but can cause morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants. Plants have developed a wide range of tolerance mechanisms that are activated in response to Pb exposure. Pb affects plants primarily through their root systems. Plant roots rapidly respond either (i) by the synthesis and deposition of callose, creating a barrier that stops Pb entering (ii) through the uptake of large amounts of Pb and its sequestration in the vacuole accompanied by changes in root growth and branching pattern or (iii) by its translocation to the aboveground parts of plant in the case of hyperaccumulators plants. Here we review the interactions of roots with the presence of Pb in the rhizosphere and the effect of Pb on the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of root development.

  12. Effect of lead on root growth

    PubMed Central

    Fahr, Mouna; Laplaze, Laurent; Bendaou, Najib; Hocher, Valerie; Mzibri, Mohamed El; Bogusz, Didier; Smouni, Abdelaziz

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most widespread heavy metal contaminant in soils. It is highly toxic to living organisms. Pb has no biological function but can cause morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants. Plants have developed a wide range of tolerance mechanisms that are activated in response to Pb exposure. Pb affects plants primarily through their root systems. Plant roots rapidly respond either (i) by the synthesis and deposition of callose, creating a barrier that stops Pb entering (ii) through the uptake of large amounts of Pb and its sequestration in the vacuole accompanied by changes in root growth and branching pattern or (iii) by its translocation to the aboveground parts of plant in the case of hyperaccumulators plants. Here we review the interactions of roots with the presence of Pb in the rhizosphere and the effect of Pb on the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of root development. PMID:23750165

  13. Long-term control of root growth

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin. 7 figs.

  14. Long-term control of root growth

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  15. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    DOEpatents

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.; Van Voris, P.

    1993-01-26

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a geotextile'' and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  16. Root-growth-inhibiting sheet

    DOEpatents

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene; Van Voris, Peter

    1993-01-01

    In accordance with this invention, a porous sheet material is provided at intervals with bodies of a polymer which contain a 2,6-dinitroaniline. The sheet material is made porous to permit free passage of water. It may be either a perforated sheet or a woven or non-woven textile material. A particularly desirable embodiment is a non-woven fabric of non-biodegradable material. This type of material is known as a "geotextile" and is used for weed control, prevention of erosion on slopes, and other landscaping purposes. In order to obtain a root repelling property, a dinitroaniline is blended with a polymer which is attached to the geotextile or other porous material.

  17. Changes in hormonal balance and meristematic activity in primary root tips on the slowly rotating clinostat and their effect on the development of the rapeseed root system.

    PubMed

    Aarrouf, J; Schoevaert, D; Maldiney, R; Perbal, G

    1999-04-01

    The morphometry of the root system, the meristematic activity and the level of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), abscisic acid (ABA) and zeatin in the primary root tips of rapeseed seedlings were analyzed as functions of time on a slowly rotating clinostat (1 rpm) or in the vertical controls (1 rpm). The fresh weight of the root system was 30% higher throughout the growth period (25 days) in clinorotated seedlings. Morphometric analysis showed that the increase in biomass on the clinostat was due to greater primary root growth, earlier initiation and greater elongation of the secondary roots, which could be observed even in 5-day-old seedlings. However, after 15 days, the growth of the primary root slowed on the clinostat, whereas secondary roots still grew faster in clinorotated plants than in the controls. At this time, the secondary roots began to be initiated closer to the root tip on the clinostat than in the control. Analysis of the meristematic activity and determination of the levels in IAA, ABA and zeatin in the primary root tips demonstrated that after 5 days on the clinostat, the increased length of the primary root could be the consequence of higher meristematic activity and coincided with an increase in both IAA and ABA concentrations. After 15 days on the clinostat, a marked increase in IAA, ABA and zeatin, which probably reached supraoptimal levels, seems to cause a progressive disturbance of the meristematic cells, during a decrease of primary root growth between 15 and 25 days. These modifications in the hormonal balance and the perturbation of the meristematic activity on the clinostat were followed by a loss of apical dominance, which was responsible for the early initiation of secondary roots, the greater elongation of the root system and the emergence of the lateral roots near the tip of the primary root.

  18. Tungsten disrupts root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana by PIN targeting.

    PubMed

    Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Panteris, Emmanuel; Eleftheriou, Eleftherios P

    2014-08-15

    Tungsten is a heavy metal with increasing concern over its environmental impact. In plants it is extensively used to deplete nitric oxide by inhibiting nitrate reductase, but its presumed toxicity as a heavy metal has been less explored. Accordingly, its effects on Arabidopsis thaliana primary root were assessed. The effects on root growth, mitotic cell percentage, nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide levels, the cytoskeleton, cell ultrastructure, auxin and cytokinin activity, and auxin carrier distribution were investigated. It was found that tungsten reduced root growth, particularly by inhibiting cell expansion in the elongation zone, so that root hairs emerged closer to the root tip than in the control. Although extensive vacuolation was observed, even in meristematic cells, cell organelles were almost unaffected and microtubules were not depolymerized but reoriented. Tungsten affected auxin and cytokinin activity, as visualized by the DR5-GFP and TCS-GFP expressing lines, respectively. Cytokinin fluctuations were similar to those of the mitotic cell percentage. DR5-GFP signal appeared ectopically expressed, while the signals of PIN2-GFP and PIN3-GFP were diminished even after relatively short exposures. The observed effects were not reminiscent of those of any nitric oxide scavengers. Taken together, inhibition of root growth by tungsten might rather be related to a presumed interference with the basipetal flow of auxin, specifically affecting cell expansion in the elongation zone.

  19. Root-zone temperature and water availability affect early root growth of planted longleaf pine

    Treesearch

    M.A. Sword

    1995-01-01

    Longleaf pine seedlings from three seed sources were exposed to three root-zone temperatures and three levels of water availability for 28 days. Root growth declined as temperature and water availability decreased. Root growth differed by seed source. Results suggest that subtle changes in the regeneration environment may influence early root growth of longleaf pine...

  20. Quest for Continual Growth Takes Root

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surdey, Mary M.; Hashey, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the quest for continual growth has taken its root at Vestal Central School district. Located at the heart of upstate New York, educators at Vestal Central School district have created a spirit of "kaizen," a Japanese word meaning the relentless quest for continual improvement and higher-quality…

  1. Quest for Continual Growth Takes Root

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surdey, Mary M.; Hashey, Jane M.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how the quest for continual growth has taken its root at Vestal Central School district. Located at the heart of upstate New York, educators at Vestal Central School district have created a spirit of "kaizen," a Japanese word meaning the relentless quest for continual improvement and higher-quality…

  2. Shoot-derived abscisic acid promotes root growth.

    PubMed

    McAdam, Scott A M; Brodribb, Timothy J; Ross, John J

    2016-03-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in regulating root growth. Most work to date has investigated the influence of root-sourced ABA on root growth during water stress. Here, we tested whether foliage-derived ABA could be transported to the roots, and whether this foliage-derived ABA had an influence on root growth under well-watered conditions. Using both application studies of deuterium-labelled ABA and reciprocal grafting between wild-type and ABA-biosynthetic mutant plants, we show that both ABA levels in the roots and root growth in representative angiosperms are controlled by ABA synthesized in the leaves rather than sourced from the roots. Foliage-derived ABA was found to promote root growth relative to shoot growth but to inhibit the development of lateral roots. Increased root auxin (IAA) levels in plants with ABA-deficient scions suggest that foliage-derived ABA inhibits root growth through the root growth-inhibitor IAA. These results highlight the physiological and morphological importance, beyond the control of stomata, of foliage-derived ABA. The use of foliar ABA as a signal for root growth has important implications for regulating root to shoot growth under normal conditions and suggests that leaf rather than root hydration is the main signal for regulating plant responses to moisture.

  3. Primary Postnatal Dorsal Root Ganglion Culture from Conventionally Slaughtered Calves

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, A.; Bärtschi, M.; Hemphill, A.; Widmer, H. R.; Zurbriggen, A.; Perona, P.; Vidondo, B.; Oevermann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders in ruminants have an important impact on veterinary health, but very few host-specific in vitro models have been established to study diseases affecting the nervous system. Here we describe a primary neuronal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) culture derived from calves after being conventionally slaughtered for food consumption. The study focuses on the in vitro characterization of bovine DRG cell populations by immunofluorescence analysis. The effects of various growth factors on neuron viability, neurite outgrowth and arborisation were evaluated by morphological analysis. Bovine DRG neurons are able to survive for more than 4 weeks in culture. GF supplementation is not required for neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. However, exogenously added growth factors promote neurite outgrowth. DRG cultures from regularly slaughtered calves represent a promising and sustainable host specific model for the investigation of pain and neurological diseases in bovines. PMID:27936156

  4. Comparative transcriptome profiling of the maize primary, crown and seminal root in response to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Maolin; Kong, Xiangpei; Xu, Xiangbo; Li, Cuiling; Tian, Huiyu; Ding, Zhaojun

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity is a major constraint to crop growth and yield. The primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis thaliana are known to respond differentially to a number of environmental stresses, including salinity. Although the maize root system as a whole is known to be sensitive to salinity, whether or not different structural root systems show differential growth responses to salinity stress has not yet been investigated. The maize primary root (PR) was more tolerant of salinity stress than either the crown root (CR) or the seminal root (SR). To understand the molecular mechanism of these differential growth responses, RNA-Seq analysis was conducted on cDNA prepared from the PR, CR and SR of plants either non-stressed or exposed to 100 mM NaCl for 24 h. A set of 444 genes were shown to be regulated by salinity stress, and the transcription pattern of a number of genes associated with the plant salinity stress response differed markedly between the various types of root. The pattern of transcription of the salinity-regulated genes was shown to be very diverse in the various root types. The differential transcription of these genes such as transcription factors, and the accumulation of compatible solutes such as soluble sugars probably underlie the differential growth responses to salinity stress of the three types of roots in maize.

  5. Endosomal Interactions during Root Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    von Wangenheim, Daniel; Rosero, Amparo; Komis, George; Šamajová, Olga; Ovečka, Miroslav; Voigt, Boris; Šamaj, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic localization of endosomal compartments labeled with targeted fluorescent protein tags is routinely followed by time lapse fluorescence microscopy approaches and single particle tracking algorithms. In this way trajectories of individual endosomes can be mapped and linked to physiological processes as cell growth. However, other aspects of dynamic behavior including endosomal interactions are difficult to follow in this manner. Therefore, we characterized the localization and dynamic properties of early and late endosomes throughout the entire course of root hair formation by means of spinning disc time lapse imaging and post-acquisition automated multitracking and quantitative analysis. Our results show differential motile behavior of early and late endosomes and interactions of late endosomes that may be specified to particular root hair domains. Detailed data analysis revealed a particular transient interaction between late endosomes—termed herein as dancing-endosomes—which is not concluding to vesicular fusion. Endosomes preferentially located in the root hair tip interacted as dancing-endosomes and traveled short distances during this interaction. Finally, sizes of early and late endosomes were addressed by means of super-resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to corroborate measurements on the spinning disc. This is a first study providing quantitative microscopic data on dynamic spatio-temporal interactions of endosomes during root hair tip growth. PMID:26858728

  6. How grow-and-switch gravitropism generates root coiling and root waving growth responses in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tzer Han; Silverberg, Jesse L; Floss, Daniela S; Harrison, Maria J; Henley, Christopher L; Cohen, Itai

    2015-10-20

    Experimental studies show that plant root morphologies can vary widely from straight gravity-aligned primary roots to fractal-like root architectures. However, the opaqueness of soil makes it difficult to observe how environmental factors modulate these patterns. Here, we combine a transparent hydrogel growth medium with a custom built 3D laser scanner to directly image the morphology of Medicago truncatula primary roots. In our experiments, root growth is obstructed by an inclined plane in the growth medium. As the tilt of this rigid barrier is varied, we find Medicago transitions between randomly directed root coiling, sinusoidal root waving, and normal gravity-aligned morphologies. Although these root phenotypes appear morphologically distinct, our analysis demonstrates the divisions are less well defined, and instead, can be viewed as a 2D biased random walk that seeks the path of steepest decent along the inclined plane. Features of this growth response are remarkably similar to the widely known run-and-tumble chemotactic behavior of Escherichia coli bacteria, where biased random walks are used as optimal strategies for nutrient uptake.

  7. How grow-and-switch gravitropism generates root coiling and root waving growth responses in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tzer Han; Silverberg, Jesse L.; Floss, Daniela S.; Harrison, Maria J.; Henley, Christopher L.; Cohen, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies show that plant root morphologies can vary widely from straight gravity-aligned primary roots to fractal-like root architectures. However, the opaqueness of soil makes it difficult to observe how environmental factors modulate these patterns. Here, we combine a transparent hydrogel growth medium with a custom built 3D laser scanner to directly image the morphology of Medicago truncatula primary roots. In our experiments, root growth is obstructed by an inclined plane in the growth medium. As the tilt of this rigid barrier is varied, we find Medicago transitions between randomly directed root coiling, sinusoidal root waving, and normal gravity-aligned morphologies. Although these root phenotypes appear morphologically distinct, our analysis demonstrates the divisions are less well defined, and instead, can be viewed as a 2D biased random walk that seeks the path of steepest decent along the inclined plane. Features of this growth response are remarkably similar to the widely known run-and-tumble chemotactic behavior of Escherichia coli bacteria, where biased random walks are used as optimal strategies for nutrient uptake. PMID:26432881

  8. Regulation of Growth Response to Water Stress in the Soybean Primary Root. I. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Region-Specific Regulation of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism and Control of Free Iron in the Elongation Zone.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In water-stressed soybean primary roots, elongation was maintained at well-watered rates in the apical 4 mm (region 1) but was progressively inhibited in the 4-8 mm region (region 2), which exhibits maximum elongation in well-watered roots. These responses are similar to previous results for the mai...

  9. Hormone symphony during root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; De La Paz Sánchez, María; García-Ponce, Berenice; Azpeitia, Eugenio; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R

    2012-12-01

    Hormones regulate plant growth and development in response to external environmental stimuli via complex signal transduction pathways, which in turn form complex networks of interaction. Several classes of hormones have been reported, and their activity depends on their biosynthesis, transport, conjugation, accumulation in the vacuole, and degradation. However, the activity of a given hormone is also dependent on its interaction with other hormones. Indeed, there is a complex crosstalk between hormones that regulates their biosynthesis, transport, and/or signaling functionality, although some hormones have overlapping or opposite functions. The plant root is a particularly useful system in which to study the complex role of plant hormones in the plastic control of plant development. Physiological, cellular, and molecular genetic approaches have been used to study the role of plant hormones in root meristem homeostasis. In this review, we discuss recent findings on the synthesis, signaling, transport of hormones and role during root development and examine the role of hormone crosstalk in maintaining homeostasis in the apical root meristem. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Proteomic Profiling of the Microsomal Root Fraction: Discrimination of Pisum sativum L. Cultivars and Identification of Putative Root Growth Markers

    PubMed Central

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lüthje, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Legumes are a large and economically important family, containing a variety of crop plants. Alongside different cereals, some fruits, and tropical roots, a number of leguminosae evolved for millennia as crops with human society. One of these legumes is Pisum sativum L., the common garden pea. In the past, breeding has been largely selective on improved above-ground organs. However, parameters, such as root-growth, which determines acquisition of nutrients and water, have largely been underestimated. Although the genome of P. sativum is still not fully sequenced, multiple proteomic studies have been published on a variety of physiological aspects in the last years. The presented work focused on the connection between root length and the influence of the microsomal root proteome of four different pea cultivars after five days of germination (cultivar Vroege, Girl from the Rhineland, Kelvedon Wonder, and Blauwschokker). In total, 60 proteins were identified to have significantly differential abundances in the four cultivars. Root growth of five-days old seedlings and their microsomal proteome revealed a similar separation pattern, suggesting that cultivar-specific root growth performance is explained by differential membrane and ribosomal protein levels. Hence, we reveal and discuss several putative root growth protein markers possibly playing a key role for improved primary root growth breeding strategies. PMID:28257117

  11. Proteomic Profiling of the Microsomal Root Fraction: Discrimination of Pisum sativum L. Cultivars and Identification of Putative Root Growth Markers.

    PubMed

    Meisrimler, Claudia-Nicole; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Lüthje, Sabine

    2017-03-02

    Legumes are a large and economically important family, containing a variety of crop plants. Alongside different cereals, some fruits, and tropical roots, a number of leguminosae evolved for millennia as crops with human society. One of these legumes is Pisum sativum L., the common garden pea. In the past, breeding has been largely selective on improved above-ground organs. However, parameters, such as root-growth, which determines acquisition of nutrients and water, have largely been underestimated. Although the genome of P. sativum is still not fully sequenced, multiple proteomic studies have been published on a variety of physiological aspects in the last years. The presented work focused on the connection between root length and the influence of the microsomal root proteome of four different pea cultivars after five days of germination (cultivar Vroege, Girl from the Rhineland, Kelvedon Wonder, and Blauwschokker). In total, 60 proteins were identified to have significantly differential abundances in the four cultivars. Root growth of five-days old seedlings and their microsomal proteome revealed a similar separation pattern, suggesting that cultivar-specific root growth performance is explained by differential membrane and ribosomal protein levels. Hence, we reveal and discuss several putative root growth protein markers possibly playing a key role for improved primary root growth breeding strategies.

  12. A New Model for Root Growth in Soil with Macropores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, M.; Huber, K.; Schnepf, A.; Vanderborght, J.; Javaux, M.; Bengough, G.; Vereecken, H.

    2016-12-01

    In order to study soil-root interaction processes, dynamic root architecture models which are linked to models that simulate water flow and nutrient transport in the soil-root system are needed. Such models can be used to predict the impact of soil structural features, e.g. the presence of macropores in dense subsoil, on water and nutrient uptake by plants. In dynamic root architecture models, root growth is represented by moving root tips whose growth trajectory results in the creation of linear root segments. Typically, the direction of each new root segment is calculated as the vector sum of various direction-affecting components. The use of these established methods to simulate root growth in soil containing macropores, however, failed to reproduce experimentally observed root growth patterns. We therefore developed an alternative modelling approach where we distinguish between, firstly, the driving force for root growth which is determined by the orientation of the previous root segment as well as the influence of gravitropism and, secondly, soil mechanical resistance to root growth. The latter is expressed by root conductance which represents the inverse of soil penetration resistance and is treated similarly to hydraulic conductivity in Darcy's law. At the presence of macropores, root conductance is anisotropic which leads to a difference between the direction of the driving force and the direction of the root tip movement. The model was tested using data from the literature, at pot scale, at macropore scale, and in a series of simulations where sensitivity to gravity and macropore orientation was evaluated. The model simulated root growth trajectories in structured soil at both single root and whole root-system scales, generating root systems that were similar to images from experiments. Its implementation in the three dimensional soil and root water uptake model R-SWMS enables the use of the model in the future to evaluate the effect of macropores on crop

  13. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex

    PubMed Central

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good’s buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5–7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex. PMID:26925066

  14. MES Buffer Affects Arabidopsis Root Apex Zonation and Root Growth by Suppressing Superoxide Generation in Root Apex.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František

    2016-01-01

    In plants, growth of roots and root hairs is regulated by the fine cellular control of pH and reactive oxygen species (ROS). MES, 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid as one of the Good's buffers has broadly been used for buffering medium, and it is thought to suit for plant growth with the concentration at 0.1% (w/v) because the buffer capacity of MES ranging pH 5.5-7.0 (for Arabidopsis, pH 5.8). However, many reports have shown that, in nature, roots require different pH values on the surface of specific root apex zones, namely meristem, transition zone, and elongation zone. Despite the fact that roots always grow on a media containing buffer molecule, little is known about impact of MES on root growth. Here, we have checked the effects of different concentrations of MES buffer using growing roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that 1% of MES significantly inhibited root growth, the number of root hairs and length of meristem, whereas 0.1% promoted root growth and root apex area (region spanning from the root tip up to the transition zone). Furthermore, superoxide generation in root apex disappeared at 1% of MES. These results suggest that MES disturbs normal root morphogenesis by changing the ROS homeostasis in root apex.

  15. Alkamides isolated from plants promote growth and alter root development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Molina-Torres, Jorge

    2004-03-01

    To date, several classes of hormones have been described that influence plant development, including auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, and, more recently, brassinosteroids. However, it is known that many fungal and bacterial species produce substances that alter plant growth that, if naturally present in plants, might represent novel classes of plant growth regulators. Alkamides are metabolites widely distributed in plants with a broad range of biological activities. In this work, we investigated the effects of affinin, an alkamide naturally occurring in plants, and its derivates, N-isobutyl-2E-decenamide and N-isobutyl-decanamide, on plant growth and early root development in Arabidopsis. We found that treatments with affinin in the range of 10(-6) to 10(-4) m alter shoot and root biomass production. This effect correlated with alteration on primary root growth, lateral root formation, and root hair elongation. Low concentrations of affinin (7 x 10(-6)-2.8 x 10(-5) m) enhanced primary root growth and root hair elongation, whereas higher concentrations inhibited primary root growth that related with a reduction in cell proliferating activity and cell elongation. N-isobutyl-2E-decenamide and N-isobutyl-decanamide were found to stimulate root hair elongation at concentrations between 10(-8) to 10(-7) m. Although the effects of alkamides were similar to those produced by auxins on root growth and cell parameters, the ability of the root system to respond to affinin was found to be independent of auxin signaling. Our results suggest that alkamides may represent a new group of plant growth promoting substances with significant impact on root development and opens the possibility of using these compounds for improved plant production.

  16. Alkamides Isolated from Plants Promote Growth and Alter Root Development in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Molina-Torres, Jorge

    2004-01-01

    To date, several classes of hormones have been described that influence plant development, including auxins, cytokinins, ethylene, and, more recently, brassinosteroids. However, it is known that many fungal and bacterial species produce substances that alter plant growth that, if naturally present in plants, might represent novel classes of plant growth regulators. Alkamides are metabolites widely distributed in plants with a broad range of biological activities. In this work, we investigated the effects of affinin, an alkamide naturally occurring in plants, and its derivates, N-isobutyl-2E-decenamide and N-isobutyl-decanamide, on plant growth and early root development in Arabidopsis. We found that treatments with affinin in the range of 10-6 to 10-4 m alter shoot and root biomass production. This effect correlated with alteration on primary root growth, lateral root formation, and root hair elongation. Low concentrations of affinin (7 × 10-6–2.8 × 10-5 m) enhanced primary root growth and root hair elongation, whereas higher concentrations inhibited primary root growth that related with a reduction in cell proliferating activity and cell elongation. N-isobutyl-2E-decenamide and N-isobutyl-decanamide were found to stimulate root hair elongation at concentrations between 10-8 to 10-7 m. Although the effects of alkamides were similar to those produced by auxins on root growth and cell parameters, the ability of the root system to respond to affinin was found to be independent of auxin signaling. Our results suggest that alkamides may represent a new group of plant growth promoting substances with significant impact on root development and opens the possibility of using these compounds for improved plant production. PMID:14988477

  17. Graviresponsiveness and cap dimensions of primary and secondary roots of Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Moore, R; Pasieniuk, J

    1984-01-01

    After branching from the primary root, secondary roots of castor bean (Ricinus communis) grow laterally for 15-20 mm, after which they bend downward (i.e., become positively gravitropic). During the first 10 mm of growth, the lengths of caps of secondary roots increase from 120 +/- 26 to 220 +/- 28 micrometers. Although this increase is statistically significant (P < 0.1%), the resulting secondary roots are only minimally graviresponsive. A subsequent doubling of the lengths and widths of the root caps (i.e., to 420 +/- 34 and 450 +/- 41 micrometers, respectively) is positively correlated with the onset of gravicurvature. The graviresponsiveness and dimensions of caps of positively gravitropic secondary roots are not significantly different from those of positively gravitropic primary roots. These results indicate that (i) a statistically significant increase in the length and length : width ratio of a root cap does not necessarily result in the root becoming positively gravitropic, (ii) there may be a minimum cap length and (or) width necessary for graviresponsiveness, and (iii) the degree of graviresponsiveness exhibited by a particular root may be related to the size of its root cap.

  18. Functional genomics of root growth and development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali; Simpson, June; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Benfey, Philip N

    2009-04-01

    Roots are vital for the uptake of water and nutrients, and for anchorage in the soil. They are highly plastic, able to adapt developmentally and physiologically to changing environmental conditions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind this growth and development requires knowledge of root transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Genomics approaches, including the recent publication of a root expression map, root proteome, and environment-specific root expression studies, are uncovering complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks underlying root development. The challenge is in further capitalizing on the information in these datasets to understand the fundamental principles of root growth and development. In this review, we highlight progress researchers have made toward this goal.

  19. Copper regulates primary root elongation through PIN1-mediated auxin redistribution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2013-05-01

    The heavy metal copper (Cu) is an essential microelement required for normal plant growth and development, but it inhibits primary root growth when in excess. The mechanism underlying how excess Cu functions in this process remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that a higher concentration of CuSO4 inhibited primary root elongation of Arabidopsis seedlings by affecting both the elongation and meristem zones. In the meristem zone, meristematic cell division potential was reduced by excess Cu. Further experiments showed that Cu can modulate auxin distribution, resulting in higher auxin activities in both the elongation and meristem zones of Cu-treated roots based on DR5::GUS expression patterns. This Cu-mediated auxin redistribution was shown to be responsible for Cu-mediated inhibition of primary root elongation. Additional genetic and physiological data demonstrated that it was PINFORMED1 (PIN1), but not PIN2 or AUXIN1 (AUX1), that regulated this process. However, Cu-induced hydrogen peroxide accumulation did not contribute to Cu-induced auxin redistribution for inhibition of root elongation. When the possible role of ethylene in this process was analyzed, Cu had a similar impact on the root elongation of both the wild type and the ein2-1 mutant, implying that Cu-mediated inhibition of primary root elongation was not due to the ethylene signaling pathway.

  20. Touch and gravitropic set-point angle interact to modulate gravitropic growth in roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, G. D.; Gilroy, S.

    2003-01-01

    Plant roots must sense and respond to a variety of environmental stimuli as they grow through the soil. Touch and gravity represent two of the mechanical signals that roots must integrate to elicit the appropriate root growth patterns and root system architecture. Obstacles such as rocks will impede the general downwardly directed gravitropic growth of the root system and so these soil features must be sensed and this information processed for an appropriate alteration in gravitropic growth to allow the root to avoid the obstruction. We show that primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis do appear to sense and respond to mechanical barriers placed in their path of growth in a qualitatively similar fashion. Both types of roots exhibited a differential growth response upon contacting the obstacle that directed the main axis of elongation parallel to the barrier. This growth habit was maintained until the obstacle was circumvented, at which point normal gravitropic growth was resumed. Thus, the gravitational set-point angle of the primary and lateral roots prior to encountering the barrier were 95 degrees and 136 degrees respectively and after growing off the end of the obstacle identical set-point angles were reinstated. However, whilst tracking across the barrier, quantitative differences in response were observed between these two classes of roots. The root tip of the primary root maintained an angle of 136 degrees to the horizontal as it traversed the barrier whereas the lateral roots adopted an angle of 154 degrees. Thus, this root tip angle appeared dependent on the gravitropic set-point angle of the root type with the difference in tracking angle quantitatively reflecting differences in initial set-point angle. Concave and convex barriers were also used to analyze the response of the root to tracking along a continuously varying surface. The roots maintained the a fairly fixed angle to gravity on the curved surface implying a constant resetting of this tip angle

  1. Touch and gravitropic set-point angle interact to modulate gravitropic growth in roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, G. D.; Gilroy, S.

    2003-05-01

    Plant roots must sense and respond to a variety of environmental stimuli as they grow through the soil. Touch and gravity represent two of the mechanical signals that roots must integrate to elicit the appropriate root growth patterns and root system architecture. Obstacles such as rocks will impede the general downwardly directed gravitropic growth of the root system and so these soil features must be sensed and this information processed for an appropriate alteration in gravitropic growth to allow the root to avoid the obstruction. We show that primary and lateral roots of Arabidopsis do appear to sense and respond to mechanical barriers placed in their path of growth in a qualitatively similar fashion. Both types of roots exhibited a differential growth response upon contacting the obstacle that directed the main axis of elongation parallel to the barrier. This growth habit was maintained until the obstacle was circumvented, at which point normal gravitropic growth was resumed. Thus, the gravitational set-point angle of the primary and lateral roots prior to encountering the barrier were 95° and 136° respectively and after growing off the end of the obstacle identical set-point angles were reinstated. However, whilst tracking across the barrier, quantitative differences in response were observed between these two classes of roots. The root tip of the primary root maintained an angle of 136° to the horizontal as it traversed the barrier whereas the lateral roots adopted an angle of 154°. Thus, this root tip angle appeared dependent on the gravitropic set-point angle of the root type with the difference in tracking angle quantitatively reflecting differences in initial set-point angle. Concave and convex barriers were also used to analyze the response of the root to tracking along a continuously varying surface. The roots maintained the a fairly fixed angle to gravity on the curved surface implying a constant resetting of this tip angle/tracking response as

  2. Characterization of the growth and auxin physiology of roots of the tomato mutant, diageotropica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, G. K.; Lomax, T. L.; Rayle, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Roots of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant (diageotropica (dgt) exhibit an altered phenotype. These roots are agravitropic and lack lateral roots. Relative to wild-type (VFN8) roots, dgt roots are less sensitive to growth inhibition by exogenously applied IAA and auxin transport inhibitors (phytotropins), and the roots exhibit a reduction in maximal growth inhibition in response to ethylene. However, IAA transport through roots, binding of the phytotropin, tritiated naphthylphthalamic acid ([3H]NPA), to root microsomal membranes, NPA-sensitive IAA uptake by root segments, and uptake of [3H]NPA into root segments are all similar in mutant and wild-type roots. We speculate that the reduced sensitivity of dgt root growth to auxin-transport inhibitors and ethylene is an indirect result of the reduction in sensitivity to auxin in this single gene, recessive mutant. We conclude that dgt roots, like dgt shoots, exhibit abnormalities indicating they have a defect associated with or affecting a primary site of auxin perception or action.

  3. Characterization of the growth and auxin physiology of roots of the tomato mutant, diageotropica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muday, G. K.; Lomax, T. L.; Rayle, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    Roots of the tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill.) mutant (diageotropica (dgt) exhibit an altered phenotype. These roots are agravitropic and lack lateral roots. Relative to wild-type (VFN8) roots, dgt roots are less sensitive to growth inhibition by exogenously applied IAA and auxin transport inhibitors (phytotropins), and the roots exhibit a reduction in maximal growth inhibition in response to ethylene. However, IAA transport through roots, binding of the phytotropin, tritiated naphthylphthalamic acid ([3H]NPA), to root microsomal membranes, NPA-sensitive IAA uptake by root segments, and uptake of [3H]NPA into root segments are all similar in mutant and wild-type roots. We speculate that the reduced sensitivity of dgt root growth to auxin-transport inhibitors and ethylene is an indirect result of the reduction in sensitivity to auxin in this single gene, recessive mutant. We conclude that dgt roots, like dgt shoots, exhibit abnormalities indicating they have a defect associated with or affecting a primary site of auxin perception or action.

  4. Effect of nitrate on nodule and root growth of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.).

    PubMed

    Saito, Akinori; Tanabata, Sayuri; Tanabata, Takanari; Tajima, Seiya; Ueno, Manabu; Ishikawa, Shinji; Ohtake, Norikuni; Sueyoshi, Kuni; Ohyama, Takuji

    2014-03-13

    The application of combined nitrogen, especially nitrate, to soybean plants is known to strongly inhibit nodule formation, growth and nitrogen fixation. In the present study, we measured the effects of supplying 5 mM nitrate on the growth of nodules, primary root, and lateral roots under light at 28 °C or dark at 18 °C conditions. Photographs of the nodulated roots were periodically taken by a digital camera at 1-h intervals, and the size of the nodules was measured with newly developed computer software. Nodule growth was depressed approximately 7 h after the addition of nitrate under light conditions. The nodule growth rate under dark conditions was almost half that under light conditions, and nodule growth was further suppressed by the addition of 5 mM nitrate. Similar results were observed for the extending growth rate of the primary root as those for nodule growth supplied with 5 mM nitrate under light/dark conditions. In contrast, the growth of lateral roots was promoted by the addition of 5 mM nitrate. The 2D-PAGE profiles of nodule protein showed similar patterns between the 0 and 5 mM nitrate treatments, which suggested that metabolic integrity may be maintained with the 5 mM nitrate treatment. Further studies are required to confirm whether light or temperature condition may give the primary effect on the growth of nodules and roots.

  5. Early Arabidopsis root hair growth stimulation by pathogenic strains of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Pecenková, Tamara; Janda, Martin; Ortmannová, Jitka; Hajná, Vladimíra; Stehlíková, Zuzana; Žárský, Viktor

    2017-09-01

    Selected beneficial Pseudomonas spp. strains have the ability to influence root architecture in Arabidopsis thaliana by inhibiting primary root elongation and promoting lateral root and root hair formation. A crucial role for auxin in this long-term (1week), long-distance plant-microbe interaction has been demonstrated. Arabidopsis seedlings were cultivated in vitro on vertical plates and inoculated with pathogenic strains Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) and P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst), as well as Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu) and Escherichia coli (Eco). Root hair lengths were measured after 24 and 48h of direct exposure to each bacterial strain. Several Arabidopsis mutants with impaired responses to pathogens, impaired ethylene perception and defects in the exocyst vesicle tethering complex that is involved in secretion were also analysed. Arabidopsis seedling roots infected with Psm or Pst responded similarly to when infected with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria; root hair growth was stimulated and primary root growth was inhibited. Other plant- and soil-adapted bacteria induced similar root hair responses. The most compromised root hair growth stimulation response was found for the knockout mutants exo70A1 and ein2. The single immune pathways dependent on salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and PAD4 are not directly involved in root hair growth stimulation; however, in the mutual cross-talk with ethylene, they indirectly modify the extent of the stimulation of root hair growth. The Flg22 peptide does not initiate root hair stimulation as intact bacteria do, but pretreatment with Flg22 prior to Psm inoculation abolished root hair growth stimulation in an FLS2 receptor kinase-dependent manner. These early response phenomena are not associated with changes in auxin levels, as monitored with the pDR5::GUS auxin reporter. Early stimulation of root hair growth is an effect of an unidentified component of living plant pathogenic bacteria. The root

  6. Biophysical and genetic aspects of light-potentiated gravitropic curvature in the maize primary root

    SciTech Connect

    Fantin, D.M.

    1991-04-01

    This thesis explores issues related to light-induced gravitotropic curvature in maize primary roots, such as the root cap as the potential photosensor, entrainment by light of curvature in the gravistimulated root, and the possibility of genetic control of bending response variation. Central to this thesis is a mathematical model, emphasizing physical forces and molecular flows, linking the stages of light-stimulated gravitropic curvature. The model assumes a growth inhibitor is produced in the root cap, transported by diffusion to the extension zone, transported by convection around the extension zone where it retards growth at a rate proportional to its concentration. Model predictions were compared to experimental data to evaluate these assumptions. The root cap is shown to be the photosensor, and genetic crosses show that more than two genes must control the bending response. 140 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Abscisic acid accumulation modulates auxin transport in the root tip to enhance proton secretion for maintaining root growth under moderate water stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weifeng; Jia, Liguo; Shi, Weiming; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhou, Feng; Li, Qianfeng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of root growth is essential for plant adaptation to soil drying. Here, we tested the hypothesis that auxin transport is involved in mediating ABA's modulation by activating proton secretion in the root tip to maintain root growth under moderate water stress. Rice and Arabidopsis plants were raised under a hydroponic system and subjected to moderate water stress (-0.47 MPa) with polyethylene glycol (PEG). ABA accumulation, auxin transport and plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase activity at the root tip were monitored in addition to the primary root elongation and root hair density. We found that moderate water stress increases ABA accumulation and auxin transport in the root apex. Additionally, ABA modulation is involved in the regulation of auxin transport in the root tip. The transported auxin activates the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase to release more protons along the root tip in its adaption to moderate water stress. The proton secretion in the root tip is essential in maintaining or promoting primary root elongation and root hair development under moderate water stress. These results suggest that ABA accumulation modulates auxin transport in the root tip, which enhances proton secretion for maintaining root growth under moderate water stress.

  8. Manganese Toxicity Inhibited Root Growth by Disrupting Auxin Biosynthesis and Transport in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingjing; Wang, Wenying; Zhou, Huakun; Wang, Ruling; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Huichun; Pan, Xiangliang; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mn toxicity inhibits both primary root (PR) growth and lateral root development. However, the mechanism underlying Mn-mediated root growth inhibition remains to be further elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of auxin in Mn-mediated inhibition of PR growth in Arabidopsis using physiological and genetic approaches. Mn toxicity inhibits PR elongation by reducing meristematic cell division potential. Mn toxicity also reduced auxin levels in root tips by reducing IAA biosynthesis and down-regulating the expression of auxin efflux carriers PIN4 and PIN7. Loss of function pin4 and pin7 mutants showed less inhibition of root growth than col-0 seedlings. These results indicated that this inhibitory effect of Mn toxicity on PR growth was mediated by affecting auxin biosynthesis and the expression of auxin efflux transporters PIN4 and PIN7. PMID:28316607

  9. Manganese Toxicity Inhibited Root Growth by Disrupting Auxin Biosynthesis and Transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingjing; Wang, Wenying; Zhou, Huakun; Wang, Ruling; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Huichun; Pan, Xiangliang; Xu, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Mn toxicity inhibits both primary root (PR) growth and lateral root development. However, the mechanism underlying Mn-mediated root growth inhibition remains to be further elucidated. Here, we investigated the role of auxin in Mn-mediated inhibition of PR growth in Arabidopsis using physiological and genetic approaches. Mn toxicity inhibits PR elongation by reducing meristematic cell division potential. Mn toxicity also reduced auxin levels in root tips by reducing IAA biosynthesis and down-regulating the expression of auxin efflux carriers PIN4 and PIN7. Loss of function pin4 and pin7 mutants showed less inhibition of root growth than col-0 seedlings. These results indicated that this inhibitory effect of Mn toxicity on PR growth was mediated by affecting auxin biosynthesis and the expression of auxin efflux transporters PIN4 and PIN7.

  10. Transcriptional profile of maize roots under acid soil growth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aluminum (Al) toxicity is one of the most important yield-limiting factors of many crops worldwide. The primary symptom of Al toxicity syndrome is the inhibition of root growth leading to poor water and nutrient absorption. Al tolerance has been extensively studied using hydroponic experiments. However, unlike soil conditions, this method does not address all of the components that are necessary for proper root growth and development. In the present study, we grew two maize genotypes with contrasting tolerance to Al in soil containing toxic levels of Al and then compared their transcriptomic responses. Results When grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al, the Al-sensitive genotype (S1587-17) showed greater root growth inhibition, more Al accumulation and more callose deposition in root tips than did the tolerant genotype (Cat100-6). Transcriptome profiling showed a higher number of genes differentially expressed in S1587-17 grown in acid soil, probably due to secondary effects of Al toxicity. Genes involved in the biosynthesis of organic acids, which are frequently associated with an Al tolerance response, were not differentially regulated in both genotypes after acid soil exposure. However, genes related to the biosynthesis of auxin, ethylene and lignin were up-regulated in the Al-sensitive genotype, indicating that these pathways might be associated with root growth inhibition. By comparing the two maize lines, we were able to discover genes up-regulated only in the Al-tolerant line that also presented higher absolute levels than those observed in the Al-sensitive line. These genes encoded a lipase hydrolase, a retinol dehydrogenase, a glycine-rich protein, a member of the WRKY transcriptional family and two unknown proteins. Conclusions This work provides the first characterization of the physiological and transcriptional responses of maize roots when grown in acid soil containing toxic levels of Al. The transcriptome profiles highlighted

  11. Trichoderma-Induced Acidification Is an Early Trigger for Changes in Arabidopsis Root Growth and Determines Fungal Phytostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pelagio-Flores, Ramón; Esparza-Reynoso, Saraí; Garnica-Vergara, Amira; López-Bucio, José; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are common rhizosphere inhabitants widely used as biological control agents and their role as plant growth promoting fungi has been established. Although soil pH influences several fungal and plant functional traits such as growth and nutrition, little is known about its influence in rhizospheric or mutualistic interactions. The role of pH in the Trichoderma–Arabidopsis interaction was studied by determining primary root growth and lateral root formation, root meristem status and cell viability, quiescent center (QC) integrity, and auxin inducible gene expression. Primary root growth phenotypes in wild type seedlings and STOP1 mutants allowed identification of a putative root pH sensing pathway likely operating in plant–fungus recognition. Acidification by Trichoderma induced auxin redistribution within Arabidopsis columella root cap cells, causing root tip bending and growth inhibition. Root growth stoppage correlated with decreased cell division and with the loss of QC integrity and cell viability, which were reversed by buffering the medium. In addition, stop1, an Arabidopsis mutant sensitive to low pH, was oversensitive to T. atroviride primary root growth repression, providing genetic evidence that a pH root sensing mechanism reprograms root architecture during the interaction. Our results indicate that root sensing of pH mediates the interaction of Trichoderma with plants. PMID:28567051

  12. Distinctive expression patterns and roles of the miRNA393/TIR1 homolog module in regulating flag leaf inclination and primary and crown root growth in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Bian, Hongwu; Xie, Yakun; Guo, Fu; Han, Ning; Ma, Shengyun; Zeng, Zhanghui; Wang, Junhui; Yang, Yinong; Zhu, Muyuan

    2012-10-01

    • MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation of auxin signaling components plays a critical role in plant development. miRNA expression and functional diversity contribute to the complexity of regulatory networks of miRNA/target modules. • This study functionally characterizes two members of the rice (Oryza sativa) miR393 family and their target genes, OsTIR1 and OsAFB2 (AUXIN SIGNALING F-BOX), the two closest homologs of Arabidopsis TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1 (TIR1). • We found that the miR393 family members possess distinctive expression patterns, with miR393a expressed mainly in the crown and lateral root primordia, as well as the coleoptile tip, and miR393b expressed in the shoot apical meristem. Transgenic plants overexpressing miR393a/b displayed a severe phenotype with hallmarks of altered auxin signaling, mainly including enlarged flag leaf inclination and altered primary and crown root growth. Furthermore, OsAFB2- and OsTIR1-suppressed lines exhibited increased inclination of flag leaves at the booting stage, resembling miR393-overexpressing plants. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays showed that OsTIR1 and OsAFB2 interact with OsIAA1. • Expression diversification of miRNA393 implies the potential role of miRNA regulation during species evolution. The conserved mechanisms of the miR393/target module indicate the fundamental importance of the miR393-mediated regulation of auxin signal transduction in rice.

  13. Effects of glycoalkaloids from Solanum plants on cucumber root growth.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fang; Li, Shengyu; He, Dajun; Cao, Gang; Ni, Xiuzhen; Tai, Guihua; Zhou, Yifa; Wang, Deli

    2010-09-01

    The phytotoxic effect of four glycoalkaloids and two 6-O-sulfated glycoalkaloid derivatives were evaluated by testing their inhibition of cucumber root growth. The bioassays were performed using both compounds singly and in equimolar mixtures, respectively. Cucumber root growth was reduced by chaconine (C), solanine (S), solamargine (SM) and solasonine (SS) with IC(50) values of 260 (C), 380 (S), 530 (SM), and 610 microM (SS). The inhibitory effect was concentration-dependent. 6-O-sulfated chaconine and 6-O-sulfated solamargine had no inhibitory effects, which indicated that the carbohydrate moieties play an important role in inhibiting cucumber root growth. The equimolar mixtures of paired glycoalkaloids, both chaconine/solanine and solamargine/solasonine, produced synergistic effects on inhibition of cucumber root growth. By contrast, mixtures of unpaired glycoalkaloids from different plants had no obviously synergistic effects. The growth inhibited plant roots lacked hairs, which implied that inhibition was perhaps at the level of root hair growth.

  14. Determinate Root Growth and Meristem Maintenance in Angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Shishkova, S.; Rost, T. L.; Dubrovsky, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Background The difference between indeterminate and determinate growth in plants consists of the presence or absence of an active meristem in the fully developed organ. Determinate root growth implies that the root apical meristem (RAM) becomes exhausted. As a consequence, all cells in the root tip differentiate. This type of growth is widely found in roots of many angiosperm taxa and might have evolved as a developmental adaptation to water deficit (in desert Cactaceae), or low mineral content in the soil (proteoid roots in various taxa). Scope and Conclusions This review considers the mechanisms of determinate root growth to better understand how the RAM is maintained, how it functions, and the cellular and genetic bases of these processes. The role of the quiescent centre in RAM maintenance and exhaustion will be analysed. During root ageing, the RAM becomes smaller and its organization changes; however, it remains unknown whether every root is truly determinate in the sense that its RAM becomes exhausted before senescence. We define two types of determinate growth: constitutive where determinacy is a natural part of root development; and non-constitutive where determinacy is induced usually by an environmental factor. Determinate root growth is proposed to include two phases: the indeterminate growth phase, when the RAM continuously produces new cells; and the termination growth phase, when cell production gradually decreases and eventually ceases. Finally, new concepts regarding stem cells and a stem cell niche are discussed to help comprehend how the meristem is maintained in a broad taxonomic context. PMID:17954472

  15. Graviresponsiveness of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimon, E.; Moore, R.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the gravitropic responses of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays to determine the route by which gravitropic inhibitors move from the root tip to the elongating zone. Horizontally oriented roots, from which a 1-mm-wide girdle of epidermis plus 2-10 layers of cortex were removed from the apex of the elongating zone, curve downward. However, curvature occurred only apical to the girdle. Filling the girdle with mucilage-like material transmits curvature beyond the girdle. Vertically oriented roots with a half-girdle' (i.e. the epidermis and 2-10 layers of the cortex removed from half of the circumference of the apex of the elongating zone) curve away from the girdle. Inserting the half-girdle at the base of the elongating zone induces curvature towards the girdle. Filling the half-circumference girdles with mucilage-like material reduced curvature significantly. Stripping the epidermis and outer 2-5 layers of cortex from the terminal 1.5 cm of one side of a primary root induces curvature towards the cut, irrespective of the root's orientation to gravity. This effect is not due to desiccation since treated roots submerged in water also curved towards their cut surface. Coating a root's cut surface with a mucilage-like substance minimizes curvature. These results suggest that the outer cell-layers of the root, especially the epidermis, play an important role in root gravicurvature, and the gravitropic signals emanating from the root tip can move apoplastically through mucilage.

  16. Graviresponsiveness of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Maimon, E; Moore, R

    1991-02-01

    We examined the gravitropic responses of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays to determine the route by which gravitropic inhibitors move from the root tip to the elongating zone. Horizontally oriented roots, from which a 1-mm-wide girdle of epidermis plus 2-10 layers of cortex were removed from the apex of the elongating zone, curve downward. However, curvature occurred only apical to the girdle. Filling the girdle with mucilage-like material transmits curvature beyond the girdle. Vertically oriented roots with a half-girdle' (i.e. the epidermis and 2-10 layers of the cortex removed from half of the circumference of the apex of the elongating zone) curve away from the girdle. Inserting the half-girdle at the base of the elongating zone induces curvature towards the girdle. Filling the half-circumference girdles with mucilage-like material reduced curvature significantly. Stripping the epidermis and outer 2-5 layers of cortex from the terminal 1.5 cm of one side of a primary root induces curvature towards the cut, irrespective of the root's orientation to gravity. This effect is not due to desiccation since treated roots submerged in water also curved towards their cut surface. Coating a root's cut surface with a mucilage-like substance minimizes curvature. These results suggest that the outer cell-layers of the root, especially the epidermis, play an important role in root gravicurvature, and the gravitropic signals emanating from the root tip can move apoplastically through mucilage.

  17. Graviresponsiveness of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maimon, E.; Moore, R.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the gravitropic responses of surgically altered primary roots of Zea mays to determine the route by which gravitropic inhibitors move from the root tip to the elongating zone. Horizontally oriented roots, from which a 1-mm-wide girdle of epidermis plus 2-10 layers of cortex were removed from the apex of the elongating zone, curve downward. However, curvature occurred only apical to the girdle. Filling the girdle with mucilage-like material transmits curvature beyond the girdle. Vertically oriented roots with a half-girdle' (i.e. the epidermis and 2-10 layers of the cortex removed from half of the circumference of the apex of the elongating zone) curve away from the girdle. Inserting the half-girdle at the base of the elongating zone induces curvature towards the girdle. Filling the half-circumference girdles with mucilage-like material reduced curvature significantly. Stripping the epidermis and outer 2-5 layers of cortex from the terminal 1.5 cm of one side of a primary root induces curvature towards the cut, irrespective of the root's orientation to gravity. This effect is not due to desiccation since treated roots submerged in water also curved towards their cut surface. Coating a root's cut surface with a mucilage-like substance minimizes curvature. These results suggest that the outer cell-layers of the root, especially the epidermis, play an important role in root gravicurvature, and the gravitropic signals emanating from the root tip can move apoplastically through mucilage.

