Sample records for primary school year

  1. Children's Experiences of the First Year of Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsdottir, Johanna

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a study with first grade children and their views on the primary school curriculum, as well as their influence on decision-making in school. The study was conducted with 20 six- and seven-year-old children in one primary school in Reykjavik, Iceland. The data gathered includes varied research methods such as group…

  2. Inequality in the First Year of Primary School. CES Briefing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croxford, Linda

    In Scotland, the Early Intervention Programme (EIP) aims to raise standards of literacy and numeracy in the first 2 years of primary school with an emphasis on overcoming disadvantage and inequality. As part of this initiative, one local authority, Aberdeen City, has introduced Baseline Assessment on entry to primary school with a follow-up…

  3. Math Anxiety and Math Ability in Early Primary School Years.

    PubMed

    Krinzinger, Helga; Kaufmann, Liane; Willmes, Klaus

    2009-06-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLDs) are often associated with math anxiety, yet until now, very little is known about the causal relations between calculation ability and math anxiety during early primary school years. The main aim of this study was to longitudinally investigate the relationship between calculation ability, self-reported evaluation of mathematics, and math anxiety in 140 primary school children between the end of first grade and the middle of third grade. Structural equation modeling revealed a strong influence of calculation ability and math anxiety on the evaluation of mathematics but no effect of math anxiety on calculation ability or vice versa-contrasting with the frequent clinical reports of math anxiety even in very young MLD children. To summarize, our study is a first step toward a better understanding of the link between math anxiety and math performance in early primary school years performance during typical and atypical courses of development.

  4. Math Anxiety and Math Ability in Early Primary School Years

    PubMed Central

    Krinzinger, Helga; Kaufmann, Liane; Willmes, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLDs) are often associated with math anxiety, yet until now, very little is known about the causal relations between calculation ability and math anxiety during early primary school years. The main aim of this study was to longitudinally investigate the relationship between calculation ability, self-reported evaluation of mathematics, and math anxiety in 140 primary school children between the end of first grade and the middle of third grade. Structural equation modeling revealed a strong influence of calculation ability and math anxiety on the evaluation of mathematics but no effect of math anxiety on calculation ability or vice versa—contrasting with the frequent clinical reports of math anxiety even in very young MLD children. To summarize, our study is a first step toward a better understanding of the link between math anxiety and math performance in early primary school years performance during typical and atypical courses of development. PMID:20401159

  5. Processes and Dynamics behind Whole-School Reform: Nine-Year Journeys of Four Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yuk Yung

    2017-01-01

    Despite decades of research, little is known about the dynamics of sustaining change in school reform and how the process of change unfolds. By tracing the nine-year reform journeys of four primary schools in Hong Kong (using multiyear interview, observational, and archival data), this study uncovers the micro-processes the schools experienced…

  6. Health education in primary school textbooks in iran in school year 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, Reza; Ghasemi, Hadi; Movahhed, Taraneh; Kazemian, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Health education in schools is one of the most effective ways of promoting health in a society. Studies have shown the effectiveness of health interventions aimed at improving students' knowledge, attitude, and behaviors about health issues. The aim of this study was to evaluate health issues in primary school textbooks in Iran. In school year 2010-2011, the contents of all primary school textbooks in Iran were assessed in accordance to their health-related teachings. Health lessons of these 27 textbooks in the form of picture and text were retrieved and analyzed using content analysis method. In total, 502 health-related lessons were found. The textbooks of the third grade contained the highest (144) and those of the fourth grade had the lowest (26) number of health lessons. Among health-related issues, the largest number (87) of lessons were about personal hygiene, while prevention of high risk behaviors comprised the least number (8). Some important health issues such as nutrition, oral health, and prevention of high-risk behaviors were not adequately discussed in the textbooks. The potential of primary school textbooks in delivering health messages has been neglected in Iran. Taking the critical importance of school ages into account, incorporating health issues in textbooks should be more strongly emphasized.

  7. [Analysis on absentees due to injury during 2012-2013 school year from 32 primary schools in Hubei province].

    PubMed

    Tan, Li; Yan, Weirong; Wang, Ying; Fan, Yunzhou; Jiang, Hongbo; Yang, Wenwen; Nie, Shaofa

    2014-09-01

    To analyze absentees due to injury among primary school pupils in Hubei, 2012-2013; and to provide theoretical basis for the prevention and control of injuries. A total of 32 primary schools in Qianjiang city and Shayang county were sampled to conduct injury absenteeism surveillance, and the total number of students was 21 493. The surveillance contents included absent dates, genders, grades, initial or return absent, and the detailed absent reasons. The classification of injury was based on the 10th Revision of the international classification of diseases developed by WHO. Data from 2012-2013 school-year were extracted from the surveillance system for analysis. The total surveillance period was 182 days, of which the fall semester was 98 days and the spring semester was 84 days. The absenteeism rate and injury rate in different characteristics of primary school students were compared by χ² test, and the possible risk factors of injury were preliminary explored by calculating the RR (95% CI) value. The total daily injury absenteeism rate was 8.26/100 100 during 2012-2013 school-year in 32 primary schools in Hubei province, which was higher in fall semester (9.16/100 000), Qianjiang area (9.63/100 000), rural primary schools (13.44/100 000), boys (9.57/100 000), 1-2 grades (10.41/100 000), and the differences were significant (P < 0.05). The total injury rate was 0.46%. Rural primary schools (RR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.46-3.70), boys (RR = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.23-2.87), and 3-4 grades (RR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.10-3.09) were identified as high-risk factors, while using city primary schools, girls, and 5-6 grades as references, respectively. The injury absenteeism rate and injury rate were more higher in rural primary schools, boys and low or middle grades in Hubei province during 2012 to 2013 school year, so monitoring and preventive measures should be focused on those students.

  8. Teacher Transition between Year Levels in Primary Schools: An Opportunity for Continuing Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlyon, Tracey

    2015-01-01

    Teacher transition between year levels is common practice in many primary schools in New Zealand; however, it is not always perceived as an opportunity for teachers' continuing professional development (CPD). This article reports on a case study that explored four primary school teachers' experiences of transition between year levels. The teachers…

  9. Math Anxiety and Math Ability in Early Primary School Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krinzinger, Helga; Kaufmann, Liane; Willmes, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical learning disabilities (MLDs) are often associated with math anxiety, yet until now, very little is known about the causal relations between calculation ability and math anxiety during early primary school years. The main aim of this study was to longitudinally investigate the relationship between calculation ability, self-reported…

  10. Puberty, Health and Sexual Education in Australian Regional Primary Schools: Year 5 and 6 Teacher Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Bernadette; Fotinatos, Nina; Smith, Amanda; Burke, Jenene

    2013-01-01

    The research reported in this paper investigates why teachers in regional primary schools in the Ballarat region of Victoria, Australia, are choosing to outsource the teaching of sexuality education. A survey was conducted of 29 Year 5 and Year 6 teachers from local primary schools. The teachers provided information about: their confidence in…

  11. The Friendly Schools Friendly Families Programme: Three-Year Bullying Behaviour Outcomes in Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Donna; Waters, Stacey; Pearce, Natasha; Shaw, Therese; Hall, Margaret; Erceg, Erin; Burns, Sharyn; Roberts, Clare; Hamilton, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This three-year group randomized controlled trial assessed whether a multi-age, multi-level bullying prevention and intervention with staff capacity building, can reduce bullying among primary school children. Methods: This study comprised two intervention and one comparison conditions. Student self-report data were collected from 2552…

  12. 10 years with Planet Earth essence in the primary school children drawings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana

    2016-04-01

    "10 years with Planet Earth" is the title of the 2016 INGV calendar for primary schools representing the review of a project conceived as support and complement of 15 years long INGV dissemination activities with schools. We realized 10 calendars together with and for primary schools, every year with a subject related to a World in constant evolution. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, tsunami waves, magnetic storms and other phenomena are manifestations of the complexity and dynamicity, which began more than four billion years ago and never halted. Since the Earth originated to the first presence of water, life and oxygen, the Cambrian explosion of species, the domain of dinosaurs, the great extinctions and glaciations, the surface of our planet experiences continents collisions, mountains and oceans formation and life forms emerging and disappearing. Every year we have launched a competition asking children to send drawings on themes chosen to stimulate learning about Earth Sciences and Planet Earth dynamics. We intended to raise awareness on issues as water resources availability, protection against natural disasters and control of environmental degradation. For each competition, we chose the most significant drawings to be included in the yearly calendar about the Earth. The authors of drawings were awarded by scientists, journalists, artists and science communicators and even by a minister. Besides the competitions, these drawings depict their own impressions and reflections, providing an opportunity to illustrate the children's point of view. From drawings and texts arise a great consideration and respect for the Planet, raising hopes that similar initiatives can contribute to increase the knowledge of the Earth and of the fragile human ecosystem in the hearts and minds of future active citizens. The project was made possible thanks to the teachers and to the wonderful students of more than 200 schools that sent about 10,000 drawings that have intrigued

  13. Teacher Behaviours Observed by Teacher Candidates throughout Their Primary and Secondary School Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Güven, Semra

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the positive/negative teacher behaviours which teacher candidates observed during their primary and secondary school years and the effects of these behaviours on themselves. The research was conducted in the spring term of 2012-2013 academic year with 88 teacher candidates (52 females and 36 males), studying…

  14. Teacher-Reported Quality of Schooling Indicators in Botswana Primary Schools: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ntinda, Kayi; Ntinda, Magdalene Nakalowa; Mpofu, Elias

    2015-01-01

    This study examined teacher self-reported views on quality indicators in Botswana primary schools. A purposively selected sample of primary school teachers in the city of Gaborone, Botswana (N = 72, females = 56; males = 16; mean age = 39 years, SD = 7.17 years; mean years of service = 15.6; SD= 8 years; public schools = 65%; private schools =…

  15. Parent involvement in beginning primary school: Correlates and changes in involvement across the first two years of school in a New Zealand sample.

    PubMed

    McDowall, Philippa S; Taumoepeau, Mele; Schaughency, Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    This study described the relations of parents' and teachers' beliefs and attitudes to forms of parents' involvement in children's first two years of primary school. Parents of children in their first year of primary school (age 5) were recruited from 12 classrooms within four schools in New Zealand; 196 families participated in their child's first year, and 124 families continued to participate in their child's second school year. Parents completed the Family-Involvement Questionnaire, New Zealand, and we archivally collected parent-documented children's oral reading homework. Teachers' rated helpfulness of parents' involvement at school (level 2) and parents' rated teacher invitations to be involved and their perceived time and energy (level 1) contributed to school-based involvement in Year 1 in multilevel models, with parents' rated teacher invitations for involvement also found to predict Year 1 home-school communication in regression analyses. Contributors to Year 1 child-parent reading in multilevel models included level 1 predictors of two or more adults in the home and parents' perceived time and energy. Longitudinal analyses suggested both consistency and change in each form of involvement from Year 1 to Year 2, with increases in each form of involvement found to be associated with increases in parents' and/or teachers' views about involvement in Year 2 in cross-sectional time-series analyses. Implications for schools wanting to engage families are that parents' involvement in children's schooling may be influenced by parents' perceptions of their capacity, teachers' engagement efforts, and the school's climate for involvement. This is a special issue paper "Family Engagement in Education and Intervention". Copyright © 2017 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Management Philosophies of Primary School Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Said

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the management philosophies of primary school principals. Stratification method of sampling was used in the study. The study sample consisted of 33 school principals and 132 teachers serving at primary education schools in Isparta in the academic year 2008-2009. The "Manager Philosophy Scale" developed by Tanriogen and…

  17. Assessment of body posture in 12- and 13-year-olds attending primary schools in Pabianice.

    PubMed

    Motylewski, Sławomir; Zientala, Aleksandra; Pawlicka-Lisowska, Agnieszka; Poziomska-Piątkowska, Elżbieta

    2015-12-01

    of study was to estimate the body posture in children finishing primary schools. This is the last moment to make any improvement in body posture needed, because after the end of the child's growth the correction of postural defects is practically impossible. The study was conducted on 236 pupils aged 12-13 years attending primary schools number 3, 5 and 17 in Pabianice. To evaluate body posture Kasperczyk's points method was used. It is a commonly applied method for screening purposes. Over 50% of studied children had poor body posture and just under 6% of pupils' posture was assessed as very good. In the study population of children finishing primary schools the occurrence of faulty posture was shown to be very high. The most common defect in body posture among pupils was an uneven alignment of shoulders and shoulder blades. The results obtained in this study indicate the need to undertake action reducing the occurrence of faulty posture among children in Pabianice. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  18. Primary School Teachers' Views on Intergenerational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Soner; Kazak, Ender

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the views of primary school teachers on intergenerational learning (IGL). The study group consists of eight primary schools in the central district of Düzce during the 2013-2014 academic year and 13 teachers who teach in these schools. Participants were selected among teachers working in Düzce's city…

  19. Long-Term Effects of Primary Schools on Educational Positions of Students 2 and 4 Years after the Start of Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanwynsberghe, Griet; Vanlaar, Gudrun; Van Damme, Jan; De Fraine, Bieke

    2017-01-01

    Although the importance of primary schools in the long term is of interest in educational effectiveness research, few studies have examined the long-term effects of schools over the past decades. In the present study, long-term effects of primary schools on the educational positions of students 2 and 4 years after starting secondary education are…

  20. Islamic Primary Schools in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronkers, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    During the last 20 years of the 20th century, Islamic primary schools were founded in the Netherlands thanks to its constitutional "freedom of education" (which allows state-funded religious schools), its voucher system (each school receives the same amount of money per pupil), and school choice by parents. This essay gives some…

  1. Problem Solving Strategies among Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yew, Wun Thiam; Lian, Lim Hooi; Meng, Chew Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine problem solving strategies among primary school teachers. The researchers employed survey research design to examine their problem solving strategies. The participants of this study consisted of 120 primary school teachers from a public university in Peninsula Malaysia who enrolled in a 4-year Graduating…

  2. Working Together for the Student: What I Learned from Two Years on a Primary School Board in New Zealand.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Samuel Coad

    1998-01-01

    A former board member of a New Zealand primary school describes the country's political climate as radical economic libertarian; contract bidding among schools will soon be required. Elementary schools are child-centered and multicultural, operate year-round, involve the board and community, follow a national curriculum, and have overworked,…

  3. Preschool and Primary School Influences on the Development of Children's Early Numeracy Skills between the Ages of 3 and 7 Years in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anders, Yvonne; Grosse, Christiane; Rossbach, Hans-Gunther; Ebert, Susanne; Weinert, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have investigated how preschool and primary school interact to influence children's cognitive development. The present investigation explores German children's numeracy skills between age 3 (1st year of preschool) and age 7 (1st year of primary school). We first identified the influence of preschool experience on development while…

  4. The Inclusion of Pseudowords within the Year One Phonics "Screening Check" in English Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Howard; England, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The paper highlights problems surrounding the Year 1 Phonics Screening Check that has accompanied the legislative framework for synthetic phonics in English primary schools. It investigates the inclusion of pseudowords and raises questions regarding their generation and categorization, the rationale for their inclusion and the assumption that the…

  5. Views of Primary School Administrators on Change in Schools and Change Management Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosgörür, Vural

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the opinions of primary school administrators about change, and to reveal which strategies they use to manage change in schools. This is a qualitative study conducted in 2014 academic year in Mugla province. Research data were collected from primary school administrators through semi-structured interviews.…

  6. Analyzing the Learning Styles of Pre-Service Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Özdemir, Muhammet; Kaptan, Fitnat

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the learning styles of pre-service primary school teachers by various variables. The universe of the research is composed of 2136 pre-service primary school teachers study in freshman (first year) and senior (fourth year) classes of Faculty of Education School Teaching department in Gazi University,…

  7. Effects of School Quality, School Citizenship Policy, and Student Body Composition on the Acquisition of Citizenship Competences in the Final Year of Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dijkstra, Anne Bert; Geijsel, Femke; Ledoux, Guuske; van der Veen, Ineke; ten Dam, Geert

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effects of general educational quality of schools, school citizenship policy, and ethnic homogeneity of the student body on the acquisition of citizenship competences in the final year of primary education. The theoretical framework is based on developmental, psychological, and sociological studies into effects of social…

  8. Gender in the Early Years: Boys and Girls in an African Working Class Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhana, Deevia; Nzimakwe, Thokozani; Nzimakwe, Phumzile

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the ways in which young boys and girls give meaning to gender and sexuality is vital, and is especially significant in the light of South Africa's commitment to gender equality. Yet the, gendered cultures of young children in the early years of South African primary schools remains a, marginal concern in debate, research and…

  9. Men Managing, Not Teaching Foundation Phase: Teachers, Masculinity and the Early Years of Primary Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moosa, Shaaista; Bhana, Deevia

    2017-01-01

    In this article we argue that eliminating the divisions of labour between men and women could work towards counteracting gender inequality within professions. Globally women are over-represented in the teaching of young children in the early years of primary school, or Foundation Phase (FP), as it is known in South Africa. We are concerned to go…

  10. Transitioning Year 7 Primary Students to Secondary Settings in Western Australian Catholic Schools: How Successful Was the Move?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Anne; Berlach, Richard G.; O'Neill, Michael

    2013-01-01

    After much preparatory work, the Catholic Education Office in Western Australia determined to move Year 7 students from its more than 100 primary schools to secondary schools in 2009. This was the first time in the state's history that a major education system had embarked on such an undertaking. This system-wide shift presented a unique…

  11. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Misconceptions about States of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Erdal

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify prospective primary school teachers' misconceptions about the states of matter. The sample of the study was 227 fourth-year prospective primary school teachers in a Department of Primary Education in Turkey. Researcher asked from every participant to write a response to an open ended question about…

  12. Impact of a Play-Based Curriculum in the First Two Years of Primary School: Literacy and Numeracy Outcomes over Seven Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuinness, Carol; Sproule, Liz; Bojke, Chris; Trew, Karen; Walsh, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    In 2000-2002 an innovative early years curriculum, the Enriched Curriculum (EC), was introduced into 120 volunteer schools across Northern Ireland, replacing a traditional curriculum similar to others across the UK at that time. It was intended by the designers to be developmentally appropriate and play-based with the primary goal of preventing…

  13. Examining the Sustainability of Teacher Learning Following a Year-Long Science Professional Development Programme for Inservice Primary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drits-Esser, Dina; Gess-Newsome, Julie; Stark, Louisa A.

    2017-01-01

    This two-year, mixed-methods study explored teacher learning during a year-long professional development programme and during the year following the programme. The study examined patterns of change in primary school teachers' inquiry practices, inquiry beliefs and physical science content knowledge during both years as well as the effects of…

  14. The Relationship Between School Climate and Mental and Emotional Wellbeing Over the Transition from Primary to Secondary School.

    PubMed

    Lester, Leanne; Cross, Donna

    School climate has often been described as the "quality and character of school life", including both social and physical aspects of the school, that can positively promote behaviour, school achievement, and the social and emotional development of students. The current study examined the relationship between students' mental and emotional wellbeing and factors pertaining to school climate, focussing on the domains of safety, social relationships and school connectedness, during the last year of their primary schooling (age 11-12 years) and their first 2 years of secondary school. Data was collected using a self-completion questionnaire, four times over 3 years from 1800 students' aged 11-14 years. Multilevel modelling was used to determine the strongest school climate predictor of students' mental and emotional wellbeing at each time point. In the last year of primary school, peer support was the strongest protective predictor of wellbeing, while feeling less connected and less safe at school predicted mental wellbeing. Feeling safe at school was the strongest protective factor for student wellbeing in the first year of secondary school. In the second year of secondary school, peer support was the strongest protective factor for mental wellbeing, while feeling safe at school, feeling connected to school and having support from peers were predictive of emotional wellbeing. School climate factors of feeling safe at school, feeling connected to school, and peer support are all protective of mental and emotional wellbeing over the transition period while connectedness to teachers is protective of emotional wellbeing. Primary school appears to be an important time to establish quality connections to peers who have a powerful role in providing support for one another before the transition to secondary school. However, school policies and practices promoting safety and encouraging and enabling connectedness are important during the first years of secondary school

  15. Health Activities for Primary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    This manual targets new and second-year Peace Corps volunteers, presenting health lessons and activities for primary school students in Thailand. Each section of the manual outlines basic technical information about the topic, contains several detailed lesson plans, and lists quick activities that can be carried out at schools. Songs and recipes…

  16. The Reading Profile of Turkish Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dag, Nilgün

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to reveal the reading profile of primary school students. The research design is based on a survey model with the research population being comprised of primary school students in the 2014-2015 academic year in the city center of Nevsehir, Turkey. The sample of the study consists of 120 fourth-grade students. The research data was…

  17. One Teacher Primary Schools: England, Scotland and Wales, 1996-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muse, Ivan; Hite, Steve; Powley, Ellen

    During the 1996-97 school year, 63 one-teacher primary schools were identified in Great Britain and 54 of these were surveyed. Three of the schools surveyed were in England, 47 in Scotland, and 4 in Wales. The majority of teachers in these schools were female, married, and 40-49 years old; had over 20 years teaching experience, with 5-15 years in…

  18. Prevalence of early loss of primary teeth in 5-10-year-old school children in Chidambaram town.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, S Syed Shaheed; Reddy, Venugopal N; Krishnakumar, R; Mohan, Muthu G; Sugumaran, Durai K; Rao, Arun P

    2012-01-01

    The premature loss of primary teeth may reduce arch length required for the succeeding tooth and, hence, predisposes crowding, rotation and impaction of the permanent teeth. There are only limited studies carried out about the prevalence of early loss of primary teeth. The present study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of early loss of primary teeth in school children in Chidambaram town in Tamilnadu, India. A total of 1121 school children (561 boys and 560 girls) between 5 and 10 years of age were selected for the study. An experienced examiner performed all clinical examinations under natural light. Data including age and missing tooth was collected. Microsoft Excel/2000 (Microsoft Office XP) data spreadsheet was used and later exported to the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) for Windows (version 10.0). Descriptive statistics was applied and, from the results, chi-square tests were applied at a level of significance of 5% (P < 0.05). The results showed that 16.5% of the sample had early loss of primary teeth, but no differences were observed between genders (P > 0.05). The greatest prevalence was found among the 8-year olds (5.08%), and the most commonly missing teeth were the right lower primary first molars (16.82%). It can be concluded that the prevalence of early loss was high and that the lower primary molars were the most commonly missing teeth in the present study.

  19. School-Based Primary School Sexuality Education for Migrant Children in Beijing, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Wenli; Su, Yufen

    2014-01-01

    In May 2007, Beijing Normal University launched a programme of school-based sexuality education for migrant children in Xingzhi Primary School in Beijing. Over the past seven years, the project team has developed a school-based sexuality education curriculum using the "International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education" published by…

  20. The English proficiency and academic language skills of Australian bilingual children during the primary school years.

    PubMed

    Dennaoui, Kamelia; Nicholls, Ruth Jane; O'Connor, Meredith; Tarasuik, Joanne; Kvalsvig, Amanda; Goldfeld, Sharon

    2016-04-01

    Evidence suggests that early proficiency in the language of school instruction is an important predictor of academic success for bilingual children. This study investigated whether English-proficiency at 4-5 years of age predicts academic language and literacy skills among Australian bilingual children at 10-11 years of age, as part of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children ( LSAC, 2012 ). The LSAC comprises a nationally representative clustered cross-sequential sample of Australian children. Data were analysed from a sub-sample of 129 bilingual children from the LSAC Kindergarten cohort (n = 4983), for whom teachers completed the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) checklist (a population measure of early childhood development) and the Academic Rating Scale (ARS) language and literacy subscale. Linear regression analyses revealed that bilingual children who commenced school with stronger English proficiency had higher academic language and literacy scores at the end of primary school (β = 0.45). English proficiency remained a significant predictor, even when accounting for gender and socio-economic disadvantage (β = 0.38). The findings indicate that bilingual children who begin school without English proficiency are at risk of difficulties with academic language and literacy, even after 6 years of schooling. Risk factors need to be identified so early support can be targeted towards the most vulnerable children.

  1. Making Physics Matter in Primary Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaherty, Jackie; Cox, Wendy; Poole, Amanda; Watson, Jenny; Greygoose, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    "Efforts to broaden students' aspirations, particularly in relation to STEM, need to begin in primary school." Kings College London "Aspires" Research Project 2013 From my outreach activity I have learnt that primary teachers could feel under pressure when faced with delivering the science curriculum. The teachers could be lacking confidence in their subject knowledge, lacking the equipment needed to deliver practical science or lacking enthusiasm for the subject. In addition, English and Mathematics were the subjects that were externally tested and reported to the authorities and so some teachers felt that time for science was being marginalised to ensure the best results in the externally assessed subjects. In my work with The Ogden Trust Primary Science team I have been involved in developing a range of strategies to address some of the issues outlined above. • CPD (Teacher Training) Programme We have provided free training to improve teachers knowledge and understanding of key physics concepts to GCSE standard and a practical workshop consisting of ten investigations, extension and challenge tasks. The teachers each receive a book of lesson plans and a resource box containing a class set of the equipment required. The four year programme covers Forces Light and Sound Electricity Earth & Space • "Phiz Labs" Funding from The Ogden Trust has allowed us to set up science laboratories within primary schools. The pupils have lab coats, goggles and access to a range of equipment that allows them to participate in more practical science activity and open-ended investigative work. My Phiz Lab is in the secondary school where I teach physics and practical workshops for primary pupils and teachers are held there on a regular basis. • Enrichment In order to enthuse and challenge the primary pupils a variety of enrichment activities take place. These include "Physics of Go-Karts" and "Particle Physics for Primary" workshops, competitions and regional Science Fairs

  2. Effects of a 2-Year School-Based Intervention of Enhanced Physical Education in the Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacchetti, Rossella; Ceciliani, Andrea; Garulli, Andrea; Dallolio, Laura; Beltrami, Patrizia; Leoni, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to assess whether a school-based physical education intervention was effective in improving physical abilities and influencing daily physical activity habits in primary school children. The possible effect on body mass index (BMI) was also considered. Methods: Twenty-six 3rd-grade classes were randomly selected…

  3. The Personal and Contextual Contributors to School Belongingness among Primary School Students

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Passmore, Anne; Parsons, Richard; Tan, Tele; Falkmer, Torbjorn

    2015-01-01

    School belongingness has gained currency among educators and school health professionals as an important determinant of adolescent health. The current cross-sectional study presents the 15 most significant personal and contextual factors that collectively explain 66.4% (two-thirds) of the variability in 12-year old students’ perceptions of belongingness in primary school. The study is part of a larger longitudinal study investigating the factors associated with student adjustment in the transition from primary to secondary school. The study found that girls and students with disabilities had higher school belongingness scores than boys, and their typically developing counterparts respectively; and explained 2.5% of the variability in school belongingness. The majority (47.1% out of 66.4%) of the variability in school belongingness was explained by student personal factors, such as social acceptance, physical appearance competence, coping skills, and social affiliation motivation; followed by parental expectations (3% out of 66.4%), and school-based factors (13.9% out of 66.4%) such as, classroom involvement, task-goal structure, autonomy provision, cultural pluralism, and absence of bullying. Each of the identified contributors of primary school belongingness can be shaped through interventions, system changes, or policy reforms. PMID:25876074

  4. Religion and Primary School Choice in Ireland: School Institutional Identities and Student Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darmody, Merike; Smyth, Emer

    2018-01-01

    Ireland's demographic profile has changed significantly in the past 20 years, being now characterised by increasing cultural, ethnic and religious diversity. However, primary schooling in Ireland has remained highly denominational, mostly Roman Catholic, in nature, with a small number of minority faith schools and multi-denominational schools.…

  5. The causal effect of increased primary schooling on child mortality in Malawi: Universal primary education as a natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Makate, Marshall; Makate, Clifton

    2016-11-01

    The primary objective of this analysis is to investigate the causal effect of mother's schooling on under-five health - and the passageways through which schooling propagates - by exploiting the exogenous variability in schooling prompted by the 1994 universal primary schooling program in Malawi. This education policy, which saw the elimination of tuition fees across all primary schooling grades, creates an ideal setting for observing the causal influence of improved primary school enrollment on the under-five fatality rates of the subsequent generation. Our analysis uses data from three waves of the nationally representative Malawi Demographic and Health Surveys conducted in 2000, 2004/05, and 2010. To address the potential endogeneity of schooling, we employ the mother's age at implementation of the tuition-free primary school policy in 1994 as an instrumental variable for the prospect of finishing primary level instruction. The results suggest that spending one year in school translated to a 3.22 percentage point reduction in mortality for infants and a 6.48 percent reduction for children under age five years. For mothers younger than 19 years, mortality was reduced by 5.95 percentage points. These figures remained approximately the same even after adjusting for potential confounders. However, we failed to find any statistically meaningful effect of the mother's education on neonatal survival. The juvenile fatality estimates we find are weakly robust to several robustness checks. We also explored the potential mechanisms by which increased maternal schooling might help enhance child survival. The findings indicated that an added year of motherly learning considerably improves the prospect of prenatal care use, literacy levels, father's educational level, and alters fertility behavior. Our results suggest that increasing the primary schooling prospects for young women might help reduce under-five mortality in less-industrialized regions experiencing high under

  6. Primary School Teachers' Opinion on Digital Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana; Drîngu, Maria-Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Ministry of Education, Research, Youth and Sports of Romania through order no. 3654/29.03.2012 approved the Framework Plan for Primary Education, Preparatory Grade, First and Second Grades. New subjects and syllabuses were introduced. In 2014-2015 school year appeared new school textbooks for first and second grade. Unlike the previous textbooks…

  7. Pre-Service Primary School Teachers' Spatial Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2017-01-01

    Spatial abilities are used in many aspects of everyday life, thus developing these abilities should be one of the most important goal of Mathematics Education. These abilities should be developed starting with early school years, thus pre-school and primary school teachers have an important role in setting the foundation of these abilities. A…

  8. Exploring Musical Expectations: Understanding the Impact of a Year-Long Primary School Music Project in the Context of School, Home and Prior Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Stephanie E.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a year-long project carried out in three UK primary schools, which aimed to understand the expectations and experiences of children participating in a series of workshops delivered by the chamber music organisation, Music in the Round. Through drawings, discussions, questionnaires and observations, the children's developing…

  9. The HMI Report on Primary Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Science, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Gives a summary of a report on primary schools in England. A comprehensive survey of a representation sample of 7-, 9-, and 11- year-old pupils was conducted. The findings and their implications are considered. Recommendations are presented. (GA)

  10. Survival of occlusal ART restorations in primary molars placed in school environment and hospital dental setup-one year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Noor-Mohammed; Sakeenabi, Basha

    2011-11-01

    The objectives of this clinical study were to: evaluate the survival of occlusal atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) restorations, on a longitudinal basis, in the primary molars of children; and compare the success rate of ART restorations placed in school environment and in hospital dental setup. One dentist placed 120 ART restorations in 60 five- to seven year-olds who had bilateral matched pairs of carious primary molars. A split-mouth design was used to place restorations in school and in hospital dental setup, which were assigned randomly to contralateral sides. Restorations were evaluated after 6 and 12 months using the ART criteria. The survival rate of ART restorations placed in school environment was 82.2% at the 6-month assessment and 77.77% at the 12-month assessment. The success rates of ART restorations placed in hospital dental setup in the 2 assessments were 87.7% and 81.48%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between the ART restorations placed in school environment and hospital dental setup in both assessments (P > O.05). The main cause of failure was the loss of restoration. The one year success rate of occlusal ART restorations in primary molars was moderately successful. The ART technique's done in hospital dental setup was not proven to be better than restorations placed in school environment.

  11. Personal Smartphones in Primary School: Devices for a PLE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honegger, Beat Döbeli; Neff, Christian

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the goals and first results of an ongoing two year case study in a European primary school (5th primary class) where the teacher and all students were equipped with a personal smartphone. Students are allowed to use phone and internet services at no charge and to take home their smartphones after school. In this project the…

  12. Children's Exposure to Radon in Nursery and Primary Schools.

    PubMed

    Branco, Pedro T B S; Nunes, Rafael A O; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C M; Martins, Fernando G; Sousa, Sofia I V

    2016-03-30

    The literature proves an evident association between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, even at low doses. This study brings a new approach to the study of children's exposure to radon by aiming to evaluate exposure to indoor radon concentrations in nursery and primary schools from two districts in Portugal (Porto and Bragança), considering different influencing factors (occupation patterns, classroom floor level, year of the buildings' construction and soil composition of the building site), as well as the comparison with IAQ standard values for health protection. Fifteen nursery and primary schools in the Porto and Bragança districts were considered: five nursery schools for infants and twelve for pre-schoolers (seven different buildings), as well as eight primary schools. Radon measurements were performed continuously. The measured concentrations depended on the building occupation, classroom floor level and year of the buildings' construction. Although they were in general within the Portuguese legislation for IAQ, exceedances to international standards were found. These results point out the need of assessing indoor radon concentrations not only in primary schools, but also in nursery schools, never performed in Portugal before this study. It is important to extend the study to other microenvironments like homes, and in time to estimate the annual effective dose and to assess lifetime health risks.

  13. Primary school accident reporting in one education authority.

    PubMed

    Latif, A H A; Williams, W R; Sibert, J

    2002-02-01

    Studies have shown a correlation between increased accident rates and levels of deprivation in the community. School accident reporting is one area where an association might be expected. To investigate differences in primary school accident rates in deprived and more affluent wards, in an area managed by one education authority. Statistical analysis of accident form returns for 100 primary schools in one education authority in Wales over a two year period, in conjunction with visits to over one third of school sites. Accident report rates from schools in deprived wards were three times higher than those from schools in more affluent wards. School visits showed that this discrepancy was attributable primarily to differences in reporting procedures. One third of schools did not report accidents and approximately half did not keep records of minor accidents. The association between school accident report rates and deprivation in the community is complex. School accident data from local education authorities may be unreliable for most purposes of collection.

  14. Relationship between the Phonological Awareness Skills and Writing Skills of the First Year Students at Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdogan, Ozge

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the phonological awareness skills and writing skills of the first year students at primary school. In the study, the phonological awareness skills and writing skills of the students were measured at the beginning of the term. Students' writing skills were measured in the middle of…

  15. The Primary Program: Report from the Task Force on Improving Kentucky Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence, Lexington, KY.

    Because the primary years are the point where specific changes are required in teaching practice and school organization, a task force examined Kentucky's primary program through school visits, interviews, expert testimony, and research. The last three years have shown marked improvement in student performance in the basics (reading, writing, and…

  16. Engaging with Schools and Increasing Primary School Students' Interest in Science: An Intersectoral Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willsher, Kerre; Penman, Joy

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses an initiative called "Scientists in Schools" which was implemented with a group of seventy (n=70) Year 4 and Year 7 students studying in a local school in regional South Australia with the primary objective of raising awareness and interest in the study of sciences. Mezirow's critical reflection was used by the…

  17. Developmentally Appropriate Practices in the Primary Program: A Survey of Primary School Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addington, Brenda Burton; Hinton, Samuel

    Under the Kentucky Education Reform Act, public schools in Kentucky were required to restructure the traditional kindergarten through third-grade classes into a multi-age and multi-ability level, ungraded primary program during the 1993-1994 school year. Classrooms that once contained children at relatively the same age have been replaced with…

  18. Belongingness in Early Secondary School: Key Factors that Primary and Secondary Schools Need to Consider.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Passmore, Anne; Parsons, Richard; Black, Melissa; Cuomo, Belinda; Tan, Tele; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown if, and how, students redefine their sense of school belongingness after negotiating the transition to secondary school. The current study used longitudinal data from 266 students with, and without, disabilities who negotiated the transition from 52 primary schools to 152 secondary schools. The study presents the 13 most significant personal student and contextual factors associated with belongingness in the first year of secondary school. Student perception of school belongingness was found to be stable across the transition. No variability in school belongingness due to gender, disability or household-socio-economic status (SES) was noted. Primary school belongingness accounted for 22% of the variability in secondary school belongingness. Several personal student factors (competence, coping skills) and school factors (low-level classroom task-goal orientation), which influenced belongingness in primary school, continued to influence belongingness in secondary school. In secondary school, effort-goal orientation of the student and perception of their school's tolerance to disability were each associated with perception of school belongingness. Family factors did not influence belongingness in secondary school. Findings of the current study highlight the need for primary schools to foster belongingness among their students at an early age, and transfer students' belongingness profiles as part of the hand-over documentation. Most of the factors that influenced school belongingness before and after the transition to secondary are amenable to change.

  19. Belongingness in Early Secondary School: Key Factors that Primary and Secondary Schools Need to Consider

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Ciccarelli, Marina; Passmore, Anne; Parsons, Richard; Black, Melissa; Cuomo, Belinda; Tan, Tele; Falkmer, Torbjörn

    2015-01-01

    It is unknown if, and how, students redefine their sense of school belongingness after negotiating the transition to secondary school. The current study used longitudinal data from 266 students with, and without, disabilities who negotiated the transition from 52 primary schools to 152 secondary schools. The study presents the 13 most significant personal student and contextual factors associated with belongingness in the first year of secondary school. Student perception of school belongingness was found to be stable across the transition. No variability in school belongingness due to gender, disability or household-socio-economic status (SES) was noted. Primary school belongingness accounted for 22% of the variability in secondary school belongingness. Several personal student factors (competence, coping skills) and school factors (low-level classroom task-goal orientation), which influenced belongingness in primary school, continued to influence belongingness in secondary school. In secondary school, effort-goal orientation of the student and perception of their school’s tolerance to disability were each associated with perception of school belongingness. Family factors did not influence belongingness in secondary school. Findings of the current study highlight the need for primary schools to foster belongingness among their students at an early age, and transfer students’ belongingness profiles as part of the hand-over documentation. Most of the factors that influenced school belongingness before and after the transition to secondary are amenable to change. PMID:26372554

  20. Risk factors for refractive errors in primary school children (6-12 years old) in Nakhon Pathom Province.

    PubMed

    Yingyong, Penpimol

    2010-11-01

    Refractive error is one of the leading causes of visual impairment in children. An analysis of risk factors for refractive error is required to reduce and prevent this common eye disease. To identify the risk factors associated with refractive errors in primary school children (6-12 year old) in Nakhon Pathom province. A population-based cross-sectional analytic study was conducted between October 2008 and September 2009 in Nakhon Pathom. Refractive error, parental refractive status, and hours per week of near activities (studying, reading books, watching television, playing with video games, or working on the computer) were assessed in 377 children who participated in this study. The most common type of refractive error in primary school children was myopia. Myopic children were more likely to have parents with myopia. Children with myopia spend more time at near activities. The multivariate odds ratio (95% confidence interval)for two myopic parents was 6.37 (2.26-17.78) and for each diopter-hour per week of near work was 1.019 (1.005-1.033). Multivariate logistic regression models show no confounding effects between parental myopia and near work suggesting that each factor has an independent association with myopia. Statistical analysis by logistic regression revealed that family history of refractive error and hours of near-work were significantly associated with refractive error in primary school children.

  1. Primary school accident reporting in one education authority

    PubMed Central

    Latif, A; Williams, W; Sibert, J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown a correlation between increased accident rates and levels of deprivation in the community. School accident reporting is one area where an association might be expected. Aims: To investigate differences in primary school accident rates in deprived and more affluent wards, in an area managed by one education authority. Methods: Statistical analysis of accident form returns for 100 primary schools in one education authority in Wales over a two year period, in conjunction with visits to over one third of school sites. Results: Accident report rates from schools in deprived wards were three times higher than those from schools in more affluent wards. School visits showed that this discrepancy was attributable primarily to differences in reporting procedures. One third of schools did not report accidents and approximately half did not keep records of minor accidents. Conclusions: The association between school accident report rates and deprivation in the community is complex. School accident data from local education authorities may be unreliable for most purposes of collection. PMID:11827900

  2. Primary School Text Comprehension Predicts Mathematical Word Problem-Solving Skills in Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Björn, Piia Maria; Aunola, Kaisa; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2016-01-01

    This longitudinal study aimed to investigate the extent to which primary school text comprehension predicts mathematical word problem-solving skills in secondary school among Finnish students. The participants were 224 fourth graders (9-10 years old at the baseline). The children's text-reading fluency, text comprehension and basic calculation…

  3. School-Community Links: Supporting Learning in the Middle Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Debra; Chodkiewicz, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on research into how schools, parents and local communities work together to support students' learning during the transition from primary to secondary schools in what is referred to as the middle years of schooling. The research was conducted in four Australian schools within one urban school district. These schools were…

  4. Perceptions of Democracy of Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kus, Zafer; Cetin, Turhan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the perceptions of democracy of primary school students, identify the factors that affect these, and compare the results with those obtained from other countries. The research was carried out during the 2011-2012 school year with 1,667 students from the 6th, 7th, and 8th grades who were chosen from 26 cities in…

  5. [Study on mental workload of teachers in primary schools].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yuan-mei; Wang, Zhi-ming; Wang, Mian-zhen; Lan, Ya-jia; Fan, Guang-qin; Feng, Chang

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the distribution characteristics and influencing factors of mental workload of teachers in primary schools. National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) was used to assess the mental workload levels for 397 teachers of primary schools in a city. The mental workload (64.34+10.56) of female teachers was significantly higher than that (61.73+ 9.77) of male teachers (P<0.05). The mental workload (65.66+10.42) of "-35" years old group was the highest. When age of teachers was younger than 35 years old, there was a positive correlation between the mental workload and age (r=0.146, P<0.05). When age of teachers was older than 35 years old, there was a negative correlation between the mental workload and age (r=-0.190, P<0.05). The teachers with higher education level felt higher mental workload (unstandardized coefficients B=1.524, standardized coefficients /=0.111, P<0.05). There was a positive correlation between the mental workload and working hours per day (unstandardized coefficients B =4.659, standardized coefficients/3 =0.223, P<0.001). Mental workload of the teachers in primary schools is closely related to age, educational level and work hours per day. Work hours per day is an important risk factor for mental workload. Reducing work hours per day (8 hours) is an effective measure of alleviating the mental workload of teachers in primary schools.

  6. Organizational Learning in Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tas, Ali

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to make suggestions for primary schools to become organizational learning environments, by searching the relationship between the characteristics and behaviors of school administrators and the formation of an organizational learning environment in primary schools. The author used a survey model in this research and…

  7. Children’s Exposure to Radon in Nursery and Primary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Pedro T. B. S.; Nunes, Rafael A. O.; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C. M.; Martins, Fernando G.; Sousa, Sofia I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The literature proves an evident association between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, even at low doses. This study brings a new approach to the study of children’s exposure to radon by aiming to evaluate exposure to indoor radon concentrations in nursery and primary schools from two districts in Portugal (Porto and Bragança), considering different influencing factors (occupation patterns, classroom floor level, year of the buildings’ construction and soil composition of the building site), as well as the comparison with IAQ standard values for health protection. Fifteen nursery and primary schools in the Porto and Bragança districts were considered: five nursery schools for infants and twelve for pre-schoolers (seven different buildings), as well as eight primary schools. Radon measurements were performed continuously. The measured concentrations depended on the building occupation, classroom floor level and year of the buildings’ construction. Although they were in general within the Portuguese legislation for IAQ, exceedances to international standards were found. These results point out the need of assessing indoor radon concentrations not only in primary schools, but also in nursery schools, never performed in Portugal before this study. It is important to extend the study to other microenvironments like homes, and in time to estimate the annual effective dose and to assess lifetime health risks. PMID:27043596

  8. Cooperative Learning in Science: Follow-up from primary to high school

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Allen; Topping, Keith J.; Tolmie, Andrew; Christie, Donald; Karagiannidou, Eleni; Murray, Pauline

    2010-03-01

    This paper reports a two-year longitudinal study of the effects of cooperative learning on science attainment, attitudes towards science, and social connectedness during transition from primary to high school. A previous project on cooperative learning in primary schools observed gains in science understanding and in social aspects of school life. This project followed 204 children involved in the previous project and 440 comparison children who were not as they undertook transition from 24 primary schools to 16 high schools. Cognitive, affective, and social gains observed in the original project survived transition. The implications improving the effectiveness of school transition by using cooperative learning initiatives are explored. Possibilities for future research and the implications for practice and policy are discussed.

  9. Career Development in Primary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazli, Serap

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper has three objectives. The first is to determine the level of primary school students' career development, the second is to test Super's childhood years career development model, and the third is to determine the level of Turkish children's career development. Design/methodology/approach: Employing qualitative research models,…

  10. Changes in Student Populations and Average Test Scores of Dutch Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luyten, Hans; de Wolf, Inge

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on the relation between student population characteristics and average test scores per school in the final grade of primary education from a dynamic perspective. Aggregated data of over 5,000 Dutch primary schools covering a 6-year period were used to study the relation between changes in school populations and shifts in mean…

  11. Reducing Physical Violence Toward Primary School Students With Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Devries, Karen; Kuper, Hannah; Knight, Louise; Allen, Elizabeth; Kyegombe, Nambusi; Banks, Lena Morgon; Kelly, Susan; Naker, Dipak

    2018-03-01

    We tested whether the Good School Toolkit reduces physical violence from peers and school staff toward students with and without disabilities in Ugandan primary schools. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial, with data collected via cross-sectional surveys in 2012 and 2014. Forty-two primary schools in Luwero District, Uganda, were randomly assigned to receive the Good School Toolkit for 18 months, or to a waitlisted control group. The primary outcome was past week physical violence from school staff, measured by primary 5, 6, and 7 students' (aged 11-14 years) self-reports using the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect Child Abuse Screening Tool-Child Institutional. Disability was assessed through the six Short Set Washington Group questions on functioning. Analyses were by intention to treat. At endline, 53% of control group students with no functional difficulties reported violence from peers or school staff, versus 84% of students with a disability. Prevalence of past week physical violence from school staff was lower in intervention schools than in the control schools after the intervention, in students with no functional difficulties (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = .41, 95% confidence interval [CI .26-.65]), students with some functional difficulties (aOR = .36, 95% CI .21-.63), and students with disabilities (aOR = .29, 95% CI .14-.59). The intervention also reduced violence from peers in young adolescents, with no evidence of a difference in effect by disability status. The Good School Toolkit is an effective intervention to reduce violence perpetrated by peers and school staff against young adolescents with disabilities in Ugandan primary schools. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeted vaccination in healthy school children - Can primary school vaccination alone control influenza?

    PubMed

    Thorrington, Dominic; Jit, Mark; Eames, Ken

    2015-10-05

    The UK commenced an extension to the seasonal influenza vaccination policy in autumn 2014 that will eventually see all healthy children between the ages of 2-16 years offered annual influenza vaccination. Models suggest that the new policy will be both highly effective at reducing the burden of influenza as well as cost-effective. We explore whether targeting vaccination at either primary or secondary schools would be more effective and/or cost-effective than the current strategy. An age-structured deterministic transmission dynamic SEIR-type mathematical model was used to simulate a national influenza outbreak in England. Costs including GP consultations, hospitalisations due to influenza and vaccinations were compared to potential gains in quality-adjusted life years achieved through vaccinating healthy children. Costs and benefits of the new JCVI vaccination policy were estimated over a single season, and compared to the hypothesised new policies of targeted and heterogeneous vaccination. All potential vaccination policies were highly cost-effective. Influenza transmission can be eliminated for a particular season by vaccinating both primary and secondary school children, but not by vaccinating only one group. The most cost-effective policy overall is heterogeneous vaccination coverage with 48% uptake in primary schools and 34% in secondary schools. The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation can consider a modification to their policy of offering seasonal influenza vaccinations to all healthy children of ages 2-16 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary school teacher as a primary health care worker.

    PubMed

    Nayar, S; Singh, D; Rao, N P; Choudhury, D R

    1990-01-01

    School children (1608) were examined for three items (nails, scalp hairs and teeth) relating to personal hygiene and relevant infective conditions from two sets of villages i.e. one set where primary school teacher was working as primary health care worker (Group I) and the other set where Community Health Volunteer (CHV) was delivering primary health care (Group II). The objective was to evaluate the efficiency of school teachers' role vis-a-vis CHVs' in imparting health education to school children. Out of 1608 school children, 801 belonged to Group I villages and the remaining 807 to Group II villages. From the results, it was evident that children of Group I villages were better with respect to all the items related to personal hygiene and infective conditions excepting scalp infections, where difference was not statistically significant, indicating teachers' superiority over the CHVs' in imparting health education to school children.

  14. Executive Functions as Predictors of School Performance and Social Relationships: Primary and Secondary School Students.

    PubMed

    Zorza, Juan Pablo; Marino, Julián; Acosta Mesas, Alberto

    2016-05-12

    This study examined the relationship between executive functions (EFs) and school performance in primary and secondary school students aged 8 to 13 years (N = 146, M = 10.4, 45.8% girls). EFs were evaluated using the Trail Making Test (TMT), Verbal Fluency (VF), and the Stroop Test. Students' GPAs and teachers' assessment of academic skills were used to measure school performance. To evaluate the students' social behavior, participants were asked to rate all their classmates' prosocial behavior and nominate three students with whom they preferred to do school activities; teachers also provided evaluations of students' social skills. EF measures explained 41% (p = .003, f 2 = .694) of variability in school performance and 29% (p = .005, f 2 = .401) of variance in social behavior in primary school students. The predictive power of EFs was found to be lower for secondary school students, although the TMT showed significant prediction and explained 13% (p = .004, f 2 = .149) of variance in school performance and 15% (p = .008, f 2 = .176) in peer ratings of prosocial behavior. This paper discusses the relevance of EFs in the school environment and their different predictive power in primary and secondary school students.

  15. Job Satisfaction of Catholic Primary School Staff: A Study of Biographical Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Nobile, John J.; McCormick, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study's purpose is to examine the relationships between the biographical characteristics gender, age, years of experience and employment position, and job satisfaction of staff members in Catholic primary schools. Design/methodology/approach: Survey data were collected from 356 staff members from Catholic primary schools. Research…

  16. School grounds and physical activity: Associations at secondary schools, and over the transition from primary to secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Flo; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Corder, Kirsten; Jones, Andy

    2016-05-01

    This paper aims to further understanding of the physical environments of secondary schools and their associations with young peoples' physical activity. Accelerometer-derived physical activity measurements from 299 participants in the SPEEDY study (Norfolk, UK) were obtained from baseline measurements (age 9-10y) and +4y follow-up. These were linked to objective measures of primary and secondary school environments as measured by the SPEEDY grounds audit tool. We saw considerable differences in the nature of school grounds between primary and secondary schools. Cross-sectional associations were seen between active travel provision scores and commuting time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for 13-14 year old boys and adolescents living further from school. However, few associations were seen between changes in school grounds scores and changes in school-based MVPA. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. The Contribution of the New South Wales Primary Schools Sports Association towards Developing Talent in Australian 12-Year-Old Female Swimmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a case study that inquired into the influence of the New South Wales Primary Schools Sports Association competitive swimming structure on the development of talented 12-year old female swimmers. The study focused on ten 12-year old girls in the New South Wales team that contested the 2009 national swimming championships…

  18. The Transition from Primary to Secondary School: Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Belinda; Hay, Ian; Dyment, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The transition from primary school to secondary school has long been recognised as one of the most challenging times in a young adolescent students' education, particularly in regard to their academic achievement. Research evidence from the last 30 years has identified a consistent pattern in students' academic achievement across transition,…

  19. Creativity and physical fitness in primary school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Latorre Román, Pedro Ángel; Pinillos, Felipe García; Pantoja Vallejo, Antonio; Berrios Aguayo, Beatriz

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between creativity and physical fitness in elementary school children. Data were collected from 308 primary school students in southern Spain, ranging in age from 8 to 12 years (mean, 9.72 ± 1.25 years). They completed a fitness test battery, and the Prueba de Imaginación Creativa para Niños (PIC-N; Creative Imagination Test for Children) to analyze creativity. Significant differences were found between the sexes. Boys had better physical fitness but there were no sex differences in creativity. On clusters analysis, the highly creative groups had better physical fitness. Creativity was correlated with physical fitness. Aerobic capacity was a predictor of creativity. There is an association between creativity and physical fitness in primary school children that may have important implications for academic achievement. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Primary school children's communication experiences with Twitter: a case study from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gunuc, Selim; Misirli, Ozge; Odabasi, H Ferhan

    2013-06-01

    This case study examines the utilization of Twitter as a communication channel among primary school children. This study tries to answer the following questions: "What are the cases for primary school children's use of Twitter for communication?" and "What are primary school children's experiences of utilizing Twitter for communication?" Participants were 7th grade students (17 female, 34 male; age 13 years) studying in a private primary school in Turkey within the 2011-12 academic year. A questionnaire, semi-structured interview, document analysis, and open ended questions were used as data collection tools. The children were invited and encouraged to use Twitter for communication. Whilst participants had some minor difficulties getting accustomed to Twitter, they managed to use Twitter for communication, a conclusion drawn from the children's responses and tweets within the study. However, the majority of children did not consider Twitter as a communication tool, and were observed to quit using Twitter once the study had ended. They found Twitter unproductive and restrictive for communication. Furthermore, Twitter's low popularity among adolescents was also a problem. This study suggests that social networking tools favored by children should be integrated into educational settings in order to maximize instructional benefits for primary school children and adolescents.

  1. The impact of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence and mental health functioning across the primary-secondary school transition.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Sharmila; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjörn; Passmore, Anne Elizabeth; Falkmer, Marita

    2014-01-01

    Students negotiate the transition to secondary school in different ways. While some thrive on the opportunity, others are challenged. A prospective longitudinal design was used to determine the contribution of personal background and school contextual factors on academic competence (AC) and mental health functioning (MHF) of 266 students, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary school. Data from 197 typically developing students and 69 students with a disability were analysed using hierarchical linear regression modelling. Both in primary and secondary school, students with a disability and from socially disadvantaged backgrounds gained poorer scores for AC and MHF than their typically developing and more affluent counterparts. Students who attended independent and mid-range sized primary schools had the highest concurrent AC. Those from independent primary schools had the lowest MHF. The primary school organisational model significantly influenced post-transition AC scores; with students from Kindergarten--Year 7 schools reporting the lowest scores, while those from the Kindergarten--Year 12 structure without middle school having the highest scores. Attending a school which used the Kindergarten--Year 12 with middle school structure was associated with a reduction in AC scores across the transition. Personal background factors accounted for the majority of the variability in post-transition AC and MHF. The contribution of school contextual factors was relatively minor. There is a potential opportunity for schools to provide support to disadvantaged students before the transition to secondary school, as they continue to be at a disadvantage after the transition.

