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Sample records for primary solidification phase

  1. Solidification of Liquid Distributed in its Primary Matrix Phase of Al-10Cu-Fe Alloy and Their Tribological Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, L. Sankara; Jha, A. K.; Ojha, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    Solidification behavior of liquid phase entrained in its primary solid has been investigated. A hypoeutectic alloy based on Al-Cu-Fe system containing Fe and Si was thermal cycled between semisolid regions to low temperatures. The freezing characteristics of the liquid were recorded in inverse rate cooling curves. The continuous network of the liquid phase progressively changed into isolated droplets with their different size and size distribution. Such droplets revealed undercooling of the melt varying from 20 to 35 °C below the eutectic temperature of the alloy. This behavior of melt undercooling is discussed in light of independent nucleation events associated with freezing of droplets. Solidification structure of droplets revealed particulate eutectic phases in contrast to lamellar eutectic microstructure in the interdendritic region of the as-cast alloy. The droplet distribution and their solidification structure resulted in an improvement in tribological characteristics of the alloy. This effect is correlated with features of wear surfaces generated on the matting surfaces.

  2. Solidification of Liquid Distributed in its Primary Matrix Phase of Al-10Cu-Fe Alloy and Their Tribological Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, L. Sankara; Jha, A. K.; Ojha, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    Solidification behavior of liquid phase entrained in its primary solid has been investigated. A hypoeutectic alloy based on Al-Cu-Fe system containing Fe and Si was thermal cycled between semisolid regions to low temperatures. The freezing characteristics of the liquid were recorded in inverse rate cooling curves. The continuous network of the liquid phase progressively changed into isolated droplets with their different size and size distribution. Such droplets revealed undercooling of the melt varying from 20 to 35 °C below the eutectic temperature of the alloy. This behavior of melt undercooling is discussed in light of independent nucleation events associated with freezing of droplets. Solidification structure of droplets revealed particulate eutectic phases in contrast to lamellar eutectic microstructure in the interdendritic region of the as-cast alloy. The droplet distribution and their solidification structure resulted in an improvement in tribological characteristics of the alloy. This effect is correlated with features of wear surfaces generated on the matting surfaces.

  3. Formation mechanism of axial macrosegregation of primary phases induced by a static magnetic field during directional solidification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the macrosegregation formed by applying magnetic fields is of high commercial importance. This work investigates how static magnetic fields control the solute and primary phase distributions in four directionally solidified alloys (i.e., Al-Cu, Al-Si, Al-Ni and Zn-Cu alloys). Experimental results demonstrate that significant axial macrosegregation of the solute and primary phases (i.e., Al2Cu, Si, Al3Ni and Zn5Cu phases) occurs at the initial solidification stage of the samples. This finding is accompanied by two interface transitions in the mushy zone: quasi planar → sloping → quasi planar. The amplitude of the macrosegregation of the primary phases under the magnetic field is related to the magnetic field intensity, temperature gradient and growth speed. The corresponding numerical simulations present a unidirectional thermoelectric (TE) magnetic convection pattern in the mushy zone as a consequence of the interaction between the magnetic field and TE current. Furthermore, a model is proposed to explain the peculiar macrosegregation phenomenon by considering the effect of the forced TE magnetic convection on the solute distribution. The present study not only offers a new approach to control the solute distribution by applying a static magnetic field but also facilitates the understanding of crystal growth in the solute that is controlled by the static magnetic field during directional solidification. PMID:28367991

  4. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizingmore » the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.« less

  5. Rapid Solidification and Phase Transformations in Additive Manufactured Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Asle Zaeem, Mohsen; Clarke, Amy Jean

    2016-01-14

    Within the past few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has emerged as a promising manufacturing technique to enable the production of complex engineering structures with high efficiency and accuracy. Among the important factors establishing AM as a sustainable manufacturing process is the ability to control the microstructures and properties of AM products. In most AM processes, such as laser sintering (LS), laser melting (LM), and laser metal deposition (LMD), rapid solidification and high-temperature phase transformations play primary roles in determining nano- and microstructures, and consequently the mechanical and other properties of AM products. This topic of JOM is dedicated to summarizing the current research efforts in the area of rapid solidification and phase transformations in additively manufactured materials. Finally, a brief summary follows below of 10 journal articles in this topic.

  6. Evolution of Secondary Phases Formed upon Solidification of a Ni-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Qiang; Liu, Feng; Wang, Lei; Chen, Changfeng

    2013-07-01

    The solidification of UNS N08028 alloy subjected to different cooling rates was studied, where primary austenite dendrites occur predominantly and different amounts of sigma phase form in the interdendritic regions. The solidification path and elemental segregation upon solidification were simulated using the CALPHAD method, where THERMO-CALC software packages and two classical segregation models were employed to predict the real process. It is thus revealed that the interdendritic sigma phase is formed via eutectic reaction at the last stage of solidification. On this basis, an analytical model was developed to predict the evolution of nonequilibrium eutectic phase, while the isolated morphology of sigma phase can be described using divorced eutectic theory. Size, fraction, and morphology of the sigma phase were quantitatively studied by a series of experiments; the results are in good agreement with the model prediction.

  7. Evidence for the transition from primary to peritectic phase growth during solidification of undercooled Ni-Zr alloy levitated by electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, P.; Zhou, K.; Wang, H. P.

    2016-12-01

    The Ni83.25Zr16.75 peritectic alloy was undercooled by electromagnetic levitation method up to 198 K. The measured dendritic growth velocity shows a steep acceleration at a critical undercooling of ΔTcrit = 124 K, which provides an evidence of the transition of the primary growth mode from Ni7Zr2 phase to peritectic phase Ni5Zr. This is ascertained by combining the temperature-time profile and the evolution of the solidified microstructures. Below the critical undercooling, the solidified microstructure is composed of coarse Ni7Zr2 dendrites, peritectic phase Ni5Zr and eutectic structure. However, beyond the critical undercooling, only a small amount of Ni7Zr2 phase appears in the solidified microstructure. The dendritic growth mechanism of Ni7Zr2 phase is mainly governed by solute diffusion. While, the dendritic growth mechanism of Ni5Zr phase is mainly controlled by thermal diffusion and liquid-solid interface atomic attachment kinetics.

  8. Evidence for the transition from primary to peritectic phase growth during solidification of undercooled Ni-Zr alloy levitated by electromagnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Lü, P.; Zhou, K.; Wang, H. P.

    2016-01-01

    The Ni83.25Zr16.75 peritectic alloy was undercooled by electromagnetic levitation method up to 198 K. The measured dendritic growth velocity shows a steep acceleration at a critical undercooling of ΔTcrit = 124 K, which provides an evidence of the transition of the primary growth mode from Ni7Zr2 phase to peritectic phase Ni5Zr. This is ascertained by combining the temperature-time profile and the evolution of the solidified microstructures. Below the critical undercooling, the solidified microstructure is composed of coarse Ni7Zr2 dendrites, peritectic phase Ni5Zr and eutectic structure. However, beyond the critical undercooling, only a small amount of Ni7Zr2 phase appears in the solidified microstructure. The dendritic growth mechanism of Ni7Zr2 phase is mainly governed by solute diffusion. While, the dendritic growth mechanism of Ni5Zr phase is mainly controlled by thermal diffusion and liquid-solid interface atomic attachment kinetics. PMID:27958359

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Modelling polycrystalline solidification using phase field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gránásy, László; Pusztai, Tamás; Warren, James A.

    2004-10-01

    We review recent advances made in the phase field modelling of polycrystalline solidification. Areas covered include the development of theory from early approaches that allow for only a few crystal orientations, to the latest models relying on a continuous orientation field and a free energy functional that is invariant to the rotation of the laboratory frame. We discuss a variety of phenomena, including homogeneous nucleation and competitive growth of crystalline particles having different crystal orientations, the kinetics of crystallization, grain boundary dynamics, and the formation of complex polycrystalline growth morphologies including disordered ('dizzy') dendrites, spherulites, fractal-like polycrystalline aggregates, etc. Finally, we extend the approach by incorporating walls, and explore phenomena such as heterogeneous nucleation, particle-front interaction, and solidification in confined geometries (in channels or porous media).

  10. Dual-scale phase-field simulation of Mg-Al alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, A.; Shchyglo, O.; Höche, D.; Tegeler, M.; Steinbach, I.

    2015-06-01

    Phase-field simulations of the nucleation and growth of primary α-Mg phase as well as secondary, β-phase of a Mg-Al alloy are presented. The nucleation model for α- and β-Mg phases is based on the “free growth model” by Greer et al.. After the α-Mg phase solidification we study a divorced eutectic growth of α- and β-Mg phases in a zoomed in melt channel between α-phase dendrites. The simulated cooling curves and final microstructures of α-grains are compared with experiments. In order to further enhance the resolution of the interdendritic region a high-performance computing approach has been used allowing significant simulation speed gain when using supercomputing facilities.

  11. Immiscible phase incorporation during directional solidification of hypermonotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Merrick, Roger A.

    1993-01-01

    Solidification processes in immiscible samples were investigated by directly observing the events taking place at the solid-liquid interface during directional solidification. Visualization of these events was made possible through the use of a transparent metal analog system and a temperature gradient stage assembly fitted to an optical microscope. The immiscible transparent analog system utilized was the succinonitrile-glycerol system. This system has been shown to exhibit the same morphological transitions as observed in metallic alloys of monotectic composition. Both monotectic and hypermonotectic composition samples were directionally solidified in order to gain an improved understanding of the manner in which the excess hypermonotectic liquid is incorporated into the solidifying structure. The processing conditions utilized prevented sedimentation of the excess hypermonotectic liquid by directionally solidifying the samples in very thin (13 microns), horizontally oriented cells. High thermal gradient to growth rate ratios (G/R) were used in an effort to prevent constitutional supercooling and the subsequent formation of L(sub 2) droplets in advance of the solidification front during the growth of fibrous composite structures. Results demonstrated that hypermonotectic composites could be produced in samples up to two weight percent off of the monotectic composition by using a G/R ratio greater than or equal to 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2) to avoid constitutional supercooling. For hypermonotectic samples processed with G/R ratios below 4.6 x 10(exp 4) C(s)/mm(sup 2), constitutional supercooling occurred and resulted in slight interfacial instability. For these samples, two methods of incorporation of the hypermonotectic liquid were observed and are reported. The correlation between the phase spacing, lambda, and the growth rate, R, was examined and was found to obey a relationship generally associated with a diffusion controlled coupled growth process. For

  12. A phenomenological approach of solidification of polymeric phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrani, Seyed Amir; Royon, Laurent; Abou, Bérengère; Osipian, Rémy; Azzouz, Kamel; Bontemps, André

    2017-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are widely used in thermal energy storage and thermal management systems due to their small volume for a given stored energy and their capability for maintaining nearly constant temperatures. However, their performance is limited by their low thermal conductivity and possible leaks while in the liquid phase. One solution is to imprison the PCM inside a polymer mesh to create a Polymeric Phase Change Material (PPCM). In this work, we have studied the cooling and solidification of five PPCMs with different PCMs and polymer fractions. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms involved, we have carried out micro- and macrorheological measurements in which Brownian motion of tracers embedded in PPCMs has been depicted and viscoelastic moduli have been measured, respectively. Beyond a given polymer concentration, it was shown that the Brownian motion of the tracers is limited by the polymeric chains and that the material exhibits an elastic behavior. This would suggest that heat transfer essentially occurs by conduction, instead of convection. Experiments were conducted to measure temperature variation during cooling of the five samples, and a semi-empirical model based on a phenomenological approach was proposed as a practical tool to choose and size PPCMs.

  13. Phase Transformations During Solidification of a Laser-Beam-Welded TiAl Alloy—An In Situ Synchrotron Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Staron, Peter; Riekehr, Stefan; Stark, Andreas; Schell, Norbert; Huber, Norbert; Schreyer, Andreas; Müller, Martin; Kashaev, Nikolai

    2016-12-01

    An in situ highly time-resolved, high-energy X-ray diffraction investigation was carried out to observe the phase transformations of a TiAl alloy during laser beam welding. The diffraction patterns are recorded every 0.1 seconds by a fast area two-dimensional detector and plotted according to time, yielding the solidification pathway, the solid phase volume fraction, and the lattice parameter variation of different phases during the solidification and cooling process. Moreover, it is the first study that can demonstrate that the α phase without any Burgers orientation relationship, the so-called non-Burgers α, precipitates appear earlier than the Burgers α. The non-Burgers α grains are found to nucleate on the primary borides.

  14. On migration of primary/peritectic interface during interrupted directional solidification of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-04-01

    The migration of the primary/peritectic interface in local isothermal condition is observed in dendritic structure of Sn–Ni peritectic alloy after experiencing interrupted directional solidification. It was observed that this migration of primary Ni3Sn2/peritectic Ni3Sn4 interface towards the primary Ni3Sn2 phase was accompanied by migration of liquid film located at this interface. The migration velocity of this interface was confirmed to be much faster than that of peritectic transformation, so this migration was mostly caused by superheating of primary Ni3Sn2 phase below TP, leading to nucleation and migration of liquid film at this interface. This migration can be classified as a kind of liquid film migration (LFM), and the migration velocity at the horizontal direction has been confirmed to be much faster than that along the direction of temperature gradient. Analytical prediction has shown that the migration of liquid film could be divided into two stages depending on whether primary phase exists below TP. If the isothermal annealing time is not long enough, both the liquid film and the primary/peritectic interface migrate towards the primary phase until the superheated primary phase has all been dissolved. Then, this migration process towards higher temperature is controlled by temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM).

  15. On migration of primary/peritectic interface during interrupted directional solidification of Sn-Ni peritectic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie; Fu, Hengzhi

    2016-01-01

    The migration of the primary/peritectic interface in local isothermal condition is observed in dendritic structure of Sn–Ni peritectic alloy after experiencing interrupted directional solidification. It was observed that this migration of primary Ni3Sn2/peritectic Ni3Sn4 interface towards the primary Ni3Sn2 phase was accompanied by migration of liquid film located at this interface. The migration velocity of this interface was confirmed to be much faster than that of peritectic transformation, so this migration was mostly caused by superheating of primary Ni3Sn2 phase below TP, leading to nucleation and migration of liquid film at this interface. This migration can be classified as a kind of liquid film migration (LFM), and the migration velocity at the horizontal direction has been confirmed to be much faster than that along the direction of temperature gradient. Analytical prediction has shown that the migration of liquid film could be divided into two stages depending on whether primary phase exists below TP. If the isothermal annealing time is not long enough, both the liquid film and the primary/peritectic interface migrate towards the primary phase until the superheated primary phase has all been dissolved. Then, this migration process towards higher temperature is controlled by temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM). PMID:27075006

  16. Variations of Microsegregation and Second Phase Fraction of Binary Mg-Al Alloys with Solidification Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Manas; Kang, Dae Hoon; Essadiqi, Elhachmi; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-07-01

    A systematic experimental investigation on microsegregation and second phase fraction of Mg-Al binary alloys (3, 6, and 9 wt pct Al) has been carried out over a wide range of cooling rates (0.05 to 700 K/s) by employing various casting techniques. In order to explain the experimental results, a solidification model that takes into account dendrite tip undercooling, eutectic undercooling, solute back diffusion, and secondary dendrite arm coarsening was also developed in dynamic linkage with an accurate thermodynamic database. From the experimental data and solidification model, it was found that the second phase fraction in the solidified microstructure is not determined only by cooling rate but varied independently with thermal gradient and solidification velocity. Lastly, the second phase fraction maps for Mg-Al alloys were calculated from the solidification model.

  17. Solidification and phase equilibria in the Fe-C-Cr-NbC system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregolin, J. A. R.; Alcantara, N. G.

    1991-10-01

    A solidification model is developed and experimentally checked for Fe-C-Cr-Nb alloys in the white cast irons range. It is based on a partial quaternary Fe-C-Cr-NbC phase diagram and predicts the possible solidification paths for the alloys containing γ, with (Fe,Cr)7C3 and NbC as the microconstituents at room temperature. The dendritic γ to massive (Fe,Cr)7C3 transition in experimental alloy microstructures with NbC contents up to 22 pet is explained by this model. Thermal analysis is also used to compare the solidification paths and model approach.

  18. Thermal modeling of phase change solidification in thermal control devices including natural convection effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukanwa, A. O.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Natural convection effects in phase change thermal control devices were studied. A mathematical model was developed to evaluate natural convection effects in a phase change test cell undergoing solidification. Although natural convection effects are minimized in flight spacecraft, all phase change devices are ground tested. The mathematical approach to the problem was to first develop a transient two-dimensional conduction heat transfer model for the solidification of a normal paraffin of finite geometry. Next, a transient two-dimensional model was developed for the solidification of the same paraffin by a combined conduction-natural-convection heat transfer model. Throughout the study, n-hexadecane (n-C16H34) was used as the phase-change material in both the theoretical and the experimental work. The models were based on the transient two-dimensional finite difference solutions of the energy, continuity, and momentum equations.

  19. Containerless Solidification of Hexagonal Metastable Phases from an Undercooled R3Fe5O12 Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijaya; Kentei Yu, Yu; Kameko, Masashi; Ishikawa, Takehiko; Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko; Yoda, Shinichi

    Containerless processing is a promising technique to explore the technologically important materials using rapid solidification of an undercooled melt because it provides large undercooling prior to nucleation. In the R-Fe-O system (R=Rare-earth element), rare-earth iron garnet (R3 Fe5 O12 ) can be formed through a peritectic reaction between RFeO3 , which is a primary phase, and a melt, which contains more Fe2 O3 than the R3 Fe5 O12 composition. The iron garnet is know to become unstable with increasing ionic radius of the rare-earth ion from Lu to Sm and does not exist in a stable form in La, Pr, and Nd [1,2]. Recently, we investigated the effect of oxygen partial pressure Po2 on metastable phase formation from an undercooled RFeO3 melt through containerless solidification. On the other hand, Po2 was considered to be one of the most important thermodynamic parameters which control phase constituents during containerless processing. In the R-Fe-O system, multiferroic hexagonal RFeO3 (P63 cm) and Fe2+ -containing ferroelectric phases such as RFe2 O4 (r-R3m) and new hexagonal R3 Fe2 O7 (P63 /mmc) phases were obtained metastably with decreasing Po2 from 105 to 10-1 Pa [3,4]. However, in the R3 Fe5 O12 system, the effect of Po2 during rapid solidification has not been studied yet. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the effect of Po2 on the formation of metastable phases from an undercooled R3 Fe5 O12 melt under controlled Po2 using gas-jet levitation technique. In order to undercool the melt deeply below the melting temperature under a precisely con-trolled oxygen partial pressure, an aerodynamic levitator (ADL) combined with ZrO2 oxygen sensor was designed. A spherical R3 Fe5 O12 sample was levitated by an ADL and completely melted by a CO2 laser in an atmosphere with predetermined Po2 . The surface temperature of the levitated droplet was monitored by a two-color pyrometer. Then, the droplet was cooled by turning off the CO2 laser. Meanwhile, the recalescence

  20. In-situ Monitoring of Dynamic Phenomena during Solidification and Phase Transformation Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J; Mariam, Fesseha G; Patterson, Brian M.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Lee, Wah Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Tucker, Tim J.; Clarke, Kester D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Teter, David F.; Beard, Timothy V.; Hudson, Richard W.; Freibert, Franz J.; Korzekwa, Deniece R.; Farrow, Adam M.; Cross, Carl E.; Mihaila, Bogdan; Lookman, Turab; Hunter, Abigail; Choudhury, Samrat; Karma, Alain; Ott, Jr., Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; O'Neill, Finian; Hill, Joshua; Emigh, Megan G.

    2012-07-30

    The purpose of this project is to: (1) Directly observe phase transformations and microstructure evolution using proton (and synchrotron x-ray) radiography and tomography; (2) Constrain phase-field models for microstructure evolution; (3) Experimentally control microstructure evolution during processing to enable co-design; and (4) Advance toward the MaRIE vision. Understand microstructure evolution and chemical segregation during solidification {yields} solid-state transformations in Pu-Ga.

  1. Effect of Shrinkage on Primary Dendrite Arm Spacing during Binary Al-Si Alloy Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongda; Hamed, Mohamed S.; Shankar, Sumanth

    2011-08-01

    Upward and downward directional solidification of hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys were numerically simulated inside a cylindrical container. Undercooling of the liquidus temperature prior to the solidification event was introduced in the numerical model. The finite-volume method was used to solve the energy, concentration, momentum, and continuity equations. Temperature and liquid concentrations inside the mushy zone were coupled with local equilibrium assumptions. An energy equation was applied to determine the liquid fraction inside the mushy zone while considering the temperature undercooling at the solidifying dendrite/liquid interface. Momentum and continuity equations were coupled by the SIMPLE algorithm. Flow velocity distribution at various times, G, R, λ 1, and solidification time at mushy zone/liquid interface during solidification were predicted. The effect of shrinkage during solidification on these solidification parameters was quantified. Transient temperature distribution, solidification time for the mushy zone/liquid interface, and λ 1 were validated by laboratory experiments. It was found that better agreement could be achieved when the fluid flow due to solidification shrinkage was considered. Considering shrinkage in upward solidification was found to only have a marginal effect on solidification parameters, such as G, R, and λ 1; whereas, in the downward solidification, fluid flow due to shrinkage had a significant effect on these solidification parameters. Considering shrinkage during downward solidification resulted in a smaller R, stronger fluid flow, and increased solidification time at the mushy zone/liquid interface. Further, the flow pattern was significantly altered when solidification shrinkage was considered in the simulation. The effect of shrinkage on G and λ 1 strongly depended on the instantaneous location of the mushy zone/liquid interface in the computational domain. The numerical results could be validated by experimental data

  2. Solidification Processing and Phase Transformations in Ordered High Temperature Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-20

    transformation from cubic to hexagonal and ends with a transformation, from c2 to Orthorhombic phase. During these stages a complex domain structure is formed...arrangement of rotational domains of the 6 ower symmetry orthorhombic phase. [he Crystal Structure of the Ti2AINb Orthorhombic Phase - The results of a... orthorhombic phase in the Ti-Al-Nb system (Paper #7). The structure is ýmcmn (HgNa or Cd 3Er) with a=0.6089 nm, b=0.9569 nm, and c= 0.4667 rnm. Ti(Nb) fills

  3. Faceted growth of primary Al{sub 2}Cu crystals during directional solidification in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanjun; Ren, Zhongming; Shen, Yu; Wang, Qiuliang; Dai, Yinming; Wang, Hui

    2013-10-21

    The high magnetic field is widely used to modify the crystal morphology. In this work, the effect of the magnetic field on growing behavior of faceted crystals in the Al-40 wt. %Cu alloy was investigated using directional solidification technique. It was found that the faceted growth of primary Al{sub 2}Cu phase was degraded and the primary spacing was reduced upon applying the magnetic field. Additionally, the length of the mushy zone first decreased and then increased with increase of the magnetic field intensity. The quantitative analysis reveals that the shear stress induced by the fluid motion is insufficient to break the atom bonds at the solid-liquid interface. However, both of the thermoelectric magnetic convection (TEMC) and the thermoelectric magnetic force (TEMF) cause dendrites to fracture and reduce the primary spacing. The two effects also weaken the faceting growth. Moreover, the instability of the solid-liquid interface is generated by the TEMF, which further leads to degrade the faceted growth. The length of mushy zone was changed by the TEMC and reached the minimum in the magnetic field of 0.5 T, which is in good agreement with the predicted value (0.83 T)

  4. Experimental Study on Melting and Solidification of Phase Change Material Thermal Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambarita, H.; Abdullah, I.; Siregar, C. A.; Siregar, R. E. T.; Ronowikarto, A. D.

    2017-03-01

    Melting and solidification process of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are investigated experimentally. The tested PCMs are Paraffin wax and Steric acid which typically used for solar water heater. The objective is to explore the characteristics of the PCM when it is being melted and solidified. The experiments are performed in a glass box. One side of the box wall is heated while the opposite wall is kept constant and other walls are insulated. Temperature of the heated wall are kept constant at 80°C, 85°C, and 90°C, respectively. Every experiment is carried out for 600 minutes. Temperatures are recorded and the melting and solidification processes are pictured by using camera. The results show that the melting process starts from the upper part of the thermal storage. In the solidification process, it starts from the lower part of the thermal storage. As a thermal energy storage, Paraffin wax is better than Steric acid. This is because Paraffin wax can store more energy. At heat source temperature of 90°C, thermal energy stored by Paraffin wax and Stearic acid is 61.84 kJ and 57.39 kJ, respectively. Thus it is better to used Paraffin wax in the solar water heater as thermal energy storage.

  5. Modeling of subcooling and solidification of phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Eva; Mehling, Harald; Hiebler, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) are able to store thermal energy in small temperature intervals very efficiently due to their high latent heat. Particularly high storage capacity is found in salt hydrates. Salt hydrates however often show subcooling, thus inhibiting the release of the stored heat. In the state of the art simulations of PCM, the effect of subcooling is almost always neglected. This is a practicable approach for small subcooling, but it is problematic for subcooling in the order of the driving temperature gradient on unloading the storage. In this paper, we first present a new algorithm to simulate subcooling in a physically proper way. Then, we present a parametric study to demonstrate the main features of the algorithm and a comparison of computed and experimentally obtained data. The new algorithm should be particularly useful in simulating applications with low cooling rates, for example building applications.

  6. Terfenol: A study of the phase equilibrium diagram and the solidification process

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.

    1993-12-07

    Terfenol is a rare earth-iron alloy that was first developed at the Naval Ordinance Laboratory because of its rare magnetostrictive properties. Terfenol is composed of terbium and dysprosium combined with iron in a composition Tb{sub x}Dy{sub 1{minus}x}Fe{sub 2}, where x{approximately}0.3. The objective of this work was to determine the growth characteristics of Terfenol and its dependence on solidification rate, temperature gradient, and stoichiometry. Specific goals of this work were to verify the phase equilibria that is currently accepted for the systems DyFe{sub 2} and TbFe{sub 2}, and establish the phase equilibria near the composition Tb{sub 0.3}Dy{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 2}; establish that Terfenol grows directly from the liquid and that the reaction is occurring under metastable conditions; evaluate whether or not Terfenol can be grown under plane front conditions with a new radiofrequency float zone apparatus, and; determine whether or not <111> seeded crystals can be grown and <111> single crystals produced by elimination of dendrites employing growth methods capable of achieving high gradient/solidification rate ratios.

  7. Specimen analysis of Skylab, M553 experiment, flight specimens, phase C.. [on metals melting containerless solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Skylab 2 flight samples were analyzed to study containerless solidification and the effects of weightlessness on the process. A record of solute redistribution processes and of solidification terracing is reported. The solute redistribution process was highly localized, and low index, crystallographic system were suggested. Samples demonstrated that under reduced pressure and gravity conditions the anticipated solid/liquid solidification process was perturbed and superseded by solid/liquid/gas reactions during melting and solidification.

  8. Phase-field investigation on the non-equilibrium interface dynamics of rapid alloy solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jeong

    2011-01-01

    The research program reported here is focused on critical issues that represent conspicuous gaps in current understanding of rapid solidification, limiting our ability to predict and control microstructural evolution (i.e. morphological dynamics and microsegregation) at high undercooling, where conditions depart significantly from local equilibrium. More specifically, through careful application of phase-field modeling, using appropriate thin-interface and anti-trapping corrections and addressing important details such as transient effects and a velocity-dependent (i.e. adaptive) numerics, the current analysis provides a reasonable simulation-based picture of non-equilibrium solute partitioning and the corresponding oscillatory dynamics associated with single-phase rapid solidification and show that this method is a suitable means for a self-consistent simulation of transient behavior and operating point selection under rapid growth conditions. Moving beyond the limitations of conventional theoretical/analytical treatments of non-equilibrium solute partitioning, these results serve to substantiate recent experimental findings and analytical treatments for single-phase rapid solidification. The departure from the equilibrium solid concentration at the solid-liquid interface was often observed during rapid solidification, and the energetic associated non-equilibrium solute partitioning has been treated in detail, providing possible ranges of interface concentrations for a given growth condition. Use of these treatments for analytical description of specific single-phase dendritic and cellular operating point selection, however, requires a model for solute partitioning under a given set of growth conditions. Therefore, analytical solute trapping models which describe the chemical partitioning as a function of steady state interface velocities have been developed and widely utilized in most of the theoretical investigations of rapid solidification. However, these

  9. Refinement and growth enhancement of Al2Cu phase during magnetic field assisting directional solidification of hypereutectic Al-Cu alloy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Yue, Sheng; Fautrelle, Yves; Lee, Peter D.; Li, Xi; Zhong, Yunbo; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the magnetic fields affect the formation of reinforced phase during solidification is crucial to tailor the structure and therefor the performance of metal matrix in situ composites. In this study, a hypereutectic Al-40 wt.%Cu alloy has been directionally solidified under various axial magnetic fields and the morphology of Al2Cu phase was quantified in 3D by means of high resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. With rising magnetic fields, both increase of Al2Cu phase’s total volume and decrease of each column’s transverse section area were found. These results respectively indicate the growth enhancement and refinement of the primary Al2Cu phase in the magnetic field assisting directional solidification. The thermoelectric magnetic forces (TEMF) causing torque and dislocation multiplication in the faceted primary phases were thought dedicate to respectively the refinement and growth enhancement. To verify this, a real structure based 3D simulation of TEMF in Al2Cu column was carried out, and the dislocations in the Al2Cu phase obtained without and with a 10T high magnetic field were analysed by the transmission electron microscope. PMID:27091383

  10. Refinement and growth enhancement of Al2Cu phase during magnetic field assisting directional solidification of hypereutectic Al-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiang; Yue, Sheng; Fautrelle, Yves; Lee, Peter D.; Li, Xi; Zhong, Yunbo; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how the magnetic fields affect the formation of reinforced phase during solidification is crucial to tailor the structure and therefor the performance of metal matrix in situ composites. In this study, a hypereutectic Al-40 wt.%Cu alloy has been directionally solidified under various axial magnetic fields and the morphology of Al2Cu phase was quantified in 3D by means of high resolution synchrotron X-ray tomography. With rising magnetic fields, both increase of Al2Cu phase’s total volume and decrease of each column’s transverse section area were found. These results respectively indicate the growth enhancement and refinement of the primary Al2Cu phase in the magnetic field assisting directional solidification. The thermoelectric magnetic forces (TEMF) causing torque and dislocation multiplication in the faceted primary phases were thought dedicate to respectively the refinement and growth enhancement. To verify this, a real structure based 3D simulation of TEMF in Al2Cu column was carried out, and the dislocations in the Al2Cu phase obtained without and with a 10T high magnetic field were analysed by the transmission electron microscope.

  11. Surface rippling during solidification of binary polycrystalline alloy: Insights from 3-D phase-field simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankit, Kumar; Xing, Hui; Selzer, Michael; Nestler, Britta; Glicksman, Martin E.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms by which crystalline imperfections initiate breakdown of a planar front during directional solidification remain a topic of longstanding interest. Previous experimental findings show that the solid-liquid interface adjacent to a grain boundary provides a potential site where morphological instabilities initiate. However, interpretation of experimental data is difficult for complex 3-D diffusion fields that develop around grain multi-junctions and boundary ridges. We apply a phase-field approach to investigate factors that induce interfacial instabilities during directional solidification of a binary polycrystalline alloy. Using 2-D simulations, we establish the influence of solid-liquid interfacial energies on the spatial localization of initial interfacial perturbations. Based on parametric studies, we predict that grain misorientation and supersaturation in the melt provide major crystal growth factors determining solute segregation responsible for surface rippling. Subsequent breakdown of boundary ridges into periodic rows of hills, as simulated in 3-D, conform well with experiments. Finally, the significance of crystal misorientation relationships is elucidated in inducing spatial alignment of surface ripples.

  12. The interaction of bubbles with solidification interfaces. [during coasting phase of sounding rocket flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of bubbles at a dendritic solidification interface was studied during the coasting phase of a sounding rocket flight. Sequential photographs of the gradient freeze experiment showed nucleation, growth and coalescence of bubbles at the moving interface during both the low-gravity and one-gravity tests. In the one-gravity test the bubbles were observed to detach from the interface and float to the top of the melt. However, in the low-gravity tests no bubble detachment from the interface or steady state bubble motion occurred and large voids were grown into the crystal. These observations are discussed in terms of the current theory of thermal migration of bubbles and in terms of their implications on the space processing of metals.

  13. Effect of solidification rate on microstructure evolution in dual phase microalloyed steel

    PubMed Central

    Kostryzhev, A. G.; Slater, C. D.; Marenych, O. O.; Davis, C. L.