  18. Phene Synergism between Root Hair Length and Basal Root Growth Angle for Phosphorus Acquisition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, Magalhaes Amade

    2015-01-01

    Shallow basal root growth angle (BRGA) increases phosphorus acquisition efficiency by enhancing topsoil foraging because in most soils, phosphorus is concentrated in the topsoil. Root hair length and density (RHL/D) increase phosphorus acquisition by expanding the soil volume subject to phosphorus depletion through diffusion. We hypothesized that shallow BRGA and large RHL/D are synergetic for phosphorus acquisition, meaning that their combined effect is greater than the sum of their individual effects. To evaluate this hypothesis, phosphorus acquisition in the field in Mozambique was compared among recombinant inbred lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) having four distinct root phenotypes: long root hairs and shallow basal roots, long root hairs and deep basal roots, short root hairs and shallow basal roots, and short root hairs and deep basal roots. The results revealed substantial synergism between BRGA and RHL/D. Compared with short-haired, deep-rooted phenotypes, long root hairs increased shoot biomass under phosphorus stress by 89%, while shallow roots increased shoot biomass by 58%. Genotypes with both long root hairs and shallow roots had 298% greater biomass accumulation than short-haired, deep-rooted phenotypes. Therefore, the utility of shallow basal roots and long root hairs for phosphorus acquisition in combination is twice as large as their additive effects. We conclude that the anatomical phene of long, dense root hairs and the architectural phene of shallower basal root growth are synergetic for phosphorus acquisition. Phene synergism may be common in plant biology and can have substantial importance for plant fitness, as shown here. PMID:25699587

  19. Mapping the functional roles of cap cells in the response of Arabidopsis primary roots to gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Fasano, J. M.; Gilroy, S.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The cap is widely accepted to be the site of gravity sensing in roots because removal of the cap abolishes root curvature. Circumstantial evidence favors the columella cells as the gravisensory cells because amyloplasts (and often other cellular components) are polarized with respect to the gravity vector. However, there has been no functional confirmation of their role. To address this problem, we used laser ablation to remove defined cells in the cap of Arabidopsis primary roots and quantified the response of the roots to gravity using three parameters: time course of curvature, presentation time, and deviation from vertical growth. Ablation of the peripheral cap cells and tip cells did not alter root curvature. Ablation of the innermost columella cells caused the strongest inhibitory effect on root curvature without affecting growth rates. Many of these roots deviated significantly from vertical growth and had a presentation time 6-fold longer than the controls. Among the two inner columella stories, the central cells of story 2 contributed the most to root gravitropism. These cells also exhibited the largest amyloplast sedimentation velocities. Therefore, these results are consistent with the starch-statolith sedimentation hypothesis for gravity sensing.

  20. Glucose control of root growth direction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjul; Gupta, Aditi; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2014-07-01

    Directional growth of roots is a complex process that is modulated by various environmental signals. This work shows that presence of glucose (Glc) in the medium also extensively modulated seedling root growth direction. Glc modulation of root growth direction was dramatically enhanced by simultaneous brassinosteroid (BR) application. Glc enhanced BR receptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) endocytosis from plasma membrane to early endosomes. Glc-induced root deviation was highly enhanced in a PP2A-defective mutant, roots curl in naphthyl phthalamic acid 1-1 (rcn1-1) suggesting that there is a role of phosphatase in Glc-induced root-growth deviation. RCN1, therefore, acted as a link between Glc and the BR-signalling pathway. Polar auxin transport worked further downstream to BR in controlling Glc-induced root deviation response. Glc also affected other root directional responses such as root waving and coiling leading to altered root architecture. High light intensity mimicked the Glc-induced changes in root architecture that were highly reduced in Glc-signalling mutants. Thus, under natural environmental conditions, changing light flux in the environment may lead to enhanced Glc production/response and is a way to manipulate root architecture for optimized development via integrating several extrinsic and intrinsic signalling cues. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 microns2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

  2. Characterizing pathways by which gravitropic effectors could move from the root cap to the root of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; McClelen, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Plasmodesmata linking the root cap and root in primary roots Zea mays are restricted to approx. 400 protodermal cells bordering approx. 110000 microns2 of the calyptrogen of the root cap. This area is less than 10% of the cross-sectional area of the root-tip at the cap junction. Therefore, gravitropic effectors moving from the root cap to the root can move symplastically only through a relatively small area in the centre of the root. Decapped roots are non-responsive to gravity. However, decapped roots whose caps are replaced immediately after decapping are strongly graviresponsive. Thus, gravicurvature occurs only when the root cap contacts the root, and symplastic continuity between the cap and root is not required for gravicurvature. Completely removing mucilage from the root tip renders the root non-responsive to gravity. Taken together, these data suggest that gravitropic effectors move apoplastically through mucilage from the cap to the root.

  3. Physiologic root resorption in primary teeth: molecular and histological events.

    PubMed

    Harokopakis-Hajishengallis, Evlambia

    2007-03-01

    Root resorption is a physiologic event for the primary teeth. It is still unclear whether odontoclasts, the cells which resorb the dental hard tissue, are different from the osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone. Root resorption seems to be initiated and regulated by the stellate reticulum and the dental follicle of the underlying permanent tooth via the secretion of stimulatory molecules, i.e. cytokines and transcription factors. The primary root resorption process is regulated in a manner similar to bone remodeling, involving the same receptor ligand system known as RANK/RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B/ RANK Ligand). Primary teeth without a permanent successor eventually exfoliate as well, but our current understanding on the underlying mechanism is slim. The literature is also vague on how resorption of the pulp and periodontal ligament of the primary teeth occurs. Knowledge on the mechanisms involved in the physiologic root resorption process may enable us to delay or even inhibit exfoliation of primary teeth in those cases that the permanent successor teeth are not present and thus preservation of the primary teeth is desirable.

  4. Effects of bisphenol A on growth and nitrogen nutrition of roots of soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hai; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an environmental endocrine disruptor that seriously threatens ecological systems. Plants are the primary producers in ecological systems, but little information is available concerning the toxic effect of BPA on plants. In the present study, the effects of BPA on the growth and nitrogen nutrition of roots of soybean seedlings were investigated by using a root automatic scan apparatus and biochemical methods. It was found that when soybean seedlings were treated with 1.5 mg/L BPA, the growth of roots was improved, the content of nitrate in roots was increased, the content of ammonium in roots was decreased, and the activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase in roots were not changed. The opposite effects were observed in roots treated with 17.2 mg/L and 50.0 mg/L BPA, except for an increase in the content of nitrate in roots treated with 17.2 mg/L BPA and a decrease in the activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase in roots of soybeans seedlings. Statistical analysis indicated that the change in the nitrogen nutrition of roots of soybean seedlings treated with BPA was one reason why the growth of roots was changed. The authors suggest that the potential environmental and ecological risk of BPA to plants should receive more consideration. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  5. Effects of abscisic acid and xanthoxin on elongation and gravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Mulkey, T. J.; Yang, R. L.; Evans, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    We examined the involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) and xanthoxin (Xan) in maize root gravitropism by (1) testing the ability of ABA to allow positive gravitropism in dark-grown seedlings of the maize cultivar LG11, a cultivar known to require light for positive gravitropism of the primary root, (2) comparing curvature in roots in which half of the cap had been excised and replaced with agar containing either ABA or indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), (3) measuring gravitropism in roots of seedlings submerged in oxygenated solutions of ABA or IAA and (4) testing the effect of Xan on root elongation. Using a variety of methods of applying ABA to the root, we found that ABA did not cause horizontally-oriented primary roots of dark-grown seedlings to become positively gravitropic. Replacing half of the root cap of vertically oriented roots with an agar block containing ABA had little or no effect on curvature relative to that of controls in which the half cap was replaced by a plain agar block. Replacement of the removed half cap with IAA either canceled or reversed the curvature displayed by controls. When light-grown seedlings were submerged in ABA they responded strongly to gravistimulation while those in IAA did not. Xan (up to 0.1 mM) did not affect root elongation. The results indicate that ABA is not a likely mediator of root gravitropism and that the putative ABA precursor, Xan, lacks the appropriate growth-inhibiting properties to serve as a mediator of root gravitropism.

  6. Effects of abscisic acid and xanthoxin on elongation and gravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Mulkey, T. J.; Yang, R. L.; Evans, M. L.

    1990-01-01

    We examined the involvement of abscisic acid (ABA) and xanthoxin (Xan) in maize root gravitropism by (1) testing the ability of ABA to allow positive gravitropism in dark-grown seedlings of the maize cultivar LG11, a cultivar known to require light for positive gravitropism of the primary root, (2) comparing curvature in roots in which half of the cap had been excised and replaced with agar containing either ABA or indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), (3) measuring gravitropism in roots of seedlings submerged in oxygenated solutions of ABA or IAA and (4) testing the effect of Xan on root elongation. Using a variety of methods of applying ABA to the root, we found that ABA did not cause horizontally-oriented primary roots of dark-grown seedlings to become positively gravitropic. Replacing half of the root cap of vertically oriented roots with an agar block containing ABA had little or no effect on curvature relative to that of controls in which the half cap was replaced by a plain agar block. Replacement of the removed half cap with IAA either canceled or reversed the curvature displayed by controls. When light-grown seedlings were submerged in ABA they responded strongly to gravistimulation while those in IAA did not. Xan (up to 0.1 mM) did not affect root elongation. The results indicate that ABA is not a likely mediator of root gravitropism and that the putative ABA precursor, Xan, lacks the appropriate growth-inhibiting properties to serve as a mediator of root gravitropism.

  7. Phenotyping jasmonate regulation of root growth.

    PubMed

    Kellermeier, Fabian; Amtmann, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Root architecture is a complex and highly plastic feature of higher plants. Direct treatments with jasmonates and alterations in jasmonate signaling have been shown to elicit a range of root phenotypes. Here, we describe a fast, noninvasive, and semiautomatic method to monitor root architectural responses to environmental stimuli using plant tissue culture and the software tool EZ-RHIZO.

  8. CO/sub 2/ speeds root growth of cuttings

    SciTech Connect

    Yarris, L.

    1984-06-01

    Researchers have determined that CO/sub 2/ enrichment accelerates cutting root growth on foliage plants and flowering shrubs. For horticultural crops, including most woody ornamentals, apples, pears, and small fruit trees, roots consistently emerged 1 or 2 days earlier in the enriched atmosphere. These tests were conducted as part of a broad, ongoing study to determine how photosynthesis is related to rooting and whether rooting can be stimulated by stimulating photosynthesis.

  9. Graviresponsiveness and the development of columella tissue in primary and lateral roots of Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; Pasieniuk, J

    1984-01-01

    Half-tipped primary and lateral roots of Ricinus communis cv Hale bend toward the side of the root on which the intact half-tip remains. Therefore, the minimal graviresponsiveness of lateral roots is not due to the inability of their caps to produce growth effectors (presumably inhibitors). The columella tissues of primary (i.e. graviresponsive) roots are (a) 4.30 times longer, (b) 2.95 times wider, (c) 37.4 times more voluminous, and (d) composed of 17.2 times more cells than those of lateral roots. The onset of positive gravitropism by lateral roots is positively correlated with a (a) 2.99-fold increase in length, (b) 2.63-fold increase in width, (c) 20.7-fold increase in volume of their columella tissues. We propose that the minimal graviresponsiveness of lateral roots is due to the small size of their columella tissues, which results in their caps being unable to (a) establish a concentration gradient of the effector sufficient to induce gravicurvature and (b) produce as much as the effector as caps of graviresponsive roots.

  10. Effect of Environmental Density and Buoyancy on Growth and Gravitropic Response in Maize Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, J. L.; Mulkey, T. J.

    2008-06-01

    The mechanism by which plants sense gravity is not fully understood. The hydrostatic model was proposed as an alternative to the statolith model. These experiments are designed to provide further understanding about the underlying mechanism of the gravitropic sensing. Primary roots of maize with a length of about 1 cm were used. The roots were placed in environments of various density and buoyancy using air, water, sucrose, sucrose/polyethylene glycol 4000 (PEG), PEG 8000, and Ficoll PM 400. The rates of growth and gravitropic curvature were monitored using time-lapse video and digital recordings. Comparison of roots in air to roots in oxygenated water indicate that there is no significant difference in growth rates but the higher density of water and the other test solutions significantly slows the gravitropic response. Altering the environmental density and buoyancy of the solution surrounding the root does not appear to alter sedimentation of statoliths within the root tip.

  11. A Simple Device to Measure Root Growth Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauser, Wilfried E.; Horton, Roger F.

    1975-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple auxanometer which students can use to accurately measure root growth rates of intact seedlings. Typical time course data are presented for the effect of ethylene and indole acetic acid on pea root growth. (Author/BR)

  12. A Simple Device to Measure Root Growth Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauser, Wilfried E.; Horton, Roger F.

    1975-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple auxanometer which students can use to accurately measure root growth rates of intact seedlings. Typical time course data are presented for the effect of ethylene and indole acetic acid on pea root growth. (Author/BR)

  13. Melatonin promotes seminal root elongation and root growth in transgenic rice after germination.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2012-11-01

    The effect of melatonin on root growth after germination was examined in transgenic rice seedlings expressing sheep serotonin N-acetyltransferase (NAT). Enhanced melatonin levels were found in T(3) homozygous seedlings because of the ectopic overexpression of sheep NAT, which is believed to be the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in animals. Compared with wild-type rice seeds, the transgenic rice seeds showed enhanced seminal root growth and an analogous number of adventitious roots 4 and 10 days after seeding on half-strength Murashige and Skoog medium. The enhanced initial seminal root growth in the transgenic seedlings matched their increased root biomass well. We also found that treatment with 0.5 and 1 μM melatonin promoted seminal root growth of the wild type under continuous light. These results indicate that melatonin plays an important role in regulating both seminal root length and root growth after germination in monocotyledonous rice plants. This is the first report on the effects of melatonin on root growth in gain-of-function mutant plants that produce high levels of melatonin. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. An improved agar-plate method for studying root growth and response of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weifeng; Ding, Guochang; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Li, Qian-Feng; Liu, Yinggao; Shi, Weiming; Liang, Jiansheng; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a widely used model plant for plant biology research. Under traditional agar-plate culture system (TPG, traditional plant-growing), both plant shoots and roots are exposed to illumination, and roots are grown in sucrose-added medium. This is not a natural environment for the roots and may cause artifact responses. We have developed an improved agar-plate culture system (IPG, improved plant-growing) where shoots are illuminated but roots are grown in darkness without sucrose addition. Compared to TPG, IPG produced plants with significantly less total root length, lateral root length and root hair density, although their primary roots were longer. Root gravitropism, PIN2 (an auxin efflux carrier) abundance, H⁺ efflux or Ca²⁺ influx in root apexes, were weaker in IPG-grown roots than those in TPG-grown roots. We conclude that IPG offers a more natural way to study the root growth and response of Arabidopsis thaliana.

  15. Differential growth and hormone redistribution in gravireacting maize roots.

    PubMed

    Pilet, P E

    1989-01-01

    When growing roots are placed in a horizontal position gravity induces a positive curvature. It is classically considered to be the consequence of a faster elongation rate by the upper side compared to the lower side. A critical examination indicates that the gravireaction is caused by differential cell extension depending on several processes. Some of the endogenous regulators which may control the growth and gravitropism of elongating roots are briefly presented. The growth inhibitors produced or released from the root cap move preferentially in a basipetal direction and accumulate in the lower side of the elongation zone of horizontally maintained roots. The identity of these compounds is far from clear, but one of these inhibitors could be abscisic acid (ABA). However, indol-3y1 acetic acid (IAA) is also important for root growth and gravitropism. ABA may interact with IAA. Two other aspects of root cell extension have also to be carefully considered. An elongation gradient measured from the tip to the base of the root was found to be important for the growth of both vertical and horizontal gravireactive roots. It was changed significantly during the gravipresentation and can be considered as the origin of the differential elongation. Sephadex beads have been used as both growth markers and as monitors of surface pH changes when they contain some pH indicator. This technique has shown that the distribution of cell extension along the main root axis is related to a pH gradient, the proton efflux being larger for faster growing parts of roots. A lateral movement of calcium is obtained when Ca2+ is applied across the tips of horizontally placed roots with a preferential transport towards the lower side. Endogenous calcium, which may accumulate inside the endoplasmic reticulum of some cap cells, may also act in the gravireception. These observations and several others strongly suggest that calcium may play an essential role in controlling root growth and several

  16. Antisense expression of an Arabidopsis ran binding protein renders transgenic roots hypersensitive to auxin and alters auxin-induced root growth and development by arresting mitotic progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Arnold, D.; Lloyd, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding an Arabidopsis Ran binding protein, AtRanBP1c, and generated transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the antisense strand of the AtRanBP1c gene to understand the in vivo functions of the Ran/RanBP signal pathway. The transgenic plants showed enhanced primary root growth but suppressed growth of lateral roots. Auxin significantly increased lateral root initiation and inhibited primary root growth in the transformants at 10 pM, several orders of magnitude lower than required to induce these responses in wild-type roots. This induction was followed by a blockage of mitosis in both newly emerged lateral roots and in the primary root, ultimately resulting in the selective death of cells in the tips of both lateral and primary roots. Given the established role of Ran binding proteins in the transport of proteins into the nucleus, these findings are consistent with a model in which AtRanBP1c plays a key role in the nuclear delivery of proteins that suppress auxin action and that regulate mitotic progress in root tips.

  17. Antisense expression of an Arabidopsis ran binding protein renders transgenic roots hypersensitive to auxin and alters auxin-induced root growth and development by arresting mitotic progress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S. H.; Arnold, D.; Lloyd, A.; Roux, S. J.

    2001-01-01

    We cloned a cDNA encoding an Arabidopsis Ran binding protein, AtRanBP1c, and generated transgenic Arabidopsis expressing the antisense strand of the AtRanBP1c gene to understand the in vivo functions of the Ran/RanBP signal pathway. The transgenic plants showed enhanced primary root growth but suppressed growth of lateral roots. Auxin significantly increased lateral root initiation and inhibited primary root growth in the transformants at 10 pM, several orders of magnitude lower than required to induce these responses in wild-type roots. This induction was followed by a blockage of mitosis in both newly emerged lateral roots and in the primary root, ultimately resulting in the selective death of cells in the tips of both lateral and primary roots. Given the established role of Ran binding proteins in the transport of proteins into the nucleus, these findings are consistent with a model in which AtRanBP1c plays a key role in the nuclear delivery of proteins that suppress auxin action and that regulate mitotic progress in root tips.

  18. ROOTing Out Meaning: More Morphemic Analysis for Primary Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain, Lee

    2005-01-01

    In an elementary-school professional development program, a group of primary teachers and a university consultant reviewed the research on morphemic analysis and then explored ways to give pupils in grades 1, 2, and 3 an early start on using prefixes, suffixes, and roots to construct word meaning. The teachers examined some middle-grade strategies…

  19. Functional genomics of root growth and development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali; Simpson, June; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Benfey, Philip N.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Roots are vital for the uptake of water and nutrients, and for anchorage in the soil. They are highly plastic, able to adapt developmentally and physiologically to changing environmental conditions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms behind this growth and development requires knowledge of root transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Genomics approaches, including the recent publication of a root expression map, root proteome, and environment-specific root expression studies, are uncovering complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks underlying root development. The challenge is in further capitalizing on the information in these datasets to understand the fundamental principles of root growth and development. In this review, we highlight progress researchers have made toward this goal. PMID:19117793

  20. Plant development in space: Observations on root formation and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. G.; Kann, R. P.; Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1990-01-01

    Root growth in space is discussed and observations on root production from plants flown as part of the Chromex project that were defined as to their origin, stage of development and physiological status, are presented. Roots were generated from fully differentiated, aseptically maintained individuals of Haplopappus gracilis (Compositae) under spaceflight conditions. Results are compared for tissue culture generated plantlets and comparably sized seedling clone individuals, both of which had their roots trimmed on Earth before they were loaded into NASA's plant growth unit and subjected to a 5 day shuttle flight (STS-29). Asepsis was maintained throughout the experiment. Overall root production was 40 to 50 percent greater under spaceflight conditions than during ground control tests. However, root formation slowed down towards the end of the flight. This decrease in new roots did not occur in the ground controls that sought to simulate flight except for microgravity.

  1. Plant development in space: Observations on root formation and growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H. G.; Kann, R. P.; Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1990-01-01

    Root growth in space is discussed and observations on root production from plants flown as part of the Chromex project that were defined as to their origin, stage of development and physiological status, are presented. Roots were generated from fully differentiated, aseptically maintained individuals of Haplopappus gracilis (Compositae) under spaceflight conditions. Results are compared for tissue culture generated plantlets and comparably sized seedling clone individuals, both of which had their roots trimmed on Earth before they were loaded into NASA's plant growth unit and subjected to a 5 day shuttle flight (STS-29). Asepsis was maintained throughout the experiment. Overall root production was 40 to 50 percent greater under spaceflight conditions than during ground control tests. However, root formation slowed down towards the end of the flight. This decrease in new roots did not occur in the ground controls that sought to simulate flight except for microgravity.

  2. Cytokinin and growth of excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum.

    PubMed

    Robbins, W J; Hervey, A

    1971-02-01

    Excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum require for growth both auxin and cytokinin. This is demonstrated by the poor growth of 2-mm root tips in a basal medium of mineral salts, sucrose, and vitamins supplemented with either an auxin or a cytokinin, and much better growth when the basal medium is supplemented with both auxin and cytokinin. However, both substances are synthesized by the root, as is demonstrated by the growth of large inocula (dry wt 6-7 mg) through many successive passages in a medium limited to mineral salts, sugar, and vitamins.

  3. Cytokinin and Growth of Excised Roots of Bryophyllum calycinum

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, William J.; Hervery, Annette

    1971-01-01

    Excised roots of Bryophyllum calycinum require for growth both auxin and cytokinin. This is demonstrated by the poor growth of 2-mm root tips in a basal medium of mineral salts, sucrose, and vitamins supplemented with either an auxin or a cytokinin, and much better growth when the basal medium is supplemented with both auxin and cytokinin. However, both substances are synthesized by the root, as is demonstrated by the growth of large inocula (dry wt 6-7 mg) through many successive passages in a medium limited to mineral salts, sugar, and vitamins. Images PMID:5277083

  4. Overexpression of Arabidopsis plasmodesmata germin-like proteins disrupts root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Ham, Byung-Kook; Li, Gang; Kang, Byung-Ho; Zeng, Fanchang; Lucas, William J

    2012-09-01

    In plants, a population of non-cell-autonomous proteins (NCAPs), including numerous transcription factors, move cell to cell through plasmodesmata (PD). In many cases, the intercellular trafficking of these NCAPs is regulated by their interaction with specific PD components. To gain further insight into the functions of this NCAP pathway, coimmunoprecipitation experiments were performed on a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plasmodesmal-enriched cell wall protein preparation using as bait the NCAP, pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) PHLOEM PROTEIN16 (Cm-PP16). A Cm-PP16 interaction partner, Nt-PLASMODESMAL GERMIN-LIKE PROTEIN1 (Nt-PDGLP1) was identified and shown to be a PD-located component. Arabidopsis thaliana putative orthologs, PDGLP1 and PDGLP2, were identified; expression studies indicated that, postgermination, these proteins were preferentially expressed in the root system. The PDGLP1 signal peptide was shown to function in localization to the PD by a novel mechanism involving the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi secretory pathway. Overexpression of various tagged versions altered root meristem function, leading to reduced primary root but enhanced lateral root growth. This effect on root growth was corrected with an inability of these chimeric proteins to form stable PD-localized complexes. PDGLP1 and PDGLP2 appear to be involved in regulating primary root growth by controlling phloem-mediated allocation of resources between the primary and lateral root meristems.

  5. Ozone decreases spring root growth and root carbohydrate content in ponderosa pine the year following exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, C.P.; Hogsett, W.E.; Wessling, R.; Plocher, M.

    1991-01-01

    Storage carbohydrates are extremely important for new shoot and root development following dormancy or during periods of high stress. The hypothesis that ozone decreases carbohydrate storage and decreases new root growth during the year following exposure was investigated. The results suggest that (1) ponderosa pine seedlings exposed to 122 and 169 ppm hrs ozone for one season have significantly less root starch reserves available just prior to and during bud break the following year, and (2) spring root growth is decreased following ozone exposure. The carry-over effects of ozone stress may be important in long-lived perennial species which are annually subjected to ozone.

  6. Effects of microgravity on the growth of Lepidium roots.

    PubMed

    Antonsen, F; Johnsson, A

    1998-10-01

    The normal growth dynamics of plant roots is partly controlled by the gravitational force. In order to study the detailed growth behavior in absence of gravity, the growth of Lepidium sativum roots was recorded by time lapse photography at 1h intervals in a Spacelab ESA-experiment (IML-2). Plants were germinated and kept in microgravity during the experiments, while control roots were at 1 g with normal static gravistimulation. Extended image analyses allowed new information to be achieved about movements of all parts of the roots, extending earlier published results. Root contours were extracted from the images and divided into 0.6mm segments. Deviation angles were calculated for each root segment, both for the first 8-10 h (phase I) and for the last 6-8 h of the experiment (phase II). For phase I, the present analysis confirmed that the average square deviation increased linearly with time for roots in microgravity, while for roots under 1 g conditions it stayed constant. This was consistent with a random walk hypothesis for the bending pattern. In phase II, roots in microgravity stopped their spontaneous curvatures and showed more straight growth or even diminished the root curvatures that had occurred during phase I. Thus, the growth is distinctly different in the two phases and is thought to be controlled by autotropic reactions in phase II. Root hairs developed when the roots passed into phase II. During phase I, the root growth rates were equal in microgravity and on the ground (0.50 mm h-1 with SE 0.04 and 0.51 mm h-1 with SE 0.03, respectively). In phase II the growth rate on the ground was higher than in microgravity (1.44 mm h-1 with SE 0.10 and 1.07 mm h-1 with SE 0.04 in microgravity). Microgravity conditions, therefore, clearly affect Lepidium root growth: In phase I the bending pattern is random in contrast to the normal straight growth under 1g. In phase II the growth rate is reduced, as compared to the growth rate under 1 g.

  7. NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE INHIBITOR L-NAMEAFFECTS ARABIDOPSIS ROOT GROWTH, MORPHOLOGY AND MICROTUBULE ORGANIZATION.

    PubMed

    Yu A, Krasylenko; A I, Yemets; Ya B, Blume

    2017-10-05

    The presence of evolutionarily conserved NOS or NOS-like enzymes in land plants different than those in animals is still unclear, despite their activity has been revealed in cytosol and some organelles. At the same time, the emerging evidence for the importance of L-arginine-dependent pathways of NO synthesis in plant cells is still accumulating. The aim of our study was to reveal physiological effects on growth and differentiation processes and microtubular cytoskeleton organization of the competitive mammalian NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME. Thus, the treatment of Arabidopsis with L-NAME (50 μM-1 mM) caused dose- and time-dependent inhibition of primary roots growth. Moreover, the morphology of primary roots under the influence of L-NAME also underwent changes. L-NAME (>100 μM) induced the formation of novel over-elongated root hairs in shortened elongation zone, while in higher concentrations (500 μM) it caused a slight swelling of epidermal cells in differentiation zone. L-NAME also provoked microtubule reorganization in epidermal cells of different root growth zones. Thus, L-NAME at concentrations of 50 μM-1 mM induces cortical microtubules randomization and/or depolymerization in epidermal cells of the root apex, meristem, transition, elongation and differentiation zones after 2 h of treatment. Disordered microtubules in trichoblasts could initiate the formation of actively elongating root hairs that reveals longitudinal microtubules ensuring their active growth at 24 h of treatment. Therefore, L-NAME inhibits primary root growth, induces the differentiation processes in roots and reorganizes cortical microtubules in epidermal root cells suggesting the importance of L-arginine-dependent pathways of NO synthesis in plants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro Cultured Primary Roots Derived from Stem Segments of Cassava (Manihot esculenta) Can Behave Like Storage Organs

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Ricardo D.; Faloci, Mirta M.; Gonzalez, Ana M.; Mroginski, Luis A.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Cassava (Manihot esculenta) has three adventitious root types: primary and secondary fibrous roots, and storage roots. Different adventitious root types can also regenerate from in vitro cultured segments. The aim of this study was to investigate aspects of in vitro production of storage roots. Methods Morphological and anatomical analyses were performed to identify and differentiate each root type. Twenty-nine clones were assayed to determine the effect of genotype on the capacity to form storage roots in vitro. The effects of cytokinins and auxins on the formation of storage roots in vitro were also examined. Key Results Primary roots formed in vitro and in vivo had similar tissue kinds; however, storage roots formed in vitro exhibited physiological specialization for storing starch. The only consistent diagnostic feature between secondary fibrous and storage roots was their functional differentiation. Anatomical analysis of the storage roots formed in vitro showed that radial expansion as a consequence of massive proliferation and enlargement of parenchymatous cells occurred in the middle cortex, but not from cambial activity as in roots formed in vivo. Cortical expansion could be related to dilatation growth favoured by hormone treatments. Starch deposition of storage roots formed in vitro was confined to cortical tissue and occurred earlier than in storage roots formed in vivo. Auxin and cytokinin supplementation were absolutely required for in vitro storage root regeneration; these roots were not able to develop secondary growth, but formed a tissue competent for starch storing. MS medium with 5 % sucrose plus 0·54 μm 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 0·44 μm 6-benzylaminopurine was one of the most effective in stimulating the storage root formation. Genotypes differed significantly in their capacity to produce storage roots in vitro. Storage root formation was considerably affected by the segment's primary position and strongly

  9. Root growth during molar eruption in extant great apes.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Jay; Dean, Christopher; Ross, Sasha

    2009-01-01

    While there is gradually accumulating knowledge about molar crown formation and the timing of molar eruption in extant great apes, very little is known about root formation during the eruption process. We measured mandibular first and second molar root lengths in extant great ape osteological specimens that died while either the first or second molars were in the process of erupting. For most specimens, teeth were removed so that root lengths could be measured directly. When this was not possible, roots were measured radiographically. We were particularly interested in the variation in the lengths of first molar roots near the point of gingival emergence, so specimens were divided into early, middle and late phases of eruption based on the number of cusps that showed protein staining, with one or two cusps stained equated with immediate post-gingival emergence. For first molars at this stage, Gorilla has the longest roots, followed by Pongo and Pan. Variation in first molar mesial root lengths at this stage in Gorilla and Pan, which comprise the largest samples, is relatively low and represents no more than a few months of growth in both taxa. Knowledge of root length at first molar emergence permits an assessment of the contribution of root growth toward differences between great apes and humans in the age at first molar emergence. Root growth makes up a greater percentage of the time between birth and first molar emergence in humans than it does in any of the great apes.

  10. Root morphology and growth of bare-root seedlings of Oregon white oak

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Gould; Constance A. Harrington

    2009-01-01

    Root morphology and stem size were evaluated as predictors of height and basal-area growth (measured at groundline) of 1-1 Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana Dougl. ex Hook.) seedlings planted in raised beds with or without an additional irrigation treatment. Seedlings were classified into three root classes based on a visual assessment of the...

  11. Understanding the development of roots exposed to contaminants and the potential of plant-associated bacteria for optimization of growth.

    PubMed

    Remans, Tony; Thijs, Sofie; Truyens, Sascha; Weyens, Nele; Schellingen, Kerim; Keunen, Els; Gielen, Heidi; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2012-07-01

    Plant responses to the toxic effects of soil contaminants, such as excess metals or organic substances, have been studied mainly at physiological, biochemical and molecular levels, but the influence on root system architecture has received little attention. Nevertheless, the precise position, morphology and extent of roots can influence contaminant uptake. Here, data are discussed that aim to increase the molecular and ecological understanding of the influence of contaminants on root system architecture. Furthermore, the potential of plant-associated bacteria to influence root growth by their growth-promoting and stress-relieving capacities is explored. Root growth parameters of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in vertical agar plates are quantified. Mutants are used in a reverse genetics approach to identify molecular components underlying quantitative changes in root architecture after exposure to excess cadmium, copper or zinc. Plant-associated bacteria are isolated from contaminated environments, genotypically and phenotypically characterized, and used to test plant root growth improvement in the presence of contaminants. The molecular determinants of primary root growth inhibition and effects on lateral root density by cadmium were identified. A vertical split-root system revealed local effects of cadmium and copper on root development. However, systemic effects of zinc exposure on root growth reduced both the avoidance of contaminated areas and colonization of non-contaminated areas. The potential for growth promotion and contaminant degradation of plant-associated bacteria was demonstrated by improved root growth of inoculated plants exposed to 2,4-di-nitro-toluene (DNT) or cadmium. Knowledge concerning the specific influence of different contaminants on root system architecture and the molecular mechanisms by which this is achieved can be combined with the exploitation of plant-associated bacteria to influence root development and increase plant stress

  12. Understanding the development of roots exposed to contaminants and the potential of plant-associated bacteria for optimization of growth

    PubMed Central

    Remans, Tony; Thijs, Sofie; Truyens, Sascha; Weyens, Nele; Schellingen, Kerim; Keunen, Els; Gielen, Heidi; Cuypers, Ann; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2012-01-01

    Background and Scope Plant responses to the toxic effects of soil contaminants, such as excess metals or organic substances, have been studied mainly at physiological, biochemical and molecular levels, but the influence on root system architecture has received little attention. Nevertheless, the precise position, morphology and extent of roots can influence contaminant uptake. Here, data are discussed that aim to increase the molecular and ecological understanding of the influence of contaminants on root system architecture. Furthermore, the potential of plant-associated bacteria to influence root growth by their growth-promoting and stress-relieving capacities is explored. Methods Root growth parameters of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings grown in vertical agar plates are quantified. Mutants are used in a reverse genetics approach to identify molecular components underlying quantitative changes in root architecture after exposure to excess cadmium, copper or zinc. Plant-associated bacteria are isolated from contaminated environments, genotypically and phenotypically characterized, and used to test plant root growth improvement in the presence of contaminants. Key Results The molecular determinants of primary root growth inhibition and effects on lateral root density by cadmium were identified. A vertical split-root system revealed local effects of cadmium and copper on root development. However, systemic effects of zinc exposure on root growth reduced both the avoidance of contaminated areas and colonization of non-contaminated areas. The potential for growth promotion and contaminant degradation of plant-associated bacteria was demonstrated by improved root growth of inoculated plants exposed to 2,4-di-nitro-toluene (DNT) or cadmium. Conclusions Knowledge concerning the specific influence of different contaminants on root system architecture and the molecular mechanisms by which this is achieved can be combined with the exploitation of plant-associated bacteria to

  13. Nitrate Reductase of Primary Roots of Red Spruce Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Yandow, Tim S.; Klein, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity (NRA) was found in primary roots, but not in foliage of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) seedlings. Nitrate induced NRA:NH4+ did not induce and slightly depressed NRA in older seedlings. Induction required 8 hours and, once induced, NRA decreased slowly in the absence of exogenous NO3−. Seedlings were grown in perlite with a complete nutrient solution containing NH4+ to limit NR induction. Established seedlings were stressed with nutrient solutions at pH 3, 4, or 5 supplemented with Cl− salts of Al, Cd, Pb, or Zn each at two concentrations. NRA in primary root tips was measured at 2, 14, 28, and 42 days. NRA induction was greatest at pH 3, and remained high during the period of study. NRA induction at pH 4 was lower. Metal ions suppressed NRA at pH 3 and 5, but enhanced NRA at pH 4. It is concluded that acidity and soluble metals in the root environment of red spruce are unlikely to be important factors in nitrogen transformations in red spruce roots. PMID:16664891

  14. Aspen Sucker Production and Growth from Outplanted Root Cuttings

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Perala

    1978-01-01

    Aspen suckers from 1-m-long root cuttings survived and grew better than those from 12.5-cm-long cuttings. Sucker survival and growth were also inversely related to parent root diameter. Discusses the practical implications for aspen management.

  15. Root growth dynamics linked to above-ground growth in walnut (Juglans regia)

    PubMed Central

    Contador, Maria Loreto; Comas, Louise H.; Metcalf, Samuel G.; Stewart, William L.; Porris Gomez, Ignacio; Negron, Claudia; Lampinen, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Examination of plant growth below ground is relatively scant compared with that above ground, and is needed to understand whole-plant responses to the environment. This study examines whether the seasonal timing of fine root growth and the spatial distribution of this growth through the soil profile varies in response to canopy manipulation and soil temperature. Methods Plasticity in the seasonal timing and vertical distribution of root production in response to canopy and soil water manipulation was analysed in field-grown walnut (Juglans regia ‘Chandler’) using minirhizotron techniques. Key Results Root production in walnuts followed a unimodal curve, with one marked flush of root growth starting in mid-May, with a peak in mid-June. Root production declined later in the season, corresponding to increased soil temperature, as well as to the period of major carbohydrate allocation to reproduction. Canopy and soil moisture manipulation did not influence the timing of root production, but did influence the vertical distribution of roots through the soil profile. Water deficit appeared to promote root production in deeper soil layers for mining soil water. Canopy removal appeared to promote shallow root production. Conclusions The findings of this study add to growing evidence that root growth in many ecosystems follows a unimodal curve with one marked flush of root growth in coordination with the initial leaf flush of the season. Root vertical distribution appeared to have greater plasticity than timing of root production in this system, with temperature and/or carbohydrate competition constraining the timing of root growth. Effects on root distribution can have serious impacts on trees, with shallow rooting having negative impacts in years with limited soil water or positive impacts in years with wet springs, and deep rooting having positive impacts on soil water mining from deeper soil layers but negative impacts in years with wet springs

  16. Root growth dynamics linked to above-ground growth in walnut (Juglans regia).

    PubMed

    Contador, Maria Loreto; Comas, Louise H; Metcalf, Samuel G; Stewart, William L; Porris Gomez, Ignacio; Negron, Claudia; Lampinen, Bruce D

    2015-07-01

    Examination of plant growth below ground is relatively scant compared with that above ground, and is needed to understand whole-plant responses to the environment. This study examines whether the seasonal timing of fine root growth and the spatial distribution of this growth through the soil profile varies in response to canopy manipulation and soil temperature. Plasticity in the seasonal timing and vertical distribution of root production in response to canopy and soil water manipulation was analysed in field-grown walnut (Juglans regia 'Chandler') using minirhizotron techniques. Root production in walnuts followed a unimodal curve, with one marked flush of root growth starting in mid-May, with a peak in mid-June. Root production declined later in the season, corresponding to increased soil temperature, as well as to the period of major carbohydrate allocation to reproduction. Canopy and soil moisture manipulation did not influence the timing of root production, but did influence the vertical distribution of roots through the soil profile. Water deficit appeared to promote root production in deeper soil layers for mining soil water. Canopy removal appeared to promote shallow root production. The findings of this study add to growing evidence that root growth in many ecosystems follows a unimodal curve with one marked flush of root growth in coordination with the initial leaf flush of the season. Root vertical distribution appeared to have greater plasticity than timing of root production in this system, with temperature and/or carbohydrate competition constraining the timing of root growth. Effects on root distribution can have serious impacts on trees, with shallow rooting having negative impacts in years with limited soil water or positive impacts in years with wet springs, and deep rooting having positive impacts on soil water mining from deeper soil layers but negative impacts in years with wet springs. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press

  17. Modeling the Hydraulics of Root Growth in Three Dimensions with Phloem Water Sources1[C][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wiegers, Brandy S.; Cheer, Angela Y.; Silk, Wendy K.

    2009-01-01

    Primary growth is characterized by cell expansion facilitated by water uptake generating hydrostatic (turgor) pressure to inflate the cell, stretching the rigid cell walls. The multiple source theory of root growth hypothesizes that root growth involves transport of water both from the soil surrounding the growth zone and from the mature tissue higher in the root via phloem and protophloem. Here, protophloem water sources are used as boundary conditions in a classical, three-dimensional model of growth-sustaining water potentials in primary roots. The model predicts small radial gradients in water potential, with a significant longitudinal gradient. The results improve the agreement of theory with empirical studies for water potential in the primary growth zone of roots of maize (Zea mays). A sensitivity analysis quantifies the functional importance of apical phloem differentiation in permitting growth and reveals that the presence of phloem water sources makes the growth-sustaining water relations of the root relatively insensitive to changes in root radius and hydraulic conductivity. Adaptation to drought and other environmental stresses is predicted to involve more apical differentiation of phloem and/or higher phloem delivery rates to the growth zone. PMID:19542299

  18. Root-Specific Reduction of Cytokinin Causes Enhanced Root Growth, Drought Tolerance, and Leaf Mineral Enrichment in Arabidopsis and Tobacco[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Tomáš; Nehnevajova, Erika; Köllmer, Ireen; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Krämer, Ute; Schmülling, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Optimizing root system architecture can overcome yield limitations in crop plants caused by water or nutrient shortages. Classic breeding approaches are difficult because the trait is governed by many genes and is difficult to score. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with enhanced root-specific degradation of the hormone cytokinin, a negative regulator of root growth. These transgenic plants form a larger root system, whereas growth and development of the shoot are similar. Elongation of the primary root, root branching, and root biomass formation were increased by up to 60% in transgenic lines, increasing the root-to-shoot ratio. We thus demonstrated that a single dominant gene could regulate a complex trait, root growth. Moreover, we showed that cytokinin regulates root growth in a largely organ-autonomous fashion that is consistent with its dual role as a hormone with both paracrine and long-distance activities. Transgenic plants had a higher survival rate after severe drought treatment. The accumulation of several elements, including S, P, Mn, Mg, Zn, as well as Cd from a contaminated soil, was significantly increased in shoots. Under conditions of sulfur or magnesium deficiency, leaf chlorophyll content was less affected in transgenic plants, demonstrating the physiological relevance of shoot element accumulation. Our approach might contribute to improve drought tolerance, nutrient efficiency, and nutrient content of crop plants. PMID:21148816

  19. Analysis of changes in relative elemental growth rate patterns in the elongation zone of Arabidopsis roots upon gravistimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Although Arabidopsis is an important system for studying root physiology, the localized growth patterns of its roots have not been well defined, particularly during tropic responses. In order to characterize growth rate profiles along the apex of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh (ecotype Columbia) we applied small charcoal particles to the root surface and analyzed their displacement during growth using an automated video digitizer system with custom software for tracking the markers. When growing vertically, the maximum elongation rate occurred 481 +/- 50 microns back from the extreme tip of the root (tip of root cap), and the elongation zone extended back to 912 +/- 137 microns. The distal elongation zone (DEZ) has previously been described as the apical region of the elongation zone in which the relative elemental growth rate (REGR) is < or = 30% of the peak rate in the central elongation zone. By this definition, our data indicate that the basal limit of the DEZ was located 248 +/- 30 microns from the root tip. However, after gravistimulation, the growth patterns of the root changed. Within the first hour of graviresponse, the basal limit of the DEZ and the position of peak REGR shifted apically on the upper flank of the root. This was due to a combination of increased growth in the DEZ and growth inhibition in the central elongation zone. On the lower flank, the basal limit of the DEZ shifted basipetally as the REGR decreased. These factors set up the gradient of growth rate across the root, which drives curvature.

  20. Analysis of changes in relative elemental growth rate patterns in the elongation zone of Arabidopsis roots upon gravistimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1998-01-01

    Although Arabidopsis is an important system for studying root physiology, the localized growth patterns of its roots have not been well defined, particularly during tropic responses. In order to characterize growth rate profiles along the apex of primary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh (ecotype Columbia) we applied small charcoal particles to the root surface and analyzed their displacement during growth using an automated video digitizer system with custom software for tracking the markers. When growing vertically, the maximum elongation rate occurred 481 +/- 50 microns back from the extreme tip of the root (tip of root cap), and the elongation zone extended back to 912 +/- 137 microns. The distal elongation zone (DEZ) has previously been described as the apical region of the elongation zone in which the relative elemental growth rate (REGR) is < or = 30% of the peak rate in the central elongation zone. By this definition, our data indicate that the basal limit of the DEZ was located 248 +/- 30 microns from the root tip. However, after gravistimulation, the growth patterns of the root changed. Within the first hour of graviresponse, the basal limit of the DEZ and the position of peak REGR shifted apically on the upper flank of the root. This was due to a combination of increased growth in the DEZ and growth inhibition in the central elongation zone. On the lower flank, the basal limit of the DEZ shifted basipetally as the REGR decreased. These factors set up the gradient of growth rate across the root, which drives curvature.

  1. Root growth and development in response to CO2 enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Frank P., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    A non-destructive technique (minirhizotron observation tubes) was used to assess the effects of CO2 enrichment on root growth and development in experimental plots in a scrub oak-palmetto community at the Kennedy Space Center. Potential effects of CO2 enrichment on plants have a global significance in light of concerns over increasing CO2 concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere. The study at Kennedy Space Center focused on aboveground physiological responses (photosynthetic efficiency and water use efficiency), effects on process rates (litter decomposition and nutrient turnover), and belowground responses of the plants. Belowground dynamics are an exceptionally important component of total plant response but are frequently ignored due to methodological difficulties. Most methods used to examine root growth and development are destructive and, therefore, severely compromise results. Minirhizotrons allow nondestructive observation and quantification of the same soil volume and roots through time. Root length density and root phenology were evaluated for CO2 effects with this nondestructive technique.

  2. Growth and development of the root apical meristem.

    PubMed

    Perilli, Serena; Di Mambro, Riccardo; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2012-02-01

    A key question in plant developmental biology is how cell division and cell differentiation are balanced to modulate organ growth and shape organ size. In recent years, several advances have been made in understanding how this balance is achieved during root development. In the Arabidopsis root meristem, stem cells in the apical region of the meristem self-renew and produce daughter cells that differentiate in the distal meristem transition zone. Several factors have been implicated in controlling the different functional zones of the root meristem to modulate root growth; among these, plant hormones have been shown to play a main role. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding the role of hormone signaling and transcriptional networks in regulating root development.

  3. Root growth inhibition by NH(4)(+) in Arabidopsis is mediated by the root tip and is linked to NH(4)(+) efflux and GMPase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Li, Bao-Hai; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Wei-Ming

    2010-09-01

    Root growth in higher plants is sensitive to excess ammonium (NH(4)(+)). Our study shows that contact of NH(4)(+) with the primary root tip is both necessary and sufficient to the development of arrested root growth under NH(4)(+) nutrition in Arabidopsis. We show that cell elongation and not cell division is the principal target in the NH(4)(+) inhibition of primary root growth. Mutant and expression analyses using DR5:GUS revealed that the growth inhibition is furthermore independent of auxin and ethylene signalling. NH(4)(+) fluxes along the primary root, measured using the Scanning Ion-selective Electrode Technique, revealed a significant stimulation of NH(4)(+) efflux at the elongation zone following treatment with elevated NH(4)(+), coincident with the inhibition of root elongation. Stimulation of NH(4)(+) efflux and inhibition of cell expansion were significantly more pronounced in the NH(4)(+)-hypersensitive mutant vtc1-1, deficient in the enzyme GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase). We conclude that both restricted transmembrane NH(4)(+) fluxes and proper functioning of GMPase in roots are critical to minimizing the severity of the NH(4)(+) toxicity response in Arabidopsis.