  2. Primary School Teachers' Perceptions of Adequacy and Quality of Physical Facilities in Public Primary Schools under Free Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muthima, Ndirangu Wahome; Udoto, Maurice O.; Anditi, Zephania O.

    2016-01-01

    The Free Primary Education (FPE) programme was commissioned in Kenya in January 2003 to provide basic education to all children of school going age and to ease the burden of cost sharing from the parents. However, even though the public primary school class teachers were to shoulder the greatest responsibility in the implementation of this…

  3. Changing from primary to secondary school highlights opportunities for school environment interventions aiming to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Marks, Jennifer; Barnett, Lisa M; Strugnell, Claudia; Allender, Steven

    2015-05-08

    There is little empirical evidence of the impact of transition from primary to secondary school on obesity-related risk behaviour. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a change of school system on physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviour in pre-early adolescents. Fifteen schools in Victoria, Australia were recruited at random from the bottom two strata of a five level socio-economic scale. In nine schools, students in year 6 primary school transitioned to a different school for year 7 secondary school, while in six schools (combined primary-secondary), students remained in the same school environment from year 6 to year 7. Time 1 (T1) measures were collected from students (N=245) in year 6 (age 11-13). Time 2 (T2) data were collected from 243 (99%) of the original student cohort when in year 7. PA and sedentary behaviour data were collected objectively (via ActiGraph accelerometer) and subjectively (via child self-report recall questionnaire). School environment data were collected via school staff survey. Change of behaviour analyses were conducted longitudinally i) for all students and ii) by change/no change of school. Mixed model regression analysis tested for behavioural interaction effects of changing/not changing school. Sixty-three percent (N=152) changed schools from T1 to T2. Across all students we observed declines in average daily moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (-4 min) and light PA (-23 min), and increases in average daily sedentary behaviour (16 min), weekday leisure screen time (17 min) and weekday homework screen time (25 min), all P<0.05. Compared to students who remained in the same school environment, students who changed school reported a greater reduction in PA intensity at recess and lunch, less likelihood to cycle to/from school, greater increase in weekday (41 mins) and weekend (45 mins) leisure screen time (P<0.05) and greater encouragement to participate in sport. School staff surveys identified that

  4. Prognosis and Continuity of Child Mental Health Problems from Preschool to Primary School: Results of a Four-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Thomas; Postert, Christian; Muller, Jorg M.; Furniss, Tilman

    2012-01-01

    In a four-year longitudinal study, changes in and continuity of behavioral and emotional problems were examined in 814 subjects from kindergarten to primary school. Mental health problems were assessed by means of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The distribution of the CBCL broadband groups revealed a high level of continuity of internalizing…

  5. Which Specific Skills Developing during Preschool Years Predict the Reading Performance in the First and Second Grade of Primary School?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadimitriou, Artemis M.; Vlachos, Filippos M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if specific skills that are developed during preschool years could predict the reading performance in the first and second grade of primary school. Two hundred and eighty-seven children participated in this longitudinal study. At the kindergarten level, phonological awareness (PA), rapid automatised naming,…

  6. State of personal hygiene among primary school children: A community based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ahmadu, Baba Usman; Rimamchika, Musa; Ibrahim, Ahmad; Nnanubumom, Andy Angela; Godiya, Andrew; Emmanuel, Pembi

    2013-01-01

    Good personal hygiene in primary school children could be effective towards preventing infectious diseases. This work examined personal cleanliness of primary school children in Banki based on the following variables: bathing, state of uniforms, hair, nails and oral hygiene. One hundred and fifty primary school children in Banki community were selected using the cluster random sampling method. Analysis of variance was used to compare means and to test for significance of data, and coefficient of correlation to investigate the relationship between cleanliness and age of subjects. There were 87 (58 %) boys and 63 (42 %) girls in a ratio of 1.4:1. Ninety six (64 %) pupils belong to low socioeconomic class. Whereas, 53 (35.3 %) were found within 11-13 years age group, the overall mean age was 9 years (Standard deviation [SD] was 2.2), 95 CI (7.0 - 11.0) years. Comparing means for the different categories of personal hygiene, there was significant difference (F= 61.47, p < 0.0001). General personal cleanliness in our participants improved with age, and a positive significant correlation was observed between age and personal cleanliness in (r = 0.971, p = 0.026). In conclusion, significant number of primary school pupils in Banki community had good personal hygiene, which was observed to be directly proportional with age. Therefore, all efforts towards quality health education on personal hygiene as a means of primary prevention of illnesses in primary school pupils should be sustained.

  7. The Momentum behind the International Primary Curriculum in Schools in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunnell, Tristan

    2010-01-01

    The year 2007 saw a discrete yet significant development in the sphere of "international education" in England: a doubling in number of state-funded schools offering the International Primary Curriculum. This curriculum had been developed in 2000 for the Shell Company Group of Schools. It first emerged in England in 2003; two years later…

  8. Primary School Leadership Today and Tomorrow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southworth, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    The article provides a retrospective and prospective view of primary school leadership. It begins with an analytic description of primary school leadership in the recent past. The second part looks at school leadership today, identifies contemporary issues and examines role continuities and changes. The third part looks at what the future might…

  9. Proposing a Primary School Principalship Model through Positive and Negative Metaphoric Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erden, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Primary school ages are very important for the students. It is the time for most students to start their formal education period. The aim of the current research is to explore the perceptions of the teachers, 4th year initial teacher training students from education faculties, parents, vice principals and primary school principals as the key…

  10. Primary School Sun Protection Policies and Practices 4 Years after Baseline--A Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeder, Anthony I.; Jopson, Janet A.; Gray, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Before the 2005 launch of the New Zealand SunSmart Schools Accreditation Programme (SSAP), 242 randomly sampled primary schools completed a mail survey about sun protection policies, practices, curriculum and environment. A 2009 follow-up included 189 (78%) and their mean Total Accreditation Score (TAS = total SSAP requirements met, range 0-12),…