    2016-01-01

    In steels the dependence of ambient temperature microstructure and mechanical properties on solidification rate is not well reported. In this work we investigate the microstructure and hardness evolution for a low C low Mn NbTi-microalloyed steel solidified in the cooling rate range of 1–50 Cs−1. The maximum strength was obtained at the intermediate solidification rate of 30 Cs−1. This result has been correlated to the microstructure variation with solidification rate. PMID:27759109

  14. A Phase-Field Solidification Model of Almost Pure ITS-90 Fixed Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Large, M. J.; Pearce, J. V.

    2014-07-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric phase-field model of thermo-solutal solidification in freezing-point cells used for calibrating standard platinum resistance thermometers for realization and dissemination of the International Temperature Scale of 1990 is presented. The cell is essentially a graphite crucible containing an ingot of very pure metal (of order 99.9999 %). A graphite tube is inserted along the axis of the ingot to enable immersion of the thermometer in the metal. In this study, the metal is tin (freezing temperature of ). During the freezing of these cells, a steady, reproducible temperature is realized, with a defined temperature that can be used to calibrate thermometers with uncertainties mK. The model is applied to understand the effect of experimental parameters, such as initiation technique and furnace homogeneity, on the measured freezing curve. Results show that freezing curves whose behavior is consistent with the Scheil theory of solidification can be obtained with a specific furnace temperature profile, and provided that the freeze is of a long duration, the results are consistent with previous one-dimensional models and experiments. Morphological instability is observed with the inner interface initiation technique, causing the interface to adopt a cellular structure. This elevates the measured temperature, in accordance with the Gibbs-Thomson effect. In addition, the influence of initiation techniques on the solidification behavior is examined. The model indicates that an initially smooth inner mantle can `de-wet' from the thermometer well-forming agglomerated solid droplets, following recalescence, under certain conditions. This manifests as a measured temperature depression due to the Gibbs-Thomson effect, with a magnitude of to in simulations. The temperature rises to that of the stable outer mantle as freezing progresses and the droplets re-melt. It is demonstrated that the effect occurs below a critical mantle thickness. A physical

  15. Solidification processing and phase transformations in ordered high temperature alloys. Final report, 30 March 1990-30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Boettinger, W.J.; Bendersky, L.A.; Kattner, U.R.

    1993-01-20

    Useful high temperature alloys generally have microstructures consisting of more than one phase. Multiphase microstructures are necessary to develop acceptable toughness and creep strength in high temperature intermetallic alloy matrices. The optimum microstructures must be developed by a careful selection of processing path that includes both solidification and solid state heat treatment. Research has been conducted on the rapid solidification of selected intermetallic alloys and on the phase transformation paths that occur during cooling, primarily in the Ti-Al-Nb system. This report describes research performed in the Metallurgy Division at NIST under DARPA order 7469 between 1/1/89 and 12/31/92. Various research tasks were completed and the results have been published or have been submitted for publication.... Intermetallics, Ti-Al-Nb Alloys, Phase Diagrams, Phase Transformations, Ti-Al-Ta Alloys, MoSi2 Alloys.

  16. Recovering thermodynamic consistency of the antitrapping model: A variational phase-field formulation for alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Angbo; Mi, Yongli

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenological antitrapping phase-field model has attained much success in describing alloy solidification. The heuristically introduced antitrapping current enables removing artificial effects due to the use of large interfacial width. Nevertheless, such a model is not thermodynamically consistent and has not been fitted into a variational framework. Here we present two approaches to develop a variational phase-field model to describe patten formation in alloys. Following the principles of linear irreversible thermodynamics we build in the cross-coupling between the phase transition rate and solute diffusion current. Our formulation not only naturally incorporates the antitrapping current but also predicts the conjugated mesoscopic solute drag effect. A more general form of the antitrapping current is obtained by thin-interface analysis. Benchmark simulations on isothermal dendrite growth are carried out to show the capability of our model to quantitatively characterize the interface evolution and solute profile even with a large interface width used. Importantly, our theory also provides general insights on how to obtain the genuine dynamic coupling between nonconserved and conserved order parameters. This leads to a thermodynamically consistent generalization of the celebrated model C proposed by Hohenberg and Halperin [Rev. Mod. Phys.0034-686110.1103/RevModPhys.49.435 49, 435 (1977)].

  17. Phase-field simulations of nuclei and early stage solidification microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Selzer, M.; Danilov, D.

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the local properties of heterogeneous nuclei on substrates, a phase-field model is extended to incorporate volume constraints and a third order line tension in the gradient free energy density formulation. The new model is applied to sessile drop simulations of Cu nuclei on Ni substrates to precisely analyse 3D equilibrium shapes and diffusion processes across the phase boundaries. In particular, the formalism with higher order potentials is used to investigate the length-scale dependent effect of the line tension on Young's force balance at triple lines in 3D. The employment of parallel and adaptive simulation techniques is essential for three-dimensional numerical computations. Early stage solidification microstructures of cubic Ni crystals are simulated by scale-bridging molecular dynamics (MD) and phase-field (PF) simulations. The domain of the PF computations is initialized by transferring MD data of the atomic positions and of the shape of the nuclei. The combined approach can be used to study the responses of microstructures upon nucleation.

  18. Phase equillibria and solidification behaviour in the vanillin- p-anisidine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N. B.; Das, S. S.; Gupta, Preeti; Dwivedi, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    Phase diagram of the vanillin- p-anisidine system has been studied by the thaw melt method. Congruent melting-type phase diagram exhibiting two eutectic points was obtained. Vanillin and p-anisidine react in 1:1 M ratio and form N-(4-methoxy phenyl)-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy phenyl methanimine (NHM) and water. Heats of fusion of pure components and the eutectic mixtures ( E1 and E2) were obtained from DSC studies. Jackson's roughness parameters ( α) were calculated. Excess Gibbs free energy ( GE), excess entropy ( SE) and excess enthalpy ( HE) of mixing of pre-, post- and eutectic mixtures were also calculated by using activity coefficient data. Linear velocities of solidification of components and eutectic mixtures were determined at different undercoolings. The values of excess thermodynamic functions and linear velocity data have indicated the non-ideal nature of the eutectic mixtures. Interaction energies in the gaseous state, calculated from computer simulation, have also indicated that the eutectics are non-ideal mixtures. Microstructural studies of vanillin, p-anisidine and NHM show the formation of broken lamellar type structures. However, for the eutectic E1, an irregular type and for the eutectic E2, a lamellar type structures were obtained. The effect of impurity on the microstructures of eutectic mixtures was also studied.

  19. Application of vesicular coacervate phase for microextraction based on solidification of floating drop.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Morteza; Yamini, Yadollah

    2012-03-16

    A new, efficient and environmentally friendly method for the analysis of parabens as model compounds was developed using solidified floating vesicular coacervative drop microextraction (SFVCDME). A supramolecular solvent consisting of vesicles of decanoic acid in the nano- and microscale regimes was firstly used as the solvent in solidification of floating drop microextraction. The solvent was produced from the coacervation of decanoic acid aqueous vesicles in the presence of tetrabutylammonium (Bu(4)N(+)). Methylparaben (MP), ethylparaben (EP), and propylparaben (PP) were extracted on the basis of hydrophobic and π-cation interactions and the formation of hydrogen bonds. Microliter volume of vesicular coacervative droplet was delivered to the surface of the aqueous sample, and the sample was stirred for a desired time. The sample vial was cooled by immersing it into an ice bath for 3 min. The solidified solvent was transferred into a suitable vial and melted immediately. Twenty microliter of the vesicular coacervative solvent was directly injected to high-performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection, with no need to dilution or solvent evaporation. Several parameters affecting the microextraction efficiency including sample temperature, stirring rate, pH, salt effect, volume of the solvent and extraction time were investigated and optimized. Under optimum conditions, preconcentration factors and relative recoveries of the studied compounds were obtained in the range of 81-174 and 91-108%, respectively; and the performance of the method was comparable with that of solid-phase extraction as the reference method.

  20. In-Situ X-Ray Microscopy of Phase and Composition Distributions in Metal Alloys During Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.; Curreri, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, to image the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. By employing a hard x-ray source with sub-micron dimensions, resolutions of up to 3 gm can be obtained with magnifications of over 800 X. Specimen growth conditions were optimized and the best imaging technologies applied to maintain x-ray image resolution, contrast and sensitivity. In addition, a special furnace design is required to permit controlled growth conditions and still offer maximum resolution and image contrast. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid inter-face. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. Composition gradients within the specimen cause vafiations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lameilae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Keywords: x-ray, microscope, solidification, microfocus, real-time, microstructure

  1. Formation mechanism of primary phases and eutectic structures within undercooled Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weili; Dai, Fuping; Wei, Bingbo

    2007-08-01

    The solidification characteristics of three types of Pb-Sb-Sn ternary alloys with different primary phases were studied under substantial undercooling conditions. The experimental results show that primary (Pb) and SbSn phases grow in the dendritic mode, whereas primary (Sb) phase exhibits faceted growth in the form of polygonal blocks and long strips. (Pb) solid solution phase displays strong affinity with SbSn intermetallic compound so that they produce various morphologies of pseudobinary eutectics, but it can only grow in the divorced eutectic mode together with (Sb) phase. Although (Sb) solid solution phase and SbSn intermetallic compound may grow cooperatively within ternary eutectic microstructures, they seldom form pseudobinary eutectics independently. The (Pb)+(Sb)+SbSn ternary eutectic structure usually shows lamellar morphology, but appears as anomalous eutectic when its volume fraction becomes small. EDS analyses reveal that all of the three primary (Pb), (Sb) and SbSn phases exhibit conspicuous solute trapping effect during rapid solidification, which results in the remarkable extension of solute solubility.

  2. Modeling of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Popov, Dmitri

    1997-01-01

    Our long term goal is to develop techniques to achieve detached solidification reliably and reproducibly, in order to produce crystals with fewer defects. To achieve this goal it is necessary to understand thoroughly the physics of detached solidification. It was the primary objective of the current project to make progress toward this complete understanding. 'Me products of this grant are attached. These include 4 papers and a preliminary survey of the observations of detached solidification in space. We have successfully modeled steady state detached solidification, examined the stability of detachment, and determined the influence of buoyancy-driven convection under different conditions. Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Indeed, under the Soviet microgravity program the major objective was to achieve detached solidification with its resulting improvement in perfection and properties. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past three years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification.

  3. Thermodynamic evaluation of the solidification phase of molten core-concrete under estimated Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagaki, Toru; Yano, Kimihiko; Ogino, Hideki; Washiya, Tadahiro

    2017-04-01

    The solidification phases of molten core-concrete under the estimated molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) conditions in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 were predicted using the thermodynamic equilibrium calculation tool, FactSage 6.2, and the NUCLEA database in order to contribute toward the 1F decommissioning work and to understand the accident progression via the analytical results for the 1F MCCI products. We showed that most of the U and Zr in the molten core-concrete forms (U,Zr)O2 and (Zr,U)SiO4, and the formation of other phases with these elements is limited. However, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 requires a relatively long time because it involves a change in the crystal structure from fcc-(U,Zr)O2 to tet-(U,Zr)O2, followed by the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 by reaction with SiO2. Therefore, the formation of (Zr,U)SiO4 is limited under quenching conditions. Other common phases are the oxide phases, CaAl2Si2O8, SiO2, and CaSiO3, and the metallic phases of the Fe-Si and Fe-Ni alloys. The solidification phenomenon of the crust under quenching conditions and that of the molten pool under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions in the 1F MCCI progression are discussed.

  4. Microstructure selection in thin-sample directional solidification of an Al-Cu alloy: In situ X-ray imaging and phase-field simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, A. J.; Tourret, D.; Song, Y.; ...

    2017-05-01

    We study microstructure selection during during directional solidification of a thin metallic sample. We combine in situ X-ray radiography of a dilute Al-Cu alloy solidification experiments with three-dimensional phase-field simulations. Here we explore a range of temperature gradient G and growth velocity V and build a microstructure selection map for this alloy. We investigate the selection of the primary dendritic spacing Λ and tip radius ρ. While ρ shows a good agreement between experimental measurements and dendrite growth theory, with ρ~V$-$1/2, Λ is observed to increase with V (∂Λ/∂V > 0), in apparent disagreement with classical scaling laws for primarymore » dendritic spacing, which predict that ∂Λ/∂V<0. We show through simulations that this trend inversion for Λ(V) is due to liquid convection in our experiments, despite the thin sample configuration. We use a classical diffusion boundary-layer approximation to semi-quantitatively incorporate the effect of liquid convection into phase-field simulations. This approximation is implemented by assuming complete solute mixing outside a purely diffusive zone of constant thickness that surrounds the solid-liquid interface. This simple method enables us to quantitatively match experimental measurements of the planar morphological instability threshold and primary spacings over an order of magnitude in V. Lastly, we explain the observed inversion of ∂Λ/∂V by a combination of slow transient dynamics of microstructural homogenization and the influence of the sample thickness.« less

  5. Removal of Phosphorus in Silicon by the Formation of CaAl2Si2 Phase at the Solidification Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liyuan; Wang, Zhi; Chen, Hang; Wang, Dong; Qian, Guoyu

    2017-02-01

    To fully understand the role of CaAl2Si2 phase in concentrating the non-metallic impurity phosphorus, an experiment of directional solidification of Al-70 at. pct Si alloy with extreme small lowering rate 0.05 mm min-1 was carried out. With good dynamic condition for the diffusion of impurity (Ca, Al, P) from silicon to the S/L interface, the CaAl2Si2 phase with 0.6-0.7 at. pct P was successfully observed by Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA), and its distribution character was originally presented. This impurity phase was widely detected in the refined sample but only at the interface of silicon crystal and Al-Si alloy which contributed to the deep removal of impurity P. The formation mechanism of CaAl2Si2-P phase was thus explored, in which the microsegregation and concentration of element P, Ca, Al in front of S/L interface were crucial. After acid leaching, the P content decreased from the original 23 ppm to below 5 ppm. Compared with normal solidification, a 16 pct higher removal efficiency of P was obtained in this study.

  6. Numerical testing of quantitative phase-field models with different polynomials for isothermal solidification in binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Munekazu; Takaki, Tomohiro; Shibuta, Yasushi

    2017-04-01

    Quantitative phase-field models have been developed as feasible computational tools for solving the free-boundary problem in solidification processes. These models are constructed with some polynomials of the phase-field variable that describe variations of the physical quantities inside the diffuse interface. The accuracy of the simulation depends on the choice of the polynomials and such dependence is indispensable for high-performance computing and valuable for extending the range of applications of the model to several physical systems. However, little is known about the dependence of the accuracy on the choice of the polynomials. In this study, numerical testing is carried out for quantitative phase-field models with extensive sets of polynomials (24 different models) for isothermal solidification in binary alloys. It is demonstrated in two-dimensional simulations of dendritic growth that a specific set of polynomials must be employed to achieve high accuracy in the models with double-well and double-obstacle potentials. Both types of model with the best set of polynomials yield almost the same numerical accuracy.

  7. Phase relationships in the iron-rich Fe-Cr-Ni-C system at solidification temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrat, D. M.; Elliott, J. F.

    1986-08-01

    The phase relationships between the liquid phase and the primary solid phases were investigated in the iron-rich comer of the Fe-Cr-Ni-C system as part of a larger study of the Fe-Cr-Mn-Ni-C system. The investigation consisted of measurements of tie-lines for the liquid-delta (bcc) and the liquid-gamma (fcc) equilibria in the iron-rich corner of the Gibbs tetrahedron bounded by 0 to 25 wt Pct Cr, 0 to 25 wt Pct Ni, and 1.2 wt Pct C (bal. Fe). The temperature ranged from 1811 to 1750 K. Compositions for the tie-lines were obtained from liquid-solid equilibrium couples and the temperatures of the equilibrium, by differential thermal analysis (DTA). A mathematical procedure was employed on the experimental data to obtain parameters for a thermodynamic model of the alloy system. This involved minimization of an error function. The details of this analysis are discussed fully in this paper. Calculations by the model employing the “best-set” parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. The usefulness of the model is demonstrated by calculation of the three-phase equilibrium in the quaternary system as a function of temperature.

  8. Natural convection in steady solidification - Finite element analysis of a two-phase Rayleigh-Benard problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. J.; Brown, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Galerkin finite-element approximations and Newton's method for solving free boundary problems are combined with computer-implemented techniques from nonlinear perturbation analysis to study solidification problems with natural convection in the melt. The Newton method gives rapid convergence to steady state velocity, temperature and pressure fields and melt-solid interface shapes, and forms the basis for algebraic methods for detecting multiple steady flows and assessing their stability. The power of this combination is demonstrated for a two-phase Rayleigh-Benard problem composed of melt and solid in a veritical cylinder with the thermal boundary conditions arranged so that a static melt with a flat melt-solid interface is always a solution. Multiple cellular flows bifurcating from the static state are detected and followed as Rayleigh number is varied. Changing the boundary conditions to approach those appropriate for the vertical Bridgman solidification system causes imperfections that eliminate the static state. The flow structure in the Bridgman system is related to those for the Rayleigh-Benard system by a continuous evolution of the boundary conditions.

  9. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Martinez, Raymond J; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-01-01

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found. This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GT A W showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  10. Weld solidification cracking in 304 to 204L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hochanadel, Patrick W; Lienert, Thomas J; Martinez, Jesse N; Johnson, Matthew Q

    2010-09-15

    A series of annulus welds were made between 304 and 304L stainless steel coaxial tubes using both pulsed laser beam welding (LBW) and pulsed gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). In this application, a change in process from pulsed LBW to pulsed gas tungsten arc welding was proposed to limit the possibility of weld solidification cracking since weldability diagrams developed for GTAW display a greater range of compositions that are not crack susceptible relative to those developed for pulsed LBW. Contrary to the predictions of the GTAW weldability diagram, cracking was found.This result was rationalized in terms of the more rapid solidification rate of the pulsed gas tungsten arc welds. In addition, for the pulsed LBW conditions, the material compositions were predicted to be, by themselves, 'weldable' according to the pulsed LBW weldability diagram. However, the composition range along the tie line connecting the two compositions passed through the crack susceptible range. Microstructurally, the primary solidification mode (PSM) of the material processed with higher power LBW was determined to be austenite (A), while solidification mode of the materials processed with lower power LBW apparently exhibited a dual PSM of both austenite (A) and ferrite-austenite (FA) within the same weld. The materials processed by pulsed GTAW showed mostly primary austenite solidification, with some regions of either primary austenite-second phase ferrite (AF) solidification or primary ferrite-second phase austenite (FA) solidification. This work demonstrates that variations in crack susceptibility may be realized when welding different heats of 'weldable' materials together, and that slight variations in processing can also contribute to crack susceptibility.

  11. Degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics in directional solidification of non-axially oriented crystals: a phase-field study

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Hui; Dong, Xianglei; Wu, Hongjing; Hao, Guanhua; Wang, Jianyuan; Chen, Changle; Jin, Kexin

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of a phase-field study of degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics during directional solidification of a binary alloy. Morphological selection maps in the planes of (G, Vp) and (ε4, Vp) show that lower pulling velocity, weaker anisotropic strength and higher thermal gradient can enhance the formation of the degenerate seaweed. The tip undercooling shows oscillations in seaweed growth, but it keeps at a constant value in dendritic growth. The M-S instability on the tips and the surface tension anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface are responsible for the formation of the degenerate seaweed. It is evidenced that the place where the interfacial instability occurs determines the morphological transition. The transient transition from degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite shows that dendrites are dynamically preferred over seaweed. For the tilted dendritic arrays with a large tilted angle, primary spacing is investigated by comparing predicted results with the classical scaling power law, and the growth direction is found to be less sensitive to the pulling velocity and the primary spacing. Furthermore, the effect of the initial interface wavelength on the morphological transition is investigated to perform the history dependence of morphological selection. PMID:27210816

  12. Degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics in directional solidification of non-axially oriented crystals: a phase-field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Hui; Dong, Xianglei; Wu, Hongjing; Hao, Guanhua; Wang, Jianyuan; Chen, Changle; Jin, Kexin

    2016-05-01

    We report the results of a phase-field study of degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite transition and their growth dynamics during directional solidification of a binary alloy. Morphological selection maps in the planes of (G, Vp) and (ε4, Vp) show that lower pulling velocity, weaker anisotropic strength and higher thermal gradient can enhance the formation of the degenerate seaweed. The tip undercooling shows oscillations in seaweed growth, but it keeps at a constant value in dendritic growth. The M-S instability on the tips and the surface tension anisotropy of the solid-liquid interface are responsible for the formation of the degenerate seaweed. It is evidenced that the place where the interfacial instability occurs determines the morphological transition. The transient transition from degenerate seaweed to tilted dendrite shows that dendrites are dynamically preferred over seaweed. For the tilted dendritic arrays with a large tilted angle, primary spacing is investigated by comparing predicted results with the classical scaling power law, and the growth direction is found to be less sensitive to the pulling velocity and the primary spacing. Furthermore, the effect of the initial interface wavelength on the morphological transition is investigated to perform the history dependence of morphological selection.

  13. On the Solidification and Phase Stability of a Co-Cr-Fe-Ni-Ti High-Entropy Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, An-Chou; Chang, Yao-Jen; Tsai, Che-Wei; Wang, Yen-Chun; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Kuo, Chen-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a Co1.5CrFeNi1.5Ti0.5 high-entropy alloy has been investigated for its high-temperature microstructural stability. This material is shown to possess mainly a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure; the η phase is present at the interdendritic region in the as-cast condition, and it is stable between 1073 K and 1273 K (800 °C and 1000 °C); γ' particles are found throughout the microstructures below 1073 K (800 °C). Segregation analysis has been conducted on a single crystal sample fabricated by a directional solidification process with a single crystal seed. Results show that Co, Cr, and Fe partition toward the dendritic region, while Ni and Ti partition toward the interdendritic areas. Scheil analysis indicates that the solid-liquid partitioning ratio of each element is very similar to those in typical single crystal superalloys.

  14. Nucleation mechanism of nano-sized NaZn13-type and α-(Fe,Si) phases in La-Fe-Si alloys during rapid solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xue-Ling; Xue, Yun; Liu, Chun-Yu; Xu, Hui; Han, Ning; Ma, Chun-Wei; Phan, Manh-Huong

    2015-03-01

    The nucleation mechanism involving rapid solidification of undercooled La-Fe-Si melts has been studied experimentally and theoretically. The classical nucleation theory-based simulations show a competitive nucleation process between the α-(Fe,Si) phase (size approximately 10 to 30 nm) and the cubic NaZn13-type phase (hereinafter 1:13 phase, size approximately 200 to 400 nm) during rapid solidification, and that the undercooled temperature change ∆ T plays an important factor in this process. The simulated results about the nucleation rates of the α-(Fe,Si) and 1:13 phases in La-Fe-Si ribbons fabricated by a melt-spinner using a copper wheel with a surface speed of 35 m/s agree well with the XRD, SEM, and TEM studies of the phase structure and microstructure of the ribbons. Our study paves the way for designing novel La-Fe-Si materials for a wide range of technological applications.

  15. Microstructural evolution in Mg-Zn alloys during solidification: An experimental and simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliwal, Manas; Jung, In-Ho

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive microstructural evolution of Mg-1.5, 4.0 and 5.5 wt% Zn alloys with respect to the solidification parameters such as thermal gradient (G), solidification velocity (V), cooling rate (GV) and solute (Zn) content were investigated in the present study. Solidification techniques such as directional solidification and wedge casting were employed in order to obtain cooling rates between 0.05 and 250 K/s. Microstructural features such as secondary dendrite arm spacing (SDAS), primary dendrite arm spacing (PDAS), microsegregration along the secondary dendrites and secondary phase fractions were experimentally determined. A solidification model that incorporates solute back diffusion, secondary arm coarsening, dendrite tip undercooling and dynamically linked with accurate thermodynamic databases is used to explain the experimental results.

  16. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Ranjan; Jha, Sunil C.

    1987-01-01

    Marko's rapid solidification technology was applied to processing high strength aluminum alloys. Four classes of alloys, namely, Al-Li based (class 1), 2124 type (class 2), high temperature Al-Fe-Mo (class 3), and PM X7091 type (class 4) alloy, were produced as melt-spun ribbons. The ribbons were pulverized, cold compacted, hot-degassed, and consolidated through single or double stage extrusion. The mechanical properties of all four classes of alloys were measured at room and elevated temperatures and their microstructures were investigated optically and through electron microscopy. The microstructure of class 1 Al-Li-Mg alloy was predominantly unrecrystallized due to Zr addition. Yield strengths to the order of 50 Ksi were obtained, but tensile elongation in most cases remained below 2 percent. The class 2 alloys were modified composition of 2124 aluminum alloy, through addition of 0.6 weight percent Zr and 1 weight percent Ni. Nickel addition gave rise to a fine dispersion of intermetallic particles resisting coarsening during elevated temperature exposure. The class 2 alloy showed good combination of tensile strength and ductility and retained high strength after 1000 hour exposure at 177 C. The class 3 Al-Fe-Mo alloy showed high strength and good ductility both at room and high temperatures. The yield and tensile strength of class 4 alloy exceeded those of the commercial 7075 aluminum alloy.

  17. Polytypic phase formation in DyAl3 by rapid solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Altounian, Z.; Muir, W. B.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous ribbons of AlxDy100-x, 93≳x≳85, were obtained by melt spinning. During crystallization, in addition to Al, four different metastable crystalline phases of DyAl3 were observed. These phases are, in order of appearance, the high-pressure face-centered cubic phase, γ-DyAl3 and three polytypic rhombohedral phases, β-DyAl3, β'-DyAl3, and α'-DyAl3. It is the first time that the β' phase in rare-earth trialuminides and the α' phase in Dy-Al alloy system have been observed. It is shown that all these phases are associated with the polytypic packing of the hexagonal DyAl3 atomic layers. The relative stability of the phases is found to be related to the hexagonal to cubic stacking ratio in the structure.

  18. Fundamentals of rapid solidification processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, Merton C.; Shiohara, Yuh

    1985-01-01

    An attempt is made to illustrate the continuous change that occurs in the solidification behavior of undercooled melts, as cooling rates increase from 0.0001 K/sec to about 1000 K/sec. At the higher cooling rates, more significant changes occur as the dendrite tip temperature begins to drop from the equilibrium liquidus. Discontinuous solidification behavior changes will occur if absolute stability is reached, or a metastable phase forms, or solidification proceeds to a glass rather than to a crystalline solid, or if there is significant undercooling prior to nucleation.

  19. Experimental study of segregation in plane front solidification and its relevance to iron meteorite solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellamuthu, R.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1983-01-01

    A directional solidification technique was developed and applied to the problem of fractional crystallization of an iron meteorite parent body. Samples of Fe-Ni alloys close to meteorite compositions and containing S, P, and C were made. The solidified structures contain secondary phases such as sulphides within the proeutectic single crystal austenite (taenite). As a result of these experiments, we propose that the secondary phases observed in iron meteorites were formed during primary solidification of austenite (taenite). The measured composition profiles of Ni, P and C in the alloys were used to explain the elemental distribution within a chemical group of iron meteorites. An analytical procedure was applied to determine the equilibrium distribution coefficients as a function of fraction solidified for Ni and P from the composition profiles. The distribution coefficients of Ni and P agree with previous values. These distribution coefficients are of particular interest in the determination of the elemental distributions in iron meteorites.

  20. Effect of Primary Dendrite Orientation on Stray Grain Formation in Cross-Section Change Region During the Directional Solidification of Ni-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weidong; Li, Chuantao; Zhao, Dengke; Wang, Baojun; Li, Chuanjun; Ren, Zhongming; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Cao, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    The effect of primary dendrite orientation on stray grain formation in a cross-section change region during the directional solidification of Ni-based superalloy is investigated through both experimental observations and numerical simulation. The results clearly show that the orientation of primary dendrite affects the formation of stray grains in the cross-section change region. It is observed that, for the primary dendrite without misorientation, no stray grain is formed in the cross-section change region; for the primary dendrite with a moderate misorientation (15 deg), stray grains are formed only on the side converging from the mold wall in the cross-section change region. When the misorientation is 25 deg, stray grains are formed on both the side converging from the mold wall and the side diverging from the mold wall in the cross-section change region (the converging side and the diverging side for short). The simulation results are in accordance with experimental results. Furthermore, the correlation among factors such as stray grain formation, primary dendrite orientation, and withdrawal velocity has been analyzed. The mechanism of stray grain formation in various oriented primary dendrites is discussed.

  1. Appearance of metastable B2 phase during solidification of Ni 50 Zr 50 alloy: electrostatic levitation and molecular dynamics simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Quirinale, D. G.; Rustan, G. E.; Wilson, S. R.; Kramer, M. J.; Goldman, A. I.; Mendelev, M. I.

    2015-02-04

    High-energy x-ray diffraction measurements of undercooled, electrostatically levitated Ni50Zr50 liquid droplets were performed. The observed solidification pathway proceeded through the nucleation and growth of the metastable B2 phase, which persisted for several seconds before the rapid appearance of the stable B33 phase. This sequence is shown to be consistent with predictions from classical nucleation theory using data obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A plausible mechanism for the B2–B33 transformation is proposed and investigated through further MD simulations.

  2. Appearance of metastable B2 phase during solidification of Ni50Zr50 alloy: electrostatic levitation and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Quirinale, D G; Rustan, G E; Wilson, S R; Kramer, M J; Goldman, A I; Mendelev, M I

    2015-03-04

    High-energy x-ray diffraction measurements of undercooled, electrostatically levitated Ni50Zr50 liquid droplets were performed. The observed solidification pathway proceeded through the nucleation and growth of the metastable B2 phase, which persisted for several seconds before the rapid appearance of the stable B33 phase. This sequence is shown to be consistent with predictions from classical nucleation theory using data obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A plausible mechanism for the B2-B33 transformation is proposed and investigated through further MD simulations.

  3. The effect of heating power on impurity formation and transport during the holding phase in a Bridgman furnace for directional solidification of multi-crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, Kjerstin; Lindholm, Dag; M`Hamdi, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen and carbon are the most common impurities in multi-crystalline silicon. The general mechanism for formation and transport of O and C in the solidification furnace is as follows: oxygen from the silica crucible comes into the melt and combines with a silicon atom and evaporates at the gas/melt interface in the form of silicon oxide (SiO). Argon inert gas, injected into the furnace chamber, carries the SiO to the hot graphite fixtures, where it reacts with carbon to form carbon monoxide (CO) and silicon carbide (SiC). CO is carried by the gas to the melt free surface, where it dissociates into carbon and oxygen. Finally, during solidification oxygen and carbon are incorporated into the crystal. A global furnace model accounting for heat transfer, melt flow, gas flow and impurity transport has been applied to investigate the oxygen and carbon formation and transport in a vertical Bridgman furnace during the holding phase when the furnace is at its hottest. A case study is performed to investigate the effect of the applied heating power on the carbon and oxygen concentrations in the melt prior to solidification.

  4. Macrosegregation and Grain Formation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification Through Cross-Section Increase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghods, Masoud; Lauer, Mark; Tewari, Surendra; Poirier, David; Grugel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrical Al-7 wt% Silicon, Al-19 wt% Copper and Lead-6 wt% Antimony alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS) with liquid above, solid below, and gravity pointing down, in graphite crucibles having an abrupt cross-sectional increase. These alloys have similar solidification shrinkage but are expected to have different degrees of thermosolutal convection during solidification. Microstructures in the DS samples in the vicinity of the section change have been studied in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal effects and solidification shrinkage. Extensive radial and axial macrosegregation associated with cross-section change is observed. It also appears that steepling and local primary alpha-phase remelting resulting from convection are responsible for stray grain formation at the reentrant corners. Preliminary results from a numerical model, which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone, indicate that these regions are prone to solutal remelting of dendrites.

  5. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  6. In Situ Observation of the Competition Between Metastable and Stable Phases in Solidification of Undercooled Fe-17at. pctB Alloy Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Di; Xu, Junfeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-11-01

    High-speed video (HSV) technique was used to investigate the solidification behavior of undercooled Fe-17at. pctB alloy melt. Competitive growth between Fe/Fe3B (metastable eutectic) and Fe/Fe2B (stable eutectic) was captured, which is correlated with the critical nucleation undercooling Δ Tn^{*} [=104 K (104 °C)] and the critical growth undercooling Δ T_{g}^{*} [=151 K 183 K (151 °C 183 °C)]. For the initial undercooling, Δ T < Δ Tn^{*} , only the stable eutectic reaction (L → Fe/Fe2B) occurs during solidification, whereas, for Δ T > Δ Tn^{*} , the metastable eutectic reaction (L → Fe/Fe3B) occurs firstly, followed by the stable eutectic reaction. Nevertheless, Δ T > Δ Tn^{*} does not guarantee that the metastable phase (Fe3B) appears finally. Only if Δ T > Δ T_{g}^{*} , Fe3B phase can be found in the room microstructure, as the growth velocity of metastable eutectic (Fe/Fe3B) is larger than stable eutectic (Fe/Fe2B) from HSV results; otherwise, the final structure consists of Fe2B and α-Fe. Accordingly, not only the competitive nucleation, but the competitive growth also determines the final microstructure of Fe-17at. pctB alloy.