  4. Genetic improvement for root growth angle to enhance crop production

    PubMed Central

    Uga, Yusaku; Kitomi, Yuka; Ishikawa, Satoru; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The root system is an essential organ for taking up water and nutrients and anchoring shoots to the ground. On the other hand, the root system has rarely been regarded as breeding target, possibly because it is more laborious and time-consuming to evaluate roots (which require excavation) in a large number of plants than aboveground tissues. The root growth angle (RGA), which determines the direction of root elongation in the soil, affects the area in which roots capture water and nutrients. In this review, we describe the significance of RGA as a potential trait to improve crop production, and the physiological and molecular mechanisms that regulate RGA. We discuss the prospects for breeding to improve RGA based on current knowledge of quantitative trait loci for RGA in rice. PMID:26069440

  5. Enhancing auxin accumulation in maize root tips improves root growth and dwarfs plant height.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoxia; Zhang, Xinrui; Zhao, Yajie; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Guangfeng; Peng, Zhenghua; Zhang, Juren

    2017-05-12

    Maize is a globally important food, feed crop and raw material for the food and energy industry. Plant architecture optimization plays important roles in maize yield improvement. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are important for regulating auxin spatiotemporal asymmetric distribution in multiple plant developmental processes. In this study, ZmPIN1a overexpression in maize increased the number of lateral roots and inhibited their elongation, forming a developed root system with longer seminal roots and denser lateral roots. ZmPIN1a overexpression reduced plant height, internode length and ear height. This modification of the maize phenotype increased the yield under high-density cultivation conditions, and the developed root system improved plant resistance to drought, lodging and a low-phosphate environment. IAA concentration, transport capacity determination and application of external IAA indicated that ZmPIN1a overexpression led to increased IAA transport from shoot to root. The increase in auxin in the root enabled the plant to allocate more carbohydrates to the roots, enhanced the growth of the root and improved plant resistance to environmental stress. These findings demonstrate that maize plant architecture can be improved by root breeding to create an ideal phenotype for further yield increases. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. High-throughput phenotyping of root growth dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Fisahn, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Plant organ phenotyping by noninvasive video imaging techniques provides a powerful tool to assess physiological traits, circadian and diurnal rhythms, and biomass production. In particular, growth of individual plant organs is known to exhibit a high plasticity and occurs as a result of the interaction between various endogenous and environmental processes. Thus, any investigation aiming to unravel mechanisms that determine plant or organ growth has to accurately control and document the environmental growth conditions. Here we describe challenges in establishing a recently developed plant root monitoring platform (PlaRoM) specially suited for noninvasive high-throughput plant growth analysis with highest emphasis on the detailed documentation of capture time, as well as light and temperature conditions. Furthermore, we discuss the experimental procedure for measuring root elongation kinetics and key points that must be considered in such measurements. PlaRoM consists of a robotized imaging platform enclosed in a custom designed phytochamber and a root extension profiling software application. This platform has been developed for multi-parallel recordings of root growth phenotypes of up to 50 individual seedlings over several days, with high spatial and temporal resolution. Two Petri dishes are mounted on a vertical sample stage in a custom designed phytochamber that provides exact temperature control. A computer-controlled positioning unit moves these Petri dishes in small increments and enables continuous screening of the surface under a binocular microscope. Detection of the root tip is achieved by applying thresholds on image pixel data and verifying the neighbourhood for each dark pixel. The growth parameters are visualized as position over time or growth rate over time graphs and averaged over consecutive days, light-dark periods and 24 h day periods. This setup enables the investigation of root extension profiles of different genotypes in various growth

  7. Impact of axial root growth angles on nitrogen acquisition in maize depends on environmental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dathe, A.; Postma, J. A.; Postma-Blaauw, M. B.; Lynch, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds and Aims Crops with reduced requirement for nitrogen (N) fertilizer would have substantial benefits in developed nations, while improving food security in developing nations. This study employs the functional structural plant model SimRoot to test the hypothesis that variation in the growth angles of axial roots of maize (Zea mays L.) is an important determinant of N capture. Methods Six phenotypes contrasting in axial root growth angles were modelled for 42 d at seven soil nitrate levels from 10 to 250 kg ha−1 in a sand and a silt loam, and five precipitation regimes ranging from 0·5× to 1·5× of an ambient rainfall pattern. Model results were compared with soil N measurements of field sites with silt loam and loamy sand textures. Key Results For optimal nitrate uptake, root foraging must coincide with nitrate availability in the soil profile, which depends on soil type and precipitation regime. The benefit of specific root architectures for efficient N uptake increases with decreasing soil N content, while the effect of soil type increases with increasing soil N level. Extreme root architectures are beneficial under extreme environmental conditions. Extremely shallow root systems perform well under reduced precipitation, but perform poorly with ambient and greater precipitation. Dimorphic phenotypes with normal or shallow seminal and very steep nodal roots performed well in all scenarios, and consistently outperformed the steep phenotypes. Nitrate uptake increased under reduced leaching conditions in the silt loam and with low precipitation. Conclusions Results support the hypothesis that root growth angles are primary determinants of N acquisition in maize. With decreasing soil N status, optimal angles resulted in 15–50 % greater N acquisition over 42 d. Optimal root phenotypes for N capture varied with soil and precipitation regimes, suggesting that genetic selection for root phenotypes could be tailored to specific environments. PMID

  8. Impact of axial root growth angles on nitrogen acquisition in maize depends on environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Dathe, A; Postma, J A; Postma-Blaauw, M B; Lynch, J P

    2016-09-01

    Crops with reduced requirement for nitrogen (N) fertilizer would have substantial benefits in developed nations, while improving food security in developing nations. This study employs the functional structural plant model SimRoot to test the hypothesis that variation in the growth angles of axial roots of maize (Zea mays L.) is an important determinant of N capture. Six phenotypes contrasting in axial root growth angles were modelled for 42 d at seven soil nitrate levels from 10 to 250 kg ha(-1) in a sand and a silt loam, and five precipitation regimes ranging from 0·5× to 1·5× of an ambient rainfall pattern. Model results were compared with soil N measurements of field sites with silt loam and loamy sand textures. For optimal nitrate uptake, root foraging must coincide with nitrate availability in the soil profile, which depends on soil type and precipitation regime. The benefit of specific root architectures for efficient N uptake increases with decreasing soil N content, while the effect of soil type increases with increasing soil N level. Extreme root architectures are beneficial under extreme environmental conditions. Extremely shallow root systems perform well under reduced precipitation, but perform poorly with ambient and greater precipitation. Dimorphic phenotypes with normal or shallow seminal and very steep nodal roots performed well in all scenarios, and consistently outperformed the steep phenotypes. Nitrate uptake increased under reduced leaching conditions in the silt loam and with low precipitation. Results support the hypothesis that root growth angles are primary determinants of N acquisition in maize. With decreasing soil N status, optimal angles resulted in 15-50 % greater N acquisition over 42 d. Optimal root phenotypes for N capture varied with soil and precipitation regimes, suggesting that genetic selection for root phenotypes could be tailored to specific environments. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  9. The effect of ethylene on root growth of Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, M. C.; Feldman, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    The control of primary root growth in Zea mays cv. Merit by ethylene was examined. At applied concentrations of ethylene equal to or greater than 0.1 microliter L-1, root elongation during 24 h was inhibited. The half-maximal response occurred at 0.6 microliter L-1 and the response saturated at 6 microliters L-1. Inhibition of elongation took place within 20 min. However, after ethylene was removed, elongation recovered to control values within 15 min. Root elongation was also inhibited by green light. The inhibition caused by a 24-h exposure to ethylene was restricted to the elongating region just behind the apex, with inhibition of cortical cell elongation being the primary contributor to the effect. Based on use of 2,5-norbornadiene, a gaseous competitive inhibitor of ethylene, it was concluded that endogenous ethylene normally inhibits root elongation.

  10. The effect of ethylene on root growth of Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, M. C.; Feldman, L. J.

    1988-01-01

    The control of primary root growth in Zea mays cv. Merit by ethylene was examined. At applied concentrations of ethylene equal to or greater than 0.1 microliter L-1, root elongation during 24 h was inhibited. The half-maximal response occurred at 0.6 microliter L-1 and the response saturated at 6 microliters L-1. Inhibition of elongation took place within 20 min. However, after ethylene was removed, elongation recovered to control values within 15 min. Root elongation was also inhibited by green light. The inhibition caused by a 24-h exposure to ethylene was restricted to the elongating region just behind the apex, with inhibition of cortical cell elongation being the primary contributor to the effect. Based on use of 2,5-norbornadiene, a gaseous competitive inhibitor of ethylene, it was concluded that endogenous ethylene normally inhibits root elongation.

  11. Helical growth trajectories in plant roots interacting with stiff barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbode, Sharon; Noar, Roslyn; Harrison, Maria

    2009-03-01

    Plant roots successfully navigate heterogeneous soil environments with varying nutrient and water concentrations, as well as a variety of stiff obstacles. While it is thought that the ability of roots to penetrate into a stiff lower soil layer is important for soil erosion, little is known about how a root actually responds to a rigid interface. We have developed a laser sheet imaging technique for recording the 3D growth dynamics of plant roots interacting with stiff barriers. We find that a root encountering an angled interface does not grow in a straight line along the surface, but instead follows a helical trajectory. These experiments build on the pioneering studies of roots grown on a tilted 2D surface, which reported ``root waving,'' a similar curved pattern thought to be caused by the root's sensitivity to both gravity and the rigid surface on which it is grown. Our measurements extend these results to the more physiologically relevant case of 3D growth, where the spiral trajectory can be altered by tuning the relative strengths of the gravity and touch stimuli, providing some intuition for the physical mechanism driving it.

  12. Radial force development during root growth measured by photoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Evelyne; Hartmann, Christian; Genet, Patricia

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical and topological properties of a soil like the global porosity and the distribution of void sizes greatly affect the development of a plant root, which in turn affects the shoot development. In particular, plant roots growing in heterogeneous medium like sandy soils or cracked substrates have to adapt their morphology and exert radial forces depending on the pore size in which they penetrate. We propose a model experiment in which a pivot root (chick-pea seeds) of millimetric diameter has to grow in a size-controlled gap δ (δ ranging 0.5-2.3 mm) between two photoelastic grains. By time-lapse imaging, we continuously monitored the root growth and the development of optical fringes in the photoelastic neighbouring grains when the root enters the gap. Thus we measured simultaneously and in situ the root morphological changes (length and diameter growth rates, circumnutation) as well as the radial forces the root exerts. Radial forces were increasing in relation with gap constriction and experiment duration but a levelling of the force was not observed, even after 5 days and for narrow gaps. The inferred mechanical stress was consistent with the turgor pressure of compressed cells. Therefore our set-up could be a basis for testing mechanical models of cellular growth.

  13. Physical effects of soil drying on roots and crop growth.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Andrew P; Whalley, W Richard

    2009-01-01

    The nature and effect of the stresses on root growth in crops subject to drying is reviewed. Drought is a complex stress, impacting on plant growth in a number of interacting ways. In response, there are a number of ways in which the growing plant is able to adapt to or alleviate these stresses. It is suggested that the most significant opportunity for progress in overcoming drought stress and increasing crop yields is to understand and exploit the conditions in soil by which plant roots are able to maximize their use of resources. This may not be straightforward, with multiple stresses, sometimes competing functions of roots, and conditions which impact upon roots very differently depending upon what soil, what depth or what stage of growth the root is at. Several processes and the interaction between these processes in soil have been neglected. It is our view that drought is not a single, simple stress and that agronomic practice which seeks to adapt to climate change must take account of the multiple facets of both the stress induced by insufficient water as well as other interacting stresses such as heat, disease, soil strength, low nutrient status, and even hypoxia. The potential for adaptation is probably large, however. The possible changes in stress as a result of the climate change expected under UK conditions are assessed and it appears possible that wet warm winters will impact on root growth as much if not more than dry warm summers.

  14. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning

    PubMed Central

    Vacheron, Jordan; Desbrosses, Guilhem; Bouffaud, Marie-Lara; Touraine, Bruno; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Muller, Daniel; Legendre, Laurent; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2013-01-01

    The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and development of root hairs. PGPR also modify root functioning, improve plant nutrition and influence the physiology of the whole plant. Recent results provided first clues as to how PGPR signals could trigger these plant responses. Whether local and/or systemic, the plant molecular pathways involved remain often unknown. From an ecological point of view, it emerged that PGPR form coherent functional groups, whose rhizosphere ecology is influenced by a myriad of abiotic and biotic factors in natural and agricultural soils, and these factors can in turn modulate PGPR effects on roots. In this paper, we address novel knowledge and gaps on PGPR modes of action and signals, and highlight recent progress on the links between plant morphological and physiological effects induced by PGPR. We also show the importance of taking into account the size, diversity, and gene expression patterns of PGPR assemblages in the rhizosphere to better understand their impact on plant growth and functioning. Integrating mechanistic and ecological knowledge on PGPR populations in soil will be a prerequisite to develop novel management strategies for sustainable agriculture. PMID:24062756

  15. Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and root system functioning.

    PubMed

    Vacheron, Jordan; Desbrosses, Guilhem; Bouffaud, Marie-Lara; Touraine, Bruno; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Muller, Daniel; Legendre, Laurent; Wisniewski-Dyé, Florence; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2013-09-17

    The rhizosphere supports the development and activity of a huge and diversified microbial community, including microorganisms capable to promote plant growth. Among the latter, plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) colonize roots of monocots and dicots, and enhance plant growth by direct and indirect mechanisms. Modification of root system architecture by PGPR implicates the production of phytohormones and other signals that lead, mostly, to enhanced lateral root branching and development of root hairs. PGPR also modify root functioning, improve plant nutrition and influence the physiology of the whole plant. Recent results provided first clues as to how PGPR signals could trigger these plant responses. Whether local and/or systemic, the plant molecular pathways involved remain often unknown. From an ecological point of view, it emerged that PGPR form coherent functional groups, whose rhizosphere ecology is influenced by a myriad of abiotic and biotic factors in natural and agricultural soils, and these factors can in turn modulate PGPR effects on roots. In this paper, we address novel knowledge and gaps on PGPR modes of action and signals, and highlight recent progress on the links between plant morphological and physiological effects induced by PGPR. We also show the importance of taking into account the size, diversity, and gene expression patterns of PGPR assemblages in the rhizosphere to better understand their impact on plant growth and functioning. Integrating mechanistic and ecological knowledge on PGPR populations in soil will be a prerequisite to develop novel management strategies for sustainable agriculture.

  16. Extensive tissue-specific transcriptomic plasticity in maize primary roots upon water deficit

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Lithio, Andrew; Brandt, Ronny; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is the most important environmental constraint severely limiting global crop growth and productivity. This study investigated early transcriptome changes in maize (Zea mays L.) primary root tissues in response to moderate water deficit conditions by RNA-Sequencing. Differential gene expression analyses revealed a high degree of plasticity of the water deficit response. The activity status of genes (active/inactive) was determined by a Bayesian hierarchical model. In total, 70% of expressed genes were constitutively active in all tissues. In contrast, <3% (50 genes) of water deficit-responsive genes (1915) were consistently regulated in all tissues, while >75% (1501 genes) were specifically regulated in a single root tissue. Water deficit-responsive genes were most numerous in the cortex of the mature root zone and in the elongation zone. The most prominent functional categories among differentially expressed genes in all tissues were ‘transcriptional regulation’ and ‘hormone metabolism’, indicating global reprogramming of cellular metabolism as an adaptation to water deficit. Additionally, the most significant transcriptomic changes in the root tip were associated with cell wall reorganization, leading to continued root growth despite water deficit conditions. This study provides insight into tissue-specific water deficit responses and will be a resource for future genetic analyses and breeding strategies to develop more drought-tolerant maize cultivars. PMID:26463995

  17. Determination of zinc oxide nanoparticles toxicity in root growth in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Meppaloor G; Chung, Ill Min

    2016-09-01

    The effect of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) was studied in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings under in vitro exposure conditions. To avoid precipitation of nanoparticles, the seedlings were grown in half strength semisolid Murashige and Skoog medium containing 0, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 500 mg L(-1) of ZnONPs. Analysis of zinc (Zn) content showed significant increase in roots. In vivo detection using fluorescent probe Zynpyr-1 indicated accumulation of Zn in primary and lateral root tips. All concentrations of ZnONPs significantly reduced root growth. However, significant decrease in shoot growth was observed only after exposure to 400 and 500 mg L(-1) of ZnONPs. The reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation levels significantly increased in roots. Significant increase in cell-wall bound peroxidase activity was observed after exposure to 500 mg L(-1) of ZnONPs. Histochemical staining with phloroglucinol-HCl showed lignification of root cells upon exposure to 500 mg L(-1) of ZnONPs. Treatment with propidium iodide indicated loss of cell viability in root tips of wheat seedlings. These results suggest that redox imbalances, lignification and cell death has resulted in reduction of root growth in wheat seedlings exposed to ZnONPs nanoparticles.

  18. Impact of copper oxide nanoparticles exposure on Arabidopsis thaliana growth, root system development, root lignificaion, and molecular level changes.

    PubMed

    Nair, Prakash M Gopalakrishnan; Chung, Ill Min

    2014-11-01

    The effect of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) on physiological and molecular level responses were studied in Arabidopsis thaliana. The seedlings were exposed to different concentrations of CuONPs (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L) for 21 days in half strength Murashige and Skoog medium. The plant biomass significantly reduced under different concentrations (2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L) of CuONPs stress. Exposure to 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L of CuONPs has resulted in significant reduction of total chlorophyll content. The anthocyanin content significantly increased upon exposure to 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg/L of CuONPs. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed upon exposure to 5, 10, and 20 mg/L of CuONPs and amino acid proline content was significantly high in plants exposed to 10 and 20 mg/L of CuONPs. Significant reduction in root elongation was observed upon exposure to 0.5-100 mg/L of CuONPs for 21 days. Exposure to CuONPs has resulted in retardation of primary root growth, enhanced lateral root formation, and also resulted in loss of root gravitropism. Staining with phloroglucionol detected the deposition of lignin in CuONPs-treated roots. Histochemical staining of leaves and roots of CuONPs-exposed plants with nitroblue tetrazolium and 3'3'-diaminobenzidine showed a concentration-dependant increase in superoxide and hydrogen peroxide formation in leaves and roots of CuONPs-exposed plants. Cytotoxicity was observed in root tips of CuONPs-exposed plants as evidenced by increased propidium iodide staining. Real-time PCR analysis showed significant induction of genes related to oxidative stress responses, sulfur assimilation, glutathione, and proline biosynthesis under CuONPs stress.

  19. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  20. Cell Cycle Modulation in the Response of the Primary Root of Arabidopsis to Salt Stress1

    PubMed Central

    West, Gerrit; Inzé, Dirk; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Salt stress inhibits plant growth and development. We investigated the importance of cell cycle regulation in mediating the primary root growth response of Arabidopsis to salt stress. When seedlings were transferred to media with increasing concentrations of NaCl, root growth rate was progressively reduced. At day 3 after transfer of seedlings to growth medium containing 0.5% NaCl the primary roots grew at a constant rate well below that prior to the transfer, whereas those transferred to control medium kept accelerating. Kinematic analysis revealed that the growth reduction of the stressed roots was due to a decrease in cell production and a smaller mature cell length. Surprisingly, average cell cycle duration was not affected. Hence, the reduced cell production was due to a smaller number of dividing cells, i.e. a meristem size reduction. To analyze the mechanism of meristem size adaptation prior to day 3, we investigated the short-term cell cycle events following transfer to saline medium. Directly after transfer cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity and CYCB1;2 promoter activity were transiently reduced. Because protein levels of both CDKA;1 and CDKB1;1 were not affected, the temporary inhibition of mitotic activity that allows adaptation to the stress condition is most likely mediated by posttranslational control of CDK activity. Thus, the adaptation to salt stress involves two phases: first, a rapid transient inhibition of the cell cycle that results in fewer cells remaining in the meristem. When the meristem reaches the appropriate size for the given conditions, cell cycle duration returns to its default. PMID:15181207

  1. Mutations in exocyst complex subunit SEC6 gene impaired polar auxin transport and PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis primary root.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoyun; Feng, Yihong; Liu, Yulong; Bao, Yiqun

    2016-09-01

    Polar auxin transport, which is critical for land plant pattern formation and directional growth, is largely depended on asymmetric distribution of PIN proteins at the plasma membrane (PM). Endocytosis and recycling processes play important roles in regulating PIN protein distribution and abundance at the PM. Two subunits (SEC8, EXO70A1) of exocyst, an octameric vesicle-tethering complex, have been reported to be involved in PIN protein recycling in Arabidopsis. However, the function of exocyst complex in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport remains incompletely understood. In this study, we utilized two SEC6 down-regulation mutants (PRsec6-1 and PRsec6-2) to investigate the role of exocyst subunit SEC6 in the primary root development, polar auxin transport and PIN proteins recycling. We found that in PRsec6 mutants: 1. Primary root growth was retarded, and lateral root initiation were compromised. 2. Primary roots were sensitive to exogenous auxin 1-napthalene acetic acid (NAA) but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxy (2.4-D). 3. Recycling of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins from the Brefeldin A (BFA) compartment to the PM was delayed. 4. Vesicles accumulated in the primary root tip cells, especially accumulated in the cytosol closed to the PM. These results further demonstrated that the exocyst complex plays an important role in PIN protein recycling and polar auxin transport in Arabidopsis primary root. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Correlations between polyamine ratios and growth patterns in seedling roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H. J.; Galston, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The levels of putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine and spermine were determined in seedling roots of pea, tomato, millet and corn, as well as in corn coleoptiles and pea internodes. In all roots, putrescine content increased as elongation progressed, and the putrescine/spermine ratio closely paralleled the sigmoid growth curve up until the time of lateral root initiation. Spermidine and spermine were most abundant near the apices and declined progressively with increasing age of the cells. In the zone of differentiation of root hairs in pea roots, putrescine rose progressively with increasing age, while cadaverine declined. In both pea internodes and corn coleoptiles, the putrescine/spermidine ratio rises with increasing age and elongation. Thus, a block in the conversion of the diamine putrescine to the triamine spermidine may be an important step in the change from cell division to cell elongation.

  3. Correlations between polyamine ratios and growth patterns in seedling roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, H. J.; Galston, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    The levels of putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine and spermine were determined in seedling roots of pea, tomato, millet and corn, as well as in corn coleoptiles and pea internodes. In all roots, putrescine content increased as elongation progressed, and the putrescine/spermine ratio closely paralleled the sigmoid growth curve up until the time of lateral root initiation. Spermidine and spermine were most abundant near the apices and declined progressively with increasing age of the cells. In the zone of differentiation of root hairs in pea roots, putrescine rose progressively with increasing age, while cadaverine declined. In both pea internodes and corn coleoptiles, the putrescine/spermidine ratio rises with increasing age and elongation. Thus, a block in the conversion of the diamine putrescine to the triamine spermidine may be an important step in the change from cell division to cell elongation.

  4. Phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis mutants: quantitative analysis of root growth.

    PubMed

    Doerner, Peter

    2008-03-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe growth of plant roots is very easy to measure and is particularly straightforward in Arabidopsis thaliana, because the increase in organ size is essentially restricted to one dimension. The precise measurement of root apical growth can be used to accurately determine growth activity (the rate of growth at a given time) during development in mutants, transgenic backgrounds, or in response to experimental treatments. Root growth is measured in a number of ways, the simplest of which is to grow the seedlings in a Petri dish and record the position of the advancing root tip at appropriate time points. The increase in root length is measured with a ruler and the data are entered into Microsoft Excel for analysis. When dealing with large numbers of seedlings, however, this procedure can be tedious, as well as inaccurate. An alternative approach, described in this protocol, uses "snapshots" of the growing plants, which are taken using gel-documentation equipment (i.e., a video camera with a frame-grabber unit, now commonly used to capture images from ethidium-bromide-stained electrophoresis gels). The images are analyzed using publicly available software (NIH-Image), which allows the user simply to cut and paste data into Microsoft Excel.

  5. Arabidopsis alcohol dehydrogenase expression in both shoots and roots is conditioned by root growth environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. J.; Ferl, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Arabidopsis Adh (alcohol dehydrogenase) gene is constitutively expressed at low levels in the roots of young plants grown on agar media, and that the expression level is greatly induced by anoxic or hypoxic stresses. We questioned whether the agar medium itself created an anaerobic environment for the roots upon their growing into the gel. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression driven by the Adh promoter was examined by growing transgenic Arabidopsis plants in different growing systems. Whereas roots grown on horizontal-positioned plates showed high Adh/GUS expression levels, roots from vertical-positioned plates had no Adh/GUS expression. Additional results indicate that growth on vertical plates closely mimics the Adh/GUS expression observed for soil-grown seedlings, and that growth on horizontal plates results in induction of high Adh/GUS expression that is consistent with hypoxic or anoxic conditions within the agar of the root zone. Adh/GUS expression in the shoot apex is also highly induced by root penetration of the agar medium. This induction of Adh/GUS in shoot apex and roots is due, at least in part, to mechanisms involving Ca2+ signal transduction.

  6. AUXIN AND GROWTH OF EXCISED ROOTS OF Bryophyllum calycinum

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, William J.; Hervey, Annette

    1969-01-01

    Exogenous auxin (α-naphthalene acetic acid, indole acetic acid, or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) was essential for the growth of single excised root tips of Bryophyllum calycinum in 50 ml of a mineral salt-sucrose medium supplemented with vitamins. Large inocula with a dry weight of 2.0 mg or more grew with no auxin added to the medium. Evidence for the synthesis of auxin by the excised roots grown from the larger inocula is presented. Leaching of auxin from single root tips cultivated in 15 or 50 ml of basal medium is considered to account for their failure to grow. Images PMID:16591793

  7. AUXIN AND GROWTH OF EXCISED ROOTS OF Bryophyllum calycinum.

    PubMed

    Robbins, W J; Hervey, A

    1969-10-01

    Exogenous auxin (alpha-naphthalene acetic acid, indole acetic acid, or 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) was essential for the growth of single excised root tips of Bryophyllum calycinum in 50 ml of a mineral salt-sucrose medium supplemented with vitamins. Large inocula with a dry weight of 2.0 mg or more grew with no auxin added to the medium. Evidence for the synthesis of auxin by the excised roots grown from the larger inocula is presented. Leaching of auxin from single root tips cultivated in 15 or 50 ml of basal medium is considered to account for their failure to grow.

  8. Biocompatibility of various formula root filling materials for primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Ding, Shinn-Jyh; Kao, Chia-Tze

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different materials used in primary root canal fillings on the cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell lines. The experimental group contained six different types of root canal filling materials, including zinc oxide (ZnO) + eugenol + formocresol (FC), Ca(OH)(2) + FC, Ca(OH)(2) + Iodoform, Ca(OH)(2) + Iodoform + camphorated parachlorophenol (CPC), Ca(OH)(2) + CPC, and Vitapex. Cell viability tests were performed using tetrazolium bromide colorimetric (MTT) assay on human osteosacorma cell lines (U2OS). The results were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student-Newman-Keul's test with p < 0.05 showed statistical differences. The ZnO + eugenol + FC group and Ca(OH)(2) + FC group showed the lowest survival rates (p < 0.05). The Ca(OH)(2) + Iodoform + CPC group and Ca(OH)(2) + CPC group showed significantly lower survival rates at concentrations above 6 microL/mL (p < 0.05). The Ca(OH)(2) + Iodoform group and Vitapex group showed the highest survival rates (p < 0.05). We concluded that the use of calcium hydroxide with iodoform as a root filling base material is a better option than other medications.

  9. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of soybean primary root under varying water-deficit conditions.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Prince, Silvas; Valliyodan, Babu; Joshi, Trupti; Maldonado dos Santos, Joao V; Wang, Jiaojiao; Lin, Li; Wan, Jinrong; Wang, Yongqin; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T

    2016-01-15

    Soybean is a major crop that provides an important source of protein and oil to humans and animals, but its production can be dramatically decreased by the occurrence of drought stress. Soybeans can survive drought stress if there is a robust and deep root system at the early vegetative growth stage. However, little is known about the genome-wide molecular mechanisms contributing to soybean root system architecture. This study was performed to gain knowledge on transcriptome changes and related molecular mechanisms contributing to soybean root development under water limited conditions. The soybean Williams 82 genotype was subjected to very mild stress (VMS), mild stress (MS) and severe stress (SS) conditions, as well as recovery from the severe stress after re-watering (SR). In total, 6,609 genes in the roots showed differential expression patterns in response to different water-deficit stress levels. Genes involved in hormone (Auxin/Ethylene), carbohydrate, and cell wall-related metabolism (XTH/lipid/flavonoids/lignin) pathways were differentially regulated in the soybean root system. Several transcription factors (TFs) regulating root growth and responses under varying water-deficit conditions were identified and the expression patterns of six TFs were found to be common across the stress levels. Further analysis on the whole plant level led to the finding of tissue-specific or water-deficit levels specific regulation of transcription factors. Analysis of the over-represented motif of different gene groups revealed several new cis-elements associated with different levels of water deficit. The expression patterns of 18 genes were confirmed byquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method and demonstrated the accuracy and effectiveness of RNA-Seq. The primary root specific transcriptome in soybean can enable a better understanding of the root response to water deficit conditions. The genes detected in root tissues that were associated with

  10. Genetic control of root growth: from genes to networks

    PubMed Central

    Slovak, Radka; Ogura, Takehiko; Satbhai, Santosh B.; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Background Roots are essential organs for higher plants. They provide the plant with nutrients and water, anchor the plant in the soil, and can serve as energy storage organs. One remarkable feature of roots is that they are able to adjust their growth to changing environments. This adjustment is possible through mechanisms that modulate a diverse set of root traits such as growth rate, diameter, growth direction and lateral root formation. The basis of these traits and their modulation are at the cellular level, where a multitude of genes and gene networks precisely regulate development in time and space and tune it to environmental conditions. Scope This review first describes the root system and then presents fundamental work that has shed light on the basic regulatory principles of root growth and development. It then considers emerging complexities and how they have been addressed using systems-biology approaches, and then describes and argues for a systems-genetics approach. For reasons of simplicity and conciseness, this review is mostly limited to work from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in which much of the research in root growth regulation at the molecular level has been conducted. Conclusions While forward genetic approaches have identified key regulators and genetic pathways, systems-biology approaches have been successful in shedding light on complex biological processes, for instance molecular mechanisms involving the quantitative interaction of several molecular components, or the interaction of large numbers of genes. However, there are significant limitations in many of these methods for capturing dynamic processes, as well as relating these processes to genotypic and phenotypic variation. The emerging field of systems genetics promises to overcome some of these limitations by linking genotypes to complex phenotypic and molecular data using approaches from different fields, such as genetics, genomics, systems biology and phenomics. PMID

  11. Genetic control of root growth: from genes to networks.

    PubMed

    Slovak, Radka; Ogura, Takehiko; Satbhai, Santosh B; Ristova, Daniela; Busch, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Roots are essential organs for higher plants. They provide the plant with nutrients and water, anchor the plant in the soil, and can serve as energy storage organs. One remarkable feature of roots is that they are able to adjust their growth to changing environments. This adjustment is possible through mechanisms that modulate a diverse set of root traits such as growth rate, diameter, growth direction and lateral root formation. The basis of these traits and their modulation are at the cellular level, where a multitude of genes and gene networks precisely regulate development in time and space and tune it to environmental conditions. This review first describes the root system and then presents fundamental work that has shed light on the basic regulatory principles of root growth and development. It then considers emerging complexities and how they have been addressed using systems-biology approaches, and then describes and argues for a systems-genetics approach. For reasons of simplicity and conciseness, this review is mostly limited to work from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in which much of the research in root growth regulation at the molecular level has been conducted. While forward genetic approaches have identified key regulators and genetic pathways, systems-biology approaches have been successful in shedding light on complex biological processes, for instance molecular mechanisms involving the quantitative interaction of several molecular components, or the interaction of large numbers of genes. However, there are significant limitations in many of these methods for capturing dynamic processes, as well as relating these processes to genotypic and phenotypic variation. The emerging field of systems genetics promises to overcome some of these limitations by linking genotypes to complex phenotypic and molecular data using approaches from different fields, such as genetics, genomics, systems biology and phenomics. © The Author 2015. Published by

  12. The exploring root--root growth responses to local environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Monshausen, Gabriele B; Gilroy, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Because of their sessile lifestyle, the areas which plants can access to forage for resources are confined to those which can be explored by growth. High sensitivity to environmental conditions coupled to the appropriate readjustment of growth and developmental responses are thus critical to plant survival. In this review, we focus on how roots perceive physical cues such as soil water status and mechanical properties and translate them into physiological signals to redirect organ growth and modulate root system architecture. Because the precise molecular identity of most of the sensors used by the root to sample the soil environment remain to be determined, the mechanisms underlying similar processes in microbes are providing important models for how these receptor systems may be functioning in plants.

  13. Root growth regulation and gravitropism in maize roots does not require the epidermis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have earlier published observations showing that endogenous alterations in growth rate during gravitropism in maize roots (Zea mays L.) are unaffected by the orientation of cuts which remove epidermal and cortical tissue in the growing zone (Bjorkman and Cleland, 1988, Planta 176, 513-518). We concluded that the epidermis and cortex are not essential for transporting a growth-regulating signal in gravitropism or straight growth, nor for regulating the rate of tissue expansion. This conclusion has been challenged by Yang et al. (1990, Planta 180, 530-536), who contend that a shallow girdle around the entire perimeter of the root blocks gravitropic curvature and that this inhibition is the result of a requirement for epidermal cells to transport the growth-regulating signal. In this paper we demonstrate that the entire epidermis can be removed without blocking gravitropic curvature and show that the position of narrow girdles does not affect the location of curvature. We therefore conclude that the epidermis is not required for transport of a growth-regulating substance from the root cap to the growing zone, nor does it regulate the growth rate of the elongating zone of roots.

  14. Root growth regulation and gravitropism in maize roots does not require the epidermis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, T.; Cleland, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    We have earlier published observations showing that endogenous alterations in growth rate during gravitropism in maize roots (Zea mays L.) are unaffected by the orientation of cuts which remove epidermal and cortical tissue in the growing zone (Bjorkman and Cleland, 1988, Planta 176, 513-518). We concluded that the epidermis and cortex are not essential for transporting a growth-regulating signal in gravitropism or straight growth, nor for regulating the rate of tissue expansion. This conclusion has been challenged by Yang et al. (1990, Planta 180, 530-536), who contend that a shallow girdle around the entire perimeter of the root blocks gravitropic curvature and that this inhibition is the result of a requirement for epidermal cells to transport the growth-regulating signal. In this paper we demonstrate that the entire epidermis can be removed without blocking gravitropic curvature and show that the position of narrow girdles does not affect the location of curvature. We therefore conclude that the epidermis is not required for transport of a growth-regulating substance from the root cap to the growing zone, nor does it regulate the growth rate of the elongating zone of roots.

  15. Control of root growth and development by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relatively simple molecules that exist within cells growing in aerobic conditions. ROS were originally associated with oxidative stress and seen as highly reactive molecules that are injurious to many cell components. More recently, however, the function of ROS as signal molecules in many plant cellular processes has become more evident. One of the most important functions of ROS is their role as a plant growth regulator. For example, ROS are key molecules in regulating plant root development, and as such, are comparable to plant hormones. In this review, the molecular mechanisms of ROS that are mainly associated with plant root growth are discussed. The molecular links between root growth regulation by ROS and other signals will also be briefly discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic flux cartography of hairy roots primary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M; Perrier, M; Jolicoeur, M

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model for plant cell and hairy root primary metabolism is presented. The model includes nutrient uptake (Pi, sugars, nitrogen sources), the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, the TCA cycle, amino acid biosynthesis, respiratory chain, biosynthesis of cell building blocks (structural hexoses, organic acids, lipids, and organic phosphated molecules). The energy shuttles (ATP, ADP) and cofactors (NAD/H, NADP/H) are also included. The model describes the kinetics of 44 biochemical reactions (fluxes) of the primary metabolism of plant cells and includes 41 biochemical species (metabolites, nutrients, biomass components). Multiple Michaelis-Menten type kinetics are used to describe biochemical reaction rates. Known regulatory phenomena on metabolic pathways are included using sigmoid switch functions. A visualization framework showing fluxes and metabolite concentrations over time is presented. The visualization of fluxes and metabolites is used to analyze simulation results from Catharanthus roseus hairy root 50 d batch cultures. The visualization of the metabolic system allows analyzing split ratios between pathways and flux time-variations. For carbon metabolism, the cells were observed to have relatively high and stable fluxes for the central carbon metabolism and low and variable fluxes for anabolic pathways. For phosphate metabolism, a very high free intracellular Pi turnover rate was observed with higher flux variations than for the carbon metabolism. Nitrogen metabolism also exhibited large flux variations. The potential uses of the model are also discussed.

  17. Root growth studies of willow cuttings using Rhizoboxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omarova, Dinara; Lammeranner, Walter; Florineth, Florin

    2014-05-01

    Riparian forests (Tugay forests) in Central Asia (Kazakhstan) play a significant in soil protection. However, unadapted forest use leads to damage and loss of these fragile ecosystems. Willows have a crucial function in the ecosystem of these riparian forests. Willows facilitate the colonization with other important tree species and furthermore they protect the soil from wind and water erosion. To propagate willows and to estimate the beneficial effects of these plants it is important to know the root growth development. The research design is planned as model experiment with rhizoboxes. Rhizoboxes are non-invasive investigation methods which offer the possibility to survey the root system growth dynamics in time and space. A total of 33 rhizoboxes in size of 50cm x 75 cm x 5 cm will be constructed. The rhizoboxes will be tilted by 45 degrees using the gravitropism of the roots. The willow cuttings (Salix purpurea) will be planted in three different soil types. Each test series (growth period) will take three months. Investigated parameters will be root architecture, dynamic of root growth and above and below ground biomass allocation. Data will be drawn from photographic surveys which will be performed once a week. The contribution will present the methodology of these rhizobox investigations.

  18. Local Transcriptional Control of YUCCA Regulates Auxin Promoted Root-Growth Inhibition in Response to Aluminium Stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangchao; Gao, Shan; Tian, Huiyu; Wu, Wenwen; Robert, Hélène S; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-10-01

    Auxin is necessary for the inhibition of root growth induced by aluminium (Al) stress, however the molecular mechanism controlling this is largely unknown. Here, we report that YUCCA (YUC), which encodes flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, regulates local auxin biosynthesis in the root apex transition zone (TZ) in response to Al stress. Al stress up-regulates YUC3/5/7/8/9 in the root-apex TZ, which we show results in the accumulation of auxin in the root-apex TZ and root-growth inhibition during the Al stress response. These Al-dependent changes in the regulation of YUCs in the root-apex TZ and YUC-regulated root growth inhibition are dependent on ethylene signalling. Increasing or disruption of ethylene signalling caused either enhanced or reduced up-regulation, respectively, of YUCs in root-apex TZ in response to Al stress. In addition, ethylene enhanced root growth inhibition under Al stress was strongly alleviated in yuc mutants or by co-treatment with yucasin, an inhibitor of YUC activity, suggesting a downstream role of YUCs in this process. Moreover, ethylene-insensitive 3 (EIN3) is involved into the direct regulation of YUC9 transcription in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) functions as a transcriptional activator for YUC5/8/9. PIF4 promotes Al-inhibited primary root growth by regulating the local expression of YUCs and auxin signal in the root-apex TZ. The Al-induced expression of PIF4 in root TZ acts downstream of ethylene signalling. Taken together, our results highlight a regulatory cascade for YUCs-regulated local auxin biosynthesis in the root-apex TZ mediating root growth inhibition in response to Al stress.

  19. Local Transcriptional Control of YUCCA Regulates Auxin Promoted Root-Growth Inhibition in Response to Aluminium Stress in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Huiyu; Wu, Wenwen; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is necessary for the inhibition of root growth induced by aluminium (Al) stress, however the molecular mechanism controlling this is largely unknown. Here, we report that YUCCA (YUC), which encodes flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, regulates local auxin biosynthesis in the root apex transition zone (TZ) in response to Al stress. Al stress up-regulates YUC3/5/7/8/9 in the root-apex TZ, which we show results in the accumulation of auxin in the root-apex TZ and root-growth inhibition during the Al stress response. These Al-dependent changes in the regulation of YUCs in the root-apex TZ and YUC-regulated root growth inhibition are dependent on ethylene signalling. Increasing or disruption of ethylene signalling caused either enhanced or reduced up-regulation, respectively, of YUCs in root-apex TZ in response to Al stress. In addition, ethylene enhanced root growth inhibition under Al stress was strongly alleviated in yuc mutants or by co-treatment with yucasin, an inhibitor of YUC activity, suggesting a downstream role of YUCs in this process. Moreover, ethylene-insensitive 3 (EIN3) is involved into the direct regulation of YUC9 transcription in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) functions as a transcriptional activator for YUC5/8/9. PIF4 promotes Al-inhibited primary root growth by regulating the local expression of YUCs and auxin signal in the root-apex TZ. The Al–induced expression of PIF4 in root TZ acts downstream of ethylene signalling. Taken together, our results highlight a regulatory cascade for YUCs-regulated local auxin biosynthesis in the root-apex TZ mediating root growth inhibition in response to Al stress. PMID:27716807

  20. Calcium ion dependency of ethylene production in segments of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Ca2+ on ethylene production in 2-cm long apical segments from primary roots of corn (Zea mays L., B73 x Missouri 17) seedlings. The seedlings were raised under different conditions of Ca2+ availability. Low-Ca and high-Ca seedlings were raised by soaking the grains and watering the seedlings with distilled water or 10 mM CaCl2, respectively. Segments from high-Ca roots produced more than twice as much ethylene as segments from low-Ca roots. Indoleacetic acid (IAA; 1 micromole) enhanced ethylene production in segments from both low-Ca and high-Ca roots but auxin-induced promotion of ethylene production was consistently higher in segments from high-Ca roots. Addition of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) to root segments from low-Ca seedlings doubled total ethylene production and the rate of production remained fairly constant during a 24 h period of monitoring. In segments from high-Ca seedlings ACC also increased total ethylene production but most of the ethylene was produced within the first 6 h. The data suggest that Ca2+ enhances the conversion of ACC to ethylene. The terminal 2 mm of the root tip were found to be especially important to ethylene biosynthesis by apical segments and, experiments using 45Ca2+ as tracer indicated that the apical 2 mm of the root is the region of strongest Ca2+ accumulation. Other cations such as Mn2+, Mg2+, and K+ could largely substitute for Ca2+. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to recent evidence for gravity-induced Ca2+ redistribution and its relationship to the establishment of asymmetric growth during gravitropic curvature.

  1. Calcium ion dependency of ethylene production in segments of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Ca2+ on ethylene production in 2-cm long apical segments from primary roots of corn (Zea mays L., B73 x Missouri 17) seedlings. The seedlings were raised under different conditions of Ca2+ availability. Low-Ca and high-Ca seedlings were raised by soaking the grains and watering the seedlings with distilled water or 10 mM CaCl2, respectively. Segments from high-Ca roots produced more than twice as much ethylene as segments from low-Ca roots. Indoleacetic acid (IAA; 1 micromole) enhanced ethylene production in segments from both low-Ca and high-Ca roots but auxin-induced promotion of ethylene production was consistently higher in segments from high-Ca roots. Addition of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) to root segments from low-Ca seedlings doubled total ethylene production and the rate of production remained fairly constant during a 24 h period of monitoring. In segments from high-Ca seedlings ACC also increased total ethylene production but most of the ethylene was produced within the first 6 h. The data suggest that Ca2+ enhances the conversion of ACC to ethylene. The terminal 2 mm of the root tip were found to be especially important to ethylene biosynthesis by apical segments and, experiments using 45Ca2+ as tracer indicated that the apical 2 mm of the root is the region of strongest Ca2+ accumulation. Other cations such as Mn2+, Mg2+, and K+ could largely substitute for Ca2+. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to recent evidence for gravity-induced Ca2+ redistribution and its relationship to the establishment of asymmetric growth during gravitropic curvature.

  2. Co-ordinated Growth between Aerial and Root Systems in Young Apple Plants Issued from in vitro Culture

    PubMed Central

    COSTES, E.; GARCÍA-VILLANUEVA, E.; JOURDAN, C.; REGNARD, J. L.; GUÉDON, Y.

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims In several species exhibiting a rhythmic aerial growth, the existence of an alternation between root and shoot growth has been demonstrated. The present study aims to investigate the respective involvement of the emergence of new organs and their elongation in relation to this phenomenon and its possible genotypic variation in young apple plants. • Methods Two apple varieties, X6407 (recently named ‘Ariane’) and X3305 (‘Chantecler’ × ‘Baujade’), were compared. Five plants per variety, issued from in vitro culture, were observed in minirhizotrons over 4 months. For each plant, root emergence and growth were observed twice per week. Growth rates were calculated for all roots with more than two segments and the branching density was calculated on primary roots. On the aerial part, the number of leaves, leaf area and total shoot length were observed weekly. • Key Results No significant difference was observed between varieties in any of the final characteristics of aerial growth. Increase in leaf area and shoot length exhibited a 3-week rhythm in X3305 while a weaker signal was observed in Ariane. The primary root growth rate was homogeneous between the plants and likewise between the varieties, while their branching density differed significantly. Secondary roots emerged rhythmically, with a 3-week and a 2-week rhythm, respectively, in X3305 and ‘Ariane’. Despite a high intra-variety variability, significant differences were observed between varieties in the secondary root life span and mean length. A synchronism between leaf emergence and primary root growth was highlighted in both varieties, while an opposition phase was observed between leaf area increments and secondary root emergence in X3305 only. • Conclusion A biological model of dynamics that summarizes the interactions between processes and includes the assumption of a feedback effect of lateral root emergence on leaf emergence is proposed. PMID:16260441

  3. Light perception in aerial tissues enhances DWF4 accumulation in root tips and induces root growth.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Jun; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2017-05-12

    Many attempts have been made to characterize the activities of brassinosteroids (BRs), which are important plant hormones. The crosstalk between light perception and the BR signalling pathway has been extensively studied regarding its effects on photomorphogenesis, especially in elongating etiolated hypocotyls. In contrast, how and where the light induces BR biosynthesis remain uncharacterized. DWF4 is one of the main enzymes involved in the BR biosynthesis pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. We established DWF4-GUS A. thaliana lines in a homozygous dwf4-102 genetic background, but functionally complemented with a genomic DWF4 sequence fused in-frame with a β-glucuronidase (GUS) marker gene. The DWF4-GUS plants enabled the visualization of the accumulation of DWF4 under different conditions. We investigated the effects of aboveground light on root and hypocotyl growth. We observed that root length increased when shoots were maintained under light irrespective of whether roots were exposed to light. We also determined that light perception in aerial tissues enhanced DWF4 accumulation in the root tips. Overall, our data indicate that BR biosynthesis is promoted in the root tip regions by an unknown mechanism in distantly located shoot tissues exposed to light, leading to increased root growth.

  4. Endodontic management of a four rooted retained primary maxillary second molar

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Naveen

    2013-01-01

    The presence of accessory roots is rare in the primary dentition. Complete knowledge and understanding of tooth anatomy is essential to carry out high quality dental treatment with excellent outcome. In addition, the persistent primary tooth and its missing permanent successor in the dental arch pose several hurdles in front of the clinician due to doubtful survival of primary tooth. In this paper, highlights the root canal treatment of a rarest four rooted retained primary maxillary second molar. PMID:24347898

  5. Root foraging influences plant growth responses to earthworm foraging.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Erin K; Cahill, James F; Bayne, Erin M

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among the foraging behaviours of co-occurring animal species can impact population and community dynamics; the consequences of interactions between plant and animal foraging behaviours have received less attention. In North American forests, invasions by European earthworms have led to substantial changes in plant community composition. Changes in leaf litter have been identified as a critical indirect mechanism driving earthworm impacts on plants. However, there has been limited examination of the direct effects of earthworm burrowing on plant growth. Here we show a novel second pathway exists, whereby earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris L.) impact plant root foraging. In a mini-rhizotron experiment, roots occurred more frequently in burrows and soil cracks than in the soil matrix. The roots of Achillea millefolium L. preferentially occupied earthworm burrows, where nutrient availability was presumably higher than in cracks due to earthworm excreta. In contrast, the roots of Campanula rotundifolia L. were less likely to occur in burrows. This shift in root behaviour was associated with a 30% decline in the overall biomass of C. rotundifolia when earthworms were present. Our results indicate earthworm impacts on plant foraging can occur indirectly via physical and chemical changes to the soil and directly via root consumption or abrasion and thus may be one factor influencing plant growth and community change following earthworm invasion. More generally, this work demonstrates the potential for interactions to occur between the foraging behaviours of plants and soil animals and emphasizes the importance of integrating behavioural understanding in foraging studies involving plants.

  6. Root Foraging Influences Plant Growth Responses to Earthworm Foraging

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Erin K.; Cahill, James F.; Bayne, Erin M.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions among the foraging behaviours of co-occurring animal species can impact population and community dynamics; the consequences of interactions between plant and animal foraging behaviours have received less attention. In North American forests, invasions by European earthworms have led to substantial changes in plant community composition. Changes in leaf litter have been identified as a critical indirect mechanism driving earthworm impacts on plants. However, there has been limited examination of the direct effects of earthworm burrowing on plant growth. Here we show a novel second pathway exists, whereby earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris L.) impact plant root foraging. In a mini-rhizotron experiment, roots occurred more frequently in burrows and soil cracks than in the soil matrix. The roots of Achillea millefolium L. preferentially occupied earthworm burrows, where nutrient availability was presumably higher than in cracks due to earthworm excreta. In contrast, the roots of Campanula rotundifolia L. were less likely to occur in burrows. This shift in root behaviour was associated with a 30% decline in the overall biomass of C. rotundifolia when earthworms were present. Our results indicate earthworm impacts on plant foraging can occur indirectly via physical and chemical changes to the soil and directly via root consumption or abrasion and thus may be one factor influencing plant growth and community change following earthworm invasion. More generally, this work demonstrates the potential for interactions to occur between the foraging behaviours of plants and soil animals and emphasizes the importance of integrating behavioural understanding in foraging studies involving plants. PMID:25268503

  7. Serotonin modulates Arabidopsis root growth via changes in reactive oxygen species and jasmonic acid-ethylene signaling.

    PubMed

    Pelagio-Flores, Ramón; Ruiz-Herrera, León Francisco; López-Bucio, José

    2016-09-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) is a bioactive indoleamine with neurotransmitter function in vertebrates, which represents an emerging signaling molecule in plants, playing key roles in the development and defense. In this study, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and jasmonic acid (JA)-ethylene (Et) signaling in root developmental alterations induced by serotonin was investigated. An Arabidopsis thaliana mutant defective at the RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) locus was resistant to paraquat-induced ROS accumulation in primary roots and showed decreased inhibition or root growth in response to serotonin. A suite of JA- and Et-related mutants including coronatine insensitive1, jasmonic acid resistant1 (jar1), etr1, ein2 and ein3 showed tolerance to serotonin in the inhibition of primary root growth and ROS redistribution within the root tip when compared with wild-type (WT) seedlings. Competence assays between serotonin and AgNO3 , a well-known blocker of Et action, showed that primary root growth in medium supplemented with serotonin was normalized by AgNO3 , whereas roots of eto3, an Et overproducer mutant, were oversensitive to serotonin. Comparison of ROS levels in WT, etr1, jar1 and rcd1 primary root tips using the ROS-specific probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate and confocal imaging showed that serotonin inhibition of primary root growth likely occurs independently of its conversion into melatonin. Our results provide compelling evidence that serotonin affects ROS distribution in roots, involving RCD1 and components of the JA-Et signaling pathways. © 2016 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  8. Mitochondrial complex II-derived superoxide is the primary source of mercury toxicity in barley root tip.