  11. Formative and summative assessment of science in English primary schools: evidence from the Primary Science Quality Mark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Background:Since the discontinuation of Standard Attainment Tests (SATs) in science at age 11 in England, pupil performance data in science reported to the UK government by each primary school has relied largely on teacher assessment undertaken in the classroom. Purpose:The process by which teachers are making these judgements has been unclear, so this study made use of the extensive Primary Science Quality Mark (PSQM) database to obtain a 'snapshot' (as of March 2013) of the approaches taken by 91 English primary schools to the formative and summative assessment of pupils' learning in science. PSQM is an award scheme for UK primary schools. It requires the science subject leader (co-ordinator) in each school to reflect upon and develop practice over the course of one year, then upload a set of reflections and supporting evidence to the database to support their application. One of the criteria requires the subject leader to explain how science is assessed within the school. Sample:The data set consists of the electronic text in the assessment section of all 91 PSQM primary schools which worked towards the Quality Mark in the year April 2012 to March 2013. Design and methods:Content analysis of a pre-existing qualitative data set. Text in the assessment section of each submission was first coded as describing formative or summative processes, then sub-coded into different strategies used. Results:A wide range of formative and summative approaches were reported, which tended to be described separately, with few links between them. Talk-based strategies are widely used for formative assessment, with some evidence of feedback to pupils. Whilst the use of tests or tracking grids for summative assessment is widespread, few schools rely on one system alone. Enquiry skills and conceptual knowledge were often assessed separately. Conclusions:There is little consistency in the approaches</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3946588','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3946588"><span>The Impact of Personal Background and <span class="hlt">School</span> Contextual Factors on Academic Competence and Mental Health Functioning across the <span class="hlt">Primary</span>-Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span> Transition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vaz, Sharmila; Parsons, Richard; Falkmer, Torbjörn; Passmore, Anne Elizabeth; Falkmer, Marita</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Students negotiate the transition to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> in different ways. While some thrive on the opportunity, others are challenged. A prospective longitudinal design was used to determine the contribution of personal background and <span class="hlt">school</span> contextual factors on academic competence (AC) and mental health functioning (MHF) of 266 students, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. Data from 197 typically developing students and 69 students with a disability were analysed using hierarchical linear regression modelling. Both in <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>, students with a disability and from socially disadvantaged backgrounds gained poorer scores for AC and MHF than their typically developing and more affluent counterparts. Students who attended independent and mid-range sized <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> had the highest concurrent AC. Those from independent <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> had the lowest MHF. The <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> organisational model significantly influenced post-transition AC scores; with students from Kindergarten - <span class="hlt">Year</span> 7 <span class="hlt">schools</span> reporting the lowest scores, while those from the Kindergarten - <span class="hlt">Year</span> 12 structure without middle <span class="hlt">school</span> having the highest scores. Attending a <span class="hlt">school</span> which used the Kindergarten - <span class="hlt">Year</span> 12 with middle <span class="hlt">school</span> structure was associated with a reduction in AC scores across the transition. Personal background factors accounted for the majority of the variability in post-transition AC and MHF. The contribution of <span class="hlt">school</span> contextual factors was relatively minor. There is a potential opportunity for <span class="hlt">schools</span> to provide support to disadvantaged students before the transition to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>, as they continue to be at a disadvantage after the transition. PMID:24608366</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24445017','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24445017"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teacher's knowledge and attitudes toward children with epilepsy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abulhamail, Albaraa S; Al-Sulami, Fahad E; Alnouri, Mouneeb A; Mahrous, Najeeb M; Joharji, Dima G; Albogami, Maha M; Jan, Mohammed M</p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teacher's knowledge and attitudes toward epilepsy can have significant impact on the performance and psycho-social development of the child with epilepsy. Our objectives were to study teacher's knowledge and attitudes and identify areas in which further teacher training and education are required. A stratified random sample survey involving a group of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia included private/public <span class="hlt">schools</span> designated for male and female students. A structured 37-item questionnaire was used to examine their demographics, knowledge, attitudes, and experience with epilepsy. Six hundred and twenty <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers working in public (58%) or private (42%) <span class="hlt">schools</span> were included with ages ranging between 21 and 59 <span class="hlt">years</span> (mean 36). Most teachers (79%) were of Saudi Arabian nationality and 66% had a college or university degree. Their <span class="hlt">years</span> of experience ranged from 1 to 35 (mean 13.5). Only 17% of the teachers felt very well informed about epilepsy. Teachers with higher education were more likely to have good knowledge (p=0.009). Teachers of Saudi nationality were also more likely to report good knowledge, independent of their educational level (p=0.013). Overall, teachers with good knowledge were less likely to have negative attitudes including minding to have an epileptic child in their class (p=0.028) or thinking that they should be placed in a special classroom (p=0.029). <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teacher's knowledge about epilepsy needs improvements. Their attitudes correlated highly with their knowledge. Educational campaigns about epilepsy are needed to develop a well informed and tolerant community. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Theories+AND+bullying&pg=4&id=ED551234','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Theories+AND+bullying&pg=4&id=ED551234"><span>Effectiveness of <span class="hlt">School</span>-Based Bullying Intervention Programs in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dogini, Eric U.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Bullying behavior has reached pandemic proportions and is a growing concern in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. Most intervention programs in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> are focused on bullying prevention or principally on the behavior of the bully. The purpose of this study was to explore whether a <span class="hlt">school</span>-based bullying intervention program is an effective method for reducing…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1082721.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1082721.pdf"><span>Factors Contributing to the Current Academic Performance of Both Private <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> and Public <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: A Case of Kitale Municipality, Kenya</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Catherine, Ochenje</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>There have been current controversial discussions concerning the performance of private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> versus public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the Kenya Certificate of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Examination (K.C.P.E.). Lately, the private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> appear to be performing better than public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. For example; in the 2003 K.C.P.E. results, more than 31% of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29524611','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29524611"><span>Increasing inequality in childhood obesity in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in a northern English town.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Black, M; Joseph, V; Mott, L; Maheswaran, R</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>To undertake an analysis of National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP) data to quantify the obesity prevalence gap over time between children in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the most and least deprived areas of Doncaster. The research design for this study was retrospective quantitative analysis of secondary data. The study undertook secondary analysis of NCMP data on obesity prevalence in children in Reception <span class="hlt">Year</span> and <span class="hlt">Year</span> 6 in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Doncaster for the period 2006-2007 to 2014-2015. Data were combined into three 3-<span class="hlt">year</span> periods (2006-2007 to 2008-2009; 2009-2010 to 2011-2012; and 2012-2013 to 2014-2015), and <span class="hlt">schools</span> were grouped by deprivation based on the national Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2015. Analysis was undertaken to assess whether there is a difference in obesity prevalence for Reception <span class="hlt">Year</span> and <span class="hlt">Year</span> 6 children in <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the most deprived areas compared with the least deprived (prevalence gap), over time. The difference in obesity prevalence between children attending <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the most and least deprived areas has increased over time. For Reception <span class="hlt">Year</span> children, the prevalence gap has widened from a difference of 1.01% higher in the most deprived <span class="hlt">schools</span> in 2006-2007 to 2008-2009 to 3.64% higher in 2012-2013 to 2014-2015. In the same time periods, for <span class="hlt">Year</span> 6 children, the obesity prevalence gap has also increased over time from 2.82% to 5.08%. There is inequality in relation to obesity in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Doncaster with those in <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the most deprived areas carrying the greatest burden. Research is needed to understand why the plateau seen nationally is not reaching the most deprived children. Copyright © 2018 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+resources+AND+ANALYSIS&id=EJ1048685','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+resources+AND+ANALYSIS&id=EJ1048685"><span>Rich <span class="hlt">Schools</span>, Poor <span class="hlt">Schools</span>. Hidden Resource Inequalities between <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Poesen-Vandeputte, Mayke; Nicaise, Ides</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background: There has been relatively little analysis of <span class="hlt">school</span> context including a large number of elements from the broader social, political and economic influences. However, <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Flanders (Belgium) are supposed to consider their <span class="hlt">school</span> context when implementing the Flemish policy on equal opportunities in education. Purpose: In…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28862298','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28862298"><span>Effectiveness of Student Learning during Experimental Work in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Logar, Ana; Peklaj, Cirila; Ferk Savec, Vesna</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>The aim of the research was to optimize the effectiveness of student learning based on experimental work in chemistry classes in Slovenian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. To obtain evidence about how experimental work is implemented during regular chemistry classes, experimental work was videotaped during 19 units of chemistry lessons at 12 Slovenian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> from the pool of randomly selected <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Altogether 332 eight-grade students were involved in the investigation, with an average age of 14.2 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Students were videotaped during chemistry lessons, and their worksheets were collected afterward. The 12 chemistry teachers, who conducted lessons in these <span class="hlt">schools</span>, were interviewed before the lessons; their teaching plans were also collected. The collected data was analyzed using qualitative methods. The results indicate that many teachers in Slovenian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> are not fully aware of the potential of experimental work integrated into chemistry lessons for the development of students' experimental competence. Further research of the value of different kinds of training to support teachers for the use of experimental work in chemistry teaching is needed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Culture+AND+differences&pg=2&id=EJ1031756','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Culture+AND+differences&pg=2&id=EJ1031756"><span>Examining <span class="hlt">School</span> Culture in Flemish and Chinese <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zhu, Chang; Devos, Geert; Tondeur, Jo</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this research is to gain understanding about <span class="hlt">school</span> culture characteristics of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the Flemish and Chinese context. The study was carried out in Flanders (Belgium) and China, involving a total of 44 Flemish <span class="hlt">schools</span> and 40 Chinese <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The <span class="hlt">School</span> Culture Scales were used to measure five <span class="hlt">school</span> culture dimensions with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24645802','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24645802"><span>Changes in physical activity during the transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> in Belgian children: what is the role of the <span class="hlt">school</span> environment?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>De Meester, Femke; Van Dyck, Delfien; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte; Cardon, Greet</p> <p>2014-03-19</p> <p>Key life periods have been associated with changes in physical activity (PA). This study investigated (1) how PA changes when <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children transfer to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>, (2) if <span class="hlt">school</span> environmental characteristics differ between <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> and (3) if changes in <span class="hlt">school</span> environmental characteristics can predict changes in PA in Belgian schoolchildren. Moderating effects of gender and the baseline level of PA were investigated for the first and third research question. In total, 736 children (10-13 <span class="hlt">years</span>) of the last <span class="hlt">year</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> participated in the first phase of this longitudinal study. Two <span class="hlt">years</span> later, 502 of these children (68.2%) agreed to participate in the second phase. Accelerometers, pedometers and the Flemish Physical Activity Questionnaire were used to measure PA. <span class="hlt">School</span> environmental characteristics were reported by the <span class="hlt">school</span> principals. Cross-classified regression models were conducted to analyze the data. Self-reported active transport to <span class="hlt">school</span> and accelerometer weekday moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) increased after the transition to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> while self-reported extracurricular PA and total PA decreased. Pedometer weekday step counts decreased, but this decrease was only apparent among those who achieved the PA guidelines in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>.Secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> scored higher on the <span class="hlt">school</span> environmental characteristics: provision of sports and PA during lunch break, active schoolyards and playgrounds and health education policy but lower on sports and PA after-<span class="hlt">school</span> than <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Changes in the <span class="hlt">school</span> environmental characteristics: active commuting to <span class="hlt">school</span>, active schoolyards and playgrounds and health education policy resulted in changes in self-reported extracurricular PA, total PA , pedometer/accelerometer determined step counts and accelerometer determined MVPA. Moderating effects were found for baseline PA and gender. PA changed after the transition to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. In general, secondary</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");'>3</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li class="active"><span>5</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_5 --> <div id="page_6" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="101"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1116417.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1116417.pdf"><span>Comparison between <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Teacher Educators' and <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Beliefs of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Geography Education Quality</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bent, Gert Jan; Bakx, Anouke; den Brok, Perry</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this study teacher educators' beliefs concerning <span class="hlt">primary</span> geography education have been investigated and compared with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' beliefs. In this study 45 teacher educators and 489 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers completed a questionnaire, and nine teacher educators have been interviewed as well. It has been found that teacher educators…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4962178','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4962178"><span>The Life-Cycle Costs of <span class="hlt">School</span> Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Alexander, Kelly T.; Mwaki, Alex; Adhiambo, Dorothy; Cheney-Coker, Malaika; Muga, Richard; Freeman, Matthew C.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programs in <span class="hlt">schools</span> can increase the health, dignity and comfort of students and teachers. Understanding the costs of WASH facilities and services in <span class="hlt">schools</span> is one essential piece for policy makers to utilize when budgeting for <span class="hlt">schools</span> and helping to make WASH programs more sustainable. In this study we collected data from NGO and government offices, local hardware shops and 89 rural <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> across three Kenyan counties. Current expenditures on WASH, from <span class="hlt">school</span> and external (NGO, government, parent) sources, averaged 1.83 USD per student per <span class="hlt">year</span>. After reviewing current expenditures, estimated costs of operations and maintenance for bringing <span class="hlt">schools</span> up to basic WASH standards, were calculated to be 3.03 USD per student per <span class="hlt">year</span>. This includes recurrent costs, but not the cost of installing or setting up WASH infrastructure, which was 18,916 USD per <span class="hlt">school</span>, for a <span class="hlt">school</span> of 400 students (4.92 USD per student, per <span class="hlt">year</span>). These findings demonstrate the need for increases in allocations to <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Kenya, and stricter guidance on how money should be spent on WASH inputs to enable all <span class="hlt">schools</span> to provide basic WASH for all students. PMID:27355962</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27355962','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27355962"><span>The Life-Cycle Costs of <span class="hlt">School</span> Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Alexander, Kelly T; Mwaki, Alex; Adhiambo, Dorothy; Cheney-Coker, Malaika; Muga, Richard; Freeman, Matthew C</p> <p>2016-06-27</p> <p>Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programs in <span class="hlt">schools</span> can increase the health, dignity and comfort of students and teachers. Understanding the costs of WASH facilities and services in <span class="hlt">schools</span> is one essential piece for policy makers to utilize when budgeting for <span class="hlt">schools</span> and helping to make WASH programs more sustainable. In this study we collected data from NGO and government offices, local hardware shops and 89 rural <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> across three Kenyan counties. Current expenditures on WASH, from <span class="hlt">school</span> and external (NGO, government, parent) sources, averaged 1.83 USD per student per <span class="hlt">year</span>. After reviewing current expenditures, estimated costs of operations and maintenance for bringing <span class="hlt">schools</span> up to basic WASH standards, were calculated to be 3.03 USD per student per <span class="hlt">year</span>. This includes recurrent costs, but not the cost of installing or setting up WASH infrastructure, which was 18,916 USD per <span class="hlt">school</span>, for a <span class="hlt">school</span> of 400 students (4.92 USD per student, per <span class="hlt">year</span>). These findings demonstrate the need for increases in allocations to <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Kenya, and stricter guidance on how money should be spent on WASH inputs to enable all <span class="hlt">schools</span> to provide basic WASH for all students.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Erdogan&pg=4&id=EJ923919','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Erdogan&pg=4&id=EJ923919"><span>Turkish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Perceptions of <span class="hlt">School</span> Culture Regarding ICT Integration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tezci, Erdogan</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The current study aimed at identifying Turkish <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' perceptions of <span class="hlt">school</span> culture regarding ICT integration in education. In addition, the current study was designed to investigate factors that might influence their perceptions. The participants were 1540 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers. The findings revealed that the teachers'…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5390583','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5390583"><span>Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Preventive Dental Health Education Programme Implemented Through <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children in Mysore City</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Naidu, Jaya; Nandlal, B.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Aims and Objectives: The present study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the effectiveness of a <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Preventive Dental Health Education Programme conducted for 6–12-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Mysore City. Materials and Methods: A total of 12 <span class="hlt">schools</span>, one each in the category of Government, Aided, and Unaided, were randomly selected per zone viz., North, South, East, and West. These 12 <span class="hlt">schools</span> constituted the study group where the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Preventive <span class="hlt">School</span> Dental Health Education Programme (PPSDHEP) was implemented. Two additional <span class="hlt">schools</span> were selected at random from the four zones to serve as the control. A total of 926 children participated in the study. The PPSDHEP involved the second-level transfer of preventive package wherein the oral health education was imparted to the <span class="hlt">school</span> children by schoolteachers trained by the investigator. Among the parameters for evaluating the outcome of the programme were the pre and post-programme assessment (at the baseline and at follow-up, i.e., after 6 months) of knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP), dental caries status, oral hygiene, and gingival health status. Results: The results suggest that the PPSDHEP resulted in bringing about an enhancement in the KAP towards oral health and also an improvement in dental caries, oral hygiene, and gingival health status of the <span class="hlt">school</span> children in the study group. Conclusion: The present study supports the implementation of similar programmes in <span class="hlt">schools</span> and the contention that schoolteachers are suitable personnel for imparting dental health education to <span class="hlt">school</span> children on a regular basis. PMID:28462175</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1147160.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1147160.pdf"><span>Educators' Perceptions of <span class="hlt">School</span> Climate and Health in Selected <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pretorius, Stephanus; de Villiers, Elsabe</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The aims in this research were to determine the perceptions of <span class="hlt">school</span> climate held by educators of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the southern Cape. Six <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> with a staff complement of 178 educators participated in the investigation. Two instruments were used: the Organisational Climate Description Questionnaire Rutgers Elementary (OCDQ-RE) and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1078840.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1078840.pdf"><span>Perception of Teaching Efficacy by <span class="hlt">Primary</span> and Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bedir, Gülay</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This research aims to identify how teaching efficacy is perceived by teachers working at state <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Having a survey model design, this study hosts a total of 678 <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers--401 females and 277 males--working in the province of Tokat during the academic <span class="hlt">year</span> of 2013 and 2014. Research data has been collected through…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27609702','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27609702"><span>Illness absenteeism rates in <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> in 2013-2014 in England: was there any impact of vaccinating children of <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> age against influenza?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Green, H K; Brousseau, N; Andrews, N; Selby, L; Pebody, R</p> <p>2016-09-09</p> <p>A phased introduction of routine influenza vaccination of healthy children was recommended in the UK in 2012, with the aim of protecting both vaccinated children and the wider population through reducing transmission. In the first <span class="hlt">year</span> of the programme in 2013-2014, 4- to 11-<span class="hlt">year</span>-olds were targeted in pilot areas across England. This study assesses if this was associated with <span class="hlt">school</span> absenteeism, an important societal burden of influenza. During the spring 2014 term when influenza predominantly circulated, the proportion of absence sessions due to illness was compared between vaccination pilot and non-pilot areas for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (to measure overall impact) and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> (to measure indirect impact). A linear multilevel regression model was applied, adjusting for clustering within <span class="hlt">schools</span> and potential <span class="hlt">school</span>-level confounders, including deprivation, past absenteeism, and ethnicity. Low levels of influenza activity were reported in the community in 2013-2014. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in pilot areas had a significantly adjusted decrease in illness absenteeism of 0·05% relative to non-pilot <span class="hlt">schools</span>; equivalent to an average of 4 days per <span class="hlt">school</span>. In secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span>, there was no significant indirect impact of being located in a pilot area on illness absenteeism. These insights can be used in conjunction with routine healthcare surveillance data to evaluate the full benefits of such a programme.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20034728','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20034728"><span>Performance of newly implemented Environmental Management Systems in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in South Africa.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hens, Luc; Wiedemann, Torsten; Raath, Schalk; Stone, Riana; Renders, Paul; Craenhals, Eric</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Quantitative results from Environmental Management Systems (EMS) at <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> have rarely been examined in literature. This paper presents the monitoring results of environmental care in 39 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Northern South Africa. During 2 <span class="hlt">years</span>, after the EMS was implemented in the curriculum and in the <span class="hlt">school</span>'s management, the progress of environmental performances of the participating <span class="hlt">schools</span> has been measured, by means of detailed questionnaires, related to four environmental aspects: water, waste, energy and greening. At the beginning of the project, 50% of the <span class="hlt">schools</span> performed well on water-related environmental actions. Two <span class="hlt">years</span> later it was 76%. For waste-related activities the improvement was even stronger: from 50% to 100%. The environmental performances of the <span class="hlt">schools</span> improved also for greening-related actions, from 50% at the start of the project to 64% two <span class="hlt">years</span> later. Only energy-related activities did not improve significantly with only 24% of all <span class="hlt">schools</span> performing well at the end of the survey period. In general, the introduction of an EMS succeeded in an improvement of the overall environmental performances of the <span class="hlt">schools</span>, but cost-intensive activities were less successful than others. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26866114','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26866114"><span>PREVALENCE OF HEAD LICE INFESTATION IN <span class="hlt">PRIMARY</span> <span class="hlt">SCHOOL</span> CHILDREN IN PORT HARCOURT.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Okoh, B A N; Alikor, E A D</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Head lice infestation affects mainly <span class="hlt">school</span>-aged children and prevalence varies from region to region. Head lice infestation is of public health concern and screening is integrated into the <span class="hlt">School</span> Health Programme. To determine the prevalence of head lice infestation in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>-aged children in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Cross-sectional descriptive study. A stratified multi-staged sampling technique was used to recruit pupils between six and 12 <span class="hlt">years</span> of age, from thirteen <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> located in three <span class="hlt">School</span> Districts in the area. The heads of the pupils were inspected for head lice and nits with the aid of a battery operated Robi lice comb, magnifying glass and a torch as light source. A total of 1350 pupils were studied, 743 (55%) females and 607 (45%) males giving a female to male ratio of 1.2:1. Ten (0.7%) of the pupils had head lice infestation while five (0.4%) had evidence of past head lice infestation. The number of infested pupils among the younger age group (six to nine <span class="hlt">years</span>) was seven (0.8%) and is higher, though not statistically significant, than that in the older age group (ten to twelve <span class="hlt">years</span>) which was three (0.6%) (p = 0.453). No male was found to be infested while ten (1.3%) females were infested and the observed gender difference was statistically significant (p = 0.002). Head lice infestation still exists in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> children in Nigeria, therefore, screening for head lice infestation should still remain a part of the <span class="hlt">School</span> Health Programme.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=risk+AND+return+AND+relationship&pg=7&id=ED399086','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=risk+AND+return+AND+relationship&pg=7&id=ED399086"><span>Effective Intervention in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Nurture Groups.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bennathan, Marion; Boxall, Marjorie</p> <p></p> <p>This book summarizes the experiences of nurture groups (small special education classes started in 1970 in London <span class="hlt">schools</span>), where young children from disadvantaged environments are prepared to access the full <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> curriculum. Chapter 1, "Children at Risk of Failure in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>" (Marion Bennathan), discusses the incidence…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bullied&pg=5&id=EJ850809','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bullied&pg=5&id=EJ850809"><span>Intervention Research on <span class="hlt">School</span> Bullying in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ju, Yucui; Wang, Shuqiong; Zhang, Wenxin</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Intervention research on <span class="hlt">school</span> bullying was conducted in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> with an action research method. After conducting a five-week intervention program, the occurrence ratio of being bullied on the way to <span class="hlt">school</span> and back home and the degree to which children were bullied dropped significantly, but the rate of reduction in grade three was…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=convenience+AND+sampling&pg=2&id=EJ1075735','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=convenience+AND+sampling&pg=2&id=EJ1075735"><span>The Role of Training in Improving Peer Assessment Skills amongst <span class="hlt">Year</span> Six Pupils in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Writing: An Action Research Enquiry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boon, Stuart Ian</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Peer assessment is where students assess the quality of a peer's work. Studies have demonstrated its positive impact on learning yet most of these are in higher education. This study used training to improve the quality of written feedback in a <span class="hlt">year</span> six <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> classroom. Action Research was selected as a research strategy given the need to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ882727.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ882727.pdf"><span>The Measurement of Students' Achievement in Teaching <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Fifth <span class="hlt">Year</span> Mathematics Classes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Doganay, Ahmet; Bal, Ayten Pinar</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to investigate students' and teachers' point of views about preparing measurement tools used in mathematics classes, the level of learning that these tools are intended to measure, how often they are used and how they are scored in terms of assessing 5th grade <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> mathematic courses. The population of the study…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1130350.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1130350.pdf"><span>Program Development for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Critical Thinking</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boonjeam, Waraporn; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-ampai, Anan</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The objectives of this research were: 1) to study the elements and indicators of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' critical thinking, 2) to study current situation, desirable situation, development technique, and need for developing the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' critical thinking, 3) to develop the program for developing the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers'…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5705107','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5705107"><span>Inattention in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> is not good for your future <span class="hlt">school</span> achievement—A pattern classification study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bøe, Tormod; Lundervold, Arvid</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Inattention in childhood is associated with academic problems later in life. The contribution of specific aspects of inattentive behaviour is, however, less known. We investigated feature importance of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers’ reports on nine aspects of inattentive behaviour, gender and age in predicting future academic achievement. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers of n = 2491 children (7–9 <span class="hlt">years</span>) rated nine items reflecting different aspects of inattentive behaviour in 2002. A mean academic achievement score from the previous semester in high <span class="hlt">school</span> (2012) was available for each youth from an official <span class="hlt">school</span> register. All scores were at a categorical level. Feature importances were assessed by using multinominal logistic regression, classification and regression trees analysis, and a random forest algorithm. Finally, a comprehensive pattern classification procedure using k-fold cross-validation was implemented. Overall, inattention was rated as more severe in boys, who also obtained lower academic achievement scores in high <span class="hlt">school</span> than girls. Problems related to sustained attention and distractibility were together with age and gender defined as the most important features to predict future achievement scores. Using these four features as input to a collection of classifiers employing k-fold cross-validation for prediction of academic achievement level, we obtained classification accuracy, precision and recall that were clearly better than chance levels. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers’ reports of problems related to sustained attention and distractibility were identified as the two most important features of inattentive behaviour predicting academic achievement in high <span class="hlt">school</span>. Identification and follow-up procedures of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children showing these characteristics should be prioritised to prevent future academic failure. PMID:29182663</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29182663','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29182663"><span>Inattention in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> is not good for your future <span class="hlt">school</span> achievement-A pattern classification study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lundervold, Astri J; Bøe, Tormod; Lundervold, Arvid</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Inattention in childhood is associated with academic problems later in life. The contribution of specific aspects of inattentive behaviour is, however, less known. We investigated feature importance of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' reports on nine aspects of inattentive behaviour, gender and age in predicting future academic achievement. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers of n = 2491 children (7-9 <span class="hlt">years</span>) rated nine items reflecting different aspects of inattentive behaviour in 2002. A mean academic achievement score from the previous semester in high <span class="hlt">school</span> (2012) was available for each youth from an official <span class="hlt">school</span> register. All scores were at a categorical level. Feature importances were assessed by using multinominal logistic regression, classification and regression trees analysis, and a random forest algorithm. Finally, a comprehensive pattern classification procedure using k-fold cross-validation was implemented. Overall, inattention was rated as more severe in boys, who also obtained lower academic achievement scores in high <span class="hlt">school</span> than girls. Problems related to sustained attention and distractibility were together with age and gender defined as the most important features to predict future achievement scores. Using these four features as input to a collection of classifiers employing k-fold cross-validation for prediction of academic achievement level, we obtained classification accuracy, precision and recall that were clearly better than chance levels. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' reports of problems related to sustained attention and distractibility were identified as the two most important features of inattentive behaviour predicting academic achievement in high <span class="hlt">school</span>. Identification and follow-up procedures of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children showing these characteristics should be prioritised to prevent future academic failure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Nutrition+AND+support&pg=2&id=EJ946304','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Nutrition+AND+support&pg=2&id=EJ946304"><span>The Effects of Nutrition Education on 6th Graders Knowledge of Nutrition in Nine-<span class="hlt">Year</span> <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Slovenia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kostanjevec, Stojan; Jerman, Janez; Koch, Verena</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Incorporating nutrition topics in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> curricula should support the acquisition of nutrition knowledge in different ways and indirectly the development of healthy eating habits in children and teenagers. In Slovenia, nutrition education is part of all <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> education levels and may take the form of compulsory and/or elective…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1115414.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1115414.pdf"><span>Melinda: De Facto <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Music Teacher</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>de Vries, Peter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A series of reviews dating back to the 1960s and a body of research literature points to the inadequate delivery of music education by generalist <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in Australian <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Despite recommendations for specialist music teachers to teach music in all Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> to counter this ongoing trend, such an approach has…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1122074.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1122074.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Principals' Self-Monitoring Skills</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Konan, Necdet</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study is to identify <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> principals' self-monitoring skills. The study adopted the general survey model and its population comprised <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> principals serving in the city of Diyarbakir, Turkey, while 292 of these constituted the sample. Self-Monitoring Scale was used as the data collection instrument. In…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");'>4</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li class="active"><span>6</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_6 --> <div id="page_7" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="121"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED581778.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED581778.pdf"><span>Humor Climate of the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sahin, Ahmet</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study is to determine the opinions <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> administrators and teachers on humor climates in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The study was modeled as a convergent parallel design, one of the mixed methods. The data gathered from 253 administrator questionnaires, and 651 teacher questionnaires was evaluated for the quantitative part of the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018AIPC.1923c0037P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018AIPC.1923c0037P"><span>Improving the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science learning unit about force and motion through lesson study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Phaikhumnam, Wuttichai; Yuenyong, Chokchai</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>The study aimed to develop <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science lesson plan based on inquiry cycle (5Es) through lesson study. The study focused on the development of 4 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science lesson plans of force and motion for Grade 3 students in KKU Demonstration <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> (Suksasart), first semester of 2015 academic <span class="hlt">year</span>. The methodology is mixed method. The Inthaprasitha (2010) lesson study cycle was implemented in group of KKU Demonstration <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>. Instruments of reflection of lesson plan developing included participant observation, meeting and reflection report, lesson plan and other document. The instruments of examining students' learning include classroom observation and achievement test. Data was categorized from these instruments to find the issues of changing and improving the good lesson plan of Thai <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science learning. The findings revealed that teachers could develop the lesson plans through lesson study. The issues of changing and improving were disused by considering on engaging students related to societal issues, students' prior knowledge, scientific concepts for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students, and what they learned from their changing. It indicated that the Lesson Study allowed <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science teachers to share ideas and develop ideas to improve the lesson. The study may have implications for Thai science teacher education through Lesson Study.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED520077.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED520077.pdf"><span>Success in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>. Success in <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Academy for Educational Development, 2010</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>A quality education system is not measured solely by national test scores, but by whether all students are successful in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. This simply stated goal is surprisingly difficult to achieve where substantial numbers of children are at risk of failing to complete a <span class="hlt">primary</span> education. This paper explores the challenges and the diverse…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED387259.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED387259.pdf"><span>[What Can We Learn from the English <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>? Questions and Answers from My Fulbright Administrative Exchange.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Firlik, Russell J.</p> <p></p> <p>This paper discusses the <span class="hlt">primary</span> education system in England as a whole and the operation of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Leicestershire in particular. It also contains questions and answers concerning English <span class="hlt">primary</span> education. The paper describes the organization, funding, and administration of English <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, which provide the first 6 <span class="hlt">years</span> of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19696036','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19696036"><span>Contribution of free play towards physical activity guidelines for New Zealand <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 7-9 <span class="hlt">years</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McGall, S E; McGuigan, M R; Nottle, C</p> <p>2011-02-01</p> <p>the objectives of this study were to investigate children's physical activity patterns to gain comparisons between home and <span class="hlt">school</span> and to determine whether the current physical activity guidelines of 60 min of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) daily were being met. participants were recruited from two New Zealand <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (60 children, mean age (SD) 8.3 (0.7) <span class="hlt">years</span>). Physical activity was measured for seven consecutive days using Actigraph accelerometers. Total activity and average counts were determined for <span class="hlt">school</span> playtime, after <span class="hlt">school</span> and weekends. Differences between average counts for these intervals were compared using the t statistic. Time and percentage of time spent were categorised into the activity thresholds: sedentary (<100), light (101-299), moderate (3000-5200) and vigorous (>5200). Total activity for each day was also determined. no child met the recommended 60 min of MVPA daily during the investigation. Compared to <span class="hlt">school</span> playtime, activity counts were lower by 36% (CI 25% to 45.5%, p<0.001, effect size (ES)=-1.29) after <span class="hlt">school</span>, 50.1% (CI 37% to 60.5%, p<0.001, ES=-2.01) on Saturday and 57.4% (CI 46.3% to 66.3%, p<0.001, ES=-2.47) on Sunday. Mean results showed children spent 91-96% of their time engaged in light or sedentary activities. Even during <span class="hlt">school</span> playtime, where the children were most active, only 8 of 80 min were spent engaged in MVPA. this study found activity levels were considerably lower than the recommended guidelines, and children were more active during <span class="hlt">school</span> playtime compared to after <span class="hlt">school</span> and weekends.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11921563','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11921563"><span>Survival of Fuji IX ART fillings in permanent teeth of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Tanzania.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kikwilu, E N; Mandari, G J; Honkala, E</p> <p>2001-08-01</p> <p>To evaluate the clinical performance of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) fillings using Fuji IX as a filling material in field conditions. Longitudinal study of the ART fillings in permanent teeth of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged eight to fifteen <span class="hlt">years</span>. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Morogoro municipality, Tanzania. Standard 3 and 4 children in five <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> randomly selected from a list of 36 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Morogoro municipality were examined for dental caries and periodontal conditions. All 296 carious lesions that were indicated for restoration were treated using ART approach according to the instructions given in the manual for ART approach for the control of dental caries. Essential measurements for treated teeth and cavity were taken. The cavities were filled with Fuji IX glass ionomer cement as per manufacturer's instructions. After one <span class="hlt">year</span>, 238 restorations were evaluated using the criteria for evaluating ART restorations. Clinical appearance of the surface of the restorations. Ninety four per cent of the restorations evaluated were rated as good and intact, while 1.7% were rated as having slight defects that needed no repair, giving a one <span class="hlt">year</span> survival rate of 96.1%. Mean working time was 14.5 minutes. The one-<span class="hlt">year</span> survival rate of 96.1% is high enough to recommend wide use of ART in Tanzania. Town and municipal councils should be encouraged to adopt ART in their <span class="hlt">school</span> oral health programmes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3100255','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3100255"><span>PLAYgrounds: Effect of a PE playground program in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> on PA levels during recess in 6 to 12 <span class="hlt">year</span> old children. Design of a prospective controlled trial</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Background The relative number of children meeting the minimal required dose of daily physical activity remains execrably low. It has been estimated that in 2015 one out of five children will be overweight. Therefore, low levels of physical activity during early childhood may compromise the current and future health and well-being of the population, and promoting physical activity in younger children is a major public health priority. This study is to gain insight into effects of a Physical Education based playground program on the PA levels during recess in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 6-12. Methods/design The effectiveness of the intervention program will be evaluated using a prospective controlled trial design in which <span class="hlt">schools</span> will be matched, with a follow-up of one <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span>. The research population will consist of 6-12 <span class="hlt">year</span> old <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. The intervention program will be aimed at improving physical activity levels and will consist of a multi-component alteration of the <span class="hlt">schools</span>' playground. In addition, playground usage will be increased through altered time management of recess times, as well as a modification of the Physical Education content. Discussion The effects of the intervention on physical activity levels during recess (<span class="hlt">primary</span> outcome measure), overall daily physical activity and changes in physical fitness (secondary outcome measures) will be assessed. Results of this study could possibly lead to changes in the current playground system of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> and provide structured health promotion for future public health. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR): NTR2386 PMID:21548998</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19894469','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19894469"><span>Dermatophyte infections in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Kibera slums of Nairobi.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chepchirchir, A; Bii, C; Ndinya-Achola, J O</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>To determine the prevalence and aetiology of dermatophyte infections in relation to social economic factors in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Kibera. A cross-sectional descriptive study. City council sponsored <span class="hlt">schools</span> namely Olympic, Kibera, Ayany and Mbagathi way all in Kibera, the largest of the informal settlement within Nairobi which is home to between 700,000-1,000,000 inhabitamts. The study was conducted between September 2006 and February 2007. A total of 422 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children from the ages of five <span class="hlt">years</span> to 15 <span class="hlt">years</span> were selected for the study. The prevalence of dermatophytoses was 11.2% with tinea capitis being the most common type while the grey patch form being the dominant clinical manifestation. There was a significant difference (p = 0.001) in dermatophytoses in different <span class="hlt">schools</span> with Olympic <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> registering the highest prevalence (22.6%). The highest infection rate occurred among six to eight <span class="hlt">years</span> age bracket in both sexes compared to other age brackets (p = 0.002). The genera of fungi associated with dermatophytoses were isolated indicating the number in each species as follows; T. violecium (35), T. mentagrophytes(3), T. terestre(3), T. schoenleinii(2), and T. interdigitale(1), M. canis(2), M. equinum(1) and E. flocossum(1). T. violecium was the predominant species isolated, at 35/48 (71%) followed by T. mentagrophytes and T. terrestre at 3/48 (6%) each. The study indicates high prevalence of 11.2% dermatophyte infection among the <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Kibera. Factors contributing to the high frequency and chronic occurrences of ring worm in this area may include poor living environment, children interaction patterns and poor health seeking behaviour. There is need for health education and public awareness campaigns among the communities in urban informal settlements on healthy seeking behaviors and hygiene in order to reduce transmission and severe clinical manifestations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1137661.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1137661.pdf"><span>Examining the Mathematical Modeling Processes of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> 4th-Grade Students: Shopping Problem</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ulu, Mustafa</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study is to identify <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students' thinking processes within the mathematical modeling process and the challenges they encounter, if any. This is a basic qualitative research study conducted in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in the city of Kütahya in the academic <span class="hlt">year</span> of 2015-2016. The study group of the research was composed of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23283044','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23283044"><span>Prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Al Hassa , Saudi Arabia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Al Wadaani, Fahd Abdullah; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Ali, Ayub; Khan, Atuar Rahman</p> <p>2012-11-11</p> <p>Some 12.8 million in the age group 5-15 <span class="hlt">years</span> are visually impaired from uncorrected or inadequately corrected refractive errors. In Saudi Arabia, the size of this public health problem is not well defined especially among <span class="hlt">primary</span> schoolchildren. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia.  A total of 2246 Saudi <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 6 to 14 <span class="hlt">years</span> of both genders were selected using multistage sampling method form 30 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> located in the three different areas of Al Hassa. <span class="hlt">School</span> children were interviewed to collect demographics and vision data using a special data collection form followed by screening for refractive errors by trained optometrists within the <span class="hlt">school</span> premises using a standardized protocol. Assessment of visual acuity and ocular motility evaluation were carried out and cover-uncover test was performed. Children detected with defective vision were referred for further examination employing subjective refraction with auto refractometer and objective refraction using streak retinoscopy after 1% cyclopentolate. Of the screened <span class="hlt">school</span> children (N=2002), the overall prevalence of refractive errors was 13.7% (n=274), higher among females (Odds ratio, OR=1.39, P=0.012) and significantly more among students of rural residence (OR=2.40, P=0.001). The prevalence of refractive errors was disproportionately more among those aged 12-14 <span class="hlt">years</span> (OR=9.02, P=0.001). Only 9.4% of students with poor vision were wore spectacles for correction. Myopia was the most commonly encountered refractive error among both genders (65.7% of the total errors encountered). Uncorrected refractive errors affected a sizable portion of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> schoolchildren especially females, rural and older children represents high risk group for refractive errors for which the included children were unaware.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4776961','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4776961"><span>Prevalence and Pattern of Refractive Errors among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wadaani, Fahd Abdullah Al; Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Ali, Ayub; Khan, Ataur Rahman</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Some 12.8 million in the age group 5–15 <span class="hlt">years</span> are visually impaired from uncorrected or inadequately corrected refractive errors. In Saudi Arabia, the size of this public health problem is not well defined especially among <span class="hlt">primary</span> schoolchildren. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence and pattern of refractive errors among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. A total of 2246 Saudi <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 6 to 14 <span class="hlt">years</span> of both genders were selected using multistage sampling method form 30 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> located in the three different areas of Al Hassa. <span class="hlt">School</span> children were interviewed to collect demographics and vision data using a special data collection form followed by screening for refractive errors by trained optometrists within the <span class="hlt">school</span> premises using a standardized protocol. Assessment of visual acuity and ocular motility evaluation were carried out and cover-uncover test was performed. Children detected with defective vision were referred for further examination employing subjective refraction with auto refractometer and objective refraction using streak retinoscopy after 1% cyclopentolate. Of the screened <span class="hlt">school</span> children (N=2002), the overall prevalence of refractive errors was 13.7% (n=274), higher among females (Odds ratio, OR=1.39, P=0.012) and significantly more among students of rural residence (OR=2.40, P=0.001). The prevalence of refractive errors was disproportionately more among those aged 12-14 <span class="hlt">years</span> (OR=9.02, P=0.001). Only 9.4% of students with poor vision were wore spectacles for correction. Myopia was the most commonly encountered refractive error among both genders (65.7% of the total errors encountered). Uncorrected refractive errors affected a sizable portion of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> schoolchildren especially females, rural and older children represents high risk group for refractive errors for which the included children were unaware. PMID:23283044</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=elementary+AND+school+AND+school+AND+counselor&pg=2&id=ED556016','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=elementary+AND+school+AND+school+AND+counselor&pg=2&id=ED556016"><span>Differences in Burnout Indicators between <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Counselors and Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span> Counselors: Implications for Delivery of Student Services and Retention</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Roberts, Jennifer W.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in <span class="hlt">primary</span> professional <span class="hlt">school</span> counselor burnout and secondary professional <span class="hlt">school</span> counselor burnout indicators. Specifically, this study was concerned with influences of the variables: age, level of licensure, professional affiliation, <span class="hlt">years</span> of counseling experience, type of <span class="hlt">school</span> and type…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27260298','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27260298"><span>Long-term effectiveness of a <span class="hlt">school</span>-based <span class="hlt">primary</span> prevention program for anorexia nervosa: A 7-to 8-<span class="hlt">year</span> follow-up.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Adametz, Luise; Richter, Felicitas; Strauss, Bernhard; Walther, Mario; Wick, Katharina; Berger, Uwe</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>This is the first study to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of a <span class="hlt">school</span>-based prevention program in Germany. The aim is to determine the long-term effects of the <span class="hlt">primary</span> prevention program PriMa (<span class="hlt">Primary</span> prevention of anorexia nervosa in preadolescent girls) on disordered eating and body self-esteem from childhood to young adulthood. PriMa was conducted and successfully evaluated in a quasi-experimental pre-post design with a control group from 2007 to 2008 consisting of 11-13<span class="hlt">year</span> old girls (N=1508) from Thuringian <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Germany. Seven to eight <span class="hlt">years</span> after the intervention, the same cohort (mean age 19.8<span class="hlt">years</span>) was invited to complete an online survey. Disordered eating (EAT-26), body self-esteem (FBeK) and BMI were assessed via self-report. The response rate at seven-to-eight-<span class="hlt">year</span> follow-up was very low (7%). Data of N=100 girls were analyzed. Concerning changes in disordered eating, results revealed no significant long-term effect of PriMa seven to eight <span class="hlt">years</span> after the intervention. During this time, disordered eating remained stable without a significant increase or decrease. Regarding changes in body self-esteem, group courses differed significantly from each other. The results revealed a significant main effect of group, indicating significant differences in changes of body self-esteem between the intervention and the control group. Following the analysis of these changes of body self-esteem over time, it was found that the intervention group revealed an increase of body self-esteem after program participation and remained stable over time. By contrast, the control group revealed a decrease of body self-esteem over time. Long-term intervention effects of PriMa could be found for body self-esteem but not for disordered eating. The findings suggest that PriMa prevented a decrease of body self-esteem from childhood to young adulthood. For a broader dissemination it is necessary to implement prevention programs consistently in <span class="hlt">school</span> settings. In order to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27856338','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27856338"><span>Sedentary behaviour across the <span class="hlt">primary</span>-secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> transition: A systematic review.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pearson, Natalie; Haycraft, Emma; P Johnston, Julie; Atkin, Andrew J</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span>/middle <span class="hlt">school</span> to secondary/high <span class="hlt">school</span> is likely to be a key period in children's development, characterised by significant changes in their social and physical environment. However, little is known about the changes in sedentary behaviour that accompany this transition. This review aimed to identify, critically appraise and summarise the evidence on changes in sedentary behaviour across the <span class="hlt">primary</span> - secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> transition. Published English language studies were located from computerised and manual searches in 2015. Inclusion criteria specified a longitudinal design, baseline assessment when children were in <span class="hlt">primary</span>/middle <span class="hlt">school</span> with at least one follow-up during secondary/high <span class="hlt">school</span> and a measure of sedentary behaviour at both (or all) points of assessment. Based on data from 11 articles (19 independent samples), tracking coefficients were typically in the range of 0.3 to 0.5 and relatively consistent across the different sedentary behaviours examined and durations of follow-up. Both screen-based sedentary behaviour and overall sedentary time increased during the <span class="hlt">school</span> transition. Overall there was an increase of approximately 10-20min per day per <span class="hlt">year</span> in accelerometer-assessed sedentary time. Consistent with the broader age-related changes in behaviour observed during this period, sedentary behaviour increases during the transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span>/middle to secondary/high <span class="hlt">school</span>. Investigating features of the social and physical environment that might exacerbate or attenuate this trend would be a valuable next step. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=biology%3a+AND+global+AND+approach&pg=7&id=EJ315633','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=biology%3a+AND+global+AND+approach&pg=7&id=EJ315633"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> and Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span> Science.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Educational Documentation and Information, 1984</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>This 344-item annotated bibliography presents overview of science teaching in following categories: science education; <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science; integrated science teaching; teaching of biology, chemistry, physics, earth/space science; laboratory work; computer technology; out-of-<span class="hlt">school</span> science; science and society; science education at…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26087985','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26087985"><span>The Good <span class="hlt">School</span> Toolkit for reducing physical violence from <span class="hlt">school</span> staff to <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students: a cluster-randomised controlled trial in Uganda.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Devries, Karen M; Knight, Louise; Child, Jennifer C; Mirembe, Angel; Nakuti, Janet; Jones, Rebecca; Sturgess, Joanna; Allen, Elizabeth; Kyegombe, Nambusi; Parkes, Jenny; Walakira, Eddy; Elbourne, Diana; Watts, Charlotte; Naker, Dipak</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Violence against children from <span class="hlt">school</span> staff is widespread in various settings, but few interventions address this. We tested whether the Good <span class="hlt">School</span> Toolkit-a complex behavioural intervention designed by Ugandan not-for-profit organisation Raising Voices-could reduce physical violence from <span class="hlt">school</span> staff to Ugandan <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. We randomly selected 42 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (clusters) from 151 <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Luwero District, Uganda, with more than 40 <span class="hlt">primary</span> 5 students and no existing governance interventions. All <span class="hlt">schools</span> agreed to be enrolled. All students in <span class="hlt">primary</span> 5, 6, and 7 (approximate ages 11-14 <span class="hlt">years</span>) and all staff members who spoke either English or Luganda and could provide informed consent were eligible for participation in cross-sectional baseline and endline surveys in June-July 2012 and 2014, respectively. We randomly assigned 21 <span class="hlt">schools</span> to receive the Good <span class="hlt">School</span> Toolkit and 21 to a waitlisted control group in September, 2012. The intervention was implemented from September, 2012, to April, 2014. Owing to the nature of the intervention, it was not possible to mask assignment. The <span class="hlt">primary</span> outcome, assessed in 2014, was past week physical violence from <span class="hlt">school</span> staff, measured by students' self-reports using the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect Child Abuse Screening Tool-Child Institutional. Analyses were by intention to treat, and are adjusted for clustering within <span class="hlt">schools</span> and for baseline <span class="hlt">school</span>-level means of continuous outcomes. The trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01678846. No <span class="hlt">schools</span> left the study. At 18-month follow-up, 3820 (92·4%) of 4138 randomly sampled students participated in a cross-sectional survey. Prevalence of past week physical violence was lower in the intervention <span class="hlt">schools</span> (595/1921, 31·0%) than in the control <span class="hlt">schools</span> (924/1899, 48·7%; odds ratio 0·40, 95% CI 0·26-0·64, p<0·0001). No adverse events related to the intervention were detected, but 434 children were referred to child</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1171044.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1171044.pdf"><span>Investigation of the Work Motivation Levels of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ates, Hatice Kadioglu; Yilmaz, Perihan</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to examine the work motivation levels of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers working in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> institutions located in Istanbul province, Kucukcekmece district. The descriptive survey model was used in this study. The population of the study consists of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> administrators working in state…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1119Q.228M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1119Q.228M"><span>Physicists in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> (PIPS) Project: Fun Presentations for Physicists to Take into <span class="hlt">Schools</span> Worldwide (abstract)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Marks, Ann</p> <p>2009-04-01</p> <p>The Physicists in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> (PIPS) project is a joint venture initiated by the UK Women in Physics Group. A team from the University of Sheffield, with Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council funding, has developed fun presentations and novel class activities using everyday articles for physicists to take into <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The objectives are to instill enthusiasm in young children-including girls-through the enjoyment and excitement of physics, and support <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers with a curriculum which includes many abstract concepts. All PIPS material is free to download from the Institute of Physics website (www.iop.org/pips), providing PowerPoint presentations and detailed explanations, as well as videos of the activities in classrooms. The topics are suitable for children age 4 to 11 <span class="hlt">years</span>. There is interest in translating the presentations into other languages as there are few words on the slides and the material is likely valuable for older age groups. The presentations therefore have the potential to be useful worldwide.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004IJSEd..26.1111S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004IJSEd..26.1111S"><span>Portuguese <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children's conceptions about digestion: identification of learning obstacles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Silva, Rui Graça; Lima, Nelson; Coquet, Eduarda; Clément, Pierre</p> <p>2004-09-01</p> <p>A cross-sectional study of Portuguese <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils' conceptions on digestion and the digestive tract was carried out before and after teaching this topic. Pupils of the prior four <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span> (5/6 to 9/10 <span class="hlt">year</span> old) drew what happens to a cookie inside their body. In some cases they also wrote a short text or were interviewed. To identify their level of graphic development, they produced a free-hand drawing. The main conceptual changes in explaining digestion were strongly linked to teaching. Children's previous conceptions were not epistemological obstacles to learning about digestion. The main obstacles were of didactical origin, as images of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> books do not represent (i) the path of food from the intestine into the blood, (associated to the epistemological obstacle of the permeability of the gut wall); (ii) a clear continuous tract from stomach to anus, which causes a specific confusion at the intestine level.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=residential+AND+segregation&pg=4&id=EJ682354','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=residential+AND+segregation&pg=4&id=EJ682354"><span>50 <span class="hlt">Years</span> after "Brown": Segregation in the Miami-Dade County Public <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Moore, James</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Fifty <span class="hlt">years</span> after the "Brown v. Board of Education" decision outlawed de jure segregation in American <span class="hlt">schools</span>, many <span class="hlt">school</span> districts remain segregated. Despite numerous efforts aimed at desegregation, residential segregation--the <span class="hlt">primary</span> barrier to significant <span class="hlt">school</span> desegregation--remains entrenched throughout the United States. The Miami-Dade…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");'>5</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li class="active"><span>7</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_7 --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="141"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPPhy.145..425G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPPhy.145..425G"><span>Dynamic Modelling with "MLE-Energy Dynamic" for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Giliberti, Enrico; Corni, Federico</p> <p></p> <p>During the recent <span class="hlt">years</span> simulation and modelling are growing instances in science education. In <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, however, the main use of software is the simulation, due to the lack of modelling software tools specially designed to fit/accomplish the needs of <span class="hlt">primary</span> education. In particular <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers need to use simulation in a framework that is both consistent and simple enough to be understandable by children [<CitationRef CitationID="CR2">2]. One of the possible area to approach modelling is about the construction of the concept of energy, in particular for what concerns the relations among substance, potential, power [<CitationRef CitationID="CR3">3]. Following the previous initial research results with this approach [<CitationRef CitationID="CR2">2], and with the static version of the software MLE Energy [<CitationRef CitationID="CR1">1], we suggest the design and the experimentation of a dynamic modelling software—MLE dynamic-capable to represent dynamically the relations occurring when two substance-like quantities exchange energy, modifying their potential. By means of this software the user can graphically choose the dependent and independent variables and leave the other parameters fixed. The software has been initially evaluated, during a course of science education with a group of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers-to-be, to test the ability of the software to improve teachers' way of thinking in terms of substance-like quantities and their effects (graphical representation of the extensive, intensive variables and their mutual relations); moreover, the software has been tested with a group of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers, asking their opinion about the software didactical relevance in the class work.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1161534.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1161534.pdf"><span>Inclusive Education in Government <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Teacher Perceptions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Khan, Itfaq Khaliq; Hashmi, ShujahatHaider; Khanum, Nabeela</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The perceptions of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers towards inclusive education was investigated in mainstream government <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Islamabad capital territory where inclusive education was being supported by Sight savers and other international organizations. The study was carried out involving 54 teachers in six randomly selected <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1155560.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1155560.pdf"><span>The Relationship between the Organizational Alienation and the Organizational Citizenship Behaviors of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dagli, Abidin; Averbek, Emel</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study is to determine the relationship between the organizational alienation and the organizational citizenship behaviors of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers. The research population consists of 700 teachers from 90 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the central district of Mardin/Turkey in the academic <span class="hlt">year</span> of 2015-2016. The research sample consists of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+Science+AND+primary&pg=6&id=EJ991289','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+Science+AND+primary&pg=6&id=EJ991289"><span>Teaching Science in the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>: Surveying Teacher Wellbeing and Planning for Survival</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Morgan, Anne-Marie</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>A teacher-researcher in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> setting surveyed the middle <span class="hlt">years</span>' teachers of her <span class="hlt">school</span> and those in the local science hub group, to determine their confidence and satisfaction levels in relation to teaching science. Her results confirm feelings of inadequacy and reluctance to teach Science, but also indicate ways that <span class="hlt">schools</span> can…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1143750.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1143750.pdf"><span>The Level of Implementation of the Strategic Management in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yenipinar, Senyurt; Akgün, Nuri</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>In this study, <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> principals and teachers apply determination of the degree to which the views of the <span class="hlt">primary</span> institutions. The research was carried out in the scan; working population in Istanbul province, Turkey on the Asian side in the Atasehir, Kadiköy, Kartal, Maltepe and the townships of Sultanbeyli the academic <span class="hlt">year</span> 2011-2012,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+gut&id=EJ688585','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=human+AND+gut&id=EJ688585"><span>Portuguese <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children's Conceptions about Digestion: Identification of Learning Obstacles. Research Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Carvalho, Graca; Silva, Rui; Lima, Nelson; Coquet, Eduarda; Clement, Pierre</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>A cross-sectional study of Portuguese <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils' conceptions on digestion and the digestive tract was carried out before and after teaching this topic. Pupils of the prior four <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span> (5/6 to 9/10 <span class="hlt">year</span> old) drew what happens to a cookie inside their body. In some cases they also wrote a short text or were interviewed. To identify…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Teaching+AND+methodology+AND+research+AND+degree&pg=4&id=EJ1022581','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Teaching+AND+methodology+AND+research+AND+degree&pg=4&id=EJ1022581"><span>Generalist Teachers' Self-Efficacy in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Music Teaching</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>de Vries, Peter</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This qualitative study focuses on the music teaching experiences of five Australian generalist <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in their third <span class="hlt">year</span> of teaching. The aim was to identify these teachers' current practices in teaching music, in particular their self-efficacy in relation to teaching music. A narrative inquiry methodology was employed, drawing…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=difficulty+AND+writing+AND+motor+AND+skills&pg=4&id=EJ475912','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=difficulty+AND+writing+AND+motor+AND+skills&pg=4&id=EJ475912"><span>A Longitudinal Study on Dysgraphic Handwriting in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hamstra-Bletz, Lisa; Blote, Anke W.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Annual evaluation for 5 <span class="hlt">years</span> of the handwriting of 121 Dutch <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children revealed that children with dysgraphic handwriting had lower fine motor ability, exhibited poorer structural performance, and, in higher grades, showed less preference for a personal style, than did other writers. Children with and without dysgraphic handwriting…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1137217.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1137217.pdf"><span>Relational Aggression: The Voices of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Learners</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Botha, Johan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this research was to explore and describe <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> learners' experiences of relational aggression at <span class="hlt">school</span>. This was done within a qualitative research design with a phenomenological approach. In order to give a voice to <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> learners' lived experiences of relational aggression, 25 individual interviews were conducted…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1095786.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1095786.pdf"><span>Strengthening Collaborative Leadership for Thai <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Administrators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Samriangjit, Prapaporn; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The objectives of this research were: 1) to investigate the elements and indicators of collaborative leadership of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> administrators, 2) to explore the existing situation and required situation of collaborative leadership of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> administrators, 3) to develop a program to enhance collaborative leadership of <span class="hlt">primary</span> school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1121578.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1121578.pdf"><span>Development of Educational Management System in Small <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alsammarry, Yupayao; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Duangcharthom, Surat</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The purposes of the research were: (1) to study the factors of Educational Management System in Small <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>; (2) to investigate current situations problems and guidelines of developing educational management in small <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>; (3) to develop Educational Management System in Small <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>; and (4) to examine the results of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22well+being%22+AND+scholastic&pg=4&id=EJ830154','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22well+being%22+AND+scholastic&pg=4&id=EJ830154"><span>Adjustment to the First <span class="hlt">Year</span> in <span class="hlt">School</span>--A Singapore Perspective</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yeo, Lay See; Clarke, Christine</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This paper investigates the concept of adjustment to <span class="hlt">school</span> for a group of <span class="hlt">primary</span> one (first grade) pupils in Singapore. Pupils rated by their teachers as being well adjusted obtained significantly higher grades at the end of the <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span>, did not require additional learning support, and exhibited better social skills compared to children…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5691295','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5691295"><span>Environmental and nutrition impact of achieving new <span class="hlt">School</span> Food Plan recommendations in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meals sector in England</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Wickramasinghe, Kremlin; Rayner, Mike; Goldacre, Michael; Townsend, Nick; Scarborough, Peter</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Objectives The aim of this modelling study was to estimate the expected changes in the nutritional quality and greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meals due to the adoption of new mandatory food-based standards for <span class="hlt">school</span> meals. Setting Nationally representative random sample of 136 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in England was selected for the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Food Survey (PSFS) with 50% response rate. Participants A sample of 6690 <span class="hlt">primary</span> students from PSFS who consumed <span class="hlt">school</span> meals. Outcome measures <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Food Plan (SFP) nutritional impact was assessed using both macronutrient and micronutrient quality. The environmental impact was measured by GHGEs. Methods The scenario tested was one in which every meal served in <span class="hlt">schools</span> met more than half of the food-based standards mentioned in the SFP (SFP scenario). We used findings from a systematic review to assign GHGE values for each food item in the data set. The GHGE value and nutritional quality of SFP scenario meals was compared with the average <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meal in the total PSFS data set (pre-SFP scenario). Prior to introduction of the SFP (pre-SFP scenario), the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meals had mandatory nutrient-based guidelines. Results The percentage of meals that met the protein standard increased in the SFP scenario and the proportion of meals that met the standards for important micronutrients (eg, iron, calcium, vitamin A and C) also increased. However, the SFP scenario did not improve the salt, saturated fat and free sugar levels. The mean GHGE value of meals which met the SFP standards was 0.79 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.81) kgCO2e compared with a mean value of 0.72 (0.71 to 0.74) kgCO2e for all meals. Adopting the SFP would increase the total emissions associated with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meals by 22 000 000 kgCO2e per <span class="hlt">year</span>. Conclusions The universal adoption of the new food-based standards, without reformulation would result in an increase in the GHGEs of <span class="hlt">school</span> meals and improve some aspects of the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25576142','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25576142"><span>The transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> in mainstream education for children with autism spectrum disorder.