  7. Prediction of phase distribution pattern in phase field simulations on Mo5SiB2-primary areas in near eutectic Mo-Si-B alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, O.; Hasemann, G.; Krüger, M.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    A Mo-10.9Si-20.3B (if not stated otherwise all compositions are given in at.%) alloy was modeled using the phase field method with linearized phase diagrams and thermodynamic data. The simulation results showed that there are two specific microstructural constituents. According to the simulations and experimental microstructural investigations the primary Mo5SiB2 phase observed in this study was combined by the Moss-Mo3Si-Mo5SiB2 eutectics. The overall composition of the both primary and eutectic area was probed and the phase evolution along with the concentration change of the core areas were explored and visualized in the solidification domain. To verify the accuracy of the simulation results, they were comprised with the experimental achievements. In terms of the fraction of phases, the portion of the primary phase and the eutectic constituent and the phase distribution pattern our results were in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Phase-field modelling of β(Ti) solidification in Ti-45at.%Al: columnar dendrite growth at various gravity levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viardin, A.; Berger, R.; Sturz, L.; Apel, M.; Hecht, U.

    2016-03-01

    The effect of solutal convection on the solidification of γ titanium aluminides, specifically on β(Ti) dendrite growth, is not well known. With the aim of supporting directional solidification experiments under hyper-gravity using a large diameter centrifuge, 2D-phase field simulations of β(Ti) dendrite growth have been performed for the binary alloy Ti-45at.%Al and various gravity scenarios. Both, the direction and magnitude of the gravity vector were varied systematically in order to reveal the subtle interplay between the convective flow pattern and mushy zone characteristics. In this presentation, gravity effects are discussed for early dendrite growth. For selected cases the evolution on longer timescales is also analyse of and oscillatory modes leading to dynamically stable steady state growth are outlined. In a dedicated simulation series forced flow is superimposed, as to mimic thermally driven fluid flow expected to establish on the macroscopic scale (sample size) in the centrifugal experiments. Above a certain threshold this flow turns dominant and precludes solutally driven convective effects.

  9. Eutectic solidification patterns: Interest of microgravity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plapp, Mathis; Bottin-Rousseau, Sabine; Faivre, Gabriel; Akamatsu, Silvère

    2017-01-01

    The solidification of binary eutectic alloys produces two-phase composite materials in which the microstructure, that is, the geometrical distribution of the two solid phases, results from complex pattern-formation processes at the moving solid-liquid interface. Since the volume fraction of the two solids depends on the local composition, solidification dynamics can be strongly influenced by thermosolutal convection in the liquid. In this contribution, we review our experimental and numerical work devoted to the understanding of eutectic solidification under purely diffusive conditions, which will soon be tested and extended during the microgravity experiment TRANSPARENT ALLOYS planned by the European Space Agency (ESA). xml:lang="fr"

  10. Nonequilibrium solidification in undercooled Ti{sub 45}Al{sub 55} melts

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, H.; Galenko, P. K.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Kolbe, M.; Herlach, D. M.; Shuleshova, O.

    2008-04-01

    Ti-Al alloys are of high technological interest as light-weight high-performance materials. When produced by solidification from the liquid state, the material properties of as-solidified materials are strongly dependent on the conditions governing the solidification process. Nonequilibrium solidification from the state of an undercooled liquid may result to the formation of metastable solid materials. On the one hand undercooling under special cases may influence the phase selection behavior during solidification, and on the other hand during rapid growth of solid phases in undercooled melts nonequilibrium effects such as solute trapping and disorder trapping may occur. In the present work containerless processing by electromagnetic levitation is used to undercool Ti{sub 45}Al{sub 55} melts deeply below the liquidus temperature. The dendrite growth velocity during the solidification is measured as a function of undercooling by application of a high-speed video camera. In situ diffraction experiments at ESRF in Grenoble and microstructure investigations are performed in order to identify the primary solidified phases. The experimental findings are interpreted within current theoretical models for dendritic growth and solute trapping.

  11. Solidification of undercooled liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, J. H.; Shiohara, Y.; Paik, J. S.; Flemmings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    During rapid solidification processing (RSP) the amount of liquid undercooling is an important factor in determining microstructural development by controlling phase selection during nucleation and morphological evolution during crystal growth. While undercooling is an inherent feature of many techniques of RSP, the deepest undercoolings and most controlled studies have been possible in carefully prepared fine droplet samples. From past work and recent advances in studies of nucleation kinetics it has become clear that the initiation of crystallization during RSP is governed usually by heterogeneous sites located at surfaces. With known nucleant sites, it has been possible to identify specific pathways of metastable phase formation and microstructural development in alloys. These advances have allowed for a clearer assessment of the interplay between undercooling, cooling rate and particle size statistics in structure formation. New approaches to the examination of growth processes have been developed to follow the thermal behavior and morphology in small samples in the period of rapid crystallization and recalescence. Based upon the new experimental information from these studies, useful models can be developed for the overall solidification process to include nucleation behavior, thermodynamic constraints, thermal history, growth kinetics, solute redistribution and resulting structures. From the refinement of knowledge concerning the underlying factors that govern RSP a basis is emerging for an effective alloy design and processing strategy.

  12. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1991-01-01

    The long range goal of this program is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification and to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  13. Modelling Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.; Regel, Liya L.; Zhou, Jian; Yuan, Weijun

    1992-01-01

    The long range goal of this program has been to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, in order to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Current emphasis is on determining the influence of perturbations on directional solidification.

  14. A fully implicit, fully adaptive time and space discretisation method for phase-field simulation of binary alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosam, J.; Jimack, P. K.; Mullis, A.

    2007-08-01

    A fully implicit numerical method based upon adaptively refined meshes for the simulation of binary alloy solidification in 2D is presented. In addition we combine a second-order fully implicit time discretisation scheme with variable step size control to obtain an adaptive time and space discretisation method. The superiority of this method, compared to widely used fully explicit methods, with respect to CPU time and accuracy, is shown. Due to the high nonlinearity of the governing equations a robust and fast solver for systems of nonlinear algebraic equations is needed to solve the intermediate approximations per time step. We use a nonlinear multigrid solver which shows almost h-independent convergence behaviour.

  15. Divorced Eutectic Solidification of Mg-Al Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monas, Alexander; Shchyglo, Oleg; Kim, Se-Jong; Yim, Chang Dong; Höche, Daniel; Steinbach, Ingo

    2015-08-01

    We present simulations of the nucleation and equiaxed dendritic growth of the primary hexagonal close-packed -Mg phase followed by the nucleation of the -phase in interdendritic regions. A zoomed-in region of a melt channel under eutectic conditions is investigated and compared with experiments. The presented simulations allow prediction of the final properties of an alloy based on process parameters. The obtained results give insight into the solidification processes governing the microstructure formation of Mg-Al alloys, allowing their targeted design for different applications.

  16. Containerless Solidification and Characterization of Industrial Alloys (NEQUISOL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbagi, A.; Henein, H.; Chen, J.; Herlach, D. M.; Lengsdorf, R.; Gandin, Ch-A.; Tourret, D.; Garcia-Escorial, A.

    2011-12-01

    Containerless solidification using electromagnetic levitator (EML), gas atomization and an instrumented drop tube, known as impulse atomization is investigated for Al-Fe and Al-Ni alloys. The effects of primary phase and eutectic undercooling on the microstructure of Al-Fe alloys are investigated using the impulse drop tube and parabolic flight. The TEM characterization on the eutectic microstructure of impulse-atomized Al-Fe powders with two compositions showed that the metastable AlmFe formed in these alloys. Also, the growth undercooling that the dendritic front experiences during the solidification of the droplet resulted in variation of dendrite growth direction from <100> to <111>. For Al-4 at%Fe, it was found that in reduced-gravity and in the impulse-atomized droplets the primary intermetallic forms with a flower-like morphology, whereas in the terrestrial EML sample it has a needle like morphology. For Al-Ni, the effect of primary phase undercooling on dendrite growth velocity under terrestrial and reduced-gravity condition is discussed. It is shown that under terrestrial conditions, in the Ni-rich alloys with increasing undercooling the growth velocity increases, whereas in the Al-rich alloys the growth velocity decreases. However, the Al-rich alloy that was studied in reduced-gravity showed similar behavior to that of Ni-rich alloys. Furthermore, the effect of cooling rate on the phase fractions and metastable phase formation of impulse-atomized Al-Ni alloys is compared with EML. A microsegregation model for the solidification of Al-Ni alloys is applied to impulse atomized powders. The model accounts for the occurrence of several phase transformations, including one or several peritectic reactions and one eutectic reaction.

  17. MIKES’ primary phase stepping gauge block interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byman, V.; Lassila, A.

    2015-08-01

    MIKES’ modernized phase stepping interferometer for gauge block calibration (PSIGB) will be described. The instrument is based on the well-regarded NPL-TESA gauge block interferometer from 1994. The decision to upgrade the instrument resulted from several components, such as the PC and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, having reached the end of their lifetime. In this paper modernized components, measurement method and analysis will be explained. The lasers are coupled to the instrument using single mode fiber. The instrument uses phase stepping generated by an added optical window on a controllable rotatory table in the reference arm with a recently developed nine-position phase stepping algorithm. Unwrapping is done with a robust path following algorithm. Procedures for adjusting the interferometer are explained. Determination and elimination of wavefront error, coherent noise and analysis of their influence on the results is described. Flatness and variation in length are also important parameters of gauge blocks to be characterized, and the corresponding analysis method is clarified. Uncertainty analysis for the central length, flatness and variation in length is also described. The results are compared against those of the old hardware and software. The standard uncertainty for central length measurement is u = [(9.5 nm)2 + (121 × 10-9 L)2]½, where L is measured length.

  18. In situ metathesis reaction combined with liquid-phase microextraction based on the solidification of sedimentary ionic liquids for the determination of pyrethroid insecticides in water samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lu; Zhang, Panjie; Shan, Wanyu; Wang, Xuan; Li, Songqing; Zhou, Wenfeng; Gao, Haixiang

    2015-11-01

    A novel dispersion liquid-liquid microextraction method based on the solidification of sedimentary ionic liquids (SSIL-DLLME), in which an in situ metathesis reaction forms an ionic liquid (IL) extraction phase, was developed to determine four pyrethroid insecticides (i.e., permethrin, cyhalothrin, fenpropathrin, and transfluthrin) in water followed by separation using high-performance liquid chromatography. In the developed method, in situ DLLME was used to enhance the extraction efficiency and yield. After centrifugation, the extraction solvent, tributyldodecylphosphonium hexafluorophosphate ([P44412][PF6]), was easily collected by solidification in the bottom of the tube. The effects of various experimental parameters, the quantity of tributyldodecylphosphonium bromide ([P44412]Br), the molar ratio of [P44412]Br to potassium hexafluorophosphate (KPF6), the ionic strength, the temperature of the sample solution, and the centrifugation time, were optimized using a Plackett-Burman design to identify the significant factors that affected the extraction efficiency. These significant factors were then optimized using a central composite design. Under the optimized conditions, the recoveries of the four pyrethroid insecticides at four spiked levels ranged from 87.1% to 101.7%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranging from 0.1% to 5.5%. At concentration levels between 1 and 500 µg/L, good linearity was obtained, with coefficients of determination greater than 0.9995. The limits of detection (LODs) for the four pyrethroid insecticides were in the range of 0.71-1.54 µg/L. The developed method was then successfully used for the determination of pyrethroid insecticides in environmental samples.

  19. Solidification mechanism of highly undercooled metal alloys. [tin-lead and nickel-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiohara, Y.; Chu, M. G.; Macisaac, D. G.; Flemings, M. C.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on metal droplet undercooling, using Sn-25wt%Pb and Ni-34wt%Sn alloys. To achieve the high degree of undercooling, emulsification treatments were employed. Results show the fraction of supersaturated primary phase is a function of the amount of undercooling, as is the fineness of the structures. The solidification behavior of the tin-lead droplets during recalescence was analyzed using three different hypotheses; (1) solid forming throughout recalescence is of the maximum thermodynamically stable composition; (2) partitionless solidification below the T sub o temperature, and solid forming thereafter is of the maximum thermodynamically stable composition; and (3) partitionless solidification below the T sub o temperature with solid forming thereafter that is of the maximum thermodynamically metastable composition that is possible. The T sub o temperature is calculated from the equal molar free energies of the liquid solid using the regular solution approximation.

  20. Metastable coupled-growth kinetics between primary and peritectic phases of undercooled hypoperitectic Fe54.5Ti45.5 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y. H.; Chang, J.; Wang, W. L.; Wei, B.

    2016-10-01

    The metastable coupled-growth kinetics between the primary Fe2Ti and peritectic FeTi phases of undercooled Fe54.5Ti45.5 alloy was systematically investigated by both electromagnetic levitation and drop tube techniques. Employing a high-speed camera, the rapid crystallization processes of levitated bulk alloy were recorded in the undercooling range of 34-187 K. In small undercooling regime below 143 K, peritectic solidification proceeded and the dependence of primary Fe2Ti dendritic growth velocity V on the bulk undercooling ΔT satisfied a power relation of V = 2.43 × 10-14 × ΔT7.72 (mm s-1). Once liquid undercooling increased beyond 143 K, the metastable coupled-growth was induced and the microstructure was characterized by the Fe2Ti rods embedded in FeTi phase. Furthermore, the coupled-growth velocity decreased linearly with the rise in undercooling according to V = 1.47 × 103-7.44ΔT (mm s-1). In drop tube experiment, peritectic solidification characteristics of small alloy droplets disappeared and the primary and peritectic phases directly nucleated from undercooled liquid and grew cooperatively to form spherical coupled-growth cells if droplet diameter decreased below 481 μm.

  1. Unidirectional solidification of Sn- Pb alloys under forced melt flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, J.; Rogozsán, B.; Rónaföldi, A.; Roósz, A.

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical Sn-Pb alloy samples of different compositions (10, 20 and 30 wt.-% Pb) were prepared from high purity (4N) components. After metals have been melted, a rotating magnetic field (RMF) with an induction of 150 mT and a frequency of 50 Hz was switched on in order to homogenize the liquid. The electromagnetic field was generated by a 3-phase, 2-pole inductor. Just before the start of the solidification process, the magnetic field was switched off to achieve a microstructure free of melt flow influence. The sample translation velocity was constant (0.05 mm/s), and the temperature gradient changed from 7 to 3 K/mm during the solidification process. The first half part of each sample solidified without influence of rotating magnetic field while solidification of the second half part proceeded under the action of the RMF. The columnar microstructure formed in the absence of RMF induced fluid flow was replaced after switching on the RMF by a characteristic "Christmas tree"- like macro-segregated structure with equiaxed dendrites. The secondary dendrite arm spacing and the volume fraction of primary tin phase (dendrite) were measured by an automatic image analyzer on the longitudinal polished sections along the whole length of the samples. The effect of the forced melt flow and alloy composition on its micro- and macrostructure development was investigated.

  2. Solidification in syntectic and monotectic systems.

    PubMed

    Hüter, C; Boussinot, G; Brener, E A; Spatschek, R

    2012-08-01

    We present theoretical studies of syntectic and monotectic solidification scenarios. Steady-state solidification along the liquid-liquid interface in a syntectic system is considered by means of a boundary-integral technique developed previously. We study the case of small asymmetry of the pattern and extract from the results the scaling relations in terms of the undercooling and the asymmetry parameter. We also investigate monotectic solidification using the phase-field method. We present two kinds of two-phase fingers, with the solid phase being either the exterior phase or the interior phase, and the pattern corresponding to the growth along the solid-liquid interface. We finally analyze the asymptotic shape of these new morphologies far behind their tip.

  3. Modelling direction solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop an improved understanding of some phenomena of importance to directional solidification. The aim of this research is also to help predict differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and solidification in space. In this report, the validity of the Burton-Primslichter equation is explored. The influence of operating variables on grain and twin generation and propagation in single crystals of In sub (x) Ga sub (1-x) Sb is also investigated.

  4. MPS solidification model. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Maples, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Work performed on several existing solidification models for which computer codes and documentation were developed is presented. The models describe the solidification of alloys in which there is a time varying zone of coexisting solid and liquid phases; i.e., the S/L zone. The primary purpose of the models is to calculate macrosegregation in a casting or ingot which results from flow of interdendritic liquid in this S/L zone during solidification. The flow, driven by solidification contractions and by gravity acting on density gradients in the interdendritic liquid, is modeled as flow through a porous medium. In Model 1, the steady state model, the heat flow characteristics are those of steady state solidification; i.e., the S/L zone is of constant width and it moves at a constant velocity relative to the mold. In Model 2, the unsteady state model, the width and rate of movement of the S/L zone are allowed to vary with time as it moves through the ingot. Each of these models exists in two versions. Models 1 and 2 are applicable to binary alloys; models 1M and 2M are applicable to multicomponent alloys.

  5. The volume change during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rittich, M.

    1985-01-01

    The liquid-solid phase transformation of solidifying metallic melts is accompanied by a volume change Delta-Vm. This volume change produces a gravity-independent microscopic flow near the solidification front. In a ground-based laboratory, solidification processes are also affected by convection due to temperature and concentration gradients. A quantitative evaluation of the effects of these flows on the formation of structure requires reproducible values of Delta-Vm. Alloys with Delta-Vm = 0 would be best suited for such an evaluation, while alloys with a constant value for Delta-Vm are still usable. Another requirement is related to a solidus-liquidus interval which is as small as possible. One-phase alloys, which would be particularly well suited, could not be found. For these reasons, alloys which solidify in two phases, as for example eutectics, have been considered, taking into account the Al-Ge system. Attention is given to the volume change at the melting point, the measurement of this change, the volume change at solidification, and applications to terrestrial technology.

  6. Solidification of floating organic drop liquid-phase microextraction cell fishing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for screening bioactive components from Amomum villosum Lour.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xue; Yang, Depo; Wang, Dongmei; Xu, Xinjun; Zhu, Longping; Zhao, Zhimin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a novel solidification of floating organic drop liquid-phase microextraction cell fishing with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS) method was established and used to screen, isolate and analyze bioactive components from Amomum villosum Lour. extract. Through comparision of its effect on the models of normal cell and inflammatory cells, anti-inflammatory active components of essential oil from A. villosum Lour. were readily screened, and the components obtained are in agreement with related pharmacological articles. SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS was used to analyze the interaction of A. villosum Lour. extracts with normal and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. The effect of A. villosum Lour. essential oil extracts in the LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 model were also assessed in terms of cytotoxicity and nitric oxide production as an indication of bioactivity. Three potentially bioactive components were identified, demonstrating that SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS can be used successfully in the drug-screening process. This approach avoids the requirement for protein precipitation, but more importantly, generates a high concentration ratio, allowing analysis of trace components in traditional Chinese medicines. SFOD-LPME-CF-GC-MS is a simple, fast, effective and reliable method for the screening and analysis of bioactive components, and it can be extended to screen other bioactive components from TCMs.

  7. Chemometric assisted ultrasound leaching-solid phase extraction followed by dispersive-solidification liquid-liquid microextraction for determination of organophosphorus pesticides in soil samples.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Kamyar; Abdollahzadeh, Yaser; Asadollahzadeh, Mehdi; Hemmati, Alireza; Tavakoli, Hamed; Torkaman, Rezvan

    2015-05-01

    Ultrasound leaching-solid phase extraction (USL-SPE) followed by dispersive-solidification liquid-liquid microextraction (DSLLME) was developed for preconcentration and determination of organophosphorus pesticides (OPPs) in soil samples prior gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. At first, OPPs were ultrasonically leached from soil samples by using methanol. After centrifugation, the separated methanol was diluted to 50 mL with double-distillated water and passed through the C18 SPE cartridge. OPPs were eluted with 1 mL acetonitrile. Thus, 1 mL acetonitrile extract (disperser solvent) and 10 µL 1-undecanol (extraction solvent) were added to 5 mL double-distilled water and a DSLLME technique was applied. The variables of interest in the USL-SPE-DSLLME method were optimized with the aid of chemometric approaches. First, in screening experiments, fractional factorial design (FFD) was used for selecting the variables which significantly affected the extraction procedure. Afterwards, the significant variables were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD). Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factors were 6890-8830. The linear range was 0.025-625 ng g(-1) and limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.012 and 0.2 ng g(-1). The relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 4.06-8.9% (n=6). The relative recoveries of OPPs from different soil samples were 85-98%.

  8. Solid-Phase Extraction Followed by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Based on Solidification of Floating Organic Drop for the Determination of Parabens.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Beshare; Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir

    2015-09-01

    A dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic drop method combined with solid-phase extraction (500-mg C18 sorbent) was developed for preconcentration and determination of some parabens. The experimental parameters influencing the extraction efficiency such as the type of extraction and disperser solvents, as well as their volumes, breakthrough volume, flow rate and salt addition were studied and optimized. The optimum experimental conditions found included: sample volume, 100 mL; KCl concentration, 1% (w/v); extraction solvent (1-undecanol) volume, 20 µL and disperser solvent (acetone) volume, 250 µL. Under the optimum experimental conditions, calibration graphs were linear in the range of 1-200 µg L(-1) with limits of detection ranged from 0.3 to 1.7 µg L(-1). The relative standard deviations were in the range of 1.2-3.1% (n = 5). The enrichment factors and absolute recoveries of parabens in different matrices were 245-1886 and 9.0-69.8%, respectively. The method was applied to the simultaneous determination of parabens in different matrices. The relative recoveries from water, shampoo and mouth rinse samples, which have been spiked at different levels of parabens, were 87.83-112.25%, 82.80-108.40% and 90.10-97.60%, respectively.

  9. Solidification-Rate Effects In MAR-M-246+Hf Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, David

    1988-01-01

    Under slower solidification, primary-dendrite-arm spacing increases. Report discusses experiments on influence of solidification rates on crystallographic orientation and mechanical properties of superalloy MAR-M-246+Hf. Specimens grown in directional-solidification furnace, visually examined for microstructure, and stretched to failure in tensile-testing machine. Back-reflection Laue x-ray photographs taken to determine growth orientations.

  10. Rapid solidification of Nb-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokhale, A. B.; Javed, K. R.; Abbaschian, G. J.; Lewis, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    New Nb-base alloys are of interest for aerospace structural applications at high temperatures, viz, 800 to 1650 C. Fundamental information regarding the effects of rapid solidification in achieving greatly refined microstructures, extended solid solubility, suppression of embrittling equilibrium phases, and formation of new phases is desired in a number of Nb-X alloys. The microstructures and selected properties of Nb-Si and other Nb-base alloys are presented for materials both rapidly quenched from the equilibrium liquidus and rapidly solidified following deep supercooling. Electromagnetic levitation was used to achieve melting and supercooling in a containerless inert gas environment. A variety of solidification conditions were employed including splatting or drop casting of supercooled samples. The morphology and composition of phases formed are discussed in terms of both solidification history and bulk composition.

  11. Modeling of the primary rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik Tahir, Abdul; Malik, Amer; Amberg, Gustav

    2016-10-01

    The dimensional variations during the rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering could have a detrimental effect on the dimensional tolerances of the sintered product. A numerical approach to model the liquid phase penetration into interparticle boundaries and the accompanied dimensional variations during the primary rearrangement stage of liquid phase sintering is presented. The coupled system of the Cahn-Hilliard and the Navier-Stokes equations is used to model the penetration of the liquid phase, whereas the rearrangement of the solid particles due to capillary forces is modeled using the equilibrium equation for a linear elastic material. The simulations are performed using realistic physical properties of the phases involved and the effect of green density, wettability and amount of liquid phase is also incorporated in the model. In the first step, the kinetics of the liquid phase penetration and the rearrangement of solid particles connected by a liquid bridge is modeled. The predicted and the calculated (analytical) results are compared in order to validate the numerical model. The numerical model is then extended to simulate the dimensional changes during primary rearrangement stage and a qualitative match with the published experimental data is achieved.

  12. X-ray nano-diffraction study of Sr intermetallic phase during solidification of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Gorny, Anton; Shankar, Sumanth; Cai, Zhonghou

    2014-02-17

    The evolution of strontium (Sr) containing intermetallic phase in the eutectic reaction of Sr-modified Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy was studied with high energy synchrotron beam source for nano-diffraction experiments and x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping. Contrary to popular belief, Sr does not seem to interfere with the Twin Plane Re-entrant Edge (TPRE) growth mechanism of eutectic Si, but evolves as the Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Sr phase during the eutectic reaction at the boundary between the eutectic Si and Al grains.

  13. Solidification of hypermonotectic Al-In alloys under microgravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potard, C.

    1982-01-01

    Four samples of the Al-In system having monotectic and hypermonotectic compositions that were solidified under microgravity during the NASA-SPAR IX flight of January 20, 1981, are considered. The experimental thermal and physicochemical conditions that were actually achieved are analyzed. Radiographic and metallographic observations of the samples reveal a nonregular dispersed primary phase inside the monotectic matrix. These observations are discussed in relation to capillarity and solidification aspects. A key finding is the preservation of a certain degree of dispersion of the indium primary phase. This result differs fundamentally from the results obtained under microgravity conditions on the same system and compositions (Gelles and Markworth, 1980; Alborn and Loehberg, 1979). The results are seen as clearly establishing that the space environment can be used to obtain dispersed structures from hypermonotectic alloys.

  14. Microsegregation during directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coriell, S. R.; Mcfadden, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    During the directional solidification of alloys, solute inhomogeneities transverse to the growth direction arise due to morphological instabilities (leading to cellular or dendritic growth) and/or due to convection in the melt. In the absence of convection, the conditions for the onset of morphological instability are given by the linear stability analysis of Mullins and Sekerka. For ordinary solidification rates, the predictions of linear stability analysis are similar to the constitutional supercooling criterion. However, at very rapid solidification rates, linear stability analysis predicts a vast increase in stabilization in comparison to constitutional supercooling.

  15. Solidification of Portland Cement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Solidification of materials is introduced, and the constitution and hydration of portland cement is reviewed. Microstructural zones are introduced...100, 171, and 384 days age. Similar micrographs for tricalcium silicate pastes and commercial portland cement pastes are shown and discussed. The...hardening of portland cement is discussed as a solidification process. The potential flaws and stress concentrators within the cement paste are identified and their effect on mechanical properties is discussed. (Author)

  16. Solidification process in melt spun Nd-Fe-B type magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changping

    1998-02-23

    A generalized solidification model has been developed based on a systematic investigation on the microstructure of melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Melt spinning was conducted on initial stoichiometric and TiC added Nd2Fe14B (2-14-1) compositions to produce under, optimally and over quenched microstructures. Microstructural characterization was carried out by TEM, SEM, Optical microscopy, XRD, DTA, VSM and DC SQUID techniques. By taking the dendritic breakup during recalescence into consideration, this generalized model has successfully explained the solidification process of the melt spun Nd-Fe-B alloys. Challenging the conventional homogeneous nucleation models, the new model explains the fine and uniform equiaxed 2-14-1 microstructure in optimally quenched ribbons as a result of the breakup of the 2-14-1 dendrites which nucleate heterogeneously from the wheel surface and grow dendritically across the ribbon thickness due to the recalescence. Besides this dendritic breakup feature, the under quenched microstructure is further featured with another growth front starting with the primary solidification of Fe phase near the free side, which results in a coarsely grained microstructure with Fe dendritic inclusions and overall variation in microstructure across the ribbon thickness. In addition, because a epitaxy exists between the Fe phase and the 2-14-1, the so-formed coarse 2-14-1 grains may be textured. C-axis texturing was observed in under quenched ribbons. As a constraint to solidification models in this system, the cause and characteristics of this phenomenon has been studied in detail to test the authors proposed model, and agreement has been found. An extension has also been made to understand the solidification process when TiC is added, which suggests that Ti and C slow down the growth front of both Fe and 2-14-1 phase.

  17. Liquid-phase microextraction by solidification of floating organic microdrop and GC-MS detection of trihalomethanes in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Hadi; Norouzi, Parviz; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza

    2009-01-01

    A simple and sensitive methodology based on liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) followed by GC-MS, was developed for the determination of trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water. A microdrop of organic solvent was floated on the surface of the aqueous sample and it was agitated for a desired time. Then, the sample vial was cooled by inserting it into an ice bath for 4 min. The solidified solvent was transferred into a suitable vial and immediately melted. The extract was directly injected into the GC. Microextraction efficiency factors were investigated and optimized: 7 muL 1-undecanol microdrop exposed for 15 min floated on the surface of a 10.0 mL aqueous sample with the temperature of 60 degrees C containing 3 M of NaCl and stirred at 750 rpm. Under the selected conditions, enrichment factors (EFs) up to 482-fold, LOD of 0.03-0.08 mug/L (S/N = 3) and dynamic linear ranges of 0.10-100 mug/L were obtained. A reasonable repeatability (RSD < 8.6%, n = 8) with satisfactory linearity (r(2) greater, not dbl equals 0.9947) of results illustrated a good performance of the present method. The protocol proved to be rapid, cost-effective, and is a green procedure for the screening purposes.

  18. Liquid-Phase Separation in the Interdendritic Region After Growth of Primary β-Sn in Undercooled Sn-2.8Ag-0.3Cu Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Yoshiko; Esaka, Hisao; Shinozuka, Kei

    2012-08-01

    An unusual microstructure consisting of both Sn-Ag3Sn and Sn-Cu6Sn5 binary eutectic structures is observed in actual solder balls. In this study, the solidification process of the Sn-Ag3Sn binary eutectic structure after the growth of primary β-Sn in an undercooled Sn-2.8Ag-0.3Cu alloy was investigated by using thermal analysis and interruption tests to understand the formation of the unusual microstructure. First, fine Ag-enriched liquid zones formed around β-Sn after the growth of primary β-Sn. The Ag-enriched zones then gradually enlarged with the accumulation of Ag from the remnant liquid with a decrease in temperature. This indicated that the liquid-phase separation occurred in the remnant liquid after the nucleation of β-Sn. Eventually, when the temperature of the specimen decreased to approximately the binary eutectic temperature, eutectic Ag3Sn nucleated in the Ag-enriched zones. From interruption tests, we determined the precursor of the Sn-Ag3Sn binary eutectic structure before the beginning of Sn-Ag3Sn binary eutectic solidification. This finding corresponds to the precursor of the Sn-Cu6Sn5 binary eutectic structure observed in the Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu alloy.

  19. Grain Refining and Microstructural Modification during Solidification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    and 100 ml of distilled water (called etchant A) for 5 to 15 seconds. The others were etched with aqua regia (called etchant B) for 10 to 25 seconds... reverse lide It noceoav. aid IduntIty by block um-bet) Grain refining, microstructure, solidification, phase diagrams, electromagnetic stirring, Cu-Fe

  20. Flight Planning for the International Space Station - Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification (LODESTARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, Merton C.; Matson, Douglas M.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2003-01-01

    During rapid solidification, a molten sample is cooled below its equilibrium solidification temperature to form a metastable liquid. Once nucleation is initiated, growth of the solid phase proceeds and can be seen as a sudden rise in temperature. The heat of fusion is rejected ahead of the growing dendrites into the undercooled liquid in a process known as recalescence. Fe-Cr-Ni alloys may form several equilibrium phases and the hypoeutectic alloys, with compositions near the commercially important 316 stainless steel alloy, are observed to solidify by way of a two-step process known as double recalescence. During double recalescence, the first temperature rise is associated with formation of the metastable ferritic solid phase with subsequent conversion to the stable austenitic phase during the second temperature rise. Selection of which phase grows into the undercooled melt during primary solidification may be accomplished by choice of the appropriate nucleation trigger material or by control of the processing parameters during rapid solidification. Due to the highly reactive nature of the molten sample material and in order to avoid contamination of the undercooled melt, a containerless electromagnetic levitation (EML) processing technique is used. In ground-based EML, the same forces that support the weight of the sample against gravity also drive convection in the liquid sample. However, in microgravity, the force required to position the sample is greatly reduced, so convection may be controlled over a wide range of internal flows. Space Shuttle experiments have shown that the double recalescence behavior of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys changes between ground and space EML experiments. This program is aimed at understanding how melt convection influences phase selection and the evolution of rapid solidification microstructures.

  1. Melt Flow Control in the Directional Solidification of Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabaras, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    Our main project objectives are to develop computational techniques based on inverse problem theory that can be used to design directional solidification processes that lead to desired temperature gradient and growth conditions at the freezing front at various levels of gravity. It is known that control of these conditions plays a significant role in the selection of the form and scale of the obtained solidification microstructures. Emphasis is given on the control of the effects of various melt flow mechanisms on the local to the solidification front conditions. The thermal boundary conditions (furnace design) as well as the magnitude and direction of an externally applied magnetic field are the main design variables. We will highlight computational design models for sharp front solidification models and briefly discuss work in progress toward the development of design techniques for multi-phase volume-averaging based solidification models.