    PubMed

    Tamás, Ladislav; Zelinová, Veronika

    2017-02-01

    Enhanced superoxide generation and significant inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity followed by a strong reduction of root growth were detected in barley seedlings exposed to a 5μM Hg concentration for 30min, which increased further in an Hg dose-dependent manner. While at a 25μM Hg concentration no cell death was detectable, a 50μM Hg treatment triggered cell death in the root meristematic zone, which was markedly intensified after the treatment of roots with 100μM Hg and was detectable in the whole root tips. Generation of superoxide and H2O2 was a very rapid response of root tips occurring even after 5min of exposure to Hg. Application of an NADPH oxidase inhibitor or the inhibition of electron flow in mitochondria by the inhibition of complex I did not influence the Hg-induced H2O2 production. Treatment of roots with thenoyltrifluoroacetone, a non-competitive inhibitor of SDH, markedly reduced root growth and induced both superoxide and H2O2 production in a dose dependent manner. Similar to results obtained in intact roots, Hg strongly inhibited SDH activity in the crude mitochondrial fraction and caused a considerable increase of superoxide production, which was markedly reduced by the competitive inhibitors of SDH. These results indicate that the mitochondrial complex II-derived superoxide is the primary source of Hg toxicity in the barley root tip.

  9. Effect of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced adaptive response of root growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chenguang; Wang, Ting; Wu, Jingjing; Xu, Wei; Li, Huasheng; Liu, Min; Wu, Lijun; Lu, Jinying; Bian, Po

    2017-02-01

    Space particles have an inevitable impact on organisms during space missions; radio-adaptive response (RAR) is a critical radiation effect due to both low-dose background and sudden high-dose radiation exposure during solar storms. Although it is relevant to consider RAR within the context of microgravity, another major space environmental factor, there is no existing evidence as to its effects on RAR. In the present study, we established an experimental method for detecting the effects of gamma-irradiation on the primary root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana, in which RAR of root growth was significantly induced by several dose combinations. Microgravity was simulated using a two-dimensional rotation clinostat. It was shown that RAR of root growth was significantly inhibited under the modeled microgravity condition, and was absent in pgm-1 plants that had impaired gravity sensing in root tips. These results suggest that RAR could be modulated in microgravity. Time course analysis showed that microgravity affected either the development of radio-resistance induced by priming irradiation, or the responses of plants to challenging irradiation. After treatment with the modeled microgravity, attenuation in priming irradiation-induced expressions of DNA repair genes (AtKu70 and AtRAD54), and reduced DNA repair efficiency in response to challenging irradiation were observed. In plant roots, the polar transportation of the phytohormone auxin is regulated by gravity, and treatment with an exogenous auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) prevented the induction of RAR of root growth, suggesting that auxin might play a regulatory role in the interaction between microgravity and RAR of root growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cinnamic Acid Increases Lignin Production and Inhibits Soybean Root Growth

    PubMed Central

    Salvador, Victor Hugo; Lima, Rogério Barbosa; dos Santos, Wanderley Dantas; Soares, Anderson Ricardo; Böhm, Paulo Alfredo Feitoza; Marchiosi, Rogério; Ferrarese, Maria de Lourdes Lucio; Ferrarese-Filho, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Cinnamic acid is a known allelochemical that affects seed germination and plant root growth and therefore influences several metabolic processes. In the present work, we evaluated its effects on growth, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) oxidase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H) activities and lignin monomer composition in soybean (Glycine max) roots. The results revealed that exogenously applied cinnamic acid inhibited root growth and increased IAA oxidase and C4H activities. The allelochemical increased the total lignin content, thus altering the sum and ratios of the p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G), and syringyl (S) lignin monomers. When applied alone or with cinnamic acid, piperonylic acid (PIP, a quasi-irreversible inhibitor of C4H) reduced C4H activity, lignin and the H, G, S monomer content compared to the cinnamic acid treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that exogenously applied cinnamic acid can be channeled into the phenylpropanoid pathway via the C4H reaction, resulting in an increase in H lignin. In conjunction with enhanced IAA oxidase activity, these metabolic responses lead to the stiffening of the cell wall and are followed by a reduction in soybean root growth. PMID:23922685

  11. Genetic variability of oxalate oxidase activity and elongation in water-stressed primary roots of diverse maize and rice lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous work on maize primary roots under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. In association with these responses, several proteins related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, part...

  12. Abscisic acid is not necessary for gravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of Zea mays L. cv. Tx 5855 treated with fluridone are strongly graviresponsive, but have undetectable levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Primary roots of the carotenoid-deficient w-3, vp-5, and vp-7 mutants of Z. mays are also graviresponsive despite having undetectable amounts of ABA. Graviresponsive roots of untreated and wild-type seedlings contain 286 to 317 ng ABA g-1 f. wt, respectively. These results indicate that ABA is not necessary for root gravicurvature.

  13. Abscisic acid is not necessary for gravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of Zea mays L. cv. Tx 5855 treated with fluridone are strongly graviresponsive, but have undetectable levels of abscisic acid (ABA). Primary roots of the carotenoid-deficient w-3, vp-5, and vp-7 mutants of Z. mays are also graviresponsive despite having undetectable amounts of ABA. Graviresponsive roots of untreated and wild-type seedlings contain 286 to 317 ng ABA g-1 f. wt, respectively. These results indicate that ABA is not necessary for root gravicurvature.

  14. Effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on rooting and root growth of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) stem cuttings.

    PubMed

    Erturk, Yasar; Ercisli, Sezai; Haznedar, Ayhan; Cakmakci, Ramazan

    2010-01-01

    The effects of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) on the rooting and root growth of semi-hardwood and hardwood kiwifruit stem cuttings were investigated. The PGPR used were Bacillus RC23, Paenibacillus polymyxa RC05, Bacillus subtilis OSU142, Bacillus RC03, Comamonas acidovorans RC41, Bacillus megaterium RC01 and Bacillus simplex RC19. All the bacteria showed indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) producing capacity. Among the PGPR used, the highest rooting ratios were obtained at 47.50% for semi-hardwood stem cuttings from Bacillus RC03 and Bacillus simplex RC19 treatments and 42.50% for hardwood stem cuttings from Bacillus RC03. As well, Comamonas acidovorans RC41 inoculations indicated higher value than control treatments. The results suggest that these PGPR can be used in organic nursery material production and point to the feasibility of synthetic auxin (IBA) replacement by organic management based on PGPR.

  15. Root and shoot jasmonic acid applications differentially affect leaf chemistry and herbivore growth

    PubMed Central

    Oomen, Mariëlle WAT

    2008-01-01

    Many induced responses in plants are systemic. Therefore, root-induced responses may alter leaf quality for shoot herbivores. Previously, we found that root and shoot application of jasmonic acid (JA) to feral Brassica oleracea both induced glucosinolates in the leaves. However, the types of glucosinolates that increased in root- and shoot induced plants were different. Here we analyse whether primary metabolites, such as sugars and amino acids, are also differentially affected. Moreover, we test whether chemical differences in root- and shoot-induced plants differentially affect growth of the generalist Mamestra brassicae and the specialist Pieris rapae. Comprehensive analysis of glucosinolates, amino acid and sugars with principal component analysis revealed that leaf chemical profiles were affected both by JA application and by the organ that was induced. Shoot-induction increased indole glucosinolates, whereas root-induction induced aliphatic glucosinolates in the leaves. Leaves of shoot-induced plants had lower total sugar and total amino acid levels, whereas in root-induced plants only total sugar levels were significantly decreased. (Iso)leucine responded significantly different from the general trend, which allowed us to discuss the potential role of Myb transcription factors which are coordinating JA-induced glucosinolate and amino acid responses in Arabidopsis thaliana. Both M. brassicae and P. rapae grew the slowest on leaves of shoot-induced plants. M. brassicae growth and survival was also reduced on root-induced plants, whereas P. rapae growth on these plants was similar to that on controls. Specialist and generalist herbivores thus are differentially affected by the chemical changes after root and shoot-JA application. PMID:19516980

  16. Root Growth Patterns and Morphometric Change Based on the Growth Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Eric R.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J.

    2016-12-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana roots skew with minimal waving in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Root skewing and root waving have been studied on the ground as well as in spaceflight, but often using different media types. In this study, Arabidopsis seedlings were grown on nutrient media plates that were comprised of various gelling agents with varied hardness in order to better assess these media for spaceflight research experiments. ImageJ was used to quantify the root morphology of 8-dayold seedlings, while R was used to perform statistical analyses. Root growth was drastically different between Difco agar, agarose, and Phytagel. Additionally, root waving masked skewing in certain media. Regression analysis revealed overall patterns when organized by hardness but also revealed that differences in media type had more of an impact on root growth than hardness itself. Different arrangements of media around the root tip revealed that roots grown on the media surface were longer and had fewer waves per millimeter than roots grown embedded in media. The implications for spaceflight research are discussed.

  17. Using low energy x-ray radiography to evaluate root initiation and growth of Populus

    Treesearch

    Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny; A. L. Friend; B. Kodrzycki; D.W. McDonald; R. Michaels; A.H. Wiese; J.W. Powers

    2007-01-01

    Populus roots have been studied less than aboveground tissues. However, there is an overwhelming need to evaluate root initiation and growth in order to understand the genetics and physiology of rooting, along with genotype x environment interactions.

  18. Postembryonic control of root meristem growth and development.

    PubMed

    Sozzani, Rosangela; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali

    2014-02-01

    Organ development in multicellular organisms is dependent on the proper balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. In the Arabidopsis root apical meristem, meristem growth is the result of cell divisions in the proximal meristem and cell differentiation in the elongation and differentiation zones. Hormones, transcription factors and small peptides underpin the molecular mechanisms governing these processes. Computer modeling has aided our understanding of the dynamic interactions involved in stem cell maintenance and meristem activity. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of postembryonic root stem cell maintenance and control of meristem size. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism.

    PubMed

    Mullen, J L; Wolverton, C; Ishikawa, H; Hangarter, R P; Evans, M L

    2002-09-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  20. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Wolverton, C.; Ishikawa, H.; Hangarter, R. P.; Evans, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  1. Spatial separation of light perception and growth response in maize root phototropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, J. L.; Wolverton, C.; Ishikawa, H.; Hangarter, R. P.; Evans, M. L.

    2002-01-01

    Although the effects of gravity on root growth are well known and interactions between light and gravity have been reported, details of root phototropic responses are less documented. We used high-resolution image analysis to study phototropism in primary roots of Zea mays L. Similar to the location of perception in gravitropism, the perception of light was localized in the root cap. Phototropic curvature away from the light, on the other hand, developed in the central elongation zone, more basal than the site of initiation of gravitropic curvature. The phototropic curvature saturated at approximately 10 micromoles m-2 s-1 blue light with a peak curvature of 29 +/- 4 degrees, in part due to induction of positive gravitropism following displacement of the root tip from vertical during negative phototropism. However, at higher fluence rates, development of phototropic curvature is arrested even if gravitropism is avoided by maintaining the root cap vertically using a rotating feedback system. Thus continuous illumination can cause adaptation in the signalling pathway of the phototropic response in roots.

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Primary Roots of Brassica napus Seedlings with Extremely Different Primary Root Lengths Using RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Dun, Xiaoling; Tao, Zhangsheng; Wang, Jie; Wang, Xinfa; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-01-01

    Primary root (PR) development is a crucial developmental process that is essential for plant survival. The elucidation of the PR transcriptome provides insight into the genetic mechanism controlling PR development in crops. In this study, we performed a comparative transcriptome analysis to investigate the genome-wide gene expression profiles of the seedling PRs of four Brassica napus genotypes that were divided into two groups, short group (D43 and D61), and long group (D69 and D72), according to their extremely different primary root lengths (PRLs). The results generated 55,341,366–64,631,336 clean reads aligned to 62,562 genes (61.9% of the current annotated genes) in the B. napus genome. We provide evidence that at least 44,986 genes are actively expressed in the B. napus PR. The majority of the genes that were expressed during seedling PR development were associated with metabolism, cellular processes, response to stimulus, biological regulation, and signaling. Using a pairwise comparison approach, 509 differentially expressed genes (DEGs; absolute value of log2 fold-change ≥1 and p ≤ 0.05) between the long and short groups were revealed, including phytohormone-related genes, protein kinases and phosphatases, oxygenase, cytochrome P450 proteins, etc. Combining GO functional category, KEGG, and MapMan pathway analyses indicated that the DEGs involved in cell wall metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, secondary metabolism, protein modification and degradation, hormone pathways and signaling pathways were the main causes of the observed PRL differences. We also identified 16 differentially expressed transcription factors (TFs) involved in PR development. Taken together, these transcriptomic datasets may serve as a foundation for the identification of candidate genes and may provide valuable information for understanding the molecular and cellular events related to PR development. PMID:27594860

  3. Brassinolide Increases Potato Root Growth In Vitro in a Dose-Dependent Way and Alleviates Salinity Stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yueqing; Xia, Shitou; Su, Yi; Wang, Huiqun; Luo, Weigui; Su, Shengying; Xiao, Langtao

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroidal phytohormones that regulate various physiological processes, such as root development and stress tolerance. In the present study, we showed that brassinolide (BL) affects potato root in vitro growth in a dose-dependent manner. Low BL concentrations (0.1 and 0.01 μg/L) promoted root elongation and lateral root development, whereas high BL concentrations (1-100 μg/L) inhibited root elongation. There was a significant (P < 0.05) positive correlation between root activity and BL concentrations within a range from 0.01 to 100 μg/L, with the peak activity of 8.238 mg TTC·g(-1) FW·h(-1) at a BL concentration of 100 μg/L. Furthermore, plants treated with 50 μg/L BL showed enhanced salt stress tolerance through in vitro growth. Under this scenario, BL treatment enhanced the proline content and antioxidant enzymes' (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase) activity and reduced malondialdehyde content in potato shoots. Application of BL maintain K(+) and Na(+) homeostasis by improving tissue K(+)/Na(+) ratio. Therefore, we suggested that the effects of BL on root development from stem fragments explants as well as on primary root development are dose-dependent and that BL application alleviates salt stress on potato by improving root activity, root/shoot ratio, and antioxidative capacity in shoots and maintaining K(+)/Na(+) homeostasis in potato shoots and roots.

  4. Brassinolide Increases Potato Root Growth In Vitro in a Dose-Dependent Way and Alleviates Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shitou; Su, Yi; Wang, Huiqun; Luo, Weigui; Su, Shengying

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are steroidal phytohormones that regulate various physiological processes, such as root development and stress tolerance. In the present study, we showed that brassinolide (BL) affects potato root in vitro growth in a dose-dependent manner. Low BL concentrations (0.1 and 0.01 μg/L) promoted root elongation and lateral root development, whereas high BL concentrations (1–100 μg/L) inhibited root elongation. There was a significant (P < 0.05) positive correlation between root activity and BL concentrations within a range from 0.01 to 100 μg/L, with the peak activity of 8.238 mg TTC·g−1 FW·h−1 at a BL concentration of 100 μg/L. Furthermore, plants treated with 50 μg/L BL showed enhanced salt stress tolerance through in vitro growth. Under this scenario, BL treatment enhanced the proline content and antioxidant enzymes' (superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase) activity and reduced malondialdehyde content in potato shoots. Application of BL maintain K+ and Na+ homeostasis by improving tissue K+/Na+ ratio. Therefore, we suggested that the effects of BL on root development from stem fragments explants as well as on primary root development are dose-dependent and that BL application alleviates salt stress on potato by improving root activity, root/shoot ratio, and antioxidative capacity in shoots and maintaining K+/Na+ homeostasis in potato shoots and roots. PMID:27803931

  5. High-throughput 2D root system phenotyping platform facilitates genetic analysis of root growth and development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High-throughput phenotyping of root systems requires a combination of specialized techniques and adaptable plant growth, root imaging and software tools. A custom phenotyping platform was designed to capture images of whole root systems, and novel software tools were developed to process and analyz...

  6. Exogenous hydrogen peroxide reversibly inhibits root gravitropism and induces horizontal curvature of primary root during grass pea germination.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinglong; Su, Miao; Wang, Liyan; Jiao, Chengjin; Sun, Zhengxi; Cheng, Wei; Li, Fengmin; Wang, Chongying

    2012-04-01

    During germination in distilled water (dH(2)O) on a horizontally positioned Petri dish, emerging primary roots of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) grew perpendicular to the bottom of the Petri dish, due to gravitropism. However, when germinated in exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), the primary roots grew parallel to the bottom of the Petri dish and asymmetrically, forming a horizontal curvature. Time-course experiments showed that the effect was strongest when H(2)O(2) was applied prior to the emergence of the primary root. H(2)O(2) failed to induce root curvature when applied post-germination. Dosage studies revealed that the frequency of primary root curvature was significantly enhanced with increased H(2)O(2) concentrations. This curvature could be directly counteracted by dimethylthiourea (DMTU), a scavenger of H(2)O(2), but not by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and pyridine, inhibitors of H(2)O(2) production. Exogenous H(2)O(2) treatment caused both an increase in the activities of H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzymes [including ascorbate peroxidase (APX: EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT: EC 1.11.1.6) and peroxidase (POD: EC 1.11.1.7)] and a reduction in endogenous H(2)O(2) levels and root vitality. Although grass pea seeds absorbed exogenous H(2)O(2) during seed germination, DAB staining of paraffin sections revealed that exogenous H(2)O(2) only entered the root epidermis and not inner tissues. These data indicated that exogenously applied H(2)O(2) could lead to a reversible loss of the root gravitropic response and a horizontal curvature in primary roots during radicle emergence of the seedling.

  7. Flooding, root temperature, physiology and growth of two Annona species.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Maritza; Schaffer, Bruce; Davies, Frederick S

    2004-09-01

    The effects of root zone temperature (RZT) and flooding on physiology and growth of Annona glabra L. (pond apple) and A. muricata L. (soursop) were investigated. Trees planted in containers were exposed to RZTs of 5, 10, 20, 25 or 35 degrees C in controlled root temperature chambers. Trees at each RZT were either non-flooded (control) or continuously flooded. There were four replications over time for each treatment combination. Pond apple was more flood-tolerant than soursop. A combination of flooding and RZTs of 5 and 10 degrees C resulted in tree mortality of both species by Week 4. Only trees that appeared to develop morphological adaptations survived continuous flooding. In both species, net CO2 assimilation (A) decreased to nearly zero within 1 week following exposure to RZTs of 5 or 10 degrees C and became consistently negative over the remaining experimental period. Flooding reduced leaf chlorophyll index (measured with a SPAD meter), A and plant growth, and increased root electrolyte leakage from soursop. Optimum growth occurred at RZTs of 25 to 35 degrees C for non-flooded pond apple trees and at 20 to 25 degrees C for flooded trees. Soursop exhibited maximum growth at RZTs of 35 degrees C under non-flooded conditions and at 25 degrees C under flooded conditions.

  8. Interaction of galactoglucomannan oligosaccharides with auxin in mung bean primary root.

    PubMed

    Kollárová, Karin; Vatehová, Zuzana; Slováková, L'udmila; Lisková, Desana

    2010-06-01

    In the present paper timing of galactoglucomannan oligosaccharides (GGMOs) with exogenously added indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) action on early germination stage (24 h) and primary root elongation of mung bean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) has been studied. GGMOs inhibited primary root elongation induced by low concentration (10(-8) M) of IBA. This inhibition was considerably higher after preincubation with GGMOs compared with other timing experiments. The most intensive inhibition of elongation has been ascertained at the 10(-8) M concentration of GGMOs. On the other hand GGMOs stimulated this elongation inhibited by high IBA concentration (10(-4) M). This stimulation was the most intensive by simultaneous addition of IBA and GGMOs at the beginning of the experiment and subsequent seeds incubation in distilled water. Our results indicate competition between GGMOs and auxin. The root growth inhibition, induced by GGMOs and/or IBA, was accompanied by the increase of cell wall-associated peroxidase activity and by a higher number of peroxidase isoenzymes. The presence of different peroxidase isoenzymes in experiments with distinct treatment of GGMOs and IBA could indicate variations in the mechanism of interaction between GGMOs and IBA.

  9. Root-Growth Behavior of the Arabidopsis Mutant rgr11

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Jack L.; Turk, Ed; Johnson, Karin; Wolverton, Chris; Ishikawa, Hideo; Simmons, Carl; Söll, Deiter; Evans, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we investigated the kinetics of the gravitropic response of the Arabidopsis mutant rgr1 (reduced root gravitropism). Although the rate of curvature in rgr1, which is allelic to axr4, was smaller than in the wild type (ecotype Wassilewskija), curvature was initiated in the same region of the root, the distal elongation zone. The time lag for the response was unaffected in the mutant; however, the gravitropic response of rgr1 contained a feature not found in the wild type: when roots growing along the surface of an agar plate were gravistimulated, there was often an upward curvature that initiated in the central elongation zone. Because this response was dependent on the tactile environment of the root, it most likely resulted from the superposition of the waving/coiling phenomenon onto the gravitropic response. We found that the frequency of the waving pattern and circumnutation, a cyclic endogenous pattern of root growth, was the same in rgr1 and in the wild type, so the waving/coiling phenomenon is likely governed by circumnutation patterns. The amplitudes of these oscillations may then be selectively amplified by tactile stimulation to provide a directional preference to the slanting. PMID:9847088

  10. Hormonal interactions during root tropic growth: hydrotropism versus gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Miyazawa, Yutaka; Fujii, Nobuharu

    2009-03-01

    Terrestrial plants have evolved remarkable morphological plasticity that enables them to adapt to their surroundings. One of the most important traits that plants have acquired is the ability to sense environmental cues and use them as a basis for governing their growth orientation. The directional growth of plant organs relative to the direction of environmental stimuli is a tropism. The Cholodny-Went theory proposes that auxin plays a key role in several tropisms. Recent molecular genetic studies have strongly supported this hypothesis for gravitropism. However, the molecular mechanisms of other tropisms are far less clear. Hydrotropism is the response of roots to a moisture gradient. Since its re-discovery in 1985, root hydrotropism has been shown to be common among higher plant species. Additionally, in some species, gravitropism interferes with hydrotropism, suggesting that both shared and divergent mechanisms mediating the two tropisms exist. This hypothesis has been supported by recent studies, which provide an understanding of how roots sense multiple environmental cues and exhibit different tropic responses. In this review, we focus on the overlapping and unique mechanisms of the hormonal regulation underlying gravitropism and hydrotropism in roots.

  11. Treatment of Furcal Perforation of Primary Molars with ProRoot MTA versus Root MTA: A Laboratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Haghgoo, Roza; Abbasi, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Furcal perforations are one of the most challenging causes of endodontic failures. Several materials including MTA have been used for non surgical repair of these perforations. The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcome of furcal perforation treatment in primary molars using Root MTA and ProRoot MTA. Materials and Methods This in vitro study was conducted on 54 primary first molars that were randomly divided into the two experimental groups of 24 teeth each and two control groups (n=6). After preparation of access cavities, perforations were made and the perforation areas were repaired using either Root or ProRoot MTAs. After staining and preparation of mesiodistal longitudinal sections, dye leakage was measured using a stereomicroscope. The data was analyzed by the Mann Whitney statistical test. Significant level was set at 0.05. Results The data indicated that the dye leakage of ProRoot MTA is significantly lesser than Root MTA (P=0.001). Conclusion ProRoot MTA showed good sealing ability in repairing furcal perforations of primary molars. PMID:23717329

  12. Impact of root growth and root hydraulic conductance on water availability of young walnut trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerszurki, Daniela; Couvreur, Valentin; Hopmans, Jan W.; Silva, Lucas C. R.; Shackel, Kenneth A.; de Souza, Jorge L. M.

    2015-04-01

    Walnut (Juglans regia L.) is a tree species of high economic importance in the Central Valley of California. This crop has particularly high water requirements, which makes it highly dependent on irrigation. The context of decreasing water availability in the state calls for efficient water management practices, which requires improving our understanding of the relationship between water application and walnut water availability. In addition to the soil's hydraulic conductivity, two plant properties are thought to control the supply of water from the bulk soil to the canopy: (i) root distribution and (ii) plant hydraulic conductance. Even though these properties are clearly linked to crop water requirements, their quantitative relation remains unclear. The aim of this study is to quantitatively explain walnut water requirements under water deficit from continuous measurements of its water consumption, soil and stem water potential, root growth and root system hydraulic conductance. For that purpose, a greenhouse experiment was conducted for a two month period. Young walnut trees were planted in transparent cylindrical pots, equipped with: (i) rhizotron tubes, which allowed for non-invasive monitoring of root growth, (ii) pressure transducer tensiometers for soil water potential, (iii) psychrometers attached to non-transpiring leaves for stem water potential, and (iv) weighing scales for plant transpiration. Treatments consisted of different irrigation rates: 100%, 75% and 50% of potential crop evapotranspiration. Plant responses were compared to predictions from three simple process-based soil-plant-atmosphere models of water flow: (i) a hydraulic model of stomatal regulation based on stem water potential and vapor pressure deficit, (ii) a model of plant hydraulics predicting stem water potential from soil-root interfaces water potential, and (iii) a model of soil water depletion predicting the water potential drop between the bulk soil and soil-root interfaces

  13. High-throughput two-dimensional root system phenotyping platform facilitates genetic analysis of root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Clark, Randy T; Famoso, Adam N; Zhao, Keyan; Shaff, Jon E; Craft, Eric J; Bustamante, Carlos D; McCouch, Susan R; Aneshansley, Daniel J; Kochian, Leon V

    2013-02-01

    High-throughput phenotyping of root systems requires a combination of specialized techniques and adaptable plant growth, root imaging and software tools. A custom phenotyping platform was designed to capture images of whole root systems, and novel software tools were developed to process and analyse these images. The platform and its components are adaptable to a wide range root phenotyping studies using diverse growth systems (hydroponics, paper pouches, gel and soil) involving several plant species, including, but not limited to, rice, maize, sorghum, tomato and Arabidopsis. The RootReader2D software tool is free and publicly available and was designed with both user-guided and automated features that increase flexibility and enhance efficiency when measuring root growth traits from specific roots or entire root systems during large-scale phenotyping studies. To demonstrate the unique capabilities and high-throughput capacity of this phenotyping platform for studying root systems, genome-wide association studies on rice (Oryza sativa) and maize (Zea mays) root growth were performed and root traits related to aluminium (Al) tolerance were analysed on the parents of the maize nested association mapping (NAM) population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Primary Mandibular First Molar with Single Root and Single Canal: A Case Report of a Rare Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Ghafourifard, Roya; Soleimani, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Single rooted primary mandibular first molar is a rare developmental anomaly. Literatures reveal that failure of invagination of Hertwig’s epithelial root sheath leads to this unusual root form. Thorough knowledge of root canal morphology and anatomical variations of primary teeth can help a pediatric dentist in successful root canal treatment. Hereby, we describe two cases of primary mandibular first molars with an unusual morphology as a single root called pyramidal molar. PMID:25628671

  15. Graviresponsiveness and columella cell structure in primary and secondary roots of Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Moore, R; Pasieniuk, J

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine what structural changes are associated with the onset of graviresponsiveness by plant roots, we have monitored the quantitative ultrastructures of columella (i.e., graviperceptive) cells in primary and secondary roots of Ricinus communis. The relative volumes of cellular components in lateral (i.e., minimally graviresponsive) roots were not significantly different from those of primary roots. The relative volumes of cellular components in secondary roots growing laterally were not significantly different from those of graviresponsive secondary roots. Therefore, the onset of graviresponsiveness by secondary roots of R. communis is not correlated with changes in organellar concentrations in columella cells. These results are discussed relative to a model for the differential graviresponsiveness of plant roots.

  16. Physicochemical Properties of Root Canal Filling Materials for Primary Teeth.

    PubMed

    Segato, Raquel Assed Bezerra; Pucinelli, Carolina Maschietto; Ferreira, Danielly Cunha Araújo; Daldegan, Andiara De Rossi; Silva, Roberto S da; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Léa A B da

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated physiochemical proprieties of a calcium hydroxide-based paste (Calen®) combined with a zinc oxide cement at different ratios (1:0.5, 1:0.65, 1:0.8 and 1:1). Materials were compared regarding setting time, pH variation, radiopacity, solubility, dimensional changes, flow and release of chemical elements. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Longer setting time and higher dimensional changes and solubility values were exhibited by 1:0.65 and 1:0.5 ratios (p<0.05). The 1:0.5 and 1:0.65 ratios exhibited the highest pH values at all time points. All materials exhibited high radiopacity values. Significant differences were found only between 1:0.5 and 1:1 ratios for calcium and zinc release (p<0.05), whereas the amount of zirconium was similar among all groups (p>0.05). Considering the evaluated proprieties, combinations of Calen® paste with ZO at 1:0.5 and 1:0.65 ratios had the best results as root canal filling materials for use in primary teeth.

  17. Potential involvement of drought-induced Ran GTPase CLRan1 in root growth enhancement in a xerophyte wild watermelon.

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kinya; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Kajikawa, Masataka; Hanada, Kouhei; Kosaka, Rina; Kato, Atsushi; Katoh, Akira; Nanasato, Yoshihiko; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Yokota, Akiho

    2016-10-01

    Enhanced root growth is known as the survival strategy of plants under drought. Previous proteome analysis in drought-resistant wild watermelon has shown that Ran GTPase, an essential regulator of cell division and proliferation, was induced in the roots under drought. In this study, two cDNAs were isolated from wild watermelon, CLRan1 and CLRan2, which showed a high degree of structural similarity with those of other plant Ran GTPases. Quantitative RT-PCR and promoter-GUS assays suggested that CLRan1 was expressed mainly in the root apex and lateral root primordia, whereas CLRan2 was more broadly expressed in other part of the roots. Immunoblotting analysis confirmed that the abundance of CLRan proteins was elevated in the root apex region under drought stress. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing CLRan1 showed enhanced primary root growth, and the growth was maintained under osmotic stress, indicating that CLRan1 functions as a positive factor for maintaining root growth under stress conditions.

  18. A morphometric analysis of cellular differentiation in caps of primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine if patterns of cell differentiation are similar in primary and lateral roots, I performed a morphometric analysis of the ultrastructure of calyptrogen, columella, and peripheral cells in primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus. Each cell type is characterized by a unique ultrastructure, and the ultrastructural changes characteristic of cellular differentiation in root caps are organelle specific. No major structural differences exist in the structures of the composite cell types, or in patterns of cell differentiation in caps of primary vs. lateral roots.

  19. A morphometric analysis of cellular differentiation in caps of primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine if patterns of cell differentiation are similar in primary and lateral roots, I performed a morphometric analysis of the ultrastructure of calyptrogen, columella, and peripheral cells in primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus. Each cell type is characterized by a unique ultrastructure, and the ultrastructural changes characteristic of cellular differentiation in root caps are organelle specific. No major structural differences exist in the structures of the composite cell types, or in patterns of cell differentiation in caps of primary vs. lateral roots.

  20. Root growth of Lotus corniculatus interacts with P distribution in young sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderer, B.; Boldt-Burisch, K. M.; Schneider, B. U.; Hüttl, R. F. J.; Schulin, R.

    2013-03-01

    Large areas of land are restored with unweathered soil substrates following mining activities in eastern Germany and elsewhere. In the initial stages of colonization of such land by vegetation, plant roots may become key agents in generating soil formation patterns by introducing gradients in chemical and physical soil properties. On the other hand, such patterns may be influenced by root growth responses to pre-existing substrate heterogeneities. In particular, the roots of many plants were found to preferentially proliferate into nutrient-rich patches. Phosphorus (P) is of primary interest in this respect because its availability is often low in unweathered soils, limiting especially the growth of leguminous plants. However, leguminous plants occur frequently among the pioneer plant species on such soils, as they only depend on atmospheric nitrogen (N) fixation as N source. In this study we investigated the relationship between root growth allocation of the legume Lotus corniculatus and soil P distribution on recently restored land. As test sites, the experimental Chicken Creek Catchment (CCC) in eastern Germany and a nearby experimental site (ES) with the same soil substrate were used. We established two experiments with constructed heterogeneity, one in the field on the experimental site and the other in a climate chamber. In addition, we conducted high-density samplings on undisturbed soil plots colonized by L. corniculatus on the ES and on the CCC. In the field experiment, we installed cylindrical ingrowth soil cores (4.5 × 10 cm) with and without P fertilization around single two-month-old L. corniculatus plants. Roots showed preferential growth into the P-fertilized ingrowth-cores. Preferential root allocation was also found in the climate chamber experiment, where single L. corniculatus plants were grown in containers filled with ES soil and where a lateral portion of the containers was additionally supplied with a range of different P concentrations. In

  1. Root growth of Lotus corniculatus interacts with P distribution in young sandy soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felderer, B.; Boldt-Burisch, K. M.; Schneider, B. U.; Hüttl, R. F. J.; Schulin, R.

    2012-07-01

    Large areas of land are restored with un-weathered soil substrates following mining activities in eastern Germany and elsewhere. In the initial stages of colonization of such land by vegetation, plant roots may become key agents in generating soil formation patterns by introducing gradients in chemical and physical soil properties. On the other hand, such patterns may be influenced by root growth responses to pre-existing substrate heterogeneities. In particular, the roots of many plants were found to preferentially proliferate into nutrient-rich patches. Phosphorus (P) is of primary interest in this respect because its availability is often low in unweathered soils, limiting especially the growth of leguminous plants. However, leguminous plants occur frequently among the pioneer plant species on such soils as they only depend on atmospheric nitrogen (N) fixation as N source. In this study we investigated the relationship between root growth allocation of the legume Lotus corniculatus and soil P distribution on recently restored land. As test sites the experimental Chicken Creek Catchment (CCC) in eastern Germany and a nearby experimental site (ES) with the same soil substrate were used. We established two experiments with constructed heterogeneity, one in the field on the experimental site and the other in a climate chamber. In addition we conducted high-density samplings on undisturbed soil plots colonized by L. corniculatus on the ES and on the CCC. In the field experiment, we installed cylindrical ingrowth soil cores (4.5×10 cm) with and without P fertilization around single two-month-old L. corniculatus plants. Roots showed preferential growth into the P-fertilized ingrowth-cores. Preferential root allocation was also found in the climate chamber experiment, where single L. corniculatus plants were grown in containers filled with ES soil and where a lateral portion of the containers was additionally supplied with a range of different P concentrations. In the

  2. Root Diseases: Primary Agents and Secondary Consequences of Disturbance

    SciTech Connect

    Otrosina, W.J.; Ferrell, G.T.

    1995-01-01

    A pathogen such as the P-group of Heterobasidion annosum has become an intractable problem in many Sienna east side pine stands in California because the fungus is adapted to colonization of freshly cut stump surfaces. Other diseases such as blackstain root disease are associated with certain root feeding bark beetles that are attracted to tree roots after site disturbances such as thinning. Fire may also affect various root disease fungi and their pathological behavior in longleaf pine through interactions with various soil factors as a consequence of various land use.

  3. Kedo-S Paediatric Rotary Files for Root Canal Preparation in Primary Teeth - Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jeevanandan, Ganesh

    2017-03-01

    Nickel-Titanium (Ni-Ti) instrument are widely used for root canal preparation in permanent tooth compared to primary teeth. Hand instrumentation technique remains the conventional method for root canal preparation in primary teeth. The time taken for root canal preparation with the conventional method is more resulting in patients and clinicians fatigue. Recently Ni-Ti rotary files designed for permanent tooth has been used for root canal preparation in primary teeth. Using rotary instruments for primary tooth pulpectomies resulted in better and predictable root canal filling. This article presents case reports of pulpectomy treatment performed using Kedo-S an exclusive paediatric Ni-Ti rotary files. The advantages and disadvantages in use of Ni-Ti rotary files in primary teeth are discussed in this article.

  4. Root growth in response to nitrogen supply in Chinese maize hybrids released between 1973 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Wu, QiuPing; Chen, FanJun; Chen, YanLing; Yuan, LiXing; Zhang, FuSuo; Mi, GuoHua

    2011-07-01

    Root growth has a fundamental role in nitrogen (N) use efficiency. Nevertheless, little is known about how modern breeding progress has affected root growth and its responses to N supply. The root and shoot growth of a core set of 11 representative Chinese maize (Zea mays L.) hybrids released between 1973 and 2009 were investigated under high N (4 mmol L(-1), HN) and low N (0.04 mmol L(-1), LN) levels in a solution culture system. Compared with LN, HN treatment decreased root dry weight (RDW), the root: shoot ratio (R/S), and the relative growth rate for root dry weight (RGR(root)), but increased the total root length (TRL) and the total lateral root length (LRL). The total axial root length (ARL) per plant was reduced under HN, mostly in hybrids released before the 1990s. The number of seminal roots (SRN) was largely unaffected by different N levels. More recently released hybrids showed higher relative growth rates in the shoot under both HN and LN. However, the roots only showed increased RGR under HN treatment. Correspondingly, there was a positive linear relationship with the year of hybrid release for TRL, LRL and ARL under HN treatment. Together, these results suggest that while shoot growth of maize has improved, its root growth has only improved under high N conditions over the last 36 years of selective breeding in China. Improving root growth under LN conditions may be necessary to increase the N use efficiency of maize.

  5. Growth in Turface® clay permits root hair phenotyping along the entire crown root in cereal crops and demonstrates that root hair growth can extend well beyond the root hair zone.

    PubMed

    Goron, Travis L; Watts, Sophia; Shearer, Charles; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-04-12

    In cereal crops, root hairs are reported to function within the root hair zone to carry out important roles in nutrient and water absorption. Nevertheless, these single cells remain understudied due to the practical challenges of phenotyping these delicate structures in large cereal crops growing on soil or other growth systems. Here we present an alternative growth system for examining the root hairs of cereal crops: the use of coarse Turface® clay alongside fertigation. This system allowed for root hairs to be easily visualized along the entire lengths of crown roots in three different cereal crops (maize, wheat, and finger millet). Surprisingly, we observed that the root hairs in these crops continued to grow beyond the canonical root hair zone, with the most root hair growth occurring on older crown root segments. We suggest that the Turface® fertigation system may permit a better understanding of the changing dynamics of root hairs as they age in large plants, and may facilitate new avenues for crop improvement below ground. However, the relevance of this system to field conditions must be further evaluated in other crops.

  6. [The role of pulp in the root resorption of primary teeth without permanent tooth germs].

    PubMed

    Lin, Bi-chen; Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yu-ming; Ge, Li-hong

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the role of pulp in the root resorption of primary teeth without permanent tooth germs. The animal model without permanent tooth germs was established by surgery in Beagle dog. The root resorption was observed by taking periapical radiographs periodically. The samples of mandibular bone and pulp at different resorption stages were collected. The distribution of odontoclasts and the activating factor was analyzed by histological staining and semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The role of pulp in the root resorption of primary teeth was tested by early pulpectomy. In the root resorption of primary molars without permanent teeth germs, a large number of odontoclasts were present on the pulpal surface of the root canal. Semi-quantification RT-PCR showed that the ratios of the expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) mRNA and β-actin in the pulp of permanent teeth and primary teeth without permanent teeth germ during different periods of root resorption are 0.1314, 0.1901, 0.2111 and 0.6058 (P > 0.05). The root resorption of primary teeth without permanent teeth germs in test groups was about 5 weeks later than that of control group. The pulp of primary tooth played an important role in the root resorption of primary tooth without permanent tooth germ.

  7. Plant hormone cross-talk: the pivot of root growth.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, Elena; Polverari, Laura; Sabatini, Sabrina

    2015-02-01

    Root indeterminate growth and its outstanding ability to produce new tissues continuously make this organ a highly dynamic structure able to respond promptly to external environmental stimuli. Developmental processes therefore need to be finely tuned, and hormonal cross-talk plays a pivotal role in the regulation of root growth. In contrast to what happens in animals, plant development is a post-embryonic process. A pool of stem cells, placed in a niche at the apex of the meristem, is a source of self-renewing cells that provides cells for tissue formation. During the first days post-germination, the meristem reaches its final size as a result of a balance between cell division and cell differentiation. A complex network of interactions between hormonal pathways co-ordinates such developmental inputs. In recent years, by means of molecular and computational approaches, many efforts have been made aiming to define the molecular components of these networks. In this review, we focus our attention on the molecular mechanisms at the basis of hormone cross-talk during root meristem size determination.

  8. Phytotoxicity of nanoparticles: inhibition of seed germination and root growth.

    PubMed

    Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2007-11-01

    Plants need to be included to develop a comprehensive toxicity profile for nanoparticles. Effects of five types of nanoparticles (multi-walled carbon nanotube, aluminum, alumina, zinc, and zinc oxide) on seed germination and root growth of six higher plant species (radish, rape, ryegrass, lettuce, corn, and cucumber) were investigated. Seed germination was not affected except for the inhibition of nanoscale zinc (nano-Zn) on ryegrass and zinc oxide (nano-ZnO) on corn at 2000 mg/L. Inhibition on root growth varied greatly among nanoparticles and plants. Suspensions of 2000 mg/L nano-Zn or nano-ZnO practically terminated root elongation of the tested plant species. Fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of nano-Zn and nano-ZnO were estimated to be near 50mg/L for radish, and about 20mg/L for rape and ryegrass. The inhibition occurred during the seed incubation process rather than seed soaking stage. These results are significant in terms of use and disposal of engineered nanoparticles.

  9. Growth and physiology of olive pioneer and fibrous roots exposed to soil moisture deficits.

    PubMed

    Polverigiani, S; McCormack, M L; Mueller, C W; Eissenstat, D M

    2011-11-01

    In woody plants, pioneer roots are the main roots used to expand the root system horizontally and vertically whereas fibrous 'feeder' roots are chiefly used in the absorption of water and nutrients. Because of their different roles, we expected newly emerged pioneer and fibrous roots to respond differently to restrictions in soil moisture. We hypothesized that fibrous roots would exhibit greater growth plasticity and greater physiological impairment from soil moisture deficits, especially under heterogeneous conditions. We compared the responses of fibrous and pioneer roots of olive seedlings (Olea europaea) to localized and uniform soil moisture deficits in transparent containers in the greenhouse. In comparison with uniformly wet conditions, uniformly dry conditions caused reduced shoot photosynthesis and reduced shoot growth, but no significant effect on root morphology, root respiration (measured in aerated buffer solution using excised roots) or electrolyte leakage as a function of root age. Under heterogeneous soil moisture conditions, root growth tended to preferentially occur in the moist sector, especially in the pioneer roots. In comparison with pioneer roots in the moist sector, pioneer roots in the dry sector had higher tissue density and higher suberin content, but no shift in root respiration, non-structural carbohydrates or electrolyte leakage. In contrast, fibrous roots in the dry sector exhibited evidence of impaired physiology in older (>38 days) roots compared with similar age fibrous roots in the moist sector. While we anticipated that, compared with pioneer roots, fibrous roots would be more sensitive to soil moisture deficits as expressed by higher electrolyte leakage, we did not expect the strong growth plasticity of pioneer roots under heterogeneous soil moisture conditions. Differentiating the responses of these two very different root types can improve our understanding of how different portions of the root system of woody plants cope with

  10. Root mass, net primary production and turnover in aspen, jack pine and black spruce forests in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada.

    PubMed

    Steele, Sarah J.; Gower, Stith T.; Vogel, Jason G.; Norman, John M.

    1997-01-01

    Root biomass, net primary production and turnover were studied in aspen, jack pine and black spruce forests in two contrasting climates. The climate of the Southern Study Area (SSA) near Prince Albert, Saskatchewan is warmer and drier in the summer and milder in the winter than the Northern Study Area (NSA) near Thompson, Manitoba, Canada. Ingrowth soil cores and minirhizotrons were used to quantify fine root net primary production (NPPFR). Average daily fine root growth (m m(-2) day(-1)) was positively correlated with soil temperature at 10-cm depth (r(2) = 0.83-0.93) for all three species, with black spruce showing the strongest temperature effect. At both study areas, fine root biomass (measured from soil cores) and fine root length (measured from minirhizotrons) were less for jack pine than for the other two species. Except for the aspen stands, estimates of NPPFR from minirhizotrons were significantly greater than estimates from ingrowth cores. The core method underestimated NPPFR because it does not account for simultaneous fine root growth and mortality. Minirhizotron NPPFR estimates ranged from 59 g m(-2) year(-1) for aspen stands at SSA to 235 g m(-2) year(-1) for black spruce at NSA. The ratio of NPPFR to total detritus production (aboveground litterfall + NPPFR) was greater for evergreen forests than for deciduous forests, suggesting that carbon allocation patterns differ between boreal evergreen and deciduous forests. In all stands, NPPFR consistently exceeded annual fine root turnover and the differences were larger for stands in the NSA than for stands in the SSA, whereas the difference between study areas was only significant for black spruce. The imbalance between NPPFR and fine root turnover is sufficient to explain the net accumulation of carbon in boreal forest soils.

  11. Patterns of microbial colonization in primary root canal infections.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N; Lopes, Hélio P

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the patterns of microbial infection of root canals in untreated teeth associated with chronic periradicular lesions by use of scanning electron microscopy. Fifteen extracted teeth with extensive carious lesions, radiolucent lesions of varying sizes, and attached periradicular lesions after extraction were selected for study. After fixation, lesions were removed and the teeth were split into 2 halves. The teeth were then dehydrated, sputter-coated with gold, and then examined for the patterns of microbial colonization of the root canal system by using a scanning electron microscope. All examined root canals were infected, and bacterial cells were seen in practically all areas of the root canal system. The pattern of colonization was not uniform between specimens and even within the same specimen. Most of the root canal walls of all specimens were heavily colonized by a root canal microbiota consisting of cocci and/or rods, often forming mixed communities. Spirilla were occasionally observed as single cells or as small clusters between other bacterial forms. Bacteria were often observed penetrating the dentinal tubules. Although a shallow penetration was the most common finding, bacterial cells could be observed reaching approximately 300 microm in some specimens. Yeastlike cells were observed in 1 specimen together with bacteria. The root canals of teeth associated with periradicular lesions were heavily infected by bacteria and occasionally by fungi. The pattern of colonization of the root canal microbiota often showed the characteristic of a climax community, which may require special considerations regarding its elimination and prevention of clinical problems. In addition, the observed propagation of the infection to the entire root canal system in teeth associated with periradicular lesions suggests that proper therapeutic measures may be necessary to eliminate the root canal infection completely.

  12. Computer-based video digitizer analysis of surface extension in maize roots: kinetics of growth rate changes during gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    We used a video digitizer system to measure surface extension and curvature in gravistimulated primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.). Downward curvature began about 25 +/- 7 min after gravistimulation and resulted from a combination of enhanced growth along the upper surface and reduced growth along the lower surface relative to growth in vertically oriented controls. The roots curved at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.5 degrees min-1 but the pattern of curvature varied somewhat. In about 35% of the samples the roots curved steadily downward and the rate of curvature slowed as the root neared 90 degrees. A final angle of about 90 degrees was reached 110 +/- 35 min after the start of gravistimulation. In about 65% of the samples there was a period of backward curvature (partial reversal of curvature) during the response. In some cases (about 15% of those showing a period of reverse bending) this period of backward curvature occurred before the root reached 90 degrees. Following transient backward curvature, downward curvature resumed and the root approached a final angle of about 90 degrees. In about 65% of the roots showing a period of reverse curvature, the roots curved steadily past the vertical, reaching maximum curvature about 205 +/- 65 min after gravistimulation. The direction of curvature then reversed back toward the vertical. After one or two oscillations about the vertical the roots obtained a vertical orientation and the distribution of growth within the root tip became the same as that prior to gravistimulation. The period of transient backward curvature coincided with and was evidently caused by enhancement of growth along the concave and inhibition of growth along the convex side of the curve, a pattern opposite to that prevailing in the earlier stages of downward curvature. There were periods during the gravitropic response when the normally unimodal growth-rate distribution within the elongation zone became bimodal with two peaks of rapid elongation separated by

  13. Computer-based video digitizer analysis of surface extension in maize roots: kinetics of growth rate changes during gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    We used a video digitizer system to measure surface extension and curvature in gravistimulated primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.). Downward curvature began about 25 +/- 7 min after gravistimulation and resulted from a combination of enhanced growth along the upper surface and reduced growth along the lower surface relative to growth in vertically oriented controls. The roots curved at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.5 degrees min-1 but the pattern of curvature varied somewhat. In about 35% of the samples the roots curved steadily downward and the rate of curvature slowed as the root neared 90 degrees. A final angle of about 90 degrees was reached 110 +/- 35 min after the start of gravistimulation. In about 65% of the samples there was a period of backward curvature (partial reversal of curvature) during the response. In some cases (about 15% of those showing a period of reverse bending) this period of backward curvature occurred before the root reached 90 degrees. Following transient backward curvature, downward curvature resumed and the root approached a final angle of about 90 degrees. In about 65% of the roots showing a period of reverse curvature, the roots curved steadily past the vertical, reaching maximum curvature about 205 +/- 65 min after gravistimulation. The direction of curvature then reversed back toward the vertical. After one or two oscillations about the vertical the roots obtained a vertical orientation and the distribution of growth within the root tip became the same as that prior to gravistimulation. The period of transient backward curvature coincided with and was evidently caused by enhancement of growth along the concave and inhibition of growth along the convex side of the curve, a pattern opposite to that prevailing in the earlier stages of downward curvature. There were periods during the gravitropic response when the normally unimodal growth-rate distribution within the elongation zone became bimodal with two peaks of rapid elongation separated by

  14. Identification of the primary lesion of toxic aluminum in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Kopittke, Peter M; Moore, Katie L; Lombi, Enzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Ferguson, Brett J; Blamey, F Pax C; Menzies, Neal W; Nicholson, Timothy M; McKenna, Brigid A; Wang, Peng; Gresshoff, Peter M; Kourousias, George; Webb, Richard I; Green, Kathryn; Tollenaere, Alina

    2015-04-01

    Despite the rhizotoxicity of aluminum (Al) being identified over 100 years ago, there is still no consensus regarding the mechanisms whereby root elongation rate is initially reduced in the approximately 40% of arable soils worldwide that are acidic. We used high-resolution kinematic analyses, molecular biology, rheology, and advanced imaging techniques to examine soybean (Glycine max) roots exposed to Al. Using this multidisciplinary approach, we have conclusively shown that the primary lesion of Al is apoplastic. In particular, it was found that 75 µm Al reduced root growth after only 5 min (or 30 min at 30 µm Al), with Al being toxic by binding to the walls of outer cells, which directly inhibited their loosening in the elongation zone. An alteration in the biosynthesis and distribution of ethylene and auxin was a second, slower effect, causing both a transient decrease in the rate of cell elongation after 1.5 h but also a longer term gradual reduction in the length of the elongation zone. These findings show the importance of focusing on traits related to cell wall composition as well as mechanisms involved in wall loosening to overcome the deleterious effects of soluble Al. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Water Relations of Pine Seedlings in Relation to Root and Shoot Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Merrill R.