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mandy, William; Murin, Marianna; Baykaner, Ozlem; Staunton, Sara; Hellriegel, Josselyn; Anderson, Seonaid; Skuse, David</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary education (hereafter '<span class="hlt">school</span> transition') is a major ecological shift that poses considerable social, emotional, academic and organisational challenges. It is commonly assumed that this <span class="hlt">school</span> transition is especially difficult for children with autism spectrum disorder, but that idea is mainly based on anecdotal evidence and requires systematic investigation. We describe change and continuity for children with autism spectrum disorder (N = 28, mean age = 11.29 <span class="hlt">years</span>, mean full-scale IQ = 87.86) transitioning in mainstream education from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. Levels of psychopathology, adaptive functioning and peer victimisation were measured by parent, self and teacher report in the last <span class="hlt">year</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, and again after one term of secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. At follow-up, all participants were still in their secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>, and there was no evidence for a marked escalation of difficulties during the transition. Instead, we observed high levels of psychopathology and maladaption at baseline which persisted across the transition and were in some cases under-recognised. By parent report, levels of bullying fell from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. Future research should investigate factors, such as <span class="hlt">school</span> characteristics, that influence the move to secondary education in autism spectrum disorder, to inform the development of interventions to promote successful <span class="hlt">school</span> transition. © The Author(s) 2015.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=study+AND+computers+AND+laptops&pg=7&id=EJ936644','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=study+AND+computers+AND+laptops&pg=7&id=EJ936644"><span>Informing One-to-One Computing in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Student Use of Netbooks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Larkin, Kevin; Finger, Glenn</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Although one-to-one laptop programs are being introduced in many <span class="hlt">schools</span>, minimal research has been conducted regarding their effectiveness in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Evidence-based research is needed to inform significant funding, deployment and student use of computers. This article analyses key findings from a study conducted in four <span class="hlt">Year</span> 7 classrooms…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED410251.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED410251.pdf"><span>Michigan Extended <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">Year</span> Programs 1992-1995. An Evaluation of a State Grant Initiative.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Axelrad-Lentz, Susan F.</p> <p></p> <p>Michigan lawmakers funded a competitive grant program for <span class="hlt">school</span> districts to plan and implement extended <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span> (ESY) programs of 200 days. The <span class="hlt">primary</span> purpose was to raise academic achievement. In the spring of 1992, 16 diverse <span class="hlt">school</span> districts were awarded ESY planning grants. Continuation grants funded 2 ESY implementation <span class="hlt">years</span>, for…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=factoring&pg=6&id=EJ717886','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=factoring&pg=6&id=EJ717886"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Leadership Practice: How the Subject Matters</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Spillane, James P.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Teaching is a critical consideration in investigations of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> leadership and not just as an outcome variable. Factoring in instruction as an explanatory variable in scholarship on <span class="hlt">school</span> leadership involves moving away from views of teaching as a monolithic or unitary practice. When it comes to leadership in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, the subject…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Autonomy+AND+fear&id=EJ1111022','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Autonomy+AND+fear&id=EJ1111022"><span>Academisation, <span class="hlt">School</span> Collaboration and the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Sector in England: A Story of Six <span class="hlt">School</span> Leaders</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Keddie, Amanda</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents data from a study of five English <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. It examines some of the challenges associated with <span class="hlt">school</span> autonomy and collaboration for state <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> amid the uncertainty and complexity of governance in the present English education context. The paper features the voices of six leaders gathered from interviews that…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=girl+AND+train&pg=2&id=EJ842976','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=girl+AND+train&pg=2&id=EJ842976"><span>Experiences of Violence and Deficits in Academic Achievement among Urban <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children in Jamaica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Baker-Henningham, Helen; Meeks-Gardner, Julie; Chang, Susan; Walker, Susan</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between children's experiences of three different types of violence and academic achievement among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Kingston, Jamaica. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 1300 children in grade 5 [mean (S.D.) age: 11 (0.5) <span class="hlt">years</span>] from 29 government <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in urban…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=musical+AND+school+AND+success&pg=3&id=EJ821011','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=musical+AND+school+AND+success&pg=3&id=EJ821011"><span>Learning about What Constitutes Effective Training from a Pilot Programme to Improve Music Education in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rogers, Lynne; Hallam, Susan; Creech, Andrea; Preti, Costanza</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The new <span class="hlt">primary</span> strategy in England has raised the profile of foundation subjects, including music, yet many <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers lack skills and confidence in their ability to teach music. This research explores a <span class="hlt">year</span>-long programme of training across 16 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in England that sought to improve music education. The programme involved…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");'>6</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li class="active"><span>8</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_8 --> <div id="page_9" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="161"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22290274','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22290274"><span>Prognosis and continuity of child mental health problems from preschool to <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>: results of a four-<span class="hlt">year</span> longitudinal study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Beyer, Thomas; Postert, Christian; Müller, Jörg M; Furniss, Tilman</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>In a four-<span class="hlt">year</span> longitudinal study, changes in and continuity of behavioral and emotional problems were examined in 814 subjects from kindergarten to <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. Mental health problems were assessed by means of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). The distribution of the CBCL broadband groups revealed a high level of continuity of internalizing symptoms over the four-<span class="hlt">year</span> period and a shift from externalizing symptoms at baseline towards a combination of internalizing and externalizing symptoms at follow-up. The presence of mental health problems at follow-up was correlated with gender (higher amongst boys), pre-existing mental health problems at baseline, and separation or divorce of the parents, but not with single-family status or the age and educational level of the mother. The increasing number of children with a combination of internalizing and externalizing symptoms demonstrates the increasing complexity of child mental health problems in the developmental span from preschool age to <span class="hlt">school</span> age.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3081745','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3081745"><span>Measuring social networks in British <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> through scientific engagement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Conlan, A. J. K.; Eames, K. T. D.; Gage, J. A.; von Kirchbach, J. C.; Ross, J. V.; Saenz, R. A.; Gog, J. R.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> constitute a key risk group for the transmission of infectious diseases, concentrating great numbers of immunologically naive individuals at high densities. Despite this, very little is known about the social patterns of mixing within a <span class="hlt">school</span>, which are likely to contribute to disease transmission. In this study, we present a novel approach where scientific engagement was used as a tool to access <span class="hlt">school</span> populations and measure social networks between young (4–11 <span class="hlt">years</span>) children. By embedding our research project within enrichment activities to older secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> (13–15) children, we could exploit the existing links between <span class="hlt">schools</span> to achieve a high response rate for our study population (around 90% in most <span class="hlt">schools</span>). Social contacts of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children were measured through self-reporting based on a questionnaire design, and analysed using the techniques of social network analysis. We find evidence of marked social structure and gender assortativity within and between classrooms in the same <span class="hlt">school</span>. These patterns have been previously reported in smaller studies, but to our knowledge no study has attempted to exhaustively sample entire <span class="hlt">school</span> populations. Our innovative approach facilitates access to a vitally important (but difficult to sample) epidemiological sub-group. It provides a model whereby scientific communication can be used to enhance, rather than merely complement, the outcomes of research. PMID:21047859</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24985789','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24985789"><span>The effect of increased <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> on adult women's HIV status in Malawi and Uganda: Universal <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Education as a natural experiment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Behrman, Julia Andrea</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>This paper explores the causal relationship between <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> and adult HIV status in Malawi and Uganda, two East African countries with some of the highest HIV infection rates in the world. Using data from the 2010 Malawi Demographic Health Survey and the 2011 Uganda AIDS Indicator Survey, the paper takes advantage of a natural experiment, the implementation of Universal <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Education policies in the mid 1990s. An instrumented regression discontinuity approach is used to model the relationship between increased <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> and adult women's HIV status. Results indicate that a one-<span class="hlt">year</span> increase in <span class="hlt">schooling</span> decreases the probability of an adult woman testing positive for HIV by 0.06 (p < 0.01) in Malawi and by 0.03 (p < 0.05) in Uganda. These results are robust to a variety of model specifications. In a series of supplementary analyses a number of potential pathways through which such effects may occur are explored. Findings indicate increased <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> positively affects women's literacy and spousal <span class="hlt">schooling</span> attainment in Malawi and age of marriage and current household wealth in Uganda. However <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> has no effect on recent (adult) sexual behavior. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5890098','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5890098"><span>Gender Gaps in Letter-Sound Knowledge Persist Across the First <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">Year</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Sigmundsson, Hermundur; Dybfest Eriksen, Adrian; Ofteland, Greta S.; Haga, Monika</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Literacy is the cornerstone of a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> education and enables the intellectual and social development of young children. Letter-sound knowledge has been identified as critical for developing proficiency in reading. This study explored the development of letter-sound knowledge in relation to gender during the first <span class="hlt">year</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. 485 Norwegian children aged 5–6 <span class="hlt">years</span> completed assessment of letter-sound knowledge, i.e., uppercase letters- name; uppercase letter -sound; lowercase letters- name; lowercase letter-sound. The children were tested in the beginning, middle, and end of their first <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span>. The results revealed a clear gender difference in all four variables in favor of the girls which were relatively constant over time. Implications for understanding the role of gender and letter-sound knowledge for later reading performance are discussed. PMID:29662461</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED420469.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED420469.pdf"><span>Managing Change in Small <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wilson, Valerie; McPake, Joanna</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>This report summarizes a two-phase research project on the strategies used by headteachers in small Scottish <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> to manage mandated educational changes. The research focused on four initiatives of the past decade: 5-14 Curriculum Guidelines, <span class="hlt">School</span> Development Planning, Staff Development and Appraisal, and Devolved <span class="hlt">School</span> Management.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=roles+AND+family%2c+AND+culture&pg=7&id=EJ1036466','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=roles+AND+family%2c+AND+culture&pg=7&id=EJ1036466"><span>Additional Language Teaching within the International Baccalaureate <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Years</span> Programme: A Comparative Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lebreton, Marlène</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The International Baccalaureate <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Years</span> Programme supports the learning of languages and cultures, but the role of the additional language within this programme is often unclear. There remains a great variability in <span class="hlt">schools</span> regarding the frequency of lessons and the way that the additional language is taught within the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Years…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED578034.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED578034.pdf"><span>An Investigation of Metaphors Used by <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers to Describe Supervisors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cerit, Yusuf; Kadioglu Ates, Hatice; Kadioglu, Serkan</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study is a qualitative exploration of the perceptions of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers of their supervisors using metaphors. Data in this study was obtained from interviews with 106 classroom teachers who had been supervised at least once. They worked at <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Istanbul during the 2015-2016 academic <span class="hlt">year</span> in the following districts: Esenler,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=cognitive+AND+science&pg=7&id=EJ1155012','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=cognitive+AND+science&pg=7&id=EJ1155012"><span>The Use of CASE to Bridge the Transition between <span class="hlt">Primary</span> and Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span> Science in Ireland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McCormack, Lorraine</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This article describes how the Cognitive Acceleration through Science Education (CASE) programme was implemented in the final <span class="hlt">year</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> and the first <span class="hlt">year</span> of secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> in a number of <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Ireland. The original CASE programme, pioneered in the 1980s, proved successful in its aim to develop the science-reasoning abilities…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=inclusion+AND+labour+AND+students&pg=3&id=ED493207','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=inclusion+AND+labour+AND+students&pg=3&id=ED493207"><span>Changing Teaching and Learning in the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Webb, Rosemary, Ed.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>In this topical book, leading academics in <span class="hlt">primary</span> education evaluate New Labour's Education policy. They draw on the findings of the latest research to discuss the impact of policies on <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> practice and on the views and experiences of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers and pupils. Current issues and initiatives are analyzed to identify the extent…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=tok+AND+tok&pg=2&id=EJ1012485','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=tok+AND+tok&pg=2&id=EJ1012485"><span>Reflective Teaching Practices in Turkish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tok, Sukran; Dolapcioglu, Sevda Dogan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The objective of the study is to explore the prevalence of reflective teaching practices among Turkish <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used together in the study. The sample was composed of 328 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers working in 30 <span class="hlt">primary</span> education institutions in the town of Antakya in the province of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1080607.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1080607.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">School</span> Environment and Satisfaction with <span class="hlt">Schooling</span> among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Pupils in Ondo State, Nigeria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aina, Stephen Ileoye</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Modern <span class="hlt">school</span> environments put emphasis on adequate and qualitative facilities to promote conducive teaching and learning environments, the deplorable conditions of the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> has become worrisome to the state government and education stakeholders. The study investigated the <span class="hlt">school</span> environment and pupils' satisfaction with <span class="hlt">schooling</span> in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27048551','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27048551"><span><span class="hlt">School</span> health services and its practice among public and private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Western Nigeria.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kuponiyi, Olugbenga Temitope; Amoran, Olorunfemi Emmanuel; Kuponiyi, Opeyemi Temitola</p> <p>2016-04-06</p> <p>Globally the number of children reaching <span class="hlt">school</span> age is estimated to be 1.2 billion children (18% of the world's population) and rising. This study was therefore designed to determine the <span class="hlt">school</span> health services available and its practices in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Ogun state, Western Nigeria. The study was a comparative cross-sectional survey of private and public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Ogun state using a multi-stage sampling technique. Participants were interviewed using a structured, interviewer administered questionnaire and a checklist. Data collected was analyzed using the SPSS version 15.0. A total of 360 head teachers served as respondents for the study with the overall mean age of 45.7 ± 9.9 <span class="hlt">years</span>. More than three quarters of the respondents in both groups could not correctly define the <span class="hlt">school</span> health programme. There were no health personnel or a trained first aider in 86 (47.8%) public and 110 (61.1%) private <span class="hlt">schools</span> but a nurse/midwife was present in 57 (31.7%) and 27 (15.0%) public and private <span class="hlt">schools</span>. (χ(2) = 17.122, P = 0.002). In about 95% of the <span class="hlt">schools</span>, the teacher carried out routine inspection of the pupils while periodic medical examination for staff and pupils was carried out in only 13 (7.2%) public and 31 (17.2%) private <span class="hlt">schools</span> (χ(2) = 8.398, P = 0.004). A sick bay/clinic was present in 26 (14.4%) and 67 (37.2%) public and private <span class="hlt">schools</span> respectively (χ(2) = 24.371, P = 0.001). The practice of <span class="hlt">school</span> health programme was dependent on the age (χ(2) = 12.53, P = 0.006) and the ethnicity of the respondents (χ(2) = 6.330, P = 0.042). Using multivariate analysis only one variable (type of <span class="hlt">school</span>) was found to be a predictor of <span class="hlt">school</span> health programme. (OR 4.55, CI 1.918-10.79). The study concludes that the practice of the various components of <span class="hlt">school</span> health services was poor but better in private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Nigeria. Routine inspection by teachers was the commonest form of health appraisal. This may suggest that more health personnel need to</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996RScEd..26..283S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996RScEd..26..283S"><span>Students' perceptions about science: The impact of transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Speering, Wendy; Rennie, Léonie</p> <p>1996-09-01</p> <p>As students move through <span class="hlt">school</span>, attitudes to <span class="hlt">school</span> in general, and science in particular, become less positive. This paper reports on a longitudinal study which mapped, from the students' point of view, the transition between <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> in Western Australia. The study focused on the subject of science, and used both quantitative and qualitative methods. During the transition, there is a considerable change in the organisation of the <span class="hlt">school</span>, the curriculum and the teacherstudent relationship. Students in this study, especially the girls, were generally disenchanted with the teaching strategies used in their secondary science classrooms, and regretted the loss of the close teacher-student relationship of their <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span>. Their perceptions were that science in secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> was not what they had expected, and this experience may have long term implications for their subject and career choices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=drama+AND+mathematics+AND+education&pg=4&id=EJ681251','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=drama+AND+mathematics+AND+education&pg=4&id=EJ681251"><span>The Impact of Drama on Pupils' Language, Mathematics, and Attitude in Two <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fleming, Mike; Merrell, Christine; Tymms, Peter</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>This article reports on research which examined the impact of The National Theatre's Transformation drama project on young pupils' reading, mathematics, attitude, self-concept and creative writing in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Two of the <span class="hlt">schools</span> taking part in Transformation were matched to two Control <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the first two <span class="hlt">years</span> of the project.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=structuralism+AND+power&pg=2&id=ED437464','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=structuralism+AND+power&pg=2&id=ED437464"><span>Power Plays: <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children's Constructions of Gender, Power, and Adult Work.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Francis, Becky</p> <p></p> <p>The constructions of gender formed by elementary <span class="hlt">school</span> children, aged 7 through 11 <span class="hlt">years</span>, were studied in relation to their own lives and the issue of adult occupations as revealed in children's role plays. Data were collected from dialogue and role play with 145 children in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in England, and these data were analyzed in a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1071642.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1071642.pdf"><span>Introducing National Curriculum Geography to Australia's <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Lessons from England's Experience</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Catling, Simon</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This article provides an insight into the development of <span class="hlt">primary</span> geography since the inception of the national curriculum in England in the late 1980s. It is hoped this is informative as the "Australian Curriculum: Geography Foundation to <span class="hlt">Year</span> 12" is introduced to and implemented in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. It draws out various matters which…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27475339','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27475339"><span>Effectiveness evaluation of a health promotion programme in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>: a cluster randomised controlled trial.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Grillich, Ludwig; Kien, Christina; Takuya, Yanagida; Weber, Michael; Gartlehner, Gerald</p> <p>2016-07-30</p> <p>Programmes based on the World Health Organization's Health Promoting <span class="hlt">Schools</span> framework (HPS) have been implemented in several countries but for evidence-based policy-making more research is required to determine the effectiveness of the HPS approach. We conducted a cluster randomised controlled trial. The units of randomisation were <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> classes recruited in May 2010. Eligible participants were <span class="hlt">Year</span> 3 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> classes in Lower Austria that had not participated in a similar programme during the last two <span class="hlt">years</span>. After baseline assessment in September 2010, 53 classes from 45 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Lower Austria were randomly assigned to an intervention (n = 26 classes, 432 children) or waiting control arm (n = 27 classes, 493 children aged 8.7 <span class="hlt">years</span> +/- 4 months). Over the course of 1.5 academic <span class="hlt">years</span>, participating teachers received on-the-job training (20 h) and two workshops (8 h) to promote health related behaviour in students such as physical activity during the <span class="hlt">school</span> day and to improve the quality of regular physical education classes. We assessed 15 outcomes grouped into five categories: Emotional and Social Experience in <span class="hlt">School</span>, Physical Activity, Well-being, and Attention Performance measured by validated and standardised questionnaire and Motor Skills measured by validated and standardised motoric and coordination tests in the <span class="hlt">school</span> gym. The <span class="hlt">primary</span> outcome was Classroom Climate and part of the outcomecategory Emotional and Social Experience in <span class="hlt">School</span>. The final assessment took place in April 2012. All assessors were blinded to the allocation of classes. Multilevel growth modelling was used to investigate programme effectiveness. We could not detect any statistically significant differences between groups for the outcomecategories Emotional and Social Experience in <span class="hlt">school</span> (p = 0.22 to 0.78), Physical Activity, Well-being, and Attention Performance. Significant differences between groups were limited to the outcomecategory Motor</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26257280','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26257280"><span>Relationship Between Peer Victimization and Posttraumatic Stress Among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Litman, Leib; Costantino, Giuseppe; Waxman, Richard; Sanabria-Velez, Caribel; Rodriguez-Guzman, Von Marie; Lampon-Velez, Anabelle; Brown, Richard; Cruz, Tomas</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>Peer victimization is a common stressor experienced by children. Although peer victimization has been studied extensively, few studies have examined the potential link between peer victimization and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and no studies of which we are aware have examined this link among children in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. The paucity of studies examining the link between PTSD and peer victimization in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> is surprising because peer victimization occurs more frequently and is more likely to be physical among 7- and 8-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old children. This study assessed the relationship between peer victimization and PTSD in a sample of 358 elementary <span class="hlt">school</span> children (ages 6-11 <span class="hlt">years</span>). Results indicated that peer victimization accounted for 14.1% of PTSD symptom severity among boys and 10.1% among girls. Additionally, we found gender differences in the types of peer victimization that were most associated with PTSD symptom severity (d = 0.38). The long-term developmental consequences that may be associated with peer victimization-linked PTSD symptomatology are discussed. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=JAVA+AND+8&pg=3&id=ED170017','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=JAVA+AND+8&pg=3&id=ED170017"><span>Indonesia--Innovation in the Management of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Construction: A Case Study. Education Building Report 8.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hussin</p> <p></p> <p>This UNESCO report describes the progress of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> building development under the second Five <span class="hlt">Year</span> Plan of the Government of Indonesia. The main objective of the construction program was to increase the enrollement of children of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age to 85 per cent of all eligible children. Chapter I provides an historical perspective on…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28381419','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28381419"><span>Environmental and nutrition impact of achieving new <span class="hlt">School</span> Food Plan recommendations in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meals sector in England.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wickramasinghe, Kremlin; Rayner, Mike; Goldacre, Michael; Townsend, Nick; Scarborough, Peter</p> <p>2017-04-05</p> <p>The aim of this modelling study was to estimate the expected changes in the nutritional quality and greenhouse gas emissions (GHGEs) of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meals due to the adoption of new mandatory food-based standards for <span class="hlt">school</span> meals. Nationally representative random sample of 136 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in England was selected for the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Food Survey (PSFS) with 50% response rate. A sample of 6690 <span class="hlt">primary</span> students from PSFS who consumed <span class="hlt">school</span> meals. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Food Plan (SFP) nutritional impact was assessed using both macronutrient and micronutrient quality. The environmental impact was measured by GHGEs. The scenario tested was one in which every meal served in <span class="hlt">schools</span> met more than half of the food-based standards mentioned in the SFP (SFP scenario). We used findings from a systematic review to assign GHGE values for each food item in the data set. The GHGE value and nutritional quality of SFP scenario meals was compared with the average <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meal in the total PSFS data set (pre-SFP scenario). Prior to introduction of the SFP (pre-SFP scenario), the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meals had mandatory nutrient-based guidelines. The percentage of meals that met the protein standard increased in the SFP scenario and the proportion of meals that met the standards for important micronutrients (eg, iron, calcium, vitamin A and C) also increased. However, the SFP scenario did not improve the salt, saturated fat and free sugar levels. The mean GHGE value of meals which met the SFP standards was 0.79 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.81) kgCO 2 e compared with a mean value of 0.72 (0.71 to 0.74) kgCO 2 e for all meals. Adopting the SFP would increase the total emissions associated with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> meals by 22 000 000 kgCO 2 e per <span class="hlt">year</span>. The universal adoption of the new food-based standards, without reformulation would result in an increase in the GHGEs of <span class="hlt">school</span> meals and improve some aspects of the nutritional quality, but it would not improve the average salt, sugar and</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ960116.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ960116.pdf"><span>Parametric Pedagogy: Integrating Parametric CAD in Irish Post-<span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>McGarr, Oliver; Seery, Niall</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Technology education in Irish post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> is undergoing significant change. In recent <span class="hlt">years</span> the syllabi of all technology-related subjects have been revised. A new subject, Design and Communication Graphics, has replaced the traditional Technical Drawing subject. This new subject aims to develop students' spatial awareness and graphical…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ981808.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ981808.pdf"><span>A Qualitative Analysis of <span class="hlt">School</span> Concept on <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yildiz, S. Armagan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Child drawing, known as language of thinking, is as an effective tool of expression as written language. The use of paper, composition, and colors are meaningful for professionals. In this research, it is intended to determine the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students' perception of the <span class="hlt">school</span> and schemas with their drawings of <span class="hlt">school</span>. Case study which is one…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=data+AND+governance&pg=3&id=EJ1092753','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=data+AND+governance&pg=3&id=EJ1092753"><span>Changing <span class="hlt">School</span> Board Governance in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Education through <span class="hlt">School</span> Inspections</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ehren, Melanie C. M.; Honingh, M. E.; Hooge, E. H.; O'Hara, J.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper addresses if, and to what extent, the current working methods of the Dutch Inspectorate of Education affect the governance of <span class="hlt">school</span> boards in <span class="hlt">schools</span> for <span class="hlt">primary</span> education. A key facet of the working method is the inspection meeting with the <span class="hlt">school</span> board. Drawing upon a large quantitative study (n = 244) we are able to identify some…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Masculinity&pg=3&id=EJ1165184','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Masculinity&pg=3&id=EJ1165184"><span>Addressing Gender Violence among Children in the Early <span class="hlt">Years</span> of <span class="hlt">Schooling</span>: Insights from Teachers in a South African <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mayeza, Emmanuel; Bhana, Deevia</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores how teachers in a poor township <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in South Africa construct meaning regarding gender violence among children, and how they talk about addressing that violence. The paper argues that major influences on the endemic violence include complex societal structures that are inscribed with cultures of violent…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED410644.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED410644.pdf"><span>Evaluation Report of a Detention-Based Student Disciplinary Program in a Honduran/International <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Evans, Thomas J.</p> <p></p> <p>The Escuela Internacional Sampedrana (EIS) in Honduras implemented a new discipline program in its <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> during the 1996-97 <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span>. This paper contains findings from three evaluations of the program--an initial analysis, a midyear report, and a <span class="hlt">year</span>-end report. The first report analyzed the number of suspensions and detentions, as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19697786','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19697786"><span>[A comparative study on depression symptoms in Cracow <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> kids in <span class="hlt">years</span> 1984 and 2001].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Modrzejewska, Renata; Bomba, Jacek</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The study aims to find out whether or not the image of depression in children has remained related to the changing social context within a period of fifteen <span class="hlt">years</span>. For the depression study, version AO "B1" of the Kraków Depression Inventory (KID) was used. The subject group included 10-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old fourth-form Kraków <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students selected in 1984 and 2001 by two-stage draw. The analysis included subjects with a screening diagnosis of depression. In 1984, this was a group of 160, and in 2001-200 persons. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between the groups of pupils under study in 1984 and 2001 as far as the scale of mood disorder is concerned (a reduction in the intensity of symptoms in girls and an increase in boys) and somatic symptoms (increase of symptoms in girls and a reduction in the intensity of symptoms in boys). On other scales, no differences of statistical significance were found between the groups. CONCLUSIONS. The changing social conditions have a relatively low effect on the symptomatic depression image in preadolescent children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teacher+AND+identity&pg=6&id=EJ1157457','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teacher+AND+identity&pg=6&id=EJ1157457"><span>Whiteness and National Identity: Teacher Discourses in Australian <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Walton, Jessica; Priest, Naomi; Kowal, Emma; White, Fiona; Fox, Brandi; Paradies, Yin</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>The study examines how white teachers talked to children about national identity and cultural diversity by drawing on qualitative research with eight- to 12-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old students and their teachers from four Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> with different racial, ethnic and cultural demographics. Despite a range of explicit and implicit approaches that…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4463082','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4463082"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> compliance with <span class="hlt">school</span> canteen guidelines in Fiji and its association with student obesity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Bullen, C.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Van Den Bergh, R.; Khogali, M.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Setting: Childhood obesity is of growing public health concern in Fiji. The study setting was <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Fiji’s Western Division. Objective: 1) To assess <span class="hlt">primary</span> schools’ compliance with national <span class="hlt">school</span> canteen guidelines, 2) to understand reasons for non-compliance, and 3) to assess the relationship between compliance with the guidelines and students’ body mass index (BMI). Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data collected in 2010 by public health dieticians of the Ministry of Health on annual visits to <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Results: Among 230 <span class="hlt">schools</span>, 33 (14%) had no canteen data. Of the 197 <span class="hlt">schools</span> with data, only 31 (16%) were fully compliant with national <span class="hlt">school</span> canteen guidelines, while the remaining 166 (84%) did not fully comply with the guidelines. This was irrespective of <span class="hlt">school</span> location or whether the canteen was <span class="hlt">school</span> or commercially operated. In a random sample (n = 44 <span class="hlt">schools</span>), overweight and obesity were more common among children in non-compliant <span class="hlt">schools</span> than in fully compliant <span class="hlt">schools</span> (40% vs. 32%, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Most <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Fiji’s Western Division did not comply with <span class="hlt">school</span> canteen guidelines, which is worrying given the increasing rates of overweight children. Given the association between non-compliance and student overweight/obesity, further action is needed to ensure that these guidelines are implemented. PMID:26393002</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Organizational+AND+Health&pg=2&id=EJ865129','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Organizational+AND+Health&pg=2&id=EJ865129"><span>Examining the Relationship between Teacher Organizational Commitment and <span class="hlt">School</span> Health in Turkish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sezgin, Ferudun</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between teachers' perceptions of organizational commitment and <span class="hlt">school</span> health in Turkish <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The Organizational Commitment Scale and the Organizational Health Inventory were used to gather data from 323 randomly selected teachers employed in 20 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Ankara.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=GOT&pg=3&id=EJ1063227','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=GOT&pg=3&id=EJ1063227"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students of 1980s' Turkey Remembering Their Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Saglam, Mehmet</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students of 1980s' Turkey remember their teachers in various aspects. Uncovering their reminiscences lets researchers see what factors become decisive in recontructing <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in the memories of their students. The priority of this paper is to discover the reasons why the 1980s <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students remember their…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=honesty&pg=2&id=EJ1167442','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=honesty&pg=2&id=EJ1167442"><span>Exploring the Values of Chaplains in Government <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Isaacs, Amy Kate; Mergler, Amanda</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Minimal prior research has examined the <span class="hlt">school</span> chaplaincy programme in Australia. This exploratory study sought to identify the values <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> chaplains feel are the most important to them personally, and in their role as chaplain. Eight chaplains working in government <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> were interviewed. Inductive thematic analysis was used…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=school+AND+aggression&pg=4&id=EJ1104873','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=school+AND+aggression&pg=4&id=EJ1104873"><span>Personal and Familial Predictors of Peer Victimization Trajectories from <span class="hlt">Primary</span> to Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brendgen, Mara; Girard, Alain; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Using a sample of 767 children (403 girls, 364 boys), this study aimed to (a) identify groups with distinct trajectories of peer victimization over a 6-<span class="hlt">year</span> period from <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> through the transition to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>, and (b) examine the associated personal (i.e., aggression or internalizing problems) and familial (family status,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED040497.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED040497.pdf"><span>9+ The <span class="hlt">Year</span>-Round <span class="hlt">School</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>American Association of School Administrators, Washington, DC.</p> <p></p> <p>The 9-month <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span> with a 3-month summer vacation had its origin in our earlier agrarian life. Today's teacher shortages, overcrowded <span class="hlt">schools</span>, and pressures to learn demand extensions of the <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span>. This publication analyzes five programs: (1) a staggered-vacation <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span> for all, (2) a full 48-week <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span> for all, (3) a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1034114.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1034114.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teacher Candidates' Geometric Habits of Mind</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Köse, Nilu¨fer Y.; Tanisli, Dilek</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Geometric habits of mind are productive ways of thinking that support learning and using geometric concepts. Identifying <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teacher candidates' geometric habits of mind is important as they affect the development of their future students' geometric thinking. Therefore, this study attempts to determine <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' geometric…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=What+AND+book+AND+study+AND+harvard&pg=3&id=ED390563','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=What+AND+book+AND+study+AND+harvard&pg=3&id=ED390563"><span>Hope or Despair? Learning in Pakistan's <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Warwick, Donald P.; Reimers, Fernando</p> <p></p> <p>This book reports on the research findings of the Pakistan Study, a collaboration between the Harvard Institute for International Development and other organizations in Pakistan. The focus is primarily on what affects student learning in Pakistan's government-sponsored <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Chapter 1 discusses <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Pakistan and the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26822639','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26822639"><span>[Prevalence of myopia and influencing factors among <span class="hlt">primary</span> and middle <span class="hlt">school</span> students in 6 provinces of China].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhou, Jia; Ma, Yinghua; Ma, Jun; Zou, Zhiyong; Meng, Xiangkun; Tao, Fangbiao; Luo, Chunyan; Jing, Jin; Pan, Dehong; Luo, Jiayou; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Haiping</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>To understand the prevalence of myopia in <span class="hlt">primary</span> and middle <span class="hlt">school</span> students in 6 provinces and the possible influencing factors. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> and middle <span class="hlt">school</span> students were selected through multistage cluster sampling in 60 <span class="hlt">primary</span> and middle <span class="hlt">schools</span> in 6 provinces in China. The questionnaire survey and eyesight test were conducted among all the students selected according to the national student's physique and health survey protocol. Pearson chi-square test and binary multivariate logistic regression analysis were done to identify the influencing factors for myopia in students. The prevalence of myopia among <span class="hlt">primary</span> and middle <span class="hlt">school</span> students surveyed was 55.7%, the gender specific difference was statistically significant (59.7% for girls, 51.9% for boys) (P<0.01). The prevalence of myopia increased with age obviously. The prevalence was 35.8% in age group 6-8 <span class="hlt">years</span>, 58.9% in age group 10-12 <span class="hlt">years</span>, 73.4% in age group 13-15 <span class="hlt">years</span> and 81.2% in age group 16-18 <span class="hlt">years</span>, the differences were statistically significant (P<0.001). Single factor and multivariate analysis showed that parents' myopia, distance between computer screen and eyes, distance less than 30 cm between eyes and book while reading, distance less than 10 cm between chest and the table edge while studying, distance less than 3 cm between fingers and pen tip, sleep time, average outdoor activity time during last week, <span class="hlt">school</span> sport activities in the afternoon, the size of television set at home, time spent on watching TV and playing computer were the influencing factors for myopia. The prevalence of myopia is till high in <span class="hlt">primary</span> and middle <span class="hlt">school</span> students. Myopia is associated with both genetic factors and individual eye health related behaviors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=children+AND+sex&pg=2&id=EJ1118990','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=children+AND+sex&pg=2&id=EJ1118990"><span>Engaging Parents with Sex and Relationship Education: A UK <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Alldred, Pam; Fox, Nick; Kulpa, Robert</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To assess an intervention to familiarise parents with children's books for use in <span class="hlt">primary</span> (5-11 <span class="hlt">years</span>) sex and relationship education (SRE) classes. Method: Case study of a 7-week programme in one London <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, using ethnographic observation, semi-structured interviews and focus groups with parents (n = 7) and key stakeholders…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=music&pg=7&id=EJ1058650','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=music&pg=7&id=EJ1058650"><span>Music without a Music Specialist: A <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Story</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>de Vries, Peter A.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This case study focuses on generalist <span class="hlt">primary</span> (elementary) <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers teaching music in an Australian <span class="hlt">school</span>. With the onus for teaching music moving away from the specialist music teacher to the generalist classroom teacher, this case study adds to a growing body of literature focusing on generalist <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers and music…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1053714.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1053714.pdf"><span>Pre-Service <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Logical Reasoning Skills</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Marchis, Iuliana</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Logical reasoning skills are important for a successful mathematical learning and in students' future career. These skills are essential for a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teacher, because they need to explain solving methods and solutions to their pupils. In this research we studied pre-service <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' logical reasoning skills. The results…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ940868.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ940868.pdf"><span>Boys Only: One Co-Educational <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>'s Experience of a Classroom for Boys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Price, Christopher D.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Concern over retention of boys as well as poor academic performance and behaviour, in a New Zealand co-educational <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, led the <span class="hlt">school</span> to trial, a "boys-only class". This case study reports interview and questionnaire commentary obtained at the beginning and end of the <span class="hlt">year</span> from the principal, the teacher, pupils and parents,…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4884738','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4884738"><span>Fine Motor Skills Predict Maths Ability Better than They Predict Reading Ability in the Early <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">Years</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Pitchford, Nicola J.; Papini, Chiara; Outhwaite, Laura A.; Gulliford, Anthea</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Fine motor skills have long been recognized as an important foundation for development in other domains. However, more precise insights into the role of fine motor skills, and their relationships to other skills in mediating early educational achievements, are needed to support the development of optimal educational interventions. We explored concurrent relationships between two components of fine motor skills, Fine Motor Precision and Fine Motor Integration, and early reading and maths development in two studies with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children of low-to-mid socio-economic status in the UK. Two key findings were revealed. First, despite being in the first 2 <span class="hlt">years</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> education, significantly better performance was found in reading compared to maths across both studies. This may reflect the protective effects of recent national-level interventions to promote early literacy skills in young children in the UK that have not been similarly promoted for maths. Second, fine motor skills were a better predictor of early maths ability than they were of early reading ability. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that fine motor skills did not significantly predict reading ability when verbal short-term memory was taken into account. In contrast, Fine Motor Integration remained a significant predictor of maths ability, even after the influence of non-verbal IQ had been accounted for. These results suggest that fine motor skills should have a pivotal role in educational interventions designed to support the development of early mathematical skills. PMID:27303342</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27303342','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27303342"><span>Fine Motor Skills Predict Maths Ability Better than They Predict Reading Ability in the Early <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">Years</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pitchford, Nicola J; Papini, Chiara; Outhwaite, Laura A; Gulliford, Anthea</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Fine motor skills have long been recognized as an important foundation for development in other domains. However, more precise insights into the role of fine motor skills, and their relationships to other skills in mediating early educational achievements, are needed to support the development of optimal educational interventions. We explored concurrent relationships between two components of fine motor skills, Fine Motor Precision and Fine Motor Integration, and early reading and maths development in two studies with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children of low-to-mid socio-economic status in the UK. Two key findings were revealed. First, despite being in the first 2 <span class="hlt">years</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> education, significantly better performance was found in reading compared to maths across both studies. This may reflect the protective effects of recent national-level interventions to promote early literacy skills in young children in the UK that have not been similarly promoted for maths. Second, fine motor skills were a better predictor of early maths ability than they were of early reading ability. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that fine motor skills did not significantly predict reading ability when verbal short-term memory was taken into account. In contrast, Fine Motor Integration remained a significant predictor of maths ability, even after the influence of non-verbal IQ had been accounted for. These results suggest that fine motor skills should have a pivotal role in educational interventions designed to support the development of early mathematical skills.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013RScEd..43..275V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013RScEd..43..275V"><span>At the Crossroads: The Impact of New Irish Science Curricula on First <span class="hlt">Year</span> Post-<span class="hlt">Primary</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Varley, Janet Penelope; Murphy, Clíona; Veale, Órlaith</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>In Ireland, new science curricula were introduced at <span class="hlt">primary</span> and early post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> levels in 2003, in an effort to reverse declining interest and enrolment in science. This paper reports on a national study that explored first <span class="hlt">year</span> post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> students' experiences of and attitudes towards <span class="hlt">school</span> science under these new curricula. Data were gathered from 366 pupils using survey and case study approaches. Findings revealed broadly positive attitudes towards post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science, especially the experimental work that is at the heart of the new curriculum. However, it would appear that students were not conducting open-ended investigations or using information and communications technology [ICT] to any great extent; moreover, there was some evidence of traditional teaching methods being utilised. Pupils were highly critical of previous <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science experiences, reporting a lack of `hands-on' activities, didactic methodologies and, for a significant minority, a paucity of any memorable <span class="hlt">primary</span> science at all. Improvements in curricular implementation are proposed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED578020.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED578020.pdf"><span>Why Do <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> English Teachers Decide to Teach English?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Amengual-Pizarro, Marian; Garcia Laborda, Jesus</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study is an attempt to explore the nature of L2 teachers' motivation towards English language learning and their decision to become English teachers. A total of 45 third-<span class="hlt">year</span> prospective <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> English teachers at the University of the Balearic Islands completed a small-scale survey adapted from Gardner's Attitude/Motivation Test…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hegemonic+AND+Masculinity&pg=4&id=EJ680757','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Hegemonic+AND+Masculinity&pg=4&id=EJ680757"><span>"Other" Boys: Negotiating Non-Hegemonic Masculinities in the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Renold, Emma</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Focusing on the experiences of boys who choose not to cultivate their masculinities through hegemonic discourses and practices, this paper seeks to empirically explore and theorize the extent to which it is possible to live out the category 'boy' in non-hegemonic ways in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> setting. Drawing upon a <span class="hlt">year</span>-long ethnography of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25558574','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25558574"><span>Indoor air quality in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Kecioren, Ankara.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Babayiğit, Mustafa Alparslan; Bakir, Bilal; Tekbaş, Omer Faruk; Oğur, Recai; Kiliç, Abdullah; Ulus, Serdar</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>To increase the awareness of environmental risk factors by determining the indoor air quality status of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Indoor air quality parameters in 172 classrooms of 31 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Kecioren, Ankara, were examined for the purpose of assessing the levels of air pollutants (CO, CO2, SO2, NO2, and formaldehyde) within <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. <span class="hlt">Schools</span> near heavy traffic had a statistically significant mean average of CO and SO2 (P < 0.05). The classrooms that had more than 35 students had higher and statistically significant averages of CO2, SO2, NO2, and formaldehyde compared to classrooms that had fewer than 35 students (P < 0.05). Of all classrooms, 29% had 100 CFU/100 mL and higher concentrations of microorganisms, which were not pathogens. Indoor air quality management should continually be maintained in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> for the prevention and control of acute and chronic diseases, particularly considering biological and chemical pollution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=multi+AND+location&pg=4&id=ED546046','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=multi+AND+location&pg=4&id=ED546046"><span>The Effects of Teacher Certification and Experience on Student Achievement on <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Examination in Belizean <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lopez, Carmen Jane</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The Ministry of Education has the largest portion of the national budget of 21% in Belize. Related studies in the region and around the world reveals that rural <span class="hlt">schools</span> are not provided with highly qualified teachers. Likewise, multi-grade <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the region and in Belize repeatedly perform lower on the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Examination than their…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16909529','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16909529"><span>[Phonological awareness improvement in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cárnio, Maria Sílvia; dos Santos, Daniele</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>Phonological awareness in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students. To verify the improvement of phonological awareness in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students after a speech and language stimulation program. 20 students with the worst results in the first literacy exam were selected. Phonological awareness tests were analyzed at the beginning and at the end of the stimulation program. Most of the subjects demonstrated to have a notion about phonological awareness activities. Students demonstrated improvement, suggesting the effectiveness of the program.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=comparative+AND+study&pg=4&id=EJ1071949','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=comparative+AND+study&pg=4&id=EJ1071949"><span>The Intercultural and Non-Formal Learning Processes of Children in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Exchange Programmes in France and Germany</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Melin, Valérie; Wagner, Bernd</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This paper is based on educational anthropology, and presents the initial findings of a three-<span class="hlt">year</span> international comparative study of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children's learning-processes during travel and cross-cultural encounters. A French-German research team investigated and here reports on <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> exchange programmes. Open coding of the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+sexual+AND+condoms&pg=6&id=EJ1034332','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+sexual+AND+condoms&pg=6&id=EJ1034332"><span>Replicating Impact of a <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> HIV Prevention Programme: <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Action for Better Health, Kenya</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Maticka-Tyndale, E.; Mungwete, R.; Jayeoba, O.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">School</span>-based programmes to combat the spread of HIV have been demonstrated to be effective over the short-term when delivered on a small scale. The question addressed here is whether results obtained with small-scale delivery are replicable in large-scale roll-out. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Action for Better Health (PSABH), a programme to train teachers to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4776824','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4776824"><span>The Effects of <span class="hlt">School</span>-Based Maum Meditation Program on the Self-Esteem and <span class="hlt">School</span> Adjustment in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yoo, Yang Gyeong; Lee, In Soo</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Self-esteem and <span class="hlt">school</span> adjustment of children in the lower grades of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, the beginning stage of <span class="hlt">school</span> life, have a close relationship with development of personality, mental health and characters of children. Therefore, the present study aimed to verify the effect of <span class="hlt">school</span>-based Maum Meditation program on children in the lower grades of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, as a personality education program. The result showed that the experimental group with application of Maum Meditation program had significant improvements in self-esteem and <span class="hlt">school</span> adjustment, compared to the control group without the application. In conclusion, since the study provides significant evidence that the intervention of Maum Meditation program had positive effects on self-esteem and <span class="hlt">school</span> adjustment of children in the early stage of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, it is suggested to actively employ Maum Meditation as a <span class="hlt">school</span>-based meditation program for mental health promotion of children in the early <span class="hlt">school</span> ages, the stage of formation of personalities and habits. PMID:23777717</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=product+AND+development+AND+strategy&pg=5&id=EJ1137450','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=product+AND+development+AND+strategy&pg=5&id=EJ1137450"><span>Teacher Perceived Difficulty in Implementing Differentiated Instructional Strategies in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gaitas, Sérgio; Alves Martins, Margarida</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This study analyses teacher perceived difficulty in implementing differentiated instructional strategies in regular classes. The participants were 273 Portuguese <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers with teaching experience ranging from 1 to 33 <span class="hlt">years</span>. A 39-item questionnaire was used to evaluate teacher perceived difficulty in relation to different…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=enlargement&pg=6&id=EJ071907','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=enlargement&pg=6&id=EJ071907"><span>A Local Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> French</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nisbet, J. D.; Welsh, Jennifer</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>A local study concludes that <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> French does not confer a lasting advantage but its contribution lies in the enlargement of interest rather that as a preparation for secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> work. (JB)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927586','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22927586"><span>Socialization and organizational citizenship behavior among Turkish <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Çavuş, Mustafa Fedai</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of organizational socialization levels of employees on organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). A total of 185 (70 female, 115 male) teachers were sampled at 27 <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Their ages ranged from 23 to 55 <span class="hlt">years</span>, with a mean (SD) of 36 (5.1). In this sample, 100 (54.1%) worked in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, and 85 (45.9%) worked in secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span>. A three-part questionnaire was designed for the study. The research scales were self-report measures of organizational socialization, OCB, and demographic variables. The hypothesized model was tested using Pearson correlation analyses and multiple regression analyses. The teachers demonstrated high level socialization (Mean 4.2, SD 0.7) and OCB (Mean 4.0, SD 0.54). Understanding, coworker support, and performance proficiency explained significant variance in organizational citizenship behavior; however, there was no relationship (p=0.286) between the organizational goals and values and OCB. The findings contribute to our understanding of the relationship between the level of organizational socialization and organizational citizenship behavior in educational settings. These findings suggest that high level organizational socialization supports organizational citizenship behavior in <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25113077','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25113077"><span>Is change in environmental supportiveness between <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> associated with a decline in children׳s physical activity levels?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Coombes, Emma; Jones, Andy; Page, Angie; Cooper, Ashley R</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Using a sample of English schoolchildren, we evaluate whether a change in <span class="hlt">school</span> local area environmental supportiveness between <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> is associated with changes in active travel behaviours and physical activity levels. Participant׳s activity levels and travel behaviours were recorded for a week during their <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> final <span class="hlt">year</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> first <span class="hlt">year</span>. Environmental supportiveness was evaluated using a Geographical Information System. Children attending both a <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> with a more supportive local environment were more likely to maintain active travel behaviours than those with less supportive environments. However, no trends were apparent with change in <span class="hlt">school</span> supportiveness and change in physical activity. Policies that focus on the maintenance and uptake of active travel behaviours may help maintain children׳s physical activity levels into adolescence. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=last+AND+update&id=EJ764144','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=last+AND+update&id=EJ764144"><span>Beyond Electronic Brochures: An Analysis of Singapore <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Web Sites</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hu, Chun; Soong, Andrew Kheng Fah</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This study aims to investigate how Singapore <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> use their web sites, what kind of information is contained in the web sites, and how the information is presented. Based on an analysis of 176 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> web sites, which represent all but one of the country's <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, findings indicate that most of Singapore's <span class="hlt">primary</span> school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1086963.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1086963.pdf"><span>A Scale Development for 21st Century Skills of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students: A Validity and Reliability Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Boyaci, S. Dilek Belet; Atalay, Nurhan</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The objective of the present study is to develop a measurement tool to assess 21st Century learning and innovation skills of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students. Study data was collected from 632 fourth grade students in five different <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> during 2014-2015 academic <span class="hlt">year</span> and data obtained from 609 fourth grade students were utilized in the study.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=seed+AND+development&pg=7&id=EJ1031372','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=seed+AND+development&pg=7&id=EJ1031372"><span>From Recipient to Contributor: The Story of a Social Justice Leader in a Hong Kong <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Szeto, Elson</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This article presents a principal's story of social justice practice in a Hong Kong <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. The narration accounts for the notion of social justice through his practice in various ways. Studying in a "rooftop" <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> located in a public housing area in Hong Kong was the principal's salient memory of his first <span class="hlt">year</span> of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Parental+AND+Authority+AND+Questionnaire&pg=6&id=ED184802','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Parental+AND+Authority+AND+Questionnaire&pg=6&id=ED184802"><span>Rural <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Closures in England.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Whitfield, Richard C.</p> <p></p> <p>A three-phase interdisciplinary effort between educators and environmental planners is focusing on the social effects of rural <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> reorganization now occuring in England as a result of a declining birth rate and the resulting need for <span class="hlt">school</span> closure. A questionnaire mailed nationally to rural Local Education Authorities, cross-community…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=violence+AND+primary+AND+school+AND+psychological&pg=2&id=EJ822935','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=violence+AND+primary+AND+school+AND+psychological&pg=2&id=EJ822935"><span>Crisis Management in a <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barclay, Colette</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Dunblane <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>, Scotland, and Columbine High <span class="hlt">School</span>, USA. Two headline tragedies that have led to trauma for their pupils and staff. Trauma that could be devastating because of the psychological impact and the practical requirements a crisis brings. Children's social and personal development can be negatively affected, their academic…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27612403','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27612403"><span>Anthropometric standards for Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children: Towards a system for monitoring and supporting children's development.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cochrane, Thomas; Davey, Rachel C; de Castella, F Robert</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>To provide two foundation elements of a proposed new system to support children's physical and body status development throughout <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>: (a) age and gender appropriate achievement (anthropometric) standards and (b) a system of monitoring, feedback and support. Repeated cross-sectional sampling involving 91 <span class="hlt">schools</span> across 5 Australian States and Territories between 2000 and 2011. Anthropometric data from 29,928 (14,643 girls, 15,285 boys) Australian children aged between 5 and 12.5 <span class="hlt">years</span> were used to develop progression standards (norm centiles) covering the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span>. Measures used were: height, weight, body mass index, per cent body fat, grip strength, standing long jump, cardiorespiratory fitness, sit-ups and sit-and-reach. These norms were then used to develop a Physical Activity and Lifestyle Management (PALM) system that could form the basis for progression, monitoring and reporting of anthropometric achievement standards for children. Tables and representative centile curves (3rd, 15th, 50th, 85th and 97th) for each gender and half-<span class="hlt">year</span> age group were produced. An illustrative example of the PALM system in operation was also provided. Our research provides gender and half-<span class="hlt">year</span> age specific anthropometric standards for Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. Furthermore, we have developed a monitoring and progression system that could be embedded in <span class="hlt">school</span> communities to help address the prevalence of underweight, overweight and obesity and decline in physical fitness standards. The proposed system is designed on behalf of children and families and would be administered through <span class="hlt">school</span> settings. Change, where needed, would be delivered by the supporting <span class="hlt">school</span> community. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26944936','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26944936"><span>Dental caries status of students from migrant <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Shanghai Pudong New Area.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Liu, Cheng-Jun; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Xue-Shan</p> <p>2016-03-05</p> <p>In China, there is a large migrant population. A significant proportion of children of the migrant population in China are not able to attend public <span class="hlt">schools</span> due to the lack of local household registration (HuKou). They turn to privately-operated migrant <span class="hlt">schools</span>, which are usually under-funded, have bad environmental facilities and are inadequately staffed compared to public <span class="hlt">schools</span>. This study aims to describe the dental caries status of students from migrant <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Shanghai Pudong New Area and factors that influence their caries status. Children (7-12 <span class="hlt">years</span> old) from migrant <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Shanghai Pudong New Area were randomly selected through a multi-stage cluster sampling method. Following the recommendation of the World Health Organization, caries experiences were recorded using the dmft index. A questionnaire to survey the children's socio-demographic characteristics and oral health-related behaviours was completed by the children's parents or guardians. A total of 1385 children in migrant <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> were invited, of which 1323 joined the survey (95.5 %). Among all the surveyed subjects, the prevalence rate of dental caries was 74.7 % (65.7 % for <span class="hlt">primary</span> teeth and 28.1 % for permanent teeth). The mean (SD) dmft scores were 3.17 (3.12), 2.74 (3.02) for the <span class="hlt">primary</span> teeth and 0.44 (0.84) for the permanent teeth, and 99.5 % of the carious teeth received no treatment. Students from migrant <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Shanghai Pudong New Area had bad conditions of dental caries and most of the carious teeth were left untreated. The caries experience was associated with tooth brushing habits, snacking habits, dental visit and gender.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14598928','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14598928"><span>Epidemiology of <span class="hlt">school</span> accidents during a six <span class="hlt">school-year</span> period in one region in Poland.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sosnowska, Stefania; Kostka, Tomasz</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The aim of the study was to analyse the incidence of <span class="hlt">school</span> accidents in relation to <span class="hlt">school</span> size, urban/rural environment and conditions of physical education classes. 202 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> with nearly 50,000 students aged 7-15 <span class="hlt">years</span> were studied during a 6-<span class="hlt">year</span> period in the Włocławek region in Poland. There were in total 3274 <span class="hlt">school</span> accidents per 293,000 student-<span class="hlt">years</span>. Accidents during breaks (36.6%) and physical education (33.2%) were most common. Most frequently accidents took place at schoolyard (29.7%), gymnasium (20.2%), and in the corridor and stairs (25.2%). After adjustment for students' age and sex, student-staff ratio and duration of <span class="hlt">school</span> hours, urban environment increased the probability of accident (OR: 1.25; 95% CI: 1.14-1.38). Middle-size <span class="hlt">schools</span> (8-23 classes) had similar accident rate as small <span class="hlt">schools</span> (OR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.83-1.04), while <span class="hlt">schools</span> with 24-32 classes (OR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.10-1.43) and with > or = 33 classes (OR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.17-1.58) had increased accident rate. Presence of a gymnasium was also associated with increased probability of accident (OR: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.38-1.61). Urban environment, larger <span class="hlt">school</span>-size and equipment with full-size gymnasium are important and independent risk factors for <span class="hlt">school</span> accidents. These findings provide some new insights into the epidemiology of <span class="hlt">school</span>-related accidents and may be useful information for the planning of strategies to reduce accident incidence in <span class="hlt">schools</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=appliances&pg=7&id=EJ813285','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=appliances&pg=7&id=EJ813285"><span>A Phenomenographic Study of Greek <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students' Representations Concerning Technology in Daily Life</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Solomonidou, Christina; Tassios, Athanassios</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>The present research investigated and studied students' representations about daily life technologies, in a prospect of studying technology in Greek <span class="hlt">primary</span> education. In the research participated 60 Greek <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students aged 9 to 12 <span class="hlt">years</span> old. Research data were collected through semi-structured, personal, clinical-type interviews. Each…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11461035','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11461035"><span>Anthropometric study of Mexican <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Prado-León, L R; Avila-Chaurand, R; González-Muñoz, E L</p> <p>2001-08-01</p> <p>This paper presents the results of an anthropometric survey conducted on male and female Mexican <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children age 6-11 <span class="hlt">years</span> in the metropolitan area of the city of Guadalajara. A set of 50 body dimensions was taken based on international standards. The sample consisted of 4758 children (boys and girls). The anthropometric measurements were compared to those of American, Cuban and Mexican children. The results indicate that the body dimensions of Mexican children from this study are different from those of American, Cuban, and other Mexican children, probably due to ethnic differences and the time lapse between the different studies. It is considered that the 50 parameters are necessary for the design of <span class="hlt">school</span> furniture, fittings and equipment in order to minimize musculoskeletal, visual, and circulatory problems resulting from using those badly designed elements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1106539.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1106539.pdf"><span>Teachers' Performance Motivation System in Thai <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pasathang, Sarojn; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sataphonwong, Pattananusron</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This research aims to: 1) study the present conditions and desirable condition of the motivation systems as well as how to find methods for motivating the performance of teachers in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, 2) develop a motivation system for the performance of teachers in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, 3) study the effects of using the motivation system for compliance…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1078739.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1078739.pdf"><span>A Thought on Reviewing Ways in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>He, Xiaojun</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This paper will focus on the effective review of English in the third grade of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. In the first part, the author introduces the importance of improving the effective review of English in the third grade of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. Analyzing from the aspects of theories, teachers have to get a good knowledge of language theories and analyze it…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=area+AND+51&id=EJ1168088','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=area+AND+51&id=EJ1168088"><span>Strengthening "the Foundations" of the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Curriculum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Duncombe, Rebecca; Cale, Lorraine; Harris, Jo</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>The low status of the foundation subjects (e.g. Music and Physical Education (PE)) in English <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> is well documented. Using PE as an illustrative example, a thematic analysis of 51 PE trainee students' assignments, based on their perceptions of a two-week experience in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, highlighted a number of areas of concern (e.g.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=data+AND+collection+AND+music&pg=7&id=EJ751096','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=data+AND+collection+AND+music&pg=7&id=EJ751096"><span>The Music Co-ordinator in the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Button, Stuart; Potter, Allison</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This article reports on the results of a study which investigated teachers' and head teachers' perceptions of the role of the music co-ordinator in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, and provides insight into how the role might be made more effective. The teachers participating in this project were chosen from twenty <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> from one local educational…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED506516.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED506516.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Inspection in Turkey: <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Expectations about Inspectors' Guidance Roles and the Realisation Level of These Expectations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Polat, Soner; Ugurlu, Celal Teyyar</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this research is to point out <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' expectations about inspectors' guidance roles and the realisation level of these expectations. The data used in this research that will be done in descriptive scanning model is collected from the views of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers selected randomly from Balikesir, Batman and Hatay.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED511468.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED511468.pdf"><span>Trigger Happy: The Troubling Trend of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Closures in Glasgow City <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Koch, Joshua F.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This paper examines the continuing trend of <span class="hlt">school</span> closures in Glasgow, Scotland. Particular attention will be paid to Stonedyke <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>, which Glasgow City Council was proposing to close at the time of this research. Current statistical data and research is used to better examine the current crisis Stonedyke <span class="hlt">Primary</span> faces. Furthermore,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1146680.