  2. Clinical efficacy of 2-phase versus 4-phase computed tomography for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Adriana G.; Shada, Amber L.; Martin, Allison N.; Raghavan, Prashant; Durst, Christopher R.; Mukherjee, Sugoto; Gaughen, John R.; Ornan, David A.; Hanks, John B.; Smith, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Four-dimensional computed tomography is being used increasingly for localization of abnormal glands in primary hyperparathyroidism. We hypothesized that compared with traditional 4-phase imaging, 2-phase imaging would halve the radiation dose without compromising parathyroid localization and clinical outcomes. Methods A transition from 4-phase to 2-phase imaging was instituted between 2009 and 2010. A pre-post analysis was performed on patients undergoing operative treatment with a parathyroid protocol computed tomography, and relevant data were correlated with operative findings. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, technical success, and cure rates were calculated. The Fisher exact test or χ2 test assessed the significance of 2-phase and 4-phase imaging and operative findings. Results Twenty-seven patients had traditional four-dimensional computed tomography and 35 had modified 2-phase computed tomography. Effective radiation doses were 6.8 mSy for 2-phase and 14 mSv for 4-phase. Four-phase computed tomography had a sensitivity and positive predictive value of 93% and 96%, respectively. Two-phase computed tomography had a comparable sensitivity and positive predictive value of 97% and 94%, respectively. Eight patients with discordant imaging had an average parathyroid weight of 240 g compared with 1,300 g for all patients. Technical surgical success (90% for 4-phase computed tomography versus 91% 2-phase computed tomography) and normocalcemia rates at 6 months (88% for both) did not differ between computed tomography protocols. Computed tomography correctly predicted multiglandular disease and localization for reoperations in 88% and 90% of cases, respectively, with no difference by computed tomography protocol. Conclusion With regard to surgical outcomes and localization, 2-phase parathyroid computed tomography is equivalent to 4-phase for parathyroid localization, including small adenomas, reoperative cases, and multiglandular disease. Two-phase

  3. Solidification/Stabilization Resource Guide

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Solidification/Stabilization Resource Guide is intended to inform site cleanup managers of recently-published materials such as field reports and guidance documents that address issues relevant to solidification/stabilization technologies.

  4. Visualization of solidification front phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1993-01-01

    Directional solidification experiments have been utilized throughout the Materials Processing in Space Program to provide an experimental platform which minimizes variables in solidification experiments. Because of the wide-spread use of this experimental technique in space-based research, it has become apparent that a better understanding of all the phenomena occurring during solidification can be better understood if direct visualization of the solidification interface were possible.

  5. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1987-01-01

    An improved understanding of the phenomena of importance to directional solidification is attempted to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis is now on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection. A correlation is sought between heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneities using naphthalene doped with anthracene. The influence of spin-up/spin-down is determined on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide. The effect is determined of imposed melting - freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide. The mechanism behind the increase of grain size caused by using spin-up/spin-down in directional solidification of mercury cadimum telluride is sought.

  6. Models of Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmer, G. H.; Broughton, J. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Laser annealing studies provide much information on various consequences of rapid solidification, including the trapping of impurities in the crystal, the generation of vacancies and twins, and on the fundamental limits to the speed of the crystal-melt interface. Some results obtained by molecular dynamics methods of the solidification of a Lennard-Jones liquid are reviewed. An indication of the relationship of interface speed to undercooling for certain materials can be derived from this model. Ising model simulations of impurity trapping in silicon are compared with some of the laser annealing results. The consequences of interface segregation and atomic strain are discussed.

  7. Phase errors in gossamer membrane primary objective gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditto, Thomas D.; Ritter, Joseph M.

    2008-07-01

    A ribbon-shaped primary objective grating (POG) telescope lends itself to deployment in space, because it can be stowed for transport on a roll. Unlike mirrors which need to be segmented for sizes beyond the diameter of the fairing or payload bay, the ribbon is a continuous integral surface transported on a drum and unfurled during deployment. A flat POG membrane abandons a standard three dimensional figure requirement of mirrors and solves the problem of making primary objectives from tensile structures. Moreover, POG telescopes enjoy relaxed surface dimensional tolerances compared with mirrors. We have demonstrated mathematically and empirically that the tolerance for flatness relaxes as the receiving angle increases toward grazing exodus where the magnification of the POG is greatest. At the same time, the tolerance for phase error is worsened as the angle of reconstruction moves toward grazing exodus. The problem will be aggravated by the rigors of the space deployment environment. We give a mathematical treatment for the flatness and phase error. We mention engineering methods that could ameliorate the error.

  8. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Steinbach, I.; Karma, A.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during solidification of an assemblage of equiaxed dendritic crystals. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology (i.e., tip radii, branch spacings, etc.) and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of initial supercoolings and, thus, interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment thus extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and coworkers for steady growth of a single dendrite [Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment (IDGE), first flown on USMP-2] to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation more close to actual casting conditions. Corresponding earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will primarily be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  9. Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; Karma, A.; Steinbach, I.; deGroh, H. C., III

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the research is to quantitatively determine and understand the fundamental mechanisms that control the microstructural evolution during equiaxed dendritic solidification. A microgravity experiment will be conducted to obtain benchmark data on the transient growth and interaction of up to four equiaxed crystals of a pure and transparent metal analog (succinonitrile, SCN) under strictly diffusion-dominated conditions. Of interest in the experiment are the transient evolution of the primary and secondary dendrite tip speeds, the dendrite morphology and solid fraction, the tip selection criterion, and the temperature field in the melt for a range of interaction "strengths" between the crystals. The experiment extends the microgravity measurements of Glicksman and co-workers isothermal dendritic growth experiment (IDGE) for steady growth of a single dendrite to a case where growth transients are introduced due to thermal interactions between neighboring dendrites - a situation closer to actual casting conditions. Corresponding Earth-based experiments will be conducted to ascertain the influence of melt convection. The experiments are supported by a variety of analytical models and numerical simulations. The data will be used to develop and test theories of transient dendritic growth and the solidification of multiple interacting equiaxed crystals in a supercooled melt.

  10. Dispersive solid-phase extraction followed by vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic droplet for the determination of benzoylurea insecticides in soil and sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Lu, Ying; Zhong, Zhihui; Liu, Hanyang; Pan, Weiliang; Zhou, Guangming; Chen, Junhua

    2016-04-01

    A novel dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet was developed for the determination of eight benzoylurea insecticides in soil and sewage sludge samples before high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The analytes were first extracted from the soil and sludge samples into acetone under optimized pretreatment conditions. Clean-up of the extract was conducted by dispersive solid-phase extraction using activated carbon as the sorbent. The vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet procedure was performed by using 1-undecanol with lower density than water as the extraction solvent, and the acetone contained in the solution also acted as dispersive solvent. Under the optimum conditions, the linearity of the method was in the range 2-500 ng/g with correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9993-0.9999. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.08-0.56 ng/g. The relative standard deviations varied from 2.16 to 6.26% (n = 5). The enrichment factors ranged from 104 to 118. The extraction recoveries ranged from 81.05 to 97.82% for all of the analytes. The good performance has demonstrated that the proposed methodology has a strong potential for application in the multiresidue analysis of complex matrices.

  11. Kinetics of fiber solidification

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, C.; Lucas, A.; Derré, A.; Zakri, C.; Moisan, S.; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  12. Solidification microstructures: A conceptual approach

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.; Kurz, W.

    1994-01-01

    Detailed theoretical models have been developed in the literature to correlate microstructural characteristics as a function of processing parameters. These results are examined with a broad perspective to show that various laws for microstructural transitions and microstructural spacings can be represented in terms of three simple characteristic lengths of the important physical processes. Initially, the important physical processes of solute and thermal transport and capillarity effect are considered, and they are related to the microstructural lengths such as dendrite tip radius, primary and secondary spacing, and eutectic spacing. It is shown that these microstructural lengths are simply given by the geometric mean of the characteristic lengths of physical processes that are important in a given problem. New characteristic lengths that become important under rapid solidification are then developed, and how these characteristic lengths influence microstructural transition and microstructural scales is also discussed.

  13. Directional solidification studies in Ni-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Je-hyun

    1993-05-01

    Three solid phases are involved in the phase equilibria of the intermetallic compound Ni{sub 3}Al near its melting point, {beta}, {gamma}{prime}(Ni{sub 3}Al), and {gamma}. The generally-accepted phase diagram involves a eutectic reaction between {beta}{prime} and {gamma}, but some recent studies agree with an older diagram due to Schramm, which has a eutectic reaction between the {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases. The phase equilibria near Ni{sub 3}Al compositions was evaluated using quenched directional solidification experiments, that preserve the microstructures tonned at the solidification front, and using diffusion couple experiments. These experiments show that eutectic forms between {beta} and {gamma}{prime} phases, as in the Schramm diagram. Growth and phase transformations of these three phases are also studied in the directional solidification experiments. Microstructure analysis shows that etching of Ni{sub 3}Al({gamma}{prime}) is very sensitive to small composition variations and crystallographic orientation changes. The eutectic solidification study confirms that the equilibrium eutectic is {gamma}{prime}+{beta}, and that the metastable {gamma}+{beta} eutectic might be also produced in this system according to the impurities, solidification rates, and composition variations.

  14. Modelling directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, William R.

    1990-01-01

    The long range goal is to develop an improved understanding of phenomena of importance to directional solidification, to enable explanation and prediction of differences in behavior between solidification on Earth and in space. Emphasis during the period of this grant was on experimentally determining the influence of convection and freezing rate fluctuations on compositional homogeneity and crystalline perfection in the vertical Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. Heater temperature profiles, buoyancy-driven convection, and doping inhomogeneties were correlated using naphthalene doped with azulene. In addition the influence of spin-up/spin-down on compositional homogeneity and microstructure of indium gallium antimonide and the effect of imposed melting-freezing cycles on indium gallium antimonide are discussed.

  15. Solidification of undercooled metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Shiohara, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the subject of undercooling (i.e., supercooling) in the case of metal alloys, taking into account the effects of undercooling on microstructure and microsegregation in alloys which solidify in a crystalline manner. Techniques for obtaining a large degree of undercooling are discussed. These techniques make it possible to eliminate heterogeneous nucleants from the melt and to remove container nucleation effects. The nucleation behavior of small metal droplets is considered along with the formation of a dispersion of fine droplets in a suitable inert medium, the mixing of fine metal powders with glass powder, and the levitation melting technique. Attention is given to solidification with rapid interface velocity, aspects of dendritic morphology, and thermal measurements during solidification of undercooled droplets.

  16. Nuclear waste solidification

    DOEpatents

    Bjorklund, William J.

    1977-01-01

    High level liquid waste solidification is achieved on a continuous basis by atomizing the liquid waste and introducing the atomized liquid waste into a reaction chamber including a fluidized, heated inert bed to effect calcination of the atomized waste and removal of the calcined waste by overflow removal and by attrition and elutriation from the reaction chamber, and feeding additional inert bed particles to the fluidized bed to maintain the inert bed composition.

  17. Influence of Al content on non-equilibrium solidification behavior of Ni-Al-Ta model single crystal alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Cheng; Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Heng; Zhao, Xinbao; Pei, Yanling; Li, Shusuo; Gong, Shengkai

    2016-01-01

    The non-equilibrium solidification behaviors of five Ni-Al-Ta ternary model single crystal alloys with different Al contents were investigated by experimental analysis and theoretical calculation (by JMatPro) in this study. These model alloys respectively represented the γ' phase with various volume fractions (100%, 75%, 50%, 25% and 0%) at 900 °C. It was found that with decreasing Al content, liquidus temperature of experimental alloys first decreased and then increased. Meanwhile, the solidification range showed a continued downward trend. In addition, with decreasing Al content, the primary phases of non-equilibrium solidified model alloys gradually transformed from γ' phase to γ phase, and the area fraction of which first decreased and then increased. Moreover, the interdendritic/intercellular precipitation of model alloys changed from β phase (for 100% γ') to (γ+γ')Eutectic (for 75% γ'), (γ+γ')Eutectic+γ' (for 50% γ' and 25% γ') and none interdendritic precipitation (for 0% γ'), and the last stage non-equilibrium solidification sequence of model alloys was determined by the nominal Al content and different microsegregation behaviors of Al element.

  18. Microstructural Development during Directional Solidification of Peritectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the microstructures produced through solidification in peritectic systems has yet to be achieved, even though a large number of industrially and scientifically significant materials are in this class. One type of microstructure frequently observed during directional solidification consists of alternating layers of primary solid and peritectic solid oriented perpendicular to the growth direction. This layer formation is usually reported for alloy compositions within the two-phase region of the peritectic isotherm and for temperature gradient and growth rate conditions that result in a planar solid-liquid interface. Layered growth in peritectic alloys has not previously been characterized on a quantitative basis, nor has a mechanism for its formation been verified. The mechanisms that have been proposed for layer formation can be categorized as either extrinsic or intrinsic to the alloy system. The extrinsic mechanisms rely on externally induced perturbations to the system for layer formation, such as temperature oscillations, growth velocity variations, or vibrations. The intrinsic mechanisms approach layer formation as an alternative type of two phase growth that is inherent for certain peritectic systems and solidification conditions. Convective mixing of the liquid is an additional variable which can strongly influence the development and appearance of layers due to the requisite slow growth rate. The first quantitative description of layer formation is a model recently developed by Trivedi based on the intrinsic mechanism of cyclic accumulation and depiction of solute in the liquid ahead of the interface, linked to repeated nucleation events in the absence of convection. The objective of this research is to characterize the layered microstructures developed during ground-based experiments in which external influences have been minimized as much as possible and to compare these results to the current the model. Also, the differences

  19. MPS Solidification Model. Volume 2: Operating guide and software documentation for the unsteady model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of solidification Model 2 is described and documentation of the software associated with the model is provided. Model 2 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of unsteady horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The solidification program allows interactive modification of calculation parameters as well as selection of graphical and tabular output. In batch mode, parameter values are input in card image form and output consists of printed tables of solidification functions. The operational aspects of Model 2 that differ substantially from Model 1 are described. The global flow diagrams and data structures of Model 2 are included. The primary program documentation is the code itself.

  20. Understanding the solidification and microstructure evolution during CSC-MIG welding of Fe–Cr–B-based alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sorour, A.A. Chromik, R.R. Gauvin, R. Jung, I.-H. Brochu, M.

    2013-12-15

    The present is a study of the solidification and microstructure of Fe–28.2%Cr–3.8%B–1.5%Si–1.5%Mn (wt.%) alloy deposited onto a 1020 plain carbon steel substrate using the controlled short-circuit metal inert gas welding process. The as-solidified alloy was a metal matrix composite with a hypereutectic microstructure. Thermodynamic calculation based on the Scheil–Gulliver model showed that a primary (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase formed first during solidification, followed by an eutectic formation of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase and a body-centered cubic Fe-based solid solution matrix, which contained Cr, Mn and Si. Microstructure analysis confirmed the formation of these phases and showed that the shape of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase was irregular plate. As the welding heat input increased, the weld dilution increased and thus the volume fraction of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates decreased while other microstructural characteristics were similar. - Highlights: • We deposit Fe–Cr–B-based alloy onto plain carbon steel using the CSC-MIG process. • We model the solidification behavior using thermodynamic calculation. • As deposited alloy consists of (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates embedded in Fe-based matrix. • We study the effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure.

  1. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  2. Undercooling of materials during solidification in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. I.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical research program was undertaken on the under cooling and solidification of materials under variable external field conditions. A catalog of theories and models of nucleation of solid phases in the melt is provided, as is a discussion of the relation of undercooling to intermolecular potentials, the dependence of growth rate on undercooling, the influence of undercooling on liquid-solid interface stability and solid structure, the direct effects of external fields on melts, the relation of solid physical properties to structure and the role of nucleants in solidification. Results of the theoretical analysis of several experiments related to the space processing applications program are given, and recommendations for future experiments and further theoretical developments along with procedures for correlation of theory and experiment are specified.

  3. Transport Phenomena During Equiaxed Solidification of Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckermann, C.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1997-01-01

    Recent progress in modeling of transport phenomena during dendritic alloy solidification is reviewed. Starting from the basic theorems of volume averaging, a general multiphase modeling framework is outlined. This framework allows for the incorporation of a variety of microscale phenomena in the macroscopic transport equations. For the case of diffusion dominated solidification, a simplified set of model equations is examined in detail and validated through comparisons with numerous experimental data for both columnar and equiaxed dendritic growth. This provides a critical assessment of the various model assumptions. Models that include melt flow and solid phase transport are also discussed, although their validation is still at an early stage. Several numerical results are presented that illustrate some of the profound effects of convective transport on the final compositional and structural characteristics of a solidified part. Important issues that deserve continuing attention are identified.

  4. Cellular solidification in a monotectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile-glycerol, SN-G, transparent organic monotectic alloy is studied with particular attention to cellular growth. The phase diagram is determined, near the monotectic composition, with greater accuracy than previous studies. A solidification interface stability diagram is determined for planar growth. The planar-to-cellular transition is compared to predictions from the Burton, Primm, Schlichter theory. A new technique to determine the solute segregation by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is developed. Proposed models that involve the cellular interface for alignment of monotectic second-phase spheres or rods are compared with observations.

  5. Effect of Ce melt treatment on solidification path of ZA8 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudheer, R.; Vijeesh, V.; Prabhu, K. N.

    2016-03-01

    The solidification path of ZA8 alloy with Ce addition was characterized using Newtonian technique of thermal analysis. The solidification events were determined using cooling curve and its first derivative curve. The microstructure and chemical composition of various phases in the alloy were studied using EDS, SEM and XRD techniques. It was found that the addition of Ce did not cause formation of new phases. However, it hinders the nucleation of stable β dendrites in the alloy. The presence of Ce promotes the eutectoid phase transformation and increases the hardness of the alloy. Latent heat of solidification and heat of eutectoid transformation were found to increase on Ce addition. The upward solidification of the alloy against Cu chill was analysed. Chilling had significant influence on solidification parameters, and caused refinement of the microstructure. The addition of Ce to the melt had no effect during chill casting of the alloy.

  6. Low Melt Height Solidification of Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montakhab, Mehdi; Bacak, Mert; Balikci, Ercan

    2016-06-01

    Effect of a reduced melt height in the directional solidification of a superalloy has been investigated by two methods: vertical Bridgman (VB) and vertical Bridgman with a submerged baffle (VBSB). The latter is a relatively new technique and provides a reduced melt height ahead of the solidifying interface. A low melt height leads to a larger primary dendrite arm spacing but a lower mushy length, melt-back transition length, and porosity. The VBSB technique yields up to 38 pct reduction in the porosity. This may improve a component's mechanical strength especially in a creep-fatigue type dynamic loading.

  7. 30 CFR 250.916 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... design phase? 250.916 Section 250.916 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Structures Platform Verification Program § 250.916 What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase... design phase include the following: Type of facility . . . The CVA must . . . (1) For fixed platforms...

  8. Stabilization/Solidification Remediation Method for Contaminated Soil: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Azmi, M. A. M.; Nabila, A. T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) is typically a process that involves a mixing of waste with binders to reduce the volume of contaminant leachability by means of physical and chemical characteristics to convert waste in the environment that goes to landfill or others possibly channels. Stabilization is attempts to reduce the solubility or chemical reactivity of the waste by changing the physical and chemical properties. While, solidification attempt to convert the waste into easily handled solids with low hazardous level. These two processes are often discussed together since they have a similar purpose of improvement than containment of potential pollutants in treated wastes. The primary objective of this review is to investigate the materials used as a binder in Stabilization/Solidification (S/S) method as well as the ability of these binders to remediate the contaminated soils especially by heavy metals.

  9. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  10. Novel Directional Solidification of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.

    2000-01-01

    There are many metal alloy systems that separate into two different liquids upon cooling from a higher temperature. Uniform microstructural development during solidification of these immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of an initial modeling effort will also be presented.

  11. Overview of the Tusas Code for Simulation of Dendritic Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Trainer, Amelia J.; Newman, Christopher Kyle; Francois, Marianne M.

    2016-01-07

    The aim of this project is to conduct a parametric investigation into the modeling of two dimensional dendrite solidification, using the phase field model. Specifically, we use the Tusas code, which is for coupled heat and phase-field simulation of dendritic solidification. Dendritic solidification, which may occur in the presence of an unstable solidification interface, results in treelike microstructures that often grow perpendicular to the rest of the growth front. The interface may become unstable if the enthalpy of the solid material is less than that of the liquid material, or if the solute is less soluble in solid than it is in liquid, potentially causing a partition [1]. A key motivation behind this research is that a broadened understanding of phase-field formulation and microstructural developments can be utilized for macroscopic simulations of phase change. This may be directly implemented as a part of the Telluride project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), through which a computational additive manufacturing simulation tool is being developed, ultimately to become part of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program within the U.S. Department of Energy [2].

  12. Predicting weld solidification cracking using damage mechanics -- LDRD summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.; Krafcik, J.S.; Yang, N.Y.C.

    1997-04-01

    This report summarizes the efforts to develop and validate a finite element based model to predict weld solidification cracking behavior. Such a model must capture the solidification behavior, the thermal behavior in the weld pool region, the material mechanical response, and some failure criteria to determine when solidification cracking will occur. For such a program to be successful, each aspect of the model had to be accurately modeled and verified since the output of one portion of the model served as the input to other portions of the model. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was developed and used in both the thermal and mechanical finite element analysis. High magnification video techniques were developed to measure strains for validation of the mechanical predictions using a strain rate and temperature dependent constitutive model. This model was coupled with a ductile void growth damage model and correlated with experimental observations to determine capabilities of predicting cracking response. A two phase (solid + liquid) material model was also developed that can be used to more accurately capture the mechanics of weld solidification cracking. In general, reasonable agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment for location of crack initiation and extent of cracking for 6061-T6 aluminum. 35 refs.

  13. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending.

  14. Continuities and Discontinuities in Economic and Industrial Understanding between the Primary and Secondary Phases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Michael; Jephcote, Martin

    1993-01-01

    The (British) National Curriculum Council emphasizes the importance of cross-phase curriculum continuity when students pass from primary to secondary learning stages. This article summarizes results of a survey examining how primary-secondary school liaisons handled one cross-curricular theme--economic and industrial understanding--across years…

  15. A mixture of massive and feathery microstructures of Ti48Al2Cr2Nb alloy by high undercooled solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Hu, Rui Kou, Hongchao; Zhang, Tiebang; Wang, Jun; Li, Jinshan

    2015-02-15

    A mixture of massive and feathery microstructures was observed in Ti48Al2Cr2Nb alloy subjected to the undercooled solidification rather than the heat treatments in most cases. Double recalescence events and primary β solidification confirmed that massive γ phase did not directly nucleate from the undercooled melt but formed during the solid-state transformations. It is believed that small white areas (aluminium-poor) along lamellar grain boundaries may be closely related to the formation of massive γ phase and feathery γ phase. High dislocation density and stacking faults were detected in massive γ phase by transmission electron microscopy. The high energy of defects and undercooling in the solid state phase transformation can provide sufficiently high driving force for the nucleation of massive γ phase. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • A mixture of massive and feathery microstructures was observed. • Massive γ formed during the solid-state transformations. • Defects and undercooling provide driving force for the nucleation of massive γ.

  16. Numerical simulation of freckle formation in directional solidification of binary alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Felicelli, Sergio D.; Heinrich, Juan C.; Poirier, David R.

    1992-01-01

    A mathematical model of solidification is presented which simulates the formation of segregation models known as 'freckles' during directional solidification of binary alloys. The growth of the two-phase or dendritic zone is calculated by solving the coupled equations of momentum, energy, and solute transport, as well as maintaining the thermodynamic constraints dictated by the phase diagram of the alloy. Calculations for lead-tin alloys show that the thermosolutal convection in the dendritic zone during solidification can produce heavily localized inhomogeneities in the composition of the final alloy.

  17. Solidification analysis of a centrifugal atomizer using the Al-32.7wt.% Cu alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Matthew G.

    1998-02-23

    A centrifugal atomizer (spinning disk variety) was designed and constructed for the production of spherical metal powders, 100-1,000 microns in diameter in an inert atmosphere. Initial atomization experiments revealed the need for a better understanding of how the liquid metal was atomized and how the liquid droplets solidified. To investigate particle atomization, Ag was atomized in air and the process recorded on high-speed film. To investigate particle solidification, Al-32.7 wt.% Cu was atomized under inert atmosphere and the subsequent particles were examined microscopically to determine solidification structure and rate. This dissertation details the experimental procedures used in producing the Al-Cu eutectic alloy particles, examination of the particle microstructures, and determination of the solidification characteristics (e.g., solidification rate) of various phases. Finally, correlations are proposed between the operation of the centrifugal atomizer and the observed solidification spacings.

  18. Speciation of As(III) and As(V) in water samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after solid phase extraction combined with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Fattahi, Nazir; Assadi, Yaghoub; Sadeghi, Marzieh; Sharafi, Kiomars

    2014-12-01

    A solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic drop (DLLME-SFO) method, using diethyldithiphosphate (DDTP) as a proper chelating agent, has been developed as an ultra preconcentration technique for the determination of inorganic arsenic in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Variables affecting the performance of both steps were thoroughly investigated. Under optimized conditions, 100mL of As(ΙΙΙ) solution was first concentrated using a solid phase sorbent. The extract was collected in 2.0 mL of acetone and 60.0 µL of 1-undecanol was added into the collecting solvent. The mixture was then injected rapidly into 5.0 mL of pure water for further DLLME-SFO. Total inorganic As(III, V) was extracted similarly after reduction of As(V) to As(III) with potassium iodide and sodium thiosulfate and As(V) concentration was calculated by difference. A mixture of Pd(NO3)2 and Mg(NO3)2 was used as a chemical modifier in GFAAS. The analytical characteristics of the method were determined. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 10-100 ng L(-1) with detection limit of 2.5 ng L(-1). Repeatability (intra-day) and reproducibility (inter-day) of method based on seven replicate measurements of 80 ng L(-1) of As(ΙΙΙ) were 6.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The method was successfully applied to speciation of As(III), As(V) and determination of the total amount of As in water samples and in a certified reference material (NIST RSM 1643e).

  19. The melting and solidification of nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florio, B. J.; Myers, T. G.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the melting of nanowires. The first section of the paper deals with a standard theoretical situation, where the wire melts due to a fixed boundary temperature. This analysis allows us to compare with existing results for the phase change of nanospheres. The equivalent solidification problem is also examined. This shows that solidification is a faster process than melting; this is because the energy transfer occurs primarily through the solid rather than the liquid which is a poorer conductor of heat. This effect competes with the energy required to create new solid surface which acts to slow down the process, but overall conduction dominates. In the second section, we consider a more physically realistic boundary condition, where the phase change occurs due to a heat flux from surrounding material. This removes the singularity in initial melt velocity predicted in previous models of nanoparticle melting. It is shown that even with the highest possible flux the melting time is significantly slower than with a fixed boundary temperature condition.

  20. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked to experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.

  1. Atomistic to continuum modeling of solidification microstructures

    DOE PAGES

    Karma, Alain; Tourret, Damien

    2015-09-26

    We summarize recent advances in modeling of solidification microstructures using computational methods that bridge atomistic to continuum scales. We first discuss progress in atomistic modeling of equilibrium and non-equilibrium solid–liquid interface properties influencing microstructure formation, as well as interface coalescence phenomena influencing the late stages of solidification. The latter is relevant in the context of hot tearing reviewed in the article by M. Rappaz in this issue. We then discuss progress to model microstructures on a continuum scale using phase-field methods. We focus on selected examples in which modeling of 3D cellular and dendritic microstructures has been directly linked tomore » experimental observations. Finally, we discuss a recently introduced coarse-grained dendritic needle network approach to simulate the formation of well-developed dendritic microstructures. The approach reliably bridges the well-separated scales traditionally simulated by phase-field and grain structure models, hence opening new avenues for quantitative modeling of complex intra- and inter-grain dynamical interactions on a grain scale.« less

  2. Rapid solidification of metallic particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, N. J.

    1982-01-01

    In order to maximize the heat transfer coefficient the most important variable in rapid solidification is the powder particle size. The finer the particle size, the higher the solidification rate. Efforts to decrease the particle size diameter offer the greatest payoff in attained quench rate. The velocity of the liquid droplet in the atmosphere is the second most important variable. Unfortunately the choices of gas atmospheres are sharply limited both because of conductivity and cost. Nitrogen and argon stand out as the preferred gases, nitrogen where reactions are unimportant and argon where reaction with nitrogen may be important. In gas atomization, helium offers up to an order of magnitude increase in solidification rate over argon and nitrogen. By contrast, atomization in vacuum drops the quench rate several orders of magnitude.

  3. Model transport directional solidification apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.T.; Eshelman, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    A model transport directional solidification apparatus is described. It has three functional components, each of which are described: the temperature gradient stage, the motor and drive mechanism, and the measuring systems. A small amount of sample is held between two glass slides on the temperature gradient stage so that the portion of sample in the hot chamber is molten and the portion in the cold chamber is solidified. Conditions are set so that the solid-liquid interface occurs in the gap between the chambers and can be observed through the microscope system. In-situ directional solidification is observed by driving the sample from the hot chamber to the cold chamber and observing the solidification process as it occurs. (LEW)

  4. Rapid Solidification of Magnetic Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalonji, G.; Deguire, M. R.

    1985-01-01

    The enhanced control over microstructural evolution inherent in rapid solidification processing techniques are exploited to create novel ceramic magnetic materials. The great sensitivity of magnetic properties to local structure provides a powerful probe both for the study of structure and of microscopic solidification mechanisms. The first system studied is the SrO-Fe2O3 binary, which contains the commercially important hard magnetic compound strontium hexaferrite. The products were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, Mossbauer spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and differential thermal analysis. As-quenched ribbons contain high concentrations of super-paramagnetic particles, 80 to 250 Angstroms in diameter, in a glassy matrix. This suggests the possibility of crystallizing monodomain strontium hexaferrite during subsequent heat treatment, with a resulting increase in coercivity over conventionally processed ferrite magnets. That magnetic properties can be controlled in solidification processing by varying the quench rate is demonstrated.

  5. Numerical study of dendritic growth during solidification using front-tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaafar, Mohamad Ali; Gibout, Stéphane; Rousse, Daniel; Bédécarrats, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-01

    A two dimensional front-tracking method is developed in order to model dendritic growth during solidification processes of pure substances. The method uses a sequential set of moving marker points to describe and track the liquid-solid interface which evolves over a fixed background mesh describing the whole medium. The code behaviour is first checked by a simple stable case of solidification to provide homogeneous velocity at the interface. Then, test examples of unstable solidification cases considering different modes of anisotropy are performed. Finally, interface evolution, with primary and secondary branches, is described, showing the ability of the code to study realistic dendritic growth characteristics.

  6. Flight Planning for the International Space Station-Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Matson, D. M.; Loser, W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper is an overview of the status and science for the LODESTARS (Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification) research project. The program is aimed at understanding how melt convection influences phase selection and the evolution of rapid solidification microstructures.

  7. Approximate Calculation of Voltage in Three-Phase Primary Distribution Feeder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iioka, Daisuke; Iwata, Kubou; Kondo, Hisashi; Sakaguchi, Takuma; Shigetou, Takaya; Matsumura, Toshiro

    An approximate method to calculate voltage in three-phase primary distribution feeder has been proposed. Generally, nonlinear simultaneous equations have been solved to calculate the voltage in power system since the dependence of electrical equipment on voltage is represented by exponential model such as constant power load, constant current load and constant impedance load. The nonlinear simultaneous equations were transformed to linear simultaneous equations by the proposed method. As a result, the proposed method can calculate the voltage without convergence calculations. It was found that the approximate value of voltage in the three-phase primary distribution feeder is in good agreement with the exact value.

  8. Interactions Between Solidification and Compositional Convection in Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, S. H.; Worster, M. G.; Chiareli, A. O. P.; Anderson, D. M.; Schultze, T. P.

    1998-01-01

    This project combined theoretical and experimental ground-based studies of the interactions between convection and solidification of binary melts. Particular attention was focused on the alteration of the composition and microstructure of castings caused by convective flows through the interstices of mushy layers. Two different mechanisms causing convection were investigated. (i) Compositional, buoyancy driven convection is known to cause chimneys and freckles in directionally cast alloys on Earth. The analytical studies provide quantitative criteria for the formation of chimneys that can be used to assess the expediency of producing alloys in Space. (ii) Flow of the melt is also driven by the contraction (expansion) that typically occurs during change of phase. Such convection will occur even in the absence of gravity, and may indeed be the primary cause of macrosegregation during the production of alloys in Space. The studies will employed asymptotic methods in order to determine conditions for the stability of various states of solidifying systems. Further, simple macroscopic models of complete systems were developed and solved. These analytical studies were augmented by laboratory experiments using aqueous solutions, in which the convective flows could be easily observed and the effects of convection could be readily measured. These y experiments guided the development of the theoretical models and provided data against which the predictions of the models can be tested.