    1968-01-01

    The effects of water stress on growth and water relations of loblolly and white pine seedlings were studied during series of drying cycles. As mean soil water potential decreased, growth of roots, needles, and buds decreased. Growth of roots during successive severe drying cycles was not uniform, however. A study of needle and root extension showed that of the total growth of roots for 3 7-day drying cycles, only 6% occurred during the third cycle, while needle extension was uniform for the 3 cycles. The difference in response of needles and roots to drying cycles may be attributed primarily to the effect of water stress on the growing region. When subjected to a severe stress, roots matured toward the tip and became dormant, resulting in less growth during subsequent drying cycles. The intercalary growing region of needles, however, was not altered seriously enough by the stress to cause a difference in amount of growth during each drying cycle. Transpiration of loblolly pine was lower in the second drying cycle than in the first. Needle water potential after rewatering was as high as that of control plants watered daily; root resistance was apparently not important in restricting transpiration during a second drying cycle. Needle diffusion resistance of loblolly pine, measured with a low-resistance diffusion porometer, was slightly higher during the second drying cycle than during the first. In addition, many primary needles were killed during the first period of stress. These factors contributed to the reduction of transpiration during the second drying cycle. Diffusion resistance of Coleus increased and transpiration ceased during the first drying cycle while water potential remained relatively high. After rewatering, both leaf resistance and transpiration returned to the control level, presumably because the stress during the first period of drying was not severe. The diffusion resistances observed for well-watered plants were 30 to 50 sec·cm−1 for loblolly

  16. Identification of SHRUBBY, a SHORT-ROOT and SCARECROW interacting protein that controls root growth and radial patterning.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Koji; Gallagher, Kimberly L

    2013-03-01

    The timing and extent of cell division is particularly important for the growth and development of multicellular organisms. Roots of the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana have been widely studied as a paradigm for organ development in plants. In the Arabidopsis root, the plant-specific GRAS family transcription factors SHORT-ROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR) are key regulators of root growth and of the asymmetric cell divisions that separate the ground tissue into two separate layers: the endodermis and cortex. To elucidate the role of SHR in root development, we identified 17 SHR-interacting proteins. Among those isolated was At5g24740, which we named SHRUBBY (SHBY). SHBY is a vacuolar sorting protein with similarity to the gene responsible for Cohen syndrome in humans. Hypomorphic alleles of shby caused poor root growth, decreased meristematic activity and defects in radial patterning that are characterized by an increase in the number of cell divisions in the ground tissue that lead to extra cells in the cortex and endodermis, as well as additional cell layers. Analysis of genetic and molecular markers indicates that SHBY acts in a pathway that partially overlaps with SHR, SCR, PLETHORA1 and PLETHORA2 (PLT1 and PLT2). The shby-1 root phenotype was partially phenocopied by treatment of wild-type roots with the proteosome inhibitor MG132 or the gibberellic acid (GA) synthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol (PAC). Our results indicate that SHBY controls root growth downstream of GA in part through the regulation of SHR and SCR.

  17. Crown-root fracture of fused primary teeth--a case report.

    PubMed

    Lima, Marina de Deus de Moura; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva; Leopoldino, Valeria de Deus; Batista-Netto, Otacilio de Sousa; Carvalho, Carmen Milena Rodrigues Siqueira; Moura, Lucia de Fatima Almeida de Deus

    2012-01-01

    In the primary dentition, traumatic injuries affecting the tooth-supporting structures are common due to increased bone resilience in children. Crown-root fracture, defined as a fracture involving enamel, dentin, and cementum, is uncommon in the primary dentition, comprising only 2% of dental traumas. This article reports the treatment and follow-up of a 2-year-old boy who suffered a traumatic crown-root fracture involving a primary anterior incisor that was fused to a supernumerary tooth.

  18. Cytohistological analysis of roots whose growth is affected by a 60-Hz electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Brulfert, A.; Miller, M.W.; Robertson, D.; Dooley, D.A.; Economou, P.

    1985-01-01

    Roots of Pisum sativum were exposed for 48 h to 60-Hz electric fields of 430 V/m in an aqueous inorganic growth medium. The growth in length of the exposed roots was 44% of that for control roots. Root tips were analyzed for mitotic index and cell cycle duration. Mature, differentiated root sections from tissue produced after electrode energization were analyzed for cell lengths and number of files. The major reason for the observation that exposed roots are shorter than control roots is that cell elongation in the former is greatly diminished relative to controls. 15 references, 1 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Putting theory to the test: which regulatory mechanisms can drive realistic growth of a root?

    PubMed

    De Vos, Dirk; Vissenberg, Kris; Broeckhove, Jan; Beemster, Gerrit T S

    2014-10-01

    In recent years there has been a strong development of computational approaches to mechanistically understand organ growth regulation in plants. In this study, simulation methods were used to explore which regulatory mechanisms can lead to realistic output at the cell and whole organ scale and which other possibilities must be discarded as they result in cellular patterns and kinematic characteristics that are not consistent with experimental observations for the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root. To aid in this analysis, a 'Uniform Longitudinal Strain Rule' (ULSR) was formulated as a necessary condition for stable, unidirectional, symplastic growth. Our simulations indicate that symplastic structures are robust to differences in longitudinal strain rates along the growth axis only if these differences are small and short-lived. Whereas simple cell-autonomous regulatory rules based on counters and timers can produce stable growth, it was found that steady developmental zones and smooth transitions in cell lengths are not feasible. By introducing spatial cues into growth regulation, those inadequacies could be avoided and experimental data could be faithfully reproduced. Nevertheless, a root growth model based on previous polar auxin-transport mechanisms violates the proposed ULSR due to the presence of lateral gradients. Models with layer-specific regulation or layer-driven growth offer potential solutions. Alternatively, a model representing the known cross-talk between auxin, as the cell proliferation promoting factor, and cytokinin, as the cell differentiation promoting factor, predicts the effect of hormone-perturbations on meristem size. By down-regulating PIN-mediated transport through the transcription factor SHY2, cytokinin effectively flattens the lateral auxin gradient, at the basal boundary of the division zone, (thereby imposing the ULSR) to signal the exit of proliferation and start of elongation. This model exploration underlines the value of

  20. Putting Theory to the Test: Which Regulatory Mechanisms Can Drive Realistic Growth of a Root?

    PubMed Central

    De Vos, Dirk; Vissenberg, Kris; Broeckhove, Jan; Beemster, Gerrit T. S.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been a strong development of computational approaches to mechanistically understand organ growth regulation in plants. In this study, simulation methods were used to explore which regulatory mechanisms can lead to realistic output at the cell and whole organ scale and which other possibilities must be discarded as they result in cellular patterns and kinematic characteristics that are not consistent with experimental observations for the Arabidopsis thaliana primary root. To aid in this analysis, a ‘Uniform Longitudinal Strain Rule’ (ULSR) was formulated as a necessary condition for stable, unidirectional, symplastic growth. Our simulations indicate that symplastic structures are robust to differences in longitudinal strain rates along the growth axis only if these differences are small and short-lived. Whereas simple cell-autonomous regulatory rules based on counters and timers can produce stable growth, it was found that steady developmental zones and smooth transitions in cell lengths are not feasible. By introducing spatial cues into growth regulation, those inadequacies could be avoided and experimental data could be faithfully reproduced. Nevertheless, a root growth model based on previous polar auxin-transport mechanisms violates the proposed ULSR due to the presence of lateral gradients. Models with layer-specific regulation or layer-driven growth offer potential solutions. Alternatively, a model representing the known cross-talk between auxin, as the cell proliferation promoting factor, and cytokinin, as the cell differentiation promoting factor, predicts the effect of hormone-perturbations on meristem size. By down-regulating PIN-mediated transport through the transcription factor SHY2, cytokinin effectively flattens the lateral auxin gradient, at the basal boundary of the division zone, (thereby imposing the ULSR) to signal the exit of proliferation and start of elongation. This model exploration underlines the value of

  1. Root respiratory costs of ion uptake, root growth, and root maintenance in wetland plants: efficiency and strategy of O2 use for adaptation to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takatoshi; Nakamura, Motoka

    2016-11-01

    Oxygen use in roots is an important aspect of wetland plant ecophysiology, and it depends on the respiratory costs of three major processes: ion uptake, root growth, and root maintenance. However, O2 allocation in wetland plants has received little attention. This study aimed to determine the O2 allocation and specific respiratory cost of each process under hypoxic conditions, to better understand the strategy and efficiency of O2 use in wetland plants. The root respiration rate, nitrogen uptake, and root growth in three Carex species with different growth rates were examined under hypoxic conditions using different N sources, and the respiratory costs of ion uptake, root growth, and root maintenance were statistically estimated. All species exhibited low specific costs and low ratios of O2 allocation for root growth (2.0 ± 0.4 mmol O2 g(-1) and 15.2 ± 2.7 %, respectively). The specific cost of ion uptake was 20-30 % lower in fast-growing species than in slow-growing species. As plant growth rate increased, the O2 allocation ratio for ion uptake increased, and that for root maintenance decreased. The cost was higher when NO3 (-) was fed, than when NH4 (+) was fed, although the pattern of O2 allocation ratios for three processes was similar for NO3 (-) and NH4 (+). Our results indicate that wetland plants primarily employ an O2 use strategy of minimising the respiratory costs of root growth, and fast-growing plants specifically use O2 to maximise ion uptake. These findings provide new insights into ecophysiological behaviours of roots in adaptation to hypoxia.

  2. Plant-in-chip: Microfluidic system for studying root growth and pathogenic interactions in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Archana; Pandey, Santosh

    2011-06-01

    We report a microfluidic platform for the hydroponic growth of Arabidopsis plants with high-resolution visualization of root development and root-pathogen interactions. The platform comprises a set of parallel microchannels with individual input/output ports where 1-day old germinated seedlings are initially placed. Under optimum conditions, a root system grows in each microchannel and its images are recorded over a 198-h period. Different concentrations of plant growth media show different root growth characteristics. Later, the developed roots are inoculated with two plant pathogens (nematodes and zoospores) and their physicochemical interactions with the live root systems are observed.

  3. Root growth and physiology of potted and field-grown trembling aspen exposed to tropospheric ozone

    Treesearch

    M.D. Coleman; R.E. Dickson; J.G. Isebrands; D.F. Karnosky

    1996-01-01

    We studied root growth and respiration of potted plants and field-grown aspen trees (Populus tremuloides Michx.) exposed to ambient or twice-ambient ozone. Root dry weight of potted plants decreased up to 45% after 12 weeks of ozone treatment, and root system respiration decreased by 27%. The ozone-induced decrease in root system respiration of...

  4. A secreted chitinase-like protein (OsCLP) supports root growth through calcium signaling in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingni; Wang, Yiming; Kim, Sang Gon; Jung, Ki-Hong; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Joonyup; Park, Younghoon; Kang, Kyu Young; Kim, Sun Tae

    2017-04-12

    Chitinases belong to a conserved protein family and play multiple roles in defense, development, and growth regulation in plants. Here, we identified a secreted chitinase-like protein, OsCLP, which functions in rice growth. A T-DNA insertion mutant of OsCLP (osclp) showed significant retardation of root and shoot growth. A comparative proteomic analysis was carried out using root tissue of wild-type and the osclp mutant to understand the OsCLP-mediated rice growth retardation. Results obtained revealed that proteins related to glycolysis (phosphoglycerate kinase), stress adaption (chaperonin) and calcium signaling (calreticulin and CDPK1) were differentially regulated in osclp roots. Fura-2 molecular probe staining, which is an intracellular calcium indicator, and ICP-MS analysis suggested that the intracellular calcium content was significantly lower in roots of osclp as compared to the wild-type. Exogenous application of Ca(2+) resulted in successful recovery of both primary and lateral root growth in osclp. Moreover, overexpression of OsCLP resulted in improved growth with modified seed shape and starch structure; however, the overall yield remained unaffected. Taken together, our results highlight the involvement of OsCLP in rice growth by regulating the intracellular calcium concentrations.

  5. Live substrate positively affects root growth and stolon direction in the woodland strawberry, Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Erica M.; Watson, Maxine A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of clonal plant foraging generally focus on growth responses to patch quality once rooted. Here we explore the possibility of true plant foraging; the ability to detect and respond to patch resource status prior to rooting. Two greenhouse experiments were conducted to investigate the morphological changes that occur when individual daughter ramets of Fragaria vesca (woodland strawberry) were exposed to air above live (non-sterilized) or dead (sterilized) substrates. Contact between daughter ramets and substrate was prohibited. Daughter ramet root biomass was significantly larger over live versus dead substrate. Root:shoot ratio also increased over live substrate, a morphological response we interpret as indicative of active nutrient foraging. Daughter ramet root biomass was positively correlated with mother ramet size over live but not dead substrate. Given the choice between a live versus a dead substrate, primary stolons extended preferentially toward live substrates. We conclude that exposure to live substrate drives positive nutrient foraging responses in F. vesca. We propose that volatiles emitted from the substrates might be effecting the morphological changes that occur during true nutrient foraging. PMID:26483826

  6. Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana root growth kinetics with high temporal and spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Fisahn, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Background Methods exist to quantify the distribution of growth rate over the root axis. However, non-destructive, high-throughput evaluations of total root elongation in controlled environments and the field are lacking in growth studies. A new imaging approach to analyse total root elongation is described. Scope High pixel resolution of the images enables the study of growth in short time intervals and provides high temporal resolution. Using the method described, total root elongation rates are calculated from the displacement of the root tip. Although the absolute root elongation rate changes in response to growth conditions, this set-up enables root growth of Arabidopsis wild-type seedlings to be followed for more than 1 month after germination. The method provides an easy approach to decipher root extension rate and much simpler calculations compared with other methods that use segmental growth to address this question. Conclusions The high temporal resolution allows small modifications of total root elongation growth to be revealed. Furthermore, with the options to investigate growth of various mutants in diverse growth conditions the present tool allows modulations in root growth kinetics due to different biotic and abiotic stimuli to be unravelled. Measurements performed on Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type (Col0) plants revealed rhythms superimposed on root elongation. Results obtained from the starchless mutant pgm, however, present a clearly modified pattern. As expected, deviation is strongest during the dark period. PMID:20421235

  7. Does Salinity Reduce Growth in Maize Root Epidermal Cells by Inhibiting Their Capacity for Cell Wall Acidification? 1

    PubMed Central

    Zidan, Ibrahim; Azaizeh, Hassan; Neumann, Peter M.

    1990-01-01

    The reduction in growth of maize (Zea mays L.) seedling primary roots induced by salinization of the nutrient medium with 100 millimolar NaCl was accompanied by reductions in the length of the root tip elongation zone, the length of fully elongated epidermal cells, and the apparent rate of cell production: Each was partially restored when calcium levels in the salinized growth medium were increased from 0.5 to 10.0 millimolar. We investigated the possibility that the inhibition of elongation growth by salinity might be associated with an inhibition of cell wall acidification, such as that which occurs when root growth is inhibited by IAA. A qualitative assay of root surface acidification, using bromocresol purple pH indicator in agar, showed that salinized roots, with and without extra calcium, produced a zone of surface acidification which was similar to that produced by control roots. The zone of acidification began 1 to 2 millimeters behind the tip and coincided with the zone of cell elongation. The remainder of the root alkalinized its surface. Kinetics of surface acidification were assayed quantitatively by placing a flat tipped pH electrode in contact with the elongation zone. The pH at the epidermal surfaces of roots grown either with 100 millimolar NaCl (growth inhibitory), or with 10 millimolar calcium ± NaCl (little growth inhibition), declined from 6.0 to 5.1 over 30 minutes. We conclude that NaCl did not inhibit growth by reducing the capacity of epidermal cells to acidify their walls. PMID:16667468

  8. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots.

  9. Transcriptomic and anatomical complexity of primary, seminal, and crown roots highlight root type-specific functional diversity in maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Huanhuan; Lu, Xin; Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Lithio, Andrew; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Maize develops a complex root system composed of embryonic and post-embryonic roots. Spatio-temporal differences in the formation of these root types imply specific functions during maize development. A comparative transcriptomic study of embryonic primary and seminal, and post-embryonic crown roots of the maize inbred line B73 by RNA sequencing along with anatomical studies were conducted early in development. Seminal roots displayed unique anatomical features, whereas the organization of primary and crown roots was similar. For instance, seminal roots displayed fewer cortical cell files and their stele contained more meta-xylem vessels. Global expression profiling revealed diverse patterns of gene activity across all root types and highlighted the unique transcriptome of seminal roots. While functions in cell remodeling and cell wall formation were prominent in primary and crown roots, stress-related genes and transcriptional regulators were over-represented in seminal roots, suggesting functional specialization of the different root types. Dynamic expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and histochemical staining suggested diversification of cell wall lignification among the three root types. Our findings highlight a cost-efficient anatomical structure and a unique expression profile of seminal roots of the maize inbred line B73 different from primary and crown roots. PMID:26628518

  10. The influence of treeshelters and irrigation on shoot and root growth of three California oak species

    Treesearch

    Douglas McCreary; Laurence R. Costello; Jerry Tecklin; Katherine Jones; David Labadie

    2002-01-01

    Treeshelters are individual seedling protectors that can accelerate height growth of native California oaks. There is concern, however, that this growth may occur at the expense of the roots, resulting in poor long-term field performance. This study could detect no differences between protected and unprotected seedlings in shoot weight, root weight or shoot/root ratios...

  11. Development of the primary root and mobilisation of reserves in etiolated seedlings of Brassica napus grown on a slowly rotating clinostat.

    PubMed

    Aarrouf, Jawad; Demandre, Chantal; Darbelley, Nicole; Villard, Claude; Perbal, Gérald

    2003-04-01

    The effect of the slow rotating clinostat (1 rpm) on the growth of the primary root was studied on Brassica napus seedlings. After 5 d in darkness, the primary root was longer and thinner in seedlings grown on the clinostat than in seedlings grown in the vertical position. However, the breakdown of lipid reserves, sucrose level and transport of 14C-labeled sucrose from the cotyledons to the primary root, were not altered by growth on the clinostat. Moreover, the activity of isocitrate lyase, one of the two enzymes necessary for the conversion of lipids into glucids also was also not modified in the cotyledons of clinorotated seedlings. Thus, there was clear evidence that clinorotation had a direct effect on the growth of the primary root that was independent of the mobilisation of lipid reserves in the cotyledons. As a sink, the primary root had the same strength on the clinostat as in the vertical position, but the reserves were used in a different way. The increase in root elongation on the clinostat could be due to the slight, but continuous, omnilateral gravitropic stimulation due to the rotation of the seedlings about a horizontal axis.

  12. Arabidopsis thaliana mitogen-activated protein kinase 6 is involved in seed formation and modulation of primary and lateral root development

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-García, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) cascades are signal transduction modules highly conserved in all eukaryotes regulating various aspects of plant biology, including stress responses and developmental programmes. In this study, we characterized the role of MAPK 6 (MPK6) in Arabidopsis embryo development and in post-embryonic root system architecture. We found that the mpk6 mutation caused altered embryo development giving rise to three seed phenotypes that, post-germination, correlated with alterations in root architecture. In the smaller seed class, mutant seedlings failed to develop the primary root, possibly as a result of an earlier defect in the division of the hypophysis cell during embryo development, but they had the capacity to develop adventitious roots to complete their life cycle. In the larger class, the MPK6 loss of function did not cause any evident alteration in seed morphology, but the embryo and the mature seed were bigger than the wild type. Seedlings developed from these bigger seeds were characterized by a primary root longer than that of the wild type, accompanied by significantly increased lateral root initiation and more and longer root hairs. Apparently, the increment in primary root growth resulted from an enhanced cell production and cell elongation. Our data demonstrated that MPK6 plays an important role during embryo development and acts as a repressor of primary and lateral root development. PMID:24218326

  13. Increased soil phosphorus availability induced by faba bean root exudation stimulates root growth and phosphorus uptake in neighbouring maize.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deshan; Zhang, Chaochun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Li, Haigang; Zhang, Fusuo; Rengel, Zed; Whalley, William R; Davies, William J; Shen, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    Root growth is influenced by soil nutrients and neighbouring plants, but how these two drivers affect root interactions and regulate plant growth dynamics is poorly understood. Here, interactions between the roots of maize (Zea mays) and faba bean (Vicia faba) are characterized. Maize was grown alone (maize) or with maize (maize/maize) or faba bean (maize/faba bean) as competitors under five levels of phosphorus (P) supply, and with homogeneous or heterogeneous P distribution. Maize had longer root length and greater shoot biomass and P content when grown with faba bean than with maize. At each P supply rate, faba bean had a smaller root system than maize but greater exudation of citrate and acid phosphatase, suggesting a greater capacity to mobilize P in the rhizosphere. Heterogeneous P availability enhanced the root-length density of maize but not faba bean. Maize root proliferation in the P-rich patches was associated with increased shoot P uptake. Increased P availability by localized P application or by the presence of faba bean exudation stimulated root morphological plasticity and increased shoot growth in maize in the maize/faba bean mixture, suggesting that root interactions of neighbouring plants can be modified by increased P availability.

  14. Improving root-zone soil moisture estimations using dynamic root growth and crop phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemian, Minoo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Crow, Wade T.; Kustas, William P.

    2015-12-01

    Water Energy Balance (WEB) Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) modelling can be used to estimate soil moisture by forcing the model with observed data such as precipitation and solar radiation. Recently, an innovative approach that assimilates remotely sensed thermal infrared (TIR) observations into WEB-SVAT to improve the results has been proposed. However, the efficacy of the model-observation integration relies on the model's realistic representation of soil water processes. Here, we explore methods to improve the soil water processes of a simple WEB-SVAT model by adopting and incorporating an exponential root water uptake model with water stress compensation and establishing a more appropriate soil-biophysical linkage between root-zone moisture content, above-ground states and biophysical indices. The existing WEB-SVAT model is extended to a new Multi-layer WEB-SVAT with Dynamic Root distribution (MWSDR) that has five soil layers. Impacts of plant root depth variations, growth stages and phenological cycle of the vegetation on transpiration are considered in developing stages. Hydrometeorological and biogeophysical measurements collected from two experimental sites, one in Dookie, Victoria, Australia and the other in Ponca, Oklahoma, USA, are used to validate the new model. Results demonstrate that MWSDR provides improved soil moisture, transpiration and evaporation predictions which, in turn, can provide an improved physical basis for assimilating remotely sensed data into the model. Results also show the importance of having an adequate representation of vegetation-related transpiration process for an appropriate simulation of water transfer in a complicated system of soil, plants and atmosphere.

  15. Induction of hairy roots and characterization of peroxidase expression as a potential root growth marker in sesame.

    PubMed

    Chun, J-A; Lee, J-W; Yi, Y-B; Park, G-Y; Chung, C-H

    2009-01-01

    Using hypocotyl and cotyledon of sesame seedlings, hairy root cultures were established and cDNA coding for a peroxidase was cloned from the roots. The frequency of sesame hairy root formation was higher in hypocotyl (33.4%) than cotyledon (9.3%). Applicable levels of kanamycin and hygromycin as a selectable marker were 100 microg/mL and 30 microg/mL, respectively. The peroxidase cDNA showed relatively high sequence identity with and similarity to plant class III peroxidase family. The cDNA encoded polypeptide was identified with the presence of three sequence features: 1) the putative 4 disulfide bridges, 2) an ER-targeted signal sequence in the N-terminus, and 3) two triplets, NXS for glycosylation. A real-time RT-PCR exhibited an abrupt increase in the peroxidase transcription activity after 4-week cultures of the sesame hairy roots and its highest level in 6-week cultured hairy roots. In contrast, the growth pattern of sesame hairy roots showed a typical sigmoidal curve. The active hairy root growth began after 2-week culture and their stationary growth phase occurred after 5-week culture. These results suggested that the peroxidase expression patterns at its transcription level could be used a potential indicator signaling a message that there will be no longer active growth in hairy root cultures. The sesame peroxidase gene was differentially expressed in different tissues.

  16. Growth, gas exchange, and root respiration of Quercus rubra seedlings exposed to low root zone temperatures in solution culture

    Treesearch

    Kent G. Apostol; Douglass F. Jacobs; Barrett C. Wilson; K. Francis Salifu; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2007-01-01

    Spring planting is standard operational practice in the Central Hardwood Region, though little is known about potential impacts of low root temperature (RT) common during spring on establishment success of temperate deciduous forest tree species. The effects of low RTon growth, gas exchange, and root respiration following winter dormancy were studied in 1-year-old...

  17. Glucose and auxin signaling interaction in controlling Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Bhuwaneshwar S; Singh, Manjul; Aggrawal, Priyanka; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2009-01-01

    Plant root growth and development is highly plastic and can adapt to many environmental conditions. Sugar signaling has been shown to affect root growth and development by interacting with phytohormones such as gibberellins, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Auxin signaling and transport has been earlier shown to be controlling plant root length, number of lateral roots, root hair and root growth direction. Increasing concentration of glucose not only controls root length, root hair and number of lateral roots but can also modulate root growth direction. Since root growth and development is also controlled by auxin, whole genome transcript profiling was done to find out the extent of interaction between glucose and auxin response pathways. Glucose alone could transcriptionally regulate 376 (62%) genes out of 604 genes affected by IAA. Presence of glucose could also modulate the extent of regulation 2 fold or more of almost 63% genes induced or repressed by IAA. Interestingly, glucose could affect induction or repression of IAA affected genes (35%) even if glucose alone had no significant effect on the transcription of these genes itself. Glucose could affect auxin biosynthetic YUCCA genes family members, auxin transporter PIN proteins, receptor TIR1 and members of a number of gene families including AUX/IAA, GH3 and SAUR involved in auxin signaling. Arabidopsis auxin receptor tir1 and response mutants, axr2, axr3 and slr1 not only display a defect in glucose induced change in root length, root hair elongation and lateral root production but also accentuate glucose induced increase in root growth randomization from vertical suggesting glucose effects on plant root growth and development are mediated by auxin signaling components. Our findings implicate an important role of the glucose interacting with auxin signaling and transport machinery to control seedling root growth and development in changing nutrient conditions.

  18. Glucose and Auxin Signaling Interaction in Controlling Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings Root Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Aggrawal, Priyanka; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2009-01-01

    Background Plant root growth and development is highly plastic and can adapt to many environmental conditions. Sugar signaling has been shown to affect root growth and development by interacting with phytohormones such as gibberellins, cytokinin and abscisic acid. Auxin signaling and transport has been earlier shown to be controlling plant root length, number of lateral roots, root hair and root growth direction. Principal Findings Increasing concentration of glucose not only controls root length, root hair and number of lateral roots but can also modulate root growth direction. Since root growth and development is also controlled by auxin, whole genome transcript profiling was done to find out the extent of interaction between glucose and auxin response pathways. Glucose alone could transcriptionally regulate 376 (62%) genes out of 604 genes affected by IAA. Presence of glucose could also modulate the extent of regulation 2 fold or more of almost 63% genes induced or repressed by IAA. Interestingly, glucose could affect induction or repression of IAA affected genes (35%) even if glucose alone had no significant effect on the transcription of these genes itself. Glucose could affect auxin biosynthetic YUCCA genes family members, auxin transporter PIN proteins, receptor TIR1 and members of a number of gene families including AUX/IAA, GH3 and SAUR involved in auxin signaling. Arabidopsis auxin receptor tir1 and response mutants, axr2, axr3 and slr1 not only display a defect in glucose induced change in root length, root hair elongation and lateral root production but also accentuate glucose induced increase in root growth randomization from vertical suggesting glucose effects on plant root growth and development are mediated by auxin signaling components. Conclusion Our findings implicate an important role of the glucose interacting with auxin signaling and transport machinery to control seedling root growth and development in changing nutrient conditions. PMID

  19. Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation growth is sensitive to lunisolar tidal acceleration and may also be weakly correlated with geomagnetic variations.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Peter W; Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Moraes, Thiago A; Khabarova, Olga V; Gallep, Cristiano M

    2013-05-01

    Correlative evidence suggests a relationship between the lunisolar tidal acceleration and the elongation rate of arabidopsis roots grown under free-running conditions of constant low light. Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were grown in a controlled-climate chamber maintained at a constant temperature and subjected to continuous low-level illumination from fluorescent tubes, conditions that approximate to a 'free-running' state in which most of the abiotic factors that entrain root growth rates are excluded. Elongation of evenly spaced, vertical primary roots was recorded continuously over periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging and were analysed in conjunction with geophysical variables. The results confirm the lunisolar tidal/root elongation relationship. Also presented are relationships between the hourly elongation rates and the contemporaneous variations in geomagnetic activity, as evaluated from the disturbance storm time and ap indices. On the basis of time series of root elongation rates that extend over ≥4 d and recorded at different seasons of the year, a provisional conclusion is that root elongation responds to variation in the lunisolar force and also appears to adjust in accordance with variations in the geomagnetic field. Thus, both lunisolar tidal acceleration and the geomagnetic field should be considered as modulators of root growth rate, alongside other, stronger and more well-known abiotic environmental regulators, and perhaps unexplored factors such as air ions. Major changes in atmospheric pressure are not considered to be a factor contributing to oscillations of root elongation rate.

  20. Effect of seed pelleting with biocontrol agents on growth and colonisation of roots of mungbean by root-infecting fungi.

    PubMed

    Ramzan, Nadia; Noreen, Nayara; Perveen, Zahida; Shahzad, Saleem

    2016-08-01

    Mungbean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) is a leguminous pulse crop that is a major source of proteins, vitamins and minerals. Root-infecting fungi produce severe plant diseases like root rot, charcoal rot, damping-off and stem rot. The soil-borne pathogens can be controlled by chemicals, but these chemicals have several negative effects. Use of microbial antagonist such as fungi and bacteria is a safe, effective and eco-friendly method for the control of many soil-borne pathogens. Biological control agents promote plant growth and develop disease resistance. Application of bacteria and fungi as seed dressing suppressed the root-infecting fungi on leguminous crops. Seeds of mungbean were pelleted with different biocontrol agents to determine their effect on plant growth and colonisation of roots by root-infecting fungi, viz. Fusarium solani, Macrophomina phaseolina, Pythium aphanidermatum, Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. Treatment of mungbean seeds with fungal antagonists showed more shoot and root length as compared to bacterial antagonists, whereas seed treated with bacterial antagonists showed maximum shoot and root weight. Trichoderma harzianum and Bacillus subtilis were the best among all the biocontrol agents since they provided the highest plant growth and greater reduction in root colonisation by all root-infecting fungi. Bacillus cereus, Trichoderma virens, Pseudomonas fluorescens and Micrococcus varians were also effective against root-infecting fungi but to a lesser extent. T. harzianum, T. virens, B. subtilis and P. fluorescens were found to be best among all biocontrol agents. The root-infecting fungi can be controlled by pelleting seeds with biocontrol agents as it is safe and effective method. Additionally, plant growth was promoted more by this method. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Spatial and directional variation of growth rates in Arabidopsis root apex: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Nakielski, Jerzy; Lipowczan, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Growth and cellular organization of the Arabidopsis root apex are investigated in various aspects, but still little is known about spatial and directional variation of growth rates in very apical part of the apex, especially in 3D. The present paper aims to fill this gap with the aid of a computer modelling based on the growth tensor method. The root apex with a typical shape and cellular pattern is considered. Previously, on the basis of two types of empirical data: the published velocity profile along the root axis and dimensions of cell packets formed in the lateral part of the root cap, the displacement velocity field for the root apex was determined. Here this field is adopted to calculate the linear growth rate in different points and directions. The results are interpreted taking principal growth directions into account. The root apex manifests a significant anisotropy of the linear growth rate. The directional preferences depend on a position within the root apex. In the root proper the rate in the periclinal direction predominates everywhere, while in the root cap the predominating direction varies with distance from the quiescent centre. The rhizodermis is distinguished from the neighbouring tissues (cortex, root cap) by relatively high contribution of the growth rate in the anticlinal direction. The degree of growth anisotropy calculated for planes defined by principal growth directions and exemplary cell walls may be as high as 25. The changes in the growth rate variation are modelled.

  2. Root growth dynamics linked to aboveground growth in walnuts (Juglans regia L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background and Aims: Examination of belowground plant responses to canopy and soil moisture manipulation is scant compared to that aboveground but needed to understand whole plant responses to environmental factors. Plasticity in the seasonal timing and vertical distribution of root growth in respon...

  3. Spatio-temporal dynamics of expansion growth in roots: automatic quantification of diurnal course and temperature response by digital image sequence processing.

    PubMed

    Walter, A; Spies, H; Terjung, S; Küsters, R; Kirchgessner, N; Schurr, U

    2002-04-01

    A newly developed technique based on image sequence analysis allows automatic and precise quantification of the dynamics of the growth velocity of the root tip, the distribution of expansion growth rates along the entire growth zone and the oscillation frequencies of the root tip during growth without the need of artificial landmarks. These three major parameters characterizing expansion growth of primary roots can be analysed over several days with high spatial (20 microm) and temporal resolution (several minutes) as the camera follows the growing root by an image-controlled root tracking device. In combination with a rhizotron set up for hydroponic plant cultivation the impact of rapid changes of environmental factors can be assessed. First applications of this new system proved the absence of diurnal variation of root growth in Zea mays under constant temperature conditions. The distribution profile of relative elemental growth rate (REGR) showed two maxima under constant and varying growth conditions. Lateral oscillatory movements of growing root tips were present even under constant environmental conditions. Dynamic changes in velocity- and REGR-distribution within 1 h could be quantified after a step change in temperature from 21 degrees C to 26 degrees C. Most prominent growth responses were found in the zone of maximal root elongation.

  4. Induction of curvature in maize roots by calcium or by thigmostimulation: role of the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv Merit) to unilateral application of calcium with particular attention to the site of application, the dependence on growth rate, and possible contributions of thigmotropic stimulation during application. Unilateral application of agar to the root cap induced negative curvature whether or not the agar contained calcium. This apparent thigmotropic response was enhanced by including calcium in the agar. Curvature away from objects applied unilaterally to the extreme root tip occurred both in intact and detipped roots. When agar containing calcium chloride was applied to one side of the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone ( a region between the apical meristem and the elongation zone), the root curved toward the side of application. This response could not be induced by plain agar. We conclude that curvature away from calcium applied to the root tip results from a thigmotropic response to stimulation during application. In contrast, curvature toward the calcium applied to the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone results from direct calcium-induced inhibition of growth.

  5. The ABA receptor PYL9 together with PYL8 plays an important role in regulating lateral root growth

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lu; Zhao, Yang; Gao, Jinghui; Xiang, Chengbin; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid is a phytohormone regulating plant growth, development and stress responses. PYR1/PYL/RCAR proteins are ABA receptors that function by inhibiting PP2Cs to activate SnRK2s, resulting in phosphorylation of ABFs and other effectors of ABA response pathways. Exogenous ABA induces growth quiescence of lateral roots, which is prolonged by knockout of the ABA receptor PYL8. Among the 14 members of PYR1/PYL/RCAR protein family, PYL9 is a close relative of PYL8. Here we show that knockout of both PYL9 and PYL8 resulted in a longer ABA-induced quiescence on lateral root growth and a reduced sensitivity to ABA on primary root growth and lateral root formation compared to knockout of PYL8 alone. Induced overexpression of PYL9 promoted the lateral root elongation in the presence of ABA. The prolonged quiescent phase of the pyl8-1pyl9 double mutant was reversed by exogenous IAA. PYL9 may regulate auxin-responsive genes in vivo through direct interaction with MYB77 and MYB44. Thus, PYL9 and PYL8 are both responsible for recovery of lateral root from ABA inhibition via MYB transcription factors. PMID:27256015

  6. Apical meristem organization and lack of establishment of the quiescent center in Cactaceae roots with determinate growth.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José Fernando; Shishkova, Svetlana; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Dubrovsky, Joseph G

    2003-10-01

    Some species of Cactaceae from the Sonoran Desert are characterized by a determinate growth pattern of the primary root, which is important for rapid lateral-root formation and seedling establishment. An analysis of the determinate root growth can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of meristem maintenance in plants in general. Stenocereus gummosus (Engelm.) Gibson & Horak and Pachycereus pringlei (S. Watson) Britton & Rose are characterized by an open type of root apical meristem. Immunohistochemical analysis of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation into S. gummosus showed that the percentage of cells passing through the S-phase in a 24-h period is the same within the zone where a population of relatively slowly proliferating cells could be established and above this zone in the meristem. This indicated the absence of the quiescent center (QC) in S. gummosus. During the second and the third days of growth, in the distal meristem portion of P. pringlei roots, a compact group of cells that had a cell cycle longer than in the proximal meristem was found, indicating the presence of the QC. However, later in development, the QC could not be detected in this species. These data suggest that during post-germination the absence of the establishment of the QC within the apical meristem and limited proliferative activity of initial cells are the main components of a determinate developmental program and that establishment of the QC is required for maintenance of the meristem and indeterminate root growth in plants.

  7. Induction of curvature in maize roots by calcium or by thigmostimulation: role of the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishikawa, H.; Evans, M. L.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv Merit) to unilateral application of calcium with particular attention to the site of application, the dependence on growth rate, and possible contributions of thigmotropic stimulation during application. Unilateral application of agar to the root cap induced negative curvature whether or not the agar contained calcium. This apparent thigmotropic response was enhanced by including calcium in the agar. Curvature away from objects applied unilaterally to the extreme root tip occurred both in intact and detipped roots. When agar containing calcium chloride was applied to one side of the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone ( a region between the apical meristem and the elongation zone), the root curved toward the side of application. This response could not be induced by plain agar. We conclude that curvature away from calcium applied to the root tip results from a thigmotropic response to stimulation during application. In contrast, curvature toward the calcium applied to the postmitotic isodiametric growth zone results from direct calcium-induced inhibition of growth.

  8. Root diseases: primary agents and secondary consequences of disturbance

    Treesearch

    William J. Otrosina; George T. Ferrell

    1995-01-01

    The fact that endemic root disease causing pathogens have evolved with forest ecosystems does not necessarily mean they are inconsequential. A pathogen such as the P group of Heterobasidion annosum has become an intractable problem in many Sierra east side pine stands in California because the fungus is adapted to colonization of freshly cut stump surfaces. The S group...

  9. Flavonols Mediate Root Phototropism and Growth through Regulation of Proliferation-to-Differentiation Transition.

    PubMed

    Silva-Navas, Javier; Moreno-Risueno, Miguel A; Manzano, Concepción; Téllez-Robledo, Bárbara; Navarro-Neila, Sara; Carrasco, Víctor; Pollmann, Stephan; Gallego, F Javier; Del Pozo, Juan C

    2016-06-01

    Roots normally grow in darkness, but they may be exposed to light. After perceiving light, roots bend to escape from light (root light avoidance) and reduce their growth. How root light avoidance responses are regulated is not well understood. Here, we show that illumination induces the accumulation of flavonols in Arabidopsis thaliana roots. During root illumination, flavonols rapidly accumulate at the side closer to light in the transition zone. This accumulation promotes asymmetrical cell elongation and causes differential growth between the two sides, leading to root bending. Furthermore, roots illuminated for a long period of time accumulate high levels of flavonols. This high flavonol content decreases both auxin signaling and PLETHORA gradient as well as superoxide radical content, resulting in reduction of cell proliferation. In addition, cytokinin and hydrogen peroxide, which promote root differentiation, induce flavonol accumulation in the root transition zone. As an outcome of prolonged light exposure and flavonol accumulation, root growth is reduced and a different root developmental zonation is established. Finally, we observed that these differentiation-related pathways are required for root light avoidance. We propose that flavonols function as positional signals, integrating hormonal and reactive oxygen species pathways to regulate root growth direction and rate in response to light. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  10. [Impacts of root-zone hypoxia stress on muskmelon growth, its root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Ling; Li, Tian-Lai; Sun, Zhou-Ping; Chen, Ya-Dong

    2010-06-01

    By using aeroponics culture system, this paper studied the impacts of root-zone hypoxia (10% O2 and 5% O2) stress on the plant growth, root respiratory metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities of muskmelon at its fruit development stage. Root-zone hypoxia stress inhibited the plant growth of muskmelon, resulting in the decrease of plant height, root length, and fresh and dry biomass. Comparing with the control (21% O2), hypoxia stress reduced the root respiration rate and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity significantly, and the impact of 5% O2 stress was more serious than that of 10% O2 stress. Under hypoxic conditions, the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) activities and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content were significantly higher than the control. The increment of antioxidative enzyme activities under 10% O2 stress was significantly higher than that under 5% O2 stress, while the MDA content was higher under 5% O2 stress than under 10% O2 stress, suggesting that when the root-zone oxygen concentration was below 10%, the aerobic respiration of muskmelon at its fruit development stage was obviously inhibited while the anaerobic respiration was accelerated, and the root antioxidative enzymes induced defense reaction. With the increasing duration of hypoxic stress, the lipid peroxidation would be aggravated, resulting in the damages on muskmelon roots, inhibition of plant growth, and decrease of fruit yield and quality.

  11. [Effects of drought stress on the root growth and development and physiological characteristics of peanut].

    PubMed

    Ding, Hong; Zhang, Zhi-Meng; Dai, Liang-Xiang; Kang, Tao; Ci, Dun-Wei; Song, Wen-Wu

    2013-06-01

    Taking two peanut varieties Huayu 17 and Tangke 8 as test objects, a soil column culture experiment was conducted in a rainproof tank to study the peanut root morphological development and physiological characteristics at late growth stages under moderate drought and well-watered conditions. Tanke 8 had more developed root system and higher yield and drought coefficient, while Huayu 17 had poorer root adaptability to drought stress. For the two varieties, their root length density and root biomass were mainly distributed in 0-40 cm soil layer, whereas their root traits differed in the same soil layer. The total root length, total root surface area, and total root volume of Huayu 17 at each growth stage were smaller under drought stress than under well-balanced water treatment, while these root characteristics of Tangke 8 under drought stress only decreased at flowering-pegging stage. Drought stress increased the root biomass, surface area, and volume of the two varieties in 20-40 cm soil layer, but decreased these root traits in the soil layers below 40 cm. Under drought stress, the root activity of the two varieties in the soil layers below 40 cm at pod filling stage decreased, and the decrement was larger for Huayu 17. The differences in the root system development and physiological characteristics of the two varieties at late growth stages under drought stress suggested that the root system of the two varieties had different water absorption and utilization under drought stress.

  12. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Lesley A.; Jackson, Brian E.; Fonteno, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics) has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain. PMID:27135334

  13. Advancements in Root Growth Measurement Technologies and Observation Capabilities for Container-Grown Plants.

    PubMed

    Judd, Lesley A; Jackson, Brian E; Fonteno, William C

    2015-07-03

    The study, characterization, observation, and quantification of plant root growth and root systems (Rhizometrics) has been and remains an important area of research in all disciplines of plant science. In the horticultural industry, a large portion of the crops grown annually are grown in pot culture. Root growth is a critical component in overall plant performance during production in containers, and therefore it is important to understand the factors that influence and/or possible enhance it. Quantifying root growth has varied over the last several decades with each method of quantification changing in its reliability of measurement and variation among the results. Methods such as root drawings, pin boards, rhizotrons, and minirhizotrons initiated the aptitude to measure roots with field crops, and have been expanded to container-grown plants. However, many of the published research methods are monotonous and time-consuming. More recently, computer programs have increased in use as technology advances and measuring characteristics of root growth becomes easier. These programs are instrumental in analyzing various root growth characteristics, from root diameter and length of individual roots to branching angle and topological depth of the root architecture. This review delves into the expanding technologies involved with expertly measuring root growth of plants in containers, and the advantages and disadvantages that remain.

  14. Nonfumigant Nematicides for Control of Root-knot Nematode to Protect Carrot Root Growth in Organic Soils.

    PubMed

    Vrain, T C; Belair, G; Martel, P

    1979-10-01

    Greenhouse tests were conducted to determine the effects of two kinds of Meloidogyne hapla inoculum on the growth and quality of carrot roots, and the protection afforded in each case by nonfumigant nematicides in organic soils. For all treatments the percentage of carrots damaged was greater with larvae alone as inoculum than with larvae and eggs, indicating that most of the damage occurs early during formation of the taproot. Fosthietan, aldicarb, and oxamyl at 4 and 6 kg ai/ha protected the roots during formation and gave a lasting control of root-knot nematode. There was some nematode damage to the roots with phenamiphos and carbofuran at 4 and 6 kg ai/ha. Isazophos, diflubenzuron, and fenvalerate gave little protection to carrot roots and did not control root-knot nematode effectively.

  15. Root resorption of primary molars without successor teeth. An experimental study in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bi-Chen; Zhao, Yu-Ming; Yang, Jie; Ge, Li-Hong

    2012-04-01

    Tooth agenesis is a common craniofacial congenital malformation in humans, but little is known about the mechanisms of root resorption in this condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of root resorption in primary molars without successors. An animal model without permanent tooth germs was established by surgery in beagles. The times of onset of primary molar root resorption, with and without successors, were compared. The distribution of immune cells, odontoclasts, and their activating factors were determined by histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Root resorption of primary mandibular molars without successors began later than physiological resorption. In primary molars without permanent germs, odontoclasts and immune cells were present mainly in the apical pulp at the start of root resorption, whereas in control teeth receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-positive cells were found mainly in the region of the periodontal ligament. CD14(+) and CD3(+) cells were found in both the pulp and the periodontal ligament region. These results suggest that the dental pulp of primary molars, as well as immune cells, may play an important role in root resorption in primary molars without permanent tooth germs.

  16. Long-term Root Growth Response to Thinning, Fertilization, and Water Deficit in Plantation Loblolly Pine

    Treesearch

    M.A. Sword-Sayer; Z. Tang

    2004-01-01

    High water deficits limit the new root growth of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.), potentially reducing soil resource availability and stand growth. We evaluated new root growth and stand production in response to thinning and fertilization in loblolly pine over a 6-year period that consisted of 3 years of low water deficit followed by 3 years of high...

  17. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Bi, Yurong

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCFTIR1 ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation. PMID:24591051

  18. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Lei; Hu, Yanfeng; Wei, Yuantao; Liang, Xiaolei; Mao, Lina; Bi, Yurong

    2014-04-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCF(TIR1) ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation.

  19. Selenite-induced hormonal and signalling mechanisms during root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    PubMed

    Lehotai, Nóra; Kolbert, Zsuzsanna; Peto, Andrea; Feigl, Gábor; Ördög, Attila; Kumar, Devanand; Tari, Irma; Erdei, László

    2012-09-01

    Selenium excess can cause toxicity symptoms, e.g. root growth inhibition in non-hyperaccumulator plants such as Arabidopsis. Selenite-induced hormonal and signalling mechanisms in the course of development are poorly understood; therefore this study set out to investigate the possible hormonal and signalling processes using transgenic and mutant Arabidopsis plants. Significant alterations were observed in the root architecture of the selenite-treated plants, due to the loss of cell viability in the root apex. During mild selenite excess, the plants showed symptoms of the morphogenic response: primary root (PR) shortening and increased initiation of laterals, ensuring better nutrient and water uptake and stress acclimation. As well as lower meristem cell activity, the second reason for the Se-induced growth hindrance is the hormonal imbalance, since the in situ expression of the auxin-responsive DR5::GUS, and consequently the auxin levels, significantly decreased, while that of the cytokinin-inducible ARR5::GUS and the ethylene biosynthetic ACS8::GUS increased. It is assumed that auxin and ethylene might positively regulate selenium tolerance, since reduced levels of them resulted in sensitivity. Moreover, high cytokinin levels caused notable selenite tolerance. During early seedling development, nitric oxide (NO) contents decreased but hydrogen peroxide levels increased reflecting the antagonism between the two signal molecules during Se excess. High levels of NO in gsnor1-3, lead to selenite tolerance, while low NO production in nia1nia2 resulted in selenite sensitivity. Consequently, NO derived from the root nitrate reductase activity is responsible for the large-scale selenite tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  20. Defective secretion of mucilage is the cellular basis for agravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Ageotropic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Root caps of primary, secondary, and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Kys secrete large amounts of mucilage and are in close contact with the root all along the root apex. These roots are strongly graviresponsive. Secondary and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are also strongly graviresponsive. Similarly, their caps secrete mucilage and closely appress the root all along the root apex. However, primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are non-responsive to gravity. Their caps secrete negligible amounts of mucilage and contact the root only at the extreme apex of the root along the calyptrogen. These roots become graviresponsive when their tips are coated with mucilage or mucilage-like materials. Peripheral cells of root caps of roots of Z. mays cv. Kys contain many dictyosomes associated with vesicles that migrate to and fuse with the plasmalemma. Root-cap cells of secondary and seminal (i.e. graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are similar to those of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Kys. However, root-cap cells of primary (i.e. non-graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic have distended dictyosomal cisternae filled with an electron-dense, granular material. Large vesicles full of this material populate the cells and apparently do not fuse with the plasmalemma. Taken together, these results suggest that non-graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic results from the lack of apoplastic continuity between the root and the periphery of the root cap. This is a result of negligible secretion of mucilage by cells along the edge of the root cap which, in turn, appears to be due to the malfunctioning of dictyosomes in these cells.