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1146680.pdf"><span>An Evaluation of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students' Views about Noise Levels in <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bulunuz, Nermin; Bulunuz, Mizrap; Orbak, Ali Yurdun; Mulu, Nejla; Tavsanli, Ömer Faruk</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Effective education and teaching requires keeping classroom noise levels within specific limits. The purpose of this study is to evaluate students' views about the noise level in <span class="hlt">school</span>, its effects, and control of it at two <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (one public <span class="hlt">school</span> and one private <span class="hlt">school</span>) located in a district of Bursa--within the scope of the TÜBITAK…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=science+AND+news&pg=6&id=EJ998614','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=science+AND+news&pg=6&id=EJ998614"><span>At the Crossroads: The Impact of New Irish Science Curricula on First <span class="hlt">Year</span> Post-<span class="hlt">Primary</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Varley, Janet Penelope; Murphy, Cliona; Veale, Orlaith</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In Ireland, new science curricula were introduced at <span class="hlt">primary</span> and early post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> levels in 2003, in an effort to reverse declining interest and enrolment in science. This paper reports on a national study that explored first <span class="hlt">year</span> post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> students' experiences of and attitudes towards <span class="hlt">school</span> science under these new curricula. Data were…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27498174','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27498174"><span>Prevalence of Voice Disorders in Iranian <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mohammadzadeh, Ali; Sandoughdar, Nazila</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>The voice is the sound produced by vibration of our vocal cords and has an important role in verbal communication. A child's voice disorder may significantly impair his or her ability to be heard and understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of voice disorders in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students. In this descriptive-analytical study, a total of 501 fourth through fifth grade <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students (boys = 51.6%, girls = 48.4%) with the age range of 10-12 <span class="hlt">years</span> were selected from nine public <span class="hlt">school</span> systems in Tehran that were assessed in October 2013 through March 2014. Presence of a voice disorder characterized by hoarseness was identified by a dual approach including investigator screening and parent identification. We used the grade of overall dysphonia, roughness, breathiness, asthenia, and strain scale for perceptual evaluation of voice. All children were assessed with video laryngoscopy examination by an otorhinolaryngologist. The recordings were made during spontaneous speech, counting numbers, sustained utterance of the (/a/) vowel, reading a standard passage in Farsi, and the ratio of /s/ and /z/. Statistical analysis was done via chi-square test and t test. Results indicated that the prevalence of voice disorders in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students is 53.2%. The results indicated significant differences between gender and subjects with lesions (P = 0.00000), gender and vocal disorders (P = 0.04), and s/z ratio and type of lesion (P = 0.0002). Phonotrauma seems to play an important role in child dysphonia, with nodules as main diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2867482','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2867482"><span>A longitudinal analysis of sex differences in math and spatial skills in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age children☆</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lachance, Jennifer A.; Mazzocco, Michèle M.M.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>We report on a longitudinal study designed to assess possible sex differences in math achievement, math ability, and math-related tasks during the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age <span class="hlt">years</span>. Participants included over 200 children from one public <span class="hlt">school</span> district. Annual assessments included measures of math ability, math calculation achievement scores, rapid naming and decoding tasks, visual perception tests, visual motor tasks, and reading skills. During select <span class="hlt">years</span> of the study we also administered tests of counting and math facts skills. We examined whether girls or boys were overrepresented among the bottom or top performers on any of these tasks, relative to their peers, and whether growth rates or predictors of math-related skills differed for boys and girls. Our findings support the notion that sex differences in math are minimal or nonexistent on standardized psychometric tests routinely given in assessments of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age children. There was no persistent finding suggesting a male or female advantage in math performance overall, during any single <span class="hlt">year</span> of the study, or in any one area of math or spatial skills. Growth rates for all skills, and early correlates of later math performance, were comparable for boys and girls. The findings fail to support either persistent or emerging sex differences on non-specialized math ability measures during the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age <span class="hlt">years</span>. PMID:20463851</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MS%26E..296a2045L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018MS%26E..296a2045L"><span>Literacy Infrastructure, Access to Books, and the Implementation of the <span class="hlt">School</span> Literacy Movement in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Indonesia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Laksono, K.; Retnaningdyah, P.</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Literacy Infrastructure and access to books are the foundation of literacy activity. Indonesia has regulations from the Ministry of Education and Culture requiring that 15 minutes should be used each day before the learning begins to read books other than textbooks. However, many <span class="hlt">schools</span> are not yet obeying this requirement. The purposes of this study are to describe the literacy infrastructure in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Indonesia, to analyze access to books in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, to explain the <span class="hlt">School</span> Literacy Movement implementation, and to identify issues around the implementation of reading strategies in a context in which there is limited access to books. The questionnaire and interview study were conducted in 30 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in East Java, Indonesia. The study concluded that the literacy infrastructure and access to books in 30 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> are below standard, but the <span class="hlt">school</span> community enthusiastically implements the objectives of the <span class="hlt">School</span> Literacy Movement. Many <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> are already implementing good many reading strategies although there are some problems related to teacher competence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Incidence&pg=7&id=EJ1089539','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Incidence&pg=7&id=EJ1089539"><span>A Critical Investigation of the Nature and Extent of Cyberbullying in Two Post-<span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Northern Ireland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Purdy, Noel; York, Leanne</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study aimed to investigate internet usage among post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> pupils in <span class="hlt">years</span> 9, 11 and 13 in two contrasting post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Northern Ireland, the nature and incidence of cyberbullying among these pupils, and the ways in which their <span class="hlt">schools</span> are currently addressing the problem. A mixed methodological approach was adopted: a paper…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17689323','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17689323"><span>Quasi-experimental evaluation of a national <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> HIV intervention in Kenya.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p>This study examined the impact of a <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> pupils in Kenya. A quasi-experimental mixed qualitative-quantitative pre- and 18-month post-design using 40 intervention and 40 matched control <span class="hlt">schools</span> demonstrated significant program impact on targeted objectives of (1) adequate program delivery and, for standard 6 and 7 pupils (ages 11-16 <span class="hlt">years</span>), (2) increased HIV-related knowledge; (3) increased communication with parents and teachers about HIV and sexuality; (4) increased assistance to fellow pupils to avoid sexual activity; (5) increased self-efficacy related to abstinence and condom use; (6) decreased exposure to HIV through delayed first intercourse, decreased sexual activity and increased condom. Results support the conclusions that the existing infrastructure is adequate for national roll-out of the program; that the program has its most beneficial effect on sexually inexperienced youth and should therefore be implemented with the youngest age groups possible; and that gains are gender specific, with boys reporting increased condom use while girls are more likely to decrease or delay sexual activity. Based on these results, the program began national roll-out to all <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in 2005. By June 2006, the program was operating in 11,000 of the country's nearly 19,000 <span class="hlt">schools</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28691169','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28691169"><span>Academic Performance in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children With Common Emotional and Behavioral Problems.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mundy, Lisa K; Canterford, Louise; Tucker, Dawn; Bayer, Jordana; Romaniuk, Helena; Sawyer, Susan; Lietz, Petra; Redmond, Gerry; Proimos, Jenny; Allen, Nicholas; Patton, George</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>Many emotional and behavioral problems first emerge in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> and are the forerunners of mental health problems occurring in adolescence. However, the extent that these problems may be associated with academic failure has been explored less. We aimed to quantify the association between emotional and behavioral problems with academic performance. A stratified random sample of 8- to 9-<span class="hlt">year</span>-olds (N = 1239) were recruited from <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Australia. Data linkage was performed with a national assessment of academic performance to assess reading and numeracy. Parent report assessed emotional and behavioral problems with students dichotomized into "borderline/abnormal" and "normal" categories. One in 5 grade 3 students fell in the "borderline/abnormal" category. Boys with total difficulties (β = -47.8, 95% CI: -62.8 to -32.8), conduct problems, and peer problems scored lower on reading. Numeracy scores were lower in boys with total difficulties (β = -37.7, 95% CI: -53.9 to -21.5) and emotional symptoms. Children with hyperactivity/inattention scored lower in numeracy. Girls with peer problems scored lower in numeracy. Boys with emotional and behavioral problems in mid-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> were 12 months behind their peers. Children with emotional and behavioral problems are at high risk for academic failure, and this risk is evident in mid-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. © 2017, American <span class="hlt">School</span> Health Association.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26844179','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26844179"><span>Increasing physical activity levels in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> physical education: The SHARP Principles Model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Powell, Emma; Woodfield, Lorayne A; Nevill, Alan M</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>To evaluate the effectiveness of a one-<span class="hlt">year</span> teaching intervention to increase moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> physical education (PE). A quasi-experimental, non-equivalent group design involving four classes from two <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the West Midlands, UK. In March 2014 <span class="hlt">schools</span> were selected through purposive sampling to match <span class="hlt">schools</span> in terms of size and demographics (baseline, n = 111: post-intervention, n = 95); data were collected from children in <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span> 3 and 4 (aged 7 to 9 <span class="hlt">years</span>). The intervention involved developing teacher effectiveness through the SHARP Principles Model which was grounded in the Self Determination Theory (SDT), the Social Ecological Model (SEM) and three key ingredients from the Behaviour Change Taxonomy (BCT). MVPA was assessed at baseline and four weeks post-intervention using the System for Observing Fitness and Instruction Time (SOFIT). Four individual teacher interviews were conducted with the intervention <span class="hlt">school</span>, to explore teachers' perceptions of the intervention. A two-way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) indicated large interaction effect sizes for time spent in MVPA (F(1, 27) = 11.07, p = 0.003, ηp (2) = .316) and vigorous activity (VPA) (F = (1,27) = 8.557, p = .007, ηp (2) = .263). PA in the intervention <span class="hlt">school</span> increased significantly whereas in the control <span class="hlt">school</span> MVPA remained relatively constant and VPA decreased. The qualitative findings revealed two main emergent themes: a paradigm shift and teacher's developing pedagogy. The intervention was effective in increasing MVPA in PE. Recommendations based on this evaluation would be for the SHARP Principles Model to be replicated and evaluated on a wider scale across a variety of contexts.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4733067','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4733067"><span>Increasing physical activity levels in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> physical education: The SHARP Principles Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Powell, Emma; Woodfield, Lorayne A.; Nevill, Alan M.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a one-<span class="hlt">year</span> teaching intervention to increase moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> physical education (PE). Methods: A quasi-experimental, non-equivalent group design involving four classes from two <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the West Midlands, UK. In March 2014 <span class="hlt">schools</span> were selected through purposive sampling to match <span class="hlt">schools</span> in terms of size and demographics (baseline, n = 111: post-intervention, n = 95); data were collected from children in <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span> 3 and 4 (aged 7 to 9 <span class="hlt">years</span>). The intervention involved developing teacher effectiveness through the SHARP Principles Model which was grounded in the Self Determination Theory (SDT), the Social Ecological Model (SEM) and three key ingredients from the Behaviour Change Taxonomy (BCT). MVPA was assessed at baseline and four weeks post-intervention using the System for Observing Fitness and Instruction Time (SOFIT). Four individual teacher interviews were conducted with the intervention <span class="hlt">school</span>, to explore teachers' perceptions of the intervention. Results: A two-way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) indicated large interaction effect sizes for time spent in MVPA (F(1, 27) = 11.07, p = 0.003, ηp2 = .316) and vigorous activity (VPA) (F = (1,27) = 8.557, p = .007, ηp2 = .263). PA in the intervention <span class="hlt">school</span> increased significantly whereas in the control <span class="hlt">school</span> MVPA remained relatively constant and VPA decreased. The qualitative findings revealed two main emergent themes: a paradigm shift and teacher's developing pedagogy. Conclusions: The intervention was effective in increasing MVPA in PE. Recommendations based on this evaluation would be for the SHARP Principles Model to be replicated and evaluated on a wider scale across a variety of contexts. PMID:26844179</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=self+AND+improvement&pg=5&id=EJ978967','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=self+AND+improvement&pg=5&id=EJ978967"><span>Flying the "Active <span class="hlt">School</span> Flag": Physical Activity Promotion through Self-Evaluation in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Ireland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chroinin, Deirdre Ni; Murtagh, Elaine; Bowles, Richard</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> are key sites where children can be active, advance their knowledge and understanding of how to participate in physical activity (PA) and develop an appreciation of its importance in their lives. This study explored the role of <span class="hlt">schools</span> in promoting PA asking: how do <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> approach the promotion of whole-<span class="hlt">school</span> PA? Data…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18269427','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18269427"><span>Cooperation between parents and <span class="hlt">school</span> nurses in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>: parents' perceptions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mäenpää, Tiina; Astedt-Kurki, Päivi</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>Cooperation between pupils' parents and <span class="hlt">school</span> nurses is an important part of health promotion in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Developing frank and trusting relationships contributes to easy and uninhibited cooperation. Cooperation between parents and <span class="hlt">school</span> nurses has not been widely researched internationally. This article reports on parents' views on cooperation with <span class="hlt">school</span> nurses in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The study aims at contributing to <span class="hlt">school</span> nurses' work so that instead of focusing only on the children, family nursing approaches could be improved. Nineteen parents from 13 families from southern Finland were interviewed for the study in 2004. The data were analysed by grounded theory and the constant comparative method was utilized. Six concepts describing parents' views on cooperation were generated on the basis of the data. Cooperation consists of supporting the child's well-being. <span class="hlt">School</span> nurses take children's and parents' concerns seriously and intervene effectively if the child's health is threatened. <span class="hlt">School</span> nurses' expertise is not very visible within <span class="hlt">school</span> communities. Hoping to receive information and desiring parental involvement are important concepts of cooperation with the <span class="hlt">school</span> nurse. The child's family is not sufficiently known or taken holistically into consideration when the child's health is promoted. Parents are the initiators of cooperation within <span class="hlt">school</span> health care and parents describe this by the concept of one-sided communication. Parents do not know about <span class="hlt">school</span> nurses' work and <span class="hlt">school</span> health services. They would like to be more involved in <span class="hlt">school</span> nursing activities. When developing children's health services, parents' expertise in their children's well-being should be paid more attention. This study enhances the knowledge of family nursing by describing Finnish parents' perceptions of cooperation with <span class="hlt">school</span> nurses. The findings facilitate the understanding of cooperation in <span class="hlt">school</span> health services.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27541067','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27541067"><span>Effects of Auricular Acupressure Therapy on <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Dysmenorrhea for Female High <span class="hlt">School</span> Students in South Korea.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cha, Nam Hyun; Sok, Sohyune R</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>To examine the effect of auricular acupressure therapy on <span class="hlt">primary</span> dysmenorrhea among female high <span class="hlt">school</span> students in South Korea. A randomized controlled trial was employed. The study sample consisted of 91 female high <span class="hlt">school</span> students, with 45 participants in the experimental group and 46 in the control group in two regions of South Korea. The average age of the participants was 16.7 <span class="hlt">years</span>, and the average age of menarche was 12.2 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Auricular acupressure therapy including an auricular acupressure needle on skin paper tape was applied on an ear for 3 days during periods of extreme <span class="hlt">primary</span> dysmenorrhea. The acupoint names were Jagung, Sinmun, Gyogam, and Naebunbi. For the placebo control group, only the skin paper tape without an auricular acupressure needle was applied on the same acupoints. Measures used were the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire to assess <span class="hlt">primary</span> dysmenorrhea, and the visual analog scale to assess abdominal and back pain of participants. There were significant differences on abdominal pain (t = 24.594, p < .001), back pain (t = 22.661, p < .001), and <span class="hlt">primary</span> dysmenorrhea (t = 32.187, p < .001) between the two groups. Auricular acupressure therapy decreased abdominal pain, back pain, and <span class="hlt">primary</span> dysmenorrhea of female high <span class="hlt">school</span> students in South Korea. Auricular acupressure therapy was an effective intervention for alleviating abdominal pain, back pain, and <span class="hlt">primary</span> dysmenorrhea of female high <span class="hlt">school</span> students in South Korea. For feasibility of the auricular acupressure therapy in practice, it is needed to train and learn the exact positions of acupoints in ear. Health providers should consider providing auricular acupressure therapy as an alternative method for reducing abdominal and back pain, and <span class="hlt">primary</span> dysmenorrhea in female high <span class="hlt">school</span> students in South Korea. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4205525','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4205525"><span>Residents' perspectives on the final <span class="hlt">year</span> of medical <span class="hlt">school</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Obrien, Bridget; Niehaus, Brian; Teherani, Arianne; Young, John Q.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Objectives To characterize junior residents’ perspectives on the purpose, value, and potential improvement of the final <span class="hlt">year</span> of medical <span class="hlt">school</span>. Methods Eighteen interviews were conducted with junior residents who graduated from nine different medical <span class="hlt">schools</span> and who were in internal medicine, surgery, and psychiatry programs at one institution in the United States. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed inductively for themes. Results Participants’ descriptions of the purpose of their recently completed final <span class="hlt">year</span> of medical <span class="hlt">school</span> contained three <span class="hlt">primary</span> themes: residency-related purposes, interest- or need-based purposes, and transitional purposes. Participants commented on the most valued aspects of the final <span class="hlt">year</span>. Themes included opportunities to: prepare for residency; assume a higher level of responsibility in patient care; pursue experiences of interest that added breadth of knowledge, skills and perspective; develop and/or clarify career plans; and enjoy a period of respite. Suggestions for improvement included enhancing the learning value of clinical electives, augmenting specific curricular content, and making the final <span class="hlt">year</span> more purposeful and better aligned with career goals. Conclusions The final <span class="hlt">year</span> of medical <span class="hlt">school</span> is a critical part of medical education for most learners, but careful attention is needed to ensure that the <span class="hlt">year</span> is developmentally robust. Medical educators can facilitate this by creating structures to help students define personal and professional goals, identify opportunities to work toward these goals, and monitor progress so that the value of the final <span class="hlt">year</span> is optimized and not exclusively focused on residency preparation. PMID:28029642</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27285056','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27285056"><span>The production of direct object clitics in pre-<span class="hlt">school</span>- and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>-aged children with specific language impairments.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guasti, Maria Teresa; Palma, Silvia; Genovese, Elisabetta; Stagi, Paolo; Saladini, Gabriella; Arosio, Fabrizio</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Third-person direct object (DO) clitic pronoun production is examined through an elicited production method in pre-<span class="hlt">school</span>- and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>-aged groups of Italian children with specific language impairment (SLI) to establish whether there is an improvement from age 5 <span class="hlt">years</span> to age 7 <span class="hlt">years</span> and whether there are qualitative differences in the two groups' responses. It was found that 5- and 7-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old Italian children with SLI produce fewer third-person DO clitics than same-age peers. The kind of responses they provide changes: at 5 <span class="hlt">years</span>, children with SLI tend to omit clitics, while at 7 <span class="hlt">years</span>, they use a full noun. Production of third-person DO clitics is a persistent challenge for children with SLI and is confirmed to be a good clinical marker both at 5 and 7 <span class="hlt">years</span> of age.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=free+AND+education&pg=7&id=EJ1038622','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=free+AND+education&pg=7&id=EJ1038622"><span>The Effect of Free <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Education Policy on Late <span class="hlt">School</span> Entry in Urban <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Kenya</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ngware, Moses W.; Oketch, Moses; Ezeh, Alex C.; Mutisya, Maurice</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Late <span class="hlt">school</span> entry is driven by several factors, one of the key ones being the cost barrier to <span class="hlt">schooling</span>. Policies such as free <span class="hlt">primary</span> education (FPE) that advocate for universal coverage are therefore partly aimed at removing the cost barrier. The Kenyan Government, like many in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), introduced FPE in 2003 with the aim of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=philosophy&pg=7&id=EJ982249','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=philosophy&pg=7&id=EJ982249"><span>Philosophy in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>White, John</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The article is a critical discussion of the aims behind the teaching of philosophy in British <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. It begins by reviewing the recent Special Issue of the "Journal of Philosophy of Education" Vol 45 Issue 2 2011 on "Philosophy for Children in Transition", so as to see what light this might throw on the topic just…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1138576.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1138576.pdf"><span>Strengthening the Creative Transformational Leadership of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kallapadee, Yadapak; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This research and development aimed to: 1) study the components and indicators of creative transformational leadership of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers; 2) study the existing situation, and the desirable situation of creative transformational leadership of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in the northeastern region of Thailand; 3) develop a program to strengthen…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=RESILIENCE&pg=5&id=EJ1026802','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=RESILIENCE&pg=5&id=EJ1026802"><span>Does a Socio-Ecological <span class="hlt">School</span> Model Promote Resilience in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lee, Patricia C.; Stewart, Donald E.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background: This research investigates the extent to which the holistic, multistrategy "health-promoting <span class="hlt">school</span>" (HPS) model using a resilience intervention can lead to improved resilience among students. Methods: A quasi-experimental design using a study cohort selected from 20 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Queensland, Australia was employed. Ten…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3641928','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3641928"><span>Screening for refractive error among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Bayelsa state, Nigeria</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Opubiri, Ibeinmo; Pedro-Egbe, Chinyere</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Vision screening study in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children has not been done in Bayelsa State. This study aims to screen for refractive error among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Bayelsa State and use the data to plan for <span class="hlt">school</span> Eye Health Program. Methods A cross sectional study on screening for refractive error in <span class="hlt">school</span> children was carried out in Yenagoa Local Government Area of Bayelsa State in June 2009. A multistage sampling technique was used to select the study population (pupils aged between 5-15 <span class="hlt">years</span>). Visual acuity (VA) for each eye, was assessed outside the classroom at a distance of 6 meters. Those with VA ≤6/9 were presented with a pinhole and the test repeated. Funduscopy was done inside a poorly lit classroom. An improvement of the VA with pinhole was considered refractive error. Data was analyzed with EPI INFO version 6. Results A total of 1,242 <span class="hlt">school</span> children consisting of 658 females and 584 males were examined.About 97.7% of pupils had normal VA (VA of 6/6) while 56 eyes had VAs ≤ 6/9. Of these 56 eyes, the visual acuity in 49 eyes (87.5%) improved with pinhole. Twenty seven pupils had refractive error, giving a prevalence of 2.2%. Refractive error involved both eyes in 22 pupils (81.5%) and the 8-10 <span class="hlt">years</span> age range had the highest proportion (40.7%) of cases of refractive error followed by the 9-13 <span class="hlt">year</span>-old age range (37%). Conclusion The prevalence of refractive error was 2.2% and most eyes (97.7%) had normal vision. PMID:23646210</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3442379','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3442379"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> sun protection policies and practices 4 <span class="hlt">years</span> after baseline—a follow-up study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Reeder, Anthony I.; Jopson, Janet A.; Gray, Andrew</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Before the 2005 launch of the New Zealand SunSmart <span class="hlt">Schools</span> Accreditation Programme (SSAP), 242 randomly sampled <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> completed a mail survey about sun protection policies, practices, curriculum and environment. A 2009 follow-up included 189 (78%) and their mean Total Accreditation Score (TAS = total SSAP requirements met, range 0–12), increased by 0.8 (95% CI 0.5–1.2, P < 0.001) from 7.8 (95% CI 7.4–8.1) to 8.6 (95% CI 8.3–8.9) with evidence changes differed between regions (P = 0.024). The 2009 mean TAS varied by region (range 7.9–9.4, unadjusted P = 0.004, adjusted P = 0.013) with no clear pattern, but likely resource allocation association. TAS of <span class="hlt">schools</span> acknowledging input from Health Promoting <span class="hlt">Schools</span> demonstrated a tendency towards being statistically significantly higher by 0.5 (95% CI −0.1 to 1.1, P = 0.082), but statistically significantly higher by 1.1 (95% CI 0.5–1.7, P < 0.001) for <span class="hlt">schools</span> acknowledging Cancer Society input. Lowest attainment was for the clothing (43%), shade (52%) and curriculum (55%) criteria. Key perceived barriers were cost, particularly of shade and limited support by parents and others. <span class="hlt">Schools</span> which had not applied for accreditation identified lack of programme awareness and ‘other priorities’ as barriers; further information, better resourcing and training assistance as key needs. Observed positive change justifies increased support to consolidate gains and achieve sustainable universality. PMID:22907533</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED574121.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED574121.pdf"><span>Gender Bias in Singaporean <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> English Coursebooks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ong, Chye Wah; Jacobs, George M.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Schools</span> can have an important effect on children's developing views of gender roles, and coursebooks form an important element of children's <span class="hlt">school</span> experience. In 1996, we read an article by Anthea Fraser Gupta and Ameline Lee Su Yin that described gender bias in a 1980s <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> English coursebook series used in Singapore <span class="hlt">schools</span>. We had…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=morality+AND+everyday+AND+life&id=EJ681132','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=morality+AND+everyday+AND+life&id=EJ681132"><span>New Directions in the Moral Education Curriculum in Chinese <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jie, Lu; Desheng, Gao</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>An analysis is presented of the problems that have existed for over 20 <span class="hlt">years</span> in the moral education curriculum in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> of China. These include the separation of moral education from children's lives, the moralizing and memorization used as the basic methods of teaching and learning, and the overlaps between courses on society and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21314913','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21314913"><span>The Incredible <span class="hlt">Years</span> Therapeutic Dinosaur Programme to build social and emotional competence in Welsh <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bywater, Tracey; Hutchings, Judy; Whitaker, Christopher; Evans, Ceri; Parry, Laura</p> <p>2011-02-11</p> <p><span class="hlt">School</span> interventions such as the Incredible <span class="hlt">Years</span> Classroom Dinosaur Programme targets pupil behaviour across whole classrooms, yet for some children a more intense approach is needed. The Incredible <span class="hlt">Years</span> Therapeutic Dinosaur Programme is effective for clinically referred children by enhancing social, problem-solving skills, and peer relationship-building skills when delivered in a clinical setting in small groups. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Therapeutic Programme, delivered with small groups of children at high-risk of developing conduct disorder, delivered in <span class="hlt">schools</span> already implementing the Classroom Programme. This is a pragmatic, parallel, randomised controlled trial.Two hundred and forty children (aged 4-8 <span class="hlt">years</span>) rated by their teacher as above the 'borderline cut-off' for concern on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and their parents, will be recruited. Randomisation is by individual within blocks (<span class="hlt">schools</span>); 1:1 ratio, intervention to waiting list control. Twenty <span class="hlt">schools</span> will participate in two phases. Two teachers per <span class="hlt">school</span> will deliver the programme to six intervention children for 2-hours/week for 18 weeks between baseline and first follow-up. The control children will receive the intervention after first follow up. Phase 1 comprises three data collection points - baseline and two follow-ups eight months apart. Phase 2 includes baseline and first follow-up.The Therapeutic Programme includes elements on; Learning <span class="hlt">school</span> rules; understanding, identifying, and articulating feelings; problem solving; anger management; how to be friendly; how to do your best in <span class="hlt">school</span>. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> outcomes are; change in child social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. Secondary outcomes are; teacher and parent mental wellbeing, child academic attainment, child and teacher <span class="hlt">school</span> attendance. Intervention delivery will be assessed for fidelity. Intention to treat analyses will be conducted. ANCOVA, effect sizes, mediator and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1124649.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1124649.pdf"><span>Effective <span class="hlt">School</span> Evaluation in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> from the Dimension of Parents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Akan, Durdagi</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study is to analyze the effectiveness of the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> depending on "parents" dimension according to the perceptions of administrator and teacher in terms of different variables. It employed descriptive survey model. Data was collected through effective <span class="hlt">school</span> questionnaire with the aim of determining the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..1910598C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017EGUGA..1910598C"><span>"Land of Volcanoes" workshop: a first step in Earth Sciences for "L'Alzina" Public <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">primary</span> students (4-5 <span class="hlt">years</span> old)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cortés, Jordi; Geyer, Adelina; Díaz, Mabel</p> <p>2017-04-01</p> <p>"Land of Volcanoes" is a scientific outreach workshop devised by Adelina Geyer, researcher of the Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera, ICTJA-CSIC. The workshop proposes an approximation to the world of volcanology through the explanation of different concepts related to these geological phenomena: its origin and its characteristics, magma eruptions and their associated hazards, etc. Over the last <span class="hlt">years</span>, Geyer has developed the workshop in the context of different outreach activities for an audience formed, not only but mainly, by secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> students. At the beginning of 2016, as a result of different informal contacts between ICTJA-CSIC Communication Unit and Mabel Díaz, teacher of the "L'Alzina" public <span class="hlt">school</span> (Molins de Rei), arose the idea of developing Geyer's workshop in front of 26 students aged 4-5 <span class="hlt">years</span> old, <span class="hlt">primary</span> students. Díaz explains that it is "in the age ranged between 0 and 6 <span class="hlt">years</span> when observation and hands-on activities are important elements of the learning process", although she adds that " <span class="hlt">primary</span> students are usually not seen as potential audiences of this type of outreach activities and workshops". Díaz says that "Science is simple: it is about observing, asking questions and finding answers, the same that children, even the smallest, do constantly." Adelina Geyer accepted the challenge of conducting the "Land of Volcanoes" workshop in front of 4-5 <span class="hlt">year</span> old children, although it was necessary to adapt its format and content to the new audience. Meanwhile, students prepared the session following the same process used in the project work system employed at the <span class="hlt">school</span> and that started from two questions: "What do we know about volcanoes? What we want to know about them?" On June 3rd 2016, Adelina Geyer conducted "Land of Volcanoes" workshop at l'Alzina public <span class="hlt">school</span> in front of a classroom of 4-5 <span class="hlt">years</span> old students. The activity was divided in two parts with a total duration of 45 minutes: 1) Brief introductory talk: this part</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018E%26ES..125a2219L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018E%26ES..125a2219L"><span>The prevalence and risk factors of stunting among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in North Sumatera, Indonesia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lestari, S.; Fujiati, I. I.; Keumalasari, D.; Daulay, M.</p> <p>2018-03-01</p> <p>Stunting in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>-aged children is a kind of health and nutrition problem in Indonesia which has an impact on the human quality resources degradation. This research aimed to determine the stunting prevalence and the risk factors associated with stunting in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in North Sumatra Province. This research is an analysis of cross-sectional approach. The total sampleis 400 children aged 8-13 <span class="hlt">years</span> old were in the study from the Medan city and Langkat regency in July - October 2017. Data collected by using questionnaire and anthropometric assessment. Stunting (<-2 SD of height-for-age Z-score) were defined by using the World Health Organization reference 2007. Chi-square analysis and logistic regression were used toassess the association between risk factors and stunting. The prevalence of stunting in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children was 38.87%. The factors associated with stunting <span class="hlt">school</span> children were theeducation of mother (OR=1.53), income (OR=2.27), work of mother (OR=1.39), energy intake (OR=2.66) and protein intake (OR=2.02). The dominant factor that influences stunting in <span class="hlt">school</span> children was energy intake. The conclusion of this study is stunting prevalence in <span class="hlt">school</span> children in NorthSumatra higher.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29724196','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29724196"><span>Cluster randomised controlled trial of 'whole <span class="hlt">school</span>' child maltreatment prevention programme in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Northern Ireland: study protocol for Keeping Safe.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>McElearney, Aisling; Brennan-Wilson, Aoibheann; Murphy, Christina; Stephenson, Phyllis; Bunting, Brendan</p> <p>2018-05-03</p> <p>Child maltreatment has a pervasive, detrimental impact on children's wellbeing. Despite a growing focus on prevention through <span class="hlt">school</span> based education, few programmes adopt a whole- <span class="hlt">school</span> approach, are multi-component, seek to address all forms of maltreatment, or indeed have been robustly evaluated. This paper describes a cluster randomised controlled trial designed to evaluate a <span class="hlt">school</span> based child maltreatment prevention programme: 'Keeping Safe' in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Northern Ireland. The intervention has been designed by a non-profit agency. Programme resources include 63 lessons taught incrementally to children between four and 11 <span class="hlt">years</span> old, and is premised on three core themes: healthy relationships, my body, and being safe. There are programme resources to engage parents and to build the capacity and skills of <span class="hlt">school</span> staff. A cluster Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) will be conducted with children in 80 <span class="hlt">schools</span> over a two-<span class="hlt">year</span> period. The unit of randomisation is the <span class="hlt">school</span>. <span class="hlt">Schools</span> will be allocated to intervention or wait-list control groups using a computer-generated list. Data will be collected at three time points: baseline, end of <span class="hlt">year</span> one, and end of <span class="hlt">year</span> two of programme implementation. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> outcomes will include: children's understanding of key programme concepts, self-efficacy to keep safe in situations of maltreatment, anxiety arising from programme participation, and disclosure of maltreatment. Secondary outcomes include teachers' comfort and confidence in teaching the programme and parents' confidence in talking to their children about programme concepts. This RCT will address gaps in current practice and evidence regarding <span class="hlt">school</span> based child maltreatment prevention programmes. This includes the use of a whole- <span class="hlt">school</span> approach and multi-component programme that addresses all maltreatment concepts, a two-<span class="hlt">year</span> period of programme implementation, and the tracking of outcomes for children, parents, and teachers. Methodologically, it will extend</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=cyberbullies&pg=3&id=EJ980242','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=cyberbullies&pg=3&id=EJ980242"><span>The Emergence of Cyberbullying: A Survey of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Pupils' Perceptions and Experiences</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Monks, Claire P.; Robinson, Susanne; Worlidge, Penny</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>There is little research that has examined cyberbullying among children under the age of 11 <span class="hlt">years</span>. The current study explored the nature and extent of the phenomenon among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 7- to 11-<span class="hlt">years</span>-old (N = 220; 116 boys and 104 girls) and investigated their perceptions of the distress caused to victims, how victims would feel,…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=analysis+AND+climatic&pg=2&id=ED173049','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=analysis+AND+climatic&pg=2&id=ED173049"><span>Design Considerations for Construction of Rural <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Siddiqui, Kalim A.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>Widely differing local conditions, increased community participation in education, more lifelong education, and decentralization of <span class="hlt">schools</span> are factors which should affect the architecture of rural <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Pakistan. Also significant are the results of a 1977 survey which indicate that building quality is unrelated to <span class="hlt">school</span> attendance…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2130586','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2130586"><span>Sonne dysentery in day <span class="hlt">schools</span> and nurseries: an eighteen-<span class="hlt">year</span> study in Edmonton</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Thomas, Mair E. M.; Tillett, Hilary E.</p> <p>1973-01-01</p> <p>A study of Sonne dysentery infections in 19 <span class="hlt">primary</span> and 11 secondary day-<span class="hlt">schools</span> and 4 day-nurseries has been made over a period of 18 <span class="hlt">years</span> in an urban area. Measures were taken throughout to try to prevent and control outbreaks. Sonne dysentery was not endemic in the <span class="hlt">school</span> population and, even at times of high incidence, epidemics were localized within a few of the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, usually in the spring or autumn terms. Incidence rates of Sonne dysentery were highest in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> with large infant departments and in nurseries. Secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> entirely escaped outbreaks. The co-operation of head teachers was engaged for all precautionary measures in <span class="hlt">schools</span>. A policy of immediate exclusion of suspected and infected children was useful in preventing and controlling <span class="hlt">school</span> epidemics of dysentery. Toilet hygiene was often poor in <span class="hlt">schools</span> with outbreaks, and this was found to be a profitable field for applying control measures. Infected kitchen workers were only occasionally involved. Recommendations are given in the light of this study, and some reference is made to the more difficult problem posed by dysentery outbreaks in day-nurseries, where temporary closure may be the best policy. It is important that responsibility for infectious disease control in <span class="hlt">schools</span> be clearly delineated in the reorganized health services of 1974. Teachers can play an important part in limiting infection. PMID:4518360</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bad+AND+news&pg=5&id=EJ909774','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bad+AND+news&pg=5&id=EJ909774"><span>Quality of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Education Inputs in Urban <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Evidence from Nairobi</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ngware, Moses W.; Oketch, Moses; Ezeh, Alex C.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This article examines the quality of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> inputs in urban settlements with a view to understand how it sheds light on benchmarks of education quality indicators in Kenya. Data from a <span class="hlt">school</span> survey that involved 83 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> collected in 2005 were used. The data set contains information on <span class="hlt">school</span> quality characteristics of various…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20338089','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20338089"><span>Does nutrition education in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> make a difference to children's fruit and vegetable consumption?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ransley, Joan Kathleen; Taylor, Elizabeth Faye; Radwan, Yara; Kitchen, Meaghan Sarah; Greenwood, Darren Charles; Cade, Janet Elizabeth</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>To explore whether initiatives to promote fruit and vegetables in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> are associated with changes in children's diet. Cross-sectional dietary survey. Main outcome measures were intakes of fruit, vegetables and key nutrients; and a score for initiatives promoting fruit and vegetables in <span class="hlt">school</span>. One hundred and twenty-nine English <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. <span class="hlt">Year</span> 2 children (aged 6-7 <span class="hlt">years</span>, n 2530). In <span class="hlt">schools</span> running a gardening club, children ate more vegetables, 120 (95 % CI 111, 129) g/d, compared with those that did not, 99·3 (95 % CI 89·9, 109) g/d; and where parents were actively involved in <span class="hlt">school</span> initiatives to promote fruit and vegetables, children's intake of vegetables was higher, 117 (95 % CI 107, 128) g/d, compared with those where parents were not involved, 105 (95 % CI 96·2, 114) g/d. In <span class="hlt">schools</span> that achieved a high total score (derived from five key types of initiatives to promote fruit and vegetables in <span class="hlt">school</span>) children ate more vegetables, 123 (95 % CI 114, 132) g/d, compared with those that did not, 97·7 (95 % CI 88·7, 107) g/d. Gardening, parental involvement and other activities promoting fruit and vegetables to children in <span class="hlt">school</span> may be associated with increased intake of vegetables but not fruit. These effects were independent of deprivation status and ethnicity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29353440','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29353440"><span>Healthy lifestyle promotion in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> through the board game Kaledo: a pilot cluster randomized trial.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Viggiano, Emanuela; Viggiano, Alessandro; Di Costanzo, Anna; Viggiano, Adela; Viggiano, Andrea; Andreozzi, Eleonora; Romano, Vincenzo; Vicidomini, Claudia; Di Tuoro, Daniela; Gargano, Giuliana; Incarnato, Lucia; Fevola, Celeste; Volta, Pietro; Tolomeo, Caterina; Scianni, Giuseppina; Santangelo, Caterina; Apicella, Maria; Battista, Roberta; Raia, Maddalena; Valentino, Ilaria; Palumbo, Marianna; Messina, Giovanni; Messina, Antonietta; Monda, Marcellino; De Luca, Bruno; Amaro, Salvatore</p> <p>2018-01-20</p> <p>The board game Kaledo was proven to be effective in improving nutrition knowledge and in modifying dietary behavior in students attending middle and high <span class="hlt">school</span>. The present pilot study aims to reproduce these results in younger students (7-11 <span class="hlt">years</span> old) attending <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. A total of 1313 children from ten <span class="hlt">schools</span> were recruited to participate in the present study. Participants were randomized into two groups: (1) the treatment group which consisted of playing Kaledo over 20 sessions and (2) the no intervention group. Anthropometric measures were carried out for both groups at baseline (prior to any treatment) and at two follow-up post-assessments (8 and 18 months). All the participants completed a questionnaire concerning physical activity and a 1-week food diary at each assessment. The <span class="hlt">primary</span> outcomes were (i) BMI z-score, (ii) scores on physical activity, and (iii) scores on a dietary questionnaire. BMI z-score was significantly lower in the treated group compared to the control group at 8 months. Frequency and duration of self-reported physical activity were also significantly augmented in the treated group compared to the control group at both post-assessments. Moreover, a significant increase in the consumption of healthy food and a significant decrease in junk food intake were observed in the treated group. The present results confirm the efficacy of Kaledo in younger students in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, and it can be used as a useful nutritional tool for obesity prevention programs in children. What is Known: • Kaledo is a new educational board game to improve nutrition knowledge and to promote a healthy lifestyle. • In two cluster randomized trials conducted in Campania region (Italy), we showed that Kaledo could improve nutrition knowledge and dietary behavior and have a positive effect on the BMI z-score in children with age ranging from 9 to 14 <span class="hlt">years</span> old attending <span class="hlt">school</span>. • Kaledo may be used as an effective tool for obesity prevention</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED514777.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED514777.pdf"><span>Inclusive Education: Proclamations or Reality (<span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' View)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Slavica, Pavlovic</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This paper deals with 2 focal points of inclusive education, which is the integral segment of the current education reform in the Bosnia and Herzegovina: its position in various proclamations and in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' reality, i.e., legislative aspects vs. everyday situation in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The survey research was carried out through the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED516966.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED516966.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Year</span>-Round versus Traditional <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lyttle, LeighAnne</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This document serves as a literature review for the practicality and cost effectiveness of traditional versus <span class="hlt">year</span>-round <span class="hlt">school</span> systems. The differences in <span class="hlt">year</span>-round and traditional <span class="hlt">schools</span> are many, as the debate lingers on which type is best for students' learning. Generally conclusive, the literature indicates that <span class="hlt">year</span>-round <span class="hlt">schools</span>' benefits…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16420500','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16420500"><span>Indoor environmental quality in a 'low allergen' <span class="hlt">school</span> and three standard <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Western Australia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, G; Spickett, J; Rumchev, K; Lee, A H; Stick, S</p> <p>2006-02-01</p> <p>To investigate indoor environmental quality in classrooms, assessments were undertaken in a 'low allergen' <span class="hlt">school</span> and three standard <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Western Australia. Dust allergens, air pollutants and physical parameters were monitored in the four <span class="hlt">schools</span> at four times (summer <span class="hlt">school</span> term, autumn holiday, winter <span class="hlt">school</span> term and winter holiday) in 2002. The levels of particulate matter (PM(10)) and volatile organic compounds were similar between the four <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Although slightly decreased levels of dust-mite and cat allergens were observed in the 'low allergen' <span class="hlt">school</span>, the reductions were not statistically significant and the allergen levels in all <span class="hlt">schools</span> were much lower than the recommended sensitizing thresholds. However, significantly lower levels of relative humidity and formaldehyde level during summer-term were recorded in the 'low allergen' <span class="hlt">school</span>. In conclusion, the evidence here suggests that the 'low allergen' <span class="hlt">school</span> did not significantly improve the indoor environmental quality in classrooms. Practical Implications <span class="hlt">School</span> is an important environment for children in terms of exposure to pollutants and allergens. By assessing the levels of key pollutants and allergens in a low allergen <span class="hlt">school</span> and three standard <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Western Australia, this study provides useful information for implementation of healthy building design that can improve the indoor environment in <span class="hlt">schools</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hmi&pg=4&id=ED327267','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hmi&pg=4&id=ED327267"><span>A Survey of the Quality of Education for Four-<span class="hlt">Year</span>-Olds in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Classes. Report by HM Inspectors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Department of Education and Science, London (England).</p> <p></p> <p>From the spring of 1986 to the autumn of 1988, the HM Inspectorate (HMI) undertook a survey of the quality of provision of education for 4-<span class="hlt">year</span>-olds in <span class="hlt">primary</span> classes. The work of 4-<span class="hlt">year</span>-olds in 152 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in 14 different local education authorities (LEAs), serving three London boroughs, four large metropolitan authorities, and seven…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=drawings+AND+children&pg=6&id=EJ1064570','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=drawings+AND+children&pg=6&id=EJ1064570"><span>What Can <span class="hlt">Year</span>-5 Children's Drawings Tell Us about Their <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Experiences?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Maxwell, Tim</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study describes the research process and trialling of a drawing technique for gathering pupils' views within a Personal Construct Psychology framework. Seventy-two pupils in curriculum <span class="hlt">year</span> 5 were asked to produce two drawings of themselves in <span class="hlt">school</span> (144 drawings), one in a "happy" situation and one in an "unhappy"…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sources+AND+finance+AND+expansion&pg=6&id=ED037914','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sources+AND+finance+AND+expansion&pg=6&id=ED037914"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Buildings in Asia: Administration, Facilities and Programmes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Soriano, Domingo</p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> buildings of the Asian Member States of UNESCO are evaluated in this study, which is in three parts--(1) a statement of the purposes and procedures of the study, with comments and recommendations relating to the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> situation, (2) a detailed analysis of the replies to the questionnaire which was utilized, and (3) a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=I+AND+need+AND+art+AND+school&id=EJ946749','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=I+AND+need+AND+art+AND+school&id=EJ946749"><span>An Ode to Joy...or the Sounds of Silence? An Exploration of Arts Education Policy in Australian <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Russell-Bowie, Deirdre</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The arts are an integral and important component of our everyday lives. As such, they need to be a vital part of our children's education. However, this has rarely been the case in Australian state <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> over the past two hundred <span class="hlt">years</span>. This article explores the history of the arts in Australian state <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> since the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=importance+AND+communication+AND+skills&pg=3&id=EJ1009454','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=importance+AND+communication+AND+skills&pg=3&id=EJ1009454"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Councils: Organization, Composition and Head Teacher Perceptions and Values</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Burnitt, Michael; Gunter, Helen</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">School</span> councils have been an integral part of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> life for the last decade and, despite not being mandatory in England, they are now to be found in the vast majority of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. This research article aims to examine the current position of <span class="hlt">school</span> councils in terms of their organization, the issues they address and the views held…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18557454','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18557454"><span>Qualitative study on nutritional knowledge of <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> children and mothers in Tehran.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdollahi, M; Amini, M; Kianfar, H; Dadkhah-Piraghag, M; Eslami-Amirabadi, M; Zoghi, T; Assasi, N; Kalantari, N</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The nutritional education demands of <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> children in Tehran were evaluated in a qualitative study, through 20 focus group discussions, 16 for children and 4 for mothers, among 128 children aged 6-11 <span class="hlt">years</span> and 32 mothers in 8 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Tehran. Children knew about the advantages of different food groups, including helping digestion, growth and increasing intelligence. They obtained their knowledge mainly from their parents and television, as well as books, teachers and friends. Mothers thought the sources that had most effect on children's nutritional knowledge were television advertisements, parents and classmates. Most of the children claimed that they preferred to learn about nutrition from their parents and television, e.g. children's programmes and advertisements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=negative+AND+framing&pg=3&id=EJ1047928','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=negative+AND+framing&pg=3&id=EJ1047928"><span>Blackboard Bullies: Workplace Bullying in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fahie, Declan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This paper offers a comprehensive examination of the "lived experience" of workplace bullying in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Ireland. Underpinned by the qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews with a class teacher, a chairperson of a Board of Management and a <span class="hlt">school</span> principal--all of whom who believe themselves to have been targets of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=dos+AND+commands&pg=2&id=EJ1075701','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=dos+AND+commands&pg=2&id=EJ1075701"><span>The Directive Communication of Australian <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Principals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Nobile, John</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Directive communication is a key leadership practise in <span class="hlt">schools</span>. However, very little direct attention has been given to this important feature of the <span class="hlt">school</span> communication system. The purpose of the research reported here was to produce a richer description of directive communication in the context of Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, and in so doing,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20636698','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20636698"><span>Typologies of family functioning and children's adjustment during the early <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sturge-Apple, Melissa L; Davies, Patrick T; Cummings, E Mark</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Guided by family systems theory, the present study sought to identify patterns of family functioning from observational assessments of interparental, parent-child, and triadic contexts. In addition, it charted the implications for patterns of family functioning for children's developmental trajectories of adjustment in the <span class="hlt">school</span> context across the early <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span>. Two-hundred thirty-four kindergarten children (129 girls and 105 boys; mean age = 6.0 <span class="hlt">years</span>, SD = 0.50 at Wave 1) and their parents participated in this multimethod, 3-<span class="hlt">year</span> longitudinal investigation. As expected, latent class analyses extracted 3 <span class="hlt">primary</span> typologies of functioning including: (a) cohesive, (b) enmeshed, and (c) disengaged families. Furthermore, family patterns were differentially associated with children's maladaptive adjustment trajectories in the <span class="hlt">school</span> context. The findings highlight the developmental utility of incorporating pattern-based approaches to family functioning.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25810639','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25810639"><span>Health, safety and environment conditions in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Northern Iran.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Behzadkolaee, Seyed Mohammad Asadi; Mirmohammadi, Seyed Taghi; Yazdani, Jamshid; Gorji, Ali Morad Heidari; Toosi, Ameneh; Rokni, Mohammad; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>People spend a considerable part of their childhood time in the <span class="hlt">schools</span>, a phase that coincides with their physical and mental growth. A healthy educational environment is vital to student's health and wellbeing. This study is a descriptive study conducted in 100 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (both state and nonprofit <span class="hlt">schools</span>) from Sari's Districts 1 and 2 in Iran. Sampling was performed by census and data were collected using the standard questionnaire by direct interview. Data were analyzed by Excel and SPSS software (Version 20.0. IBM Corp, Armonk), NY: IBM Corp using independent numerical T2 testing. Significant relationship was observed between the kind of <span class="hlt">schools</span> (P = 0.045) and their locations (P = 0.024), however the health, safety and environment (HSE) ratings among boys only versus girls only <span class="hlt">schools</span> were similar (P = 0.159). Interestingly private and nongovernment <span class="hlt">schools</span> and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> from Sari's districts one had consistently higher HSE ratings. The differential and higher HSE ratings in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> run by Private organizations and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> from Sari's districts one could be due to manager's awareness and implementation of recommended HSE standards, <span class="hlt">schools</span> neglecting and overlooking these standards had lower HSE ratings. It is necessary that <span class="hlt">schools</span> with lower HSE ratings are made aware of the guidelines and necessary infrastructures allocated to improve their HSE ratings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Football+AND+child+AND+Research&id=EJ772744','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Football+AND+child+AND+Research&id=EJ772744"><span>Dangerous Activities within an Invisible Playground: A Study of Emergent Male Football Play and Teachers' Perspectives of Outdoor Free Play in the Early <span class="hlt">Years</span> of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jarvis, Pam</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This research was carried out during a study which focused upon the rough and tumble play of children in the early <span class="hlt">years</span> department of a suburban <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in northern England. The child sample's playtime activities were ethnographically observed over a period of 18 calendar months, during which time interviews were also carried out with the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12789105','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12789105"><span>A survey of the prevalence of refractive errors among children in lower <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Kampala district.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kawuma, Medi; Mayeku, Robert</p> <p>2002-08-01</p> <p>Refractive errors are a known cause of visual impairment and may cause blindness worldwide. In children, refractive errors may prevent those afflicted from progressing with their studies. In Uganda, like in many developing countries, there is no established vision-screening programme for children on commencement of <span class="hlt">school</span>, such that those with early onset of such errors will have many <span class="hlt">years</span> of poor vision. Over all, there is limited information on refractive errors among children in Africa. To determine the prevalence of refractive errors among <span class="hlt">school</span> children attending lower <span class="hlt">primary</span> in Kampala district; the frequency of the various types of refractive errors, and their relationship to sexuality and ethnicity. A cross-sectional descriptive study. Kampala district, Uganda A total of 623 children aged between 6 and 9 <span class="hlt">years</span> had a visual acuity testing done at <span class="hlt">school</span> using the same protocol; of these 301 (48.3%) were boys and 322 (51.7%) girls. Seventy-three children had a significant refractive error of +/-0.50 or worse in one or both eyes, giving a prevalence of 11.6% and the commonest single refractive error was astigmatism, which accounted for 52% of all errors. This was followed by hypermetropia, and myopia was the least common. Significant refractive errors occur among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 6 to 9 <span class="hlt">years</span> at a prevalence of approximately 12%. Therefore, there is a need to have regular and simple vision testing in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children at least at the commencement of <span class="hlt">school</span> so as to defect those who may suffer from these disabilities.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=single+AND+sex+AND+schools+AND+learning&pg=7&id=EJ742914','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=single+AND+sex+AND+schools+AND+learning&pg=7&id=EJ742914"><span>A Longitudinal Analysis of Sex Differences in Math and Spatial Skills in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Age Children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lachance, Jennifer A.; Mazzocco, Michele M. M.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>We report on a longitudinal study designed to assess possible sex differences in math achievement, math ability, and math-related tasks during the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age <span class="hlt">years</span>. Participants included over 200 children from one public <span class="hlt">school</span> district. Annual assessments included measures of math ability, math calculation achievement scores, rapid naming…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27837596','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27837596"><span>Perception of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers to <span class="hlt">school</span> children's mental health problems in Southwest Ethiopia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kerebih, Habtamu; Abrha, Hailay; Frank, Reiner; Abera, Mubarek</p> <p>2016-11-12</p> <p>Teachers perception of child mental health problems and their attitude to <span class="hlt">school</span>-based mental health services helps in designing early intervention strategies aimed at promoting the service. However, little is known in this regard among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in Ethiopia. Therefore, this study assessed perceptions and attitude of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers to child mental health problem and <span class="hlt">school</span>-based mental health programs in Jimma town, southwest Ethiopia in 2013. A cross-sectional study design was implemented among 568 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in Jimma town, from 1 to 30 October 2013. Perceptions and attitude of teachers to children with mental health problems and <span class="hlt">school</span> mental health related information were assessed using a structured self- administered questionnaire. About 40% of teachers recognized the list of psychopathology items presented to them as child mental health problems while 54.4% of them rated child mental health problem as severe. Externalizing behaviors were perceived as the most severe problems. Teaching experience and teaching in public <span class="hlt">schools</span> were significantly associated with the perception of severe type of child mental health problems. About 95% of teachers acknowledged that <span class="hlt">school</span>-based mental health programs are important but limited availability was reported. Despite the high problem severity ratings, teachers' perception of the psychopathology as a mental health problem in children was low. There was also a favorable attitude on the importance and the need of <span class="hlt">school</span>-based child mental health programs. Thus, creating mental health awareness for teachers and establishing <span class="hlt">school</span> mental health services to intervene in child mental health problem is crucial.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24449799','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24449799"><span>We love our <span class="hlt">school</span> toilets: involving <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in improving their <span class="hlt">school</span> toilets.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Senior, Elizabeth</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>This article reports on the planning, implementation and evaluation of an intervention to improve <span class="hlt">school</span> students' experience of using the <span class="hlt">school</span> toilet in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in Melbourne, Australia. 20 students from grades 2-6 participated in focus groups, to discuss what they valued about the <span class="hlt">school</span> and raise awareness of issues they were not happy about. A common theme from all of the focus groups was that students reported avoiding use of the <span class="hlt">school</span> toilets. Using the ideas generated from the focus groups, the student council (with input from staff), developed a self-administered pre- and post-test questionnaire. This was given to 220 students in grades 1-4, aged 6-10 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Improvements suggested by the students were made to the toilet block, and then a post-test was administered. Independent t tests were conducted. The pre-test indicated that 71% of girls and 65% of boys feared the behaviour of other students in the toilet. Overwhelmingly, the qualitative comments focused on poor student behaviour in the toilets, with lack of privacy due to student misbehaviour mentioned in 90% of the comments. After the toilets were revamped, the greatest gains were made in students' attitudes toward the toilets, with a 37% increase in students who indicated they now liked the toilet facility. Incidents of vandalism also decreased; however, student misconduct in the toilets was still regarded as a problem. Involving students in refurbishing their toilets improved how students viewed the toilets and reduced vandalism; however, a different intervention is required to change inappropriate behaviours in the toilet.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=programming+AND+visual&pg=3&id=EJ1171097','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=programming+AND+visual&pg=3&id=EJ1171097"><span>Students Learning to Program by Developing Games: Results of a <span class="hlt">Year</span>-Long Project in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Settings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fokides, Emmanuel</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Aim/Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether the authoring of computer games in a mainstream <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> setting can support the learning of game design and programming concepts. Background: Despite the benefits for students when they learn how to program and the significant body of research regarding this matter, these…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=theory+AND+necessity&pg=4&id=EJ1031551','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=theory+AND+necessity&pg=4&id=EJ1031551"><span>Environmental Attitudes, Knowledge, and Alternative Conceptions of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children in Greece</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Malandrakis, Georgios; Chatzakis, Stergios</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>In this study the environmental attitudes, knowledge, and alternative conceptions of 281 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children from 5th and 6th grade, ages 10-12 <span class="hlt">years</span> were explored. Low knowledge scores, indicate a substantial lack of knowledge on basic environmental issues, while attitude scores were relatively high. Children's environmental attitudes and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=contemporary+AND+mathematics&pg=3&id=EJ1040835','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=contemporary+AND+mathematics&pg=3&id=EJ1040835"><span>Upper <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching Functional Thinking in Algebra</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wilkie, Karina J.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This article is based on a project that investigated teachers' knowledge in teaching an important aspect of algebra in the middle <span class="hlt">years</span> of <span class="hlt">schooling</span>--functions, relations and joint variation. As part of the project, 105 upper <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers were surveyed during their participation in Contemporary Teaching and Learning of Mathematics, a research…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1105760.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1105760.pdf"><span>The Role of the Teacher in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Web 2.0 Use</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Blannin, Joanne</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have become ubiquitous in our society. In particular, 10-12 <span class="hlt">year</span> old (<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> aged) children report that they increasingly rely upon ICTs for social interaction and for learning (ACMA, 2013). In spite of the large number of students reporting high ICT use, research indicates that many…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED572932.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED572932.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Perceptions of Mathematical Reasoning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Loong, Esther Yook-Kin; Vale, Colleen; Bragg, Leicha A.; Herbert, Sandra</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Little is known about how Australian teachers interpret, enact and assess reasoning. This paper reports on <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers' perceptions of reasoning prior to observation and subsequent trialling of demonstration lessons in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. The findings indicate that while some teachers were able to articulate what reasoning means, others were…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=australian+AND+principles+AND+evidence&pg=3&id=ED163606','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=australian+AND+principles+AND+evidence&pg=3&id=ED163606"><span>Non-contact Time for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hill, Peter</p> <p></p> <p>The State <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Union of Western Australia has requested that <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers be free from teaching one-fifth time for other professional duties. Several arguments in favor of this proposal for more "noncontact time" have been advanced. The argument that <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers should have noncontact time equivalent to that of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=vision&pg=3&id=EJ1032318','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=vision&pg=3&id=EJ1032318"><span>The Potential Impact of Undiagnosed Vision Impairment on Reading Development in the Early <span class="hlt">Years</span> of <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thurston, Allen</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This article presents a critical review of the literature surrounding the potential impact of undiagnosed and untreated vision impairment on reading development in the early <span class="hlt">years</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. Despite pre-<span class="hlt">school</span> screening programmes, it is still possible for children to enter <span class="hlt">school</span> with undiagnosed, uncorrected vision impairments. This can…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED479166.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED479166.pdf"><span>Moral and Democratic Education in Public <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Veugelers, W.; Kat, E. De</p> <p></p> <p>In <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary education in the Netherlands, 30% of the <span class="hlt">schools</span> are public, and 70% are private. Both private and public <span class="hlt">schools</span> are state funded and must follow the national curriculum. Within this context, <span class="hlt">schools</span> can develop their own identities and teaching methods. With regard to the identity of public education in the Netherlands,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=statistics+AND+poverty&pg=6&id=EJ986743','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=statistics+AND+poverty&pg=6&id=EJ986743"><span>Revisiting <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Dropout in Rural Cambodia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>No, Fata; Sam, Chanphirun; Hirakawa, Yukiko</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Previous studies on <span class="hlt">school</span> dropout in Cambodia often used data from subjects after they already dropped out or statistics from education-related institutions. Using data from children in two rural provinces before they dropped out, this study examines four main factors in order to identify their influence on <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> dropout in Cambodia.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=300&pg=4&id=EJ1051232','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=300&pg=4&id=EJ1051232"><span>Perspectives on English Teacher Development in Rural <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ping, Wang</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Questionnaires are used to examine Chinese rural <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> English teachers' needs and challenges and perceptions in the implementation of Standards for Teachers of English in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> as professional development in rural <span class="hlt">school</span> contexts in China. A total of 300 teachers participated in the research. Their feedback illustrates that…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27594903','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27594903"><span>Effects of problem-solving interventions on aggressive behaviours among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils in Ibadan, Nigeria.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abdulmalik, Jibril; Ani, Cornelius; Ajuwon, Ademola J; Omigbodun, Olayinka</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Aggressive patterns of behavior often start early in childhood, and tend to remain stable into adulthood. The negative consequences include poor academic performance, disciplinary problems and encounters with the juvenile justice system. Early <span class="hlt">school</span> intervention programs can alter this trajectory for aggressive children. However, there are no studies evaluating the feasibility of such interventions in Africa. This study therefore, assessed the effect of group-based problem-solving interventions on aggressive behaviors among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils in Ibadan, Nigeria. This was an intervention study with treatment and wait-list control groups. Two public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Ibadan Nigeria were randomly allocated to an intervention group and a waiting list control group. Teachers rated male <span class="hlt">Primary</span> five pupils in the two <span class="hlt">schools</span> on aggressive behaviors and the top 20 highest scorers in each <span class="hlt">school</span> were selected. Pupils in the intervention <span class="hlt">school</span> received 6 twice-weekly sessions of group-based intervention, which included problem-solving skills, calming techniques and attribution retraining. Outcome measures were; teacher rated aggressive behaviour (TRAB), self-rated aggression scale (SRAS), strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), attitude towards aggression questionnaire (ATAQ), and social cognition and attribution scale (SCAS). The participants were aged 12 <span class="hlt">years</span> (SD = 1.2, range 9-14 <span class="hlt">years</span>). Both groups had similar socio-demographic backgrounds and baseline measures of aggressive behaviors. Controlling for baseline scores, the intervention group had significantly lower scores on TRAB and SRAS 1-week post intervention with large Cohen's effect sizes of 1.2 and 0.9 respectively. The other outcome measures were not significantly different between the groups post-intervention. Group-based problem solving intervention for aggressive behaviors among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students showed significant reductions in both teachers' and students' rated aggressive behaviours</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=students+AND+spend+AND+free+AND+time&id=ED579555','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=students+AND+spend+AND+free+AND+time&id=ED579555"><span>Missouri <span class="hlt">School</span> Superintendent Perceptions of <span class="hlt">Year</span>-Round <span class="hlt">School</span> Calendars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cook, Becca Christine</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study is to synthesize perceptions of Missouri superintendents with regards to <span class="hlt">year</span>-round <span class="hlt">school</span> calendars and correlate them to the four themes of Time, Student Learning and Achievement, District Cost, and Family Cost and Support. The idea behind <span class="hlt">year</span>-round <span class="hlt">school</span> calendars is that by going to <span class="hlt">school</span> throughout the <span class="hlt">year</span> with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=andon&id=EJ670511','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=andon&id=EJ670511"><span>Ability Grouping Practices in the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>: A Survey.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hallam, Susan; Ireson, Judith; Lister, Veronica; Chaudhury, Indrani Andon; Davies, Jane</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>Surveys how British <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> group their students for different <span class="hlt">school</span> subjects, such as according to class ability or mixed ability grouping. Finds that most <span class="hlt">schools</span> used the class ability groupings, either in mixed or ability groupings. Includes references. (CMK)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1068885.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1068885.pdf"><span>The Development of Visionary Leadership Administrators in Thai <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yordsala, Suwit; Tesaputa, Kowat; Sri-Ampai, Anan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This research aimed: 1) to investigate the current situations and needs in developing visionary leadership of Thai <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> administrators; 2) to develop visionary leadership development program of Thai <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> administrators, and; 3) to evaluate the implementation of the developed program of administrators visionary leadership…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24793869','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24793869"><span>[Dengue-related knowledge, attitudes, and practices in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Torres, José Luis; Ordóñez, José Genaro; Vázquez-Martínez, M Guadalupe</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>To identify dengue-related knowledge, attitudes, and practices among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in Tapachula, Chiapas, Mexico, before and after an educational intervention. The study was carried out at 19 randomly selected public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Surveys of knowledge, attitudes, and practices were conducted before and after educational sessions with fifthand sixth-grade elementary <span class="hlt">school</span> students. The educational strategy "Escuelas sin mosquitos" ("<span class="hlt">Schools</span> without Mosquitoes") emphasized the importance of students' participation in taking care of their <span class="hlt">schools</span> and homes in order to prevent dengue through vector control. Before and after the educational sessions, a total of 3 124 surveys were conducted on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of 1 562 fifth and sixth-grade students (772 and 790 students, respectively) between 10 and 12 <span class="hlt">years</span> of age. The students' level of knowledge was significantly higher after the implementation of the educational strategy. In comparison with the fifth-graders, the sixth-grade students both already had and also acquired significantly more knowledge of several aspects of the disease and the vector. In all the <span class="hlt">schools</span>, there were containers with water identified as potential breeding sites, and in 68% of the <span class="hlt">schools</span>, these containers tested positive for Aedes aegypti larvae. It was demonstrated that by implementing an educational strategy, children's knowledge, attitudes, and practices were improved in terms of taking care of their <span class="hlt">schools</span> and promoting a change of attitude to this disease at home.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26924878','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26924878"><span>Women's Political Empowerment and Investments in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schooling</span> in India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Halim, Nafisa; Yount, Kathryn M; Cunningham, Solveig A; Pande, Rohini P</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Using a national district-level dataset of India composed of information on investments in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> (data from the District Information Survey for Education [DISE, 2007/8]) and information on demographic characteristics of elected officials (data from the Election Commission of India [ECI, 2000/04]), we examined the relationship between women's representation in State Legislative Assembly (SLA) seats and district-level investments in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span>. We used OLS regressions adjusting for confounders and spatial autocorrelation, and estimated separate models for North and South India. Women's representation in general SLA seats typically was negatively associated with investments in <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> amenities and teachers; women's representation in SLA seats reserved for under-represented minorities, i.e., scheduled castes and scheduled tribes, typically was positively associated with investments in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span>, especially in areas addressing the basic needs of poor children. Women legislators' gender and caste identities may shape their decisions about redistributive educational policies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=black+AND+dance&pg=4&id=EJ926734','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=black+AND+dance&pg=4&id=EJ926734"><span>Positioning the <span class="hlt">School</span> in the Landscape: Exploring Black History with a Regional Australian <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zeegers, Margaret</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This paper deals with a project establishing an Indigenous Australian artists-in-residence program at a regional Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> to foreground its Black History. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students worked with Indigenous Australian story tellers, artists, dancers and musicians to explore ways in which they could examine print and non-print texts for…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22822640','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22822640"><span>Prevalence of sleep disordered breathing symptoms among Malay <span class="hlt">school</span> children in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in Malaysia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fadzil Abdullah, A A; Jamalludin, A R; Norrashidah, A W; Norzila, M Z; Asiah Kassim, K; Rus Anida, A; Hasniah, A L; Ramli, Z; Samsinah, H</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is increasingly being diagnosed in children. However, there is no prevalence study done in Malaysia. The study objective was to evaluate the prevalence of SDB symptoms based on parental reports and associated risk factors among Malay <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 6 to 10 <span class="hlt">years</span> old in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> using a translated University Michigan Paediatric Sleep Questionnaire (Malay UM-PSQ). The children whose parents responded to the questionnaire and consented were examined, documenting height, weight, skin fold thickness, neck and abdominal circumference, tonsillar size, nostril examination and presence of micrognathia or retrognathia. There were 550 respondents. The prevalence of parental report of SDB symptoms was 14.9 % (95 % CI 11.9, 17.9). Two hundred and eighty-five (51.8%) <span class="hlt">school</span> children were males with mean age of 8.5 <span class="hlt">years</span> (SD 1.1). The associated risk factors for SDB symptoms are male, obesity, large neck and waist circumference, positive history of asthma, history of recurrent tonsillitis, enlarged tonsil (> 4+) and enlarged nasal turbinate. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender is the only significant independent risk factor of SDB symptoms</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=effort+AND+preventive&pg=5&id=EJ234285','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=effort+AND+preventive&pg=5&id=EJ234285"><span>Promoting Good Mental Health from <span class="hlt">Primary</span> to Early Secondary Grades--Preventive Interventions in <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jason, Leonard A.; Ferone, Louise</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The paper describes a four-<span class="hlt">year</span> research effort aimed at developing preventive educational interventions for children with behavior problems in inner city <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The implications of switching the emphasis from early secondary to <span class="hlt">primary</span> preventive programs are discussed. (Author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Engineering+AND+article&pg=5&id=EJ1156597','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Engineering+AND+article&pg=5&id=EJ1156597"><span>Integrating STEM into the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Curriculum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Qureshi, Asima</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Science has always been a valued subject at Meadowbrook <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>, and the head teacher has a real vision for the <span class="hlt">school</span> to embrace engineering as part of the science curriculum to give the children the opportunity to be more creative with their projects. To get started, teachers attended an engineering workshop run by Science Oxford Schools…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28738407','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28738407"><span>Pain and learning in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>: a population-based study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kosola, Silja; Mundy, Lisa K; Sawyer, Susan M; Canterford, Louise; van der Windt, Danielle A; Dunn, Kate M; Patton, George C</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>Despite the frequency of pain among children, little is known about its effects on learning and <span class="hlt">school</span> outcomes. The objective of this study was to quantify the association of pain and academic achievement while taking into account the presence of co-occurring emotional symptoms. A population-based stratified random sample of 1239 students aged 8 to 9 <span class="hlt">years</span> from <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Melbourne, Australia, was recruited for the Childhood to Adolescence Transition Study. Children indicated sites of pain that had lasted for a day or longer in the past month using a pain manikin. Depressive- and anxiety-related symptoms were assessed using child-reported items. National assessment results for reading and numeracy were used to measure academic achievement. Sixty-five percent of children reported pain in at least 1 body site and 16% reported chronic pain. Increasing number of pain sites was associated with poorer reading scores in a dose-response fashion (β = -3.1; 95% confidence interval -4.9 to -1.3; P < 0.001). The association was only partly attenuated when adjusting for emotional symptoms (β = -2.6; 95% confidence interval -4.5 to -0.8; P < 0.001) and was not moderated by emotional symptoms. Children with chronic pain were a <span class="hlt">year</span> behind their peers in both reading and numeracy. Among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students, pain was associated with lower reading scores even after adjusting for the presence of emotional symptoms. Although population-based longitudinal studies will be required to ascertain consistency and possible causality, grounds exist for considering pain and emotional symptoms in the assessment of children with reading difficulties.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Seventeen&pg=4&id=EJ1020299','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Seventeen&pg=4&id=EJ1020299"><span>Effects on Coping Skills and Anxiety of a Universal <span class="hlt">School</span>-Based Mental Health Intervention Delivered in Scottish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Collins, Sabrina; Woolfson, Lisa Marks; Durkin, Kevin</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Anxiety disorders are common in children and may signal risk of depression, social, or academic difficulties. This study evaluated the effects of a universal mental health promotion intervention delivered in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Three hundred and seventeen 9- to 10-<span class="hlt">year</span>-olds were randomly allocated by class group to intervention conditions…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27834440','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27834440"><span>Role of <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in identifying attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Mansoura, Egypt.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Awadalla, N J; Ali, O F; Elshaer, S; Eissa, M</p> <p>2016-11-02</p> <p>There is a knowledge gap in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers that affects their ability to detect attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study measured <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' knowledge about ADHD, and implemented a training programme to improve early detection of ADHD. The prevalence and risk factors of ADHD were also studied. The training programme was implemented through a 2-day workshop for 39 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers who completed a validated Arabic version of the ADHD Rating Scale for 873 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. The children's parents completed the questionnaire to explore ADHD risk factors. The teachers' pre-training knowledge scores of ADHD ranged from 17.9 to 46.2%. Post-training, their scores improved significantly to 69.2-94.9%. Prevalence rate of ADHD was 12.60%. On logistic regression, independent predictors of ADHD were female gender, unemployed fathers and rural residence. In conclusion, ADHD is a significant health problem among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Mansoura, Egypt. Efforts should be made to improve teachers' knowledge about ADHD and control modifiable risk factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4709470','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4709470"><span>Mindfulness Training in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> Decreases Negative Affect and Increases Meta-Cognition in Children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vickery, Charlotte E.; Dorjee, Dusana</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Studies investigating the feasibility and impact of mindfulness programs on emotional well-being when delivered by <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in pre-adolescence are scarce. This study reports the findings of a controlled feasibility pilot which assessed acceptability and emotional well-being outcomes of an 8-week mindfulness program (Paws b) for children aged 7–9 <span class="hlt">years</span>. The program was delivered by <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers within a regular <span class="hlt">school</span> curriculum. Emotional well-being was measured using self-report questionnaires at baseline, post-training and 3 months follow-up, and informant reports were collected at baseline and follow-up. Seventy one participants aged 7–9 <span class="hlt">years</span> were recruited from three <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the UK (training group n = 33; control group n = 38). Acceptability of the program was high with 76% of children in the training group reporting ‘liking’ practicing mindfulness at <span class="hlt">school</span>, with a strong link to wanting to continue practicing mindfulness at <span class="hlt">school</span> (p < 0.001). Self-report comparisons revealed that relative to controls, the training group showed significant decreases in negative affect at follow-up, with a large effect size (p = 0.010, d = 0.84). Teacher reports (but not parental ratings) of meta-cognition also showed significant improvements at follow-up with a large effect size (p = 0.002, d = 1.08). Additionally, significant negative correlations were found between changes in mindfulness and emotion regulation scores from baseline to post-training (p = 0.038) and baseline to follow-up (p = 0.033). Findings from this study provide initial evidence that the Paws b program in children aged 7–9 <span class="hlt">years</span> (a) can be feasibly delivered by <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers as part of the regular curriculum, (b) is acceptable to the majority of children, and (c) may significantly decrease negative affect and improve meta-cognition. PMID:26793145</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18991974','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18991974"><span>Bullying in Pattani <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in southern Thailand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Laeheem, K; Kuning, M; McNeil, N; Besag, V E</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>The purpose of this research was to examine risk factors that affect the likelihood of students in Pattani <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> bullying other children. Risk factors investigated include <span class="hlt">school</span> rural/urban location, age, gender, religion, family physical abuse and preference of cartoon type. Identifying students who are at high risk of bullying could assist educational authorities to introduce better strategies for reducing the problem. A total of 1440 students at public and private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Pattani province were interviewed to collect relevant data. Pearson's chi-square test was used to assess the associations between the likelihood of bullying and possible risk factors. Logistic regression was used to investigate independent associations between the predictor variables and the outcome. We found that 32.9% reported that they had (ever) bullied other children. Bullying was significant associated with age (odds ratio 1.56 for 11+ <span class="hlt">years</span>, 95% confidence intervals 1.23, 2.18) and family physical abuse (odds ratio 4.50, 95% confidence intervals 3.40, 5.89). In addition, Those students who preferred action cartoons tended to bully others 1.87 times more than those who preferred watching comedy cartoons. There are significant differences in our population in rates of bullying others that vary according to age, preferred cartoon type and whether or not family (parental) physical abuse has been witnessed. The factor 'preference for cartoon type', not examined in previous research, remained significant after multivariable adjustment. Although there is an association, the cause of this is not clear but merits further examination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=high+AND+low+AND+context+AND+cultures&pg=7&id=EJ804904','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=high+AND+low+AND+context+AND+cultures&pg=7&id=EJ804904"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> Teacher Identity, Commitment and Career in Performative <span class="hlt">School</span> Cultures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Troman, Geoff</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The research reported here maps changes in <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers' identity, commitment and perspectives and subjective experiences of occupational career in the context of performative <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> cultures. The research aimed to provide in-depth knowledge of performative <span class="hlt">school</span> culture and teachers' subjective experiences in their work of teaching.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=quality+AND+control&id=EJ897927','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=quality+AND+control&id=EJ897927"><span>Quality Control in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Progress from 2001-2006</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hofman, Roelande H.; de Boom, Jan; Hofman, W. H. Adriaan</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This article presents findings of research into the quality control (QC) of <span class="hlt">schools</span> from 2001-2006. In 2001 several targets for QC were set and the progress of 939 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> is presented. Furthermore, using cluster analysis, <span class="hlt">schools</span> are classified into four QC-types that differ in their focus on <span class="hlt">school</span> (self) evaluation and school…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26186610','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26186610"><span>Associations between Food Outlets around <span class="hlt">Schools</span> and BMI among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Students in England: A Cross-Classified Multi-Level Analysis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Williams, Julianne; Scarborough, Peter; Townsend, Nick; Matthews, Anne; Burgoine, Thomas; Mumtaz, Lorraine; Rayner, Mike</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Researchers and policy-makers are interested in the influence that food retailing around <span class="hlt">schools</span> may have on child obesity risk. Most previous research comes from North America, uses data aggregated at the <span class="hlt">school</span>-level and focuses on associations between fast food outlets and <span class="hlt">school</span> obesity rates. This study examines associations between food retailing and BMI among a large sample of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in Berkshire, England. By controlling for individual, <span class="hlt">school</span> and home characteristics and stratifying results across the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span>, we aimed to identify if the food environment around <span class="hlt">schools</span> had an effect on BMI, independent of socio-economic variables. We measured the densities of fast food outlets and food stores found within schoolchildren's home and <span class="hlt">school</span> environments using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and data from local councils. We linked these data to measures from the 2010/11 National Child Measurement Programme and used a cross-classified multi-level approach to examine associations between food retailing and BMI z-scores. Analyses were stratified among Reception (aged 4-5) and <span class="hlt">Year</span> 6 (aged 10-11) students to measure associations across the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span>. Our multilevel model had three levels to account for individual (n = 16,956), home neighbourhood (n = 664) and <span class="hlt">school</span> (n = 268) factors. After controlling for confounders, there were no significant associations between retailing near <span class="hlt">schools</span> and student BMI, but significant positive associations between fast food outlets in home neighbourhood and BMI z-scores. <span class="hlt">Year</span> 6 students living in areas with the highest density of fast food outlets had an average BMI z-score that was 0.12 (95% CI: 0.04, 0.20) higher than those living in areas with none. We found little evidence to suggest that food retailing around <span class="hlt">schools</span> influences student BMI. There is some evidence to suggest that fast food outlet densities in a child's home neighbourhood may have an effect on BMI, particularly</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4505878','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4505878"><span>Associations between Food Outlets around <span class="hlt">Schools</span> and BMI among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Students in England: A Cross-Classified Multi-Level Analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Williams, Julianne; Scarborough, Peter; Townsend, Nick; Matthews, Anne; Burgoine, Thomas; Mumtaz, Lorraine; Rayner, Mike</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Researchers and policy-makers are interested in the influence that food retailing around <span class="hlt">schools</span> may have on child obesity risk. Most previous research comes from North America, uses data aggregated at the <span class="hlt">school</span>-level and focuses on associations between fast food outlets and <span class="hlt">school</span> obesity rates. This study examines associations between food retailing and BMI among a large sample of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in Berkshire, England. By controlling for individual, <span class="hlt">school</span> and home characteristics and stratifying results across the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span>, we aimed to identify if the food environment around <span class="hlt">schools</span> had an effect on BMI, independent of socio-economic variables. Methods We measured the densities of fast food outlets and food stores found within schoolchildren’s home and <span class="hlt">school</span> environments using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and data from local councils. We linked these data to measures from the 2010/11 National Child Measurement Programme and used a cross-classified multi-level approach to examine associations between food retailing and BMI z-scores. Analyses were stratified among Reception (aged 4-5) and <span class="hlt">Year</span> 6 (aged 10-11) students to measure associations across the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span>. Results Our multilevel model had three levels to account for individual (n = 16,956), home neighbourhood (n = 664) and <span class="hlt">school</span> (n = 268) factors. After controlling for confounders, there were no significant associations between retailing near <span class="hlt">schools</span> and student BMI, but significant positive associations between fast food outlets in home neighbourhood and BMI z-scores. <span class="hlt">Year</span> 6 students living in areas with the highest density of fast food outlets had an average BMI z-score that was 0.12 (95% CI: 0.04, 0.20) higher than those living in areas with none. Discussion We found little evidence to suggest that food retailing around <span class="hlt">schools</span> influences student BMI. There is some evidence to suggest that fast food outlet densities in a child’s home neighbourhood</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Northeast&pg=7&id=EJ1044364','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Northeast&pg=7&id=EJ1044364"><span>A Survey of Rural <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Music Education in Northeastern China</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sun, Zuodong; Leung, Bo Wah</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>China has been instituting national basic education curriculum reforms since 2001. This study provides an updated understanding of present-day, rural <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> music education in Northeastern China's Tonghua region. A total of 126 rural <span class="hlt">primary</span> music teachers and 674 students from 28 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the region were surveyed using a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29384332','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29384332"><span>Breakfast consumption among Malaysian <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> children and relationship with body weight status - Findings from the MyBreakfast Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tee, E Siong; Nurliyana, Abdul Razak; Norimah, A Karim; Mohamed, Hamid Jan B Jan; Tan, Sue Yee; Appukutty, Mahenderan; Hopkins, Sinead; Thielecke, Frank; Ong, Moi Kim; Ning, Celia; Nasir, Mohd Taib Mohd</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This study aimed to determine the relationship between breakfast consumption and body weight status among <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Malaysia. This nationwide cross-sectional study involved 5,332 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 6 to 12 <span class="hlt">years</span> and 3,000 secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 13 to 17 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Height and weight were measured and BMI-for-age was determined. Socio-demographic backgrounds, breakfast habits and physical activity levels were assessed using questionnaires. Breakfast frequency was defined as follows: breakfast skippers (ate breakfast 0-2 days/week), irregular breakfast eaters (ate breakfast 3-4 days/week) and regular breakfast eaters (ate breakfast ≥5 days/week). The overall prevalence of breakfast skippers and irregular breakfast eaters was 11.7% and 12.7% respectively. Breakfast skipping was related to age, sex, ethnicity, income and physical activity level. Among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> boys and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> girls, the proportion of overweight/obesity was higher among breakfast skippers (boys: 43.9%, girls: 30.5%) than regular breakfast eaters (boys: 31.2%, girls: 22.7%). Among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children, only boys who skipped breakfast had a higher mean BMI-for-age z-score than regular breakfast eaters. Among secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> boys and girls, BMI-for-age z-score was higher among breakfast skippers than regular breakfast eaters. Compared to regular breakfast eaters, <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> boys who skipped breakfast were 1.71 times (95% CI=1.26-2.32, p=0.001) more likely to be overweight/obese, while the risk was lower in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> girls (OR=1.36, 95% CI=1.02-1.81, p=0.039) and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> girls (OR=1.38, 95% CI=1.01-1.90, p=0.044). Regular breakfast consumption was associated with a healthier body weight status and is a dietary behaviour which should be encouraged.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=physical+AND+education&pg=5&id=EJ1181652','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=physical+AND+education&pg=5&id=EJ1181652"><span>Teachers' Perceptions of Physical Education in Aotearoa/New Zealand <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gordon, Barrie; Dyson, Ben; Cowan, Jackie; McKenzie, Allison; Shulruf, Boaz</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study examines practicing <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teacher's perceptions of the teaching of physical education in their <span class="hlt">schools</span>. There has been some criticism of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> physical education but until now this criticism has been largely based on a number of small studies involving limited numbers of teachers and <span class="hlt">schools</span>. This study involved…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24926993','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24926993"><span>Assessing the accuracy and feasibility of a refractive error screening program conducted by <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in pre-<span class="hlt">primary</span> and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Thailand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Teerawattananon, Kanlaya; Myint, Chaw-Yin; Wongkittirux, Kwanjai; Teerawattananon, Yot; Chinkulkitnivat, Bunyong; Orprayoon, Surapong; Kusakul, Suwat; Tengtrisorn, Supaporn; Jenchitr, Watanee</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>As part of the development of a system for the screening of refractive error in Thai children, this study describes the accuracy and feasibility of establishing a program conducted by teachers. To assess the accuracy and feasibility of screening by teachers. A cross-sectional descriptive and analytical study was conducted in 17 <span class="hlt">schools</span> in four provinces representing four geographic regions in Thailand. A two-staged cluster sampling was employed to compare the detection rate of refractive error among eligible students between trained teachers and health professionals. Serial focus group discussions were held for teachers and parents in order to understand their attitude towards refractive error screening at <span class="hlt">schools</span> and the potential success factors and barriers. The detection rate of refractive error screening by teachers among pre-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children is relatively low (21%) for mild visual impairment but higher for moderate visual impairment (44%). The detection rate for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children is high for both levels of visual impairment (52% for mild and 74% for moderate). The focus group discussions reveal that both teachers and parents would benefit from further education regarding refractive errors and that the vast majority of teachers are willing to conduct a <span class="hlt">school</span>-based screening program. Refractive error screening by health professionals in pre-<span class="hlt">primary</span> and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children is not currently implemented in Thailand due to resource limitations. However, evidence suggests that a refractive error screening program conducted in <span class="hlt">schools</span> by teachers in the country is reasonable and feasible because the detection and treatment of refractive error in very young generations is important and the screening program can be implemented and conducted with relatively low costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=travel+AND+agents&pg=5&id=EJ986962','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=travel+AND+agents&pg=5&id=EJ986962"><span>Framing Literacy Policy: Power and Policy Drivers in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mills, Colin</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This article is linked to the theme of the special issue through its focus on micropolitical analysis of the changing role of "policy drivers", mediating national policy through interactions with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> heads and teachers. The central arguments draw on case studies undertaken in two <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> where changes related to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27034901','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27034901"><span>Oral Health Knowledge, Attitude, and Approaches of Pre-<span class="hlt">Primary</span> and <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers in Mumbai, India.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mota, Ankita; Oswal, Kunal C; Sajnani, Dipti A; Sajnani, Anand K</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Background. <span class="hlt">School</span> teachers have an internationally recognized potential role in <span class="hlt">school</span>-based dental education and considerable importance has therefore been attributed to their dental knowledge. The objectives of this study were to determine the oral health related knowledge, attitudes, and approaches of pre-<span class="hlt">primary</span> and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in the city of Mumbai. Methods. The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in the suburban regions of Mumbai using a self-administered questionnaire and involved 511 teachers. Results. Teachers demonstrated inappropriate or incomplete knowledge regarding children's oral health. Only 53.2% knew that an individual has two sets of dentition. Moreover, only 45.4% of the teachers knew that a <span class="hlt">primary</span> dentition consists of 20 teeth. Only 56.9% of the teachers asked their children to clean their mouth after snacking during <span class="hlt">school</span> hours. 45.0% of the teachers were unaware of fluoridated tooth pastes whilst 78.9% of them were unaware of <span class="hlt">school</span> water fluoridation programmes. Also, 54.8% of the teachers never discussed the oral health of children with their parents during parents meet. Conclusions. The studied <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers demonstrated incomplete oral health knowledge, inappropriate oral practices, and unfavourable approaches to children's oral health. There is a definite and immediate need for organized training of <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers on basic oral health knowledge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED537919.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED537919.pdf"><span>Improving Achievement in Science in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> and Secondary <span class="hlt">Schools</span>. Improving Series</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2005</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This report is based on inspections of science in <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> carried out between September 2000 and March 2004. In addition to <span class="hlt">schools</span> inspected as part of the generational cycle, HMI also visited other <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> to observe and describe aspects of best practice. The report also draws on other major sources of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24967580','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24967580"><span><span class="hlt">School</span> belongingness and mental health functioning across the <span class="hlt">primary</span>-secondary transition in a mainstream sample: multi-group cross-lagged analyses.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Parsons, Richard; Passmore, Anne Elizabeth; Parkin, Timothy; Falkmer, Torbjörn</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The relationship between <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness and mental health functioning before and after the <span class="hlt">primary</span>-secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> transition has not been previously investigated in students with and without disabilities. This study used a prospective longitudinal design to test the bi-directional relationships between these constructs, by surveying 266 students with and without disabilities and their parents, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. Cross-lagged multi-group analyses found student perception of belongingness in the final <span class="hlt">year</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> to contribute to change in their mental health functioning a <span class="hlt">year</span> later. The beneficial longitudinal effects of <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness on subsequent mental health functioning were evident in all student subgroups; even after accounting for prior mental health scores and the cross-time stability in mental health functioning and <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness scores. Findings of the current study substantiate the role of <span class="hlt">school</span> contextual influences on early adolescent mental health functioning. They highlight the importance for <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> to assess students' <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness and mental health functioning and transfer these records as part of the transition process, so that appropriate scaffolds are in place to support those in need. Longer term longitudinal studies are needed to increase the understanding of the temporal sequencing between <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness and mental health functioning of all mainstream students.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4072543','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4072543"><span><span class="hlt">School</span> Belongingness and Mental Health Functioning across the <span class="hlt">Primary</span>-Secondary Transition in a Mainstream Sample: Multi-Group Cross-Lagged Analyses</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vaz, Sharmila; Falkmer, Marita; Parsons, Richard; Passmore, Anne Elizabeth; Parkin, Timothy; Falkmer, Torbjörn</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The relationship between <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness and mental health functioning before and after the <span class="hlt">primary</span>-secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> transition has not been previously investigated in students with and without disabilities. This study used a prospective longitudinal design to test the bi-directional relationships between these constructs, by surveying 266 students with and without disabilities and their parents, 6-months before and after the transition to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. Cross-lagged multi-group analyses found student perception of belongingness in the final <span class="hlt">year</span> of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> to contribute to change in their mental health functioning a <span class="hlt">year</span> later. The beneficial longitudinal effects of <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness on subsequent mental health functioning were evident in all student subgroups; even after accounting for prior mental health scores and the cross-time stability in mental health functioning and <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness scores. Findings of the current study substantiate the role of <span class="hlt">school</span> contextual influences on early adolescent mental health functioning. They highlight the importance for <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> to assess students’ <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness and mental health functioning and transfer these records as part of the transition process, so that appropriate scaffolds are in place to support those in need. Longer term longitudinal studies are needed to increase the understanding of the temporal sequencing between <span class="hlt">school</span> belongingness and mental health functioning of all mainstream students. PMID:24967580</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=feast&pg=3&id=EJ466851','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=feast&pg=3&id=EJ466851"><span>Elementary <span class="hlt">School</span> Reorganization: Looking Back One <span class="hlt">Year</span> Later.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Vann, Allan S.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Evaluates a small New York <span class="hlt">school</span> district's efforts to reorganize its two K-5 elementary <span class="hlt">schools</span> into one K-2 <span class="hlt">primary</span> grade <span class="hlt">school</span> and one 3-5 intermediate <span class="hlt">school</span>, focusing on student, staff, and parent reactions. Although the new arrangement created more focused <span class="hlt">schools</span>, the intermediate principal misses the energy deriving from the Kindergarten…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Peacock&pg=7&id=EJ933502','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Peacock&pg=7&id=EJ933502"><span>Science in the Scottish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Curriculum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Peacock, Alan</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>When one begins to look at science in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> elsewhere, one is immediately struck by the fact that those in England are the odd-ones-out. Hence this is the second in a series of articles looking at how science is dealt with in other systems, beginning with England's immediate neighbours and then looking outwards towards <span class="hlt">school</span> systems in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ITE&pg=4&id=EJ1041516','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=ITE&pg=4&id=EJ1041516"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> Teacher Education in England: 40 <span class="hlt">Years</span> On</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Murray, Jean; Passy, Rowena</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This article examines the relationship between pre-service teacher education (ITE) for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> and <span class="hlt">primary</span> teaching in England between 1974 and 2014, and explores the "fitness of purpose" of the current system of preparing teachers for the classrooms of the twenty-first century. Our historical analysis suggests that, despite 40…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=advanced+AND+performance+AND+management&pg=6&id=EJ774322','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=advanced+AND+performance+AND+management&pg=6&id=EJ774322"><span>Creativity and Performativity Policies in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Cultures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Troman, Geoff; Jeffrey, Bob; Raggl, Andrea</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Cultures of performativity in English <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> refer to systems and relationships of: target-setting; Ofsted inspections; <span class="hlt">school</span> league tables constructed from pupil test scores; performance management; performance related pay; threshold assessment; and advanced skills teachers. Systems which demand that teachers "perform" and in…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=environment+AND+behaviour&pg=7&id=ED534851','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=environment+AND+behaviour&pg=7&id=ED534851"><span>Tackling Behaviour in Your <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>: A Practical Handbook for Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Reid, Ken; Morgan, Nicola S.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>"Tackling Behaviour in the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>" provides ready-made advice and support for classroom professionals and can be used, read and adapted to suit the busy everyday lives of teachers working in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> today. This valuable text sets the scene for managing behaviour in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> classroom in the context of the Children Act 2004…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fundamental+AND+movement+AND+skills&pg=4&id=EJ907778','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fundamental+AND+movement+AND+skills&pg=4&id=EJ907778"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teacher Perceived Self-Efficacy to Teach Fundamental Motor Skills</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Callea, Micarle B.; Spittle, Michael; O'Meara, James; Casey, Meghan</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS) are a part of the <span class="hlt">school</span> curricula, yet many Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span>-age children are not mastering FMS. One reason may be a lack of perceived self-efficacy of <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers to teach FMS. This study investigated the level of perceived self-efficacy of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers to teach FMS in Victoria, Australia. A…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=quality+AND+management&id=EJ1065148','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=quality+AND+management&id=EJ1065148"><span>Application of Total Quality Management System in Thai <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Prueangphitchayathon, Setthiya; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The present study seeks to develop a total quality management (TQM) system that can be applied to <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The approach focuses on customer orientation, total involvement of all constituencies and continuous improvement. TQM principles were studied and synthesized according to case studies of the best practices in 3 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (small,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+Science+AND+primary&id=EJ1048800','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+Science+AND+primary&id=EJ1048800"><span>What Teachers Want: Supporting <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers in Teaching Science</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fitzgerald, Angela; Schneider, Katrin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Impending change can provide us with the opportunity to rethink and renew the things that we do. The first phase of the Australian Curriculum implementation offers <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers the chance to examine their approaches to science learning and teaching. This paper focuses on the perceptions of three <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers regarding what…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28917238','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28917238"><span>Qualitative study of eating habits in Bruneian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Talip, Tajidah; Serudin, Rajiah; Noor, Salmah; Tuah, Nik</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Childhood obesity is a serious public health issue globally and poor eating habits are an important contributing factor. This study aimed to explore the perceptions, practices and attitudes towards healthy eating in Bruneian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. A qualitative study was conducted among 40 subjects involving 18 children (aged 9-10 <span class="hlt">years</span> old), 12 parents and 10 teachers, who were recruited from two <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> using convenience sampling. Five focus group discussion sessions were conducted, and recorded discussions were translated. The transcripts were entered into NVivo10 and thematic analysis was conducted. All participants had differing perceptions of the term 'healthy eating'. Children reported 'healthy eating' by identifying foods or food groups they perceived as healthy and unhealthy. Only a few mentioned fruits and vegetables as essential to a healthy diet. Parents mainly perceived 'healthy eating' as consuming 'any quality food' that contains 'vitamins and minerals'. Teachers described a healthy diet as including balanced and varied dietary practices, having breakfast and eating regularly at the right, set times. They also associated eating healthily with traditional, home-grown and home-cooked food. All participants had positive attitudes towards healthy eating, however most children demonstrated unhealthy eating habits and frequently consumed unhealthy foods. The Bruneian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children reported favourable knowledge despite having poor healthy eating habits. The factors influencing participants eating behavior included food preferences, familial factors (parental style and parenting knowledge), food accessibility and availability, time constraints, as well as convenience. These factors hindered them from adopting healthy eating practices.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26630884','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26630884"><span>Prevalence of asymptomatic malaria infection and use of different malaria control measures among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Morogoro Municipality, Tanzania.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nzobo, Baraka J; Ngasala, Billy E; Kihamia, Charles M</p> <p>2015-12-02</p> <p>Malaria is a public health problem in Tanzania affecting all age groups. It is known that <span class="hlt">school</span> children are the age group most commonly infected with malaria parasites. Their infections are usually asymptomatic, go unnoticed and thus never get treated, result in anaemia, reduced ability to concentrate and learn in <span class="hlt">school</span> and if fallen sick may lead to <span class="hlt">school</span> absenteeism. Effective malaria control requires frequent evaluation of effectiveness of different malaria interventions. A cross-sectional study design involving 317 out of 350 <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 6-13 <span class="hlt">years</span> from five <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> within municipality was conducted. Multistage cluster sampling and simple random sampling methods were used to obtain <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> and study participants, respectively. Finger-prick blood samples were collected for Plasmodium parasite detection by malaria rapid diagnostic test (mRDT) and haemoglobin level assessment by Easy Touch(®) GHb system machine. A questionnaire was administered to assess use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) and anti-malarial drugs. The prevalence of asymptomatic malaria was 5.4 % (95 % CI 3.3-8.6 %) and anaemia was 10.1 % (95 % CI 7.2-13.9 %). <span class="hlt">School</span> children aged 6-9 <span class="hlt">years</span> were more affected by malaria than those aged 10-13 <span class="hlt">years</span>. The proportion of ITNs used was 90.6 % (95 % CI 86.3-93.9 %) while that of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) was 71.9 % (95 % CI 66.2-77.1 %). Findings show existence of asymptomatic malaria and walking anaemia among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Morogoro municipality. The majority of <span class="hlt">school</span> children reported use of ITNs and ACT for malaria control. These findings provide a rationale for using <span class="hlt">schools</span> and <span class="hlt">school</span> children to assess effectiveness of malaria interventions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5084037','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5084037"><span>Nutrient Intake Is Insufficient among Senegalese Urban <span class="hlt">School</span> Children and Adolescents: Results from Two 24 h Recalls in State <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Dakar</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fiorentino, Marion; Landais, Edwige; Bastard, Guillaume; Carriquiry, Alicia; Wieringa, Frank T.; Berger, Jacques</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Due to rapid urbanization and high food prices and in the absence of nutrition programs, <span class="hlt">school</span> children from urban areas in West Africa often have insufficient and inadequate diet leading to nutrient deficiencies that affect their health and <span class="hlt">schooling</span> performance. Acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent in children from <span class="hlt">primary</span> state <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Dakar (Senegal). The objectives of the present study were to assess the overall diet of these children, to report insufficient/excessive energy and nutrient intakes and to investigate association between insufficient nutrient intake and micronutrient deficiencies. Children attending urban state <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the Dakar area were selected through a two-stage random cluster sampling (30 <span class="hlt">schools</span> × 20 children). Dietary intake data were obtained from two 24 h recalls and blood samples were collected from 545 children (aged 5–17 <span class="hlt">years</span>, 45% < 10 <span class="hlt">years</span>, 53% girls) and adjusted for intra-individual variability to estimate nutrient usual intakes. Energy intake was insufficient and unbalanced with insufficient contribution of protein and excessive contribution of fat to global energy intake in one third of the children. Proportions of children with insufficient intake were: 100% for calcium, 100% for folic acid, 79% for vitamin A, 69% for zinc, 53% for vitamin C and 46% for iron. Insufficient iron and protein intake were risk factors for iron deficiency (odds ratio, OR 1.5, 2.2). Insufficient zinc intake and energy intake from protein were risk factors for zinc deficiency (OR 1.8, 3.0, 1.7, 2.9). Insufficient iron and vitamin C intake, and insufficient energy intake from protein were risk factors for marginal vitamin A status (OR 1.8, 1.8, 3.3). To address nutritional deficiencies associated with a diet deficient in energy, protein and micronutrients, nutrition education or <span class="hlt">school</span> feeding programs are needed in urban <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Senegal. PMID:27775598</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27775598','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27775598"><span>Nutrient Intake Is Insufficient among Senegalese Urban <span class="hlt">School</span> Children and Adolescents: Results from Two 24 h Recalls in State <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Dakar.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fiorentino, Marion; Landais, Edwige; Bastard, Guillaume; Carriquiry, Alicia; Wieringa, Frank T; Berger, Jacques</p> <p>2016-10-20</p> <p>Due to rapid urbanization and high food prices and in the absence of nutrition programs, <span class="hlt">school</span> children from urban areas in West Africa often have insufficient and inadequate diet leading to nutrient deficiencies that affect their health and <span class="hlt">schooling</span> performance. Acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent in children from <span class="hlt">primary</span> state <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Dakar (Senegal). The objectives of the present study were to assess the overall diet of these children, to report insufficient/excessive energy and nutrient intakes and to investigate association between insufficient nutrient intake and micronutrient deficiencies. Children attending urban state <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the Dakar area were selected through a two-stage random cluster sampling (30 <span class="hlt">schools</span> × 20 children). Dietary intake data were obtained from two 24 h recalls and blood samples were collected from 545 children (aged 5-17 <span class="hlt">years</span>, 45% < 10 <span class="hlt">years</span>, 53% girls) and adjusted for intra-individual variability to estimate nutrient usual intakes. Energy intake was insufficient and unbalanced with insufficient contribution of protein and excessive contribution of fat to global energy intake in one third of the children. Proportions of children with insufficient intake were: 100% for calcium, 100% for folic acid, 79% for vitamin A, 69% for zinc, 53% for vitamin C and 46% for iron. Insufficient iron and protein intake were risk factors for iron deficiency (odds ratio, OR 1.5, 2.2). Insufficient zinc intake and energy intake from protein were risk factors for zinc deficiency (OR 1.8, 3.0, 1.7, 2.9). Insufficient iron and vitamin C intake, and insufficient energy intake from protein were risk factors for marginal vitamin A status (OR 1.8, 1.8, 3.3). To address nutritional deficiencies associated with a diet deficient in energy, protein and micronutrients, nutrition education or <span class="hlt">school</span> feeding programs are needed in urban <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Senegal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23225257','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23225257"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> care careers among recent graduates of research-intensive private and public medical <span class="hlt">schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Choi, Phillip A; Xu, Shuai; Ayanian, John Z</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Despite a growing need for <span class="hlt">primary</span> care physicians in the United States, the proportion of medical <span class="hlt">school</span> graduates pursuing <span class="hlt">primary</span> care careers has declined over the past decade. To assess the association of medical <span class="hlt">school</span> research funding with graduates matching in family medicine residencies and practicing <span class="hlt">primary</span> care. Observational study of United States medical <span class="hlt">schools</span>. One hundred twenty-one allopathic medical <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The <span class="hlt">primary</span> outcomes included the proportion of each <span class="hlt">school</span>'s graduates from 1999 to 2001 who were <span class="hlt">primary</span> care physicians in 2008, and the proportion of each <span class="hlt">school</span>'s graduates who entered family medicine residencies during 2007 through 2009. The 25 medical <span class="hlt">schools</span> with the highest levels of research funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2010 were designated as "research-intensive." Among research-intensive medical <span class="hlt">schools</span>, the 16 private medical <span class="hlt">schools</span> produced significantly fewer practicing <span class="hlt">primary</span> care physicians (median 24.1% vs. 33.4%, p < 0.001) and fewer recent graduates matching in family medicine residencies (median 2.4% vs. 6.2%, p < 0.001) than the other 30 private <span class="hlt">schools</span>. In contrast, the nine research-intensive public medical <span class="hlt">schools</span> produced comparable proportions of graduates pursuing <span class="hlt">primary</span> care careers (median 36.1% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.87) and matching in family medicine residencies (median 7.4% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.37) relative to the other 66 public medical <span class="hlt">schools</span>. To meet the health care needs of the US population, research-intensive private medical <span class="hlt">schools</span> should play a more active role in promoting <span class="hlt">primary</span> care careers for their students and graduates.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22360010','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22360010"><span>Pediculosis capitis among <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> children in Mafraq Governorate, Jordan.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>AlBashtawy, M; Hasna, F</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Pediculosis capitis (head lice infestation) is a worldwide public health concern affecting mostly <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> children. In a cross-sectional study in 2009/2010, the prevalence of pediculosis capitis and some risk factors for infestation were investigated among 1550 randomly selected <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> children in Mafraq governorate, Jordan. The prevalence of pediculosis capitis was 26.6%. There were significant differences in the prevalence between girls (34.7%) and boys (19.6%), rural (31.2%) and urban (23.5%) residents, and history of infestation in the previous <span class="hlt">year</span> (57.4%) versus no history (11.5%), as well as between children of different ages, family size and income (P<0.001). Longer hair length, lack of bathing facilities, low frequency of hair-washing and bathing, and sharing of articles (e.g. combs, scarves) were significantly associated with infestation (P<0.001). The prevalence of infestation was higher than reported in previous studies in Jordan (< 14%). Programmes are needed to increase awareness of pediculosis capitis and the importance of good personal hygiene.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5559500','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5559500"><span>Emotion Understanding, Social Competence and <span class="hlt">School</span> Achievement in Children from <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> in Portugal</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Franco, Maria da Glória; Beja, Maria J.; Candeias, Adelinda; Santos, Natalie</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This study analyzes the relationship between emotion understanding and <span class="hlt">school</span> achievement in children of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, considering age, gender, fluid intelligence, mother’s educational level and social competence. In this study participated 406 children of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. The instruments used were the Test of Emotion Comprehension, Colored Progressive Matrices of Raven, Socially Action and Interpersonal Problem Solving Scale. The structural equation model showed the relationship between the emotion understanding and <span class="hlt">school</span> performance depends on a mediator variable that in the context of the study was designated social competence. Age appear as an explanatory factor of the differences found, the mother’s educational level only predicts significantly social emotional competence, fluid intelligence is a predictor of emotion understanding, <span class="hlt">school</span> achievement and social emotional competence. Regarding the influence of sex, emotional understanding does not emerge as a significant predictor of social emotional competence in girls or boys. Multiple relationships between the various factors associated with <span class="hlt">school</span> achievement and social emotional competence are discussed as well as their implications in promoting child development and <span class="hlt">school</span> success. PMID:28861014</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED393887.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED393887.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> Childhood <span class="hlt">School</span> Success Scale.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Seagraves, Margaret C.</p> <p></p> <p>The purpose of this research study was to build and pilot a psychometric instrument, the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Childhood <span class="hlt">School</span> Success Scale (PCSSS), to identify behaviors needed for children to be successful in first grade. Fifty-two teacher responses were collected. The instrument had a reliability coefficient (Alpha) of 0.95, a mean of 13.26, and a variance…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=exercise+AND+diet+AND+attitude&pg=4&id=ED402066','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=exercise+AND+diet+AND+attitude&pg=4&id=ED402066"><span>Children's Health in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mayall, Berry; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>Positing the relevance of well-being and social support to educational achievement, this book explores the status of children's health and its importance to the education of young children. A mail questionnaire survey of 1031 of approximately 20,000 <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Education <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in England and Wales in the fall of 1993 yielded 620 replies; a response…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16350702','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16350702"><span>Childhood epilepsy: knowledge and attitude of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Alikor, E A D; Essien, A A</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to determine the knowledge of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in Port Harcourt metropolis of epilepsy, their knowledge of the management of an attack of epilepsy and the attitude of these teachers towards epilepsy in children. This is a questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study of 118 <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers from five randomly selected <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Port Harcourt metropolis, Nigeria. Ten percent (12) of the 118 teachers were graded "Good", 45% (54) "Fair" and 43% (52) "Poor" in overall knowledge score. Sixty six teachers (56%) accept applying crude oil on the body as useful in stopping epileptic attacks in children. There was no significant association between overall knowledge score and sex, <span class="hlt">year</span> of experience as a teacher and experience with a child with epilepsy. Only 10% of the teachers studied were classified as having overall good knowledge of epilepsy. Sixty nine teachers (58.5%) were graded as having good knowledge of cause of epilepsy. Only 38 (32%) disagree that the saliva drooled during an epileptic attack is contagious; one hundred (84.8%) and 65 (55.1%) agree that some childhood illnesses can cause epilepsy and that it runs in families respectively. Overall, 54 teachers (45.8%) had a cumulative score of negative attitude towards epilepsy. Eighty three teachers (73.3%) would want all children with epilepsy put in a special <span class="hlt">school</span> whilst 57 (48%) agree that children with epilepsy should be withdrawn from <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The longer the teacher's professional experience, the more the likelihood of positive attitude towards epilepsy but the association did not reach statistically significant level (p = 0.076). Attitude was not statistically associated with sex and educational qualification. The overall knowledge of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers in Port Harcourt metropolis of epilepsy and the first-aid management of an epileptic attack is poor. The attitude of these teachers towards epilepsy is negative. Education of the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teacher and general</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1161463.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1161463.pdf"><span>Head Teachers and Teachers as Pioneers in Facilitating Dyslexic Children in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Mainstream <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jaka, Fahima Salman</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study explores the perceptions of <span class="hlt">school</span> heads and teachers in facilitating young dyslexic children in <span class="hlt">primary</span> mainstream <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Pakistan. Through purposive sampling, the researcher selected eight participants: Four <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> heads and four <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers from elite <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Karachi. The research instrument selected for this…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=supply+AND+ethics&pg=2&id=ED532887','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=supply+AND+ethics&pg=2&id=ED532887"><span>Children as Researchers in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Choice, Voice and Participation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bucknall, Sue</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>"Children as Researchers in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>" is an innovative and unique resource for practitioners supporting children to become "real world" researchers in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> classroom. It will supply you with the skills and ideas you need to implement a "children as researchers" framework in your <span class="hlt">school</span> that can be adapted for different ages and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=The+AND+innovation+AND+mechanisms&pg=2&id=EJ1075697','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=The+AND+innovation+AND+mechanisms&pg=2&id=EJ1075697"><span>Leading Curriculum Innovation in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> Project: A Final Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brundrett, Mark; Duncan, Diane</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This article provides the final report on a research project that investigated the ways in which curriculum innovation can be led successfully in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Data gathering included 40 semi-structured interviews in 10 successful <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in England of varying sizes and types and in a range of geographical and social locations. Findings…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+system+AND+outdated&pg=7&id=EJ545323','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+system+AND+outdated&pg=7&id=EJ545323"><span>Where is Music Education in Our <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Russell-Bowie, Deirdre</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Criticizes the state of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> music education in New South Wales. Paints a bleak picture of a <span class="hlt">school</span> system lacking adequate facilities, resources, and teacher training, and burdened with an outdated curriculum. Reform movements initiated in the 1980s have failed to correct these deficiencies. (MJP)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sing&pg=4&id=EJ832825','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sing&pg=4&id=EJ832825"><span>The National Singing Programme for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in England: An Initial Baseline Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Welch, G. F.; Himonides, E.; Papageorgi, I.; Saunders, J.; Rinta, T.; Stewart, C.; Preti, C.; Lani, J.; Vraka, M.; Hill, J.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The "Sing Up" National Singing Programme for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in England was launched in November 2007 under the UK government's "Music Manifesto". "Sing Up" is a four-<span class="hlt">year</span> programme whose overall aim is to raise the status of singing and increase opportunities for children throughout the country to enjoy singing as…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=attention+AND+size&pg=5&id=EJ988658','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=attention+AND+size&pg=5&id=EJ988658"><span>Do Class Size Reductions Make a Difference to Classroom Practice? The Case of Hong Kong <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Galton, Maurice; Pell, Tony</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes changes which took place in 37 Hong Kong <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> where class sizes were reduced from 38 to between 20 and 25. Chinese, English and mathematics classes were observed over three <span class="hlt">years</span> from <span class="hlt">Primary</span> 1 (aged 6) to <span class="hlt">Primary</span> 3. For 75% of observations no child was the focus of the teacher's attention in large classes. Reducing…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24046158','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24046158"><span>[Development and implementation of a state-wide "train the trainer" model of the <span class="hlt">school</span>-based prevention programme "Join the Healthy Boat - <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>"].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wartha, O; Koch, B; Kobel, S; Drenowatz, C; Kettner, S; Schreiber, A; Wirt, T; Kesztyüs, D; Steinacker, J M</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>This paper shows how a state-wide health-promotion intervention at <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> can be implemented by considering the example of the programme "Join the Healthy Boat - <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>". Additionally, it is illustrated how quality control throughout the whole process can be incorporated. To operate long-term and target-group orientated in the whole state of Baden-Württemberg, the <span class="hlt">school</span>-based prevention programme "Join the Healthy Boat" uses a "train the trainer" model. The trainers are teachers who were instructed by the project team. In the <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span> 2009/10, these trainers offered quadrinominal training courses for further teachers. Every urban and rural district is covered by 1 trainer. The trainers evaluated the 6 preparatory training courses they had been given using questionnaires. The following 4 training courses the trainers offered to the teachers were reviewed by the trainers as well as the teachers using questionnaires, too. Additionally, at the end of the <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span> 2009/10, the teachers completed a questionnaire about their satisfaction regarding the programme itself and the work with the trainer. During the <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span> 2009/10, 453 teachers were trained by 32 trainers. According to indications on the questionnaires about the preparatory training courses, all trainers felt themselves "very well" or "well" prepared for their task. The teachers evaluated the expertise of the respective trainer, the quality of the training courses and the satisfaction with the programme itself throughout highly. Based on the excellent results of the process evaluation and the programme's wide coverage, an adoption of a "train the trainer" model seems worthwhile for other <span class="hlt">school</span>-based prevention programmes, as well. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=PCI&id=ED539954','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=PCI&id=ED539954"><span>"PCI Reading Program": The Final Report of a Three <span class="hlt">Year</span> Experimental Study in Brevard Public <span class="hlt">Schools</span> and Miami-Dade County Public <span class="hlt">Schools</span>. Research Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Toby, Megan; Jaciw, Andrew; Ma, Boya; Lipton, Akiko</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>PCI Education conducted a three-<span class="hlt">year</span> longitudinal study to determine the comparative effectiveness of the "PCI Reading Program" ("PCI") for students with severe disabilities as implemented in Florida's Brevard Public <span class="hlt">Schools</span> and Miami-Dade County Public <span class="hlt">Schools</span>. The <span class="hlt">primary</span> question addressed by the study is whether students…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28073166','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28073166"><span>Low sugar nutrition policies and dental caries: A study of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in South Auckland.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Thornley, Simon; Marshall, Roger; Reynolds, Gary; Koopu, Pauline; Sundborn, Gerhard; Schofield, Grant</p> <p>2017-05-01</p> <p>The study assessed whether a healthy food policy implemented in one <span class="hlt">school</span>, Yendarra <span class="hlt">Primary</span>, situated in a socio-economically deprived area of South Auckland, had improved student oral health by comparing dental caries levels with students of similar <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the same region with no such policy. Records of caries of the <span class="hlt">primary</span> and adult teeth were obtained between 2007 and 2014 for children attending Yendarra, and were compared to those of eight other public <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the area, with a similar demographic profile. Children were selected between the ages of 8 and 11 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Linear regression models were used to estimate the strength of association between attending Yendarra <span class="hlt">school</span> and dental caries. During the study period, 3813 records were obtained of children who attended dental examinations and the <span class="hlt">schools</span> of interest. In a linear model, mean number of carious <span class="hlt">primary</span> and adult teeth were 0.37 lower (95% confidence interval: 0.09-0.65) in Yendarra <span class="hlt">school</span> children, compared to those in other <span class="hlt">schools</span>, after adjustment for confounders. Pacific students had higher numbers of carious teeth (adjusted β coefficient: 0.25; 95% confidence interval: 0.03-0.46) than Māori. This nutrition policy, implemented in a <span class="hlt">school</span> in the poorest region of South Auckland, which restricted sugary food and drink availability, was associated with a marked positive effect on the oral health of students, compared to students in surrounding <span class="hlt">schools</span>. We recommend that such policies are a useful means of improving child oral health. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018E%26ES..125a2071P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018E%26ES..125a2071P"><span>Effects of <span class="hlt">school</span>-based deworming on hemoglobin level, growth development and <span class="hlt">school</span> performance of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in North Sumatera</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pasaribu, A. P.; Angellee, J.; Pasaribu, S.</p> <p>2018-03-01</p> <p>Worm infestation is mainly caused by soil-transmitted helminths (STH) infecting one-third of the world’s population, where the most affected are <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. This chronic, long-lasting infection can affect the growth aspects in children. A <span class="hlt">school</span>-based deworming is one of the treatments recommended by WHO to counterattack worm infection in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. To evaluate the effect of <span class="hlt">school</span>-based deworming on the hemoglobin level, growth and <span class="hlt">school</span> performance of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children, an open randomized clinical trial was conducted on 165 targeted populations in SukaKaro village, North Sumatra; 156 of which were then chosen based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. The samples’ feces- sampling, hemoglobin level, and growth chart data were recorded on the first day of study before any treatment was given. They were then divided into two groups; the first group of 80 samples did not receive any treatment, while the second group of 76 samples received 400mg of albendazole as part of a <span class="hlt">school</span>-based deworming program. The samples were being followed up after sixth months of study. In conclusion, albendazole is able to improve the hemoglobin level, growth development, and <span class="hlt">school</span> performance of the samples, although there were no significant differences between the two groups.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=financing+AND+project&pg=6&id=EJ849694','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=financing+AND+project&pg=6&id=EJ849694"><span>In Slovenia, Sostanj <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Collaborates with Its Community</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cercek, Emmanuel</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Sostanj <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> offers a learning process which can enrich traditional forms of <span class="hlt">schooling</span>. It demonstrates how a <span class="hlt">school</span>, including its infrastructure, can influence family life and the environment, creating new social patterns and a local identity. Pupils and teachers are involved in different thematic projects and programmes, together with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1143958.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1143958.pdf"><span>Participation Motivation for Extracurricular Activities: Study on <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Acar, Zeycan; Gündüz, Nevin</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study is to analyse the participation motivation for extracurricular activities; study on <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students. It also analysed whether such factors as age and sex change on the basis of their participation motivation. The population of the study is composed of 797 students in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> and, the sample is composed of 513…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1074824.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1074824.pdf"><span>The <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students of 1950s' Yozgat: Our Memories about Our <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Saglam, Mehmet</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The objective of the study is to lay bare the educational memories of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in 1950s' Yozgat city which is in the center of Turkey. Memories that belong to education are also reflections of the individuals' past educational practices. Why they take part in lives of individuals as memories may let us see the importance of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22205239','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22205239"><span>Sound levels and their effects on children in a German <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Eysel-Gosepath, Katrin; Daut, Tobias; Pinger, Andreas; Lehmacher, Walter; Erren, Thomas</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Considerable sound levels are produced in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> by voices of children and resonance effects. As a consequence, hearing loss and mental impairment may occur. In a Cologne <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, sound levels were measured in three different classrooms, each with 24 children, 8-10 <span class="hlt">years</span> old, and one teacher. Sound dosimeters were positioned in the room and near the teacher's ear. Additional measurements were done in one classroom fully equipped with sound-absorbing materials. A questionnaire containing 12 questions about noise at <span class="hlt">school</span> was distributed to 100 children, 8-10 <span class="hlt">years</span> old. Measurements were repeated after children had been taught about noise damage and while "noise lights" were used. Mean sound levels of 5-h per day measuring period were 78 dB (A) near the teacher's ear and 70 dB (A) in the room. The average of all measured maximal sound levels for 1 s was 105 dB (A) for teachers, and 100 dB (A) for rooms. In the soundproofed classroom, Leq was 66 dB (A). The questionnaire revealed certain judgment of the children concerning situations with high sound levels and their ability to develop ideas for noise reduction. However, no clear sound level reduction was identified after noise education and using "noise lights" during lessons. Children and their teachers are equally exposed to high sound levels at <span class="hlt">school</span>. Early sensitization to noise and the possible installation of sound-absorbing materials can be important means to prevent noise-associated hearing loss and mental impairment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19481803','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19481803"><span>Experiences of violence and deficits in academic achievement among urban <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Jamaica.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Baker-Henningham, Helen; Meeks-Gardner, Julie; Chang, Susan; Walker, Susan</p> <p>2009-05-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between children's experiences of three different types of violence and academic achievement among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Kingston, Jamaica. A cross-sectional study of 1300 children in grade 5 [mean (S.D.) age: 11 (0.5) <span class="hlt">years</span>] from 29 government <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in urban areas of Kingston and St. Andrew, Jamaica, was conducted. Academic achievement (mathematics, reading, and spelling) was assessed using the Wide Range Achievement Test. Children's experiences of three types of violence - exposure to aggression among peers at <span class="hlt">school</span>, physical punishment at <span class="hlt">school</span>, and exposure to community violence - were assessed by self-report using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Fifty-eight percent of the children experienced moderate or high levels of all three types of violence. Boys had poorer academic achievement and experienced higher levels of aggression among peers and physical punishment at <span class="hlt">school</span> than girls. Children's experiences of the three types of violence were independently associated with all three indices of academic achievement. There was a dose-response relationship between children's experiences of violence and academic achievement with children experiencing higher levels of violence having the poorest academic achievement and children experiencing moderate levels having poorer achievement than those experiencing little or none. Exposure to three different types of violence was independently associated with poor <span class="hlt">school</span> achievement among children attending government, urban <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Jamaica. Programs are needed in <span class="hlt">schools</span> to reduce the levels of aggression among students and the use of physical punishment by teachers and to provide support for children exposed to community violence. Children in Jamaica and the wider Caribbean experience significant amounts of violence in their homes, communities, and <span class="hlt">schools</span>. In this study, we demonstrate a dose-response relationship between <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1057537.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1057537.pdf"><span>A Study on <span class="hlt">Primary</span> and Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span> Students' Misconceptions about Greenhouse Effect (Erzurum Sampling)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gul, Seyda; Yesilyurt, Selami</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study is to determine what level of <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> students' misconceptions related to greenhouse effect is. Study group consists of totally 280 students attended to totally 8 <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> (4 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, 4 secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>) which were determined with convenient sampling method from center of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bangladesh&pg=3&id=EJ964603','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bangladesh&pg=3&id=EJ964603"><span>The Role of Pre-<span class="hlt">School</span> Education on Learning Achievement at <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Level in Bangladesh</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Nath, Samir Ranjan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This paper examines the impact of pre-<span class="hlt">school</span> education on learning achievement at <span class="hlt">primary</span> level in Bangladesh. Evidence from learning achievement test and household and <span class="hlt">school</span>-related data were obtained from 7093 pupils attending 440 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Bangladesh. Findings suggest that a small proportion (15.3%) of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils attended…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Philippines+AND+financial&id=EJ537491','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Philippines+AND+financial&id=EJ537491"><span>Do Local Contributions Affect the Efficacy of Public <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jimenez, Emmanuel; Paqueo, Vicente</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>Uses cost, financial sources, and student achievement data from Philippine <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (financed primarily from central sources) to discover if financial decentralization leads to more efficient <span class="hlt">schools</span>. <span class="hlt">Schools</span> that rely more heavily on local sources (contributions from local <span class="hlt">school</span> boards, municipal government, parent-teacher associations,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED568090.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED568090.pdf"><span>Approaches to In-Servicing Training of Teachers in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in South Africa</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mahlangu, Vimbi P.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper focuses on the approaches used by <span class="hlt">school</span> heads in helping their growth and their teachers in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Limpopo and Mpumalanga Provinces of South Africa. The Department of Basic Education expects <span class="hlt">school</span> heads and teachers to bring change in their <span class="hlt">school</span> performances. The problem is that in these <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> heads and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=measurement+AND+variables+AND+environmental&pg=3&id=EJ1064437','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=measurement+AND+variables+AND+environmental&pg=3&id=EJ1064437"><span>Determinants of <span class="hlt">School</span> Efficiency: The Case of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in the State of Geneva, Switzerland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Huguenin, Jean-Marc</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The purpose of this paper is: to measure <span class="hlt">school</span> technical efficiency and to identify the determinants of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> performance. Design/Methodology/Approach: A two-stage data envelopment analysis (DEA) of <span class="hlt">school</span> efficiency is conducted. At the first stage, DEA is employed to calculate an individual efficiency score for each <span class="hlt">school</span>. At…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22455252','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22455252"><span>Impact of socioeconomic factors on nutritional status in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Babar, Nabeela Fazal; Muzaffar, Rizwana; Khan, Muhammad Athar; Imdad, Seema</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Child malnutrition is a major public health and development concern in most of the poor communities leading to high morbidity and mortality. Various studies have highlighted the factors involved. The present study focuses on socioeconomic inequality resulting in malnutrition. Objectives of the Study were to find the Impact of socio-economic factors on nutritional status in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. It was a cross sectional survey conducted at Lahore from February to August 2005 among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> from public and private sectors to assess the nutritional status of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> going children age 5-11 <span class="hlt">years</span> belonging to different socio economic classes of the society. Systematic random sampling technique was applied to collect the sample. Body Mass Index in relation to NHANES reference population was used for assessing nutritional status. The nutritional status of children from lower socio economic class was poor as compared to their counter parts in upper socio economic class. Children with BMI < 5th percentile were 41% in lower class while in upper class it was 19.28%. Prevalence of malnutrition was 42.3% among children of illiterate mothers as compare to 20% in those of literate mothers. Poverty, low literacy rate, large families, food insecurity, food safety, women's education appears to be the important underlying factors responsible for poor health status of children from low socioeconomic class. It requires economic, political and social changes as well as changes for personal advancement mainly through educational opportunities to improve the nutritional status of the children.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28483584','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28483584"><span>Changes in diet from age 10 to 14 <span class="hlt">years</span> and prospective associations with <span class="hlt">school</span> lunch choice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Winpenny, Eleanor M; Corder, Kirsten L; Jones, Andy; Ambrosini, Gina L; White, Martin; van Sluijs, Esther M F</p> <p>2017-09-01</p> <p>There is limited evidence on how diet changes over the transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. In this study we investigated changes in diet from age 10 (2007) to age 14 <span class="hlt">years</span> (2011) and the contribution of <span class="hlt">school</span>-time consumption and <span class="hlt">school</span> lunch choice to such changes. The 351 participants with dietary data (4 day food record) available at baseline (age 10 <span class="hlt">years</span>) and follow-up (age 14 <span class="hlt">years</span>) were included. Multi-level regression models were fitted for absolute or change in food and nutrient intake, cross-classified by <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> attended as appropriate, with adjustment for covariates and mis-reporting. From age 10 to age 14 <span class="hlt">years</span>, children decreased energy intake from sugars (-2.6% energy (%E)) (standard error (SE) 0.44) and from saturated fats (-0.54%E (SE 0.18)), decreased fruit (-3.13 g/MJ (SE 1.04)) and vegetables (-1.55 g/MJ (SE 0.46)) consumption and increased sugar sweetened beverage (SSB) (4.66  g/MJ (SE 1.87)) and fries (1.31  g/MJ (SE 0.39)) consumption. Intake of snack foods, SSBs, and fries, but also fruits and vegetables was higher outside <span class="hlt">school</span> hours. Prospective change from non-<span class="hlt">school</span> lunch to <span class="hlt">school</span> lunch, compared to maintaining non-<span class="hlt">school</span> lunch consumption, was associated with decreased consumption of savoury snacks (-8.32 g/day (SE 2.03)), increased consumption of fries (12.8 g/day (SE 4.01)) and decreased consumption of fruit (-25.16 g/day (SE 11.02)) during <span class="hlt">school</span> hours. Changes in diet from age 10 to age 14 <span class="hlt">years</span> differed within and outside of <span class="hlt">school</span> hours. Consumption of a <span class="hlt">school</span> lunch, compared to lunch obtained elsewhere, was associated with negative as well as positive changes in diet, suggesting that any efforts to encourage <span class="hlt">school</span> lunch take-up need to be accompanied by further efforts to improve <span class="hlt">school</span> lunch provision to meet nutritional guidelines. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19747402','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19747402"><span>Cost-effectiveness of active transport for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children - Walking <span class="hlt">School</span> Bus program.