  9. Modeling transport phenomena and uncertainty quantification in solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, Kyle S.

    Direct chill (DC) casting is the primary processing route for wrought aluminum alloys. This semicontinuous process consists of primary cooling as the metal is pulled through a water cooled mold followed by secondary cooling with a water jet spray and free falling water. To gain insight into this complex solidification process, a fully transient model of DC casting was developed to predict the transport phenomena of aluminum alloys for various conditions. This model is capable of solving mixture mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation equations during multicomponent solidification. Various DC casting process parameters were examined for their effect on transport phenomena predictions in an alloy of commercial interest (aluminum alloy 7050). The practice of placing a wiper to divert cooling water from the ingot surface was studied and the results showed that placement closer to the mold causes remelting at the surface and increases susceptibility to bleed outs. Numerical models of metal alloy solidification, like the one previously mentioned, are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. However, uncertainty in model inputs cause uncertainty in results and those insights. The analysis of model assumptions and probable input variability on the level of uncertainty in model predictions has not been calculated in solidification modeling as yet. As a step towards understanding the effect of uncertain inputs on solidification modeling, uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis were first performed on a transient solidification model of a simple binary alloy (Al-4.5wt.%Cu) in a rectangular cavity with both columnar and equiaxed solid growth models. This analysis was followed by quantifying the uncertainty in predictions from the recently developed transient DC casting model. The PRISM Uncertainty Quantification (PUQ) framework quantified the uncertainty and sensitivity in macrosegregation, solidification

  10. Three-dimensional solidification and melting using magnetic field control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.; Ahuja, Vineet

    1993-01-01

    A new two-fluid mathematical model for fully three dimensional steady solidification under the influence of an arbitrary acceleration vector and with or without an arbitrary externally applied steady magnetic field have been formulated and integrated numerically. The model includes Joule heating and allows for separate temperature dependent physical properties within the melt and the solid. Latent heat of phase change during melting/solidification was incorporated using an enthalpy method. Mushy region was automatically captured by varying viscosity orders of magnitude between liquidus and solidus temperature. Computational results were obtained for silicon melt solidification in a parallelepiped container cooled from above and from a side. The results confirm that the magnetic field has a profound influence on the solidifying melt flow field thus changing convective heat transfer through the boundaries and the amount and shape of the solid accrued. This suggests that development of a quick-response algorithm for active control of three dimensional solidification is feasible since it would require low strength magnetic fields.

  11. Teachers' Beliefs on Foreign Language Teaching Practices in Early Phases of Primary Education: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caner, Mustafa; Subasi, Gonca; Kara, Selma

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether teacher beliefs would play a role in their actual practices while teaching target language in early phases of primary education, principally, in kindergarten and first grades in a state school. As it is a very broad research area, the researchers exclusively analyzed teaching practices and teaching…

  12. 30 CFR 250.916 - What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the CVA's primary duties during the design phase? 250.916 Section 250.916 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION... data; (iv) Load determinations; (v) Stress analyses; (vi) Material designations; (vii) Soil...

  13. Simulation of weld solidification microstructure and its coupling to the macroscopic heat and fluid flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlyk, Vitaliy; Dilthey, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    The microstructure exerts a strong influence on the mechanical properties and on the integrity of welded joints. Prediction of the formation of the microstructure during welding and of other solidification processes may be an important and supporting factor for technology optimization. Nowadays, increasing computing power allows direct simulations of the dendritic and cell morphology of columnar grains in the molten zone for specific temperature conditions. Modelling is carried out, on the one hand, with the finite difference—cellular automata and, on the other hand, with the phase field method. Determination of the solidification conditions during fusion welding (temperature gradient, local solidification rate, weld pool shape) is carried out with a numerical macroscopic finite element modelling calculation of the weld pool fluid flow and of the temperature distribution, as presented in this paper. As with the use of accurate physical models, the simulations are carried out with a spatial resolution of the microstructure, and many assumptions and restrictions from traditional, analytical or phenomenological models may be eliminated. The possibilities of using numerical algorithms for generation and visualization of microstructure formation during solidification are demonstrated. The spectrum of applications extends from welding and casting to processes with rapid solidification. In particular, computer simulations of the solidification conditions and the formation of a dendritic morphology during the directional solidification in gas-tungsten-arc welding are described. Moreover, the simulation results are compared with the experimental findings.

  14. Structures Self-Assembled Through Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2005-01-01

    Nanotechnology has created a demand for new fabrication methods with an emphasis on simple, low-cost techniques. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) is an unconventional approach in comparison to low-temperature biomimetic approaches. A technical challenge for DSE is producing microstructural architectures on the nanometer scale. In both processes, the driving force is the minimization of Gibb's free energy. Selfassembly by biomimetic approaches depends on weak interaction forces between organic molecules to define the architectural structure. The architectural structure for solidification depends on strong chemical bonding between atoms. Constituents partition into atomic-level arrangements at the liquid-solid interface to form polyphase structures, and this atomic-level arrangement at the liquid-solid interface is controlled by atomic diffusion and total undercooling due to composition (diffusion), kinetics, and curvature of the boundary phases. Judicious selection of the materials system and control of the total undercooling are the keys to producing structures on the nanometer scale. The silicon-titanium silicide (Si-TiSi2) eutectic forms a rod structure under isothermal cooling conditions. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, directional solidification was employed along with a thermal gradient to promote uniform rods oriented with the thermal gradient. The preceding photomicrograph shows the typical transverse microstructure of a solidified Si-TiSi2 eutectic composition. The dark and light gray regions are Si and TiSi2, respectively. Preferred rod orientation along the thermal gradient was poor. The ordered TiSi2 rods have a narrow distribution in diameter of 2 to 3 m, as shown. The rod diameter showed a weak dependence on process conditions. Anisotropic etch behavior between different phases provides the opportunity to fabricate structures with high aspect ratios. The photomicrographs show the resulting microstructure after a wet chemical etch and a

  15. Nucleation and solidification in static arrays of monodisperse drops.

    PubMed

    Edd, Jon F; Humphry, Katherine J; Irimia, Daniel; Weitz, David A; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-07-07

    The precise measurement of nucleation and non-equilibrium solidification are vital to fields as diverse as atmospheric science, food processing, cryopreservation and metallurgy. The emulsion technique, where the phase under study is partitioned into many droplets suspended within an immiscible continuous phase, is a powerful method for uncovering rates of nucleation and dynamics of phase changes as it isolates nucleation events to single droplets. However, averaging the behavior of many drops in a bulk emulsion leads to the loss of any drop-specific information, and drop polydispersity clouds the analysis. Here we adapt a microfluidic technique for trapping monodisperse drops in planar arrays to characterize solidification of highly supercooled aqueous solutions of glycerol. This system measured rates of nucleation between 10(-5) and 10(-2) pL(-1) s(-1), yielded an ice-water interfacial energy of 33.4 mJ m(-2) between -38 and -35 degrees C, and enabled the specific dynamics of solidification to be observed for over a hundred drops in parallel without any loss of specificity. In addition to the physical insights gained, the ability to observe the time and temperature of nucleation and subsequent growth of the solid phase in static arrays of uniform drops provides a powerful tool to discover thermodynamic protocols that generate desirable crystal structures.

  16. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1973-01-01

    Two types of melt segregation effects were studied: (1) evaporative segregation, or segregation due to surface evaporation; and (2) freezing segregation, or segregation due to liquid-solid phase transformation. These segregation effects are closely related. In fact, evaporative segregation always precedes freezing segregation to some degree and must often be studied prior to performing meaningful solidification experiments. This is particularly true since evaporation may cause the melt composition, at least at the critical surface regions or layers to be affected manyfold within seconds so that the surface region or layer melting point and other thermophysical properties, nucleation characteristics, base for undercooling, and critical velocity to avoid constitutional supercooling, may be completely unexpected. An important objective was, therefore, to develop the necessary normal evaporation equations for predicting the compositional changes within specified times at temperature and to correlate these equations with actual experimental data collected from the literature.

  17. An analytical model for solute redistribution during solidification of planar, columnar, or equiaxed morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M. . Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Existing models for solute redistribution (microsegregation) during solidification were reviewed. There are no analytical models that take into account limited diffusion in both the liquid and the solid phases. A new analytical mathematical model for solute redistribution was developed. Diffusion in liquid and in solid was considered. This model does not require a prescribed movement of the interface. It can be used for one-dimensional (1-D) (plate), two-dimensional (cylinder), or three-dimensional (3-D) (sphere) calculations. Thus, it is possible to calculate microsegregation at the level of primary or secondary arm spacing for columnar dendrites or for equiaxed dendrites. The solution was compared with calculations based on existing models, as well as with some available experimental data for the segregation of base elements in as cast Al-4.9 wt pct Cu, INCONEL 718, 625, and plain carbon (0.13 wt pct C) steel.

  18. Cellular monotectic model solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile (sn) was purified to a superior level using a fractional recrystallization method. The melting point of the best twice recrystallized sn was not raised by following with double distillation. This was tested using differential scanning calorimetry. The peak shape on melting also proved that double distillation after double recrystallization did not improve the quality. Stability and phase diagrams for succinonitrile and glycerol are presented.

  19. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  20. Directional Solidification of Nodular Cast Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Hendrix, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Cerium enhances formation of graphite nodules. Preliminary experiments in directional solidification of cast iron shows quantitative correlation of graphite microstructure with growth rate and thermal gradient, with sufficient spheroidizing element to form spheroidal graphite under proper thermal conditions. Experimental approach enables use of directional solidification to study solidification of spheriodal-graphite cast iron in low gravity. Possible to form new structural materials from nodular cast iron.

  1. Modeling fluid interactions with the rigid mush in alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotkowski, Alexander J.

    Macrosegregation is a casting defect characterized by long range composition differences on the length scale of the ingot. These variations in local composition can lead to the development of unwanted phases that are detrimental to mechanical properties. Unlike microsegregation, in which compositions vary over the length scale of the dendrite arms, macrosegregation cannot be removed by subsequent heat treatment, and so it is critical to understand its development during solidification processing. Due to the complex nature of the governing physical phenomena, many researchers have turned to numerical simulations for these predictions, but properly modeling alloy solidification presents a variety of challenges. Among these is the appropriate treatment of the interface between the bulk fluid and the rigid mushy zone. In this region, the non-linear and coupled behavior of heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solute transport, and alloy thermodynamics has a dramatic effect on macrosegregation predictions. This work investigates the impact of numerical approximations at this interface in the context of a mixture model for alloy solidification. First, the numerical prediction of freckles in columnar solidification is investigated, and the predictive ability of the model is evaluated. The model is then extended to equiaxed solidification, in which the analogous interface is the transition of free-floating solid particles to a rigid dendritic network. Various models for grain attachment are investigated, and found to produce significant artifacts caused by the discrete nature of their implementation on the numerical grid. To reduce the impact of these artifacts, a new continuum grain attachment model is proposed and evaluated. The differences between these models are compared using uncertainty quantification, and recommendations for future research are presented.

  2. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    SciTech Connect

    Meco, Halim

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  3. Impact of Metal Droplets: A Numerical Approach to Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldeweij, Robin; Mandamparambil, Rajesh; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-11-01

    Layer-wise deposition of material to produce complex products is a subject of increasing technological relevance. Subsequent deposition of droplets is one of the possible 3d printing technologies to accomplish this. The shape of the solidified droplet is crucial for product quality. We employ the volume-of-fluid method (in the form of the open-source code Gerris) to study liquid metal (in particular tin) droplet impact. Heat transfer has been implemented based on the enthalpy approach for the liquid-solid phase. Solidification is modeled by adding a sink term to the momentum equations, reducing Navier-Stokes to Darcy's law for high solid fraction. Good agreement is found when validating the results against experimental data. We then map out a phase diagram in which we distinguish between solidification behavior based on Weber and Stefan number. In an intermediate impact regime impact, solidification due to a retracting phase occurs. In this regime the maximum spreading diameter almost exclusively depends on Weber number. Droplet shape oscillations lead to a broad variation of the morphology of the solidified droplet and determine the final droplet height. TNO.

  4. Fluid mechanics of directional solidification at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. F.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the proposed research is to provide additional groundbased support for the flight experiment 'Casting and Solidification Technology' (CAST). This experiment is to be performed in the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1) scheduled to be flown on a space shuttle mission scheduled for 1992. In particular, we will provide data on the convective motion and freckle formation during directional solidification of NH4Cl from its aqueous solution at simulated parameter ranges equivalent to reducing the gravity from the sea-level value down to 0.1 g or lower. The secondary objectives of the proposed research are to examine the stability phenomena associated with the onset of freckles and the mechanisms for their subsequent growth and decline (to eventual demise of some) by state-of-the-art imaging techniques and to formulate mathematical models for the prediction of the observed phenomena.

  5. Flight Planning for the International Space Station-Levitation Observation of Dendrite Evolution in Steel Ternary Alloy Rapid Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Matson, D. M.; Loser, W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The paper is an overview of the status and science for the LODESTARS research project. The program is aimed at understanding how melt convection influences phase selection and the evolution of rapid solidification microstructures

  6. Laboratory micro- and nanoscale X-ray tomographic investigation of Al–7 at.%Cu solidification structures

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, B.M. Henderson, K.C.; Gibbs, P.J.; Imhoff, S.D.; Clarke, A.J.

    2014-09-15

    X-ray computed tomography across multiple length scales provides an opportunity to non-destructively visualize and quantify the micro- to nano-scale microstructural features of solidification structures in three dimensions. Aluminum–7 at.%copper samples were directionally solidified at three cooling rates (0.44, 0.67, and 1.33 °C/s), resulting in systematic changes in the as-solidified microstructure, which are difficult to quantify using traditional microscopic techniques. The cooling rate of a material affects its ultimate microstructure, and characterizing that microstructure is key to predicting and understanding its bulk properties. Here, two different laboratory X-ray computed tomography instruments were used to characterize as-solidified microstructures, including micro-scale computed tomography with approximately 1 mm field-of-view, ∼ 1.7 μm resolution, and nano-scale X-ray computed tomography ∼ 65 μm FOV, 150 nm resolution. Micro-scale X-ray radiography and computed tomography enabled a quantitative investigation of changes in the primary dendritic solidification structure with increasing cooling rate. Nano-scale absorption contrast X-ray computed tomography resolved the distinct phases of the lamellar eutectic structure and three dimensional measurements of the ∼ 1 μm interlamellar spacing. It is found that the lamella eutectic structure thickness is inversely proportional to the cooling rate. Nano-scale Zernike phase contrast was also used to image voids at eutectic colony boundaries. The application and resolution of these two instruments are discussed with respect to the resolvable features of the solidification structures. - Highlights: • Al–Cu eutectic is a model system for studying solidification microstructure. • X-ray computed tomography provides a 3D picture of these complex structures. • Micro-scale tomography images the primary and secondary dendritic structures. • Nano-scale tomography images the eutectic lamella and

  7. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  8. Recent advances, trends and new perspectives via enthalpy-based finite element formulations for applications to solidification problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Namburu, Raju R.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper describes recent advances and trends in finite element developments and applications for solidification problems. In particular, in comparison to traditional methods of approach, new enthalpy-based architectures based on a generalized trapezoidal family of representations are presented which provide different perspectives, physical interpretation and solution architectures for effective numerical simulation of phase change processes encountered in solidification problems. Various numerical test models are presented and the results support the proposition for employing such formulations for general phase change applications.

  9. Crustal fingering: solidification on a moving interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Jimenez-Martinez, Joaquin; Porter, Mark; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Viscous fingering-the hydrodynamic instability that takes place when a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid-is a well known phenomenon. Motivated by the formation of gas hydrates in seafloor sediments and during the ascent of gas bubbles through ocean water, here we study the interplay of immiscible viscous fingering with solidification of the evolving unstable interface. We present experimental observations of the dynamics of a bubble of Xenon in a water-filled and pressurized Hele-Shaw cell. The evolution is controlled by two processes: (1) the formation of a hydrate "crust" around the bubble, and (2) viscous fingering from bubble expansion. To reproduce the experimental observations, we propose a phase-field model that describes the nucleation and thickening of a porous solid shell on a moving gas-liquid interface. We design the free energy of the three-phase system (gas-liquid-hydrate) to rigorously account for interfacial effects, mutual solubility, and phase transformations (hydrate formation and disappearance). We introduce a pseudo-plasticity model with large variations in viscosity to describe the plate-like rheology of the hydrate shell. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model, which illustrate the emergence of complex "crustal fingering" patterns as a result of gas fingering dynamics modulated by hydrate growth at the interface.

  10. Microstructure Evolution and Rapid Solidification Behavior of Blended Nickel-Based Superalloy Powders Fabricated by Laser Powder Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Y.; Gauvin, R.; Brochu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Laser powder deposition was performed on a substrate of Inconel 738 using blended powders of Mar M247 and Amdry DF3 with a ratio of 4:1 for repairing purposes. In the as-deposited condition, continuous secondary phases composed of γ-Ni3B eutectics and discrete (Cr, W)B borides were observed in inter-dendritic regions, and time-dependent nucleation simulation results confirmed that (Cr, W)B was the primary secondary phase formed during rapid solidification. Supersaturated solid solution of B was detected in the γ solid solution dendritic cores. The Kurz-Giovanola-Trivedi model was performed to predict the interfacial morphology and correlate the solidification front velocity (SFV) with dendrite tip radius. It was observed from high-resolution scanning electron microscopy that the dendrite tip radius of the upper region was in the range of 15 to 30 nm, which yielded a SFV of approx 30 cm/s. The continuous growth model for solute trapping behavior developed by Aziz and Kaplan was used to determine that the effective partition coefficient of B was approximately 0.025. Finally, the feasibility of the modeling results were rationalized with the Clyne-Kurz segregation simulation of B, where Clyne-Kurz prediction using a partition coefficient of 0.025 was in good agreement with the electron probe microanalysis results.

  11. Study on solidification of immisible alloys (M-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamio, Akihiko

    1993-01-01

    Alloying of immiscible alloys under microgravity is of interest in metallurgical processes. Several experiments investigating the alloying of immiscible alloys, such as Al-In, Al-Bi, Zn-Bi, and Zn-Pb, were done in space. Homogeneous distribution of small L2 particles in the matrix, such as an emulsion structure, was expected in the space-solidifed alloys. However, the alloys demonstrated an extremely segregated structure. To date insufficient information was obtained to explain these unexpected results. Our experiment was proposed to clarify the solidification manner of immiscible alloys and to obtain fundamental information concerning structural control of the alloys. In space, density differences between the two liquids separated in immiscible regions can be neglected, so that no sedimentation of L(sub 2) phase will take place. When the growth of the alloys is interrupted and this status is frozen by an adequate rapid cooling procedure, it will provide much information concerning decomposing homogeneous liquid and the interaction between the monotectic growth front morphology and the distribution of L(sub 2) phase. It is anticipated that the results will be useful for elucidating the monotectic solidification manner and it will be instructive to explain the segregated structures obtained in the past space experiments.

  12. Methadone induction in primary care (ANRS-Methaville): a phase III randomized intervention trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In France, the rapid scale-up of buprenorphine, an opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), in primary care for drug users has led to an impressive reduction in HIV prevalence among injecting drug users (IDU) but has had no major effect on Hepatitis C incidence. To date, patients willing to start methadone can only do so in a methadone clinic (a medical centre for drug and alcohol dependence (CSAPA) or a hospital setting) and are referred to primary care physicians after dose stabilization. This study aims to assess the effectiveness of methadone in patients who initiated treatment in primary care compared with those who initiated it in a CSAPA, by measuring abstinence from street opioid use after one year of treatment. Methods/Design The ANRS-Methaville study is a randomized multicenter non-inferiority control trial comparing methadone induction (lasting approximately 2 weeks) in primary care and in CSAPA. The model of care chosen for methadone induction in primary care was based on study-specific pre-training of all physicians, exclusion criteria and daily supervision of methadone during the initiation phase. Between January 2009 and January 2011, 10 sites each having one CSAPA and several primary care physicians, were identified to recruit patients to be randomized into two groups, one starting methadone in primary care (n = 147), the other in CSAPA (n = 48). The primary outcome of the study is the proportion of participants abstinent from street opioids after 1 year of treatment i.e. non-inferiority of primary care model in terms of the proportion of patients not using street opioids compared with the proportion observed in those starting methadone in a CSAPA. Discussion The ANRS-Methaville study is the first in France to use an interventional trial to improve access to OMT for drug users. Once the non-inferiority results become available, the Ministry of Health and agency for the safety of health products may change the the New Drug Application

  13. Optimal design of solidification processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Tortorelli, Daniel A.

    1991-01-01

    An optimal design algorithm is presented for the analysis of general solidification processes, and is demonstrated for the growth of GaAs crystals in a Bridgman furnace. The system is optimal in the sense that the prespecified temperature distribution in the solidifying materials is obtained to maximize product quality. The optimization uses traditional numerical programming techniques which require the evaluation of cost and constraint functions and their sensitivities. The finite element method is incorporated to analyze the crystal solidification problem, evaluate the cost and constraint functions, and compute the sensitivities. These techniques are demonstrated in the crystal growth application by determining an optimal furnace wall temperature distribution to obtain the desired temperature profile in the crystal, and hence to maximize the crystal's quality. Several numerical optimization algorithms are studied to determine the proper convergence criteria, effective 1-D search strategies, appropriate forms of the cost and constraint functions, etc. In particular, we incorporate the conjugate gradient and quasi-Newton methods for unconstrained problems. The efficiency and effectiveness of each algorithm is presented in the example problem.

  14. Solidification and solid state transformations of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-05-01

    The microstructure of austenitic stainless steel welds can contain a large variety of ferrite morphologies. It was originally thought that many of these morphologies were direct products of solidification. Subsequently, detailed work on castings suggested the structures can solidify either as ferrite or austenite. However, when solidification occurs by ferrite, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite during cooling via a diffusion controlled transformation. It was also shown by Arata et al that welds in a 304L alloy solidified 70-80% as primary ferrite, a large fraction of which also transformed to austenite upon cooling. More recently it was suggested that the cooling rates in welds were sufficiently high that diffusionless transformations were responsible for several commonly observed ferrite morphologies. However, other workers have suggested that even in welds, delta ..-->.. ..gamma.. transformations are diffusion controlled. A variety of ferrite morphologies have more recently been characterized by Moisio and coworkers and by David. The purpose of this paper is to provide further understanding of the evaluation of the various weld microstructures which are related to both the solidification behavior and the subsequent solid state transformations. To accomplish this, both TEM and STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy) techniques were employed.

  15. MELTING, SOLIDIFICATION, REMELTING, AND SEPARATION OF GLASS AND METAL

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. A basic knowledge of the thermal, transport, and metallurgical phenomena that occur in the melting and solidification of glass, metal, and their mixtures is the foundation of the development of the separation methods. In association with this project, an innovative liquid-liquid extractor/separator will be developed to meet the separation needs for efficient extraction/separation devices for the various DOE liquid waste treatment processes.

  16. Solidification along the interface between demixed liquids in monotectic systems.

    PubMed

    Hüter, C; Boussinot, G; Brener, E A; Temkin, D E

    2011-05-01

    The steady-state solidification along the liquid-liquid interface in the monotectic system is discussed. A boundary-integral formulation describing the diffusion in the two liquid phases is given and the corresponding equations for the three interfaces (two solid-liquid interfaces and one liquid-liquid interface) are solved. Scaling relations are extracted from the results and supported by analytic arguments in the limit of small deviation from the monotectic temperature. We present also a complementary phase-field simulation, which proves the stability of the process.

  17. Shifts of Gamma Phase across Primary Visual Cortical Sites Reflect Dynamic Stimulus-Modulated Information Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Besserve, Michel; Lowe, Scott C.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Panzeri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Distributed neural processing likely entails the capability of networks to reconfigure dynamically the directionality and strength of their functional connections. Yet, the neural mechanisms that may allow such dynamic routing of the information flow are not yet fully understood. We investigated the role of gamma band (50–80 Hz) oscillations in transient modulations of communication among neural populations by using measures of direction-specific causal information transfer. We found that the local phase of gamma-band rhythmic activity exerted a stimulus-modulated and spatially-asymmetric directed effect on the firing rate of spatially separated populations within the primary visual cortex. The relationships between gamma phases at different sites (phase shifts) could be described as a stimulus-modulated gamma-band wave propagating along the spatial directions with the largest information transfer. We observed transient stimulus-related changes in the spatial configuration of phases (compatible with changes in direction of gamma wave propagation) accompanied by a relative increase of the amount of information flowing along the instantaneous direction of the gamma wave. These effects were specific to the gamma-band and suggest that the time-varying relationships between gamma phases at different locations mark, and possibly causally mediate, the dynamic reconfiguration of functional connections. PMID:26394205

  18. Solidification of gold nanoparticles in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Arcidiacono, S; Walther, J H; Poulikakos, D; Passerone, D; Koumoutsakos, P

    2005-03-18

    The structure and the solidification of gold nanoparticles in a carbon nanotube are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations indicate that the predicted solidification temperature of the enclosed particle is lower than its bulk counterpart, but higher than that observed for clusters placed in vacuum. A comparison with a phenomenological model indicates that, in the considered range of tube radii (R(CNT)) of 0.5 < R(CNT) < 1.6 nm, the solidification temperature depends mainly on the length of the particle with a minor dependence on R(CNT).

  19. Dynamic stability of detached solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    A dynamic stability analysis model is developed for meniscus-defined crystal growth processes. The Young-Laplace equation is used to analyze the response of a growing crystal to perturbations to its radius and a thermal transport model is used to analyze the effect of perturbations on the evolution of the crystal-melt interface. A linearized differential equation is used to analyze radius perturbations but a linear integro-differential equation is required for the height perturbations. The stability model is applied to detached solidification under zero-gravity and terrestrial conditions. A numerical analysis is supplemented with an approximate analytical analysis, valid in the limit of small Bond numbers. For terrestrial conditions, a singularity is found to exist in the capillary stability coefficients where, at a critical value of the pressure differential across the meniscus, there is a transition from stability to instability. For the zero-gravity condition, exact formulas for the capillary stability coefficients are derived.

  20. Shear stabilization of solidification fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Stephen H.; Schulze, T. P.

    1994-01-01

    A linear-stability analysis is performed on the interface formed during the directional solidification of a dilute binary alloy in the presence of a time-periodic flow. In general, the flow is generated by the elliptical motion of the crystal parallel to the interface. The presence of the flow can either stabilize or destabilize the system relative to the case without flow with the result depending on the frequency and amplitude of the oscillations as well as the properties of the material. In the particular, we find that the morphological instability present in the absence of flow can be entirely suppressed with respect to disturbances of the same frequency as the oscillation.

  1. Onset of the initial instability during the solidification of welding pool of aluminum alloy under transient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjian; Dong, Zhibo; Wei, Yanhong; Song, Kuijing

    2014-09-01

    Onset of initial morphological instability is predicted by using a new analytic model and quantitative phase field model during the solidification of the welding pool of Al-Cu alloy under transient conditions. In the linear growth stage of the welding pool, the dynamic evolution of the interface instability is analyzed, and the interface behaviors under infinitesimal fluctuations are also investigated. The results show that the mean wavelength at the crossover time evaluated from this analytic model is in good agreement with those obtained by the quantitative phase field simulations and the experiments. The linear growth stage takes up quite a long time of the whole solidification of welding pool and thus it should be primarily considered in investigating the transient growth of welding pool. This study establishes a valid numerical framework for studying the dendrite growth under transient solidification conditions and provides a new approach for studying the transient solidification of welding pool.

  2. Pediatric phase I trial design using maximum target inhibition as the primary endpoint.

    PubMed

    Meany, Holly; Balis, Frank M; Aikin, Alberta; Whitcomb, Patricia; Murphy, Robert F; Steinberg, Seth M; Widemann, Brigitte C; Fox, Elizabeth

    2010-06-16

    The extent to which a drug inhibits a target responsible for a therapeutic effect is a more rational primary endpoint for dose-finding studies of more selective anticancer drugs than the conventional endpoint of dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) used for cytotoxic agents. An adaptive phase I trial design incorporating maximum target inhibition as the primary endpoint was developed to define the optimal dose of talabostat, a dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) inhibitor, in children with relapsed or refractory solid tumors. The relationship between dose and effect (percent inhibition of serum DPP-4) was assessed using a maximum effect model. Maximum target inhibition was defined as greater than 90% DPP-4 inhibition in five or more of six patients 24 hours post-dose. If DLT was to occur, the trial would adapt to a traditional phase I design with a more conservative dose escalation. At the 600 microg/m(2) dose level, serum DPP-4 inhibition at 24 hours was 85%. No talabostat-related DLT occurred. The maximum effect model predicted that 1200 microg/m(2) of talabostat would maximally inhibit DPP-4. This adaptive trial design appears to be feasible, safe, and efficient and warrants further evaluation for development of molecularly targeted agents.

  3. Solidification/Stabilization Use at Superfund Sites

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To provide interested stakeholders such as project managers, technology service providers, consulting engineers, site owners, and the general public with the most recent information about solidification/stabilization applications at Superfund sites...

  4. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-01-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components. PMID:26553246

  5. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numericalmore » modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.« less

  6. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; DebRoy, T.

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Furthermore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  7. A Citizen's Guide to Solidification and Stabilization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide describes how solidification and stabilization refer to a group of cleanup methods that prevent or slow the release of harmful chemicals from wastes, such as contaminated soil, sediment, and sludge.

  8. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wei, H L; Mazumder, J; DebRoy, T

    2015-11-10

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  9. Evolution of solidification texture during additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, H. L.; Mazumder, J.; Debroy, T.

    2015-11-01

    Striking differences in the solidification textures of a nickel based alloy owing to changes in laser scanning pattern during additive manufacturing are examined based on theory and experimental data. Understanding and controlling texture are important because it affects mechanical and chemical properties. Solidification texture depends on the local heat flow directions and competitive grain growth in one of the six <100> preferred growth directions in face centered cubic alloys. Therefore, the heat flow directions are examined for various laser beam scanning patterns based on numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in three dimensions. Here we show that numerical modeling can not only provide a deeper understanding of the solidification growth patterns during the additive manufacturing, it also serves as a basis for customizing solidification textures which are important for properties and performance of components.

  10. Microstructure of ceramics fabricated by unidirectional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kokubo, T.

    1984-01-01

    The unidirectional solidification methods are zone melting, crystal pulling, Bridgemen, and slow cooling. In order to obtain excellent properties (such as transparency), pores, voids and cracks must be avoided, and elimination of such defects is described.

  11. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN - SOLIDIFICATION/ STABILIZATION PROCESS, SOLIDTECH, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Soliditech solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous waste materials in soils or sludges with pozzolanic material (cement, fly ash, or kiln dust), a proprietary additive called Urrichem, other proprietary additives, and water. The process is designed to aid ...

  12. Directional solidification of white cast iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. S.; Verhoeven, J. D.

    1996-08-01

    Several studies of the ledeburite eutectic (Fe-Fe3C), in pure Fe-C alloys have shown that it has a lamellar morphology under plane front growth conditions. The structure of ledeburite in white cast irons, Fe-C-Si, consists of a rod morphology. It is generally not possible to produce plane front growth of Fe-C-Si eutectic alloys in the Fe-Fe3C form, because at the slow growth rates required for plane front growth, the Fe3C phase is replaced by graphite. By using small additions of Te, the growth of graphite was suppressed, and the plane front growth of the ledeburite eutectic in Fe-C-Si alloys was carried out with Si levels up to 1 wt pct. It was found that the growth morphology became a faceted rod morphology at 1 wt pct Si, but in contrast to the usual rod morphology of white cast irons, the rod phase was Fe3C rather than iron. It was shown that the usual rod morphology only forms at the sides of the two-phase cellular or dendritic growth fronts in Fe-C-Si alloys. Possible reasons for the inability of plane front directional solidification to produce the usual rod morphology in Fe-C-Si alloys are discussed. Also, data are presented on the spacing of the lamellar eutectic in pure Fe-C ledeburite, which indicates that this system does not follow the usual λ2 V = constant relation of regular eutectics.

  13. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.; Gershinsky, M.

    1974-01-01

    The generalized problem of determining the temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation was mathematically formulated. Realistic initial and boundary conditions were defined, and a computer program was developed and checked out. The programs computes the positions of two moving boundaries, evaporation and solidification, and their velocities. Temperature and solute concentration profiles in the semiinfinite material body at selected instances of time are also computed.