  1. Defective secretion of mucilage is the cellular basis for agravitropism in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Ageotropic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Root caps of primary, secondary, and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Kys secrete large amounts of mucilage and are in close contact with the root all along the root apex. These roots are strongly graviresponsive. Secondary and seminal roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are also strongly graviresponsive. Similarly, their caps secrete mucilage and closely appress the root all along the root apex. However, primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are non-responsive to gravity. Their caps secrete negligible amounts of mucilage and contact the root only at the extreme apex of the root along the calyptrogen. These roots become graviresponsive when their tips are coated with mucilage or mucilage-like materials. Peripheral cells of root caps of roots of Z. mays cv. Kys contain many dictyosomes associated with vesicles that migrate to and fuse with the plasmalemma. Root-cap cells of secondary and seminal (i.e. graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic are similar to those of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Kys. However, root-cap cells of primary (i.e. non-graviresponsive) roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic have distended dictyosomal cisternae filled with an electron-dense, granular material. Large vesicles full of this material populate the cells and apparently do not fuse with the plasmalemma. Taken together, these results suggest that non-graviresponsiveness of primary roots of Z. mays cv. Ageotropic results from the lack of apoplastic continuity between the root and the periphery of the root cap. This is a result of negligible secretion of mucilage by cells along the edge of the root cap which, in turn, appears to be due to the malfunctioning of dictyosomes in these cells.

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor stimulates root growth during the development of mouse molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, H; Fujiwara, N; Sasaki-Oikawa, A; Sakano, M; Tabata, Y; Otsu, K; Ishizeki, K; Harada, H

    2012-02-01

    It is well known that tooth root formation is initiated by the development of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS). However, relatively little is known about the regulatory mechanisms involved in root development. As hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is one of the mediators of epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in rodent tooth, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of HGF on the root development of mouse molars. The HERS of mouse molars and HERS01a, a cell line originated from HERS, were used in this study. For detection of HGF receptors in vivo and in vitro, we used immunochemical procedures. Root development was assessed by implanting molar tooth germs along with HGF-soaked beads into kidney capsules, by counting cell numbers in HERS01a cell cultures and by performing a 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay in an organ-culture system. HGF receptors were expressed in the enamel epithelium of molar germs as well as in HERS cells. HGF stimulated root development in the transplanted tooth germs, the proliferation of HERS01a cells in culture and HERS elongation in the organ-culture system. Examination using BrdU revealed that cell proliferation in HERS was increased by treatment with HGF, especially that in the outer layer of HERS. This effect was down-regulated when antibody against HGF receptor was present in the culture medium. Our results raise the possibility that HGF signaling controls root formation via the development of HERS. This study is the first to show that HGF is one of the stimulators of root development. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Development of the Casparian strip in primary roots of maize under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Karahara, Ichirou; Ikeda, Atsuo; Kondo, Takanori; Uetake, Yuzo

    2004-05-01

    The Casparian strip in the endodermis of vascular plant roots appears to play an important role in preventing the influx of salts into the stele through the apoplast under salt stress. The effects of salinity on the development and morphology of the Casparian strip in primary roots of maize ( Zea mays L.) were studied. Compared to the controls, the strip matured closer to the root tip with increase in the ambient concentration of NaCl. During growth in 200 mM NaCl, the number and the length of the endodermal cells in the region between the root tip and the lowest position of the endodermal strip decreased, as did the apparent rate of production of cells in single files of endodermal cells (the rate of cell formation being equal to the rate at which cells are lost from the meristem). The estimated time required for an individual cell to complete the formation of the strip after generation of the cell in the presence of 200 mM NaCl was not very different from that required in controls. Thus, salinity did not substantially affect the actual process of formation of the strip in individual cells. The radial width of the Casparian strip, a morphological parameter that should be related to the effectiveness of the strip as a barrier, increased in the presence of 200 mM NaCl. The mean width of the lignified region was 0.92 microm in distilled water and 1.33 microm in 200 mM NaCl at the lowest position of the strip. The mean width of the strip relative to that of the radial wall at this position was significantly greater after growth in the presence of 200 mM NaCl than in the controls, namely, 20.5% in distilled water and 33.9% in 200 mM NaCl. These observations suggest that the function of the strip is enhanced under salt stress.

  4. Brassinosteroids are inherently biosynthesized in the primary roots of maize, Zea mays L.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Soo; Kim, Tae-Wuk; Kim, Seong-Ki

    2005-05-01

    GC-MS analysis revealed that primary roots of maize contain 6-deoxocathasterone, 6-deoxoteasterone and 6-deoxotyphasterol. These brassinosteroids, and the previously identified campesterol, campestanol, 6-deoxocastasterone and castasterone, in the roots are members of a biosynthetic pathway to castasterone, namely the late C-6 oxidation pathway, suggesting that its biosynthetic pathway is operative in the roots. To verify this, a cell-free enzyme extract was prepared from maize roots, and enzymatic conversions from campesterol to castasterone through the aforementioned sterols and brassinosteroids were examined. The presence for the biosynthetic sequences, campesterol-->24-methylcholest-4-en-3beta-ol-->24-methylcholest-4-en-3-one-->24-methylcholest-5 alpha-cholestan-3-one-->campestanol and 6-deoxoteasterone-->6-deoxo-3-dehydroteasterone-->6-deoxotyphasterol-->6-deoxocastasterone-->castasterone were demonstrated. These results indicate that maize roots contain a complete set of enzymes involved in the late C-6 oxidation pathway, thereby demonstrating that endogenous brassinosteroids are biosynthesized in the roots.

  5. Maize Root Growth and Localized Indol-3yl-Acetic Acid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meuwly, Philippe; Pilet, Paul-Emile

    1987-01-01

    Resin beads loaded with indol-3yl-acetic acid (IAA) were used as asymmetrical donors along the elongation zone of intact primary Zea mays L. roots. A strong curvature, towards and above the bead, occurred when IAA was applied at a mean distance of 2.20 mm from the tip. No curvature was detected after applications at 3.89 and 5.71 mm from the tip. Correspondence analysis, a new methodological approach in plant hormone studies, permitted the evaluation of the relative influence of several factors on the curvature observed for each root. The parameters considered were the initial growth rate, the exact location of the bead (1.64-2.73 millimeters from tip) and the quantity of IAA absorbed. Roots which grew rapidly bent earlier than slowly growing ones and the more basal the treatment was, the less curvature occurred. Surprisingly, the amount of IAA taken up (between 1.2 and 2.2 times the endogenous IAA content) was found to have no influence on either the time-course or the magnitude of this growth inhibition (curvature). The usefulness of this multivariate analysis is also discussed. PMID:16665595

  6. Inhibition of root meristem growth by cadmium involves nitric oxide-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong-Mei; Huang, Xi

    2016-01-01

    The root is the first plant organ to get in contact with the toxin cadmium (Cd), which is a widespread soil contaminant. Cd inhibits the growth of the primary root, but the mechanisms underlying this inhibition remain elusive. In this study, we used physiological, pharmacological and genetic approaches to investigate the roles of nitric oxide (NO) and auxin in Cd-mediated inhibition of Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem growth. Our study demonstrated that in the first 12 h of exposure, Cd inhibits primary root elongation through a decrease in the sizes of both the elongation and meristematic zones. Following Cd exposure, a decrease in auxin levels is associated with reduced PIN1/3/7 protein accumulation, but not with reduced PIN1/3/7 transcript levels. Additionally, Cd stabilized AXR3/IAA17 protein to repress auxin signalling in this Cd-mediated process. Furthermore, decreasing Cd-induced NO accumulation with either NO-specific scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) or NO synthase inhibitor N(ω) -nitro-l-Arg-methylester (l-NAME) compromised the Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem development, reduction in auxin and PIN1/3/7 accumulation, as well as stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO participates in Cd-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, our data suggest that Cd inhibits root meristem growth by NO-mediated repression of auxin accumulation and signalling in Arabidopsis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Influence of Merosesquiterpenoids from Marine Sponges on Seedling Root Growth of Agricultural Plants.

    PubMed

    Chaikina, Elena L; Utkina, Natalia K; Anisimov, Mikhail M

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the merosesquiterpenoids avarol (1), avarone (2), 18-methylaminoavarone (3), melemeleone A (4), isospongiaquinone (5), ilimaquinone (6), and smenoquinone (7), isolated from marine sponges of the Dictyoceratida order, was studied on the root growth of seedlings of buckwheat (Fagopyrumesculentum Moench), wheat (Triticumaestivum L.), soy (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), and barley (Hordeumvulgare L.). Compounds 2and 6 were effective for the root growth of wheat seedlings, compound 3 stimulated the root growth of seedlings of buckwheat and soy, compound 4 affected the roots of barley seedlings, and compound 5 stimulated the root growth of seedlings of buckwheat and barley. Compounds 1 and 7 showed no activity on the root growth of the seedlings of any of the studied plants. The stimulatory effect depends on the chemical structure of the compounds and the type of crop plant.

  8. Fine Root Growth Phenology, Production, and Turnover in a Northern Hardwood Forest Ecosystem

    Treesearch

    Marianne K. Burke; Dudley J. Raynal

    1994-01-01

    A large part of the nutrient flux in deciduous forests is through fine root turnover, yet this process is seldom measured. As part of a nutrient cycling study, fine root dynamics were studied for two years at Huntington Forest in the Adirondack Mountain region of New York, USA. Root growth phenology was characterized using field rhizotrons, three methods were used to...

  9. Individual tree differences confound effects of growth regulators in rooting sugar maple softwood cuttings

    Treesearch

    John R. Donnelly

    1971-01-01

    Softwood stem cuttings from three mature sugar maple trees were treated with several types and concentrations of growth regulators. Lack of statistical significance was due to extreme variability in tree response: low levels of auxin stimulated rooting in two study trees, while auxins inhibited rooting in the other tree. It is postulated that variations in rooting...

  10. Effect of pruning the parent root on growth of aspen suckers

    Treesearch

    Ashbel F. Hough

    1965-01-01

    Various portions of the root systems of bigtooth aspen (Populus grandidentata) suckers were severed, and the subsequent height and radial growth of stems were measured. Aspen vegetative regeneration is heavily dependent on the parent roots for at least 25 years following initial suckering. The distal portion of the parent root contributes more to...

  11. Use Root Cause Analysis Teaching Strategy to Train Primary Pre-Service Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chow-chin; Tsai, Chun-wei; Hong, Jon-chao

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the Root Cause Analysis (RCA) teaching strategy on pre-service primary science teachers and instinct pre-service teachers to apply RCA teaching strategy to science curriculums. RCA Teaching Strategy is to coordinates 5 Why Method and Fishbone Diagram. The participants included 18 pre-service primary science teachers and the…

  12. Evaluation of root canal morphology of human primary molars by using CBCT and comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Gozde; Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Cantekin, Kenan; Aydinbelge, Mustafa; Dogan, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of primary tooth morphology is essential for clinical dentistry, especially for root canal treatment and dental traumatology. However, this has not been well documented to date with a large sample. This study was carried out to investigate the variation in number and morphology of the root canals of the primary molars, to study the applicability of cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT) in assessing the same and to provide a comprehensive review of the literature. A total of 343 primary molars, without any root resorption, were divided into four main groups including the maxillary first molars, maxillary second molars, mandibular first molars and mandibular second molars. All of them were analysed in CBCT images in the axial, sagittal and coronal planes. Various parameters such as the number of roots, number of canals, the root canal type, diameter of root and root canal and root canal curvature were studied. Primary molars in all four groups showed variability in the number of roots and root canals. As far as length of the roots was concerned, the palatal root of the maxillary molar was found to be longest, while the distobuccal root was shortest. In mandibular molars, the mesial root was longer than the distal root. The length of distobuccal root canal of the maxillary molars and the distolingual canal of the mandibular molars was found to be shortest. The number of roots and root canals varied from two to four and three to four, respectively. The maxillary molars exhibited more one-canal than two-canal roots. The present study provides comprehensive information to the existing literature concerning the variation in root canal morphology of the maxillary and mandibular primary molar teeth. These data may help clinicians in the root canal treatment of these teeth.

  13. Arabidopsis thaliana sku mutant seedlings show exaggerated surface-dependent alteration in root growth vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in the Wassilewskija (WS) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotypes often grow aslant on vertical agar surfaces. Slanted root growth always occurs to the right of the gravity vector when the root is viewed through the agar surface, and is not observed in the Columbia ecotype. Right-slanted root growth is surface-dependent and does not result directly from directional environmental stimuli or gradients in the plane of skewing. We have isolated two partially dominant mutations in WS (sku1 and sku2) that show an exaggerated right-slanting root-growth phenotype on agar surfaces. The right-slanting root-growth phenotype of wild-type and mutant roots is not the result of diagravitropism or of an alteration in root gravitropism. It is accompanied by a left-handed rotation of the root about its axis within the elongation zone, the rate of which positively correlates with the degree of right-slanted curvature. Our data suggest that the right-slanting root growth phenotype results from an endogenous structural asymmetry that expresses itself by a directional root-tip rotation.

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana sku mutant seedlings show exaggerated surface-dependent alteration in root growth vector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, R.; Masson, P. H.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in the Wassilewskija (WS) and Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotypes often grow aslant on vertical agar surfaces. Slanted root growth always occurs to the right of the gravity vector when the root is viewed through the agar surface, and is not observed in the Columbia ecotype. Right-slanted root growth is surface-dependent and does not result directly from directional environmental stimuli or gradients in the plane of skewing. We have isolated two partially dominant mutations in WS (sku1 and sku2) that show an exaggerated right-slanting root-growth phenotype on agar surfaces. The right-slanting root-growth phenotype of wild-type and mutant roots is not the result of diagravitropism or of an alteration in root gravitropism. It is accompanied by a left-handed rotation of the root about its axis within the elongation zone, the rate of which positively correlates with the degree of right-slanted curvature. Our data suggest that the right-slanting root growth phenotype results from an endogenous structural asymmetry that expresses itself by a directional root-tip rotation.

  15. Roots Revealed - Neutron imaging insight of spatial distribution, morphology, growth and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, J.; Bilheux, H.; Kang, M.; Voisin, S.; Cheng, C.; Horita, J.; Perfect, E.

    2013-05-01

    Root production, distribution and turnover are not easily measured, yet their dynamics are an essential part of understanding and modeling ecosystem response to changing environmental conditions. Root age, order, morphology and mycorrhizal associations all regulate root uptake of water and nutrients, which along with along with root distribution determines plant response to, and impact on its local environment. Our objectives were to demonstrate the ability to non-invasively monitor fine root distribution, root growth and root functionality in Zea mays L. (maize) and Panicum virgatum L. (switchgrass) seedlings using neutron imaging. Plants were propagated in aluminum chambers containing sand then placed into a high flux cold neutron beam line. Dynamics of root distribution and growth were assessed by collecting consecutive CCD radiographs through time. Root functionality was assessed by tracking individual root uptake of water (H2O) or deuterium oxide (D2O) through time. Since neutrons strongly scatter H atoms, but not D atoms, biological materials such as plants are prime candidates for neutron imaging. 2D and 3D neutron radiography readily illuminated root structure, root growth, and relative plant and soil water content. Fungal hyphae associated with the roots were also visible and appeared as dark masses since their diameter was likely several orders of magnitude less than ~100 μm resolution of the detector. The 2D pulse-chase irrigation experiments with H2O and D2O successfully allowed observation of uptake and mass flow of water within the root system. Water flux within individual roots responded differentially to foliar illumination based on internal water potential gradients, illustrating the ability to track root functionality based on root size, order and distribution within the soil. (L) neutron image of switchgrass growing in sandy soil with 100 μm diameter roots (R) 3D reconstruction of maize seedling following neutron tomography

  16. Effects of cations on hormone transport in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    We examined the influence of aluminum and calcium (and certain other cations) on hormone transport in corn roots. When aluminum was applied unilaterally to the caps of 15 mm apical root sections the roots curved strongly away from the aluminum. When aluminum was applied unilaterally to the cap and 3H-indole-3-acetic acid was applied to the basal cut surface twice as much radioactivity (assumed to be IAA) accumulated on the concave side of the curved root as on the convex side. Auxin transport in the apical region of intact roots was preferentially basipetal, with a polarity (basipetal transport divided by acropetal transport) of 6.3. In decapped 5 mm apical root segments, auxin transport was acropetally polar (polarity = 0.63). Application of aluminum to the root cap strongly promoted acropetal transport of auxin reducing polarity from 6.3 to 2.1. Application of calcium to the root cap enhanced basipetal movement of auxin, increasing polarity from 6.3 to 7.6. Application of the calcium chelator, ethylene-glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, greatly decreased basipetal auxin movement, reducing polarity from 6.3 to 3.7. Transport of label after application of tritiated abscisic acid showed no polarity and was not affected by calcium or aluminum. The results indicate that the root cap is particularly important in maintaining basipetal polarity of auxin transport in primary roots of corn. The induction of root curvature by unilateral application of aluminum or calcium to root caps is likely to result from localized effects of these ions on auxin transport. The findings are discussed relative to the possible role of calcium redistribution in the gravitropic curvature of roots and the possibility of calmodulin involvement in the action of calcium and aluminum on auxin transport.

  17. Effects of cations on hormone transport in primary roots of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Hasenstein, K H; Evans, M L

    1988-01-01

    We examined the influence of aluminum and calcium (and certain other cations) on hormone transport in corn roots. When aluminum was applied unilaterally to the caps of 15 mm apical root sections the roots curved strongly away from the aluminum. When aluminum was applied unilaterally to the cap and 3H-indole-3-acetic acid was applied to the basal cut surface twice as much radioactivity (assumed to be IAA) accumulated on the concave side of the curved root as on the convex side. Auxin transport in the apical region of intact roots was preferentially basipetal, with a polarity (basipetal transport divided by acropetal transport) of 6.3. In decapped 5 mm apical root segments, auxin transport was acropetally polar (polarity = 0.63). Application of aluminum to the root cap strongly promoted acropetal transport of auxin reducing polarity from 6.3 to 2.1. Application of calcium to the root cap enhanced basipetal movement of auxin, increasing polarity from 6.3 to 7.6. Application of the calcium chelator, ethylene-glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, greatly decreased basipetal auxin movement, reducing polarity from 6.3 to 3.7. Transport of label after application of tritiated abscisic acid showed no polarity and was not affected by calcium or aluminum. The results indicate that the root cap is particularly important in maintaining basipetal polarity of auxin transport in primary roots of corn. The induction of root curvature by unilateral application of aluminum or calcium to root caps is likely to result from localized effects of these ions on auxin transport. The findings are discussed relative to the possible role of calcium redistribution in the gravitropic curvature of roots and the possibility of calmodulin involvement in the action of calcium and aluminum on auxin transport.

  18. Effects of cations on hormone transport in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    We examined the influence of aluminum and calcium (and certain other cations) on hormone transport in corn roots. When aluminum was applied unilaterally to the caps of 15 mm apical root sections the roots curved strongly away from the aluminum. When aluminum was applied unilaterally to the cap and 3H-indole-3-acetic acid was applied to the basal cut surface twice as much radioactivity (assumed to be IAA) accumulated on the concave side of the curved root as on the convex side. Auxin transport in the apical region of intact roots was preferentially basipetal, with a polarity (basipetal transport divided by acropetal transport) of 6.3. In decapped 5 mm apical root segments, auxin transport was acropetally polar (polarity = 0.63). Application of aluminum to the root cap strongly promoted acropetal transport of auxin reducing polarity from 6.3 to 2.1. Application of calcium to the root cap enhanced basipetal movement of auxin, increasing polarity from 6.3 to 7.6. Application of the calcium chelator, ethylene-glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, greatly decreased basipetal auxin movement, reducing polarity from 6.3 to 3.7. Transport of label after application of tritiated abscisic acid showed no polarity and was not affected by calcium or aluminum. The results indicate that the root cap is particularly important in maintaining basipetal polarity of auxin transport in primary roots of corn. The induction of root curvature by unilateral application of aluminum or calcium to root caps is likely to result from localized effects of these ions on auxin transport. The findings are discussed relative to the possible role of calcium redistribution in the gravitropic curvature of roots and the possibility of calmodulin involvement in the action of calcium and aluminum on auxin transport.

  19. Light regulation of the growth response in corn root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event.

  20. Light regulation of the growth response in corn root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, M. O.; Leopold, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Roots of Merit variety corn (Zea mays L.) require red light for orthogravitropic curvature. Experiments were undertaken to identify the step in the pathway from gravity perception to asymmetric growth on which light may act. Red light was effective in inducing gravitropism whether it was supplied concomitant with or as long as 30 minutes after the gravity stimulus (GS). The presentation time was the same whether the GS was supplied in red light or in darkness. Red light given before the GS slightly enhanced the rate of curvature but had little effect on the lag time or on the final curvature. This enhancement was expanded by a delay between the red light pulse and the GS. These results indicate that gravity perception and at least the initial transduction steps proceed in the dark. Light may regulate the final growth (motor) phase of gravitropism. The time required for full expression of the light enhancement of curvature is consistent with its involvement in some light-stimulated biosynthetic event.

  1. Tree growth and management in Ugandan agroforestry systems: effects of root pruning on tree growth and crop yield.

    PubMed

    Wajja-Musukwe, Tellie-Nelson; Wilson, Julia; Sprent, Janet I; Ong, Chin K; Deans, J Douglas; Okorio, John

    2008-02-01

    Tree root pruning is a potential tool for managing belowground competition when trees and crops are grown together in agroforestry systems. We investigated the effects of tree root pruning on shoot growth and root distribution of Alnus acuminata (H.B. & K.), Casuarina equisetifolia L., Grevillea robusta A. Cunn. ex R. Br., Maesopsis eminii Engl. and Markhamia lutea (Benth.) K. Schum. and on yield of adjacent crops in sub-humid Uganda. The trees were 3 years old at the commencement of the study, and most species were competing strongly with crops. Tree roots were pruned 41 months after planting by cutting and back-filling a trench to a depth of 0.3 m, at a distance of 0.3 m from the trees, on one side of the tree row. The trench was reopened and roots recut at 50 and 62 months after planting. We assessed the effects on tree growth and root distribution over a 3 year period, and crop yield after the third root pruning at 62 months. Overall, root pruning had only a slight effect on aboveground tree growth: height growth was unaffected and diameter growth was reduced by only 4%. A substantial amount of root regrowth was observed by 11 months after pruning. Tree species varied in the number and distribution of roots, and C. equisetifolia and M. lutea had considerably more roots per unit of trunk volume than the other species, especially in the surface soil layers. Casuarina equisetifolia and M. eminii were the tree species most competitive with crops and G. robusta and M. lutea the least competitive. Crop yield data provided strong evidence of the redistribution of root activity following root pruning, with competition increasing on the unpruned side of tree rows. Thus, one-sided root pruning will be useful in only a few circumstances.

  2. Time-lapse fluorescence imaging of Arabidopsis root growth with rapid manipulation of the root environment using the RootChip.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Guido; Meier, Matthias; Cartwright, Heather N; Sosso, Davide; Quake, Stephen R; Ehrhardt, David W; Frommer, Wolf B

    2012-07-07

    The root functions as the physical anchor of the plant and is the organ responsible for uptake of water and mineral nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfate and trace elements that plants acquire from the soil. If we want to develop sustainable approaches to producing high crop yield, we need to better understand how the root develops, takes up a wide spectrum of nutrients, and interacts with symbiotic and pathogenic organisms. To accomplish these goals, we need to be able to explore roots in microscopic detail over time periods ranging from minutes to days. We developed the RootChip, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)- based microfluidic device, which allows us to grow and image roots from Arabidopsis seedlings while avoiding any physical stress to roots during preparation for imaging(1) (Figure 1). The device contains a bifurcated channel structure featuring micromechanical valves to guide the fluid flow from solution inlets to each of the eight observation chambers(2). This perfusion system allows the root microenvironment to be controlled and modified with precision and speed. The volume of the chambers is approximately 400 nl, thus requiring only minimal amounts of test solution. Here we provide a detailed protocol for studying root biology on the RootChip using imaging-based approaches with real time resolution. Roots can be analyzed over several days using time lapse microscopy. Roots can be perfused with nutrient solutions or inhibitors, and up to eight seedlings can be analyzed in parallel. This system has the potential for a wide range of applications, including analysis of root growth in the presence or absence of chemicals, fluorescence-based analysis of gene expression, and the analysis of biosensors, e.g. FRET nanosensors(3).

  3. Long-Term Effects of Season of Prescribed Burn on the Fine-Root Growth, Root Carbohydrates, and Foliar Dynamics of Mature Longleaf Pine

    Treesearch

    Eric A. Kuehler; Mary Anne Sword Sayer; James D. Haywood; C. Dan Andries

    2004-01-01

    Depending on the season and intensity of fire, as well as the phenology of foliage and new root growth, fire may damage foliage, and subsequently decrease whole-crown carbon fixation and allocation to the root system. In central Louisiana the authors investigated how season of prescribed burning affects fine-root dynamics, root carbohydrate relations, and leaf area...

  4. Early Events in the Life of Apple Roots: Variation in Root Growth Rate is Linked to Mycorrhizal and Nonmycorrhizal Fungal Colonization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was conducted to characterize early events of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal fungal colonization in newly-emerging roots of mature apple (Malus domestica) trees and to determine the relationship to fine root growth rate and development. New roots were traced on root windows to measure growt...

  5. Modeling root growth in granular soils: effects of root stiffness and packing fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakih, Mahmoud; Delenne, Jean Yves; Radjai, Farhang; Fourcaud, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the effects of root bending stiffness and packing fraction on the path followed by a growing root in 2D packings of grains representing a soil. The root is modeled as a chain of elements that can grow in length and change their direction depending on the forces exerted by soil grains. We show that the root shape is mainly controlled by the bending stiffness of its apex. At low stiffness, the root randomly explores the pore space whereas at sufficiently high stiffness, of the order of soil hardness multiplied by mean grain size, the root follows a straight path across the soil. Between these two limits, the root shape can be characterized by the standard deviation of its re-directions at the scale of soil grains. We find that this shape parameter varies as a power-law function of the normalized bending stiffness.

  6. Cytochemical localization of calcium in cap cells of primary roots of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular distribution of Ca in caps of primary roots of Zea mays was examined during the onset and early stages of gravicurvature to determine its possible role in root gravitropism. Staining becomes associated with the portion of the cell wall adjacent to the distal end of the cell after five minutes, and persists throughout the onset of gravicurvature. The outermost peripheral cells of roots oriented horizontally and vertically secrete Ca through plasmodesmata-like channels in their cell walls. Data suggest that Ca is not transported laterally through the columella tissue,but rather that the movement of Ca to the lower side of caps of horizontally-oriented roots is at least partially through and/or on the mucilage of the cap, and via an electrochemical gradient. An important role in root gravitropism is indicated for Ca secretion by peripheral cells.

  7. Reversal of primary root caries using a dentifrice with a high fluoride content.

    PubMed

    Lynch, E; Baysan, A

    2001-01-01

    Root caries is a widespread problem and can be quite serious in older populations. The restoration of root carious lesions is often difficult. Compared to enamel caries, there has been limited research into the pharmaceutical management of primary root caries lesions (PRCLs), and many of these studies have been carried out in vitro, with limited numbers of clinical trials. Fluoride is presently a cornerstone in dentifrice formulations for cost-effective and anticaries therapy. It is generally accepted that fluoride ions promote remineralization of tooth substances and reduce the rate of demineralization. The use of a dentifrice with a high fluoride content may be considered to reverse PRCLs, since more fluoride is required for the remineralization of roots than for enamel. This paper reviews the effects of dentifrices with high fluoride contents on the management of root caries.

  8. Cytochemical localization of calcium in cap cells of primary roots of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular distribution of Ca in caps of primary roots of Zea mays was examined during the onset and early stages of gravicurvature to determine its possible role in root gravitropism. Staining becomes associated with the portion of the cell wall adjacent to the distal end of the cell after five minutes, and persists throughout the onset of gravicurvature. The outermost peripheral cells of roots oriented horizontally and vertically secrete Ca through plasmodesmata-like channels in their cell walls. Data suggest that Ca is not transported laterally through the columella tissue,but rather that the movement of Ca to the lower side of caps of horizontally-oriented roots is at least partially through and/or on the mucilage of the cap, and via an electrochemical gradient. An important role in root gravitropism is indicated for Ca secretion by peripheral cells.

  9. Root cooling strongly affects diel leaf growth dynamics, water and carbohydrate relations in Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Poiré, Richard; Schneider, Heike; Thorpe, Michael R; Kuhn, Arnd J; Schurr, Ulrich; Walter, Achim

    2010-03-01

    In laboratory and greenhouse experiments with potted plants, shoots and roots are exposed to temperature regimes throughout a 24 h (diel) cycle that can differ strongly from the regime under which these plants have evolved. In the field, roots are often exposed to lower temperatures than shoots. When the root-zone temperature in Ricinus communis was decreased below a threshold value, leaf growth occurred preferentially at night and was strongly inhibited during the day. Overall, leaf expansion, shoot biomass growth, root elongation and ramification decreased rapidly, carbon fluxes from shoot to root were diminished and carbohydrate contents of both root and shoot increased. Further, transpiration rate was not affected, yet hydrostatic tensions in shoot xylem increased. When root temperature was increased again, xylem tension reduced, leaf growth recovered rapidly, carbon fluxes from shoot to root increased, and carbohydrate pools were depleted. We hypothesize that the decreased uptake of water in cool roots diminishes the growth potential of the entire plant - especially diurnally, when the growing leaf loses water via transpiration. As a consequence, leaf growth and metabolite concentrations can vary enormously, depending on root-zone temperature and its heterogeneity inside pots.

  10. New findings in the mechanisms regulating polar growth in root hair cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Root hairs cells are highly polarized cellular structures resulting from tip growth of specific root epidermal cells. Root-hair morphogenesis involves many aspects regulating tip growth such as exocitosis, ion flux, calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytoskeleton. These cells are excellent models for studying polar growth and can be challenged with many extracellular factors affecting the pattern of growth named Nod factors, elicitors, hormones, etc. The general scenery is that the well described tip-high intracellular Ca2+ gradient plays a central role in regulating tip growth. On the other hand, ROS plays a key role in various processes, for example hypersensitive response, root hair development, hormone action, gravitropism and stress responses. However, ROS has recently emerged as a key player together with calcium in regulating polar growth, not only in root hair cells but also in pollen tubes, filamentous fungi and fucoid cells. Furthermore, Ca2+-permeable channel modulation by ROS has been demonstrated in Vicia faba guard cells and Arabidopsis root hairs. Recently, root hair cells were shown to experiment ROS, pH and calcium oscillations coupled to growth oscillation. These recent findings allow considering that root hair cells present a similar pattern of growth as described for pollen tubes. PMID:19568333

  11. New findings in the mechanisms regulating polar growth in root hair cells.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Root hairs cells are highly polarized cellular structures resulting from tip growth of specific root epidermal cells. Root-hair morphogenesis involves many aspects regulating tip growth such as exocytosis, ion flux, calcium homeostasis, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytoskeleton. These cells are excellent models for studying polar growth and can be challenged with many extracellular factors affecting the pattern of growth named Nod factors, elicitors, hormones, etc. The general scenery is that the well described tip-high intracellular Ca(2+) gradient plays a central role in regulating tip growth. On the other hand, ROS plays a key role in various processes, for example hypersensitive response, root hair development, hormone action, gravitropism and stress responses. However, ROS has recently emerged as a key player together with calcium in regulating polar growth, not only in root hair cells but also in pollen tubes, filamentous fungi and fucoid cells. Furthermore, Ca(2+)-permeable channel modulation by ROS has been demonstrated in Vicia faba guard cells and Arabidopsis root hairs. Recently, root hair cells were shown to experiment ROS, pH and calcium oscillations coupled to growth oscillation. These recent findings allow considering that root hair cells present a similar pattern of growth as described for pollen tubes.

  12. An inexpensive rhizotron design for two-dimensional, horizontal root growth measurements

    Treesearch

    Adam H. Wiese; Don E. Riemenschneider; Ronald S., Jr. Zalesny

    2005-01-01

    We designed, constructed, and tested an observational system that supports two-dimensional, horizontal root growth measurements over time without disturbing aboveground plant growth and without the need for destructive sampling of roots. Our rhizotrons allow for (1) studying relatively greater numbers of plants at any given time than is now possible under traditional...

  13. Episodic growth and relative shoot:root balance in loblolly pine seedlings

    Treesearch

    A.P. Drew; F. Thomas Ledig

    1980-01-01

    Leaf, root and stem systems of loblolly pine seedlings are characterized by a seasonal periodicity in growth, during which they alternate in spurts of activity. Despite this periodicity, the allometric coefficient describing the ratio of the relative growth rates of leaf to root remains constant for at least the first two years of development. In part, constancy...

  14. CBCT analysis of root canal morphology in geminated primary incisor: a proposed classification and case report.

    PubMed

    Gandiban, Kanimozhi; Ramakrishnan, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic management of the geminated tooth requires a proper understanding of root canal morphology. The use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of complex endodontic morphology, and in revealing morphological variations, has been well documented in the literature. A case involving endodontic management of a geminated primary central incisor with CBCT is presented here. A CBCT analysis was vital in the diagnosis of this unusual root canal system and its successful endodontic treatment.

  15. The CLE40 and CRN/CLV2 signaling pathways antagonistically control root meristem growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pallakies, Helge; Simon, Rüdiger

    2014-11-01

    Differentiation processes in the primary root meristem are controlled by several signaling pathways that are regulated by phytohormones or by secreted peptides. Long-term maintenance of an active root meristem requires that the generation of new stem cells and the loss of these from the meristem due to differentiation are precisely coordinated. Via phenotypic and large-scale transcriptome analyses of mutants, we show that the signaling peptide CLE40 and the receptor proteins CLV2 and CRN act in two genetically separable pathways that antagonistically regulate cell differentiation in the proximal root meristem. CLE40 inhibits cell differentiation throughout the primary root meristem by controlling genes with roles in abscisic acid, auxin, and cytokinin signaling. CRN and CLV2 jointly control target genes that promote cell differentiation specifically in the transition zone of the proximal root meristem. While CRN and CLV2 are not acting in the CLE40 signaling pathway under normal growth conditions, both proteins are required when the levels of CLE40 or related CLE peptides increase. We show here that two antagonistically acting pathways controlling root meristem differentiation can be activated by the same peptide in a dosage-dependent manner. © The Author 2014. Published by the Molecular Plant Shanghai Editorial Office in association with Oxford University Press on behalf of CSPB and IPPE, SIBS, CAS.

  16. Application of bacteria from non-cultivated plants to promote growth, alter root architecture and alleviate salt stress of cotton.

    PubMed

    Irizarry, I; White, J F

    2017-04-01

    Cotton seeds are frequently treated with acid to remove fibres and reduce seed-transmitted diseases. This process also eliminates beneficial bacteria on the seed surface. The goal of this research was to seek and apply beneficial bacteria to acid delinted cotton seeds to evaluate their growth-promoting and salt stress alleviating effects in seedlings. Bacteria were isolated from non-cultivated plants in the Malvaceae. Seeds were collected from Portia tree (Thespesia populnea) and wild cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) from coastal and arid areas of Puerto Rico. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Curtobacterium oceanosedimentum and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans were inoculated onto acid delinted cotton seeds. Bacteria increased cotton seed germination and length of emerging seedling radicles. Cotton seeds were inoculated with B. amyloliquefaciens to evaluate growth and root architecture of non-stressed and salt stressed seedlings. Inoculating cotton seeds with B. amyloliquefaciens led to a greater percentage of seedlings with expanded cotyledons after 8 days, enhanced primary and lateral root growth, and altered root architecture. Similar results were obtained when okra seeds were inoculated with B. amyloliquefaciens. The data supported the hypothesis that non-cultivated plants in the Malvaceae growing in stressful environments possess bacteria that promote growth, alter root architecture and alleviate salt stress of cotton and okra seedlings. This study demonstrated the effects of applying beneficial bacteria on acid delinted cotton seeds. Inoculating seeds with salt stress alleviating bacteria could improve the growth of crop seedlings that are vulnerable to soil salinization. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Higher Ammonium Transamination Capacity Can Alleviate Glutamate Inhibition on Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Root Growth under High Ammonium Stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Gao, Jingwen; Liu, Yang; Tian, Zhongwei; Muhammad, Abid; Zhang, Yixuan; Jiang, Dong; Cao, Weixing; Dai, Tingbo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the studies about NH4+ stress mechanism simply address the effects of free NH4+, failing to recognize the changed nitrogen assimilation products. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of glutamate on root growth under high ammonium (NH4+) conditions in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Hydroponic experiments were conducted using two wheat cultivars, AK58 (NH4+-sensitive) and Xumai25 (NH4+-tolerant) with either 5 mM NH4+ nitrogen (AN) as stress treatment or 5 mM nitrate (NO3-) nitrogen as control. To evaluate the effects of NH4+-assimilation products on plant growth, 1 μM L-methionine sulfoximine (MSO) (an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS)) and 1 mM glutamates (a primary N assimilation product) were added to the solutions, respectively. The AN significantly reduced plant biomass, total root length, surface area and root volume in both cultivars, but less effect was observed in Xumai25. The inhibition effects were alleviated by the application of MSO but strengthened by the application of glutamate. The AN increased the activities of GS, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in both cultivars, resulting in higher glutamate contents. However, its contents were decreased by the application of MSO. Compared to AK58, Xumai25 showed lower glutamate contents due to its higher activities of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT). With the indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) contents decreasing in roots, the ratio of shoot to root in IAA was increased, and further increased by the application of glutamate, and reduced by the application of MSO, but the ratio was lower in Xumai25. Meanwhile, the total soluble sugar contents and its root to shoot ratio also showed similar trends. These results indicate that the NH4+-tolerant cultivar has a greater transamination ability to prevent glutamate over-accumulation to maintain higher IAA transport ability, and consequently promoted soluble sugar transport to roots, further

  18. Growth and changes of endogenous hormones of mulberry roots in a simulated rocky desertification area.

    PubMed

    Feng, Dalan; Huang, Xiaohui; Liu, Yun; Willison, J H Martin

    2016-06-01

    We studied the growth of roots of white mulberry (Morus alba) trees in response to different water and nutrient conditions in sets of three or five containers connected via small pipes and arranged so as to simulate the heterogeneous soil conditions associated with rocky desertification. The experiment was conducted to improve understanding of the adaptation of M. alba to this stressful environment. The trees were grown for a year under constant water and nutrient conditions in the soils within each container of any set of containers. Differences in root activity and endogenous hormones within root tips were measured at the end of the experiment. We compared four treatment groups: H (variable moisture among containers), F (variable nutrients among containers), HF (both moisture and nutrients varied among containers), and CK (non-varied control). Results showed the following: (1) Mulberry roots showed obvious hydrotropic and chemotropic growth patterns, but chemotropism did not occur in the condition of water shortage. (2) Measurement of growth indices (root surface area, total root length, number of root tips, root biomass) showed that growth status was best in group HF once the roots were able to access containers with sufficient water and nutrients, followed by group H. The indices were significantly poorer in groups F and CK. (3) The content of auxin, cytokinin, and gibberellins in roots under soil drought conditions were lower than under wetter soil conditions. In contrast, abscisic acid content and root activity were higher under soil drought conditions than under wetter soil conditions. The results indicated that water is the key factor restricting growth of white mulberry trees in areas of rocky desertification but that the trees adjust endogenous hormones in their roots to promote tropic growth and obtain sufficient moisture and nutrients over the long term. Moreover, under long-term drought stress conditions, mulberry trees retained high root activity

  19. ABA Suppresses Root Hair Growth via the OBP4 Transcriptional Regulator1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kawamura, Ayako; Schäfer, Sabine; Breuer, Christian; Shibata, Michitaro; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Matsui, Minami

    2017-01-01

    Plants modify organ growth and tune morphogenesis in response to various endogenous and environmental cues. At the cellular level, organ growth is often adjusted by alterations in cell growth, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this control remain poorly understood. In this study, we identify the DNA BINDING WITH ONE FINGER (DOF)-type transcription regulator OBF BINDING PROTEIN4 (OBP4) as a repressor of cell growth. Ectopic expression of OBP4 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) inhibits cell growth, resulting in severe dwarfism and the repression of genes involved in the regulation of water transport, root hair development, and stress responses. Among the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors known to control root hair growth, OBP4 binds the ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6-LIKE2 (RSL2) promoter to repress its expression. The accumulation of OBP4 proteins is detected in expanding root epidermal cells, and its expression level is increased by the application of abscisic acid (ABA) at concentrations sufficient to inhibit root hair growth. ABA-dependent induction of OBP4 is associated with the reduced expression of RSL2. Furthermore, ectopic expression of OBP4 or loss of RSL2 function results in ABA-insensitive root hair growth. Taken together, our results suggest that OBP4-mediated transcriptional repression of RSL2 contributes to the ABA-dependent inhibition of root hair growth in Arabidopsis. PMID:28167701

  20. SDG2-mediated H3K4 methylation is required for proper Arabidopsis root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaozhen; Feng, Haiyang; Yu, Yu; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes and play critical roles in transcriptional activation via deposition of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) in chromatin. Several Arabidopsis TrxG members have been characterized, and among them SET DOMAIN GROUP 2 (SDG2) has been shown to be necessary for global genome-wide H3K4me3 deposition. Although pleiotropic phenotypes have been uncovered in the sdg2 mutants, SDG2 function in the regulation of stem cell activity has remained largely unclear. Here, we investigate the sdg2 mutant root phenotype and demonstrate that SDG2 is required for primary root stem cell niche (SCN) maintenance as well as for lateral root SCN establishment. Loss of SDG2 results in drastically reduced H3K4me3 levels in root SCN and differentiated cells and causes the loss of auxin gradient maximum in the root quiescent centre. Elevated DNA damage is detected in the sdg2 mutant, suggesting that impaired genome integrity may also have challenged the stem cell activity. Genetic interaction analysis reveals that SDG2 and CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR-1 act synergistically in root SCN and genome integrity maintenance but not in telomere length maintenance. We conclude that SDG2-mediated H3K4me3 plays a distinctive role in the regulation of chromatin structure and genome integrity, which are key features in pluripotency of stem cells and crucial for root growth and development.

  1. SDG2-Mediated H3K4 Methylation Is Required for Proper Arabidopsis Root Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xiaozhen; Feng, Haiyang; Yu, Yu; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Trithorax group (TrxG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes and play critical roles in transcriptional activation via deposition of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) in chromatin. Several Arabidopsis TrxG members have been characterized, and among them SET DOMAIN GROUP 2 (SDG2) has been shown to be necessary for global genome-wide H3K4me3 deposition. Although pleiotropic phenotypes have been uncovered in the sdg2 mutants, SDG2 function in the regulation of stem cell activity has remained largely unclear. Here, we investigate the sdg2 mutant root phenotype and demonstrate that SDG2 is required for primary root stem cell niche (SCN) maintenance as well as for lateral root SCN establishment. Loss of SDG2 results in drastically reduced H3K4me3 levels in root SCN and differentiated cells and causes the loss of auxin gradient maximum in the root quiescent centre. Elevated DNA damage is detected in the sdg2 mutant, suggesting that impaired genome integrity may also have challenged the stem cell activity. Genetic interaction analysis reveals that SDG2 and CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY FACTOR-1 act synergistically in root SCN and genome integrity maintenance but not in telomere length maintenance. We conclude that SDG2-mediated H3K4me3 plays a distinctive role in the regulation of chromatin structure and genome integrity, which are key features in pluripotency of stem cells and crucial for root growth and development. PMID:23483879

  2. Vigorous Root Growth Is a Better Indicator of Early Nutrient Uptake than Root Hair Traits in Spring Wheat Grown under Low Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaosheng; Thorup-Kristensen, Kristian; Jensen, Lars Stoumann; Magid, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    A number of root and root hair traits have been proposed as important for nutrient acquisition. However, there is still a need for knowledge on which traits are most important in determining macro- and micronutrient uptake at low soil fertility. This study investigated the variations in root growth vigor and root hair length (RHL) and density (RHD) among spring wheat genotypes and their relationship to nutrient concentrations and uptake during early growth. Six spring wheat genotypes were grown in a soil with low nutrient availability. The root and root hair traits as well as the concentration and content of macro- and micronutrients were identified. A significant genetic variability in root and root hair traits as well as nutrient uptake was found. Fast and early root proliferation and long and dense root hairs enhanced uptake of macro- and micronutrients under low soil nutrient availability. Vigorous root growth, however, was a better indicator of early nutrient acquisition than RHL and RHD. Vigorous root growth and long and dense root hairs ensured efficient acquisition of macro- and micronutrients during early growth and a high root length to shoot dry matter ratio favored high macronutrient concentrations in the shoots, which is assumed to be important for later plant development. PMID:27379145

  3. Auxin increases the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) root tips while inhibiting root growth.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, Maria G; den Os, Désirée; Monshausen, Gabriele B; Dubrovsky, Joseph G; Bednárová, Andrea; Krishnan, Natraj

    2013-10-01

    The hormone auxin and reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate root elongation, but the interactions between the two pathways are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate how auxin interacts with ROS in regulating root elongation in tomato, Solanum lycopersicum. Wild-type and auxin-resistant mutant, diageotropica (dgt), of tomato (S. lycopersicum 'Ailsa Craig') were characterized in terms of root apical meristem and elongation zone histology, expression of the cell-cycle marker gene Sl-CycB1;1, accumulation of ROS, response to auxin and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and expression of ROS-related mRNAs. The dgt mutant exhibited histological defects in the root apical meristem and elongation zone and displayed a constitutively increased level of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the root tip, part of which was detected in the apoplast. Treatments of wild-type with auxin increased the H2O2 concentration in the root tip in a dose-dependent manner. Auxin and H2O2 elicited similar inhibition of cell elongation while bringing forth differential responses in terms of meristem length and number of cells in the elongation zone. Auxin treatments affected the expression of mRNAs of ROS-scavenging enzymes and less significantly mRNAs related to antioxidant level. The dgt mutation resulted in resistance to both auxin and H2O2 and affected profoundly the expression of mRNAs related to antioxidant level. The results indicate that auxin regulates the level of H2O2 in the root tip, so increasing the auxin level triggers accumulation of H2O2 leading to inhibition of root cell elongation and root growth. The dgt mutation affects this pathway by reducing the auxin responsiveness of tissues and by disrupting the H2O2 homeostasis in the root tip.

  4. Morphometric analysis of epidermal differentiation in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Smith, H. S.

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation in primary roots of Zea mays was divided into six cell types based on cellular shape and cytoplasmic appearance. These six cell types are: 1) apical protoderm, located at the tip of the root pole and characterized by periclinally flattened cells; 2) cuboidal protoderm, located approximately 230 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells; 3) tabular epidermis, located approximately 450 microns from the root pole and characterized by anticlinally flattened cells; 4) cuboidal epidermis, located approximately 900 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells having numerous small vacuoles; 5) vacuolate cuboidal epidermis, located approximately 1,500 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells containing several large vacuoles; and 6) columnar epidermis, located approximately 2,200 microns from the root pole (i.e., at the beginning of the zone of elongation) and characterized by elongated cells. We also used stereology to quantify the cellular changes associated with epidermal differentiation. The quiescent center and the apical protoderm have significantly different ultrastructures. The relative volume of dictyosomes increases dramatically during the early stages of epidermal differentiation. This increase correlates inversely with the amount of coverage provided by the root cap and mucilage.

  5. Morphometric analysis of epidermal differentiation in primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.; Smith, H. S.

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal differentiation in primary roots of Zea mays was divided into six cell types based on cellular shape and cytoplasmic appearance. These six cell types are: 1) apical protoderm, located at the tip of the root pole and characterized by periclinally flattened cells; 2) cuboidal protoderm, located approximately 230 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells; 3) tabular epidermis, located approximately 450 microns from the root pole and characterized by anticlinally flattened cells; 4) cuboidal epidermis, located approximately 900 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells having numerous small vacuoles; 5) vacuolate cuboidal epidermis, located approximately 1,500 microns from the root pole and characterized by cuboidal cells containing several large vacuoles; and 6) columnar epidermis, located approximately 2,200 microns from the root pole (i.e., at the beginning of the zone of elongation) and characterized by elongated cells. We also used stereology to quantify the cellular changes associated with epidermal differentiation. The quiescent center and the apical protoderm have significantly different ultrastructures. The relative volume of dictyosomes increases dramatically during the early stages of epidermal differentiation. This increase correlates inversely with the amount of coverage provided by the root cap and mucilage.