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moodie, Marjory; Haby, Michelle; Galvin, Leah; Swinburn, Boyd; Carter, Robert</p> <p>2009-09-14</p> <p>To assess from a societal perspective the incremental cost-effectiveness of the Walking <span class="hlt">School</span> Bus (WSB) program for Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children as an obesity prevention measure. The intervention was modelled as part of the ACE-Obesity study, which evaluated, using consistent methods, thirteen interventions targeting unhealthy weight gain in Australian children and adolescents. A logic pathway was used to model the effects on body mass index [BMI] and disability-adjusted life <span class="hlt">years</span> [DALYs] of the Victorian WSB program if applied throughout Australia. Cost offsets and DALY benefits were modelled until the eligible cohort reached 100 <span class="hlt">years</span> of age or death. The reference <span class="hlt">year</span> was 2001. Second stage filter criteria ('equity', 'strength of evidence', 'acceptability', feasibility', sustainability' and 'side-effects') were assessed to incorporate additional factors that impact on resource allocation decisions. The modelled intervention reached 7,840 children aged 5 to 7 <span class="hlt">years</span> and cost $AUD22.8M ($16.6M; $30.9M). This resulted in an incremental saving of 30 DALYs (7:104) and a net cost per DALY saved of $AUD0.76M ($0.23M; $3.32M). The evidence base was judged as 'weak' as there are no data available documenting the increase in the number of children walking due to the intervention. The high costs of the current approach may limit sustainability. Under current modelling assumptions, the WSB program is not an effective or cost-effective measure to reduce childhood obesity. The attribution of some costs to non-obesity objectives (reduced traffic congestion and air pollution etc.) is justified to emphasise the other possible benefits. The program's cost-effectiveness would be improved by more comprehensive implementation within current infrastructure arrangements. The importance of active transport to <span class="hlt">school</span> suggests that improvements in WSB or its variants need to be developed and fully evaluated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2758827','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2758827"><span>Cost-effectiveness of active transport for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children - Walking <span class="hlt">School</span> Bus program</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Moodie, Marjory; Haby, Michelle; Galvin, Leah; Swinburn, Boyd; Carter, Robert</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background To assess from a societal perspective the incremental cost-effectiveness of the Walking <span class="hlt">School</span> Bus (WSB) program for Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children as an obesity prevention measure. The intervention was modelled as part of the ACE-Obesity study, which evaluated, using consistent methods, thirteen interventions targeting unhealthy weight gain in Australian children and adolescents. Methods A logic pathway was used to model the effects on body mass index [BMI] and disability-adjusted life <span class="hlt">years</span> [DALYs] of the Victorian WSB program if applied throughout Australia. Cost offsets and DALY benefits were modelled until the eligible cohort reached 100 <span class="hlt">years</span> of age or death. The reference <span class="hlt">year</span> was 2001. Second stage filter criteria ('equity', 'strength of evidence', 'acceptability', feasibility', sustainability' and 'side-effects') were assessed to incorporate additional factors that impact on resource allocation decisions. Results The modelled intervention reached 7,840 children aged 5 to 7 <span class="hlt">years</span> and cost $AUD22.8M ($16.6M; $30.9M). This resulted in an incremental saving of 30 DALYs (7:104) and a net cost per DALY saved of $AUD0.76M ($0.23M; $3.32M). The evidence base was judged as 'weak' as there are no data available documenting the increase in the number of children walking due to the intervention. The high costs of the current approach may limit sustainability. Conclusion Under current modelling assumptions, the WSB program is not an effective or cost-effective measure to reduce childhood obesity. The attribution of some costs to non-obesity objectives (reduced traffic congestion and air pollution etc.) is justified to emphasise the other possible benefits. The program's cost-effectiveness would be improved by more comprehensive implementation within current infrastructure arrangements. The importance of active transport to <span class="hlt">school</span> suggests that improvements in WSB or its variants need to be developed and fully evaluated. PMID:19747402</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27884840','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27884840"><span>Long-term effects of the Active for Life <span class="hlt">Year</span> 5 (AFLY5) <span class="hlt">school</span>-based cluster-randomised controlled trial.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Anderson, Emma L; Howe, Laura D; Kipping, Ruth R; Campbell, Rona; Jago, Russell; Noble, Sian M; Wells, Sian; Chittleborough, Catherine; Peters, Tim J; Lawlor, Debbie A</p> <p>2016-11-24</p> <p>To investigate the long-term effectiveness of a <span class="hlt">school</span>-based intervention to improve physical activity and diet in children. Cluster-randomised controlled trial. 60 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the southwest of England. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children who were aged 8-9 <span class="hlt">years</span> at recruitment, 9-10 <span class="hlt">years</span> during the intervention and 10-11 <span class="hlt">years</span> at the long-term follow-up assessment. Teacher training, provision of lesson and child-parent interactive homework plans and teaching materials. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> outcomes were accelerometer-assessed minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day, accelerometer-assessed minutes of sedentary behaviour per day and reported daily consumption of servings of fruit and vegetables. 60 <span class="hlt">schools</span> with 2221 eligible children were recruited. As in the previously published assessment immediately after the end of the intervention, none of the three <span class="hlt">primary</span> outcomes differed between children in <span class="hlt">schools</span> allocated to the intervention, compared with those in control <span class="hlt">schools</span> at the end of the long-term follow-up (1 <span class="hlt">year</span> after the end of the intervention). Differences in secondary outcomes were consistent with those at the immediate follow-up, with no evidence that these had diminished over time. Comparing intervention with control <span class="hlt">schools</span>, the difference in mean child-reported screen viewing at the weekend was -16.03 min (95% CI -32.82 to 0.73), for servings of snacks per day, the difference was -0.11 (95% CI -0.39 to 0.06), in servings of high-energy drinks per day -0.20 (95% CI -0.39 to -0.01) and in servings of high-fat foods per day -0.12 (95% CI -0.39 to 0.00). None of these reached our predefined level of statistical significance, especially after accounting for multiple testing. <span class="hlt">School</span>-based curriculum interventions alone are unlikely to have a major public health impact on children's diet and physical activity. ISRCTN50133740, Post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=urbanization&pg=5&id=EJ832604','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=urbanization&pg=5&id=EJ832604"><span>Improving the English Urban <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>: Questions of Policy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Maguire, Meg; Pratt-Adams, Simon</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This article argues that the focus within much normative education policy is with in-<span class="hlt">school</span> effects which has sidelined the impact of structural and material factors in respect of the urban <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. Educational reforms intended to improve <span class="hlt">schools</span> are less likely to make much impact unless these contextualizing matters are directly…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PCE...105..224T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018PCE...105..224T"><span>Sanitation and hygiene practices among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> learners in Ngamiland district, Botswana</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Thakadu, Olekae T.; Ngwenya, Barbara N.; Phaladze, Nthabiseng A.; Bolaane, Benjamin</p> <p>2018-06-01</p> <p>Improved sanitation and personal hygienic practices are considered important towards reducing the risks of spreading communicable diseases and improving public health. Diarrheal related deaths amongst adolescents are reported to be amongst the top ten for the age groups 10-19 <span class="hlt">year</span> olds and second among the age group 10-14 <span class="hlt">year</span> olds globally. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> learners in developing countries are among the most vulnerable sub-population. These mortalities and illnesses can be reduced by addressing personal hygiene among <span class="hlt">school</span> children and simultaneously promoting better <span class="hlt">school</span> attendance and improved learning. In order to facilitate improved health and educational outcomes, it is necessary therefore to effectively address water, sanitation and hygiene matters within the <span class="hlt">school</span> environment. This study explored hygiene education, personal hygiene practices among learners, environmental sanitation and hygiene within three <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the Ngamiland district, Botswana. From the three <span class="hlt">schools</span>, a total sample of 285 pupils was selected using proportionate stratified random sampling technique, and 15 teachers purposively selected as key informants. Data was collected using semi-structured questionnaires with key informants and social survey instrument for learners. Results show that very few learners linked poor hygiene to the following diseases; diarrhea/upset stomach (31.7%); malaria (23%); bilharzia (16.4%), and cholera (14.8%), demonstrating low hygiene knowledge. Hygiene education in <span class="hlt">schools</span> is infused in the curriculum, and teacher training on hygiene education is only through in-service training workshops. Regarding personal hygiene practices, over 70% of the learners indicated that they 'always' wash their hands before and after eating, with slightly over one-fifth indicating 'sometimes'. Overwhelming majority of learners dispose solid waste in dustbins (99.3%, n = 284), use refuse bags (80.8%, n = 231), open skips (64%, n = 183) and very few throw trash</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=civil+AND+engineering&id=EJ929914','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=civil+AND+engineering&id=EJ929914"><span>Civil Engineering in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brown, Martin; Strong, Alan</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>For many children of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age, an engineer is the man who comes to service the central heating system or who fixes the family car when it breaks down. Most have never met a "real" professional engineer, and have no idea of what is involved in the exciting world of engineering. Most assume that engineers are men. To try to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=jenkins&pg=2&id=EJ1015598','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=jenkins&pg=2&id=EJ1015598"><span>ASE and <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Science</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harlen, Wynne</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This article focuses on the role of the Association for Science Education (ASE) in supporting and developing policy and practice in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science. It first sets the events after the formation of ASE in 1963 in the context of what went before. It then takes a mainly chronological view of some, but by no means all, of ASE's activities…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1116758.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1116758.pdf"><span>English Language Education in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schooling</span> in Argentina</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Porto, Melina</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This article describes public <span class="hlt">primary</span> English language education in Argentina. I begin with background information about the country and a brief historical overview of education in general, accompanied by a portrait of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> in particular. This overview involves local, political and economic considerations but also international…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27139017','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27139017"><span>Near Work Related Behaviors Associated with Myopic Shifts among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students in the Jiading District of Shanghai: A <span class="hlt">School</span>-Based One-<span class="hlt">Year</span> Cohort Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>You, Xiaofang; Wang, Ling; Tan, Hui; He, Xiangui; Qu, Xiaomei; Shi, Huijing; Zhu, Jianfeng; Zou, Haidong</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>To investigate the characteristics of various near work related behaviors among <span class="hlt">primary</span> students and their associations with changes in myopia related ocular biometric parameters during one-<span class="hlt">year</span> of follow up. A <span class="hlt">school</span>-based sample of 4,814 <span class="hlt">primary</span> 1st to 4th grade students aged 6-10 <span class="hlt">years</span> old were selected by cluster randomization based on probability proportion to size in 2013. At baseline, students together with their parents filled in a self-administered questionnaire on 9 aspects of near work related behaviors and some important covariants of myopia. A comprehensive set of eye examinations including axial length (AL) and cycloplegic refraction was conducted both at baseline and one <span class="hlt">year</span> later. With the grade level increase, students did increasingly better at finding various ways to have an eye break, but they were increasingly likely to continuously do long-time near work without an eye break. Keeping a reasonable eye distance and correct hand posture for reading, writing, or watching TV became worse for the first time before grade 2, but then became better at grade 3. In contrast, selecting appropriate lighting environments or situations and keeping a balanced diet became better for the first time before grade 2, but then became worse at grade 3. At one-<span class="hlt">year</span> follow up, the mean AL increased by 0.32 ± 0.35 mm, the ratio of AL divided by the mean corneal radius of curvature (AL/CR ratio) increased by 0.032 ± 0.054, the myopic spherical equivalent (SE) increased by -0.51 ± 0.51 diopters and the incidence of myopia was 16.0% (237/1,477). After controlling for the confounding effects of parental myopia, student's age, gender, height, daily near work time, daily outdoor activity time and all of the other near work related behaviors, keeping a reasonable distance when reading, writing and watching TV was associated with elongation of the AL [standard coefficient beta = -0.062, P = 0.004], a change in SE [beta = -0.072, P = 0.020] and incident myopia [adjusted</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fiji&pg=4&id=EJ661160','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fiji&pg=4&id=EJ661160"><span>Multilingual Proficiency in Fiji <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shameem, Nikhat</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Determined language proficiency among multilingual Indo-Fijian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children who have the languages, Fiji-Hindi, Standard Hindi, Urdu, English, Fijian, and Fijian English in their speech repertoire. Identifies the variables that affect multilingual proficiency in this group and determines whether classroom practice reflects educational…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=KPI&pg=3&id=ED394686','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=KPI&pg=3&id=ED394686"><span>Key Performance Indicators for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Strand, Steve</p> <p></p> <p>Focusing mostly on their application for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, this document describes the educational key performance indicators (KPI) employed by the Wendsworth, England, Local Educational Authority (LEA). Indicators are divided into 3 areas, educational context, resource development, and outcomes. Contextual indicators include pupil mobility, home…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1111362.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1111362.pdf"><span>Investigation of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Conflict Resolution Skills in Terms of Different Variable</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bayraktar, Hatice Vatansever; Yilmaz, Kamile Özge</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>In this study, it is aimed to determine the level of conflict resolution skills of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers and whether they vary by different variables. The study was organised in accordance with the scanning model. The universe of the study consists of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers working at 14 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, two from each of the seven geographical…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=culture+AND+happiness&pg=7&id=ED113115','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=culture+AND+happiness&pg=7&id=ED113115"><span>Happiness Is Bilingual Education for the Children in the San Luis Valley <span class="hlt">Schools</span>, <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">Year</span> 1973-74.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>San Luis Valley Board of Cooperative Services, Alamosa, CO.</p> <p></p> <p>The San Luis Valley Bilingual Bicultural Program was begun in 10 <span class="hlt">schools</span> at the kindergarten level. Each <span class="hlt">year</span> the next higher grade was to be implemented until the program was in existence from K-4. During 1972-73, there were 1,092 kindergarten and first grade children and 86 teaching staff participating in the program. Its <span class="hlt">primary</span> goal was…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+Science+AND+primary&pg=7&id=EJ1156573','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+Science+AND+primary&pg=7&id=EJ1156573"><span>Introducing Evolution into the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Curriculum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Scrase, Stuart</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The new National Curriculum for England requirements for <span class="hlt">primary</span> science have created a few challenges and opportunities for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Implementation was not compulsory for <span class="hlt">year</span> 6 (ages 10-11) until September 2015, but at the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets educators decided, as did many other <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, to start…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED574318.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED574318.pdf"><span>Unexpected <span class="hlt">School</span> Reform: Academisation of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in England. CEP Discussion Paper No. 1455</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Eyles, Andrew; Machin, Stephen; McNally, Sandra</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The change of government in 2010 provoked a large structural change in the English education landscape. Unexpectedly, the new government offered <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> the chance to have "the freedom and the power to take control of their own destiny", with better performing <span class="hlt">schools</span> given a green light to convert to become an academy <span class="hlt">school</span> on…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RScEd..46...91F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RScEd..46...91F"><span>Secondary Science Teachers' and Students' Involvement in a <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Community of Science Practice: How It Changed Their Practices and Interest in Science</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Forbes, Anne; Skamp, Keith</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>MyScience is a <span class="hlt">primary</span> science education initiative in which being in a community of practice is integral to the learning process. In this initiative, stakeholder groups—<span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers, <span class="hlt">primary</span> students and mentors—interact around the `domain' of `investigating scientifically'. This paper builds on three earlier publications and interprets the findings of the views of four secondary science teachers and five <span class="hlt">year</span> 9 secondary science students who were first-timer participants—as mentors—in MyScience. Perceptions of these mentors' interactions with <span class="hlt">primary</span> students were analysed using attributes associated with both `communities of practice' and the `nature of science'. Findings reveal that participation in MyScience changed secondary science teachers' views and practices about how to approach the teaching of science in secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> and fostered <span class="hlt">primary</span>-secondary links. <span class="hlt">Year</span> 9 students positively changed their views about secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> science and confidence in science through participation as mentors. Implications for secondary science teaching and learning through participation in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> community of science practice settings are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Geometry&pg=2&id=EJ1065066','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Geometry&pg=2&id=EJ1065066"><span>New Opportunities in Geometry Education at the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sinclair, Nathalie; Bruce, Catherine D.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This paper outlines the new opportunities that that will be changing the landscape of geometry education at the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> level. These include: the research on spatial reasoning and its connection to <span class="hlt">school</span> mathematics in general and <span class="hlt">school</span> geometry in particular; the function of drawing in the construction of geometric meaning; the role of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27273652','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27273652"><span>The long-term differential achievement effects of <span class="hlt">school</span> socioeconomic composition in <span class="hlt">primary</span> education: A propensity score matching approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Belfi, Barbara; Haelermans, Carla; De Fraine, Bieke</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>The effects of <span class="hlt">school</span> socio-economic composition on student achievement growth trajectories have been a hot topic of discussion among politicians around the world for many <span class="hlt">years</span>. However, the bulk of research investigating <span class="hlt">school</span> socio-economic composition effects has been limited in important ways. In an attempt to overcome the flaws in earlier research on <span class="hlt">school</span> socio-economic composition effects, this study used data from a large sample, followed students throughout <span class="hlt">primary</span> education, addressed selection bias problems, identified the grade(s) in which <span class="hlt">school</span> socio-economic composition mattered the most, and studied the differential effects of <span class="hlt">school</span> socio-economic composition by individual socio-economic status (SES). In a longitudinal design with seven occasions of data collection, the authors drew on a sample of N = 3,619 students (age at T1 about 5 <span class="hlt">years</span>, age at T7 about 12 <span class="hlt">years</span>) from 151 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Flanders (the northern part of Belgium). Students in low-, medium-, high-, and mixed-SES <span class="hlt">schools</span> were matched using propensity scores. To compare students' achievement growth trajectories in the different <span class="hlt">school</span> compositions, multilevel regression modelling with repeated measurements was applied. The results showed that students had more positive achievement growth in high-SES as compared to low-SES and mixed-SES <span class="hlt">schools</span>. In two of the three comparisons, students in mixed-SES <span class="hlt">schools</span> showed the lowest math development. The negative effects of mixed-SES <span class="hlt">schools</span> on math achievement growth were the strongest for high-SES students. Our findings contribute to the ongoing discussion on the effects of <span class="hlt">school</span> socio-economic composition on student achievement growth. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23173779','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23173779"><span>Nutritional and cognitive status of entry-level <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Zomba, rural Malawi.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nkhoma, Owen W W; Duffy, Maresa E; Davidson, Philip W; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A; McSorley, Emeir M; Strain, J J; O'Brien, Gerard M</p> <p>2013-05-01</p> <p>Entry-level Malawian children (n = 226) aged 6-8 <span class="hlt">years</span> from two public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, one a participant in a national <span class="hlt">school</span> feeding programme (FP), the other not, were investigated for differences in nutritional and cognitive status. Stunted growth (42%) and underweight (25%) were prevalent, with no significant differences between the <span class="hlt">schools</span>, although the <span class="hlt">school</span> attended was a significant predictor of mid-upper arm circumference. Previous attendance at a community-based childcare centre was significantly associated with lower body weight and height. There were no significant differences in memory, reversal learning and attention outcomes between the <span class="hlt">schools</span>. These findings report no major significant difference in nutrition or cognitive statuses between the <span class="hlt">schools</span>, and on this basis suggest that both <span class="hlt">schools</span> were equally in need of FP participation. More inclusive interventions and broadening/review of FP participation criteria are recommended.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=posttest+AND+controlled+AND+group+AND+design+AND+research&pg=6&id=EJ1143683','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=posttest+AND+controlled+AND+group+AND+design+AND+research&pg=6&id=EJ1143683"><span>Wilderness <span class="hlt">Schooling</span>: A Controlled Trial of the Impact of an Outdoor Education Programme on Attainment Outcomes in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Pupils</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Quibell, T.; Charlton, J.; Law, J.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Gaps in education attainment between high and low achieving children in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span> are frequently evidenced in educational reports. Linked to social disadvantage, these gaps have detrimental long-term effects on learning. There is a need to close the gap in attainment by addressing barriers to learning and offering alternative…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27601449','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27601449"><span>Young female handball players and sport specialisation: how do they cope with the transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> into a secondary sport <span class="hlt">school</span>?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kristiansen, Elsa; Stensrud, Trine</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The aim of the present study was to examine how six young female handball players (aged 13-14 <span class="hlt">years</span>) perceived the transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> to a sport-specialised secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>. Physical and physiological data as well as data from questionnaires were collected at baseline and after the first <span class="hlt">year</span> at the sport <span class="hlt">school</span>, and qualitative interviews were performed retrospectively after the first <span class="hlt">year</span> at <span class="hlt">school</span>. Evidence of competition-related stressors, organisational stressors (sport and <span class="hlt">school</span> balance) and personal stressors (social life and sport balance, lack of sleep and severe injuries) was found. Three girls developed long-lasting musculoskeletal injuries (>3 months out of ordinary training) and one experienced repeated short periods (≤2 weeks out of ordinary training) of injuries during the first <span class="hlt">year</span>. Onset of menarche and a length growth between 6 and 8 cm during the first <span class="hlt">year</span> were characteristic traits of the four injured girls. From our small study, it appears that young athletes attending a specialised secondary sport <span class="hlt">school</span> experienced many stressors due to a significant increase in training volume, reduction in sleeping time and development of severe and long-lasting injuries. Hence, trainers at sport <span class="hlt">schools</span>, club trainers and parents need to communicate and support them in order to prevent this. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29532768','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29532768"><span>Impact of Four <span class="hlt">Years</span> of Annual Mass Drug Administration on Prevalence and Intensity of Schistosomiasis among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> and High <span class="hlt">School</span> Children in Western Kenya: A Repeated Cross-Sectional Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abudho, Bernard O; Ndombi, Eric M; Guya, Bernard; Carter, Jennifer M; Riner, Diana K; Kittur, Nupur; Karanja, Diana M S; Secor, W Evan; Colley, Daniel G</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem in Kenya. The World Health Organization recommends preventive chemotherapy with praziquantel (PZQ) to control morbidity due to schistosomiasis. Morbidity is considered linked to intensity of infection, which along with prevalence is used to determine the frequency of mass drug administration (MDA) to <span class="hlt">school</span>-age children. We determined the impact of annual <span class="hlt">school</span>-based MDA on children across all <span class="hlt">primary</span> and high <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span> using a repeated cross-sectional study design in five <span class="hlt">schools</span> near Lake Victoria in western Kenya, an area endemic for Schistosoma mansoni . At baseline and for the following four consecutive <span class="hlt">years</span>, between 897 and 1,440 <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Grades 1-12 were enrolled and evaluated by Kato-Katz for S. mansoni and soil-transmitted helminths (STH), followed by annual MDA with PZQ and albendazole. Four annual rounds of MDA with PZQ were associated with reduced S. mansoni prevalence in all <span class="hlt">school</span> children (44.7-14.0%; P < 0.001) and mean intensity of infection by 91% (90.4 to 8.1 eggs per gram [epg] of stool; P < 0.001). Prevalence of high-intensity infection (≥ 400 epg) decreased from 6.8% at baseline to 0.3% by the end of the study. Soil-transmitted helminth infections, already low at baseline, also decreased significantly over the <span class="hlt">years</span>. In this high prevalence area, annual <span class="hlt">school</span>-based MDA with high coverage across all Grades (1-12) resulted in rapid and progressive declines in overall prevalence and intensity of infection. This decrease was dramatic in regard to heavy infections in older <span class="hlt">school</span>-attending children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1022546.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1022546.pdf"><span>Measuring Inviting <span class="hlt">School</span> Climate: A Case Study of a Public <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> in an Urban Low Socioeconomic Setting in Kenya</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Okaya, Tom Mboya; Horne, Marj; Lamig, Madeleine; Smith, Kenneth H.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The present study utilized the Inviting <span class="hlt">School</span> Survey-Revised (ISS-R) (Smith, 2005b, 2013) based on Invitational Theory and Practice (Purkey & Novak, 2008) to examine the <span class="hlt">school</span> climate of a public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in a low urban socio-economic setting in Kenya. <span class="hlt">School</span> climate was defined as the perceptions of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers and pupils…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5537527','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5537527"><span>‘The <span class="hlt">year</span> of first aid’: effectiveness of a 3-day first aid programme for 7-14-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Banfai, Balint; Pek, Emese; Pandur, Attila; Csonka, Henrietta; Betlehem, Jozsef</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Aim of the study Bystanders can play an important role in the event of sudden injury or illness. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a 3-day first aid course for all <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age groups (7–14 <span class="hlt">years</span> old). Methods 582 <span class="hlt">school</span> children were involved in the study. Training consisted of three sessions with transfer of theoretical knowledge and practical skills about first aid. The following most urgent situations were addressed in our study: adult basic life support (BLS), using an automated external defibrillator (AED), handling an unconscious patient, managing bleeding and calling the ambulance. Data collection was made with a questionnaire developed for the study and observation. Students were tested before, immediately after and 4 months after training. Results were considered significant in case of p<0.05. Results Prior to training there was a low level of knowledge and skills on BLS, management of the unconscious patient, use of an AED and management of bleeding. Knowledge and skills improved significantly in all of these categories (p<0.01) and remained significantly higher than the pre-test level at 4 months after training (p<0.01). Younger children overall performed less well than older children, but significantly improved over the pre-test level both immediately and 4 months after training (p<0.01). Prior first aid training was associated with knowledge of the correct ambulance number (p=0.015) and management of bleeding (p=0.041). Prior to training, age was associated with pre-test knowledge and skills of all topics (p<0.01); after training, it was only associated with AED use (p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between the depth of chest compression and children’s age, weight, height and body mass index (p<0.001). Ventilation depended on the same factors (p<0.001). Conclusion Children aged 7–14 <span class="hlt">years</span> are able to perform basic life-saving skills. Knowledge retention after 4 months is good for skills, but thinking in algorithms is</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+sexual+AND+condoms&pg=7&id=EJ812563','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=education+AND+sexual+AND+condoms&pg=7&id=EJ812563"><span>Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of a National <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> HIV Intervention in Kenya</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Wildish, Janet; Gichuru, Mary</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the impact of a <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> HIV education initiative on the knowledge, self-efficacy and sexual and condom use activities of upper <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> pupils in Kenya. A quasi-experimental mixed qualitative-quantitative pre- and 18-month post-design using 40 intervention and 40 matched control <span class="hlt">schools</span> demonstrated significant…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Teacher+AND+school+AND+failure&pg=4&id=EJ1094260','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Teacher+AND+school+AND+failure&pg=4&id=EJ1094260"><span>"I Am Not Clever, They Are Cleverer than Us": Children Reading in the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Scherer, Lexie</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper examines the experiences of children learning to read in a multi-ethnic London <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. The data are drawn from doctoral research, based on ethnographic fieldwork, with children aged six to seven <span class="hlt">years</span> and ten to eleven <span class="hlt">years</span>. Reading is revealed as a strongly emotional realm for children. The children are weak to resist teacher…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Sex&pg=7&id=EJ1168053','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Sex&pg=7&id=EJ1168053"><span>"Knowledge" in English <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>' Decision-Making about Sex and Relationships Education</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Wilder, Rachel</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Objective: To assess what kinds of knowledge policymakers in a sample of English <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> utilised to make decisions about their <span class="hlt">school</span>'s sex and relationships education policy. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with policymakers at three <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the southwest of England, and documentary analysis of the <span class="hlt">schools</span>'…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=talent+AND+management&pg=3&id=EJ1007381','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=talent+AND+management&pg=3&id=EJ1007381"><span>The Talent Managing Work of the Balaton-Felvideki Szin-Vonal <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Art <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Baranyai, Valeria</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>In recent <span class="hlt">years</span>, art education has been recognized as a suitable tool for enhancing emotional intelligence and nurturing a child's creative development. However, it seems that the education of art has lost the race against other <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> subjects, with only a minimal number of lessons being taught. The establishment of the afternoon art…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hardman&pg=6&id=EJ676719','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hardman&pg=6&id=EJ676719"><span>Classroom Interaction in Kenyan <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ackers, Jim; Hardman, Frank</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Reports on a study of classroom interaction in Kenyan <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Analyzes video recordings of 102 lessons in English, mathematics, and science using systematic observation, discourse analysis, and a time-line analysis. Reveals the preponderance of teacher dominated lessons with little opportunity for student interaction. Considers…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25184075','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25184075"><span>Nutritional contents of lunch packs of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in nnewi, Nigeria.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ugochukwu, Ef; Onubogu, Cu; Edokwe, Es; Okeke, Kn</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Lunch packs play a significant role in the nutritional status and academic performance of <span class="hlt">school</span> children. Available data show a high prevalence of malnutrition among <span class="hlt">school</span>-age children. The aim of this study is to document the nutritional contents of lunch packs of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Nnewi, Anambra state, Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1018 <span class="hlt">primary</span> 1-6 pupils selected by stratified systematic random sampling from six <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, two each of private, - mission, - and government (public) - owned <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Nnewi metropolis with the aid of the semi-structured questionnaire. Lunch packs of the pupils were examined. Majority of the pupils (77.8% [792/1018]) had lunch packs although about half of pupils in public <span class="hlt">schools</span> had no lunch pack. Only 12.4% (98/792) and 19.2% (152/792) of pupils with lunch packs had balanced meals and fruits/vegetables in their lunch packs, respectively. The odds of not coming to <span class="hlt">school</span> with packed lunch was about 13 and 12 times higher for mothers with no formal education or only <span class="hlt">primary</span> education, respectively, compared with those with tertiary education. Type of <span class="hlt">school</span> had a strong influence on possession and contents of lunch pack (χ(2) = 2.88, P < 0.001, phi coefficient = 0.72). Pupils in private (97.5% [198/203]) and mission (94.4% [388/411]) <span class="hlt">schools</span> were more likely to have a lunch pack compared with public <span class="hlt">schools</span> (51.0% [206/404]). However, pupils in private <span class="hlt">schools</span> were most likely to have a balanced meal (32.5% [66/203] vs. 5.8% [24/411] in mission and 2.0% [8/404] in public <span class="hlt">schools</span>) and fruits/vegetables (48.3% [98/203] vs. 10.2% [42/411] in mission and 3.0% [12/404] in public <span class="hlt">schools</span>) in their lunch packs. Mothers' educational status and parents' occupation were significantly associated with lunch pack contents. Majority of the lunch packs of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils contain poor quality food especially in public <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Mother's educational status and parent's occupation are important</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764300','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4764300"><span>Women’s Political Empowerment and Investments in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schooling</span> in India</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yount, Kathryn M.; Cunningham, Solveig A.; Pande, Rohini P.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Using a national district-level dataset of India composed of information on investments in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span> (data from the District Information Survey for Education [DISE, 2007/8]) and information on demographic characteristics of elected officials (data from the Election Commission of India [ECI, 2000/04]), we examined the relationship between women’s representation in State Legislative Assembly (SLA) seats and district-level investments in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span>. We used OLS regressions adjusting for confounders and spatial autocorrelation, and estimated separate models for North and South India. Women’s representation in general SLA seats typically was negatively associated with investments in <span class="hlt">primary-school</span> amenities and teachers; women’s representation in SLA seats reserved for under-represented minorities, i.e., scheduled castes and scheduled tribes, typically was positively associated with investments in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schooling</span>, especially in areas addressing the basic needs of poor children. Women legislators’ gender and caste identities may shape their decisions about redistributive educational policies. PMID:26924878</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED572448.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED572448.pdf"><span>Teaching Computation in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> without Traditional Written Algorithms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hartnett, Judy</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Concerns regarding the dominance of the traditional written algorithms in <span class="hlt">schools</span> have been raised by many mathematics educators, yet the teaching of these procedures remains a dominant focus in in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. This paper reports on a project in one <span class="hlt">school</span> where the staff agreed to put the teaching of the traditional written algorithm aside,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+Science+AND+primary&pg=3&id=EJ1031744','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=teaching+AND+Science+AND+primary&pg=3&id=EJ1031744"><span>An Innovative Model of Professional Development to Enhance the Teaching and Learning of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Science in Irish <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Smith, Greg</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study investigates the influence of a two-<span class="hlt">year</span> professional development programme on <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers' attitudes towards <span class="hlt">primary</span> science, their confidence and competence in teaching science, and pupils' attitudes towards <span class="hlt">school</span> science. Unlike the traditional "one-size-fits all" model of professional development, the model developed…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fundamental+AND+movement+AND+skills&pg=4&id=ED529971','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fundamental+AND+movement+AND+skills&pg=4&id=ED529971"><span>Bridging the Transition from <span class="hlt">Primary</span> to Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Howe, Alan, Ed.; Richards, Val, Ed.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>The transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> can often be a difficult time for children, and managing the transition smoothly has posed a problem for teachers at both upper <span class="hlt">primary</span> and lower secondary level. At a time when "childhood" recedes and "adulthood" beckons, the inequalities between individual children can widen,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Effects+AND+Teachers+AND+Self-Efficacy+AND+Job+AND+Satisfaction%3a&pg=2&id=EJ801356','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Effects+AND+Teachers+AND+Self-Efficacy+AND+Job+AND+Satisfaction%3a&pg=2&id=EJ801356"><span>An Assessment of Well-Being of Principals in Flemish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Devos, G.; Bouckenooghe, D.; Engels, N.; Hotton, G.; Aelterman, A.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The goal of this inquiry is to indicate which individual, organisational and external environment factors contribute to a better understanding of the well-being of Flemish <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> principals. Design/methodology/approach: Data from a representative sample of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Flanders (n = 46) were gathered through questionnaires…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23728691','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23728691"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>-based behavioural interventions for preventing caries.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cooper, Anna M; O'Malley, Lucy A; Elison, Sarah N; Armstrong, Rosemary; Burnside, Girvan; Adair, Pauline; Dugdill, Lindsey; Pine, Cynthia</p> <p>2013-05-31</p> <p>Dental caries is one of the most common global childhood diseases and is, for the most part, entirely preventable. Good oral health is dependent on the establishment of the key behaviours of toothbrushing with fluoride toothpaste and controlling sugar snacking. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> provide a potential setting in which these behavioural interventions can support children to develop independent and habitual healthy behaviours. To assess the clinical effects of <span class="hlt">school</span>-based interventions aimed at changing behaviour related to toothbrushing habits and the frequency of consumption of cariogenic food and drink in children (4 to 12 <span class="hlt">year</span> olds) for caries prevention. We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 18 October 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 4), MEDLINE via OVID (1948 to 18 October 2012), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 18 October 2012), CINAHL via EBSCO (1981 to 18 October 2012) and PsycINFO via OVID (1950 to 18 October 2012). Ongoing trials were searched for using Current Controlled Trials (to 18 October 2012) and ClinicalTrials.gov (to 18 October 2012). Conference proceedings were searched for using ZETOC (1993 to 18 October 2012) and Web of Science (1990 to 18 October 2012). We searched for thesis abstracts using the Proquest Dissertations and Theses database (1950 to 18 October 2012). There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. Non-English language papers were included and translated in full by native speakers. Randomised controlled trials of behavioural interventions in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (children aged 4 to 12 <span class="hlt">years</span> at baseline) were selected. Included studies had to include behavioural interventions addressing both toothbrushing and consumption of cariogenic foods or drinks and have a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> as a focus for delivery of the intervention. Two pairs of review authors independently extracted data related to methods</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=stress+AND+management&pg=6&id=EJ880701','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=stress+AND+management&pg=6&id=EJ880701"><span>Gender Differences in the Role of Emotional Intelligence during the <span class="hlt">Primary</span>-Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span> Transition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jordan, Julie-Ann; McRorie, Margaret; Ewing, Cathy</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The relationship between components of emotional intelligence (EI) (interpersonal ability, intrapersonal ability, adaptability and stress management) and academic performance in English, maths and science was examined in a sample of 86 children (49 males and 37 females) aged 11-12 <span class="hlt">years</span> during the <span class="hlt">primary</span>-secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> transition period.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3647646','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3647646"><span>Tuberculosis Outbreak in a <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>, Milan, Italy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Faccini, Marino; Codecasa, Luigi Ruffo; Ciconali, Giorgio; Cammarata, Serafina; Borriello, Catia Rosanna; De Gioia, Costanza; Za, Alessandro; Marino, Andrea Filippo; Ferrarese, Maurizio; Gesu, Giovanni; Mazzola, Ester; Castaldi, Silvana</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Investigation of an outbreak of tuberculosis (TB) in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in Milan, Italy, found 15 schoolchildren had active TB disease and 173 had latent TB infection. TB was also identified in 2 homeless men near the <span class="hlt">school</span>. Diagnostic delay, particularly in the index case-patient, contributed to the transmission of infection. PMID:23621942</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=musical+AND+school&pg=3&id=EJ906208','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=musical+AND+school&pg=3&id=EJ906208"><span>Musical Behaviours of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children in Singapore</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lum, Chee-Hoo</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>In this ethnographic study, the musical behaviours of 28 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Singapore were examined for their meaning and diversity as they engaged in the <span class="hlt">school</span> day. A large part of these children's musical behaviours stemmed from their exposure to the mass media. Children's musical inventions emerged in the context of play, occasionally…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=study+AND+computers+AND+laptops&pg=5&id=EJ943729','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=study+AND+computers+AND+laptops&pg=5&id=EJ943729"><span>Laptop Classes in Some Australian Government <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fluck, Andrew E.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Australia was once a world leader for laptop adoption in <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Now overtaken by extensive roll-outs of laptops in Maine and Uruguay, this paper seeks to explain why this lead was lost. Six case studies of government <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> were undertaken to gather data about current initiatives. Comparative analysis shows how the potential of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED405087.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED405087.pdf"><span>The Northcote Network of <span class="hlt">Schools</span> and the Middle <span class="hlt">Years</span> of <span class="hlt">Schooling</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kruse, Darryn</p> <p></p> <p>Recognizing the necessity of examining the needs of early adolescents and changing the focus of middle grades education in Australia, this report describes the findings from the Northcote Network of <span class="hlt">Schools</span>, 8 <span class="hlt">primary</span> and 2 secondary <span class="hlt">schools</span> collaborating to develop continuity and coherence across grades 5 through 8. The paper outlines activities…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24479095','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24479095"><span>Morbidity pattern and personal hygiene in children among private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in urban area: are the trends changing?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mhaske, Mayavati S; Khismatrao, Deepak S; Kevin, Fernandez; Pandve, Harshal T; Kundap, Ritesh P</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">School</span> health is an important intervention as a great deal of research tells us that <span class="hlt">schools</span> can have a major effect on children's health, by teaching them about health and promoting healthy behaviors. The aim of this study is to determine common health problems and assess personal hygiene status among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. A cross-sectional study was conducted in academic <span class="hlt">years</span> 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, with three health check-up camps organized in private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> of Pune city. A total of 450 students were assessed for health problems and composite score of personal hygiene status was calculated ranging from 0 to 5 by examination of hairs, nails, skin and clothes. Proportions calculated with application of Chi-square test and Pearson co-efficient applied to observe the relation between two quantitative variables. Out of 450 students examined, 56.2% were boys and 43.8% were girls with age ranging from 5 to 10 <span class="hlt">years</span>. The major morbidities observed were dental caries (65.1%), upper respiratory tract infections (38.2%), ear wax (29.9%) and myopia (10.0%). Mean hygiene score was significantly higher in girls (4.32) than boys (3.95) and poor hygiene observed in older boys. Increasing myopia and poor dental hygiene denotes a changing morbidity pattern in private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> of the urban area. The hygiene status of the girls is significantly better than boys.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPhCS.953a2179M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPhCS.953a2179M"><span>The role of principal in optimizing <span class="hlt">school</span> climate in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Murtedjo; Suharningsih</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This article was written based on the occurrence of elementary <span class="hlt">school</span> changes that never counted because of the low quality, became the <span class="hlt">school</span> of choice of the surrounding community with the many national achievements ever achieved. This article is based on research data conducted in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. In this paper focused on the role of <span class="hlt">school</span> principals in an effort to optimize <span class="hlt">school</span> climate. To describe the principal’s role in optimizing <span class="hlt">school</span> climate using a qualitative approach to the design of Multi-Site Study. The appointment of the informant was done by snowball technique. Data collection through in-depth interviews, participant observation, and documentation. Data credibility checking uses triangulation techniques, member checks, and peer discussions. Auditability is performed by the auditor. The collected data is analyzed by site analysis and cross-site analysis. The result of the research shows that the principal in optimizing the conducive <span class="hlt">school</span> climate by creating the physical condition of the <span class="hlt">school</span> and the socio-emotional condition is pleasant, so that the teachers in implementing the learning process become passionate, happy learners which ultimately improve their learning achievement and can improve the <span class="hlt">school</span> quality.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=domenech&pg=2&id=EJ823924','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=domenech&pg=2&id=EJ823924"><span>Self-Efficacy, <span class="hlt">School</span> Resources, Job Stressors and Burnout among Spanish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> and Secondary <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers: A Structural Equation Approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Betoret, Fernando Domenech</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study examines the relationship between <span class="hlt">school</span> resources, teacher self-efficacy, potential multi-level stressors and teacher burnout using structural equation modelling. The causal structure for <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers was also examined. The sample was composed of 724 <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary Spanish <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers. The changes…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22128770','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22128770"><span>Engagement with the National Healthy <span class="hlt">Schools</span> Programme is associated with higher fruit and vegetable consumption in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Keyte, J; Harris, S; Margetts, B; Robinson, S; Baird, J</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>  Improving children's diets is currently a government focus. However, fruit and vegetable consumption, a key target, is still far below the government guidelines of five portions per day. The present study aimed to assess the impact of engagement with the National Healthy <span class="hlt">Schools</span> Programme (NHSP) on fruit and vegetable consumption in a sample of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.   A sample of 511 children, aged 7-9 <span class="hlt">years</span>, who were attending 10 randomly selected <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Hampshire, completed the Day in the Life Questionnaire, a validated 24-h recall method of dietary assessment. Fruit and vegetable intake in pupils attending <span class="hlt">schools</span> engaged with the NHSP was compared with that of pupils attending <span class="hlt">schools</span> not engaged with the programme.   Children attending <span class="hlt">schools</span> engaged with the NHSP ate a median of two (interquartile range, 0-8.0) portions of fruit and vegetables, compared to one portion (interquartile range, 0-8.0) consumed by pupils attending a <span class="hlt">school</span> not engaged with the programme (P=0.001). Gender was also a significant predictor of fruit and vegetable consumption, with girls being 1.68 times more likely to consume 2.5 or more portions of fruit and vegetables. After adjustment for free <span class="hlt">school</span> meal eligibility (as a measure of socio-economic status) and gender, pupils attending <span class="hlt">schools</span> engaged with NHSP were twice as likely to eat 2.5 portions of fruit and vegetables or more per day.   Engagement with the NHSP may be an effective way of increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. Further evaluation of the programme is recommended to determine which aspects of the NHSP are successful in achieving this. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27047607','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27047607"><span>Incorporating <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Scientific Literature in Middle and High <span class="hlt">School</span> Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fankhauser, Sarah C; Lijek, Rebeccah S</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> literature is the most reliable and direct source of scientific information, but most middle <span class="hlt">school</span> and high <span class="hlt">school</span> science is taught using secondary and tertiary sources. One reason for this is that <span class="hlt">primary</span> science articles can be difficult to access and interpret for young students and for their teachers, who may lack exposure to this type of writing. The Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI) was created to fill this gap and provide <span class="hlt">primary</span> research articles that can be accessed and read by students and their teachers. JEI is a non-profit, online, open-access, peer-reviewed science journal dedicated to mentoring and publishing the scientific research of middle and high <span class="hlt">school</span> students. JEI articles provide reliable scientific information that is written by students and therefore at a level that their peers can understand. For student-authors who publish in JEI, the review process and the interaction with scientists provide invaluable insight into the scientific process. Moreover, the resulting repository of free, student-written articles allows teachers to incorporate age-appropriate <span class="hlt">primary</span> literature into the middle and high <span class="hlt">school</span> science classroom. JEI articles can be used for teaching specific scientific content or for teaching the process of the scientific method itself. The critical thinking skills that students learn by engaging with the <span class="hlt">primary</span> literature will be invaluable for the development of a scientifically-literate public.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4798793','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4798793"><span>Incorporating <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Scientific Literature in Middle and High <span class="hlt">School</span> Education†</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Fankhauser, Sarah C.; Lijek, Rebeccah S.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> literature is the most reliable and direct source of scientific information, but most middle <span class="hlt">school</span> and high <span class="hlt">school</span> science is taught using secondary and tertiary sources. One reason for this is that <span class="hlt">primary</span> science articles can be difficult to access and interpret for young students and for their teachers, who may lack exposure to this type of writing. The Journal of Emerging Investigators (JEI) was created to fill this gap and provide <span class="hlt">primary</span> research articles that can be accessed and read by students and their teachers. JEI is a non-profit, online, open-access, peer-reviewed science journal dedicated to mentoring and publishing the scientific research of middle and high <span class="hlt">school</span> students. JEI articles provide reliable scientific information that is written by students and therefore at a level that their peers can understand. For student-authors who publish in JEI, the review process and the interaction with scientists provide invaluable insight into the scientific process. Moreover, the resulting repository of free, student-written articles allows teachers to incorporate age-appropriate <span class="hlt">primary</span> literature into the middle and high <span class="hlt">school</span> science classroom. JEI articles can be used for teaching specific scientific content or for teaching the process of the scientific method itself. The critical thinking skills that students learn by engaging with the <span class="hlt">primary</span> literature will be invaluable for the development of a scientifically-literate public. PMID:27047607</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28356095','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28356095"><span>Methylphenidate use and <span class="hlt">school</span> performance among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children: a descriptive study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>van der Schans, Jurjen; Çiçek, Rukiye; Vardar, Sefike; Bos, Jens Hj; de Vries, Tjalling W; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hak, Eelko</p> <p>2017-03-29</p> <p>There is no conclusive evidence that stimulants have beneficial effects on major associated outcome parameters, particularly <span class="hlt">school</span> performance. We assessed the differences in <span class="hlt">school</span> performance among children using methylphenidate at the end of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in relation to various parameters of methylphenidate use. We linked children from a pharmacy prescription database with standardized achievement test results at the end of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. We explored differences in test scores between current methylphenidate users versus never users and methylphenidate users who stopped treatment at least 6 months before the test, early versus late starters, different dosage of methylphenidate, and concurrent antipsychotic or asthma treatment. Out of the 7736 children, 377 (4.9%) children were treated with methylphenidate at the time of the test. After adjusting for confounders the methylphenidate users (532.58 ± .48) performed significantly lower on the test than never users (534.72 ± .11). Compared with late starters of methylphenidate treatment (536.94 ± 1.51) we found significantly lower test scores for the early starters (532.33 ± .50). Our study indicates that children using methylphenidate still perform less at <span class="hlt">school</span> compared to their peers. Our study also suggests that earlier start of methylphenidate treatment is associated with a lower <span class="hlt">school</span> performance compared to children starting later with the treatment. This result could either indicate a limited effect of long term treatment or a more strongly affected group of early starters.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28420689','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28420689"><span>'The <span class="hlt">year</span> of first aid': effectiveness of a 3-day first aid programme for 7-14-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Banfai, Balint; Pek, Emese; Pandur, Attila; Csonka, Henrietta; Betlehem, Jozsef</p> <p>2017-08-01</p> <p>Bystanders can play an important role in the event of sudden injury or illness. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a 3-day first aid course for all <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> age groups (7-14 <span class="hlt">years</span> old). 582 <span class="hlt">school</span> children were involved in the study. Training consisted of three sessions with transfer of theoretical knowledge and practical skills about first aid. The following most urgent situations were addressed in our study: adult basic life support (BLS), using an automated external defibrillator (AED), handling an unconscious patient, managing bleeding and calling the ambulance. Data collection was made with a questionnaire developed for the study and observation. Students were tested before, immediately after and 4 months after training. Results were considered significant in case of p<0.05. Prior to training there was a low level of knowledge and skills on BLS, management of the unconscious patient, use of an AED and management of bleeding. Knowledge and skills improved significantly in all of these categories (p<0.01) and remained significantly higher than the pre-test level at 4 months after training (p<0.01). Younger children overall performed less well than older children, but significantly improved over the pre-test level both immediately and 4 months after training (p<0.01). Prior first aid training was associated with knowledge of the correct ambulance number (p=0.015) and management of bleeding (p=0.041). Prior to training, age was associated with pre-test knowledge and skills of all topics (p<0.01); after training, it was only associated with AED use (p<0.001). There was a significant correlation between the depth of chest compression and children's age, weight, height and body mass index (p<0.001). Ventilation depended on the same factors (p<0.001). Children aged 7-14 <span class="hlt">years</span> are able to perform basic life-saving skills. Knowledge retention after 4 months is good for skills, but thinking in algorithms is difficult for these children. © Article author(s) (or</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=management+AND+styles&pg=2&id=EJ1067394','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=management+AND+styles&pg=2&id=EJ1067394"><span>Conflicts in <span class="hlt">Schools</span>, Conflict Management Styles and the Role of the <span class="hlt">School</span> Leader: A Study of Greek <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Educators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Saiti, Anna</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Conflict may occur in any organization (and hence <span class="hlt">school</span>) and, for <span class="hlt">schools</span>, conflict management style is a joint activity and the degree of its effectiveness determines the type of impact of conflict on <span class="hlt">school</span> performance. This empirical study investigates the potential sources of conflict in Greek <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>, determine appropriate approaches…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED518910.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED518910.pdf"><span>Missouri Public <span class="hlt">School</span> Accountability Report. 2009-10 <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">Year</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2010</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Each <span class="hlt">year</span>, the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education publishes an online "<span class="hlt">school</span> accountability report card" for each public <span class="hlt">school</span> district, each building and each charter <span class="hlt">school</span>. This document provides a statewide report card on key accountability measures about Missouri public <span class="hlt">schools</span>, including information…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1068665.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1068665.pdf"><span>Development of Effective Academic Affairs Administration System in Thai <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thongnoi, Niratchakorn; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Sri-ampai, Anan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This research aimed to: 1) study current situations and problems of academic affairs administration system in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>. 2) develop an effective academic affairs administration system, and 3) evaluate the implementation of the developed system in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, Thailand. Research and Development (R&D) was employed which consisted of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1069285.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1069285.pdf"><span>EFL <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Attitudes, Knowledge and Skills in Alternative Assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.; Taqi, Hanan A.; Abdul-Kareem, Muneera M.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The study investigated female EFL <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers' attitudes as well as teachers' knowledge and skills in alternative assessment. Data was collected via a questionnaire from 335 EFL <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers randomly selected from six educational zones. An interview with principals and head teachers and a focus group interview with EFL…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=developmental+AND+biology&pg=4&id=EJ645970','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=developmental+AND+biology&pg=4&id=EJ645970"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> Literature as a Basis for a High-<span class="hlt">School</span> Biology Curriculum.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yarden, Anat; Brill, Gilat; Falk, Hedda</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>Adopts <span class="hlt">primary</span> literature as a means of developing scientific literacy among high-<span class="hlt">school</span> biology majors. Reports on the development and implementation of a <span class="hlt">primary</span> literature-based curriculum in developmental biology. Discusses the process of adapting original research articles to the high-<span class="hlt">school</span> level, as well as a conversational model developed…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=primary+AND+data+AND+disadvantage&id=EJ964859','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=primary+AND+data+AND+disadvantage&id=EJ964859"><span>A Mixed-Methods Analysis of Achievement Disparities in Guatemalan <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Meade, Ben</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Although most Guatemalan rural students currently have access to <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, there are large differences in the levels of learning that take place among different populations and in different contexts. This paper uses multiple data and methods to examine the interrelated factors underlying achievement disparities in Guatemalan <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21425069','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21425069"><span>The prevalence of speech disorder in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in Yazd-Iran.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Karbasi, Sedighah Akhavan; Fallah, Razieh; Golestan, Motaharah</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Communication disorder is a widespread disabling problems and associated with adverse, long term outcome that impact on individuals, families and academic achievement of children in the <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span> and affect vocational choices later in adulthood. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of speech disorders specifically stuttering, voice, and speech-sound disorders in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in Iran-Yazd. In a descriptive study, 7881 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in Yazd evaluated in view from of speech disorders with use of direct and face to face assessment technique in 2005. The prevalence of total speech disorders was 14.8% among whom 13.8% had speech-sound disorder, 1.2% stuttering and 0.47% voice disorder. The prevalence of speech disorders was higher than in males (16.7%) as compared to females (12.7%). Pattern of prevalence of the three speech disorders was significantly different according to gender, parental education and by number of family member. There was no significant difference across speech disorders and birth order, religion and paternal consanguinity. These prevalence figures are higher than more studies that using parent or teacher reports.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=change+AND+social&pg=3&id=EJ1104338','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=change+AND+social&pg=3&id=EJ1104338"><span>Possibility Thinking and Social Change in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Craft, Anna Rachel; Chappell, Kerry Anne</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This paper reviews the nature of possibility thinking (PT) (transformation from what is to what might be, in everyday contexts for children and teachers) and reports on how PT manifested in two English <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> engaged in social change. It identifies shared characteristics across the <span class="hlt">schools</span> as well as unique ways in which PT manifested.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Donaldson&id=EJ1155414','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Donaldson&id=EJ1155414"><span>Improving the Teaching of Science and Technology in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>--A Cluster Approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chambers, Paul</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>The position of science and technology in Scottish <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> is broadly similar to most other <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> throughout Great Britain. There are certain <span class="hlt">schools</span> and individuals that perform at a very high level but many <span class="hlt">schools</span> are hampered by a lack of resources, a lack of confidence in teaching the topics and some significant gaps in the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19557060','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19557060"><span>Do <span class="hlt">school</span> break-time policies influence child dental health and snacking behaviours? An evaluation of a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> programme.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Freeman, R; Oliver, M</p> <p>2009-06-27</p> <p>The aim of the two-<span class="hlt">year</span> controlled trial was to evaluate the effectiveness of the 'Boosting Better Breaks' (BBB) break-time policy to reduce obvious decay experience and sugar snacking in a cohort of nine-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old children attending intervention and control <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. A matched controlled prospective trial design. Children in <span class="hlt">Year</span> 5 were invited with their parents/guardians to take part. The children were assessed at baseline and at 24-month follow-up. One hundred and eighty-nine children attended intervention <span class="hlt">schools</span> and 175 attended control <span class="hlt">schools</span> which were matched for socio-economic status (SES), <span class="hlt">school</span> location and co-education status. The outcome variables were obvious decay experience and evidence of sugar snacks found in the children's rubbish bags. All children were asked to complete a questionnaire and keep evidence of the snacks they consumed starting from <span class="hlt">school</span>-time break to when they retired for bed in a numbered and coded 'rubbish bag' on a specific collection day at baseline and 24-month follow-up. All children had a dental examination at baseline and 24-month follow-up. Sixty percent of children at baseline and all of the children at follow-up had at least one sugar snack in their rubbish bag. The most popular snacks at follow-up were sweets, chocolate, crisps and carbonated drinks. In the <span class="hlt">school</span> environment children attending BBB policy <span class="hlt">schools</span> had significantly lower mean scores for sugar snacks scores at baseline but equivalent mean sugar snacks scores at follow-up compared with children attending control <span class="hlt">schools</span>. In the outside <span class="hlt">school</span> environment there was no effect of <span class="hlt">school</span> intervention on sugar snack scores. Decay into dentine at follow-up was predicted by <span class="hlt">school</span> intervention status and evidence of sugar snacks consumption outside <span class="hlt">school</span> and at home. The BBB break-time policy did not achieve its health promotion goals of promoting child dental health or encouraging children to adopt healthier dietary habits in <span class="hlt">school</span> or in the wider</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=target+AND+marketing&pg=6&id=EJ1020019','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=target+AND+marketing&pg=6&id=EJ1020019"><span>Implementation of Mandatory Nutritional Guidelines in South Australian <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Canteens: A Qualitative Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Abery, Elizabeth; Drummond, Claire</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> are identified as being in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> position to offer nutrition education. Moreover, <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> can offer an environment which is conducive to the promotion of healthy eating while influencing eating behaviours of children to benefit their health, well-being and academic development and performance. <span class="hlt">School</span> canteens are one…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED576217.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED576217.pdf"><span>Digital Divide in Post-<span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Marcus-Quinn, Ann; McGarr, Oliver</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This research study developed curricular specific open educational resources (OERs) for the teaching of poetry at Junior Certificate level in Irish post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. It aimed to capture the collaborative design and development process used in the development of the digital resources and describe and evaluate the implementation of the resources…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=research+AND+contextual&pg=7&id=EJ958795','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=research+AND+contextual&pg=7&id=EJ958795"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> English Teachers' Research Engagement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gao, Xuesong; Chow, Alice Wai Kwan</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Research engagement is an important means for teachers to develop their professional competence. This paper reports on an enquiry into the research engagement of a group of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> English language teachers in Guangdong province on the Chinese mainland. Drawing on questionnaire data and teachers' interview narratives, the paper examines how…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16306926','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16306926"><span>Risk factors for goiter in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> girls in Qom city of Iran.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mousavi, S M; Tavakoli, N; Mardan, F</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>Goiter is endemic in Iran. The iodine deficiency disorders program was begun a few <span class="hlt">years</span> ago in Iran, and the coverage of iodized salt is sufficient now. But, in a periodic <span class="hlt">yearly</span> medical examination of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> girls in Qom, the prevalence of goiter was above 30% in 2002. This survey was designed to study the risk factors of goiter in those students. The study was a randomized (multistage, proportional simple random sampling) case-control study. We selected and performed thyroid examinations in 1050 girl students in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Qom city of Iran in 2002. We found 284 cases: girls in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> had goiter in accordance with the clinical exam of World Health Organization classification. Among students who did not present with goiter in the clinical exam, we randomly selected 288 students as the control group. We used a questionnaire to evaluate them for the risk factors of goiter. The mean+/-s.d. ages of cases and controls were 8.7+/-1.3 and 8.9+/-1.3 <span class="hlt">years</span>, respectively. There is no significant difference between the two groups regarding history of soya, kale, turnip, fish, daily iodized salt usage, education and job of mothers, monthly family income, nationality, immigration and residential situation. By using multinomial logistic regression, we found that storage of iodized salt in open containers, odds ratio (OR): 2.201 (1.412-3.428); P-value <0.0001, medium socioeconomic situation (SES) of family, OR: 2.099 (1.029-4.282), P-value=0.041, district 2 of Qom city, OR: 2.880 (1.376-6.027), P-value=0.005, and district 3 of Qom city, OR: 2.051(1.032-4.078), P-value=0.041, were the major risk factors for goiter in this population. In this study, the main risk factors for goiter were storage of iodized salt in open containers, medium SES and also living in specific districts of Qom city. As the coverage of iodinized salt is over 95% in Iran, we advise the education of the family about storage of iodized salt in closed containers. We also recommend the</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28128781','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28128781"><span>Ergonomics evaluation of <span class="hlt">school</span> bags in Tehran female <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mohammadi, Somayeh; Mokhtarinia, Hamidreza; Nejatbakhsh, Reza; Scuffham, Andrew</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>More than 90% of the elementary <span class="hlt">school</span> students in the world and most of the Iranian students use backpacks. Heavy <span class="hlt">school</span> bags, failure to apply ergonomics standards in student's backpacks, and also mismatch between anthropometrics dimensions and schoolbag size are important issues for children's health. The purpose of this study was to gather baseline information on the average weight carried by female <span class="hlt">primary</span> students. It also aimed to evaluate ergonomics standards for student backpacks. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 212 Iranian girl students aged 6- 11 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Body weight and bag weight were measured with electronic scales and body mass index calculated with WHO software 2007. A questionnaire was constructed to gather information about the backpacks. Body dimensions were measured with VICON motion Analyze system (460). Ergonomics factors were recorded using a checklist. 80.8% of the students used a backpack at a higher weight than recommended by the standards of 10% of body weight. The most common type of schoolbag used was double strap packs (92.5%). The majority of the students carried packs on their backs; however, most of them did not make any adjustments (79.8%). The results have shown a mismatch between the anthropometric measures and the student's backpack dimensions. Parents, students and <span class="hlt">school</span> staff should be informed about these critical issues as well as suitable controls should be implemented in buying and using the bags.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+science&pg=6&id=EJ1022608','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+science&pg=6&id=EJ1022608"><span>Music and Drama in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in the Madeira Island--Narratives of Ownership and Leadership</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mota, Graça; Araújo, Maria Jose</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>A three-<span class="hlt">year</span>-case study funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT) from the Portuguese Ministry of Science, Technology and Higher Education was designed to study a 30-<span class="hlt">year</span> project of music and drama in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Madeira. This article reports on the narratives of the three main figures in the project as they elaborate on its…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22989326','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22989326"><span>Effects of a 15-week accumulated brisk walking programme on the body composition of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ford, Paul A; Perkins, Gill; Swaine, Ian</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to establish whether an accumulated brisk walking programme, performed during the <span class="hlt">school</span> day, is effective in changing body composition in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 5-11 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Altogether, 152 participants (79 boys and 73 girls) took part in this repeated-measures intervention study, divided into groups of walkers and controls. The walkers took part in the intervention during <span class="hlt">school</span> time, which involved brisk walking around the <span class="hlt">school</span> grounds for 15 min in the morning and afternoon, at least three times a week for 15 weeks. This represented an additional 90 min of moderate physical activity per week. The controls undertook their usual <span class="hlt">school</span> day activities. Pre- and post-intervention anthropometric and body composition measures were taken. Body fat (-1.95 ± 2.6%) and fat mass (-0.49 ± 1.0 kg) were significantly reduced in the walkers after the intervention, whereas the controls showed no significant changes in these measures. Our results show that regular accumulated bouts of brisk walking during the <span class="hlt">school</span> day can positively affect body composition in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=prosocial+AND+skills&id=ED570994','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=prosocial+AND+skills&id=ED570994"><span>Out of <span class="hlt">School</span> Activities during <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> and KS2 Attainment. Centre for Longitudinal Studies Working Paper 2016/1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chanfreau, Jenny; Tanner, Emily; Callanan, Meg; Laing, Karen; Skipp, Amy; Todd, Liz</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The aims of this working paper were to investigate whether taking part in out of <span class="hlt">school</span> activities during <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> is linked with end of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> attainment and social, emotional and behavioural outcomes, for all children and specifically for children from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. The analysis is based on the Millennium…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hardman&pg=5&id=EJ827161','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=hardman&pg=5&id=EJ827161"><span>Changing Pedagogical Practice in Kenyan <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: The Impact of <span class="hlt">School</span>-Based Training</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hardman, Frank; Abd-Kadir, Jan; Agg, Catherine; Migwi, James; Ndambuku, Jacinta; Smith, Fay</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study reports on an investigation into the impact of a national, <span class="hlt">school</span>-based teacher development programme on learning and teaching in Kenyan <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Building on a national baseline study (n=102), 144 video-recorded lessons, covering the teaching of English, maths and science at Standards 3 and 6, were analysed to investigate…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23793282','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23793282"><span>The frequency of dyscalculia among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jovanović, Gordana; Jovanović, Zoran; Banković-Gajić, Jelena; Nikolić, Anđelka; Svetozarević, Srđana; Ignjatović-Ristić, Dragana</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Formal education, daily living activities and jobs require knowledge and application skills of counting and simple mathematical operations. Problems with mathematics start in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> and persist till adulthood. This is known as dyscalculia and its prevalence in the <span class="hlt">school</span> population ranges from 3 to 6.5%. The study included 1424 third-grade students (aged 9-10) of all <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the City of Kragujevac, Serbia. Tests in mathematics were given in order to determine their mathematical achievement. 