  14. Solidification fronts in supercooled liquids: how rapid fronts can lead to disordered glassy solids.

    PubMed

    Archer, A J; Robbins, M J; Thiele, U; Knobloch, E

    2012-09-01

    We determine the speed of a crystallization (or, more generally, a solidification) front as it advances into the uniform liquid phase after the system has been quenched into the crystalline region of the phase diagram. We calculate the front speed by assuming a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) model for the system and applying a marginal stability criterion. Our results also apply to phase field crystal (PFC) models of solidification. As the solidification front advances into the unstable liquid phase, the density profile behind the advancing front develops density modulations and the wavelength of these modulations is a dynamically chosen quantity. For shallow quenches, the selected wavelength is precisely that of the crystalline phase and so well-ordered crystalline states are formed. However, when the system is deeply quenched, we find that this wavelength can be quite different from that of the crystal, so the solidification front naturally generates disorder in the system. Significant rearrangement and aging must subsequently occur for the system to form the regular well-ordered crystal that corresponds to the free energy minimum. Additional disorder is introduced whenever a front develops from random initial conditions. We illustrate these findings with simulation results obtained using the PFC model.

  15. Dual-phase 99mTc-MIBI imaging findings in sporadic primary hyperplasia of parathyroid glands.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Sheng; Wang, Chang-Yin; Wang, Bi-Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Primary hyperplasia of parathyroid is uncommon and rarely documented in literatures. We report an 18-year-old female patient with hyperparathyroidism due to unifocal primary hyperplasia of parathyroid glands. Dual-phase Tc-MIBI imaging was performed for this patient. We found remarkably increased MIBI uptake in the hyperplastic lesion in early imaging and no extinction of the uptake in delayed imaging. These results suggest that the dual-phase Tc-MIBI imaging is useful in localizing the hyperfunctioning lesions of primary hyperplasia of parathyroid glands.

  16. PREFACE: Third International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes (ICASP - 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Gerhard; Ratke, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    The 3rd International Conference on Advances in Solidification Processes was held in the Rolduc Abbey in the Netherlands a few kilometres away from Aachen. Around 200 scientists from 24 countries come in for the four day meeting. They found a stimulating but also relaxing environment and atmosphere, with beautiful weather and the medieval abbey inviting for walks, discussions, sitting outside and drinking a beer or wine. The contributions given at the conference reflected recent advances in various topics of solidification processes, ranging from fundamental aspects to applied casting technologies. In 20 oral sessions and a large poster session innovative results of segregation phenomena, microstructure evolution, nucleation and growth, phase formation, polyphase solidification, rapid solidification and welding, casting technology, thermophysics of molten alloys, solidification with forced melt flow and growth of single crystals and superalloys together with innovative diagnostic techniques were presented. Thereby, findings from experiments as well as from numerical modeling on different lengths scales were jointly discussed and contribute to new insight in solidification behaviour. The papers presented in this open access proceedings cover about half the oral and poster presentations given. They were carefully reviewed as in classical peer reviewed journals by two independent referees and most of them were revised and thus improved according to the reviewers comments. We think that this collection of papers presented at ICASP-3 gives an impression of the excellent contributions made. The papers embrace both the basic and applied aspects of solidification. We especially wish to express our appreciation for the team around Georg Schmitz and Margret Nienhaus organising this event and giving us their valued advice and support at every stage in preparing the conference. We also thank Lokasenna Lektorat for taking the task of checking all language-associated issues and

  17. XRMON-SOL: Isothermal equiaxed solidification of a grain refined Al-20 wt%Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Houltz, Y.; Li, J.; Lockowandt, C.; Henriksson, K.; Zimmermann, G.; Melville, N.; Browne, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A novel isothermal solidification furnace (XRMON-SOL) has been developed for operation under terrestrial and microgravity conditions, using aluminium-based alloys, in conjunction with real-time in situ X-radiography. The furnace is scheduled to fly on board the MASER 13 Sounding Rocket with a view to investigating isothermal equiaxed solidification under microgravity conditions. The present work provides details of the furnace design as well as detailed analysis of pre-flight terrestrial solidification experiments investigating nucleation and growth characteristics of a thin sample of grain refined Al-20 wt%Cu alloy isothermally solidified at a constant cooling rate of -0.05 K/s. Measurements of nucleation density, nucleation undercooling, grain orientation, grain envelope evolution, primary tip growth velocities, and equiaxed grain interactions are provided. Although the effects of gravity were minimised by choice of sample orientation, we show that such effects can only be eliminated in a microgravity environment.

  18. The use of fluidized bed combustor ash in the solidification of high oil and grease sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.G.; Stine, E.F. Jr.

    1996-10-01

    A multi-part treatability study was conducted to identify lower cost solidification reagents for the solidification of oily sediments from several storm sewer impoundment ponds. The information from the treatability study was successfully applied to full-scale remediation. Several reagents were investigated including Portland cement, Class C fly ash, lime, cement kiln dust, and fluidized bed combustor ash. Screening tests were performed using single reagents and blended mixes of reagents. Testing included strength development, permeability, oil retention and volume increase due to treatment. The applicability of using the fluidized bed combustor ash was tested in a full scale field pilot study prior to full scale remediation. This paper will present background and experimental data from this study showing the successful substitution of fluidized bed combustor ash for cement as a primary solidification reagent.

  19. Combined effect of non-equilibrium solidification and thermal annealing on microstructure evolution and hardness behavior of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. Z.; Yang, W.; Chen, S. H.; Yu, H.; Xu, Z. F.

    2014-06-01

    Non-equilibrium solidification of commercial AZ91 magnesium alloy was performed by copper mold spray-casting technique and the thermal stability property of as-formed meta-stable microstructure was investigated by subsequent annealing at different temperatures and times. Remarkable grain refinement appears with increasing cooling rate during solidification process, which is accompanied by a visible cellular/dendrite transition for the grain morphology of primary phase. Moreover, the non-equilibrium solidified alloy exhibits obvious precipitation hardening effect upon annealing at 200 °C, and the precipitation mode of β-Mg17Al12 phase changes from discontinuous to continuous with extending isothermal time from 4 h to 16 h, which generates an increase of resultant micro-hardness value. After solid solution treatment at the elevated temperature of 420 °C, the volume fraction of β-Mg17Al12 phase decreases and a notable grain growth phenomenon occurs, which give rise to a reduction of hardness in comparison with that of as-quenched alloy.

  20. Effect of directional solidification on the structure and properties of Ni3Al-based alloy single crystals alloyed with W, Mo, Cr, and REM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarova, K. B.; Drozdov, A. A.; Bondarenko, Yu. A.; Bazyleva, O. A.; Bulakhtina, M. A.; Morozov, A. E.; Antonova, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of the solidification gradient ( G = 60 and 150°C/cm) at a solidification rate R = 10 mm/min on the structural parameters and the short- and long-term strength characteristics of blade-type single-crystal workpieces made of a heterophase γ' + γ VKNA-1V-type γ'(Ni3Al)-based alloy with low contents of refractory metals is studied. The single crystals have a cellular-dendritic structure: dendrites are heterophase and consist of thin discontinuous nickel-based γ solid solution layers between γ'(Ni3Al)-matrix regions. Primary γ'-phase precipitates are located in the interdendritic space. An increase in solidification gradient G from 60 to 150°C/cm (by a factor of 2.5) at a solidification rate R = 10 mm/min leads to a decrease in the dendrite arm spacing by ˜1.5 times, the size of primary γ'-phase precipitates by 2.5-3 times, and the refinement of γ' regions between γ layers in dendrite arms and at the periphery of dendrites by 2-3 times. The strength characteristics of the single crystals grown at G = 150°C/cm are higher than those of the single crystals grown at G = 60°C/cm by 10%. An increase in gradient G weakly affects the long-term strength of the single crystals. During long-term high-temperature tests under loading, secondary disperse γsec' particles precipitate in the discontinuous γ solid solution layers forming inclusions in two-phase γ' + γ dendrites, and the morphology of the γ layers changes (they become thicker and shorter). The <111> VKNA-1V alloy single crystals grown at G = 150°C/cm and R = 10 mm/min have a set of the required properties, namely, a high high-temperature strength over the entire temperature range, moderate high-temperature plasticity, and the absence of the plasticity drop at 800°C (which is characteristic of single crystals with other crystallographic orientations). These properties make <111> VKNA-1V alloy single crystals promising for working and nozzle gas turbine engine blades, including the blades in

  1. Fundamental Studies of Solidification in Microgravity Using Real-Time X-Ray Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu; Bhat, Biliyar N.

    1999-01-01

    This research applies a state of the art X-ray Transmission Microscope, XTM, to image (with resolutions up to 3 micrometers) the solidification of metallic or semiconductor alloys in real-time. We have successfully imaged in real-time: interfacial morphologies, phase growth, coalescence, incorporation of phases into the growing interface, and the solute boundary layer in the liquid at the solid-liquid interface. We have also measured true local growth rates and can evaluate segregation structures in the solid; a form of in-situ metallography. During this study, the growth of secondary phase fibers and lamellae from eutectic and monotectic alloys have been imaged during solidification, in real-time, for the first time in bulk metal alloys. Current high resolution X-ray sources and high contrast X-ray detectors have advanced to allow systematic study of solidification dynamics and the resulting microstructure. We have employed a state-of-the-art sub-micron source with acceleration voltages of 10-100 kV to image solidification of metals. One useful strength of the XTM stems from the manner an image is formed. The radiographic image is a shadow formed by x-ray photons that are not absorbed as they pass through the specimen. Composition gradients within the specimen cause variations in absorption of the flux such that the final image represents a spatial integral of composition (or thickness). The ability to image these features in real-time enables more fundamental and detailed understanding of solidification dynamics than has previously been possible. Hence, application of this technique towards microgravity experiments will allow rigorous testing of critical solidification models.

  2. Casting And Solidification Technology (CAST): Directional solidification phenomena in a metal model at reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccay, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The Casting and Solidification Technology (CAST) experiment will study the phenomena that occur during directional solidification of an alloy, e.g., constitutional supercooling, freckling, and dendrite coarsening. The reduced gravity environment of space will permit the individual phenomena to be examined with minimum complication from buoyancy driven flows.

  3. Macrosegregation Caused by Convection Associated with Directional Solidification through Cross-Section Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghods, M.; Lauer, M.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R..; Grugel, R. N.

    2015-01-01

    Al-7 wt% Si and Pb-6 wt% Sb alloy samples were directionally solidified (DS), with liquid above and solid below and gravity pointing down, in cylindrical graphite crucibles through an abrupt cross-section change. Fraction eutectic distribution in the microstructure, primary dendrite spacing and primary dendrite trunk diameters have been measured in the DS samples in the vicinity of section change in order to examine the effect of convection associated with the combined influence of thermosolutal factors and solidification shrinkage. It is observed that convection not only produces extensive radial and axial macrosegregation near cross-section change, it also affects the dendritic array morphology. Primary dendrite spacing and primary dendrite trunk diameter, both, are influenced by this convection. In addition to the experimental results, preliminary results from a numerical model which includes solidification shrinkage and thermosolutal convection in the mushy zone in its analysis will also be presented

  4. Solidification of DOE problem wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1986-01-01

    Sodium nitrate waste has been successfully solidified in two types of polymeric materials: polyethylene, a thermoplastic material, and polyester styrene (PES), a thermosetting material. Waste form property evaluation tests such as ANS 16.1 leaching test and compressive strength measurements were performed on the waste forms containing various amounts of sodium nitrate. A single-screw extruder was employed for incorporating dry waste into polyethylene at its melt temperature of 120/sup 0/C to produce a homogenous mixture. Results of the leaching test for polyethylene waste forms containing 30, 50, 60 and 70 wt% sodium nitrate are presented as cumulative fraction leached and leaching indices ranging from 11 to 7.8. Two PES systems are discussed. The first is for solidification of dry salt wastes and the second is a water extendible system that is compatible with wet waste streams. Leaching data for PES and water extendible PES waste forms containing 30 wt% sodium nitrate are presented as cumulative fraction leached and leaching indices of approximately 9. Results from compressive strength measurements are also included.

  5. Phase Change Characteristics of a Nanoemulsion as a Latent Heat Storage Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumoto, Koji; Sato, Noriaki; Kawaji, Masahiro; Kawanami, Tsuyoshi; Inamura, Takao

    2014-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the fundamental phase change characteristics of a nanoemulsion using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Tetradecane, which has a slightly higher melting point than water, was utilized as the phase change material for the nanoemulsion. The melting point of the nanoemulsion, the melting peak temperature, and latent heat were examined in detail. Regarding the fundamental phase change characteristics of the nanoemulsion, it was found that its phase change characteristics were strongly affected by the temperature-scanning rate of the DSC. Moreover, it was confirmed that the phase change behavior does not change with repeated solidification and melting.

  6. Numerical modeling of solidification and convection in a viscous pure binary eutectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Spera, Frank J.

    1991-01-01

    The solidification and convection of the pure binary eutectic silicate system diopside-anorthite (Di-An) is numerically modeled. A mass-weighted enthalpy of fusion is used to account for the second solid phase (An) which crystallizes at the solidus temperature. Variable under-relaxation is used to aid convergence of the momentum equations in the implementation of the SIMPLER algorithm used to solve the two-dimensional continuum conservation equations. Numerical experiments of the solidification of Di80 melt show that a large temperature drop occurs across the solid and mush regions which decreases convective vigor in the liquid. Interesting compositional segregation patterns are produced during the solidification of Di80.

  7. Texture of primary recrystallization on nonoriented electrical steel sheet with phase transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumano, T.; Kubota, T.; Takahashi, N.

    1995-08-01

    The magnetic properties of nonoriented (NO) electrical steel sheet are commonly improved if the texture of their products possesses cube texture e.g., {l_brace}100{r_brace} <0vw>, ``goss texture`` i.e., {l_brace}110{r_brace}<011>, and less {l_brace}222{r_brace} texture. Industrially ``cube type`` has not been obtained, but ``goss texture`` has been. In a greater or lesser degree, {l_brace}222{r_brace} texture exists. To improve ``goss texture`` and reduce {l_brace}222{r_brace} texture, the grain size of the material prior to cold rolling should be larger. When the grain size before cold rolling is larger, during primary recrystallization, ``goss texture`` is enriched, {l_brace}222{r_brace} texture is decreased, and the grain grows so easily that higher induction and lower core loss can be obtained. This does not depend on the presence of phase transformation. In case of NO steel with phase transformation, heat treatment before cold rolling has been done below the austenite transition temperature (Ac{sub 1}) in order to prevent the fine grain size caused by {alpha} {yields} {gamma}(+{alpha}) {yields} {alpha} transformation. By using material that was heated over Ac{sub 1} and cooled with changing cool rates, this study describes (a) the relationship between textures before cold rolling and the texture of the final product, and (b) the development of the magnetic properties.

  8. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS, Hazcon, Inc.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solidification/stabilization technology mixes hazardous wastes, cement, water and an additive called Chloranan. Chloranan, a nontoxic chemical, encapsulates organic molecules, rendering them ineffective in retarding or inhibiting solidification. This treatment technol...

  9. Investigations on transient directional solidification under microgravity on sounding rocket missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturz, L.; Zimmermann, G.

    2006-09-01

    Transient growth conditions are common to a variety of technical solidification processes and lead to modified materials properties. In directional solidification the microstructure at the solid-liquid interface of an alloy is a result of the interaction of diffusive and convective heat and mass transport in the bulk and of interface and thermophysical properties. We have carried out experiments under diffusive conditions without convection in microgravity during the sounding rocket missions TEXUS-36 and 40. The used transparent alloy succinonitrile-acetone freezes like metals and the solidification process was observed in-situ. Within a gradient furnace the solid-liquid interface is forced to move accelerated and to transform from planar into cellular and dendritic structures. The dynamics of the planar interface and of the spacing and the amplitude of diffusive grown cells and dendrites were observed directly with cameras and analyzed. A comparison of the TEXUS-40 results to predictions taken from a macroscopic thermal model, a coupled heat-mass transfer model and a phase-field model was carried out. A good agreement is found for the planar interface dynamics for the coupled heat-mass transfer model and the phase-field model, when using additional information from the thermal modelling. In the cellular and dendritic growth regime typical microstructure features can be reproduced by the phase-field model. The experimental results thus serve as important bench-marks for the validation of numerical models describing time-dependent solidification processes.

  10. Modeling and Simulation of Microstructural Development During Weld Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1999-10-04

    Techniques for numerical calculations of phase transformation kinetics have recently become available. These methods are integrated with computational thermodynamics to allow for the description of diffusion-controlled transformations as a function of time. Such calculations have been applied to the modeling of solidification behavior in the current study. Three examples are considered which relate to the prediction of microstructure development and solute redistribution during conditions corresponding to welding conditions. The examples evaluate dendritic growth, planar growth, and competition between alternate solidification modes. It is shown that these techniques are particularly powerful when dealing with multi-component (>2) alloy systems. For such multi-component alloys, new considerations must be taken into account to describe the solute redistribution and the conditions leading to planar front growth. Finally, when studying global behavior covering a wide range of alloy compositions and thermal conditions, individual computations become impractical. For such calculations, neural network analysis may be beneficial and an example is given where such an analysis is shown to be suitable in describing a complex series of phase transformations.

  11. Enthalpies of a binary alloy during solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poirier, D. R.; Nandapurkar, P.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to present a method of calculating the enthalpy of a dendritic alloy during solidification. The enthalpies of the dendritic solid and interdendritic liquid of alloys of the Pb-Sn system are evaluated, but the method could be applied to other binaries, as well. The enthalpies are consistent with a recent evaluation of the thermodynamics of Pb-Sn alloys and with the redistribution of solute in the same during dendritic solidification. Because of the heat of mixing in Pb-Sn alloys, the interdendritic liquid of hypoeutectic alloys (Pb-rich) of less than 50 wt pct Sn has enthalpies that increase as temperature decreases during solidification.

  12. Effects of anisotropic heat conduction on solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, J. A.; Viskanta, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional solidification influenced by anisotropic heat conduction has been considered. The interfacial energy balance was derived to account for the heat transfer in one direction (x or y) depending on the temperature gradient in both the x and y directions. A parametric study was made to determine the effects of the Stefan number, aspect ratio, initial superheat, and thermal conductivity ratios on the solidification rate. Because of the imposed boundary conditions, the interface became skewed and sometimes was not a straight line between the interface position at the upper and lower adiabatic walls (spatially nonlinear along the height). This skewness depends on the thermal conductivity ratio k(yy)/k(yx). The nonlinearity of the interface is influenced by the solidification rate, aspect ratio, and k(yy/k(yx).

  13. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    SciTech Connect

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru

    2013-07-01

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  14. Transport processes in directional solidification and their effects on microstructure development

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Prantik

    1999-11-08

    The processing of materials with unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties plays a crucial role in modern technology. The quality of these materials depend strongly on the microstructure and the solute/dopant fields in the solid product, that are strongly influenced by the intricate coupling of heat and mass transfer and melt flow in the growth systems. An integrated research program is developed that include precisely characterized experiments and detailed physical and numerical modeling of the complex transport and dynamical processes. Direct numerical simulation of the solidification process is carried out that takes into account the unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth system, and accurately models the thermal interaction between the furnace and the ampoule by appropriately using experimentally measured thermal profiles. The flow instabilities and transitions and the nonlinear evolution following the transitions are investigated by time series and flow pattern analysis. A range of complex dynamical behavior is predicted with increasing thermal Rayleigh number. The route to chaos appears as: steady convection → transient mono-periodic → transient bi-periodic → transient quasi-periodic → transient intermittent oscillation-relaxation → stable intermittent oscillation-relaxation attractor. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the melt flow is found to be directly related to the spatial patterns observed experimentally in the solidified crystals. The application of the model to two phase Sn-Cd peritectic alloys showed that a new class of tree-like oscillating microstructure develops in the solid phase due to unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the liquid melt. These oscillating layered structures can give the illusion of band structures on a plane of polish. The model is applied to single phase solidification in the Al-Cu and Pb-Sn systems to characterize the effect of convection on the macroscopic

  15. Novel Directional Solidification Processing of Hypermonotectic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity driven separation precludes uniform microstructural development during controlled directional solidification (DS) processing of hypermonotectic alloys. It is well established that liquid/liquid suspensions, in which the respective components are immiscible and have significant density differences, can be established and maintained by utilizing ultrasound. A historical introduction to this work is presented with the intent of establishing the basis for applying the phenomena to promote microstructural uniformity during controlled directional solidification processing of immiscible mixtures. Experimental work based on transparent organics, as well as salt systems, will be presented in view of the processing parameters.

  16. Directional solidification of Al-8 wt. %Fe alloy under high magnetic field gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mingxu; Liu, Tie; Dong, Meng; Sun, Jinmei; Dong, Shulin; Wang, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    We investigated applying a magnetic field (up to 6 T) during directional solidification of a hypereutectic Al-8 wt. %Fe alloy, finding that it dramatically affected the final microstructure. A eutectic area appeared at the top of the samples, and as the magnetic flux density increased, the eutectic area clearly enlarged. In addition, the Al3Fe phase was twisted and fractured, and some phases aggregated and distributed randomly in the samples. We also investigated the volume fraction distribution of the Al3Fe phase, revealing that applying the magnetic field during solidification caused dramatic disorder in the solute and phase distributions. The magnetic force induced by the interaction between the magnetic field gradient and the magnetic materials appeared to be the main reason not only for the occurrence and enlargement of the eutectic area but also for the movement of Fe-enriched zones during directional solidification. Otherwise, the deformation and fracture of the Al3Fe phase, the morphological instability in the interface between the eutectic area and the Al3Fe phase, and the random distribution of the aggregated Al3Fe phase appeared to come from the thermoelectric magnetic force/thermoelectric magnetic convection under the magnetic field.

  17. Thermal analysis of HGFQ using FIDAP(trademark): Solidification front motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodbury, Keith A.

    1996-01-01

    The High Gradient Furnace with Quench (HGFQ) is being designed by NASA/MSFC for flight on the International Space Station. The furnace is being designed specifically for solidification experiments in metal and metallic alloy systems. The HGFQ Product development Team (PDT) has been active since January 1994 and their effort is now in early Phase B. Thermal models have been developed both by NASA and Sverdrup (support contractor) to assist in the HGFQ design effort. Both these models use SINDA as a solution engine, but the NASA model was developed using PATRAN and includes more detail than the Sverdrup model. These models have been used to guide design decisions and have been validated through experimentation on a prototypical 'Breadboard' furnace at MSFC. One facet of the furnace operation of interest to the designers is the sensitivity of the solidification interface location to changes in the furnace setpoint. Specifically of interest is the motion (position and velocity) of the solidification front due to a small perturbation in the furnace temperature. FIDAP(TM) is a commercially available finite element program for analysis of heat transfer and fluid flow processes. Its strength is in solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow, but among its capabilities is the analysis of transient processes involving radiation and solidification. The models presently available from NASA and Sverdrup are steady-state models and are incapable of computing the motion of the solidification front. The objective of this investigation is to use FIDAP(TM) to compute the motion of the solidification interface due to a perturbation in the furnace setpoint.

  18. Ionic liquid-assisted liquid-phase microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets combined with high performance liquid chromatography for the determination of benzoylurea insecticide in fruit juice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miyi; Zhang, Panjie; Hu, Lu; Lu, Runhua; Zhou, Wenfeng; Zhang, Sanbing; Gao, Haixiang

    2014-09-19

    A green, simple, and efficient method, ionic liquid-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of floating organic droplets (ILSFOD-LLME) collected via a bell-shaped collection device (BSCD) coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with a variable-wavelength detector, was developed for the preconcentration and analysis of seven benzoylurea insecticides (BUs) in fruit juice. In the proposed method, the low-density solvent 1-dodecanol and the ionic liquid trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium hexafluorophosphate ([P14, 6, 6, 6]PF6) were used as extractant. The extraction solvent droplet was easily collected and separated by the BSCD without centrifugation. The experimental parameters were optimized by the one-factor-at-a-time approach and were followed using an orthogonal array design. The results indicated the different effects of each parameter for extraction efficiency. Under the optimal conditions in the water model, the limits of detection for the analytes varied from 0.03 to 0.28μgL(-1). The enrichment factors ranged from 160 to 246. Linearities were achieved for hexaflumuron and flufenoxuron in the range of 0.5-500μgL(-1), for triflumuron, lufenuron and diafenthiuron in the range of 1-500μgL(-1), and for diflubenzuron and chlorfluazuron in the range of 5-500μgL(-1); the correlation coefficients for the BUs ranged from 0.9960 to 0.9990 with recoveries of 75.6-113.9%. Finally, the developed technique was successfully applied to real fruit juice with acceptable results. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the seven BUs at two spiked levels (50 and 200μgL(-1)) varied between 0.1% and 7.3%.

  19. Effects of Traveling Magnetic Field on Dynamics of Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Grugel, Richard; Motakef, Shariar

    2001-01-01

    TMF is based on imposing a controlled phase-shift in a train of electromagnets, forming a stack. Thus, the induced magnetic field can be considered to be travelling along the axis of the stack. The coupling of this traveling wave with an electrically conducting fluid results in a basic flow in a form of a single axisymmetric roll. The magnitude and direction of this flow can be remotely controlled. Furthermore, it is possible to localize the effect of this force field though activating only a number of the magnets. This force field generated in the fluid can, in principle, be used to control and modify convection in the molten material. For example, it can be used to enhance convective mixing in the melt, and thereby modify the interface shape, and macrosegregation. Alternatively, it can be used to counteract thermal and/or solutal buoyancy forces. High frequency TMF can be used in containerless processing techniques, such as float zoning, to affect the very edge of the fluid so that Marangoni flow can be counter balanced. The proposed program consists of basic fundamentals and applications. Our goal in conducting the following experiments and analyses is to establish the validity of TMF as a new tool for solidification processes. Due to its low power consumption and simplicity of design, this tool may find wide spread use in a variety of space experiments. The proposed ground based experiments are intended to establish the advantages and limitations of employing this technique. In the fundamentals component of the proposed program, we will use theoretical tools and experiments with mercury to establish the fundamental aspects of TMF-induced convection through a detailed comparison of theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of flow field. In this work, we will conduct a detailed parametric study involving the effects of magnetic field strength, frequency, wave vector, and the fluid geometry. The applications component of this work will be focused on

  20. Benard convection in binary mixtures with Soret effects and solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, G.; Mueller, U.; Davis, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    Benard convection was studied in a two-component liquid which displayed Soret effects (Soret, 1879; DeGroot and Mazur, 1969) and in which the temperatures of the horizontal boundaries spanned the solidification temperature of the mixture. A steady basic state was observed, in which the layer is partly liquid (near the lower, heated plate) and partly solid (near the upper, cooled plate) with the interface being planar, and in which all transport is by conduction and diffusion. Linear stability of the basic state was examined to determine how the presence of solid and the ability of the material to solidify or melt under disturbance affects the critical conditions from the onset of instability. The theoretical results obtained for cases when the phase change is absent and when the Soret effects are absent (but the phase change is present) are compared with an experiment using alcohol-water mixtures.

  1. EBSD investigation of the effect of the solidification rate on the nucleation behavior of eutectic components in a hypoeutectic Al-Si-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen Sadrossadat, S.; Johansson, Sten; Peng, Ru Lin

    2012-06-01

    This article represents a study of the influence of the solidification rate on the crystallographic orientation of eutectic components with respect to the primary α-Al in the tested hypoeutectic alloy. Electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) patterns were produced from the Al-Si cast specimens that were solidified with different cooling rates and prepared via ion etch polishing as a complementary method after mechanical polishing. The results indicated a strong orientation relationship between the primary α-Al and eutectic Al phase at all cooling rates. It was also found that the silicon eutectic flakes were heterogeneously nucleated in the interdendritic eutectic liquid. The increase of the cooling rate from 2 to 80 mm/min was found to be effective in lowering the intensity of the relationship between the primary α-Al and eutectic Al phases, and changing the misorientation angle clustering between the primary α-Al and eutectic Si phases in the interval from 41-60° to lower angle intervals.

  2. Solidification Structure and Macrosegregation of Billet Continuous Casting Process with Dual Electromagnetic Stirrings in Mold and Final Stage of Solidification: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, D.; Zhu, M.

    2016-12-01

    Coupling macroscale heat transfer and fluid flow with microscale grain nucleation and crystal growth, a mixed columnar-equiaxed solidification model was established to study the SWRT82B steel solidification structure and macrosegregation in 160 mm × 160 mm billet continuous casting with dual electromagnetic stirrings in mold and final stage of solidification (M-EMS and F-EMS). In the model, the phases of liquid, columnar, and equiaxed were treated separately and the initial growing equiaxed phase, which could move freely with liquid, was regarded as slurry. To obtain the equiaxed grains nucleation and columnar front evolution, the unit tracking method and the columnar front tracking model were built. The model was validated by magnetic induction intensity of stirrer, billet surface temperature, and carbon segregation. The equiaxed phase evolution and the solute transport with effect of fluid flow and grains transport were described in this article. The results show that the equiaxed phase ratio will not increase obviously with higher current intensity of M-EMS, while the negative segregation near the strand surface becomes more serious. The negative segregation zone near the billet center and the center positive segregation come into being with the effect of equiaxed grains sedimentation and liquid thermosolutal flow. It is also found that the liquid solute transport in the F-EMS zone becomes the main factor with higher current intensity rather than the solidification rate, and therefore, the final billet center segregation decreases first and then turns to rise with the current intensity. The optimal current intensities of M-EMS and F-EMS proposed for SWRT82B billet continuous casting are 200 and 400 A, respectively.

  3. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION: IS IT ALWAYS APPROPRIATE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The findings of recent research and evaluation efforts are assessed to determine whether solidification/stabilization (S/S) has been properly and appropriately applied for different types of hazardous wastes. Results from these studies are mixed and, as a result, the need for pro...

  4. Direct Simulation of a Solidification Benchmark Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carozzani, Tommy; Gandin, Charles-André; Digonnet, Hugues; Bellet, Michel; Zaidat, Kader; Fautrelle, Yves

    2013-02-01

    A solidification benchmark experiment is simulated using a three-dimensional cellular automaton—finite element solidification model. The experiment consists of a rectangular cavity containing a Sn-3 wt pct Pb alloy. The alloy is first melted and then solidified in the cavity. A dense array of thermocouples permits monitoring of temperatures in the cavity and in the heat exchangers surrounding the cavity. After solidification, the grain structure is revealed by metallography. X-ray radiography and inductively coupled plasma spectrometry are also conducted to access a distribution map of Pb, or macrosegregation map. The solidification model consists of solutions for heat, solute mass, and momentum conservations using the finite element method. It is coupled with a description of the development of grain structure using the cellular automaton method. A careful and direct comparison with experimental results is possible thanks to boundary conditions deduced from the temperature measurements, as well as a careful choice of the values of the material properties for simulation. Results show that the temperature maps and the macrosegregation map can only be approached with a three-dimensional simulation that includes the description of the grain structure.

  5. Solidification behavior during directed light fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, D.J.; Lewis, G.K.; Nemec, R.B.

    1995-10-01

    Directed light fabrication (DLF) is a process that fuses gas delivered metal powders within a focal zone of a laser beam to produce fully dense, 3-dimensional metal components. A variety of materials have been processed with DLF, ranging from steels to tungsten, and including intermetallics such as NiAl and MoSi{sub 2}. To evaluate the processing parameters and resulting microstructures, solidification studies have been performed on defined alloy systems. For example, solidification cooling rates have been determined based upon secondary dendrite arm spacings in Fe-based alloys. In addition, eutectic spacings have been used to define growth velocities during solidification. Cooling rates vary from 10{sup 1}-10{sup 5} K s{sup {minus}1} and growth rates vary between 1--50 mm s{sup {minus}1}. As a result, process definition has been developed based upon the microstructural development during solidification. The materials explored were Ag-19Cu, Fe-24.8Ni, 316 stainless steel, Al-33Cu, W, MoSi{sub 2} and NiAl.

  6. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - USEPA SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA experience in using Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) Technology to remediate Superfund sites is reviewed. Included are several case studies for insitu and exsitu treatment and sites containing both metals and organics, both separately, and mixed on the same site. Co...

  7. Solidification Based Grain Refinement in Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-20

    thermodynamics . 2) Experimental verify the effectiveness of possible nucleating compounds. 3) Extend grain refinement theory and solidification...knowledge through experimental data. 4) Determine structure property relationships for the examined grain refiners. 5) Formulate processing techniques for...using grain refiners in the steel casting industry. During Fiscal Year 2010, this project worked on determining structure property -relationships

  8. Uncertainty Quantification of Modelling of Equiaxed Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fezi, K.; Krane, M. J. M.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulations of metal alloy solidification are used to gain insight into physical phenomena that cannot be observed experimentally. Often validation of such models has been done through comparison to sparse experimental data, to which agreement can be misinterpreted due to both model and experimental uncertainty. Uncertainty quantification (UQ) and sensitivity analysis are performed on a transient model of solidification of Al-4.5 wt.% Cu in a rectangular cavity, with equiaxed (grain refined) solidification morphology. This model solves equations for momentum, temperature, and species conservation; UQ and sensitivity analysis are performed for the degree of macrosegregation. A Smolyak sparse grid algorithm is used to select input values to construct a response surface fit to model outputs. The response surface is then used as a surrogate for the solidification model to determine the sensitivities and probability density functions of the model outputs. Uncertain model inputs of interest include the secondary dendrite arm spacing, equiaxed particle size, and fraction solid at which the rigid mushy zone forms. Similar analysis was also performed on a transient model of direct chill casting of the same alloy.