  6. Root Exudate-Induced Alterations in Bacillus cereus Cell Wall Contribute to Root Colonization and Plant Growth Promotion

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Swarnalee; Rani, T. Swaroopa; Podile, Appa Rao

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs). We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430). There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE), compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE). In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2), in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion. PMID:24205213

  7. Aggressiveness of Fusarium species and impact of root infection on growth and yield of soybeans.

    PubMed

    Arias, María M Díaz; Leandro, Leonor F; Munkvold, Gary P

    2013-08-01

    Fusarium spp. are commonly isolated from soybean roots but the pathogenic activity of most species is poorly documented. Aggressiveness and yield impact of nine species of Fusarium were determined on soybean in greenhouse (50 isolates) and field microplot (19 isolates) experiments. Root rot severity and shoot and root dry weights were compared at growth stages V3 or R1. Root systems were scanned and digital image analysis was conducted; yield was measured in microplots. Disease severity and root morphology impacts varied among and within species. Fusarium graminearum was highly aggressive (root rot severity >90%), followed by F. proliferatum and F. virguliforme. Significant variation in damping-off (20 to 75%) and root rot severity (<20 to >60%) was observed among F. oxysporum isolates. In artificially-infested microplots, root rot severity was low (<25%) and mean yield was not significantly reduced. However, there were significant linear relationships between yield and root symptoms for some isolates. Root morphological characteristics were more consistent indicators of yield loss than root rot severity. This study provides the first characterization of aggressiveness and yield impact of Fusarium root rot species on soybean at different plant stages and introduces root image analysis to assess the impact of root pathogens on soybean.

  8. Correlation between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinemetz, C. L.; Kuzmanoff, K. M.; Evans, M. L.; Jarrett, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates a role for calcium and calmodulin in the gravitropic response of primary roots of maize (Zea mays, L.). We examined this possibility by testing the relationship between calmodulin activity and gravitropic sensitivity in roots of the maize cultivars Merit and B73 x Missouri 17. Roots of the Merit cultivar require light to the gravitropically competent. The gravitropic response of the Missouri cultivar is independent of light. The occurrence of calmodulin in primary roots of these maize cultivars was tested by affinity gel chromatography followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with bovine brain calmodulin as standard. The distribution of calmodulin activity was measured using both the phosphodiesterase and NAD kinase assays for calmodulin. These assays were performed on whole tissue segments, crude extracts, and purified extracts. In light-grown seedlings of the Merit cultivar or in either dark- or light-grown seedlings of the Missouri cultivar, calmodulin activity per millimeter of root tissue was about 4-fold higher in the apical millimeter than in the subtending 3 millimeters. Calmodulin activity was very low in the apical millimeter of roots of dark-grown (gravitropically nonresponsive) seedlings of the Merit cultivar. Upon illumination, the calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter increased to a level comparable to that of light-grown seedlings and the roots became gravitropically competent. The time course of the development of gravitropic sensitivity following illumination paralleled the time course of the increase in calmodulin activity in the apical millimeter of the root. The results are consistent with the suggestion that calmodulin plays an important role in the gravitropic response of roots.

  9. Root biomass, turnover and net primary productivity of a coffee agroforestry system in Costa Rica: effects of soil depth, shade trees, distance to row and coffee age.

    PubMed

    Defrenet, Elsa; Roupsard, Olivier; Van den Meersche, Karel; Charbonnier, Fabien; Pastor Pérez-Molina, Junior; Khac, Emmanuelle; Prieto, Iván; Stokes, Alexia; Roumet, Catherine; Rapidel, Bruno; de Melo Virginio Filho, Elias; Vargas, Victor J; Robelo, Diego; Barquero, Alejandra; Jourdan, Christophe

    2016-08-21

    In Costa Rica, coffee (Coffea arabica) plants are often grown in agroforests. However, it is not known if shade-inducing trees reduce coffee plant biomass through root competition, and hence alter overall net primary productivity (NPP). We estimated biomass and NPP at the stand level, taking into account deep roots and the position of plants with regard to trees. Stem growth and root biomass, turnover and decomposition were measured in mixed coffee/tree (Erythrina poeppigiana) plantations. Growth ring width and number at the stem base were estimated along with stem basal area on a range of plant sizes. Root biomass and fine root density were measured in trenches to a depth of 4 m. To take into account the below-ground heterogeneity of the agroforestry system, fine root turnover was measured by sequential soil coring (to a depth of 30 cm) over 1 year and at different locations (in full sun or under trees and in rows/inter-rows). Allometric relationships were used to calculate NPP of perennial components, which was then scaled up to the stand level. Annual ring width at the stem base increased up to 2·5 mm yr(-1) with plant age (over a 44-year period). Nearly all (92 %) coffee root biomass was located in the top 1·5 m, and only 8 % from 1·5 m to a depth of 4 m. Perennial woody root biomass was 16 t ha(-1) and NPP of perennial roots was 1·3 t ha(-1) yr(-1) Fine root biomass (0-30 cm) was two-fold higher in the row compared with between rows. Fine root biomass was 2·29 t ha(-1) (12 % of total root biomass) and NPP of fine roots was 2·96 t ha(-1) yr(-1) (69 % of total root NPP). Fine root turnover was 1·3 yr(-1) and lifespan was 0·8 years. Coffee root systems comprised 49 % of the total plant biomass; such a high ratio is possibly a consequence of shoot pruning. There was no significant effect of trees on coffee fine root biomass, suggesting that coffee root systems are very competitive in the topsoil. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University

  10. Root biomass, turnover and net primary productivity of a coffee agroforestry system in Costa Rica: effects of soil depth, shade trees, distance to row and coffee age

    PubMed Central

    Defrenet, Elsa; Roupsard, Olivier; Van den Meersche, Karel; Charbonnier, Fabien; Pastor Pérez-Molina, Junior; Khac, Emmanuelle; Prieto, Iván; Stokes, Alexia; Roumet, Catherine; Rapidel, Bruno; de Melo Virginio Filho, Elias; Vargas, Victor J.; Robelo, Diego; Barquero, Alejandra; Jourdan, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims In Costa Rica, coffee (Coffea arabica) plants are often grown in agroforests. However, it is not known if shade-inducing trees reduce coffee plant biomass through root competition, and hence alter overall net primary productivity (NPP). We estimated biomass and NPP at the stand level, taking into account deep roots and the position of plants with regard to trees. Methods Stem growth and root biomass, turnover and decomposition were measured in mixed coffee/tree (Erythrina poeppigiana) plantations. Growth ring width and number at the stem base were estimated along with stem basal area on a range of plant sizes. Root biomass and fine root density were measured in trenches to a depth of 4 m. To take into account the below-ground heterogeneity of the agroforestry system, fine root turnover was measured by sequential soil coring (to a depth of 30 cm) over 1 year and at different locations (in full sun or under trees and in rows/inter-rows). Allometric relationships were used to calculate NPP of perennial components, which was then scaled up to the stand level. Key Results Annual ring width at the stem base increased up to 2·5 mm yr−1 with plant age (over a 44-year period). Nearly all (92 %) coffee root biomass was located in the top 1·5 m, and only 8 % from 1·5 m to a depth of 4 m. Perennial woody root biomass was 16 t ha−1 and NPP of perennial roots was 1·3 t ha−1 yr−1. Fine root biomass (0–30 cm) was two-fold higher in the row compared with between rows. Fine root biomass was 2·29 t ha−1 (12 % of total root biomass) and NPP of fine roots was 2·96 t ha−1 yr−1 (69 % of total root NPP). Fine root turnover was 1·3 yr−1 and lifespan was 0·8 years. Conclusions Coffee root systems comprised 49 % of the total plant biomass; such a high ratio is possibly a consequence of shoot pruning. There was no significant effect of trees on coffee fine root biomass, suggesting that coffee root systems are very competitive in the

  11. Comparison of endoflas and zinc oxide eugenol as root canal filling materials in primary dentition.

    PubMed

    Rewal, Nivedita; Thakur, Arun Singh; Sachdev, Vinod; Mahajan, Nanika

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide eugenol has long been the material of choice of pediatric dentists worldwide, although it fails to meet the ideal requirements of root canal filling material for primary teeth. Endoflas, a mixture of zinc oxide eugenol, calcium hydroxide, and iodoform, can be considered to be an effective root canal filling material in primary teeth as compared with zinc oxide eugenol. This study was carried out to compare zinc oxide eugenol with endoflas for pulpectomy in primary dentition. The objective of the study was to compare clinically and radiographically success rates of zinc oxide eugenol with endoflas for the root canal filling of primary teeth at 3, 6, and 9 months. Fifty primary molars were included in the study with 26 teeth in Group I (Endoflas) and 24 in Group II (zinc oxide eugenol). A single visit pulpectomy was carried out. The overall success rate of zinc oxide eugenol was 83% whereas 100% success was found in the case of endoflas. The obtained results were compiled and subjected to statistical analysis using the chi-square test. The difference in the success rate between the two was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Endoflas has shown to have better results than zinc oxide eugenol. It should therefore be the material of choice for root canal treatment in deciduous dentition.

  12. Leaf water status and root system water flux of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) seedlings in relation to new root growth after transplanting

    Treesearch

    John C. Brissette; Jim L. Chambers

    1992-01-01

    Water relations and root growth of shortleaf pine (Pinus echinata Mill.) were studied four weeks after seedlings from a half-sib family had been transplanted to one of three regimes of soil water availability at a root zone temperature of either 15 or 20 °C. About one-third of the variation in new root growth was explained by the root zone...

  13. Root growth and hydraulic conductivity of southern pine seedlings in response to soil temperature and water availability after planting

    Treesearch

    Mary Anne Sword Sayer; John C. Brissette; James P. Barnett

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of the root system growth and water transport of southern pine species after planting in different root-zone environments is needed to guide decisions regarding when, and what species to plant. Evaluation of how seed source affects root system responses to soil conditions will allow seed sources to be matched to planting conditions. The root growth and...

  14. Cytokinin-dependent secondary growth determines root biomass in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Geupil; Lee, Jung-Hun; Rastogi, Khushboo; Park, Suhyoung; Oh, Sang-Hun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-01-01

    The root serves as an essential organ in plant growth by taking up nutrients and water from the soil and supporting the rest of the plant body. Some plant species utilize roots as storage organs. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and radish (Raphanus sativus), for example, are important root crops. However, how their root growth is regulated remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the relationship between cambium and radial root growth in radish. Through a comparative analysis with Arabidopsis root expression data, we identified putative cambium-enriched transcription factors in radish and analysed their expression in representative inbred lines featuring distinctive radial growth. We found that cell proliferation activities in the cambium positively correlated with radial growth and final yields of radish roots. Expression analysis of candidate transcription factor genes revealed that some genes are differentially expressed between inbred lines and that the difference is due to the distinct cytokinin response. Taken together, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that cytokinin-dependent radial growth plays a key role in the yields of root crops. PMID:25979997

  15. The microtubule-associated protein MAP18 affects ROP2 GTPase activity during root hair growth.

    PubMed

    Kang, Erfang; Zheng, Mingzhi; Zhang, Yan; Yuan, Ming; Yalovsky, Shaul; Zhu, Lei; Fu, Ying

    2017-03-17

    Establishment and maintenance of the polar site are important for root hair tip growth. We previously reported that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN18 (MAP18) functions in controlling the direction of pollen tube growth and root hair elongation. Additionally, the Rop GTPase ROP2 was reported as a positive regulator of both root hair initiation and tip growth in Arabidopsis. Both loss-of-function of ROP2 or knock-down of MAP18 leads to a decrease in root hair length, whereas overexpression of either MAP18 or ROP2 causes multiple tips or a branching hair phenotype. However, it is unclear whether MAP18 and ROP2 coordinately regulate root hair growth. In the present study, we demonstrate that MAP18 and ROP2 interact genetically and functionally. MAP18 physically interacts with ROP2 in vitro and in vivo and preferentially binds to the inactive form of the ROP2 protein. MAP18 promotes ROP2 activity during root hair tip growth. Further investigation revealed that MAP18 competes with RhoGTPase GDP dissociation inhibitor 1 (AtRhoGDI1)/SUPERCENTIPEDE1 (SCN1) for binding to ROP2, in turn affecting localization of active ROP2 in the plasma membrane of the root hair tip. These results reveal a novel function of MAP18 in the regulation of ROP2 activation during root hair growth.

  16. Cytokinin-dependent secondary growth determines root biomass in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Jang, Geupil; Lee, Jung-Hun; Rastogi, Khushboo; Park, Suhyoung; Oh, Sang-Hun; Lee, Ji-Young

    2015-08-01

    The root serves as an essential organ in plant growth by taking up nutrients and water from the soil and supporting the rest of the plant body. Some plant species utilize roots as storage organs. Sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and radish (Raphanus sativus), for example, are important root crops. However, how their root growth is regulated remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the relationship between cambium and radial root growth in radish. Through a comparative analysis with Arabidopsis root expression data, we identified putative cambium-enriched transcription factors in radish and analysed their expression in representative inbred lines featuring distinctive radial growth. We found that cell proliferation activities in the cambium positively correlated with radial growth and final yields of radish roots. Expression analysis of candidate transcription factor genes revealed that some genes are differentially expressed between inbred lines and that the difference is due to the distinct cytokinin response. Taken together, we have demonstrated for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that cytokinin-dependent radial growth plays a key role in the yields of root crops. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  17. Phytotoxic effects of leukamenin E (an ent-kaurene diterpenoid) on root growth and root hair development in Lactuca sativa L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lan; Qi, Linlin; Jing, Hongwei; Li, Juan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Tao

    2008-11-01

    Leukamenin E, an ent-kaurene diterpenoid isolated from Isodon racemosa (Hemsl) Hara, showed phytotoxic effects on root growth and root hair development of lettuce seedlings (Lactuca sativa L.). Lower concentrations (10 microM) of leukamenin E did not affect root growth, but at concentrations higher than 50 microM, the rate was inhibited. The influence of leukamenin E on root growth rate was closely correlated with alterations in the mitotic index. A low incidence of aberrant mitosis image was observed when lettuce roots were treated with higher concentrations (100 and 200 microM) of leukamenin E. This suggests that inhibition of root growth may be due to inhibition of cell division. All tested concentrations of the diterpenoid (10 microM or more) inhibited root hair development in a dose-dependent manner. At a concentration of 80 microM, leukamenin E completely blocked root hair initiation. Application of Ag(+)-an ethylene action inhibitor-to lettuce seedlings inhibited root hair elongation similar to the diterpenoid. Enhanced root hair length was stimulated by exogenous ethephon-an ethylene-releasing agent-and could be reversed by addition of leukamenin E. This suggests that leukamenin E may act as a potential ethylene action antagonist in the inhibition of lettuce root hair development. We conclude that leukamenin E may curb root hair development by interfering with ethylene action at concentrations above 10 microM and inhibits root growth via inhibition of cell division at concentrations above 50 microM.

  18. Field and laboratory root growth and development of Lesquerella germplasm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lesquerella roots have not been fully characterized as compared to other crop species. There is initial information gathered on root trait variation in young seedling grown in laboratory settings but studies to determine if the results can be extrapolated in field grown plants are lacking. We report...

  19. Chemical Mowing: Effect of Plant Growth Retardants on Plant Roots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    fructose, sucrose, and fructans were considerably greater in leaf and stem tissue than in roots. Annual bluegrass stems were the major storage organ...for fructans , with only minor fructan storage occurring in roots. The carbohydrate content of mefluidide-treated annual bluegrass decreased

  20. Poor Aeration Curtails Slash Pine Root Growth and Nutrient Uptake

    Treesearch

    Eugene Shoulders

    1976-01-01

    Slash pine may absorb nutrients and water best in spring and early summer because soil moisture, soil aeration, and temperature are apparently optimum at this time. One-year-old slash pine seedlings maintained at a high oxygen level grew about 1% times as many roots as were produced at a low oxygen level. No other environmental conditions significantly influenced root...

  1. Dynamics of phreatophyte root growth relative to a seasonally fluctuating water table in a Mediterranean-type environment.

    PubMed

    Canham, Caroline A; Froend, Raymond H; Stock, William D; Davies, Muriel

    2012-12-01

    While seasonal redistribution of fine root biomass in response to fluctuations in groundwater level is often inferred in phreatophytic plants, few studies have observed the in situ growth dynamics of deep roots relative to those near the surface. We investigated the root growth dynamics of two Banksia species accessing a seasonally dynamic water table and hypothesized that root growth phenology varied with depth, i.e. root growth closest to the water table would be influenced by water table dynamics rather than surface micro-climate. Root in-growth bags were used to observe the dynamics of root growth at different soil depths and above-ground growth was also assessed to identify whole-plant growth phenology. Root growth at shallow depths was found to be in synchrony with above-ground growth phenophases, following increases in ambient temperature and soil water content. In contrast, root growth at depth was either constant or suppressed by saturation. Root growth above the water table and within the capillary fringe occurred in all seasons, corresponding with consistent water availability and aerobic conditions. However, at the water table, a seasonal cycle of root elongation with drawdown in summer followed by trimming in response to water table rise and saturation in winter, was observed. The ability to grow roots year-round at the capillary fringe and redistribute fine root biomass in response to groundwater drawdown is considered critical in allowing phreatophytes, in seasonally water-limited environments, to maintain access to groundwater throughout the year.

  2. Nitric oxide is involved in the oxytetracycline-induced suppression of root growth through inhibiting hydrogen peroxide accumulation in the root meristem

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qing-Xiang; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Yunlong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Jian

    2017-01-01

    Use of antibiotic-contaminated manure in crop production poses a severe threat to soil and plant health. However, few studies have studied the mechanism by which plant development is affected by antibiotics. Here, we used microscopy, flow cytometry, gene expression analysis and fluorescent dyes to study the effects of oxytetracycline (OTC), a widely used antibiotic in agriculture, on root meristem activity and the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in the root tips of tomato seedlings. We found that OTC caused cell cycle arrest, decreased the size of root meristem and inhibited root growth. Interestingly, the inhibition of root growth by OTC was associated with a decline in H2O2 levels but an increase in NO levels in the root tips. Diphenyliodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of H2O2 production, showed similar effects on root growth as those of OTC. However, exogenous H2O2 partially reversed the effects on the cell cycle, meristem size and root growth. Importantly, cPTIO (the NO scavenger) and tungstate (an inhibitor of nitrate reductase) significantly increased H2O2 levels in the root tips and reversed the inhibition of root growth by OTC. Out results suggest that OTC-induced NO production inhibits H2O2 accumulation in the root tips, thus leading to cell cycle arrest and suppression of root growth. PMID:28220869

  3. Nitric oxide is involved in the oxytetracycline-induced suppression of root growth through inhibiting hydrogen peroxide accumulation in the root meristem.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing-Xiang; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Yunlong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Jian

    2017-02-21

    Use of antibiotic-contaminated manure in crop production poses a severe threat to soil and plant health. However, few studies have studied the mechanism by which plant development is affected by antibiotics. Here, we used microscopy, flow cytometry, gene expression analysis and fluorescent dyes to study the effects of oxytetracycline (OTC), a widely used antibiotic in agriculture, on root meristem activity and the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in the root tips of tomato seedlings. We found that OTC caused cell cycle arrest, decreased the size of root meristem and inhibited root growth. Interestingly, the inhibition of root growth by OTC was associated with a decline in H2O2 levels but an increase in NO levels in the root tips. Diphenyliodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of H2O2 production, showed similar effects on root growth as those of OTC. However, exogenous H2O2 partially reversed the effects on the cell cycle, meristem size and root growth. Importantly, cPTIO (the NO scavenger) and tungstate (an inhibitor of nitrate reductase) significantly increased H2O2 levels in the root tips and reversed the inhibition of root growth by OTC. Out results suggest that OTC-induced NO production inhibits H2O2 accumulation in the root tips, thus leading to cell cycle arrest and suppression of root growth.

  4. Nitric oxide is involved in the oxytetracycline-induced suppression of root growth through inhibiting hydrogen peroxide accumulation in the root meristem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qing-Xiang; Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Yu, Yunlong; Yu, Jing-Quan; Xia, Xiao-Jian

    2017-02-01

    Use of antibiotic-contaminated manure in crop production poses a severe threat to soil and plant health. However, few studies have studied the mechanism by which plant development is affected by antibiotics. Here, we used microscopy, flow cytometry, gene expression analysis and fluorescent dyes to study the effects of oxytetracycline (OTC), a widely used antibiotic in agriculture, on root meristem activity and the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in the root tips of tomato seedlings. We found that OTC caused cell cycle arrest, decreased the size of root meristem and inhibited root growth. Interestingly, the inhibition of root growth by OTC was associated with a decline in H2O2 levels but an increase in NO levels in the root tips. Diphenyliodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of H2O2 production, showed similar effects on root growth as those of OTC. However, exogenous H2O2 partially reversed the effects on the cell cycle, meristem size and root growth. Importantly, cPTIO (the NO scavenger) and tungstate (an inhibitor of nitrate reductase) significantly increased H2O2 levels in the root tips and reversed the inhibition of root growth by OTC. Out results suggest that OTC-induced NO production inhibits H2O2 accumulation in the root tips, thus leading to cell cycle arrest and suppression of root growth.

  5. Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation growth is sensitive to lunisolar tidal acceleration and may also be weakly correlated with geomagnetic variations

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Peter W.; Fisahn, Joachim; Yazdanbakhsh, Nima; Moraes, Thiago A.; Khabarova, Olga V.; Gallep, Cristiano M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Correlative evidence suggests a relationship between the lunisolar tidal acceleration and the elongation rate of arabidopsis roots grown under free-running conditions of constant low light. Methods Seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana were grown in a controlled-climate chamber maintained at a constant temperature and subjected to continuous low-level illumination from fluorescent tubes, conditions that approximate to a ‘free-running’ state in which most of the abiotic factors that entrain root growth rates are excluded. Elongation of evenly spaced, vertical primary roots was recorded continuously over periods of up to 14 d using high temporal- and spatial-resolution video imaging and were analysed in conjunction with geophysical variables. Key Results and Conclusions The results confirm the lunisolar tidal/root elongation relationship. Also presented are relationships between the hourly elongation rates and the contemporaneous variations in geomagnetic activity, as evaluated from the disturbance storm time and ap indices. On the basis of time series of root elongation rates that extend over ≥4 d and recorded at different seasons of the year, a provisional conclusion is that root elongation responds to variation in the lunisolar force and also appears to adjust in accordance with variations in the geomagnetic field. Thus, both lunisolar tidal acceleration and the geomagnetic field should be considered as modulators of root growth rate, alongside other, stronger and more well-known abiotic environmental regulators, and perhaps unexplored factors such as air ions. Major changes in atmospheric pressure are not considered to be a factor contributing to oscillations of root elongation rate. PMID:23532042

  6. Pulpectomies in primary mandibular molars: a comparison of outcomes using three root filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pramila, R; Muthu, M S; Deepa, G; Farzan, J M; Rodrigues, S J L

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the outcome of root canal treatment in primary teeth using three root canal filling materials - RC Fill, Vitapex and Pulpdent root canal sealer. The study was a single-centre, double-blind, randomized controlled trial carried out on 129 primary mandibular molars with necrotic pulps or irreversible pulpitis in 4- to 9-year-old children. Participants were selected based on specific inclusion and exclusion criteria and were randomly allocated into 3 groups: Group I - RC Fill [zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) with iodoform]; Group II - Vitapex (calcium hydroxide with iodoform); and Group III - Pulpdent root canal sealer (ZOE). The outcome measures were evaluated both clinically and radiographically at 6, 12 and 30 months according to modified American Association of Endodontists (AAE) criteria. The radiographic outcomes were assessed by two blinded and calibrated evaluators. Pearson's chi-square analysis was performed for both intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol population. The success rates of RC Fill, Vitapex and Pulpdent were 94%, 90% and 97%, respectively, at 30 months and the differences were not significant (P = 0.137). All three materials were found to be equally effective root filling materials for primary molars with necrotic pulps and irreversible pulpitis at 30 months. However, long-term follow-up until the eruption of the permanent successor teeth is needed for more definitive assessments. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Jasmonic Acid Enhances Al-Induced Root Growth Inhibition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhong-Bao; Ma, Yanqi

    2017-01-01

    Phytohormones such as ethylene and auxin are involved in the regulation of the aluminum (Al)-induced root growth inhibition. Although jasmonate (JA) has been reported to play a crucial role in the regulation of root growth and development in response to environmental stresses through interplay with ethylene and auxin, its role in the regulation of root growth response to Al stress is not yet known. In an attempt to elucidate the role of JA, we found that exogenous application of JA enhanced the Al-induced root growth inhibition. Furthermore, phenotype analysis with mutants defective in either JA biosynthesis or signaling suggests that JA is involved in the regulation of Al-induced root growth inhibition. The expression of the JA receptor CORONATINE INSENSITIVE1 (COI1) and the key JA signaling regulator MYC2 was up-regulated in response to Al stress in the root tips. This process together with COI1-mediated Al-induced root growth inhibition under Al stress was controlled by ethylene but not auxin. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that many responsive genes under Al stress were regulated by JA signaling. The differential responsive of microtubule organization-related genes between the wild-type and coi1-2 mutant is consistent with the changed depolymerization of cortical microtubules in coi1 under Al stress. In addition, ALMT-mediated malate exudation and thus Al exclusion from roots in response to Al stress was also regulated by COI1-mediated JA signaling. Together, this study suggests that root growth inhibition is regulated by COI1-mediated JA signaling independent from auxin signaling and provides novel insights into the phytohormone-mediated root growth inhibition in response to Al stress. PMID:27932419

  8. Vegetative growth and cluster development in Shiraz grapevines subjected to partial root-zone cooling.

    PubMed

    Rogiers, Suzy Y; Clarke, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in root-zone temperature both vertically and horizontally may contribute to the uneven vegetative and reproductive growth often observed across vineyards. An experiment was designed to assess whether the warmed half of a grapevine root zone could compensate for the cooled half in terms of vegetative growth and reproductive development. We divided the root system of potted Shiraz grapevines bilaterally and applied either a cool or a warm treatment to each half from budburst to fruit set. Shoot growth and inflorescence development were monitored over the season. Simultaneous cooling and warming of parts of the root system decreased shoot elongation, leaf emergence and leaf expansion below that of plants with a fully warmed root zone, but not to the same extent as those with a fully cooled root zone. Inflorescence rachis length, flower number and berry number after fertilization were smaller only in those vines exposed to fully cooled root zones. After terminating the treatments, berry enlargement and the onset of veraison were slowed in those vines that had been exposed to complete or partial root-zone cooling. Grapevines exposed to partial root-zone cooling were thus delayed in vegetative and reproductive development, but the inhibition was greater in those plants whose entire root system had been cooled.

  9. Vegetative growth and cluster development in Shiraz grapevines subjected to partial root-zone cooling

    PubMed Central

    Rogiers, Suzy Y.; Clarke, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity in root-zone temperature both vertically and horizontally may contribute to the uneven vegetative and reproductive growth often observed across vineyards. An experiment was designed to assess whether the warmed half of a grapevine root zone could compensate for the cooled half in terms of vegetative growth and reproductive development. We divided the root system of potted Shiraz grapevines bilaterally and applied either a cool or a warm treatment to each half from budburst to fruit set. Shoot growth and inflorescence development were monitored over the season. Simultaneous cooling and warming of parts of the root system decreased shoot elongation, leaf emergence and leaf expansion below that of plants with a fully warmed root zone, but not to the same extent as those with a fully cooled root zone. Inflorescence rachis length, flower number and berry number after fertilization were smaller only in those vines exposed to fully cooled root zones. After terminating the treatments, berry enlargement and the onset of veraison were slowed in those vines that had been exposed to complete or partial root-zone cooling. Grapevines exposed to partial root-zone cooling were thus delayed in vegetative and reproductive development, but the inhibition was greater in those plants whose entire root system had been cooled. PMID:24244839

  10. Soil compaction: a review of past and present techniques for investigating effects on root growth.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Saoirse R; Black, Colin R; Roberts, Jeremy A; Mooney, Sacha J

    2011-07-01

    Soil compaction has been known to affect root growth for millennia. Root growth in natural soils is complex and soil compaction induces several stresses which may interact simultaneously, including increased soil strength, decreased aeration and reduced hydraulic conductivity. Yet, moderate soil compaction offers some benefits to growing roots by increasing root-soil contact so they can extract adequate resources. Until now, improving our understanding of the specific responses of roots to below-ground stimuli has been difficult. However, the advent of new technologies and practices, including X-ray computed tomography, to provide non-destructive, three-dimensional images of root systems throughout the plant's lifecycle now allows the responses of roots encountering changes in their physical, chemical or biotic environment to be established directly and non-invasively. Previous destructive methods, such as root washing, were incapable of identifying and characterising fine root architectural characteristics as these are inextricably linked to the composition of the soil matrix. X-ray computed tomography coupled with genetic approaches will provide a more comprehensive appreciation of the effect of soil compaction on root growth, and the knowledge required to generate improvements in plant breeding programmes and crop husbandry. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Induction of primary root curvature in radish seedlings in a static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Yano, A; Hidaka, E; Fujiwara, K; Iimoto, M

    2001-04-01

    Primary roots of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings were exposed to an inhomogeneous static magnetic field generated by a permanent magnet, during continuous rotation on a 0.06 rpm clinostat, thereby reducing the unilateral influence of gravity. The roots responded tropically to the static magnetic field with the tropism appearing to be negative. These roots responded significantly (P < 0.05) to the south pole of the magnet. The significant tropic response was found for a magnetic flux density of 13-68 mT, for a field gradient of 1.8-14.7 T/m, and for the product of magnetic field and field gradient of 0.023-1.0 T(2)/m. A small, but insignificant, response of the roots to the north pole has also been found. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Rates of Root and Organism Growth, Soil Conditions, and Temporal and Spatial Development of the Rhizosphere

    PubMed Central

    WATT, MICHELLE; SILK, WENDY K.; PASSIOURA, JOHN B.

    2006-01-01

    • Background Roots growing in soil encounter physical, chemical and biological environments that influence their rhizospheres and affect plant growth. Exudates from roots can stimulate or inhibit soil organisms that may release nutrients, infect the root, or modify plant growth via signals. These rhizosphere processes are poorly understood in field conditions. • Scope and Aims We characterize roots and their rhizospheres and rates of growth in units of distance and time so that interactions with soil organisms can be better understood in field conditions. We review: (1) distances between components of the soil, including dead roots remnant from previous plants, and the distances between new roots, their rhizospheres and soil components; (2) characteristic times (distance2/diffusivity) for solutes to travel distances between roots and responsive soil organisms; (3) rates of movement and growth of soil organisms; (4) rates of extension of roots, and how these relate to the rates of anatomical and biochemical ageing of root tissues and the development of the rhizosphere within the soil profile; and (5) numbers of micro-organisms in the rhizosphere and the dependence on the site of attachment to the growing tip. We consider temporal and spatial variation within the rhizosphere to understand the distribution of bacteria and fungi on roots in hard, unploughed soil, and the activities of organisms in the overlapping rhizospheres of living and dead roots clustered in gaps in most field soils. • Conclusions Rhizosphere distances, characteristic times for solute diffusion, and rates of root and organism growth must be considered to understand rhizosphere development. Many values used in our analysis were estimates. The paucity of reliable data underlines the rudimentary state of our knowledge of root–organism interactions in the field. PMID:16551700

  13. The organization of the actin cytoskeleton in vertical and graviresponding primary roots of maize.

    PubMed Central

    Blancaflor, E B; Hasenstein, K H

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether actin microfilament (MF) organization is correlated with differential elongation, primary roots of Zea mays cv Merit maintained vertically or reoriented horizontally for 15 to 120 min were stained with rhodamine phalloidin and examined with a confocal microscope. Root curvature was measured with a computer-controlled video digitizer. In vertical roots bundles of MFs in the elongation and maturation zone were oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of cells. MFs in the vascular parenchyma cells were more abundant than in the cortex and epidermis. Epidermal and proendodermal cells in the meristematic region contained transverse cortical MFs. The organization of MFs of graviresponding roots was similar to that of vertical roots. Application of cytochalasin B or cytochalasin D resulted in extensive disruption of MFs in the cortex and epidermis, but only partially affected MFs in the stele. Despite the cytochalasin B-induced depolymerization of MFs, gravicurvature exceeded that of controls. In contrast, the auxin transport inhibitor N-1 naphthylphthalamic acid suppressed root curvature but had no observable effect on the integrity of the MFs. The data indicate that MFs may not be involved in the graviresponse of maize roots. PMID:11536803

  14. The organization of the actin cytoskeleton in vertical and graviresponding primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether actin microfilament (MF) organization is correlated with differential elongation, primary roots of Zea mays cv Merit maintained vertically or reoriented horizontally for 15 to 120 min were stained with rhodamine phalloidin and examined with a confocal microscope. Root curvature was measured with a computer-controlled video digitizer. In vertical roots bundles of MFs in the elongation and maturation zone were oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of cells. MFs in the vascular parenchyma cells were more abundant than in the cortex and epidermis. Epidermal and proendodermal cells in the meristematic region contained transverse cortical MFs. The organization of MFs of graviresponding roots was similar to that of vertical roots. Application of cytochalasin B or cytochalasin D resulted in extensive disruption of MFs in the cortex and epidermis, but only partially affected MFs in the stele. Despite the cytochalasin B-induced depolymerization of MFs, gravicurvature exceeded that of controls. In contrast, the auxin transport inhibitor N-1 naphthylphthalamic acid suppressed root curvature but had no observable effect on the integrity of the MFs. The data indicate that MFs may not be involved in the graviresponse of maize roots.

  15. The organization of the actin cytoskeleton in vertical and graviresponding primary roots of maize

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether actin microfilament (MF) organization is correlated with differential elongation, primary roots of Zea mays cv Merit maintained vertically or reoriented horizontally for 15 to 120 min were stained with rhodamine phalloidin and examined with a confocal microscope. Root curvature was measured with a computer-controlled video digitizer. In vertical roots bundles of MFs in the elongation and maturation zone were oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of cells. MFs in the vascular parenchyma cells were more abundant than in the cortex and epidermis. Epidermal and proendodermal cells in the meristematic region contained transverse cortical MFs. The organization of MFs of graviresponding roots was similar to that of vertical roots. Application of cytochalasin B or cytochalasin D resulted in extensive disruption of MFs in the cortex and epidermis, but only partially affected MFs in the stele. Despite the cytochalasin B-induced depolymerization of MFs, gravicurvature exceeded that of controls. In contrast, the auxin transport inhibitor N-1 naphthylphthalamic acid suppressed root curvature but had no observable effect on the integrity of the MFs. The data indicate that MFs may not be involved in the graviresponse of maize roots.

  16. [Effects of cinnamic acid and vanillin on grafted eggplant root growth and physiological characteristics].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Li; Zhou, Bao-Li; Lin, Shan-Shan; Li, Xia; Ye, Xue-Ling

    2010-06-01

    Choosing Solanum torvum as rootstock and cultivated Xi'anlü eggplant as scion, a pot culture experiment was conducted to study the effects of autotoxic substances (cinnamic acid and vanillin) on the root growth, antioxidase activity, and osmoregulation substances content of grafted eggplant, own-rooted eggplant, and rootstock eggplant. Cinnamic acid and vanillin had allelopathic effects on the root system of test eggplants, with low concentration promoting and higher concentration inhibiting the root growth and physiological metabolism. For own-rooted eggplant, the critical concentration of cinnamic acid and vanillin for promotion or inhibition was 0.1 mmol x kg(-1) and 0.5 mmol x kg(-1), respectively; whereas for grafted and rootstock eggplants, it was 0.5 mmol x kg(-1) and 1 mmol x kg(-1), respectively. The root resistance to autotoxic substances was in the order of root-stock eggplant > grafted eggplant > own-rooted eggplant. Higher concentration cinamic acid (0.5-4 mmol x kg(-1)) and vanillin (1-4 mmol x kg(-1)) enhanced the SOD enzyme activity and the proline and soluble sugar contents of grafted eggplant root by 8.50%-24.50%; 9.39%-27.64%, and 12.77%-81.81%, respectively, compared with own-rooted eggplant. The soluble protein content, fresh mass, dry mass, and root activity of grafted eggplant roots were significantly higher than those of own-rooted eggplant, suggesting that grafted eggplant had a strong resistance of rootstocks to autotoxic substances, which alleviated the negative effect of autotoxic substances on root growth.

  17. Low temperature inhibits root growth by reducing auxin accumulation via ARR1/12.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Kun-Xiao; Wang, Wen-Shu; Gong, Wen; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Hong-Guo; Xu, Heng-Hao; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-04-01

    Plants exhibit reduced root growth when exposed to low temperature; however, how low temperature modulates root growth remains to be understood. Our study demonstrated that low temperature reduces both meristem size and cell number, repressing the division potential of meristematic cells by reducing auxin accumulation, possibly through the repressed expression of PIN1/3/7 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes, although the experiments with exogenous auxin application also suggest the involvement of other factor(s). In addition, we verified that ARABIDOPSIS RESPONSE REGULATOR 1 (ARR1) and ARR12 are involved in low temperature-mediated inhibition of root growth by showing that the roots of arr1-3 arr12-1 seedlings were less sensitive than wild-type roots to low temperature, in terms of changes in root length and meristem cell number. Furthermore, low temperature reduced the levels of PIN1/3 transcripts and the auxin level to a lesser extent in arr1-3 arr12-1 roots than in wild-type roots, suggesting that cytokinin signaling is involved in the low-temperature-mediated reduction of auxin accumulation. Taken together, our data suggest that low temperature inhibits root growth by reducing auxin accumulation via ARR1/12.

  18. Identification of factors associated with pathological root resorption in traumatized primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Mariane; Rocha, Maria José de Carvalho

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the factors associated with the development of pathological root resorptions in traumatized primary teeth. Based on Dental Reports on Traumatism from the Assistance Program for the Traumatized Patient, 90 children were selected. Among these children, 45 did not present pathological root resorption, while 45 did (23 replacement root resorptions and 22 external inflammatory root resorptions). Possible factors associated with the development of the pathological resorption include: (i) over 18 months or over 52 months of age, (ii) complicated trauma, and (iii) presence of more than one trauma in the same tooth. Using the chi-squared test, it was verified that trauma recurrence was considered to be a factor associated with the development of pathological root resorption (chi(2) = 3.636; P < 0.05). Through the univaried logistic regression test, it was revealed that children with trauma recurrence present a 2.6 times higher chance of developing pathological root resorptions when compared with children that did not report trauma recurrence. Through the univaried logistic regression test, it was also observed that the association of two or three factors caused the chances of pathological root resorption development to increase by 3.8 times in 18-month-old children or older (95% CI: 1.5-9.7) and by 5.1 times in 52-month-old children or older (95% CI: 1.5-17). Trauma recurrence in the same primary tooth is associated with pathological root resorption, and the interaction among two or three factors increases the chance of developing such sequelae.

  19. Root canal filling materials for primary teeth: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kubota, K; Golden, B E; Penugonda, B

    1992-01-01

    In summary, there is no known ideal root canal filling material for primary teeth. The closest to the ideal appears to be a calcium hydroxide-iodoform mixture. More histopathologic studies as well as long-term clinical studies are needed on this material.

  20. Localized idiopathic root resorption in the primary dentition: Review of the literature and a case report

    PubMed Central

    Nasehi, Atefeh; Mazhari, Fatemeh; Mohtasham, Nooshin

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic root resorption (IRR) is an infrequent condition that is usually found as an accidental finding on radiography. A significant number of cases of IRR in permanent dentition have been presented but are rarely reported in primary dentition. The aim of this case report is to present a case of localized IRR in a 7-year-old boy. The patient was referred because of increased mobility of the left mandibular primary second molar. On radiographic evaluation, severe root resorption of that tooth, and mild root resorption of the right mandibular primary second molar were evident; the patient was caries-free. The left affected tooth was lost, and after placing a band and loop space maintainer, the patient was followed for 18 months. A patient with an abnormal pattern of root resorption, especially in the primary dentition, should alert the clinician to rule out the known important local and systemic factors. The exact causes of and treatments for IRR continue to be discovered. PMID:26929703

  1. Correlation Between Bacterial Endotoxin Levels in Root Canals of Primary Teeth and the Periapical Lesion Area.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino; Arid, Juliana; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Lucisano, Marília Pacífico; Silva, Raquel Assed Bezerra; Sorgi, Carlos Arterio; Faccioli, Lúcia Helena; Silva, Lea Assed Bezerra

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (1) to assess the endotoxin levels in root canals of primary teeth with necrotic pulps and periapical lesions; and (2) to evaluate the correlation of endotoxin levels with the periapical lesion size. Twenty primary molars with necrotic pulps and periapical lesions were selected. Standardized radiographs were obtained and the lesions were measured. Material from each root canal was collected to quantify the bacterial endotoxin. The results were analyzed using Pearson's correlation, student's t test, and Fisher's exact test (α equals five percent). The initial amount of bacterial endotoxin in the root canals ranged from 0.089 to greater than 50.00 endotoxin units (EU)/mL and was detected in 100 percent of the samples. A positive but not significant correlation was observed between the amount of endotoxin and periapical lesion size in primary molars. Endotoxin was observed in 100 percent of root canals of primary teeth with a periapical lesion. However, there was no statistical significance between bacterial endotoxin levels and the periapical lesion area.

  2. QTL meta-analysis of root traits in Brassica napus under contrasting phosphorus supply in two growth systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Thomas, Catherine L.; Xiang, Jinxia; Long, Yan; Wang, Xiaohua; Zou, Jun; Luo, Ziliang; Ding, Guangda; Cai, Hongmei; Graham, Neil S.; Hammond, John P.; King, Graham J.; White, Philip J.; Xu, Fangsen; Broadley, Martin R.; Shi, Lei; Meng, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    A high-density SNP-based genetic linkage map was constructed and integrated with a previous map in the Tapidor x Ningyou7 (TNDH) Brassica napus population, giving a new map with a total of 2041 molecular markers and an average marker density which increased from 0.39 to 0.97 (0.82 SNP bin) per cM. Root and shoot traits were screened under low and ‘normal’ phosphate (Pi) supply using a ‘pouch and wick’ system, and had been screened previously in an agar based system. The P-efficient parent Ningyou7 had a shorter primary root length (PRL), greater lateral root density (LRD) and a greater shoot biomass than the P-inefficient parent Tapidor under both treatments and growth systems. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis identified a total of 131 QTL, and QTL meta-analysis found four integrated QTL across the growth systems. Integration reduced the confidence interval by ~41%. QTL for root and shoot biomass were co-located on chromosome A3 and for lateral root emergence were co-located on chromosomes A4/C4 and C8/C9. There was a major QTL for LRD on chromosome C9 explaining ~18% of the phenotypic variation. QTL underlying an increased LRD may be a useful breeding target for P uptake efficiency in Brassica. PMID:27624881

  3. Reduced Expression of the SHORT-ROOT Gene Increases the Rates of Growth and Development in Hybrid Poplar and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiehua; Andersson-Gunnerås, Sara; Gaboreanu, Ioana; Hertzberg, Magnus; Tucker, Matthew R.; Zheng, Bo; Leśniewska, Joanna; Mellerowicz, Ewa J.; Laux, Thomas; Sandberg, Göran; Jones, Brian

    2011-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) is a well characterized regulator of cell division and cell fate determination in the Arabidopsis primary root. However, much less is known about the functions of SHR in the aerial parts of the plant. In this work, we cloned SHR gene from Populus trichocarpa (PtSHR1) as an AtSHR ortholog and down-regulated its expression in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula×P. tremuloides Michx-clone T89) in order to determine its physiological functions in shoot development. Sharing a 90% similarity to AtSHR at amino acid level, PtSHR1 was able to complement the Arabidopsis shr mutant. Down regulation of PtSHR1 led to a strong enhancement of primary (height) and secondary (girth) growth rates in the transgenic poplars. A similar approach in Arabidopsis showed a comparable accelerated growth and development phenotype. Our results suggest that the response to SHR could be dose-dependent and that a partial down-regulation of SHR could lead to enhanced meristem activity and a coordinated acceleration of plant growth in woody species. Therefore, SHR functions in plant growth and development as a regulator of cell division and meristem activity not only in the roots but also in the shoots. Reducing SHR expression in transgenic poplar was shown to lead to significant increases in primary and secondary growth rates. Given the current interest in bioenergy crops, SHR has a broader role as a key regulator of whole plant growth and development and SHR suppression has considerable potential for accelerating biomass accumulation in a variety of species. PMID:22194939

  4. Reduced expression of the SHORT-ROOT gene increases the rates of growth and development in hybrid poplar and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiehua; Andersson-Gunnerås, Sara; Gaboreanu, Ioana; Hertzberg, Magnus; Tucker, Matthew R; Zheng, Bo; Leśniewska, Joanna; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Laux, Thomas; Sandberg, Göran; Jones, Brian

    2011-01-01

    SHORT-ROOT (SHR) is a well characterized regulator of cell division and cell fate determination in the Arabidopsis primary root. However, much less is known about the functions of SHR in the aerial parts of the plant. In this work, we cloned SHR gene from Populus trichocarpa (PtSHR1) as an AtSHR ortholog and down-regulated its expression in hybrid poplar (Populus tremula×P. tremuloides Michx-clone T89) in order to determine its physiological functions in shoot development. Sharing a 90% similarity to AtSHR at amino acid level, PtSHR1 was able to complement the Arabidopsis shr mutant. Down regulation of PtSHR1 led to a strong enhancement of primary (height) and secondary (girth) growth rates in the transgenic poplars. A similar approach in Arabidopsis showed a comparable accelerated growth and development phenotype. Our results suggest that the response to SHR could be dose-dependent and that a partial down-regulation of SHR could lead to enhanced meristem activity and a coordinated acceleration of plant growth in woody species. Therefore, SHR functions in plant growth and development as a regulator of cell division and meristem activity not only in the roots but also in the shoots. Reducing SHR expression in transgenic poplar was shown to lead to significant increases in primary and secondary growth rates. Given the current interest in bioenergy crops, SHR has a broader role as a key regulator of whole plant growth and development and SHR suppression has considerable potential for accelerating biomass accumulation in a variety of species.

  5. Experimental observations of root growth in a controlled photoelastic granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barés, Jonathan; Mora, Serge; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Fourcaud, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel root observation apparatus capable of measuring the mechanical evolution of both the root network and the surrounding granular medium. The apparatus consists of 11 parallel growth frames, two of them being shearable, where the roots grow inside a photo-elastic or glass granular medium sandwiched between two pieces of glass. An automated system waters the plant and image each frame periodically in white light and between crossed polarisers. This makes it possible to follow (i) the root tips and (ii) the grain displacements as well as (iii) their inner pressure. We show how a root networks evolve in a granular medium and how it can mechanically stabilize it. This constitutes a model experiment to move forward in the understanding of the complex interaction between root growth and surrounding soil mechanical evolution.

  6. Transcriptome analysis reveals the effects of sugar metabolism and auxin and cytokinin signaling pathways on root growth and development of grafted apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Guofang; Ma, Juanjuan; Tan, Ming; Mao, Jiangping; An, Na; Sha, Guangli; Zhang, Dong; Zhao, Caiping; Han, Mingyu

    2016-02-29

    The root architecture of grafted apple (Malus spp.) is affected by various characteristics of the scions. To provide information on the molecular mechanisms underlying this influence, we examined root transcriptomes of M. robusta rootstock grafted with scions of wild-type (WT) apple (M. spectabilis) and a more-branching (MB) mutant at the branching stage. The growth rate of rootstock grafted MB was repressed significantly, especially the primary root length and diameter, and root weight. Biological function categories of differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in processes associated with hormone signal transduction and intracellular activity, with processes related to the cell cycle especially down-regulated. Roots of rootstock grafted with MB scions displayed elevated auxin and cytokinin contents and reduced expression of MrPIN1, MrARF, MrAHP, most MrCRE1 genes, and cell growth-related genes MrGH3, MrSAUR and MrTCH4. Although auxin accumulation and transcription of MrPIN3, MrALF1 and MrALF4 tended to induce lateral root formation in MB-grafted rootstock, the number of lateral roots was not significantly changed. Sucrose, fructose and glucose contents were not decreased in MB-grafted roots compared with those bearing WT scions, but glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolic activities were repressed. Root resistance and nitrogen metabolism were reduced in MB-grafted roots as well. Our findings suggest that root growth and development of rootstock are mainly influenced by sugar metabolism and auxin and cytokinin signaling pathways. This study provides a basis that the characteristics of scions are related to root growth and development, resistance and activity of rootstocks.

  7. Comparison of growth characteristics of Panax ginseng hairy roots in various bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Gwi-Taek; Park, Don-Hee; Hwang, Baik; Woo, Je-Chang

    2003-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of flask-to-liquid volume ratio on the growth of Panax ginseng hairy root, transformed by Agrobacterium rhizogenes, in flask cultures and compared the characteristics of various bioreactors for scale-up. The flask-to-liquid volume ratio was optimum at 1.5 mL of air/mL of medium in flask cultures, and hairy root growth was not affected above the optimum ratio. In 500-mL flask culture, hairy root showed two growth phases. After the first exponential growth, specific growth rate decreased. The growth characteristics of P. ginseng hairy root in various bioreactors were investigated. Hairy root growth was about 55- fold of inoculum after 39 d in a 5-L bioreactor and about 38-fold of inoculum after 40 d in a 19-L bioreactor. Carbon yield was higher in a 19-L bioreactor than in others, but it did not show any linear relationship to the growth rate of hairy roots in bioreactors.