1078 students (538 boys and 540 girls) completed all five tests. The frequency of dyscalculia in the sample was 9.9%. The difference between boys and girls according to the total score on the test was statistically significant (p<0.005). The difference between students according to their <span class="hlt">school</span> achievement (excellent, very good, good, sufficient and insufficient) was statistically significant for all tests (p<0.0005). The influence of place of residence/<span class="hlt">school</span> was significant for all tests (p<0.0005). Independent prognostic variables associated with dyscalculia are marks in mathematics and Serbian language. Frequency of dyscalculia of 9.9% in the sample is higher than in the other similar studies. Further research should identify possible causes of such frequency of dyscalculia in order to improve students` mathematical abilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27456845','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27456845"><span>The Healthy <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> of the Future: study protocol of a quasi-experimental study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Willeboordse, M; Jansen, M W; van den Heijkant, S N; Simons, A; Winkens, B; de Groot, R H M; Bartelink, N; Kremers, S P; van Assema, P; Savelberg, H H; de Neubourg, E; Borghans, L; Schils, T; Coppens, K M; Dietvorst, R; Ten Hoopen, R; Coomans, F; Klosse, S; Conjaerts, M H J; Oosterhoff, M; Joore, M A; Ferreira, I; Muris, P; Bosma, H; Toppenberg, H L; van Schayck, C P</p> <p>2016-07-26</p> <p>Unhealthy lifestyles in early childhood are a major global health challenge. These lifestyles often persist from generation to generation and contribute to a vicious cycle of health-related and social problems. This design article presents a study evaluating the effects of two novel healthy <span class="hlt">school</span> interventions. The main outcome measure will be changes in children's body mass index (BMI). In addition, lifestyle behaviours, academic achievement, child well-being, socio-economic differences, and societal costs will be examined. In close collaboration with various stakeholders, a quasi-experimental study was developed, for which children of four intervention <span class="hlt">schools</span> (n = 1200) in the southern part of the Netherlands are compared with children of four control <span class="hlt">schools</span> (n = 1200) in the same region. The interventions started in November 2015. In two of the four intervention <span class="hlt">schools</span>, a whole-<span class="hlt">school</span> approach named 'The Healthy <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> of the Future', is implemented with the aim of improving physical activity and dietary behaviour. For this intervention, pupils are offered an extended curriculum, including a healthy lunch, more physical exercises, and social and educational activities, next to the regular <span class="hlt">school</span> curriculum. In the two other intervention <span class="hlt">schools</span>, a physical-activity <span class="hlt">school</span> approach called 'The Physical Activity <span class="hlt">School</span>', is implemented, which is essentially similar to the other intervention, except that no lunch is provided. The interventions proceed during a period of 4 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Apart from the effectiveness of both interventions, the process, the cost-effectiveness, and the expected legal implications are studied. Data collection is conducted within the <span class="hlt">school</span> system. The baseline measurements started in September 2015 and <span class="hlt">yearly</span> follow-up measurements are taking place until 2019. A whole-<span class="hlt">school</span> approach is a new concept in the Netherlands. Due to its innovative, multifaceted nature and sound scientific foundation, these integrated programmes</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5953387','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5953387"><span>Impact of Four <span class="hlt">Years</span> of Annual Mass Drug Administration on Prevalence and Intensity of Schistosomiasis among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> and High <span class="hlt">School</span> Children in Western Kenya: A Repeated Cross-Sectional Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Abudho, Bernard O.; Ndombi, Eric M.; Guya, Bernard; Carter, Jennifer M.; Riner, Diana K.; Kittur, Nupur; Karanja, Diana M. S.; Secor, W. Evan; Colley, Daniel G.</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Abstract. Schistosomiasis remains a major public health problem in Kenya. The World Health Organization recommends preventive chemotherapy with praziquantel (PZQ) to control morbidity due to schistosomiasis. Morbidity is considered linked to intensity of infection, which along with prevalence is used to determine the frequency of mass drug administration (MDA) to <span class="hlt">school</span>-age children. We determined the impact of annual <span class="hlt">school</span>-based MDA on children across all <span class="hlt">primary</span> and high <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">years</span> using a repeated cross-sectional study design in five <span class="hlt">schools</span> near Lake Victoria in western Kenya, an area endemic for Schistosoma mansoni. At baseline and for the following four consecutive <span class="hlt">years</span>, between 897 and 1,440 <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Grades 1–12 were enrolled and evaluated by Kato-Katz for S. mansoni and soil-transmitted helminths (STH), followed by annual MDA with PZQ and albendazole. Four annual rounds of MDA with PZQ were associated with reduced S. mansoni prevalence in all <span class="hlt">school</span> children (44.7–14.0%; P < 0.001) and mean intensity of infection by 91% (90.4 to 8.1 eggs per gram [epg] of stool; P < 0.001). Prevalence of high-intensity infection (≥ 400 epg) decreased from 6.8% at baseline to 0.3% by the end of the study. Soil-transmitted helminth infections, already low at baseline, also decreased significantly over the <span class="hlt">years</span>. In this high prevalence area, annual <span class="hlt">school</span>-based MDA with high coverage across all Grades (1–12) resulted in rapid and progressive declines in overall prevalence and intensity of infection. This decrease was dramatic in regard to heavy infections in older <span class="hlt">school</span>-attending children. PMID:29532768</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.605a2040G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JPhCS.605a2040G"><span>Spreading Optics in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gargallo, Ana; Gómez-Varela, Ana I.; Gónzalez-Nuñez, Héctor; Delgado, Tamara; Almaguer, Citlalli; Cambronero, Ferran; García-Sánchez, Ángel; Pallarés, David; Aymerich, María; Aragón, Ángel L.; Flores-Arias, Maria T.</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>The USC-OSA is a student chapter located at the University of Santiago de Compostela (Spain) whose objective is to bring optics and photonics knowledge closer to general public. In order to arouse kids' interest in Optics we developed an activity called Funny Light. This activity consisted on a visit of some USC-OSA members to a several local <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> where we organized several optics experiments. In this work we present the optics demonstrations and the reaction of the 6 <span class="hlt">years</span>-old students. The activities with greater acceptance include an explanation of light properties as polarization, refraction or reflection, and the workshop where they learnt how to build their own kaleidoscope and made a chromatic disk. Besides, they also participated in a demonstration and explanation of color properties and some optical illusions. We think that this activity has several benefits including spreading Optics through children meanwhile they have fun and experiment science in real life, as well as helping teachers to explain some complex properties and Physics phenomena of light. Given the broad acceptance of this activity, we are intending to make it a routine event of our student chapter repeating it every <span class="hlt">year</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1098113.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1098113.pdf"><span>Science That Matters: Exploring Science Learning and Teaching in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fitzgerald, Angela; Smith, Kathy</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>To help support <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students to better understand why science matters, teachers must first be supported to teach science in ways that matter. In moving to this point, this paper identifies the dilemmas and tensions <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers face in the teaching of science. The balance is then readdressed through a research-based…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1148859.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1148859.pdf"><span>A Study on Basic Process Skills of Turkish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Aydogdu, Bulent</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: The purpose of this study was to find out <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students' basic process skills (BPSs) in terms of select variables. In addition, this study aims to investigate the relationship between BPSs and academic achievement. Research Methods: The study had a survey design and was conducted with 1272 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students. The study data…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=men+AND+stereotypes&pg=6&id=EJ1114387','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=men+AND+stereotypes&pg=6&id=EJ1114387"><span>Doing Men's Work?: Discipline, Power and the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> in Taiwan</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Li, Hsiao-jung</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This article examines the masculinization of discipline and its interplay with power in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> through an exploration of teachers' gender and disciplinary work and roles by drawing on data from an ethnographic study conducted at a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in Taiwan. The research findings suggest that discipline was men's work due to women…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sun&pg=6&id=EJ900148','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=sun&pg=6&id=EJ900148"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students' Ideas Concerning the Apparent Movement of the Moon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Starakis, John; Halkia, Krystallia</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In the present study, <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students' ideas concerning the apparent movement of the Moon are investigated. The research was carried out in five <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> of Athens (Greece) with a sample of forty (40), fifth and sixth grade students. Semistructured interviews were used to gather scientific data and students had the opportunity to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23196686','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23196686"><span>[Did household parental smoking attitude change over the last 15 <span class="hlt">years</span>? A survey among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in the city of Agrigento, Italy].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Magro, Serena; de Gregorio, Cesare; Magro, Laura; Fernandez, Dalila; Sacchi, Gabriella; Sarullo, Filippo Maria; Magro, Francesco; Novo, Salvatore</p> <p>2012-12-01</p> <p>Exposure of children to passive tobacco smoking in the household setting has been demonstrated to cause respiratory diseases. Early atherosclerosis has also been demonstrated in young people previously exposed to passive tobacco smoking. Functional damage can initiate at the fetal age due to maternal smoking, with a tendency towards over-time progress. To date only scant data are available about indoor parental smoking attitudes and their changes after campaigns against smoke and risk factors in exposed youths. Questionnaires are useful tools in order to search for information on cigarette smoking and parental household lifestyle. In this study, we asked pupils of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> for providing information on their relatives' every 5 <span class="hlt">years</span> throughout the period 1994-2009. A multiple-choice answer questionnaire about sharing household parental smoking was administered to all <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children (mean age 10.5 ± 0.5 <span class="hlt">years</span>) of the city of Agrigento (Sicily, Italy). A total of 2221 questionnaires were collected from 637 children in 1994, 687 in 1999, 516 in 2004, and 381 in 2009. Important findings show a significant reduction in both smoking parents and exposure to passive tobacco smoking (from 64% in 1994 to 45% in 2009, p<0.00001). In 2009, 22% of mothers and 39% of fathers resulted to be smokers in the household setting yet. In agreement with the 2011 Italian DOXA survey on the general population, the present study demonstrates a negative trend in the prevalence of household smoker parents (predominantly mothers) and exposure of children to passive tobacco smoking. These results likely reflect such a greater awareness about smoke-related risks in children, and the effectiveness of medical campaigns against cardiovascular risk factors as well.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29682921','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29682921"><span>Alcohol Drinking among <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children in Trinidad and Tobago: Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Agu, Chinwendu F; Oshi, Daniel C; Weaver, Steve; Abel, Wendel D; Rae, Tania; Ricketts Roomes, Tana F; Oshi, Sarah N</p> <p>2018-04-23</p> <p>Background: Underage alcohol use is a pervasive problem with serious health, social and safety consequences. This study was undertaken to assess alcohol use by <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Trinidad and Tobago, and to identify associated risk factors. Methods: We analysed data collected from 40 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Trinidad and Tobago by the National Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Programme (NADAPP). The sample comprised of children aged 8 -15 <span class="hlt">years</span> old, in standards 3, 4 and 5. Result: Out of the 2052 children, 648 (31.6%) have consumed alcohol in their lifetime, and same proportion reported ever being drunk (31.6%). Male gender was significantly associated with lifetime alcohol use (AOR =1.60, 95% CI= 1.25 - 2.05). Children not living with their father (AOR= 2.45, 95% CI=1.86- 3.24) and those whose fathers have either <span class="hlt">primary</span> or secondary education (AOR = 1.88, 95%CI=1.07 - 3.31; AOR= 1.58, 95%CI=1.12 - 2.23 respectively) were at higher risk for lifetime alcohol consumption. However, age group 8 – 11 <span class="hlt">years</span> was significantly inversely associated with lifetime alcohol consumption (AOR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.48 - 0.94). Conclusion: Being a male student, not living with father, and father attaining either <span class="hlt">primary</span> or secondary education level were significantly associated with increased likelihood for lifetime alcohol use. However, children between 8 – 11 <span class="hlt">years</span> were less likely to consume alcohol. Creative Commons Attribution License</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27011995','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27011995"><span>[Internal Exposure Levels of PAHs of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students in Guangzhou].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Su, Hui; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Su-kun; Liu, Shan; Ren, Ming-zhong; Li, Jie; Shi, Xiao-xia</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>In order to investigate the internal exposure levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students of Guangzhou, the research collected urine of 78 and 86 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students from two <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the summer of 2014, one <span class="hlt">school</span> located in the ordinary residential area and the other in the industrial area. The contents of 10 kinds of OH-PAHs were tested by the rapid liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadruple tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that the concentrations of total OH-PAHs in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in the residential zone ranged from 0.83 µmol · mol⁻¹ to 80.63 µmol · mol⁻¹, while those in industrial area ranged from 1.06 µmol · mol⁻¹ to 72.47 µmol · mol⁻¹. The geometric average concentrations were 6.18 µmol · mol⁻¹ and 6.47 µmol · mol⁻¹, respectively, and there was no statistical significance between them (P > 0.05). Comparison of the exposure levels of different components of PAHs in the two areas found that all the OH-PAHs had no significant difference except for the levels of 1- OHP (P < 0.05). We should also pay attention to the higher exposure levels of PAHs in both areas when compared with other researches. In addition, the OH-PAHs in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in the ordinary residential area had a good correlation between 0. 511 and 0.928 (P < 0.01), whereas there was no correlation between 1-OHP and 2-OHN, 1-OHN in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in the industrial area and other OH-PAHs had relatively weak correlation ranging from 0.338 to 0.855 (P < 0.01). This difference might indicate different pollution sources of PAHs in different functional areas, which was relatively single in the residential area, while the industrial area was polluted by multiple sources of industrial enterprises and logistics transportation emissions.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=environmental+AND+behaviour+AND+change&pg=5&id=EJ1046592','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=environmental+AND+behaviour+AND+change&pg=5&id=EJ1046592"><span>The Effectiveness of Structured Co-Operative Teaching and Learning in Greek <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Classrooms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kaldi, Stavroula; Filippatou, Diamanto; Anthopoulou, Barbara</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This study focuses upon the effectiveness of structured co-operative group work on <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students, aged between 8.5 and 9.5 <span class="hlt">years</span> old, regarding their content knowledge, attitudes towards co-operative group work, experiential learning and open-ended curriculum as well as students' social and learning behaviour during co-operative group…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=language+AND+sign&pg=7&id=EJ1129070','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=language+AND+sign&pg=7&id=EJ1129070"><span>Sign Language as Medium of Instruction in Botswana <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Voices from the Field</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mpuang, Kerileng D.; Mukhopadhyay, Sourav; Malatsi, Nelly</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This descriptive phenomenological study investigates teachers' experiences of using sign language for learners who are deaf in the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Botswana. Eight in-service teachers who have had more than ten <span class="hlt">years</span> of teaching deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) learners were purposively selected for this study. Data were collected using multiple…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=BOT&pg=7&id=EJ655775','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=BOT&pg=7&id=EJ655775"><span>Home Language and Language Proficiency; A Large-Scale Longitudinal Study in Dutch <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Driessen, Geert; van der Slik, Frans; De Bot, Kees</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Reports on a large-scale longitudinal study into the development of language proficiency of Dutch <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children aged 7-10. Data on language proficiency and a range of background variables were analyzed. Results suggest that while immigrant children develop their language skill in Dutch considerably over 2 <span class="hlt">years</span>, they are nonetheless…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED077119.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED077119.pdf"><span>The Continuous <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">Year</span>. The Cranston Quadricycle Plan for a Continuous <span class="hlt">School</span> <span class="hlt">Year</span>. Project Pacesetter.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cranston School Dept., RI.</p> <p></p> <p>Acting on instructions from the Cranston <span class="hlt">School</span> Committee, a committee comprised of educational professional staff, community leaders, citizens, and students was organized to consider the methods and feasibility of <span class="hlt">year</span>-round <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The <span class="hlt">year</span> round concept and its application in various plans throughout the country was the subject of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Types+AND+de+AND+performance&pg=2&id=EJ1035936','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Types+AND+de+AND+performance&pg=2&id=EJ1035936"><span>The Influence of Closing Poor Performing <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> on the Educational Attainment of Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>De Witte, Kristof; Van Klaveren, Chris</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>This paper examines whether the closure of poor performing <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> improved students' educational attainment. It is believed that <span class="hlt">school</span> closure affects children's educational outcomes positively because children switch to better <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. At the same time, <span class="hlt">school</span> closure creates a social disturbance such that educational outcomes…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23085278','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23085278"><span>Clustering of food and activity preferences in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rodenburg, Gerda; Oenema, Anke; Pasma, Marleen; Kremers, Stef P J; van de Mheen, Dike</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study examined clustering of food and activity preferences in Dutch <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. It also explored whether the preference clusters are associated with child and parental background characteristics and with parenting practices. Data were used from 1480 parent-child dyads participating in the IVO Nutrition and Physical Activity Child cohort (INPACT). Children aged 8-11<span class="hlt">years</span> reported their preferences for food (e.g. fruit and sweet snacks) and activities (e.g. biking and watching television) at <span class="hlt">school</span> with a newly-developed, visual instrument designed for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. Parents completed a questionnaire at home. Principal component analysis was used to identify preference clusters. Backward regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between child and parental characteristics with cluster scores. We found (1) a clustering of preferences for unhealthy foods and unhealthy drinks, (2) a clustering of preferences for various physical activity behaviours, and (3) a clustering of preferences for unhealthy drinks and sedentary behaviour. Boys had a higher cluster score than girls on all three preference clusters. In addition, physical activity-related parenting practices were negatively related to unhealthy preference clusters and positively to the physical-activity-preference cluster. The next step is to relate our preference clusters to child dietary and activity behaviours, with special attention to gender differences. This may help in the development of interventions aimed at improving children's food and activity preferences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29500535','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29500535"><span>Astigmatism in Chinese <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children: prevalence, change, and effect on myopic shift.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chan, Shao-En; Kuo, Hsi-Kung; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Wu, Pei-Chang</p> <p>2018-05-01</p> <p>To study the prevalence, type, and progression of astigmatism in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children, and its effect on myopic shift. A prospective study carried out in a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in southern Taiwan. The study was performed on a subset of children, one <span class="hlt">year</span> after initial examination. Refractive error measured by cycloplegic autorefraction was the main study outcome. Astigmatism was recorded as negative cylinder form, and we defined clinical significant astigmatism (CSA) as cylinder refraction -1.0 D or greater. Myopia was defined as a spherical equivalent refraction (SER) of -0.50 D or greater. Three hundred sixty-two children, mean age was 8.97 y/o (SD 1.41; range 7 to 11 y/o) participated in the study. One hundred nineteen (32.9 %) subjects had CSA at the initial screening. The mean cylinder refraction was -0.80 + 0.84 diopters (D) (-5.25 D to 0.00 D), with predominant with rule astigmatism (69.7%). In the 183 children studied longitudinally, the mean cylinder refraction was reduced from -0.74 D to -0.58 D (p< 0.05). The cylinder refraction in the initial CSA group was not associated with SER change (p=0.99) or axial length change (p=0.55). Compared to the initial non-CSA group, the initial CSA group had no significant difference in axial length elongation (p=0.20). The prevalence of astigmatism was not low in the Chinese <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children and with-the-rule astigmatism was predominant. The astigmatism decreased during the 1 <span class="hlt">year</span> follow-up. The CSA was not associated with myopia progression (p=0.99).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7986415','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7986415"><span>AIDS education for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Tanzania: an evaluation study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Klepp, K I; Ndeki, S S; Seha, A M; Hannan, P; Lyimo, B A; Msuya, M H; Irema, M N; Schreiner, A</p> <p>1994-08-01</p> <p>To test the effects of an HIV/AIDS education program. A quasi-experimental, nested cross-sectional design including baseline and 6-month follow-up surveys. <span class="hlt">Schools</span>, stratified according to location, were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 6) or comparison conditions (n = 12). Public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Arusha and Kilimanjaro regions, Tanzania. A total of 2026 sixth and seventh grade pupils (average age, 14.0 <span class="hlt">years</span>) participated at baseline (85%) and 1785 at follow-up. The program was designed to reduce children's risk of HIV infection and to improve their tolerance of and care for people with AIDS. Local teachers and health workers attended a 1-week training workshop before implementing the program over a 2-3-month period (averaging 20 <span class="hlt">school</span> hours per class). Self-reported exposure to AIDS information, communication regarding AIDS; AIDS knowledge, attitudes towards people with AIDS, attitudes towards having sexual intercourse, subjective norms regarding sexual intercourse, and intention to engage in sexual intercourse. Following this program, intervention pupils reported significantly higher scores for the following outcome measures than pupils attending the comparison <span class="hlt">schools</span>: AIDS information (13.1 versus 10.5; P = 0.0001), AIDS communication (10.9 versus 7.8; P = 0.0001) AIDS knowledge (14.5 versus 11.5; P = 0.0001), attitudes towards people with AIDS (9.0 versus 6.7; P = 0.0008), subjective norms (45.5 versus 43.9; P = 0.011), and intention (1.3 versus 1.4; P = 0.020). No program effect was seen for attitudes towards sexual intercourse (47.0 versus 46.3, P = 0.44). These results indicate that it is feasible and effective to provide AIDS education for Tanzanian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED538286.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED538286.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Year</span>-Round <span class="hlt">School</span>. Research Brief</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Walker, Karen</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Despite the numerous advantages of a <span class="hlt">year</span>-round schedule, there are significant political hurdles to its implementation. The most successful <span class="hlt">year</span>-round <span class="hlt">schools</span> are those where leaders worked closely with staff and families to maximize the benefits, minimize the costs, and build support for modifying the traditional <span class="hlt">school</span> calendar. The research on…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1111062.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1111062.pdf"><span>The Examination of the Views of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers and Pre-Service <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Teachers on European Union Citizenship from the Point of Different Variables</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Üner, Sadik Selman; Yesil, Rüstü</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study is to determine the view of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers and pre-service <span class="hlt">primary</span> teachers on European Union citizenship. This study is a descriptive and quantitative research in survey methodology. The data of the research was collected from 207 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers teaching in 22 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in the city center of Kirsehir…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5598447','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5598447"><span>PREVALENCE AND DETERMINANTS OF STUNTING AMONG <span class="hlt">PRIMARY</span> <span class="hlt">SCHOOL</span> CHILDREN IN RURAL AND URBAN COMMUNITIES IN OBAFEMI OWODE LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Adenuga, W.U.; Obembe, T.A.; Odebunmi, K.O.; Asuzu, M.C.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Background: Studies on stunting in children have largely focused on the underfive, establishing it as a strong predictor of mortality in these children. Few studies have documented the prevalence or determinants of stunting among <span class="hlt">school</span> children in southwestern Nigeria. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of stunting among selected <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in rural and urban communities of Obafemi Owode Local Government Area, Ogun State. Method: A cross-sectional study of rural and urban <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children was conducted. An interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect information on respondents' and parents' socio-demographic characteristics. Stunting was defined as height-for-age less than two standard deviations from the median height-for-age of the standard World Health Organization reference population. Using EPI-INFO version 6.03, children were classified as stunted if z-scores of height-for-age were less than 2 standard deviations below the National Centre for Health statistics (NCHS)/WHO median. Height and weight were taken using a stadiometer and weighing scale respectively. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 16.0 while predictors were determined using logistic regression at 95% level of significance. Results: A total of 1,160 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children were studied with 52.2% from rural <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Males constituted 57.1% and 51.8% in the rural and urban <span class="hlt">school</span> respectively. Prevalence of stunting among rural <span class="hlt">school</span> children was 46.2%, and was significantly higher (p≤0.001) than among urban children at 33.8%. Younger children <10 <span class="hlt">years</span> (OR: 0.088; 95CI: 0.052 - 0.150) and children between 11-12 <span class="hlt">years</span> (OR: 0.534; 95CI: 0.322 - 0.886) were at a significantly lower risk of stunting both in rural <span class="hlt">schools</span> compared to children >13 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Conclusion: The prevalence of stunting was high especially among pupils from <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the rural communities. This underscores</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25838624','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25838624"><span>Knowledge and attitudes towards obesity among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Njelekela, Marina A; Muhihi, Alfa; Mpembeni, Rose N M; Anaeli, Amani; Chillo, Omary; Kubhoja, Sulende; Lujani, Benjamin; Ngarashi, Davis; Maghembe, Mwanamkuu</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Childhood obesity has increased over the past two decades. Child obesity is likely to persist through adulthood and increases the risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) later in life. This study assessed knowledge and attitudes towards obesity among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A cross-sectional study was conducted in randomly selected <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Dar es Salaam. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the knowledge and attitudes. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements were taken using standard procedures. A total of 446 children were included in the analysis. The mean age of the participants was 11.1 ± 2.0 <span class="hlt">years</span>. The mean body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were 16.6 ± 4.0 kg/m(2), 103.9 ± 10.3 mmHg and 65.6 ± 8.2 mmHg, respectively. Prevalence of obesity (defined as BMI >95(th) percentile for age and sex) was 5.2%. Half of the children (51.1%) had heard about obesity from teachers at <span class="hlt">school</span> (20%), radio (19.4%) and books/newspaper (17.3%). Less than half (45.4%) had knowledge about the risk factors for childhood obesity and correctly defined obesity (44.6%). However, a good number of the children (72.1%) were aware that they can be affected by obesity. Majority of them had negative attitude towards obesity and various factors leading to or resulting from childhood obesity. Knowledge about childhood obesity among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children is moderate and have negative attitude towards obesity. Integrating educational programs early in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> may be an effective strategy to impact knowledge about obesity and other non-communicable diseases early in childhood.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=age+AND+early+AND+primary&pg=6&id=EJ1102069','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=age+AND+early+AND+primary&pg=6&id=EJ1102069"><span>Aistear vis-à-vis the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Curriculum: The Experiences of Early <span class="hlt">Years</span> Teachers in Ireland</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gray, Colette; Ryan, Anna</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Launched in 2009, the Aistear early <span class="hlt">years</span> curriculum framework sought to complement and extend the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> curriculum (PSC) at infant class level in the Republic of Ireland. While Aistear focuses on the development of attitudes, values and learning dispositions and is neither statutory nor inspected, the PSC centres on the acquisition of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1099665.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1099665.pdf"><span>Chemistry Provision for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Pupils: The Experiences of 10 <span class="hlt">Years</span> of Bristol ChemLabs Outreach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Harrison, Timothy G.; Shallcross, Dudley E.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Bristol ChemLabS, the UK's Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in practical chemistry, delivers numerous outreach activity days per <span class="hlt">year</span> for thousands of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils annually. These mainly comprise demonstration assemblies and hands on workshops for pupils in the main. The activities support the UK's Key Stage 2 science…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4466379','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4466379"><span>Confrontation Naming and Reading Abilities at <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span>: A Longitudinal Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Savelli, Enrico; Termine, Cristiano</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Background. Confrontation naming tasks are useful in the assessment of children with learning and language disorders. Objectives. The aims of this study were (1) providing longitudinal data on confrontation naming; (2) investigating the role of socioeconomic status (SES), intelligence, age, and gender in confrontation naming; (3) identifying relationship between confrontation naming and reading abilities (fluency, accuracy, and comprehension). Method. A five-<span class="hlt">year</span> longitudinal investigation of confrontation naming (i.e., the Boston Naming Test (BNT)) in a nonclinical sample of Italian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children was conducted (n = 126), testing them at the end of each <span class="hlt">school</span> <span class="hlt">year</span>, to assess nonverbal intelligence, confrontation naming, and reading abilities. Results. Performance on the BNT emerged as a function of IQ and SES. Significant correlations between confrontation naming and reading abilities, especially comprehension, were found; BNT scores correlated better with reading fluency than with reading accuracy. Conclusions. The longitudinal data obtained in this study are discussed with regard to reading abilities, intelligence, age, gender, and socioeconomic status. PMID:26124541</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19780361','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19780361"><span>Opportunities and challenges to promoting oral health in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gill, P; Chestnutt, I G; Channing, D</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Inequalities in oral health in areas of socio-economic disadvantage are well recognised. As children spend a considerable proportion of their lives in education, <span class="hlt">schools</span> can play a significant role in promoting children's health and oral health. However, to what extent <span class="hlt">schools</span> are able to do this is unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate opportunities and challenges to promoting oral health in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. A purposive sample of 20 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> from socially and economically disadvantaged areas of Cardiff, UK were selected to participate in this qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews conducted with head teachers or their nominated deputies. General awareness of health and oral health was good, with all <span class="hlt">schools</span> promoting the consumption of fruit, water and milk and discouraging products such as carbonated drinks and confectionaries. Health promotion schemes wereimplemented primarily to improve the health of the children, although <span class="hlt">schools</span> felt they also offered the potential to improve classroom behaviour and attendance. However, oral health was viewed as a separate entity to general health and perceived to be inadequately promoted. Successful health promotion schemes were also influenced by the attitudes of headteachers. Most <span class="hlt">schools</span> had no or limited links with local dental services and, or oral health educators, although such input, when it occurred, was welcomed and highly valued. Knowledge of how to handle dental emergencies was limited and only two <span class="hlt">schools</span> operated toothbrushing schemes, although all expressed an interest in such programmes. This study identified a positive predisposition to promoting health in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The challenge for the dental team, however, is to promote and integrate oral health into mainstream health promotion activities in <span class="hlt">schools</span>. The paper also makes recommendations for further research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12536573','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12536573"><span>[Appraisal of occupational stress and strain in <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Z; Lan, Y; Li, J; Wang, M</p> <p>2001-09-01</p> <p>This study was conducted to assess occupational stress and strain in <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers. A test of occupational stress and strain was carried out by using Occupational Stress Inventory Revised Edition (OSI-R) in 1460 <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers (teacher group) and 319 mental workers in non-educational area (non-teacher group as control). The results showed the level of occupational stress in role overload and physical environment in the teacher group was significantly higher than that in the non-teacher group (P < 0.05). In teacher group the level of occupational stress and strain increased with age; the occupational stress and strain in male teachers were significantly higher than those in female teachers (P < 0.01); the occupational stress and strain in secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers were significantly higher than those in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers. These results indicate: to protect and promote <span class="hlt">primary</span> and secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> teacher's health, particularly male teachers' health, to mitigate their work pressure and to raise the quality of education are important tasks in the area of occupational health.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1008595.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1008595.pdf"><span>Exploring <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Children's Views and Experiences of the <span class="hlt">School</span> Ground: The Case of a Greek <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Christidou, Vasilia; Tsevreni, Irida; Epitropou, Maria; Kittas, Constantinos</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>The present study explores the use of a conventional <span class="hlt">school</span> ground of a <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> and its potential as a space for creative play and environmental learning. Children's play behavior and views of the <span class="hlt">school</span> ground are explored, as well as their vision for its improvement. The research constitutes part of a wider <span class="hlt">school</span> ground project and was…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29416998','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29416998"><span>Association of personal hygiene with common morbidities among upper <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children in rural Odisha.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Paul, Kalyan Kumar; Panigrahi, Sandeep Kumar; Soodi Reddy, Arun Kiran; Sahu, Trilochan</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>In India, children of upper <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> receive less attention from health-care providers. The majority of their health problems are preventable through hygienic practices. The aim of this study was to find out the association of personal hygiene with common morbidities among upper <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. A cross-sectional study conducted in a rural upper <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> of Odisha. A semi-structured schedule based on the Global <span class="hlt">School</span> Health Survey Questionnaire and necessary instruments for clinical examination were used. Data were entered in Microsoft Excel 2007 and analyzed by SPSS version 20 software. Of 90 participants, 58 (64.4%) were girls. The mean age was 11.8 (±1.01) <span class="hlt">years</span>. The mean body mass index of females was significantly higher than males (16.95 vs. 14.72; P = 0.001). More than 90% of children maintained good personal hygiene such as clean tongue, clean hair, handwashing, and using footwear. The most common morbidities found were dental caries (38.9%), history of worms in stool and lethargy (20%). A mean score of 6.14 ± 0.11 (out of 8) was seen for personal hygiene and not associated with any particular morbidity or gender. Brushing daily was significantly associated with reduced dental caries (χ 2 = 8.7; P < 0.005) and foul-smelling breath (χ 2 = 4.93; P < 0.05). Fungal infections were significantly less in children who bathed daily (χ 2 = 28.7; <0.005) and wore clean clothes (χ 2 = 5.06; P < 0.05). Dental caries, foul-smelling breath, and fungal infections were significantly associated with poor personal hygiene. <span class="hlt">School</span> health services should also focus on upper <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children for improvement of personal hygiene.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=critical+AND+chain&id=EJ1160305','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=critical+AND+chain&id=EJ1160305"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Leadership in England: Performativity and Matters of Professionalism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Keddie, Amanda</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This article presents interview data from a study involving nine <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> leaders. Five are leaders of local authority <span class="hlt">schools</span> while four are leaders of <span class="hlt">schools</span> within a large academy chain. The article examines their perspectives about the current regimes of performativity in the English education context and, in particular, the…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Studies+AND+power+AND+Anna&pg=2&id=EJ1131083','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Studies+AND+power+AND+Anna&pg=2&id=EJ1131083"><span>Regulative Discourses of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schooling</span> in Greece: Memories of Punishment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Asimaki, Anna; Koustourakis, Gerasimos; Vergidis, Dimitris</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The mechanisms of discipline and power within the institution of the <span class="hlt">school</span> constitute, in part, the relationship between society and childhood. This article traces the relationship between official regulative discourses of control and punishment practices over students in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. It focuses on the memories of <span class="hlt">schooling</span> of first-year…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28711522','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28711522"><span>Engaging with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>: Supporting the delivery of the new curriculum in evolution and inheritance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kover, Paula X; Hogge, Emily S</p> <p>2017-10-01</p> <p>The official <span class="hlt">school</span> regulator in England (OFSTED) recently reported that the delivery of science lessons has been significantly diminished in many <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. There is concern that the lack of good quality science in <span class="hlt">school</span> can reduce the recruitment of young scientists, and the level of science literacy among the general public. We believe university scientists and undergraduate students can have a significant impact in the delivery of science in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. However, a relatively small proportion of scientists engage with young children to improve curricular <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science education. Here, we argue that long term engagement with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> can produce significant impact for the scientist's research, <span class="hlt">schools</span>, and society. As an example, we describe our experience developing teaching materials for the topic of "Evolution and inheritance"; highlighting possible pitfalls and perceived benefits, in hope of encouraging and facilitating other scientists to engage with <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1146505.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1146505.pdf"><span>Development of Program to Enhance Team Building Leadership Skills of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Administrators</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sairam, Boonchauy; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Wisetrinthong, Kanjana</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Team building leadership skills are important to understandings of how the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> administrators might work towards creating more effective teamwork in the <span class="hlt">school</span>. This research aimed 1) to study the components of team building leadership skills needed for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> administrators, 2) to examine the current states and desirable…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=children+AND+bad+AND+behavior&pg=7&id=EJ941039','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=children+AND+bad+AND+behavior&pg=7&id=EJ941039"><span>"Stop It, It's Bad for You and Me": Experiences of and Views on Passive Smoking among <span class="hlt">Primary-School</span> Children in Liverpool</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Woods, Susan E.; Springett, Jane; Porcellato, Lorna; Dugdill, Lindsey</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>This article looks at how children between the ages of 4 and 8 <span class="hlt">years</span> report they feel when they are exposed to passive smoking and how they react in these situations. Data were collected annually from a cohort of 250 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children, which was tracked from their Reception Classes to <span class="hlt">Year</span> 3 across six Liverpool <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Quantitative and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29707243','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29707243"><span>Economic evaluation of the Good <span class="hlt">School</span> Toolkit: an intervention for reducing violence in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Uganda.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Greco, Giulia; Knight, Louise; Ssekadde, Willington; Namy, Sophie; Naker, Dipak; Devries, Karen</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents the cost and cost-effectiveness of the Good <span class="hlt">School</span> Toolkit (GST), a programme aimed at reducing physical violence perpetrated by <span class="hlt">school</span> staff to students in Uganda. The effectiveness of the Toolkit was tested with a cluster randomised controlled trial in 42 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Luwero District, Uganda. A full economic costing evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis were conducted alongside the trial. Both financial and economic costs were collected retrospectively from the provider's perspective to estimate total and unit costs. The total cost of setting up and running the Toolkit over the 18-month trial period is estimated at US$397 233, excluding process monitor (M&E) activities. The cost to run the intervention is US$7429 per <span class="hlt">school</span> annually, or US$15 per <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupil annually, in the trial intervention <span class="hlt">schools</span>. It is estimated that the intervention has averted 1620 cases of past-week physical violence during the 18-month implementation period. The total cost per case of violence averted is US$244, and the annual implementation cost is US$96 per case averted during the trial. The GST is a cost-effective intervention for reducing violence against pupils in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Uganda. It compares favourably against other violence reduction interventions in the region.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3902684','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3902684"><span>Morbidity Pattern and Personal Hygiene in Children Among Private <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> in Urban Area: Are the Trends Changing?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mhaske, Mayavati S.; Khismatrao, Deepak S.; Kevin, Fernandez; Pandve, Harshal T.; Kundap, Ritesh P.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Introduction: <span class="hlt">School</span> health is an important intervention as a great deal of research tells us that <span class="hlt">schools</span> can have a major effect on children's health, by teaching them about health and promoting healthy behaviors. Aims: The aim of this study is to determine common health problems and assess personal hygiene status among <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted in academic <span class="hlt">years</span> 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, with three health check-up camps organized in private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> of Pune city. Materials and Methods: A total of 450 students were assessed for health problems and composite score of personal hygiene status was calculated ranging from 0 to 5 by examination of hairs, nails, skin and clothes. Statistical Analysis Used: Proportions calculated with application of Chi-square test and Pearson co-efficient applied to observe the relation between two quantitative variables. Results: Out of 450 students examined, 56.2% were boys and 43.8% were girls with age ranging from 5 to 10 <span class="hlt">years</span>. The major morbidities observed were dental caries (65.1%), upper respiratory tract infections (38.2%), ear wax (29.9%) and myopia (10.0%). Mean hygiene score was significantly higher in girls (4.32) than boys (3.95) and poor hygiene observed in older boys. Conclusion: Increasing myopia and poor dental hygiene denotes a changing morbidity pattern in private <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> of the urban area. The hygiene status of the girls is significantly better than boys. PMID:24479095</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2042506','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2042506"><span>Free breakfasts in <span class="hlt">schools</span>: design and conduct of a cluster randomised controlled trial of the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Free Breakfast Initiative in Wales [ISRCTN18336527</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Moore, Laurence; Moore, Graham F; Tapper, Katy; Lynch, Rebecca; Desousa, Carol; Hale, Janine; Roberts, Chris; Murphy, Simon</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">School</span>-based breakfast provision is increasingly being seen as a means of improving educational performance and dietary behaviour amongst children. Furthermore, recognition is growing that breakfast provision offers potential as a means of addressing social inequalities in these outcomes. At present however, the evidence base on the effectiveness of breakfast provision in bringing about these improvements is limited. Methods/Design This paper describes the research design of a large scale evaluation of the effectiveness of the Welsh Assembly Government's <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Free Breakfast Initiative. A cluster randomised trial, with <span class="hlt">school</span> as the unit of randomisation was used for the outcome evaluation, with a nested qualitative process evaluation. Quantitative outcome measures included dietary habits, attitudes, cognitive function, classroom behaviour, and <span class="hlt">school</span> attendance. The study recruited 111 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Wales, of which 56 were randomly assigned to control condition and 55 to intervention. Participants were <span class="hlt">Year</span> 5 and 6 students (aged 9–11 <span class="hlt">years</span>) in these <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Data were collected for all 111 <span class="hlt">schools</span> at each of three time points: baseline, 4 month and 12 month follow-up. This was achieved through a repeated cross-sectional survey of approximately 4350 students on each of these occasions. Of those students in <span class="hlt">Year</span> 5 at baseline, 1975 provided data at one or both of the follow-ups, forming a nested cohort. The evaluation also included a nested process evaluation, using questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and case studies with students, <span class="hlt">school</span> staff, and local authority scheme coordinators as key informants. Discussion An overview of the methods used for the evaluation is presented, providing an example of the feasibility of conducting robust evaluations of policy initiatives using a randomised trial design with nested process evaluation. Details are provided of response rates and the flow of participants. Reflection is offered on</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17888158','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17888158"><span>Free breakfasts in <span class="hlt">schools</span>: design and conduct of a cluster randomised controlled trial of the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Free Breakfast Initiative in Wales [ISRCTN18336527].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Moore, Laurence; Moore, Graham F; Tapper, Katy; Lynch, Rebecca; Desousa, Carol; Hale, Janine; Roberts, Chris; Murphy, Simon</p> <p>2007-09-21</p> <p><span class="hlt">School</span>-based breakfast provision is increasingly being seen as a means of improving educational performance and dietary behaviour amongst children. Furthermore, recognition is growing that breakfast provision offers potential as a means of addressing social inequalities in these outcomes. At present however, the evidence base on the effectiveness of breakfast provision in bringing about these improvements is limited. This paper describes the research design of a large scale evaluation of the effectiveness of the Welsh Assembly Government's <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Free Breakfast Initiative. A cluster randomised trial, with <span class="hlt">school</span> as the unit of randomisation was used for the outcome evaluation, with a nested qualitative process evaluation. Quantitative outcome measures included dietary habits, attitudes, cognitive function, classroom behaviour, and <span class="hlt">school</span> attendance. The study recruited 111 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Wales, of which 56 were randomly assigned to control condition and 55 to intervention. Participants were <span class="hlt">Year</span> 5 and 6 students (aged 9-11 <span class="hlt">years</span>) in these <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Data were collected for all 111 <span class="hlt">schools</span> at each of three time points: baseline, 4 month and 12 month follow-up. This was achieved through a repeated cross-sectional survey of approximately 4350 students on each of these occasions. Of those students in <span class="hlt">Year</span> 5 at baseline, 1975 provided data at one or both of the follow-ups, forming a nested cohort. The evaluation also included a nested process evaluation, using questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and case studies with students, <span class="hlt">school</span> staff, and local authority scheme coordinators as key informants. An overview of the methods used for the evaluation is presented, providing an example of the feasibility of conducting robust evaluations of policy initiatives using a randomised trial design with nested process evaluation. Details are provided of response rates and the flow of participants. Reflection is offered on methodological issues encountered at</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=science+AND+knowledge&pg=2&id=ED578851','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=science+AND+knowledge&pg=2&id=ED578851"><span>Science Content Knowledge: A Component of Teacher Effectiveness in A <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> in Jamaica</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Robinson, Euphemia</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Empirical evidence from the National Education Inspectorate suggested that teachers at the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in this study in an island country in the Caribbean have inadequate science content knowledge. Students' average performance on the science Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) has been below 40% for the last 5 <span class="hlt">years</span>. The purpose of this bounded…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=operational+AND+management&pg=6&id=EJ1142638','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=operational+AND+management&pg=6&id=EJ1142638"><span>The SENCO Role in Post-<span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Ireland: Victims or Agents of Change?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Fitzgerald, Johanna; Radford, Julie</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This paper considers the role of Special Educational Needs Coordinators (SENCOs) in mainstream post-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> (12-18 <span class="hlt">years</span>) in Ireland. Little is known of the role in the Irish context and it is hoped that this research will inform policy. The Irish educational landscape has witnessed seismic change recently with further transformation…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Vietnam+AND+environment&pg=3&id=ED519010','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Vietnam+AND+environment&pg=3&id=ED519010"><span>Effective <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Geographically Isolated Areas of Vietnam</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Ikeda, Miyako</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This study identifies the major characteristics of "effective" <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in isolated areas in Vietnam. It suggests areas in which the implementation of beneficial changes can occur. Pupils in isolated areas of Vietnam are, in many respects, educationally disadvantaged. Usually, these pupils are in <span class="hlt">schools</span> that have fewer…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=CP&pg=3&id=EJ1075574','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=CP&pg=3&id=EJ1075574"><span>Development of Learning to Learn Skills in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Vainikainen, Mari-Pauliina; Wüstenberg, Sascha; Kupiainen, Sirkku; Hotulainen, Risto; Hautamäki, Jarkko</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In Finland, <span class="hlt">schools</span>' effectiveness in fostering the development of transversal skills is evaluated through large-scale learning to learn (LTL) assessments. This article presents how LTL skills--general cognitive competences and learning-related motivational beliefs--develop during <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> and how they predict pupils' CPS skills at the end…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPhCS.953a2150H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2018JPhCS.953a2150H"><span>Characteristics of competence and civic education materials curriculum in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> in Indonesia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harmanto; Listyaningsih; Wijaya, R.</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Civic education is a compulsory subject within the structure of the <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> curriculum, junior high, and high <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Indonesia. This study aimed to analyze the characteristic of the subject matter and competence of civic education in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Indonesia. The approach used in this study is a qualitative research. The results showed that the subjects of civic education at Indonesia serves as education, legal, political and educational value. Civic education as an education program in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> as a <span class="hlt">primary</span> vehicle and have the essence of a democratic education carried out in order to achieve competency in the civic aspects of Intelligence, civic responsibility, and civic participation. Core competencies in civic education in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> psychological-pedagogical competence of learners to integrate fully and coherently with the planting, development, and strengthening moral values of Pancasila; values and norms of the Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia 1945; values and the spirit of unity in diversity; as well as the insight and commitment of the Republic of Indonesia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=scottish+AND+rural&pg=2&id=EJ811508','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=scottish+AND+rural&pg=2&id=EJ811508"><span>Effects of Continuing Professional Development on Group Work Practices in Scottish <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Thurston, A.; Christie, D.; Howe, C. J.; Tolmie, A.; Topping, K. J.</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The present study investigated the effects of a continuing professional development (CPD) initiative that provided collaborative group work skills training for <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers. The study collected data from 24 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> classrooms in different <span class="hlt">schools</span> in a variety of urban and rural settings. The sample was composed of 332 pupils,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=queensland&pg=6&id=EJ1100750','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=queensland&pg=6&id=EJ1100750"><span>Tipping Points: Teachers' Reported Reasons for Referring <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Children for Excessive Anxiety</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hinchliffe, Kaitlin J.; Campbell, Marilyn A.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The current study explored the reasons that <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers reported were tipping points for them in deciding whether or not and when to refer a child to the <span class="hlt">school</span> student support team for excessive anxiety. Twenty teachers in two Queensland <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> were interviewed. Content analysis of interview transcripts revealed six themes…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5439714','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5439714"><span>Education on organ donation and transplantation in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>; teachers' support and the first results of a teaching module</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Siebelink, Marion J.; Van de Wiel, Harry B. M.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Organ and tissue donation can also involve children. Because of its sensitivity, this topic requires careful decision making. Children have the ability to carefully reflect on this subject and enjoy participating in family discussions about it. Therefore, what children need is proper information. When <span class="hlt">schools</span> are used to educate children about this subject, information about teacher support for this type of lesson along with its effects on the depth of family discussions is important. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all 7,542 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the Netherlands. The goal was to gather information on teachers’ perspectives about a neutral lesson devoted to organ and tissue donation, and also on the best age to start giving such a lesson. The second part of our study examined the effects of a newly developed lesson among 269 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils. The <span class="hlt">school</span> response was 23%. Of these, 70% were positive towards a lesson; best age to start was 10–11 <span class="hlt">years</span>. Pupils reported 20% more family discussions after <span class="hlt">school</span> education and enjoyed learning more about this topic. There is significant support in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> for a <span class="hlt">school</span> lesson on organ and tissue donation. Educational programs in <span class="hlt">schools</span> support family discussions. PMID:28531238</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27451292','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27451292"><span>The economic benefits of reducing the levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) near <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>: The case of London.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guerriero, Carla; Chatzidiakou, Lia; Cairns, John; Mumovic, Dejan</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Providing a healthy <span class="hlt">school</span> environment is a priority for child health. The aim of this study is to develop a methodology that allows quantification of the potential economic benefit of reducing indoor exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in children attending <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Using environmental and health data collected in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in London, this study estimates that, on average, 82 asthma exacerbations per <span class="hlt">school</span> can be averted each <span class="hlt">year</span> by reducing outdoor NO2 concentrations. The study expands upon previous analyses in two ways: first it assesses the health benefits of reducing children's exposure to indoor NO2 while at <span class="hlt">school</span>, second it considers the children's perspective in the economic evaluation. Using a willingness to pay approach, the study quantifies that the monetary benefits of reducing children's indoor NO2 exposure while at <span class="hlt">school</span> would range between £2.5 k per <span class="hlt">school</span> if a child's perspective based on child's budget is adopted up to £60 k if a parent's perspective is considered. This study highlights that designers, engineers, policymakers and stakeholders need to consider the reduction of outdoor pollution, and particularly NO2 levels, near <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> as there may be substantial health and monetary benefits. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1064621.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1064621.pdf"><span>Exploring Links between Pedagogical Knowledge Practices and Student Outcomes in STEM Education for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hudson, Peter; English, Lyn; Dawes, Les; King, Donna; Baker, Steve</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is an emerging initiative in Australia, particularly in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span>. This qualitative research aimed to understand <span class="hlt">Year</span> 4 students' involvement in an integrated STEM education unit that focused on science concepts (e.g., states of matter, testing properties of materials) and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=new+AND+generation+AND+church&pg=2&id=EJ508248','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=new+AND+generation+AND+church&pg=2&id=EJ508248"><span><span class="hlt">School</span> Governors and the Religious Ethos of C of E Voluntary Aided <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Francis, Leslie J.; Stone, Ernest A.</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Charts attitudes of the first generation of governors appointed to the Church of England voluntary aided <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the Chichester (England) diocese, following the new Instruments of Government implemented in 1985. The foundation governors remain highly committed to maintaining a distinctive church-related ethos in these <span class="hlt">schools</span>. (60…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1089767.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1089767.pdf"><span>The Implementation of Character Education Model Based on Empowerment Theatre for <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Anggraini, Purwati; Kusniarti, Tuti</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study aimed at constructing character education model implemented in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. The research method was qualitative with five samples in total, comprising <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Malang city/regency and one <span class="hlt">school</span> as a pilot model. The pilot model was instructed by theatre coach teacher, parents, and <span class="hlt">school</span> society. The result showed that…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Autonomy+AND+fear&pg=2&id=EJ881209','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Autonomy+AND+fear&pg=2&id=EJ881209"><span>Pedagogy--How Is It Influenced in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>? A Comparative Study of Literature about Pedagogical Influences in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in England and Poland, with a Focus on English <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Allison, Ewa Barbara</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This article is a critical review of recent literature comparing pedagogical influences in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in England and Poland. It identifies curriculum, assessment, leadership, teacher perceptions and personal fears as immense influences on pedagogy and considers how these factors influence pedagogy. Comparison of England's prescriptive…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=power+AND+influence+AND+prosocial+AND+behavior&id=EJ1026709','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=power+AND+influence+AND+prosocial+AND+behavior&id=EJ1026709"><span>Children's Behavioral Adjustment in Pre-<span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Tanzania: A Multilevel Approach</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shavega, Theresia J.; Brugman, Daniel; van Tuijl, Cathy</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Research Findings: The present study concerns children's behavioral adjustment in the context of pre-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Tanzania. Twenty teachers and 320 children from 20 pre-<span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> participated in the study. Teacher-child relationships, children's behavioral adjustment, and teachers' cultural beliefs were reported by teachers; classroom…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bullied&pg=4&id=EJ1038795','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=bullied&pg=4&id=EJ1038795"><span>Do Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Predict Adolescent Victimisation Trajectories?</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Lester, Leanne; Cross, Donna</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Chronic victimisation in adolescence is a traumatic experience with potential negative long-term health consequences. Given that victimisation has been shown to increase over the transition from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span>, longitudinal data from 1810 students transitioning from <span class="hlt">primary</span> to secondary <span class="hlt">school</span> were used to identify victimisation…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1055310.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1055310.pdf"><span>Science and Technology Teachers' Views of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Science and Technology Curriculum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yildiz-Duban, Nil</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This phenomenographic study attempts to explicit science and technology teachers' views of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> science and technology curriculum. Participants of the study were selected through opportunistic sampling and consisted of 30 science and technology teachers teaching in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. Data were collected through an…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=traditional+AND+school+AND+new+AND+school&pg=3&id=ED572678','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=traditional+AND+school+AND+new+AND+school&pg=3&id=ED572678"><span>First Things First! Creating the New American <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Takanishi, Ruby</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Challenging policymakers, educators, reformers, and citizens to replace piecemeal reforms with fundamental redesign, "First Things First!" calls for a different way of organizing the American <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>. Ruby Takanishi outlines a new framework for integrating early education with <span class="hlt">primary</span> education (pre-K-5), including both short- and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1158047.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1158047.pdf"><span>Junior <span class="hlt">Primary</span> Greek <span class="hlt">School</span> Pupils' Perceptions of the City's Public Open Spaces and Especially of the Urban Square: A Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Papageorgiou, Nikoletta; Galani, Apostolia; Mavrikaki, Evangelia</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This work--part of a wider project aimed at engaging first <span class="hlt">year</span> <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> pupils in public open-space design--explores the perceptions of junior <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children as to the urban square. Data collection tools comprised semi-structured interviews, sketches and storytelling via puppet-animation. Our findings have shown that--according to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Effective+AND+ineffective+AND+management&pg=3&id=EJ888176','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Effective+AND+ineffective+AND+management&pg=3&id=EJ888176"><span>The Effective Management of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> in Ekiti State, Nigeria: An Analytical Assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Adeyemi, T. O.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated the management of education in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Ekiti State, Nigeria. As a correlational research, the study population comprised all the 694 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in the State. Out of this, a sample of 320 <span class="hlt">schools</span> was selected through the stratified random sampling technique. Two instruments were used to collect data for the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=narration+AND+film&pg=7&id=EJ408678','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=narration+AND+film&pg=7&id=EJ408678"><span>Narrative Skills and Genre Knowledge: Ways of Telling in the <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Grades.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hicks, Deborah</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children, after viewing a silent film, were asked to narrate a segment of the film and recount its events both as a news story and as an embellished story. The results indicate that <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children have only nascent ability to apply genre knowledge to <span class="hlt">school</span> language tasks. (55 references) (Author/JL)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12971479','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12971479"><span>Enterobiasis in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Bang Khun Thian District, Bangkok, Thailand.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Changsap, B; Nithikathkul, C; Boontan, P; Wannapinyosheep, S; Vongvanich, N; Poister, C</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A study of enterobiasis and its correlation with various factors that could potentially influence the rate of infection was conducted among 3,621 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children (five to ten <span class="hlt">years</span> old), drawn from sixteen <span class="hlt">schools</span> in Bang Khun Thian District, Bangkok. Diagnosis was by the transparent tape swab technique, which was used to recover Enterobius vermicularis eggs from the perianal region. The transparent tape swabs were then placed on slides for examination by light microscopy. The average rate of infection for the group was 21.57%. No statistically significant differences were found between the male and female children. The younger children had a higher rate of infection. Subjects from <span class="hlt">schools</span> located in industrial and metropolitan areas showed slightly higher rates of infection than those from agricultural areas. Data from the questionnaires in the study indicated that factors such as parental socio-economic status (occupational, income and education) and the children's personal hygiene contributed to the varying rates of infection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=humanity&pg=3&id=EJ1139735','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=humanity&pg=3&id=EJ1139735"><span>The Humanities in English <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>: Struggling to Survive</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barnes, Jonathan; Scoffham, Stephen</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>This article surveys the state of the humanities in English <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> drawing on evidence from serving head teachers, current literature and policy documents. The findings suggest that whilst the humanities are highly valued in <span class="hlt">schools</span>, there are serious challenges which threaten the "broad and balanced" curriculum. It is suggested…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+work&id=EJ1173050','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=music+AND+work&id=EJ1173050"><span>Teaching <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Music: Coping with Changing Work Conditions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>de Vries, Peter Andrew</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>The changing roles of two <span class="hlt">primary</span> (elementary) <span class="hlt">school</span> music teachers are explored in this article, and how these changed roles have impacted on music programmes in their respective <span class="hlt">schools</span>. Change readiness provides the theoretical framework for investigating the way both teachers responded to their changing roles. The first teacher's role changed…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=work+AND+inflexibility&id=EJ753591','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=work+AND+inflexibility&id=EJ753591"><span>Exploring Educational Partnerships: A Case Study of Client-Provider Technology Education Partnerships in New Zealand <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Weal, Brenda; Coll, Richard</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>This paper explores the notion of educational partnerships and reports on research on client-provider partnerships between full <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> and external technology education providers for <span class="hlt">Year</span> 7 and 8 New Zealand students (age range approx. 12 to 13 <span class="hlt">years</span>). Educational reforms in New Zealand and the introduction of a more holistic technology…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=millwater&id=EJ499740','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=millwater&id=EJ499740"><span>Resource Provision in <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span>--An Australian Perspective.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yarrow, Allan; Millwater, Jan</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>This Australian perspective on the resource provision in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> offers a framework for conceptualizing resources; explores the notion of equality; and provides suggestions for making resourcing more equitable. (AEF)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25162735','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25162735"><span>Iron profile and dietary pattern of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> obese Egyptian children.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Abd-El Wahed, Mohamed A; Mohamed, Maha H; Ibrahim, Samia S; El-Naggar, Wafaa A</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>Poor iron status affects billions of people worldwide. The prevalence of obesity continues to rise in both the developed and developing nations. An association between iron status and obesity has been described in children and adults. The aim of the study was to assess the iron profile and dietary pattern in <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>-aged obese Egyptian children. A case-control study was conducted on 120 children, both obese (n=60) and control group (n=60), recruited from three <span class="hlt">primary</span> governmental <span class="hlt">schools</span> located in Dokki Sector, El-Giza Governorate, Egypt. Their ages ranged from 6 to 12 <span class="hlt">years</span>. All children were subjected to full medical and dietetic history, anthropometric measurements, thorough clinical examination, and determination of complete blood count, serum iron, total iron-binding capacity, transferrin saturation (TS), and ferritin. Despite similar dietary iron intake in the two groups, obese children showed highly significantly decreased hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, serum iron, and TS, and increased mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and total iron-binding capacity when compared with the nonobese group. The obese group showed a highly significant increased rate of iron deficiency (ID) (TS<15% or mean corpuscular volume<76 fl) when compared with the nonobese group. Obesity was a significant risk factor for the development of ID (odds ratio: 7.09, 95% confidence interval: 3.16-15.92). The association between ID and obesity may have important public health and clinical implications. For <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> children with elevated BMIs, screening for ID should be considered. Increasing awareness of the importance of physical activity and carrying out nutritional education programs are required.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27093982','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27093982"><span>Sun protection policies of Australian <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in a region of high sun exposure.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Harrison, S L; Garzón-Chavez, D R; Nikles, C J</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Queensland, Australia has the highest rates of skin cancer globally. Predetermined criteria were used to score the comprehensiveness of sun protection policies (SPP) of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> across Queensland. SPP were sought for <span class="hlt">schools</span> in 10 regions (latitude range 16.3°S-28.1°S) from 2011 to 2014. Of the 723 <span class="hlt">schools</span> sampled, 90.9% had a written SPP available publicly. Total SPP scores were low {mean 3.6 [95% CI: 3.4-3.9]; median 2 [interquartile range (IQR) 2, 4]}, with only 3.2% of <span class="hlt">schools</span> achieving the maximum score of 12. Median SPP scores were higher in Northern and Central Queensland [both 2 (IQR 2, 6) and (IQR 2, 5), respectively] than in Southern Queensland [2 (IQR 2, 3); P = 0.004]. Clothing and hat-wearing were addressed in most policies (96% and 89%) while few <span class="hlt">schools</span> used their SPP to plan outdoor events (5.2%) or reschedule activities to minimize sun exposure (11.7%). The SunSmart <span class="hlt">Schools</span> program has been operating in Queensland for 17 <span class="hlt">years</span>, and while most <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> now have a written SPP, most are not comprehensive. Incentive-based approaches (5-star-rating award scheme and grants) may assist in addressing this issue, to reduce sun exposure of students and teachers. These data provide a baseline from which improvements in the comprehensiveness of <span class="hlt">school</span> SPPs can be evaluated. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=effect+AND+ICT+AND+children&id=EJ1045649','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=effect+AND+ICT+AND+children&id=EJ1045649"><span>Towards Optimal Education Including Self-Regulated Learning in Technology-Enhanced Preschools and <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mooij, Ton; Dijkstra, Elma M.; Walraven, Amber; Kirschner, Paul A.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>At the start of preschool, four-<span class="hlt">year</span>-old pupils differ in their development, including in their capacity to self-regulate their playing and learning. In preschool and <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span>, educational processes are generally adapted to the mean age of the pupils in the class. The same may apply to pupil-monitoring systems based on information and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29563717','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29563717"><span>Head Lice among Governmental <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students in Southern Jordan: Prevalence and Risk Factors.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Khamaiseh, Abdullah Mousa</p> <p>2018-01-01</p> <p>Head lice, a common social and health problem among all age groups, is especially widespread among <span class="hlt">school</span>-aged children. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of pediculosis capitis among governmental <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students in Southern Jordan and its related risk factors. A sample of 500 <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> students aged 6-12 from two male and two female public <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">schools</span> in four educational directorates were selected randomly in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected using a modified questionnaire that was completed by the students with the help of their parents. Students were then asked to return the questionnaire a day ahead of the examination date with a signed consent from the parents. SPSS software was used with Chi-square testing to study the significant relationship between lice infestation prevalence and the independent variables. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. The overall prevalence of lice infestation was 20.4% and was significantly higher among girls than boys. The prevalence rate was higher among rural residents, those living in shared rooms, families with a monthly income of <200 Jordanian Dinar, illiterate father and mother, those living in families with more than five members, houses with fewer than three rooms, students with longer hair, those with a history of infestation in the previous <span class="hlt">year</span>, and students who share home articles with other family members. Female gender, low socioeconomic status, a history of contact, inadequate hygiene practices, and sharing articles were the major risk factors.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1140755.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1140755.pdf"><span>The Opinions of <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Teachers' Candidates towards Material Preparation and Usage</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Genc, Zeynep</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Instruction materials help students to acquire more memorable information. Instruction materials have an important effect on providing more permanent and simple way of learning in every step of education. Instruction materials are the most frequently used by <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers. <span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> teachers should support their lectures with…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://eric.ed.gov/?q=IT+AND+Governance+AND+business&pg=3&id=EJ1150480','ERIC'); return false;" href="https://eric.ed.gov/?q=IT+AND+Governance+AND+business&pg=3&id=EJ1150480"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">Schools</span> and Network Governance: A Policy Analysis of Reception Baseline Assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Roberts-Holmes, Guy; Bradbury, Alice</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> reception baseline assessment was designed to produce a single "baseline" data figure on the basis of which young children's progress across <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> could be measured and accounted for. This paper suggests that within the context of punitive performativity, head teachers might be considered "irresponsible"…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ997815.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ997815.pdf"><span><span class="hlt">Primary</span> <span class="hlt">School</span> Students' Attitudes towards Computer Based Testing and Assessment in Turkey</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yurdabakan, Irfan; Uzunkavak, Cicek</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated the attitudes of <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students towards computer based testing and assessment in terms of different variables. The sample for this research is <span class="hlt">primary</span> <span class="hlt">school</span> students attending a computer based testing and assessment application via CITO-OIS. The "Scale on Attitudes towards Computer Based Testing and…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted" style="margin-bottom:1rem; text-align:center;">Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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