  9. Detached Growth of Germanium by Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Volz, M. P.; Cobb, S.; Motakef, S.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    The conditions of detached solidification under controlled pressure differential across the meniscus were investigated. Uncoated and graphite- or BN-coated silica and pBN crucibles were used. Detached and partly detached growth was achieved in pBN and BN-coated crucibles, respectively. The results of the experiments are discussed based on the theory of Duffar et al.

  10. Solidification of oils and organic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Colombo, P.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.

    1982-07-01

    The suitability of selected solidification media for application in the disposal of low-level oil and other organic liquid wastes has been investigated. In the past, these low-level wastes (LLWs) have commonly been immobilized by sorption onto solid absorbents such as vermiculite or diatomaceous earth. Evolving regulations regarding the disposal of these materials encourage solidification. Solidification media which were studied include Portland type I cement; vermiculite plus Portland type I cement; Nuclear Technology Corporation's Nutek 380-cement process; emulsifier, Portland type I cement-sodium silicate; Delaware Custom Materiel's cement process; and the US Gypsum Company's Envirostone process. Waste forms have been evaluated as to their ability to reliably produce free standing monolithic solids which are homogeneous (macroscopically), contain < 1% free standing liquids by volume and pass a water immersion test. Solidified waste form specimens were also subjected to vibratory shock testing and flame testing. Simulated oil wastes can be solidified to acceptable solid specimens having volumetric waste loadings of less than 40 volume-%. However, simulated organic liquid wastes could not be solidified into acceptable waste forms above a volumetric loading factor of about 10 volume-% using the solidification agents studied.

  11. Directional solidification of eutectic composites in space environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    The Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic and a nickel-base alloy containing 30 wt pct Ta were solidified unidirectionally in an electron beam floating zone melting apparatus. It was found that the volume fraction of the Ni3Ta phase in the Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic mixture was increased from 7.6 to 36 volume pct in agreement with the theory as predicted. Tensile properties of the randomly solidified and unidirectionally solidified Ni-Ni3Ta eutectic were determined as function of solidification rate and temperature. It was found that the ultimate tensile strength decreased as both the test temperature and solidification rate increased. An elongation of 40 pct was obtained for a nickelbase alloy containing 30 wt at room temperature. This unusually large elongation was attributed to the superplastic behavior of the alloy. The critical currents versus the external fields at 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.2 deg for the unidirectionally solidified Pb-Sn eutectic were measured. The values of critical fields at zero critical currents were obtained by extrapolation.

  12. Stability of a directional solidification front in subdiffusive media.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohammad Abu; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency of crystal growth in alloys is limited by the morphological instability, which is caused by a positive feedback between the interface deformation and the diffusive flux of solute at the front of the phase transition. Usually this phenomenon is described in the framework of the normal diffusion equation, which stems from the linear relation between time and the mean squared displacement of molecules 〈x2(t)〉∼K1t (K1 is the classical diffusion coefficient) that is characteristic of Brownian motion. However, in some media (e.g., in gels and porous media) the random walk of molecules is hindered by obstacles, which leads to another power law, 〈x2(t)〉∼Kαtα, where 0<α≤1. As a result, the diffusion is anomalous, and it is governed by an integro-differential equation including a fractional derivative in time variable, i.e., a memory. In the present work, we investigate the stability of a directional solidification front in the case of an anomalous diffusion. Linear stability of a moving planar directional solidification front is studied, and a generalization of the Mullins-Sekerka stability criterion is obtained. Also, an asymptotic nonlinear long-wave evolution equation of Sivashinsky's type, which governs the cellular structures at the interface, is derived.

  13. Solidification and crystal growth of solid solution semiconducting alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Problems associated with the solidification and crytal growth of solid-solution semiconducting alloy crystals in a terrestrial environment are described. A detailed description is given of the results for the growth of mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) alloy crystals by directional solidification, because of their considerable technological importance. A series of HgCdTe alloy crystals are grown from pseudobinary melts by a vertical Bridgman method using a wide range of growth rates and thermal conditions. Precision measurements are performed to establish compositional profiles for the crystals. The compositional variations are related to compositional variations in the melts that can result from two-dimensional diffusion or density gradient driven flow effects ahead of the growth interface. These effects are discussed in terms of the alloy phase equilibrium properties, the recent high temperature thermophysical data for the alloys and the highly unusual heat transfer characteristics of the alloy/ampule/furnace system that may readily lead to double diffusive convective flows in a gravitational environment.

  14. Phase alignment and crystal orientation of Al 3Ni in Al-Ni alloy by imposition of a uniform high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunjiang; Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zhongying; Li, Hutian; Nakajima, Keiji; He, Jicheng

    2008-03-01

    Solidification experiments of aluminum-nickel binary alloys under uniform high magnetic fields have been conducted. The effects of high magnetic fields on the crystal orientation of Al 3Ni were investigated by XRD and the alignment of primary phases Al 3Ni were also analyzed. Experimental results showed that the easy magnetization axis of Al 3Ni crystal oriented parallel to the imposed magnetic fields and the primary phase Al 3Ni aligned perpendicular to the magnetic fields. Magnetic orientation of crystal was determined by magnetic anisotropy energy. Whereas the phase alignment should be contributed to the combined effects of magnetic orientation, crystal growth and the effects of magnetic fields on mass transport during solidification.

  15. Unidirectional solidification of binary melts from a cooled boundary: analytical solutions of a nonlinear diffusion-limited problem.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, D V; Nizovtseva, I G; Malygin, A P; Huang, H-N; Lee, D

    2008-03-19

    A model is presented that describes nonstationary solidification of binary melts or solutions from a cooled boundary maintained at a time-dependent temperature. Heat and mass transfer processes are described on the basis of the principles of a mushy layer, which divides pure solid material and a liquid phase. Nonlinear equations characterizing the dynamics of the phase transition boundaries are deduced. Approximate analytical solutions of the model under consideration are constructed. A method for controlling the external temperature at a cooled wall in order to obtain a required solidification velocity is discussed.

  16. A new control method depending on primary phase angle of transcutaneous energy transmission system for artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Miura, H; Saito, I; Sato, F; Shiraishi, Y; Yambe, T; Matsuki, H

    2013-01-01

    A new control method for stabilizing output voltage of the transcutaneous energy transmission system for artificial heart is proposed. This method is primary side, is outside of the body, which is not depending on a signal transmission system from the implanted device. The impedance observed from primary side changes from inductive to capacitive and the output voltage decreases drastically when the output current is large and the coupling factor is higher than that of the optimal condition. In this case, the driving frequency should be changed to higher so that the phase angle of the primary impedance is zero degree. The preliminary examination showed that this control method can enhance the output voltage limit to twice and the feasibility of the primary side control.

  17. Microstructure, corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity of biodegradable Mg-Sn implant alloys prepared by sub-rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyong; Pan, Fusheng; Zhao, Shuang; Pan, Hucheng; Song, Kai; Tang, Aitao

    2015-09-01

    In this study, biodegradable Mg-Sn alloys were fabricated by sub-rapid solidification, and their microstructure, corrosion behavior and cytotoxicity were investigated by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, immersion test, potentiodynamic polarization test and cytotoxicity test. The results showed that the microstructure of Mg-1Sn alloy was almost equiaxed grain, while the Mg-Sn alloys with higher Sn content (Sn≥3 wt.%) displayed α-Mg dendrites, and the secondary dendrite arm spacing of the primary α-Mg decreased significantly with increasing Sn content. The Mg-Sn alloys consisted of primary α-Mg matrix, Sn-rich segregation and Mg2Sn phase, and the amount of Mg2Sn phases increased with increasing Sn content. Potentiodynamic polarization and immersion tests revealed that the corrosion rates of Mg-Sn alloys increased with increasing Sn content. Cytotoxicity test showed that Mg-1Sn and Mg-3Sn alloys were harmless to MG63 cells. These results of the present study indicated that Mg-1Sn and Mg-3Sn alloys were promising to be used as biodegradable implants.

  18. Nano-size solidification microconstituents in electro-spark deposited Ni-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwakarma, K. R.; Ojo, O. A.; Richards, N. L.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure of electro-spark deposited IN 718 was investigated by analytical transmission electron microscopy. The analysis shows in contrast to general assumption, extreme rapid cooling rates involved in electro-spark deposition (ESD) did not produce partitionless solidification, devoid of second phase microconstituents in the material. Nanosized Laves and MC carbide particles were formed in the interdendritic regions of IN 718 electro-spark weld deposit, which indicate the occurrence of segregation-induced phase formation during solidification of the weld. The formation of Laves phase particles, which is known to be deleterious to the mechanical properties of IN 718, requires adequate consideration in the application of IN 718, and possibly other Nb-bearing nickel-base superalloys, processed by ESD.

  19. Feasibility and effectiveness of the implementation of a primary prevention programme for type 2 diabetes in routine primary care practice: a phase IV cluster randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to perform an independent evaluation of the feasibility and effectiveness of an educational programme for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (DM2) in high risk populations in primary care settings, implanted within the Basque Health Service - Osakidetza. Methods/design This is a prospective phase IV cluster clinical trial conducted under routine conditions in 14 primary health care centres of Osakidetza, randomly assigned to an intervention or control group. We will recruit a total sample of 1089 individuals, aged between 45 and 70 years old, without diabetes but at high risk of developing the condition (Finnish Diabetes Risk Score, FINDRISC ≥ 14) and follow them up for 2 years. Primary health care nursing teams of the intervention centres will implement DE-PLAN, a structured educational intervention program focused on changing healthy lifestyles (diet and physical activity); while the patients in the control centres will receive the usual care for the prevention and treatment of DM2 currently provided in Osakidetza. The effectiveness attributable to the programme will be assessed by comparing the changes observed in patients exposed to the intervention and those in the control group, with respect to the risk of developing DM2 and lifestyle habits. In terms of feasibility, we will assess indicators of population coverage and programme implementation. Discussion The aim of this study is to provide the scientific basis for disseminate the programme to the remaining primary health centres in Osakidetza, as a novel way of addressing prevention of DM2. The study design will enable us to gather information on the effectiveness of the intervention as well as the feasibility of implementing it in routine practice. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01365013 PMID:23158830

  20. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in cooling to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.

  1. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    DOE PAGES

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; ...

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in coolingmore » to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.« less

  2. Development of a High Chromium Ni-Base Filler Metal Resistant to Ductility Dip Cracking and Solidification Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Adam T.

    Hf-bearing compositions had gamma/Ni7Hf2 as the final eutectic to solidify. This study found that the extra Cr in the current generation alloys promotes the gamma/Laves phase eutectic, which expands the solidification temperature range and promotes solidification cracking. Both Ta-bearing and Hf-bearing eutectics were found to solidify at higher temperatures than Nb-bearing eutectics, leading to narrower solidification temperature ranges. Weldability testing on the optimized Ta-bearing compositions revealed good resistance to both DDC and solidification cracking. Unexpectedly, the optimized Hf-bearing compositions were quite susceptible to solidification cracking. This led to an investigation on the possible wetting effect of eutectics on solidification cracking susceptibly, and a theory on how wetting affects the solidification crack susceptibility and the volume fraction of eutectic needed for crack healing has been proposed. Alloys with eutectics that easily wet the grain boundaries have increased solidification crack susceptibility at low volume fraction eutectics, but as the fraction eutectic is increased, experience crack healing at relatively lower fraction eutectics than alloys with eutectics that don't wet as easily. Hf rich eutectics were found to wet grain boundaries significantly more than Nb rich eutectics. Additions of Mo were also found to increase the wetting of eutectics in Nb-bearing alloys.

  3. Joining of superalloy Inconel 600 by diffusion induced isothermal solidification of a liquated insert metal

    SciTech Connect

    Egbewande, A.T.; Chukwukaeme, C.; Ojo, O.A.

    2008-08-15

    The effect of process variables on the microstructure of transient liquid phase bonded IN 600 using a commercial filler alloy was studied. Microstructural examination of bonded specimens showed that isothermal solidification of the liquated insert occurred during holding at the joining temperatures. In cases where the holding time was insufficient for complete isothermal solidification, the residual liquid transformed on cooling into a centerline eutectic product. The width of the eutectic decreased with increased holding time and an increase in initial gap width resulted in thicker eutectic width in specimens bonded at the same temperature and for equivalent holding times. In addition to the centerline eutectic microconstituent, precipitation of boron-rich particles was observed within the base metal region adjacent to the substrate-joint interface. Formation of these particles appeared to have influenced the rate of solidification of the liquated interlayer during bonding. In contrast to the conventional expectation of an increase in the rate of isothermal solidification with an increase in temperature, a decrease in the rate was observed with an increase in temperatures above 1160 deg. C. This could be related to a decrease in solubility of boron in nickel above the Ni-B eutectic temperature.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Macrosegregation in Water-Cooled Heavy Flat Ingot During Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Wang, Fuming; Li, Changrong; Li, Menglong; Zhang, Jing; Cui, Guanjun

    2014-07-01

    Based on a volume-averaged two-phase approach, a coupled concentration, temperature, and velocity fields model has been established to predict the formation of macrosegregation during solidification. Because of the significant influence of velocity field on solute transfer and distribution during solidification process, the density of liquid steel was set as a function of temperature and concentration to accurately calculate the velocity field. Therefore, the influence of gravity, temperature gradient, concentration gradient, and volume shrinkage on velocity field distribution was comprehensively considered. The calculation result showed good agreement with previous reports. Thereafter, the current model was applied to simulate the solidification of 12Cr2Mo1R (ASTM standard 2.25Cr1Mo) heavy ingot, and the influence of surface cooling intensity on the final carbon macrosegregation was investigated. The results showed that with the increase of cooling intensity, the solidification time, flow velocity, and mushy zone width decrease, and as a result, macrosegregation is alleviated. When the heat-transfer coefficient is less than 1000 W m-2 K-1, macrosegregation dramatically decreases with the rise of cooling intensity. In contrast, when heat-transfer coefficient is greater than 1000 W m-2 K-1, the effect of reducing the central carbon segregation by increasing cooling is weakened.

  5. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  6. Characterization of Energy Conservation in Primary Knock-On Atom Cascades: Ballistic Phase Effects on Variable Time Steps

    SciTech Connect

    Corrales, Louis R.; Devanathan, Ram

    2006-09-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation trajectories must in principle conserve energy along the entire path. Processes exist in high-energy primary knock-on atom cascades that can affect the energy conservation, specifically during the ballistic phase where collisions bring atoms into very close proximities. The solution, in general, is to reduce the time step size of the simulation. This work explores the effects of variable time step algorithms and the effects of specifying a maximum displacement. The period of the ballistic phase can be well characterized by methods developed in this work to monitor the kinetic energy dissipation during a high-energy cascade.

  7. A study of solidification with a rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roplekar, Jayant K.

    Due to the drive for weight reduction in the automobile industry, near net shape parts produced by semi-solid processing of aluminum alloys are increasingly replacing traditional steel parts. Magnetohydrodynamic direct chill casting (MHD-DC) process, developed in the mid-eighties, is the method of choice to produce rheocast metal alloys for semi-solid applications. In spite of commercial applicability of the MHD-DC process there is no integrated process model available for this process. In the present work we use an experimental setup that combines directional solidification with magnetic stirring to develop a numerical model for the MHD-DC process. We use the finite element method to solve the coupled equations of turbulent fluid flow, species transport and heat transfer with solidification on a fixed grid. Effects of the rotating magnetic field are incorporated through a body-force term which is determined a priori based on a detailed analytical study and experimental data. Due to the nature of temperature-solute coupling and the advection dominated evolution of the liquid fraction, special numerical procedures had to be implemented in the present work. The numerical procedure used in the present work is validated against two validation problems. In the first validation problem, we apply the two-phase methodology to solve the classical problem of diffusion-dominated solidification. The good agreement between the finite element solution and the analytical solution establishes soundness of the two-phase formulation developed in this work. In the second validation problem, a finite element prediction of the flow induced in a cylindrical cavity due to a rotating magnetic field is compared with an independent spectral solution. The close agreement between two radically different solution procedures establishes the accuracy in the formulation and implementation of the both procedures. We then simulate the experiments using the numerical model. The numerical model

  8. Modeling the flow in diffuse interface methods of solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhedar, A.; Steinbach, I.; Varnik, F.

    2015-08-01

    Fluid dynamical equations in the presence of a diffuse solid-liquid interface are investigated via a volume averaging approach. The resulting equations exhibit the same structure as the standard Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid with a constant viscosity, the effect of the solid phase fraction appearing in the drag force only. This considerably simplifies the use of the lattice Boltzmann method as a fluid dynamics solver in solidification simulations. Galilean invariance is also satisfied within this approach. Further, we investigate deviations between the diffuse and sharp interface flow profiles via both quasiexact numerical integration and lattice Boltzmann simulations. It emerges from these studies that the freedom in choosing the solid-liquid coupling parameter h provides a flexible way of optimizing the diffuse interface-flow simulations. Once h is adapted for a given spatial resolution, the simulated flow profiles reach an accuracy comparable to quasiexact numerical simulations.

  9. Self Assembled Structures by Directional Solidification of Eutectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Frederick W.; Sayir, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Interest in ordered porous structures has grown because of there unique properties such as photonic bandgaps, high backing packing density and high surface to volume ratio. Inspired by nature, biometric strategies using self assembled organic molecules dominate the development of hierarchical inorganic structures. Directional solidification of eutectics (DSE) also exhibit self assembly characteristics to form hierarchical metallic and inorganic structures. Crystallization of diphasic materials by DSE can produce two dimensional ordered structures consisting of rods or lamella. By selective removal of phases, DSE is capable to fabricate ordered pore arrays or ordered pin arrays. Criteria and limitations to fabricate hierarchical structures will be presented. Porous structures in silicon base alloys and ceramic systems will be reported.

  10. Solidification of Trapped Liquid in Rocks and Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, S. A.

    2012-12-01

    Trapped liquid in an igneous cumulate solidifies over a range of time and temperature that can be retrieved by use of the lever rule in binary solutions applied to plagioclase using the range in the An content found for the individual rock studied. The resident crystals in the cumulate count in the phase equilibria as though deposited by the resident liquid in pure fractional crystallization at the moment of trapping. The An range (Morse JPet 53:891, 2012) when measured in sufficient detail, defines the solidification history. The instantaneous solid composition along the solidus defines the zoning of the plagioclase as it follows the trapped liquid on the liquidus. The reference bulk composition of the trapped liquid is given by an intercept on the initial solid-liquid lever, defined by the fraction of plagioclase in the trapped parent magma times the residual porosity. The mafic fraction is assumed to solidify by reaction independently of the plagioclase zoning. The residual porosity is calculated from the An range when that is calibrated to a value independently determined from the evolved components. Examples from a recent treatment of residual porosity (cited above) will be given for the solidification of selected rock compositions from the Kiglapait and Skaergaard intrusions. The same principles apply to the solidification of melt inclusions, with the difference that the latter tend to sample an evolved sheath by capture, rather than a parent magma trapped by closure of a cumulate. Melt inclusions are evolved from birth, and then are likely to evolve further with continued growth and re-equilibration of the container. The cumulate, by contrast, given any small degree of adcumulus growth, has had time to exchange the evolved rejected solute owing to its slow solidification, so its trapped liquid is the contemporaneous magma at the cumulate interface. Experimental results on melt inclusions in mafic magma demonstrate their intrinsic evolved nature. For example

  11. TEMHD Effects on Solidification Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, Andrew; Pericleous, Koulis

    2012-01-01

    An unexplored potential exists to control microstructure evolution through the use of external DC magnetic fields. Thermoelectric currents form during solidification and interact with this external field to drive microscopic fluid dynamics within the inter-dendritic region. The convective heat and mass transport can lead to profound changes on the dendritic structure. In this paper the effect of high magnetic fields is demonstrated through the use of both 3-dimensional and 2-dimensional numerical models. The results show that the application of a magnetic field causes significant disruption to the dendritic morphology. Investigation into the underlying mechanism gives initial indicators of how external magnetic fields can either lead to unexpected growth behaviour, or alternatively can be used to control the evolution of microstructure in undercooled melts as encountered in levitated droplet solidification.

  12. Interface solidification of impinging metal drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Soto, Dan; Varanasi, Kripa

    2016-11-01

    Molten metal droplet deposition is important in manufacturing techniques such as spray deposition and metal inkjet printing. Key parameters are the final splat morphology and its adhesion to the base substrate. How to control these parameters is still poorly understood, since droplet deformation, cooling and solidification happen simultaneously. Here, we studied the contact patch formed between the metal drop and the base substrate, varying the thermal properties and the initial temperature of the substrate, and the initial temperature of the drop. We identify various scenarios for interface solidification, including smooth liquid-spread contact patches, entrapment of air pockets, and transient re-melting of the interface. The transitions between various scenarios can be rationalized from the interfacial temperature estimated by heat conduction, and taking into account the flow of liquid metal.

  13. Directional solidification in an imperfect furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brattkus, K.; Davis, S. H.

    1987-01-01

    The upward directional solidification of a binary alloy in which the rejected solute is more dense than the solvent is considered. The system is stably stratified both thermally and solutally. If heat is lost through the sidewalls, horizontal thermal gradients drive a steady double-diffusive convection. Solidification cells with small aspect ratios (width/length) A are considered, and asymptotic solutions to the steady double-diffusive system are obtained as A tends to 0 under the assumption heat losses are also small. When the thermal Grashof number is large, buoyancy boundary layers are at the sidewalls. The shape of the crystal-melt interface is determined by the coupled effects of local thermodynamic equilibrium, diffusion and convection.

  14. Thermophysical property sensitivity effects in steel solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overfelt, Tony

    1993-01-01

    The simulation of advanced solidification processes via digital computer techniques has gained widespread acceptance during the last decade or so. Models today can predict transient temperature fields, fluid flow fields, important microstructural parameters, and potential defects in castings. However, the lack of accurate thermophysical property data on important industrial alloys threatens to limit the ability of manufacturers to fully capitalize on the technology's benefits. A study of the sensitivity of one such numerical model of a steel plate casting to imposed variations in the data utilized for the thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, and heat of fusion is described. The sensitivity of the data's variability is characterized by its effects on the net solidification time of various points along the centerline of the plate casting. Recommendations for property measurements are given and the implications of data uncertainty for modelers are discussed.

  15. Modeling Primary Breakup: A Three-Dimensional Eulerian Level Set/Vortex Sheet Method for Two-Phase Interface Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is divided into four parts. First, the level set/vortex sheet method for three-dimensional two-phase interface dynamics is presented. Second, the LSS model for the primary breakup of turbulent liquid jets and sheets is outlined and all terms requiring subgrid modeling are identified. Then, preliminary three-dimensional results of the level set/vortex sheet method are presented and discussed. Finally, conclusions are drawn and an outlook to future work is given.

  16. Interactions between solidification and compositional convection in mushy layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worster, M. Grae

    1994-01-01

    Mushy layers are ubiquitous during the solidification of alloys. They are regions of mixed phase wherein solid crystals are bathed in the melt from which they grew. The matrix of crystals forms a porous medium through which the melt can flow, driven either by external forces or by its own buoyancy in a gravitational field. Buoyancy-driven convection of the melt depends both on temperature gradients, which are necessary for solidification, and on compositional gradients, which are generated as certain components of the alloy are preferentially incorporated in the solid phase and the remaining components are expelled into the melt. In fully liquid regions, the combined action of temperature and concentration on the density of the liquid can cause various forms of double-diffusive convection. However, in the interior of mushy regions the temperature and concentration are thermodynamically coupled so only single-diffusive convection can occur. Typically, the effect of composition on the buoyancy of the melt is much greater than the effect of temperature, and thus convection in mushy layers in driven primarily by the computational gradients within them. The rising interstitial liquid is relatively dilute, having come from colder regions of the mushy layer, where the liquidus concentration is lower, and can dissolve the crystal matrix through which it flows. This is the fundamental process by which chimneys are formed. It is a nonlinear process that requires the convective velocities to be sufficiently large, so fully fledged chimneys (narrow channels) might be avoided by means that weaken the flow. Better still would be to prevent convection altogether, since even weak convection will cause lateral, compositional inhomogeneities in castings. This report outlines three studies that examine the onset of convection within mushy layers.

  17. Microwave solidification development for Rocky Flats waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, D.; Erle, R.; Eschen, V.

    1994-04-01

    The Microwave Engineering Team at the Rocky Flats Plant has developed a production-scale system for the treatment of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes using microwave energy. The system produces a vitreous final form which meets the acceptance criteria for shipment and disposal. The technology also has potential for application on various other waste streams from the public and private sectors. Technology transfer opportunities are being identified and pursued for commercialization of the microwave solidification technology.

  18. IJEMS: Iowa Joint Experiment in Microgravity Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendle, John R.; Mashl, Steven J.; Hardin, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    The Iowa Joint Experiment in Microgravity Solidification (IJEMS) is a cooperative effort between Iowa State University and the University of Iowa to study the formation of metal-matrix composites in a microgravity environment. Of particular interest is the interaction between the solid/liquid interface and the particles in suspension. The experiment is scheduled to fly on STS-69, Space Shuttle Endeavor on August 3, 1995. This project is unique in its heavy student participation and cooperation between the universities involved.

  19. The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Equiaxed Dendritic Solidification Experiment (EDSE) is a material sciences investigation under the Formation of Microstructures/pattern formation discipline. The objective is to study the microstructural evolution of and thermal interactions between several equiaxed crystals growing dendritically in a supercooled melt of a pure and transparent substance under diffusion controlled conditions. Dendrites growing at .4 supercooling from a 2 stinger growth chamber for the EDSE in the Microgravity Development Lab (MDL).

  20. Phosphate Bonded Solidification of Radioactive Incinerator Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B. W.

    1999-04-13

    The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  1. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  2. Solidification of high temperature molten salts for thermal energy storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffield, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The solidification of phase change materials for the high temperature thermal energy storage system of an advanced solar thermal power system has been examined theoretically. In light of the particular thermophysical properties of candidate phase change high temperature salts, such as the eutectic mixture of NaF - MgF2, the heat transfer characteristics of one-dimensional inward solidification for a cylindrical geometry have been studied. The Biot number for the solidified salt is shown to be the critical design parameter for constant extraction heat flux. A fin-on-fin design concept of heat transfer surface augmentation is proposed in an effort to minimize the effects of the salt's low thermal conductivity and large volume change upon fusing.

  3. Solidification Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cast Magnesium-Aluminum-Tin Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Alan A.; Fu, Penghuai; Peng, Liming; Kang, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhenzhen; Zhu, Tianyu

    2012-01-01

    The solidification microstructure and mechanical properties of as-cast Mg-Al-Sn alloys have been investigated using computational thermodynamics and experiments. The as-cast microstructure of Mg-Al-Sn alloys consists of α-Mg, Mg17Al12, and Mg2Sn phases. The amount of Mg17Al12 and Mg2Sn phases formed increases with increasing Al and Sn content and shows good agreement between the experimental results and the Scheil solidification calculations. Generally, the yield strength of as-cast alloys increases with Al and Sn content, whereas the ductility decreases. This study has confirmed an early development of Mg-7Al-2Sn alloy for structural applications and has led to a promising new Mg-7Al-5Sn alloy with significantly improved strength and ductility comparable with commercial AZ91 alloy.

  4. Influence of electric current pulses on the solidification of Cu-Bi-Sn immiscible alloys.

    PubMed

    Hongxiang, Jiang; Jie, He; Jiuzhou, Zhao

    2015-07-31

    Continuous solidification experiments were carried out with Cu-Bi-Sn alloys under the effects of Electric Current Pulses (ECPs). A model describing the microstructure evolution was developed. The formation of the microstructure in the continuously solidified alloys was calculated. The calculations demonstrated that ECPs mainly affect the solidification process through changing the energy barrier for the nucleation of the minority phase droplets (MPDs). When the matrix liquid has a lower electric conductivity compared to the MPD, the ECPs lead to a decrease in the energy barrier for the nucleation of the MPDs which then promote the formation of a finely dispersed microstructure. When the matrix liquid has a higher electric conductivity compared to the MPD, the ECPs cause an increase in the energy barrier for the nucleation and lead to the formation of a phase segregated microstructure.

  5. Influence of electric current pulses on the solidification of Cu-Bi-Sn immiscible alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hongxiang, Jiang; Jie, He; Jiuzhou, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Continuous solidification experiments were carried out with Cu-Bi-Sn alloys under the effects of Electric Current Pulses (ECPs). A model describing the microstructure evolution was developed. The formation of the microstructure in the continuously solidified alloys was calculated. The calculations demonstrated that ECPs mainly affect the solidification process through changing the energy barrier for the nucleation of the minority phase droplets (MPDs). When the matrix liquid has a lower electric conductivity compared to the MPD, the ECPs lead to a decrease in the energy barrier for the nucleation of the MPDs which then promote the formation of a finely dispersed microstructure. When the matrix liquid has a higher electric conductivity compared to the MPD, the ECPs cause an increase in the energy barrier for the nucleation and lead to the formation of a phase segregated microstructure. PMID:26228180

  6. Numerical simulation of macrosegregation with grain motion during solidification of Mg-4wt.%Y alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qing Ya; Liu, Dong-Rong; Zhang, Jian Jiao; Wang, Li Ping; Guo, Er Jun

    2016-12-01

    A two-phase solidification model was used that incorporates the descriptions of natural convection, heat transfer, solute transport and solid movement at macroscopic scale with microscopic relations for grain nucleation and growth. The implementation of the two-phase model was validated by comparisons with a consensus of previous numerical simulation for Sn-5wt.%Pb alloy and with experiment for Mg-4wt.%Y alloy cast in one-side-chilled resin sand mould. With free movement of globular grains in the bulk liquid, effects of melt superheat and nucleation density on fluid flow behavior and macrosegregation during solidification of Mg-4wt.%Y alloy were numerically investigated. It was found that a lower melt superheat and a higher nucleation density decrease the severity of macrosegregation by weakening the flotation of grains.

  7. Polyethylene solidification of low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-02-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive waste in polyethylene. Waste streams selected for this study included those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Four types of commercially available low-density polyethylenes were employed which encompass a range of processing and property characteristics. Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste and polyethylene type. Property evaluation testing was performed on laboratory-scale specimens to assess the potential behavior of actual waste forms in a disposal environment. Waste form property tests included water immersion, deformation under compressive load, thermal cycling and radionuclide leaching. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash, and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported. 37 refs., 33 figs., 22 tabs.

  8. Solidification studies of Nb-Ge alloys at large degrees of supercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Evans, N. D.; Bayuzick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A 32 meter evacuated drop tube has been used to investigate the solidification of Nb-Ge alloys after deep undercooling. Samples have been supercooled as much as 500 K below the liquidus by using free-fall conditions to eliminate crucible induced nucleation. Final microstructures are dependent on the quenching rates at the bottom of the drop tube with a striking extension of the beta phase solubility limit at the higher quenching rates.

  9. MRO's HiRISE Education and Public Outreach during the Primary Science Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Davatzes, A. K.; Deardorff, G.; Kanefsky, B.; Conrad, L. B.; HiRISE Team

    2008-12-01

    Looking back over one Mars year, we report on the accomplishments of the HiRISE EPO program during the primary science phase of MRO. A highlight has been our student image suggestion program, conducted in association with NASA Quest as HiRISE Image Challenges (http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/challenges/hirise/). During challenges, students, either individually or as part of a collaborative classroom or group, learn about Mars through our webcasts, web chats and our educational material. They use HiWeb, HiRISE's image suggestion facility, to submit image suggestions and include a short rationale for why their target is scientifically interesting. The HiRISE team gives priority to obtaining a sampling of these suggestions as quickly as possible so that the acquired images can be examined by the students. During the challenge, a special password-protected web site allows participants to view their returned images before they are released to the public (http://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/hirise/quest/). Students are encouraged to write captions for the returned images. Finished captions are then posted and highlighted on the HiRISE web site (http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu) along with their class, teacher's name and the name of their school. Through these HiRISE challenges, students and teachers become virtual science team members, participating in the same process (selecting and justifying targets, analyzing and writing captions for acquired images), and using the same software tools as the HiRISE team. Such an experience is unique among planetary exploration EPO programs. To date, we have completed three HiRISE challenges and a fourth is currently ongoing. More than 200 image suggestions were submitted during the previous challenges and over 85 of these image requests have been acquired so far. Over 675 participants from 45 states and 42 countries have registered for the previous challenges. These participants represent over 8000 students in grades 2 through 14 and consist

  10. Effects of the location of a cast in the furnace on flatness of the solidification front in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Yuanyuan; Li, Dichen; Zhang, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Many defects of single crystals are caused by the nonplanar solidification front. The transverse temperature gradient at melt-crystal interface results in nonplanar solidification fronts. The location of a cast in the directional solidification furnace affects heat dissipation and thus influences the transverse temperature gradient. This paper presents a criterion and a searching algorithm to find the optimal location of the cast for flattening the solidification front. A numerical simulation was employed for the verification of our method. Additionally, the effects of the size of the cooling device of the furnace on the optimal location, the transverse temperature gradient and the solidification time were discussed. The transverse temperature gradient is reduced about 50% without increasing much solidification time when setting the cast with a varying thickness mould at the optimal location. In addition, the optimal location is mainly influenced by the radius of the cooling ring.