  8. Myosin XIK of Arabidopsis thaliana Accumulates at the Root Hair Tip and Is Required for Fast Root Hair Growth

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunsook; Nebenführ, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Myosin motor proteins are thought to carry out important functions in the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity by moving cellular components such as organelles, vesicles, or protein complexes along the actin cytoskeleton. In Arabidopsis thaliana, disruption of the myosin XIK gene leads to reduced elongation of the highly polar root hairs, suggesting that the encoded motor protein is involved in this cell growth. Detailed live-cell observations in this study revealed that xik root hairs elongated more slowly and stopped growth sooner than those in wild type. Overall cellular organization including the actin cytoskeleton appeared normal, but actin filament dynamics were reduced in the mutant. Accumulation of RabA4b-containing vesicles, on the other hand, was not significantly different from wild type. A functional YFP-XIK fusion protein that could complement the mutant phenotype accumulated at the tip of growing root hairs in an actin-dependent manner. The distribution of YFP-XIK at the tip, however, did not match that of the ER or several tip-enriched markers including CFP-RabA4b. We conclude that the myosin XIK is required for normal actin dynamics and plays a role in the subapical region of growing root hairs to facilitate optimal growth. PMID:24116145

  9. Consequences of insect herbivory on grape fine root systems with different growth rates.

    PubMed

    Bauerle, T L; Eissenstat, D M; Granett, J; Gardner, D M; Smart, D R

    2007-07-01

    Herbivory tolerance has been linked to plant growth rate where plants with fast growth rates are hypothesized to be more tolerant of herbivory than slower-growing plants. Evidence supporting this theory has been taken primarily from observations of aboveground organs but rarely from roots. Grapevines differing in overall rates of new root production, were studied in Napa Valley, California over two growing seasons in an established vineyard infested with the sucking insect, grape phylloxera (Daktulosphaira vitifoliae Fitch). The experimental vineyard allowed for the comparison of two root systems that differed in rates of new root tip production (a 'fast grower', Vitis berlandieri x Vitis rupestris cv. 1103P, and a slower-growing stock, Vitis riparia x Vitis rupestris cv. 101-14 Mgt). Each root system was grafted with a genetically identical shoot system (Vitis vinifera cv. Merlot). Using minirhizotrons, we did not observe any evidence of spatial or temporal avoidance of insect populations by root growth. Insect infestations were abundant throughout the soil profile, and seasonal peaks in phylloxera populations generally closely followed peaks in new root production. Our data supported the hypothesis that insect infestation was proportional to the number of growing tips, as indicated by similar per cent infestation in spite of a threefold difference in root tip production. In addition, infested roots of the fast-growing rootstock exhibited somewhat shorter median lifespans (60 d) than the slower-growing rootstock (85 d). Lifespans of uninfested roots were similar for the two rootstocks (200 d). As a consequence of greater root mortality of younger roots, infested root populations in the fast-growing rootstock had an older age structure. While there does not seem to be a trade-off between potential growth rate and relative rate of root infestation in these cultivars, our study indicates that a fast-growing root system may more readily shed infested roots that are

  10. The consequence of peroxidase overexpression in transgenic plants on root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Lagrimini, L M; Joly, R J; Dunlap, J R; Liu, T T

    1997-03-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that overproduce the tobacco anionic peroxidase wilt upon reaching maturity, although having functional stomata and normal vascular anatomy and physiology. These plants were examined further to determine the cause for wilting, and thus better understand how the anionic peroxidase functions in plant growth and development. Shoots from young peroxidase overproducing plants were grafted onto wild-type tobacco root stock to determine if the roots could absorb and transmit sufficient water to maintain leaf turgidity. These grafted plants never wilted when grown in the greenhouse though shoot peroxidase activity remained ten-fold greater than in control plants, thus indicating that wilting is a consequence of peroxidase expression in the roots. Close examination of root systems revealed considerably less root mass in the transformed plant, primarily exhibited through a decrease in branching. At flowering, root growth rate and total root mass in transformed plants were less than 50% of control plants although shoot mass and growth rate were unchanged. This is in contrast to root growth in young seedlings where transformed plants performed equivalently to controls. Root hydraulic conductivity was measured to evaluate the effect of elevated peroxidase expression on water absorption and transport; however, no significant change in hydraulic conductivity was found in transformed plants. The consequence of anionic peroxidase overexpression on indoleacetic acid (IAA) metabolism was also examined. No significant difference in IAA levels was observed; however, root elongation in plants overexpressing peroxidase was insensitive to exogenous IAA. It can be concluded that the overexpression of the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transformed plants results in diminished root mass from fewer root branches, which contributes to the wilting phenomenon seen in these plants. Further, this developmental change in transformed plants may be a consequence of the

  11. Comparative Analysis of Root Dentin Morphology and Structure of Human Versus Bovine Primary Teeth.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bruna M; Iwamoto, Alexsandra S; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M; Pascon, Fernanda M

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the structural and morphological differences between human and bovine primary root canals. Primary human maxillary central incisors (H) (n=9) and primary bovine incisors (B) (n=9) were selected. The roots were sectioned in the vestibular-lingual direction, planed and delimited in cervical, middle, and apical thirds. Tubule density (number of tubules per mm2) and diameter were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (1,000 and 5,000×) using Image J 1.47 software. Data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The highest tubule density was observed for B (28.527±1.717 mm2) compared with H (15.931±0.170 mm2) (p<0.01). Regarding root thirds, the cervical third presented a greater tubule density (26.417±11.654 mm2) than the apical third (17.999±5.873 mm2). The diameter of the dentin tubules was not different for cervical (3.50±0.08 µm), middle (3.45±0.30 µm) and apical thirds (3.42±0.33 µm) and substrate (H-3.29±0.14 µm; B-3.63±0.06 µm). It could be concluded that: (1) the radicular dentin structure of human and bovine primary teeth and root thirds differ in terms of the tubule density; (2) the radicular dentin morphology of human and bovine primary teeth and root thirds are similar in terms of the diameter of the dentin tubules.

  12. Corn-on-a-chip: Mini-channel Device for Corn Root Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, Kevin; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    Plant growth heavily relies on interactions between the root and the soil environment, but it is impossible to observe such interactions because of opaqueness of soil. Microfluidics has been successfully utilized to monitor the root growth behaviors of Arabidopsis. In this study we have chosen Maize as a model plant because of its economic significance, and aim to develop transparent mini-channel devices accommodating the root growth of corn seedlings in a controlled environment. To mimic aspects of the soil environment, we try to impose concentration gradients of key chemical ions to the growing root using the device, and to investigate how the root responds to the applied stimuli. We acknowledge support from NASA Nebraska Space Grant Fellowship.

  13. Apoptosis in pulp elimination during physiological root resorption in human primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Luciana Villela; Vasconcelos, Anilton César; Campos, Pedro Alves; Brant, Juliana Massote Caldeira

    2009-01-01

    Pulp samples of 50 healthy human teeth with indication for extraction were examined to evaluate the role of apoptosis in pulp elimination during physiological root resorption. Two groups were formed: a test group (n=30) composed of pulp samples of primary teeth with physiological root resorption and a control group (n=20) composed of pulp samples of permanent maxillary third molars. Morphological evidence of apoptosis as well as in situ detection of cellular DNA fragmentation by TUNEL assay and detection of internucleosomal pattern of fragmentation of the genomic DNA by electrophoresis were observed. The apoptotic index of the primary tooth group was significantly higher than that of the permanent tooth group (51.01 +/- 0.52 versus 25.32 +/- 0.68) (p<0.001). TUNEL reaction showed intense and diffuse labeling in the pulp samples of primary teeth, which were discrete in the controls. Intense DNA internucleosomal fragmentation, a specific pattern for apoptosis, was observed in primary tooth pulps DNA by electrophoresis, in the permanent tooth pulps this pattern fragmentation of the genomic DNA for apoptosis were not present. These results seem to indicate a role of apoptosis in pulp elimination during the physiological root resorption of human primary teeth.

  14. Combined effects of bisphenol A and cadmium on growth and nitrate assimilation of soybean seedling roots.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Wang, Qingqing; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2014-09-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and cadmium (Cd) pollution exist simultaneously in many regions. However, little information is available regarding the combined effects of BPA and Cd pollution on plants. Plant roots are in direct contact with the soil, which is an important compartment of BPA and Cd. In the present study, the effects of combined BPA and Cd pollution on soybean seedling roots were evaluated in pot experiments. Combined treatment with BPA and Cd at low concentrations (1.5 mg/kg BPA and 0.2 mg/kg Cd) improved soybean seedling root growth. However, other combined BPA and Cd treatments, including combined treatment with BPA (Cd) at the low concentration and Cd (BPA) at the high concentration as well as combined treatment with BPA and Cd at the high concentration, inhibited soybean seedling root growth. The improvement or inhibition of soybean seedling root growth was greater in the combined BPA and Cd treatments than in single treatments. The effects of the combined BPA and Cd treatments on root growth resulted from changes in nitrate assimilation. In addition, the combined effects of BPA and Cd on the nitrate and ammonium contents in roots are discussed. The present research provides a basic understanding of the combined effects of BPA and Cd pollution on plant roots.

  15. Summer dormancy and winter growth: root survival strategy in a perennial monocotyledon.

    PubMed

    Shane, Michael W; McCully, Margaret E; Canny, Martin J; Pate, John S; Ngo, Hai; Mathesius, Ulrike; Cawthray, Gregory R; Lambers, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Here, we tested the alternation of root summer dormancy and winter growth as a critical survival strategy for a long-lived monocotyledon (Restionaceae) adapted to harsh seasonal extremes of Mediterranean southwest Western Australia. Measurements of growth and the results of comparative studies of the physiology, water content, metabolites, osmotic adjustments, and proteomics of the dormant and growing perennial roots of Lyginia barbata (Restionaceae) were assessed in field-grown plants. Formation of dormant roots occurred before the onset of summer extremes. They resumed growth (average 2.3 mm d(-1)) the following winter to eventually reach depths of 2-4 m. Compared with winter-growing roots, summer dormant roots had decreased respiration and protein concentration and c. 70% water content, sustained by sand-sheaths, osmotic adjustment and presumably hydraulic redistribution. Concentrations of compatible solutes (e.g. sucrose and proline) were significantly greater during dormancy, presumably mitigating the effects of heat and drought. Fifteen root proteins showed differential abundance and were correlated with either winter growth or summer dormancy. None matched currently available libraries. The specific features of the root dormancy strategy of L. barbata revealed in this study are likely to be important to understanding similar behaviour in roots of many long-lived monocotyledons, including overwintering and oversummering crop species.

  16. Seasonal Fine-Root Carbohydrate and Growth Relations of Plantation Loblolly Pine After Thinning and Fertilization

    Treesearch

    Eric A. Kuehler; Mary Anne Sword; C. Dan Andries

    1999-01-01

    In 1989, two levels each of stand density and fertilization were established in an 8-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation. In March 1995, treatments were reapplied, and root elongation and carbohydrate concentrations were monitored for 2 years. Our objective was to evaluate relationships between seasonal root growth and carbohydrate...

  17. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT GROWTH AND PHYSIOLOGY FOR DESERT PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on the growth and physiology of roots have been measured in situ at the Nevada Desert FACE Facility. Minirhizotron measurements of fine root length production, mortality, and standing crop were not increased by elevated CO2. However, spec...

  18. Principal growth directions in development of the lateral root in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Szymanowska-Pułka, Joanna; Potocka, Izabela; Karczewski, Jerzy; Jiang, Keni; Nakielski, Jerzy; Feldman, Lewis J

    2012-07-01

    During lateral root development a new meristem is formed within the mother root body. The main objective of this work was to simulate lateral root formation in Arabidopsis thaliana and to study a potential role of the principal directions in this process. Lateral root growth is anisotropic, so that three principal directions of growth can be distinguished within the organ. This suggests a tensorial character of growth and allows for its description by means of the growth tensor method. First features of the cell pattern of developing lateral roots were analysed in A. thaliana and then a tensorial model for growth and division of cells for this case was specified, assuming an unsteady character of the growth field of the organ. Microscopic observations provide evidence that the principal directions of growth are manifested at various developmental stages by oblique cell walls observed in different regions of the primordium. Other significant features observed are atypically shaped large cells at the flanks of young apices, as well as distinct boundaries between the mother root and the primordium. Simulations were performed using a model for growth. In computer-generated sequences the above-mentioned features could be identified. An attempt was made to reconstruct the virtual lateral root that included a consideration of the formation of particular tissue types based on literature data. In the cell pattern of the developing lateral root the principal directions of growth can be recognized through occurrence of oblique cell divisions. In simulation the role of these directions in cell pattern formation was confirmed, only when cells divide with respect to the principal directions can realistic results be obtained.

  19. OsERF2 controls rice root growth and hormone responses through tuning expression of key genes involved in hormone signaling and sucrose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guiqing; Qin, Hua; Zhou, Jiahao; Quan, Ruidang; Lu, Xiangyang; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Haiwen

    2016-02-01

    Root determines plant distribution, development progresses, stress response, as well as crop qualities and yields, which is under the tight control of genetic programs and environmental stimuli. Ethylene responsive factor proteins (ERFs) play important roles in plant growth and development. Here, the regulatory function of OsERF2 involved in root growth was investigated using the gain-function mutant of OsERF2 (nsf2857) and the artificial microRNA-mediated silenced lines of OsERF2 (Ami-OsERF2). nsf2857 showed short primary roots compared with the wild type (WT), while the primary roots of Ami-OsERF2 lines were longer than those of WT. Consistent with this phenotype, several auxin/cytokinin responsive genes involved in root growth were downregulated in nsf2857, but upregulated in Ami-OsERF2. Then, we found that nsf2857 seedlings exhibited decreased ABA accumulation and sensitivity to ABA and reduced ethylene-mediated root inhibition, while those were the opposite in Ami-ERF2 plants. Moreover, several key genes involved in ABA synthesis were downregulated in nsf2857, but unregulated in Ami-ERF2 lines. In addition, OsERF2 affected the accumulation of sucrose and UDPG by mediating expression of key genes involved in sucrose metabolism. These results indicate that OsERF2 is required for the control of root architecture and ABA- and ethylene-response by tuning expression of series genes involved in sugar metabolism and hormone signaling pathways.

  20. Antimicrobial effect of ozonated water, sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine gluconate in primary molar root canals

    PubMed Central

    Goztas, Zeynep; Onat, Halenur; Tosun, Gul; Sener, Yagmur; Hadimli, Hasan Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the antimicrobial effect of ozonated water, ozonated water with ultrasonication, sodium hypochloride and chlorhexidine (CHX) in human primary root canals contaminated by Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis). Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight extracted human primary molar teeth were used. Crowns were cut off using a diamond saw under water-cooling. One hundred roots were obtained and mechanically prepared. The roots were then sterilized by autoclaving in water for 15 min at 121°C. All samples were contaminated with E. faecalis for 24 h and the root canals were randomly divided into five groups (n = 20). Group I: 25 mg/L of Ozonated water (O3aq), Group II: 25 mg/L of O3aq with ultrasonication, Group III: 2.5% Sodium hypochloride (NaOCl), Group IV: 2% CHX and Group V: Positive control. The canal of each specimen was irrigated for 4 min and positive control was untreated. All root canals were agitated with sterile saline solution. The saline solution was collected from canals with sterile paper points. For each specimen, the paper points were transposed to eppendorf vials containing 2 ml of brain heart infusion. According to bacterial proliferation, the mean values of optical density were achieved by ELİSA (Biotek EL ×800, Absorbance Microplate Reader, ABD) and the data were analyzed. Results: NaOCI, CHX and two types of O3aq were found statistically different than positive control group. NaOCI irrigation was found significantly most effective. Conclusions: NaOCl, CHX and O3aq applications provide antibacterial effect in vitro conditions in primary root canals. PMID:25512726

  1. IPP5 inhibits neurite growth in primary sensory neurons by maintaining TGF-β/Smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Han, Qing-Jian; Gao, Nan-Nan; Guo-QiangMa; Zhang, Zhen-Ning; Yu, Wen-Hui; Pan, Jing; Wang, Qiong; Zhang, Xu; Bao, Lan

    2013-01-15

    During nerve regeneration, neurite growth is regulated by both intrinsic molecules and extracellular factors. Here, we found that inhibitor 5 of protein phosphatase 1 (IPP5), a newly identified inhibitory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), inhibited neurite growth in primary sensory neurons as an intrinsic regulator. IPP5 was highly expressed in the primary sensory neurons of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and was downregulated after sciatic nerve axotomy. Knocking down IPP5 with specific shRNA increased the length of the longest neurite, the total neurite length and the number of neurite ends in cultured rat DRG neurons. Mutation of the PP1-docking motif K(8)IQF(11) or the PP1-inhibiting motif at Thr(34) eliminated the IPP5-induced inhibition of neurite growth. Furthermore, biochemical experiments showed that IPP5 interacted with type I transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRI) and PP1 and enhanced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling in a PP1-dependent manner. Overexpressing IPP5 in DRG neurons aggravated TGF-β-induced inhibition of neurite growth, which was abolished by blocking PP1 or IPP5 binding to PP1. Blockage of TGF-β signaling with the TβRI inhibitor SB431542 or Smad2 shRNA attenuated the IPP5-induced inhibition of neurite growth. Thus, these data indicate that selectively expressed IPP5 inhibits neurite growth by maintaining TGF-β signaling in primary sensory neurons.

  2. Growth and microtubule orientation of Zea mays roots subjected to osmotic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Previous work has shown that microtubule (MT) reorientation follows the onset of growth inhibition on the lower side of graviresponding roots, indicating that growth reduction can occur independently of MT reorientation. To test this observation further, we examined whether the reduction in growth in response to osmotic stress is correlated with MT reorientation. The distribution and rate of growth in maize roots exposed to 350 mOsm sorbitol and KCl or 5 mM Mes/Tris buffer were measured with a digitizer. After various times roots were processed for indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Application of sorbitol or KCl had no effect on the organization of MTs in the apical 2 mm of the root but resulted in striking and different effects in the basal region of the root. Sorbitol treatment caused rapid appearance of oval to circular holes in the microtubular array that persisted for at least 9 h. Between 30 min and 4 h of submersion in KCl, MTs in cortical cells 4 mm and farther from the quiescent center began to reorient oblique to the longitudinal axis. After 9 h, the alignment of MTs had shifted to parallel to the root axis but MTs of the epidermal cells remained transverse. In KCl-treated roots MT reorientation appeared to follow a pattern of development similar to that in controls but without elongation. Our data provide additional evidence that MT reorientation is not the cause but a consequence of growth inhibition.

  3. Growth and microtubule orientation of Zea mays roots subjected to osmotic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Previous work has shown that microtubule (MT) reorientation follows the onset of growth inhibition on the lower side of graviresponding roots, indicating that growth reduction can occur independently of MT reorientation. To test this observation further, we examined whether the reduction in growth in response to osmotic stress is correlated with MT reorientation. The distribution and rate of growth in maize roots exposed to 350 mOsm sorbitol and KCl or 5 mM Mes/Tris buffer were measured with a digitizer. After various times roots were processed for indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Application of sorbitol or KCl had no effect on the organization of MTs in the apical 2 mm of the root but resulted in striking and different effects in the basal region of the root. Sorbitol treatment caused rapid appearance of oval to circular holes in the microtubular array that persisted for at least 9 h. Between 30 min and 4 h of submersion in KCl, MTs in cortical cells 4 mm and farther from the quiescent center began to reorient oblique to the longitudinal axis. After 9 h, the alignment of MTs had shifted to parallel to the root axis but MTs of the epidermal cells remained transverse. In KCl-treated roots MT reorientation appeared to follow a pattern of development similar to that in controls but without elongation. Our data provide additional evidence that MT reorientation is not the cause but a consequence of growth inhibition.

  4. Arabidopsis cryptochrome-1 restrains lateral roots growth by inhibiting auxin transport.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianxin; Wang, Qiming; Lin, Jianzhong; Deng, Keqin; Zhao, Xiaoying; Tang, Dongying; Liu, Xuanming

    2010-05-15

    Cryptochromes are blue-light photoreceptors that control many aspects of plant development. In this study, cryptochrome mutants of Arabidopsis were examined to assess the role of cryptchrome-1 (CRY1) in lateral roots growth. When grown in blue light for 12d, mutant seedlings (cry1) showed increased growth of lateral roots, while CRY1-overexpressing transgenic seedlings (CRY1ox) exhibited a marked decrease. Lateral roots growth of CRY1ox could be stimulated by auxin, but expression of PIN1 (efflux carrier of polar auxin transport) was strongly reduced. Contrary, the cry1 mutation showed the opposite effect, indicating that blue light and the auxin-signaling pathway interact in lateral roots growth of Arabidopsis. The free IAA content in CRY1ox roots was half of that in wild type and cry1 mutant roots. Moreover, the content of flavonoids (quercetin, kaempferol, isorhamnetin), which act as endogenous negative regulators of auxin transport, increased in CRY1ox seedlings. Taken together, these results suggest that Arabidopsis CRY1 restrains lateral roots growth by inhibiting auxin transport. (c) 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Phytotoxic cyanamide affects maize (Zea mays) root growth and root tip function: from structure to gene expression.

    PubMed

    Soltys, Dorota; Rudzińska-Langwald, Anna; Kurek, Wojciech; Szajko, Katarzyna; Sliwinska, Elwira; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2014-05-01

    Cyanamide (CA) is a phytotoxic compound produced by four Fabaceae species: hairy vetch, bird vetch, purple vetch and black locust. Its toxicity is due to complex activity that involves the modification of both cellular structures and physiological processes. To date, CA has been investigated mainly in dicot plants. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of CA in the restriction of the root growth of maize (Zea mays), representing the monocot species. CA (3mM) reduced the number of border cells in the root tips of maize seedlings and degraded their protoplasts. However, CA did not induce any significant changes in the organelle structure of other root cells, apart from increased vacuolization. CA toxicity was also demonstrated by its effect on cell cycle activity, endoreduplication intensity, and modifications of cyclins CycA2, CycD2, and histone HisH3 gene expression. In contrast, the arrangement of microtubules was not altered by CA. Treatment of maize seedlings with CA did not completely arrest mitotic activity, although the frequency of dividing cells was reduced. Furthermore, prolonged CA treatment increased the proportion of endopolyploid cells in the root tip. Cytological malformations were accompanied by an induction of oxidative stress in root cells, which manifested as enhanced accumulation of H2O2. Exposure of maize seedlings to CA resulted in an increased concentration of auxin and stimulated ethylene emission. Taken together, these findings suggested that the inhibition of root growth by CA may be a consequence of stress-induced morphogenic responses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  6. Influence of electrical fields and asymmetric application of mucilage on curvature of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, H.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of Zea mays cv. Yellow Dent growing in an electric field curve towards the anode. Roots treated with EDTA and growing in electric field do not curve. When root cap mucilage is applied asymmetrically to tips of vertically-oriented roots, the roots curve toward the mucilage. Roots treated with EDTA curve toward the side receiving mucilage and toward blocks containing 10 mM CaCl2, but not toward "empty" agar blocks or the cut surfaces of severed root tips. These results suggest that 1) free calcium (Ca) is necessary for root electrotropism, 2) mucilage contains effector(s) that induce gravitropiclike curvature, and 3) mucilage can replace gravitropic effectors chelated by EDTA. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the downward movement of gravitropic effectors to the lower sides of tips of horizontally-oriented roots occurs at least partially in the apoplast.

  7. Influence of electrical fields and asymmetric application of mucilage on curvature of primary roots of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcum, H.; Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of Zea mays cv. Yellow Dent growing in an electric field curve towards the anode. Roots treated with EDTA and growing in electric field do not curve. When root cap mucilage is applied asymmetrically to tips of vertically-oriented roots, the roots curve toward the mucilage. Roots treated with EDTA curve toward the side receiving mucilage and toward blocks containing 10 mM CaCl2, but not toward "empty" agar blocks or the cut surfaces of severed root tips. These results suggest that 1) free calcium (Ca) is necessary for root electrotropism, 2) mucilage contains effector(s) that induce gravitropiclike curvature, and 3) mucilage can replace gravitropic effectors chelated by EDTA. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the downward movement of gravitropic effectors to the lower sides of tips of horizontally-oriented roots occurs at least partially in the apoplast.

  8. Influence of electrical fields and asymmetric application of mucilage on curvature of primary roots of Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Marcum, H; Moore, R

    1990-04-01

    Primary roots of Zea mays cv. Yellow Dent growing in an electric field curve towards the anode. Roots treated with EDTA and growing in electric field do not curve. When root cap mucilage is applied asymmetrically to tips of vertically-oriented roots, the roots curve toward the mucilage. Roots treated with EDTA curve toward the side receiving mucilage and toward blocks containing 10 mM CaCl2, but not toward "empty" agar blocks or the cut surfaces of severed root tips. These results suggest that 1) free calcium (Ca) is necessary for root electrotropism, 2) mucilage contains effector(s) that induce gravitropiclike curvature, and 3) mucilage can replace gravitropic effectors chelated by EDTA. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the downward movement of gravitropic effectors to the lower sides of tips of horizontally-oriented roots occurs at least partially in the apoplast.

  9. Auxin, ethylene and the regulation of root growth under mechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rameshwar; Santisree, Parankusam; Nongmaithem, Sapana; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju

    2012-07-01

    Among the multitude functions performed by plant roots, little information is available about the mechanisms that allow roots to overcome the soil resistance, in order to grow in the soil to obtain water and nutrient. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings grown on horizontally placed agar plates showed a progressive decline in the root length with the increasing impedance of agar media. The incubation with 1-methylcyclopropane (1-MCP), an inhibitor of ethylene perception, led to aerial growth of roots. In contrast, in absence of 1-MCP control roots grew horizontally anchored to the agar surface. Though 1-MCP-treated and control seedlings showed differential ability to penetrate in the agar, the inhibition of root elongation was nearly similar for both treatments. While increased mechanical impedance also progressively impaired hypocotyl elongation in 1-MCP treated seedlings, it did not affect the hypocotyl length of control seedlings. The decline in root elongation was also associated with increased expression of DR5::GUS activity in the root tip signifying accumulation of auxin at the root tip. The increased expression of DR5::GUS activity in the root tip was also observed in 1-MCP treated seedlings, indicating independence of this response from ethylene signaling. Our results indicate operation of a sensing mechanism in root that likely operates independently of ethylene but involves auxin to determine the degree of impedance of the substratum.

  10. Alterations in plant growth and in root hormone levels of lodgepole pines inoculated with rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Bent, E; Tuzun, S; Chanway, C P; Enebak, S

    2001-09-01

    The presence of other soil microorganisms might influence the ability of rhizobacterial inoculants to promote plant growth either by reducing contact between the inoculant and the plant root or by interfering with the mechanism(s) involved in rhizobacterially mediated growth promotion. We conducted the following experiments to determine whether reductions in the extent of growth promotion of lodgepole pine mediated by Paenibacillus polymyxa occur in the presence of a forest soil isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens M20) and whether changes in plant growth promotion mediated by P. polymyxa (i) are related to changes in P. polymyxa density in the rhizosphere or (ii) result from alterations in root hormone levels. The extent of plant growth, P. polymyxa rhizosphere density, and root hormone concentrations were determined for lodgepole pine treated with (i) a single growth-promoting rhizobacterial strain (P. polymyxa L6 or Pw-2) or (ii) a combination of bacteria: strain L6 + strain M20 or strain Pw-2 + strain M20. There was no difference in the growth of pines inoculated with strain L6 and those inoculated with strain L6 + strain M20. However, seedlings inoculated with strain Pw-2 had more lateral roots and greater root mass at 12 weeks after inoculation than plants inoculated with strain Pw-2 + strain M20. The extent of growth promotion mediated by P. polymyxa L6 and Pw-2 in each treatment was not correlated to the average population density of each strain in the rhizosphere. Bacterial species-specific effects were observed in root hormone levels: indole-3-acetic acid concentration was elevated in roots inoculated with P. polymyxa L6 or Pw-2, while dihydrozeatin riboside concentration was elevated in roots inoculated with P. fluorescens M20.

  11. Intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor induces gliogenesis in sensory ganglia, dorsal root, and within the dorsal root entry zone.

    PubMed

    Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Pizzo, Donald P; Morrissette, Debbi A; Winkler, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that intracerebroventricular administration of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to massive Schwann cell hyperplasia surrounding the medulla oblongata and spinal cord. This study was designed to characterize the proliferation of peripheral glial cells, that is, Schwann and satellite cells, in the trigeminal ganglia and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of adult rats during two weeks of NGF infusion using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells. The trigeminal ganglia as well as the cervical and lumbar DRG were analyzed. Along the entire neuraxis a small number of dividing cells were observed within these regions under physiological condition. NGF infusion has dramatically increased the generation of new cells in the neuronal soma and axonal compartments of sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root and the dorsal root entry zone. Quantification of BrdU positive cells within sensory ganglia revealed a 2.3- to 3-fold increase in glial cells compared to controls with a similar response to NGF for the different peripheral ganglia examined. Immunofluorescent labeling with S100β revealed that Schwann and satellite cells underwent mitosis after NGF administration. These data indicate that intracerebroventricular NGF infusion significantly induces gliogenesis in trigeminal ganglia and the spinal sensory ganglia and along the dorsal root entry zone as well as the dorsal root.

  12. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  13. The Regulation of Growth in the Distal Elongation Zone of Maize Roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    The major goals of the proposed research were 1. To develop specialized software for automated whole surface root expansion analysis and to develop technology for controlled placement of surface electrodes for analysis of relationships between root growth and root pH and electrophysiological properties. 2. To measure surface pH patterns and determine the possible role of proton flux in gravitropic sensing or response, and 3. To determine the role of auxin transport in establishment of patterns of proton flux and electrical gradients during the gravitropic response of roots with special emphasis on the role of the distal elongation zone in the early phases of the gravitropic response.

  14. Transcriptional and Functional Classification of the GOLVEN/ROOT GROWTH FACTOR/CLE-Like Signaling Peptides Reveals Their Role in Lateral Root and Hair Formation1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Ana; Drozdzecki, Andrzej; Hoogewijs, Kurt; Nguyen, Anh; Beeckman, Tom; Madder, Annemieke; Hilson, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The GOLVEN (GLV)/ROOT GROWTH FACTORS/CLE-Like small signaling peptide family is encoded by 11 genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Some of them have already been shown to control root meristem maintenance, auxin fluxes, and gravitropic responses. As a basis for the detailed analysis of their function, we determined the expression domains for each of the 11 GLV genes with promoter-reporter lines. Although they are collectively active in all examined plant parts, GLV genes have highly specific transcription patterns, generally restricted to very few cells or cell types in the root and shoot and in vegetative and reproductive tissues. GLV functions were further investigated with the comparative analysis of root phenotypes induced by gain- and loss-of-function mutants or in treatments with GLV-derived synthetic peptides. We identified functional classes that relate to the gene expression domains in the primary root and suggest that different GLV signals trigger distinct downstream pathways. Interestingly, GLV genes transcribed at the early stages of lateral root development strongly inhibited root branching when overexpressed. Furthermore, transcription patterns together with mutant phenotypes pointed to the involvement of GLV4 and GLV8 in root hair formation. Overall, our data suggest that nine GLV genes form three subgroups according to their expression and function within the root and offer a comprehensive framework to study the role of the GLV signaling peptides in plant development. PMID:23370719

  15. Influence of nitrogen and phosphorous on the growth and root morphology of Acer mono

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Shen, Hai-long; Salahuddin

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous are critical determinants of plant growth and productivity, and both plant growth and root morphology are important parameters for evaluating the effects of supplied nutrients. Previous work has shown that the growth of Acer mono seedlings is retarded under nursery conditions; we applied different levels of N (0, 5, 10, and 15 g plant-1) and P (0, 4, 6 and 8 g plant-1) fertilizer to investigate the effects of fertilization on the growth and root morphology of four-year-old seedlings in the field. Our results indicated that both N and P application significantly affected plant height, root collar diameter, chlorophyll content, and root morphology. Among the nutrient levels, 10 g N and 8 g P were found to yield maximum growth, and the maximum values of plant height, root collar diameter, chlorophyll content, and root morphology were obtained when 10 g N and 8 g P were used together. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that optimum levels of N and P can be used to improve seedling health and growth during the nursery period. PMID:28234921

  16. Influence of nitrogen and phosphorous on the growth and root morphology of Acer mono.

    PubMed

    Razaq, Muhammad; Zhang, Peng; Shen, Hai-Long; Salahuddin

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen and phosphorous are critical determinants of plant growth and productivity, and both plant growth and root morphology are important parameters for evaluating the effects of supplied nutrients. Previous work has shown that the growth of Acer mono seedlings is retarded under nursery conditions; we applied different levels of N (0, 5, 10, and 15 g plant-1) and P (0, 4, 6 and 8 g plant-1) fertilizer to investigate the effects of fertilization on the growth and root morphology of four-year-old seedlings in the field. Our results indicated that both N and P application significantly affected plant height, root collar diameter, chlorophyll content, and root morphology. Among the nutrient levels, 10 g N and 8 g P were found to yield maximum growth, and the maximum values of plant height, root collar diameter, chlorophyll content, and root morphology were obtained when 10 g N and 8 g P were used together. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that optimum levels of N and P can be used to improve seedling health and growth during the nursery period.

  17. Root growth and function of three Mojave Desert grasses in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yoder, C.K.; Vivin, P.; DeFalco, L.A.; Seemann, J.R.; Nowak, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Root growth and physiological responses to elevated CO2 were investigated for three important Mojave Desert grasses: the C3 perennial Achnatherum hymenoides, the C4 perennial Pleuraphis rigida and the C3 annual Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens. Seeds of each species were grown at ambient (360 μl l−1) or elevated (1000 μl l−1) CO2 in a glasshouse and harvested at three phenological stages: vegetative, anthesis and seed fill. Because P. rigida did not flower during the course of this study, harvests for this species represent three vegetative stages. Primary productivity was increased in both C3 grasses in response to elevated CO2 (40 and 19% for A. hymenoides and B. rubens, respectively), but root biomass increased only in the C3 perennial grass. Neither above-ground nor below-ground biomass of the C4 perennial grass was significantly affected by the CO2 treatment. Elevated CO2 did not significantly affect root surface area for any species. Total plant nitrogen was also not statistically different between CO2treatments for any species, indicating no enhanced uptake of N under elevated CO2. Physiological uptake capacities for NO3 and NH4 were not affected by the CO2 treatment during the second harvest; measurements were not made for the first harvest. However, at the third harvest uptake capacity was significantly decreased in response to elevated CO2 for at least one N form in each species. NO3 uptake rates were lower in A. hymenoides and P. rigida, and NH4 uptake rates were lower in B. rubens at elevated CO2. Nitrogen uptake on a whole root-system basis (NO3+NH4uptake capacity × root biomass) was influenced positively by elevated CO2 only for A. hymenoidesafter anthesis. These results suggest that elevated CO2 may result in a competitive advantage forA. hymenoides relative to species that do not increase root-system N uptake capacity. Root respiration measurements normalized to 20 °C were not significantly affected by the CO2treatment. However, specific root

  18. Root rots

    Treesearch

    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  19. Growth of plant root cultures in liquid- and gas-dispersed reactor environments.

    PubMed

    McKelvey, S A; Gehrig, J A; Hollar, K A; Curtis, W R

    1993-01-01

    The growth of Agrobacterium transformed "hairy root" cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus was examined in various liquid- and gas-dispersed bioreactor configurations. Reactor runs were replicated to provide statistical comparisons of nutrient availability on culture performance. Accumulated tissue mass in submerged air-sparged reactors was 31% of gyratory shake-flask controls. Experiments demonstrate that poor performance of sparged reactors is not due to bubble shear damage, carbon dioxide stripping, settling, or flotation of roots. Impaired oxygen transfer due to channeling and stagnation of the liquid phase are the apparent causes of poor growth. Roots grown on a medium-perfused inclined plane grew at 48% of gyratory controls. This demonstrates the ability of cultures to partially compensate for poor liquid distribution through vascular transport of nutrients. A reactor configuration in which the medium is sprayed over the roots and permitted to drain down through the root tissue was able to provide growth rates which are statistically indistinguishable (95% T-test) from gyratory shake-flask controls. In this type of spray/trickle-bed configuration, it is shown that distribution of the roots becomes a key factor in controlling the rate of growth. Implications of these results regarding design and scale-up of bioreactors to produce fine chemicals from root cultures are discussed.

  20. Dynamic root growth and architecture responses to limiting nutrient availability: linking physiological models and experimentation.

    PubMed

    Postma, Johannes A; Schurr, Ulrich; Fiorani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the study of root phenotypic plasticity in response to sub-optimal environmental factors and the genetic control of these responses have received renewed attention. As a path to increased productivity, in particular for low fertility soils, several applied research projects worldwide target the improvement of crop root traits both in plant breeding and biotechnology contexts. To assist these tasks and address the challenge of optimizing root growth and architecture for enhanced mineral resource use, the development of realistic simulation models is of great importance. We review this research field from a modeling perspective focusing particularly on nutrient acquisition strategies for crop production on low nitrogen and low phosphorous soils. Soil heterogeneity and the dynamics of nutrient availability in the soil pose a challenging environment in which plants have to forage efficiently for nutrients in order to maintain their internal nutrient homeostasis throughout their life cycle. Mathematical models assist in understanding plant growth strategies and associated root phenes that have potential to be tested and introduced in physiological breeding programs. At the same time, we stress that it is necessary to carefully consider model assumptions and development from a whole plant-resource allocation perspective and to introduce or refine modules simulating explicitly root growth and architecture dynamics through ontogeny with reference to key factors that constrain root growth. In this view it is important to understand negative feedbacks such as plant-plant competition. We conclude by briefly touching on available and developing technologies for quantitative root phenotyping from lab to field, from quantification of partial root profiles in the field to 3D reconstruction of whole root systems. Finally, we discuss how these approaches can and should be tightly linked to modeling to explore the root phenome.

  1. Root canal content from primary endodontic infection and upregulation of gelatinases in fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Herrera, D R; Silva, E J N L; Santos, C C; Zaia, A A; Ferraz, C C R; Almeida, J F A; Gomes, B P F A

    2015-12-01

    To investigate endotoxin levels from primary endodontic infections before and after chemomechanical preparation (CMP) and to determine their antigenicity against 3T3 fibroblasts through gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Twenty-four root canals with primary endodontic infection and apical periodontitis were selected. Samples were collected using paper points before (S1) and after chemomechanical preparation (CMP) (S2). The limulus amebocyte lysate assay was used for endotoxin measurement. Fibroblasts were stimulated with root canal contents for 24 h. Supernatants of cell cultures stimulated with root canal contents were collected after 24 h to determine the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinolytic activity using the zymography technique. Friedman and Wilcoxon tests were used to compare the amount of endotoxin before (S1) and after CMP (S2) (P < 0.05). Data obtained from gelatinolytic activity were analysed using anova and Tukey's tests (P < 0.05). Endotoxin was recovered in 100% of the samples. There was a significant reduction in endotoxin levels after CMP (P < 0.05). A correlation was found between the levels of endotoxins and MMP-2 expression (P < 0.05). Root canal contents of initial samples (S1) induced significantly greater MMP-2 expression by fibroblasts when compared to S2 and the nonstimulated group (P < 0.05). No gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 was observed in S1, S2 and control group. Root canal contents from primary endodontic infections had gelatinolytic activity for MMP-2. Moreover, CMP was effective in reducing endotoxin levels and their antigenicity against fibroblasts on gelatinolytic activity. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Involvement of brassinosteroids in the gravitropic response of primary root of maize.

    PubMed

    Kim, S K; Chang, S C; Lee, E J; Chung, W S; Kim, Y S; Hwang, S; Lee, J S

    2000-07-01

    Exogenously applied brassinolide (BL, 10(-9)-10(-5) M) increased gravitropic curvature in maize (Zea mays) primary roots. The BL-enhanced gravitropic curvature was clearly promoted in the presence of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, 10(-10)-10(-8) M), indicating that BL is interactive with IAA during the gravitropic response. The interactive effect between BL and IAA was completely diminished by treatment of p-chlorophenoxy isobutric acid, an auxin action antagonist. The activation of the gravitropic response by BL in the absence and in the presence of IAA was nullified by application of 2, 3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, a polar auxin transport inhibitor. The data indicate that brassinosteroids (BRs) might be involved in auxin-mediated processes for the gravitropic response. Gas chromotography-selected ion-monitoring analysis revealed that maize primary roots contained approximately 0.3 ng g(-1) fresh weight castasterone as an endogenous BR. Exogenously applied castasterone also increased the gravitropic response of maize roots in an IAA-dependent manner. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, for occurrence and gravitropic activity of BRs in plant roots.

  3. Involvement of Brassinosteroids in the Gravitropic Response of Primary Root of Maize1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Ki; Chang, Soo Chul; Lee, Eun Joo; Chung, Woo-Sook; Kim, Young-Soo; Hwang, Seongbin; Lee, June Seung

    2000-01-01

    Exogenously applied brassinolide (BL, 10−9–10−5 m) increased gravitropic curvature in maize (Zea mays) primary roots. The BL-enhanced gravitropic curvature was clearly promoted in the presence of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, 10−10–10−8 m), indicating that BL is interactive with IAA during the gravitropic response. The interactive effect between BL and IAA was completely diminished by treatment of p-chlorophenoxy isobutric acid, an auxin action antagonist. The activation of the gravitropic response by BL in the absence and in the presence of IAA was nullified by application of 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid, a polar auxin transport inhibitor. The data indicate that brassinosteroids (BRs) might be involved in auxin-mediated processes for the gravitropic response. Gas chromotography-selected ion-monitoring analysis revealed that maize primary roots contained approximately 0.3 ng g−1 fresh weight castasterone as an endogenous BR. Exogenously applied castasterone also increased the gravitropic response of maize roots in an IAA-dependent manner. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, for occurrence and gravitropic activity of BRs in plant roots. PMID:10889248

  4. Root deployment and shoot growth for two desert species in response to soil rockiness.

    PubMed

    Martre, Pierre; North, Gretchen B; Bobich, Edward G; Nobel, Park S

    2002-12-01

    Soil texture, as well as the presence of rocks, can determine the water status, growth, and distribution of plants in arid environments. The effects of soil rockiness and soil particle size distribution on shoot and root growth, root system size, rooting depth, and water relations were therefore investigated for the Crassulacean acid metabolism leaf succulent Agave deserti and the C(4) bunchgrass Pleuraphis rigida after precipitation events during the summer and winter/spring rainfall periods in the northwestern Sonoran Desert. The soils at the field site varied from sandy (<3% rocks by volume) to rocky (up to 35% rocks), with greater water availability at higher water potentials for sandy than for rocky soils. Although A. deserti was absent from the sandiest sites, its shoot and root growth during both rainfall periods were greatest in comparatively sandier sites and decreased as the soil rock content increased. Furthermore, A. deserti had twofold greater root surface area, root : leaf area ratio, and mean rooting depth at sandier than at rocky sites. As for A. deserti, shoot growth was greater for P. rigida at the sandier sites than at the rockier sites, even though its root surface area and mean rooting depth did not vary significantly. After early spring rainfall events, the leaf water potential for A. deserti did not differ between rocky and sandy sites, but transpiration rates were almost twofold greater at rocky than at sandy sites. During the same period, P. rigida had lower leaf water potentials and 25% lower transpiration rates at rocky than at sandy sites. The greater variability in the deployment of the root systems of A. deserti in response to soil rockiness may reflect its evergreen habit and slower growth, which allow it to endure periods of lower water availability than does P. rigida, whose leaves die during drought.

  5. [Effect of NO3- supply on lateral root growth in maize plants].

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya-Fen; Mi, Guo-Hua; Chen, Fan-Jun; Zhang, Fu-Suo

    2005-02-01

    Growth of lateral roots is regulated by both environmental factors and nitrate (NO(-)(3)) content of the plant. The mechanism involved is not clearly understood. Two maize (Zea mays L.) inbred lines (478 and Wu312) were used to study the effect of different nitrate supply on lateral root (LR) growth by a whole plants agar culture. The results showed that increasing NO(-)(3)concentration in nutrient solution from 0.01 to 1.0 mmol/L significantly increased the LR length and root biomass. Lateral root density changed little with NO(-)(3) increase up to 5x10(-3) mol/L (for Wu312) - 10x10(-3) mol/L (for 478), then decreased significantly with increasing NO(-)(3). The inhibitory effect of high NO(-)(3) on root growth was weaker in 478 than in Wu312. The growth of lateral roots in Wu312 was completely inhibited by NO(-)(3) at a concentration of 10x10(-3) mol/L, whereas LR density of 478 could reach 30% (axial) and 50% (radicle) of its maximum even at NO(-)(3) 20x10(-3) mol/L. Both the shoot total N and shoot nitrate content increased with increasing NO(-)(3) level. They had similar mathematic functions with shoot/root ratio (Exponential Decay), LR density (Gaussian) and LR length (Parabola). When shoot N content exceed about 1.6 mol/kg and NO(-)(3) content exceed 0.22 mol/kg, shoot/root ratio increased rapidly; when the shoot N content exceed about 1.5 and NO(-)(3) exceed 0.16 mol/kg, LR densities began to decrease; when shoot N content reached about 1 mol/kg and NO(-)(3) content reached 0.10 mol/kg, the LR lengths began to decrease. The possible relationship between shoot NO(-)(3) content and lateral root growth was discussed.

  6. Effect of bacterial polysaccharides on the growth of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and wheat roots.

    PubMed

    Lasík, J; Stanĕk, M; Vancura, V; Wurst, M

    1979-01-01

    Agrobacterium sp. and related species which in the soil and in the rhizosphere of wheat accompany the fungus Gaemannomyces graminis var. tritici and cause take-all of the wheat roots produced polysaccharides in pure cultures (glucans, mannoglucans and galactomannoglucans). These polysaccharides were utilized better by the mycelium of G. graminis than glucose and polysaccharides of plant origin that occurred on the surface of wheat roots (the so-called mucigel). At lower concentrations these bacterial polysaccharides stimulated growth of wheat roots, higher concentrations (more than 0.1%) were inhibitory. Bacteria inoculated on the surface of wheat first inhibited and then stimulated the development of the plants and their growth. Changes in the growth rate of wheat, the rhizosphere of which was colonized by bacteria simultaneously with the fungus G. graminis and also some changes in the course of the disease of wheat roots caused by the fungus can be explained by the inhibitory or stimulatory effect of polysaccharides of accompanying bacteria.

  7. A note on subtrees rooted along the primary path of a binary tree

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Let Fn denote the set of rooted binary plane trees with n external nodes, for given T???Fn let ui(T) be the altitude i node along the primary path of T, and let ??i(T) denote the number of external nodes in the induced subtree rooted at ui(T). We set ??i(T) = 0 if i is greater than the length of the primary path of T. We prove limn?????? ???i???x/n En{??i}/???i

  8. Cell wall-associated ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10, a proline-rich receptor-like kinase, is a negative modulator of Arabidopsis root hair growth

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Youra; Lee, Hyodong; Lee, Young-Sook; Cho, Hyung-Taeg

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell growth is restricted by the cell wall, and cell wall dynamics act as signals for the cytoplasmic and nuclear events of cell growth. Among various receptor kinases, ROOT HAIR SPECIFIC 10 (RHS10) belongs to a poorly known receptor kinase subfamily with a proline-rich extracellular domain. Here, we report that RHS10 defines the root hair length of Arabidopsis thaliana by negatively regulating hair growth. RHS10 modulates the duration of root hair growth rather than the growth rate. As poplar and rice RHS10 orthologs also showed a root hair-inhibitory function, this receptor kinase-mediated function appears to be conserved in angiosperms. RHS10 showed a strong association with the cell wall, most probably through its extracellular proline-rich domain (ECD). Deletion analysis of the ECD demonstrated that a minimal extracellular part, which includes a few proline residues, is required for RHS10-mediated root hair inhibition. RHS10 suppressed the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root, which are necessary for root hair growth. A yeast two-hybrid screening identified an RNase (RNS2) as a putative downstream target of RHS10. Accordingly, RHS10 overexpression decreased and RHS10 loss increased RNA levels in the hair-growing root region. Our results suggest that RHS10 mediates cell wall-associated signals to maintain proper root hair length, at least in part by regulating RNA catabolism and ROS accumulation. PMID:26884603

  9. Release of Growth Factors into Root Canal by Irrigations in Regenerative Endodontics.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qian; Nguyen, Sean; Zhang, Hongming; Chebrolu, Hari Priya; Alzebdeh, Dalia; Badi, Mustafa A; Kim, Jong Ryul; Ling, Junqi; Yang, Maobin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the release of growth factors into root canal space after the irrigation procedure of regenerative endodontic procedure. Sixty standardized root segments were prepared from extracted single-root teeth. Nail varnish was applied to all surfaces except the root canal surface. Root segments were irrigated with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA, 17% EDTA, or deionized water. The profile of growth factors that were released after irrigation was studied by growth factor array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to validate the release of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) at 4 hours, 1 day, and 3 days after irrigation. The final concentrations were calculated on the basis of the root canal volume measured by cone-beam computed tomography. Dental pulp stem cell migration on growth factors released from root segments was measured by using Transwell assay. Total of 11 of 41 growth factors were detected by growth factors array. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that TGF-β1 was released in all irrigation groups. Compared with the group with 17% EDTA (6.92 ± 4.49 ng/mL), the groups with 1.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA and 2.5% NaOCl + 17% EDTA had significantly higher release of TGF-β1 (69.04 ± 30.41 ng/mL and 59.26 ± 3.37 ng/mL, respectively), with a peak release at day 1. The release of bFGF was detected at a low level in all groups (0 ng/mL to 0.43 ± 0.22 ng/mL). Migration assay showed the growth factors released from root segments induced de