  11. Numerical simulation of casting processes: coupled mould filling and solidification using VOF and enthalpy-porosity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Ole; Turnow, Johann; Kornev, Nikolai; Hassel, Egon

    2016-12-01

    Within the scope of industrial casting applications a numerical model for the simultaneous mould filling and solidification process has been formulated, implemented in a finite volume code and successfully validated using analytical and experimental data. In order to account for the developing of free surface flow and the liquid/solid phase change, respectively, the volume-of-fluid and enthalpy-porosity method have been coupled under a volume averaging framework on a fixed Eulerian grid. The coupled method captures the basic physical effects of a combined mould filling and solidification process and provides a trustful method for comprehensive casting simulations.

  12. Aqueous two-phase flotation for primary recovery of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Pediococcus acidilactici Kp10.

    PubMed

    Md Sidek, Nurul Lyana; Tan, Joo Shun; Abbasiliasi, Sahar; Wong, Fadzlie Wong Faizal; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Ariff, Arbakariya B

    2016-08-01

    An aqueous two-phase flotation (ATPF) system based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) and sodium citrate (NaNO3C6H5O7·2H2O) was considered for primary recovery of bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance (BLIS) from Pediococcus acidilactici Kp10. The effects of ATPF parameters namely phase composition, tie-line length (TLL), volume ratio between the two phases (VR), amount of crude load (CL), pH, nitrogen gas flow rate (FR) and flotation time (FT) on the performance of recovery were evaluated. BLIS was mainly concentrated into the upper PEG-rich phase in all systems tested so far. The optimum conditions for BLIS purification, which composed of PEG 8000/sodium citrate, were: TLL of 42.6, VR of 0.4, CL of 22% (w/w), pH 7, average FT of 30min and FR of 20mL/min. BLIS was partially purified up to 5.9-fold with a separation efficiency of 99% under this optimal conditions. A maximum yield of BLIS activity of about 70.3% was recovered in the PEG phase. The BLIS from the top phase was successfully recovered with a single band in SDS-gel with molecular weight of about 10-15kDa. ATPF was found to be an effective technique for the recovery of BLIS from the fermentation broth of P. acidilactici Kp10.

  13. Solidification and microstructures of binary ice-I/hydrate eutectic aggregates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCarthy, C.; Cooper, R.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Rieck, K.D.; Stern, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    The microstructures of two-phase binary aggregates of ice-I + salt-hydrate, prepared by eutectic solidification, have been characterized by cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (CSEM). The specific binary systems studied were H2O-Na2SO4, H2O-MgSO4, H2O-NaCl, and H2O-H2SO4; these were selected based on their potential application to the study of tectonics on the Jovian moon Europa. Homogeneous liquid solutions of eutectic compositions were undercooled modestly (??T - 1-5 ??C); similarly cooled crystalline seeds of the same composition were added to circumvent the thermodynamic barrier to nucleation and to control eutectic growth under (approximately) isothermal conditions. CSEM revealed classic eutectic solidification microstructures with the hydrate phase forming continuous lamellae, discontinuous lamellae, or forming the matrix around rods of ice-I, depending on the volume fractions of the phases and their entropy of dissolving and forming a homogeneous aqueous solution. We quantify aspects of the solidification behavior and microstructures for each system and, with these data articulate anticipated effects of the microstructure on the mechanical responses of the materials.

  14. Solidification Microstructure, Segregation, and Shrinkage of Fe-Mn-C Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steel by Simulation and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Peng; Tang, Haiyan; Zhang, Jiaquan

    2016-06-01

    A 3D cellular automaton finite element model with full coupling of heat, flow, and solute transfer incorporating solidification grain nucleation and growth was developed for a multicomponent system. The predicted solidification process, shrinkage porosity, macrosegregation, grain orientation, and microstructure evolution of Fe-22Mn-0.7C twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel match well with the experimental observation and measurement. Based on a new solute microsegregation model using the finite difference method, the thermophysical parameters including solid fraction, thermal conductivity, density, and enthalpy were predicted and compared with the results from thermodynamics and experiment. The effects of flow and solute transfer in the liquid phase on the solidification microstructure of Fe-22Mn-0.7C TWIP steel were compared numerically. Thermal convection decreases the temperature gradient in the liquid steel, leading to the enlargement of the equiaxed zone. Solute enrichment in front of the solid/liquid interface weakens the thermal convection, resulting in a little postponement of columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). The CET behavior of Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel during solidification was fully described and mathematically quantized by grain morphology statistics for the first time. A new methodology to figure out the CET location by linear regression of grain mean size with least-squares arithmetic was established, by which a composition design strategy for Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel according to solidification microstructure, matrix compactness, and homogeneity was developed.

  15. High-Speed Synchrotron X-ray Imaging Studies of the Ultrasound Shockwave and Enhanced Flow during Metal Solidification Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Dongyue; Lee, Tung Lik; Khong, Jia Chuan; Connolley, Thomas; Fezzaa, Kamel; Mi, Jiawei

    2015-07-01

    The highly dynamic behavior of ultrasonic bubble implosion in liquid metal, the multiphase liquid metal flow containing bubbles and particles, and the interaction between ultrasonic waves and semisolid phases during solidification of metal were studied in situ using the complementary ultrafast and high-speed synchrotron X-ray imaging facilities housed, respectively, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, US, and Diamond Light Source, UK. Real-time ultrafast X-ray imaging of 135,780 frames per second revealed that ultrasonic bubble implosion in a liquid Bi-8 wt pctZn alloy can occur in a single wave period (30 kHz), and the effective region affected by the shockwave at implosion was 3.5 times the original bubble diameter. Furthermore, ultrasound bubbles in liquid metal move faster than the primary particles, and the velocity of bubbles is 70 ~ 100 pct higher than that of the primary particles present in the same locations close to the sonotrode. Ultrasound waves can very effectively create a strong swirling flow in a semisolid melt in less than one second. The energetic flow can detach solid particles from the liquid-solid interface and redistribute them back into the bulk liquid very effectively.

  16. Experimental observation of oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereda, J.; Mota, F. L.; Chen, L.; Billia, B.; Tourret, D.; Song, Y.; Debierre, J.-M.; Guérin, R.; Karma, A.; Trivedi, R.; Bergeon, N.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of oscillatory modes during three-dimensional cellular growth in a diffusive transport regime. We ground our analysis primarily on in situ observations of directional solidification experiments of a transparent succinonitrile 0.24 wt % camphor alloy performed in microgravity conditions onboard the International Space Station. This study completes our previous reports [Bergeon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 226102 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.226102; Tourret et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 042401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.042401] from an experimental perspective, and results are supported by additional phase-field simulations. We analyze the influence of growth parameters, crystal orientation, and sample history on promoting oscillations, and on their spatiotemporal characteristics. Cellular patterns display a remarkably uniform oscillation period throughout the entire array, despite a high array disorder and a wide distribution of primary spacing. Oscillation inhibition may be associated to crystalline disorientation, which stems from polygonization and is manifested as pattern drifting. We determine a drifting velocity threshold above which oscillations are inhibited, thereby demonstrating that inhibition is due to cell drifting and not directly to disorientation, and also explaining the suppression of oscillations when the pulling velocity history favors drifting. Furthermore, we show that the array disorder prevents long-range coherence of oscillations, but not short-range coherence in localized ordered regions. For regions of a few cells exhibiting hexagonal (square) ordering, three (two) subarrays oscillate with a phase shift of approximately ±120∘ (180∘), with square ordering occurring preferentially near subgrain boundaries.

  17. Comparison of Carbon and Hi-Z Primary Collimators for the LHC Phase II Collimation System

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Lewis; Markiewicz, Thomas; Smith, Jeffrey; Assmann, Ralph; Bracco, Chiara; Weiler, Thomas; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

    2011-10-31

    A current issue with the LHC collimation system is single-diffractive, off-energy protons from the primary collimators that pass completely through the secondary collimation system and are absorbed immediately downbeam in the cold magnets of the dispersion suppressor section. Simulations suggest that the high impact rate could result in quenching of these magnets. We have studied replacing the 60 cm primary graphite collimators, which remove halo mainly by inelastic strong interactions, with 5.25 mm tungsten, which remove halo mainly by multiple coulomb scattering and thereby reduce the rate of single-diffractive interactions that cause losses in the dispersion suppressor.

  18. Atomic concentration effect on thermal properties during solidification of Pt-Rh alloy: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, A. K.; Celik, F. A.

    2017-04-01

    The solidification process of Platinum-Rhodium alloy from liquid phase to solid state is investigated at the nano-scale by using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS) for different atomic concentration ratios of Pt. The critical nucleus radius, the bond order parameter, interfacial free energies and total energy based on nucleation theory of the alloy are examined with respect to the temperature changes. The heat of fusion from high temperatures to low temperatures during solidification of the alloy system is determined from molecular dynamics simulation. The structural development is determined from the radial distribution function. It is observed from the results that the melting point of the alloy system decreases with increasing concentration of Pt and that variation of Pt ratio in the alloy shows a remarkable effect on solidification to understand the cooling process of thermal effects.

  19. The feasibility of low-G grey solidification of nodular iron in the F-104 experimental furnace package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, P. A.; Smith, G. A.; Workman, G.

    1983-01-01

    The rationale for low-g experiments with cast iron and the need for solidification in the grey form during these experiments are reviewed. The factors which determine whether an iron melt will solidify grey or white are discussed. Cooling rate versus microstructure was studied for a nodular iron candidate material for F-104 low-g solidification. The study determined that low-g grey solidification, using the present F-104 furnace system, of the nodular iron composition studied is not feasible. Specimen microstructure strongly suggested that the F-104 furnace's gas cooling system was causing excessive localized chill resulting in the nucleation of the unwanted iron carbide phase. A change is suggested, in the quench system design, that could possibly overcome this problem.

  20. Probing liquation cracking and solidification through modeling of momentum, heat, and solute transport during welding of aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S.; Chakraborty, S.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-05-01

    A transport phenomena-based mathematical model is developed to understand liquation cracking in weldments during fusion welding. Equations of conservation of mass, momentum, heat, and solute transport are numerically solved considering nonequilibrium solidification and filler metal addition to determine the solid and liquid phase fractions in the solidifying region and the solute distribution in the weld pool. An effective partition coefficient that considers the local interface velocity and the undercooling is used to simulate solidification during welding. The calculations show that convection plays a dominant role in the solute transport inside the weld pool. The predicted weld-metal solute content agreed well with the independent experimental observations. The liquation cracking susceptibility in Al-Cu alloy weldments could be reliably predicted by the model based on the computed solidifying weld-metal composition and solid fraction considering nonequilibrium solidification.

  1. Three-dimensional multiscale modeling of dendritic spacing selection during Al-Si directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, Damien; Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Gibbs, John W.; Karma, Alain

    2015-05-27

    We present a three-dimensional extension of the multiscale dendritic needle network (DNN) model. This approach enables quantitative simulations of the unsteady dynamics of complex hierarchical networks in spatially extended dendritic arrays. We apply the model to directional solidification of Al-9.8 wt.%Si alloy and directly compare the model predictions with measurements from experiments with in situ x-ray imaging. The focus is on the dynamical selection of primary spacings over a range of growth velocities, and the influence of sample geometry on the selection of spacings. Simulation results show good agreement with experiments. The computationally efficient DNN model opens new avenues for investigating the dynamics of large dendritic arrays at scales relevant to solidification experiments and processes.

  2. Three-dimensional multiscale modeling of dendritic spacing selection during Al-Si directional solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Tourret, Damien; Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; ...

    2015-05-27

    We present a three-dimensional extension of the multiscale dendritic needle network (DNN) model. This approach enables quantitative simulations of the unsteady dynamics of complex hierarchical networks in spatially extended dendritic arrays. We apply the model to directional solidification of Al-9.8 wt.%Si alloy and directly compare the model predictions with measurements from experiments with in situ x-ray imaging. The focus is on the dynamical selection of primary spacings over a range of growth velocities, and the influence of sample geometry on the selection of spacings. Simulation results show good agreement with experiments. The computationally efficient DNN model opens new avenues formore » investigating the dynamics of large dendritic arrays at scales relevant to solidification experiments and processes.« less

  3. Accelerated Reader as a Literacy Catch-Up Intervention during Primary to Secondary School Transition Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siddiqui, Nadia; Gorard, Stephen; See, Beng Huat

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes an evaluation of an internet-based reading programme called Accelerated Reader (AR), which is widely used in UK schools and worldwide. AR is a whole-group reading management and monitoring programme that aims to stimulate the habit of independent reading among primary and secondary age pupils. The evaluation involved 349…

  4. Modeling of coupled motion and growth interaction of equiaxed dendritic crystals in a binary alloy during solidification.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xin Bo; Chen, Yun; Kang, Xiu Hong; Li, Dian Zhong; Gong, Tong Zhao

    2017-03-31

    Motion of growing dendrites is a common phenomenon during solidification but often neglected in numerical simulations because of the complicate underlying multiphysics. Here a phase-field model incorporating dendrite-melt two-phase flow is proposed for simulating the dynamically interacted process. The proposed model circumvents complexity to resolve dendritic growth, natural convection and solid motion simultaneously. Simulations are performed for single and multiple dendritic growth of an Al-based alloy in a gravity environment. Computing results of an isolated dendrite settling down in the convective supersaturated melt shows that solid motion is able to overwhelm solutal convection and causes a rather different growth morphology from the stationary dendrite that considers natural convection alone. The simulated tip growth dynamics are correlated with a modified boundary layer model in the presence of melt flow, which well accounts for the variation of tip velocity with flow direction. Polycrystalline simulations reveal that the motion of dendrites accelerates the occurrence of growth impingement which causes the behaviors of multiple dendrites are distinct from that of single dendrite, including growth dynamics, morphology evolution and movement path. These polycrystalline simulations provide a primary understanding of the sedimentation of crystals and resulting chemical homogeneity in industrial ingots.

  5. Modeling of coupled motion and growth interaction of equiaxed dendritic crystals in a binary alloy during solidification

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xin Bo; Chen, Yun; Kang, Xiu Hong; Li, Dian Zhong; Gong, Tong Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Motion of growing dendrites is a common phenomenon during solidification but often neglected in numerical simulations because of the complicate underlying multiphysics. Here a phase-field model incorporating dendrite-melt two-phase flow is proposed for simulating the dynamically interacted process. The proposed model circumvents complexity to resolve dendritic growth, natural convection and solid motion simultaneously. Simulations are performed for single and multiple dendritic growth of an Al-based alloy in a gravity environment. Computing results of an isolated dendrite settling down in the convective supersaturated melt shows that solid motion is able to overwhelm solutal convection and causes a rather different growth morphology from the stationary dendrite that considers natural convection alone. The simulated tip growth dynamics are correlated with a modified boundary layer model in the presence of melt flow, which well accounts for the variation of tip velocity with flow direction. Polycrystalline simulations reveal that the motion of dendrites accelerates the occurrence of growth impingement which causes the behaviors of multiple dendrites are distinct from that of single dendrite, including growth dynamics, morphology evolution and movement path. These polycrystalline simulations provide a primary understanding of the sedimentation of crystals and resulting chemical homogeneity in industrial ingots. PMID:28361933

  6. Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars investigation and data set from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's primary science phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murchie, S.L.; Seelos, F.P.; Hash, C.D.; Humm, D.C.; Malaret, E.; McGovern, J.A.; Choo, T.H.; Seelos, K.D.; Buczkowski, D.L.; Morgan, M.F.; Barnouin-Jha, O. S.; Nair, H.; Taylor, H.W.; Patterson, G.W.; Harvel, C.A.; Mustard, J.F.; Arvidson, R. E.; McGuire, P.; Smith, M.D.; Wolff, M.J.; Titus, T.N.; Bibring, J.-P.; Poulet, F.

    2009-01-01

    The part of the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer (CRISM) for Mars investigation conducted during the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's (MRO's) primary science phase was a comprehensive investigation of past aqueous environments, structure of the planet's crust, past climate, and current meteorology. The measurements to implement this investigation include over 9500 targeted observations of surface features taken at spatial resolutions of better than 40 m/pixel, monitoring of seasonal variations in atmospheric aerosols and trace gases, and acquisition of a 200 m/pixel map covering over 55% of Mars in 72 selected wavelengths under conditions of relatively low atmospheric opacity. Key results from these data include recognition of a diversity of aqueous mineral-containing deposits, discovery of a widespread distribution of phyllosilicates in early to middle Noachian units, the first definitive detection of carbonates in bedrock, new constraints on the sequence of events that formed Hesperian-aged, sulfate-rich layered deposits, characterization of seasonal polar processes, and monitoring of the 2007 global dust event. Here we describe CRISM's science investigations during the Primary Science Phase, the data sets that were collected and their calibration and uncertainties, and how they have been processed and made available to the scientific community. We also describe the ongoing investigation during MRO's extended science phase. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits cell proliferation and improves viability by regulating S phase and mitochondrial permeability in primary rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Dian; Li, Longlong; Ding, Xiao; Ma, Haitian

    2016-07-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is widely used as a nutritional supplement and exhibits putative anti‑aging properties. However, the molecular basis of the actions of DHEA, particularly on the biological characteristics of target cells, remain unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of DHEA on cell viability, cell proliferation, cell cycle and mitochondrial function in primary rat Leydig cells. Adult Leydig cells were purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation, and cell proliferation was detected using a Click-iT® EdU Assay kit and cell cycle assessment performed using flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential was detected using JC-1 staining assay. The results of the current study demonstrate that DHEA decreased cell proliferation in a dose‑dependent manner, whereas it improved cell viability in a time‑dependent and dose‑dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that DHEA treatment increased the S phase cell population and decreased the G2/M cell population. Cyclin A and CDK2 mRNA levels were decreased in primary rat Leydig cells following DHEA treatment. DHEA treatment decreased the transmembrane electrical gradient in primary Leydig cells, whereas treatment significantly increased succinate dehydrogenase activity. These results indicated that DHEA inhibits primary rat Leydig cell proliferation by decreasing cyclin mRNA level, whereas it improves cells viability by modulating the permeability of the mitochondrial membrane and succinate dehydrogenase activity. These findings may demonstrate an important molecular mechanism by which DHEA activity is mediated.

  8. Macrotransport-solidification kinetics modeling of equiaxed dendritic growth. Part 2: Computation problems and validation on INCONEL 718 superalloy castings

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M.

    1996-12-01

    In Part 1 of the article, a new analytical model that describes solidification of equiaxed dendrites was presented. In this part of the article, the model is used to simulate the solidification of INCONEL 718 superalloy castings. The model was incorporated into a commercial finite-element code, PROCAST. A special procedure called microlatent heat method (MLHM) was used for coupling between macroscopic heat flow and microscopic growth kinetics. A criterion for time-stepping selection in microscopic modeling has been derived in conjunction with MLHM. Reductions in computational (CPU) time up to 90 pct over the classic latent heat method were found by adopting this coupling. Validation of the model was performed against experimental data for an INCONEL 718 superalloy casting. In the present calculations, the model for globulitic dendrite was used. The evolution of fraction of solid calculated with the present model was compared with Scheil`s model and experiments. An important feature in solidification of INCONEL 718 is the detrimental Laves phase. Laves phase content is directly related to the intensity of microsegregation of niobium, which is very sensitive to the evolution of the fraction of solid. It was found that thee is a critical cooling rate at which the amount of Laves phase is maximum. The critical cooling rate is not a function of material parameters (diffusivity, partition coefficient, etc.). It depends only on the grain size and solidification time. The predictions generated with the present model are shown to agree very well with experiments.

  9. Co-phasing primary mirror segments of an optical space telescope using a long stroke Zernike WFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Kate; Wallace, J. K.; Pellegrino, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Static Zernike phase-contrast plates have been used extensively in microscopy for half a century and, more recently, in optical telescopes for wavefront sensing. A dynamic Zernike wavefront sensor (WFS) with four phase shifts, for reducing error due to spurious light and eliminating other asynchronous noise, has been proposed for use in adaptive optics. Here, we propose adapting this method for co-phasing the primary mirror of a segmented space telescope. In order to extend the dynamic range of the WFS, which has a maximum range of +/ - λ/2, a phase- contrast plate with multiple steps, both positive and negative, has been developed such that errors as large as +/ - 10λ can be sensed. The manufacturing tolerances have been incorporated into simulations, which demonstrate that performance impacts are minimal. We show that the addition of this small optical plate along with a high precision linear translation stage at the prime focus of a telescope and pupil viewing capability can provide extremely accurate segment phasing with a simple white-light fringe fitting algorithm and a closed-loop controller. The original focal-plane geometry of a centro-symmetric phase shifting element is replaced with a much less constrained shape, such as a slot. Also, a dedicated pupil imager is not strictly required; an existing pupil sampler such as a Shack-Hartmann (SH) WFS can be used just as effectively, allowing simultaneous detection of wavefront errors using both intensity and spot positions on the SH-WFS. This could lead to an efficient synergy between Zernike and SH-WFS, enabling segment phasing in conjunction with high-dynamic range sensing.

  10. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; Zhao, Qi; Rutkowski, Stephen F.; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2016-07-05

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (Hci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (Br) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH)max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of higher Ti compositions yielded anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying

  11. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    DOE PAGES

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; ...

    2016-07-05

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (Hci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (Br) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH)max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of higher Ti compositions yieldedmore » anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying superior magnetic properties in the 7.5% Ti

  12. Processing of alnico permanent magnets by advanced directional solidification methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Min; Johnson, Francis; Zhang, Wanming; Zhao, Qi; Rutkowski, Stephen F.; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2016-12-01

    Advanced directional solidification methods have been used to produce large (>15 cm length) castings of Alnico permanent magnets with highly oriented columnar microstructures. In combination with subsequent thermomagnetic and draw thermal treatment, this method was used to enable the high coercivity, high-Titanium Alnico composition of 39% Co, 29.5% Fe, 14% Ni, 7.5% Ti, 7% Al, 3% Cu (wt%) to have an intrinsic coercivity (Hci) of 2.0 kOe, a remanence (Br) of 10.2 kG, and an energy product (BH)max of 10.9 MGOe. These properties compare favorably to typical properties for the commercial Alnico 9. Directional solidification of higher Ti compositions yielded anisotropic columnar grained microstructures if high heat extraction rates through the mold surface of at least 200 kW/m2 were attained. This was achieved through the use of a thin walled (5 mm thick) high thermal conductivity SiC shell mold extracted from a molten Sn bath at a withdrawal rate of at least 200 mm/h. However, higher Ti compositions did not result in further increases in magnet performance. Images of the microstructures collected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal a majority α phase with inclusions of secondary αγ phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that the α phase has a spinodally decomposed microstructure of FeCo-rich needles in a NiAl-rich matrix. In the 7.5% Ti composition the diameter distribution of the FeCo needles was bimodal with the majority having diameters of approximately 50 nm with a small fraction having diameters of approximately 10 nm. The needles formed a mosaic pattern and were elongated along one <001> crystal direction (parallel to the field used during magnetic annealing). Cu precipitates were observed between the needles. Regions of abnormal spinodal morphology appeared to correlate with secondary phase precipitates. The presence of these abnormalities did not prevent the material from displaying superior magnetic properties in the 7.5% Ti

  13. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  14. Directional Solidification and Mechanical Properties of NiAl-NiAlTa Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Chen, X. F.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Directional solidification of eutectic alloys is a promising technique for producing in-situ composite materials exhibiting a balance of properties. Consequently, the microstructure, creep strength and fracture toughness of directionally solidified NiAl-NiAlTa alloys were investigated. Directional solidification was performed by containerless processing techniques to minimize alloy contamination. The eutectic composition was found to be NiAl-15.5 at% Ta and well-aligned microstructures were produced at this composition. A near-eutectic alloy of NiAl-14.5Ta was also investigated. Directional solidification of the near-eutectic composition resulted in microstructures consisting of NiAl dendrites surrounded by aligned eutectic regions. The off-eutectic alloy exhibited promising compressive creep strengths compared to other NiAl-based intermetallics, while preliminary testing indicated that the eutectic alloy was competitive with Ni-base single crystal superalloys. The room temperature toughness of these two-phase alloys was similar to that of polycrystalline NiAl even with the presence of the brittle Laves phase NiAlTa.

  15. Macrotransport-solidification kinetics modeling of equiaxed dendritic growth. Part 1: Model development and discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M.

    1996-12-01

    An analytical model that describes solidification of equiaxed dendrites has been developed for use in solidification kinetics-macrotransport modeling. It relaxes some of the assumptions made in previous models, such as the Dustin-Kurz, Rappaz-Thevoz, and Kanetkar-Stefanescu models. It is assumed that nuclei grow as unperturbed spheres until the radius of the sphere becomes larger than the minimum radius of instability. Then, growth of the dendrites is related to morphological instability and is calculated as a function of melt undercooling around the dendrite tips, which is controlled by the bulk temperature and the intrinsic volume average concentration of the liquid phase. When the general morphology of equiaxed dendrites is considered, the evolution of the fraction of solid is related to the interdendritic branching and dynamic coarsening (through the evolution of the specific interfacial areas) and to the topology and movement of the dendrite envelope (through the tip growth velocity and dendrite shape factor). The particular case of this model is the model for globulitic an overall solute and thermal balance around a growing equiaxed dendrite grain within a spherical closed system. Overall solute balance in the integral form is obtained by a complete analytical solution of the diffusion field in both liquid and solid phases. The bulk temperature is obtained from the solution of the macrotransport-solidification kinetics problem.

  16. Solidification and solid state transformations during cooling of chromium-molybdenum white cast irons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demello, J. D. B.; Durand-Charre, M.; Hamar-Thibault, S.

    1983-09-01

    Two series of Cr, Mo white cast irons were investigated by different techniques. Differential thermal analysis was carried out to determine the liquidus and eutectic temperatures. Unidirectional solidification was used to promote coarser structures easier to analyze. Furthermore, the microstructures of the sample, quenched during a slow unidirectional solidification, illustrate the behavior of the alloy during continuous cooling. The precipitates were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy and microprobe analysis. The main findings are reported: (1) a correlation was found between the end of solidification and the chromium to carbon ratio; (2) the determination was made of the crystallization path; (3) in some high Cr/C ratio alloys a peritectic reaction occurs on the border of the grain giving a δ ferritic phase; (4) then this δ ferrite was found to decompose in a complex manner giving austenite and ferrite probably in a lamellar structure, then precipitates of M6C and Mo2C in the austenitic and ferritic phases, respectively; and (5) according to the kinetics of cooling, some alloys undergo martensitic and bainitic transformations.

  17. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study.

  18. Transient magmatic convection prolonged by solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandeis, Genevieve; Marsh, Bruce D.

    1990-01-01

    Fluid dynamic experiments have been conducted on the solidification of a paraffin layer, in order to elucidate the transient stage of convection created in cooling magma by the fact that strong changes in viscosity with crystallization lock up within an inwardly propagating crust much buoyancy that would otherwise be available to drive convection. The interior of the magma remains isothermal, and the temperature decreases uniformly until it is locked at the convective liquidus; the crystals are fine hairlike dendrites without major compositional differentiations. Measurements over time are presented of crust thickness, convective velocity, and heat transfer.

  19. Effects of G-Jitter on Directional Solidification of a Binary Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjapiyaporn, C.; Timchenko, V.; deVahlDavis, G.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1999-01-01

    A study of directional solidification of a weak binary alloy (specifically, Bi - 1 at% Sn) based on the fixed grid single domain approach is being undertaken. The enthalpy method is used to solve for the temperature field over the computational domain including both the solid and liquid phases; latent heat evolution is treated with the aid of an effective specific heat coefficient. A source term accounting for the release of solute into the liquid during solidification has been incorporated into the solute transport equation. The vorticity-stream function formulation is used to describe thermo-solutal convection in the liquid region. In this paper we present a numerical simulation of g-jitter. A background gravity of 1 microgram has been assumed, and new results for the effects of periodic disturbances over a range of amplitudes and frequencies on solute field and segregation have been presented.

  20. Temperature Histories of Structural Steel Welds Calculated Using Solidification-Boundary Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2016-09-01

    Temperature histories of structural steel deep-penetration welds are presented, which are calculated using numerical-analytical basis functions and solidification-boundary constraints. These weld temperature histories can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, which include numerical models for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these temperature histories can be used parametrically for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification boundaries. In addition, the present study uses experimentally measured estimates of the heat effect zone edge to examine the consistency of calculated temperature histories for steel welds.

  1. Directional solidification of Bi-Mn alloys using an applied magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decarlo, J. L.; Pirich, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    Off-eutectic compositions of Bi-Mn were directionally solidified in applied transverse magnetic fields up to 3 kG, to determine the effects on thermal and solutal convection. Plane front directional solidification of eutectic and near-eutectic Bi-Mn results in a two-phase rodlike morphology consisting of ferromagnetic MnBi rods in a Bi solid solution matrix. Compositions of either side of the eutectic were studied in growth orientations vertically up and down. Temperature gradient was monitored during growth by means of an in-situ thermocouple. For Bi-rich compositions, the magnetic field appeared to increase mixing as determined from thermal, morphological, chemical, and magnetic analyses. For Mn-rich compositions, morphological and chemical analyses suggest some reduction in mixing due to application of the magnetic force. The capability for carrying out directional solidification of Bi-Mn in high longitudinal magnetic fields was established.

  2. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Baicheng; Xu, Qingyan; Jing, Tao; Shen, Houfa; Han, Zhiqiang

    2011-04-01

    The development of the aviation, energy and automobile industries requires an advanced integrated product/process R&D systems which could optimize the product and the process design as well. Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) is a promising approach to fulfill this requirement and make the product and process development efficient, economic, and environmentally friendly. Advances in multi-scale modeling of solidification and casting processes, including mathematical models as well as engineering applications are presented in the paper. Dendrite morphology of magnesium and aluminum alloy of solidification process by using phase field and cellular automaton methods, mathematical models of segregation of large steel ingot, and microstructure models of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade casting are studied and discussed. In addition, some engineering case studies, including microstructure simulation of aluminum casting for automobile industry, segregation of large steel ingot for energy industry, and microstructure simulation of unidirectionally solidified turbine blade castings for aviation industry are discussed.

  3. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-18

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  4. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  5. Primary gas- and particle-phase emissions and secondary organic aerosol production from gasoline and diesel off-road engines.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Timothy D; Tkacik, Daniel S; Presto, Albert A; Zhang, Mang; Jathar, Shantanu H; Nguyen, Ngoc T; Massetti, John; Truong, Tin; Cicero-Fernandez, Pablo; Maddox, Christine; Rieger, Paul; Chattopadhyay, Sulekha; Maldonado, Hector; Maricq, M Matti; Robinson, Allen L

    2013-12-17

    Dilution and smog chamber experiments were performed to characterize the primary emissions and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from gasoline and diesel small off-road engines (SOREs). These engines are high emitters of primary gas- and particle-phase pollutants relative to their fuel consumption. Two- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs emit much more (up to 3 orders of magnitude more) nonmethane organic gases (NMOGs), primary PM and organic carbon than newer on-road gasoline vehicles (per kg of fuel burned). The primary emissions from a diesel transportation refrigeration unit were similar to those of older, uncontrolled diesel engines used in on-road vehicles (e.g., premodel year 2007 heavy-duty diesel trucks). Two-strokes emitted the largest fractional (and absolute) amount of SOA precursors compared to diesel and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs; however, 35-80% of the NMOG emissions from the engines could not be speciated using traditional gas chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography. After 3 h of photo-oxidation in a smog chamber, dilute emissions from both 2- and 4-stroke gasoline SOREs produced large amounts of semivolatile SOA. The effective SOA yield (defined as the ratio of SOA mass to estimated mass of reacted precursors) was 2-4% for 2- and 4-stroke SOREs, which is comparable to yields from dilute exhaust from older passenger cars and unburned gasoline. This suggests that much of the SOA production was due to unburned fuel and/or lubrication oil. The total PM contribution of different mobile source categories to the ambient PM burden was calculated by combining primary emission, SOA production and fuel consumption data. Relative to their fuel consumption, SOREs are disproportionately high total PM sources; however, the vastly greater fuel consumption of on-road vehicles renders them (on-road vehicles) the dominant mobile source of ambient PM in the Los Angeles area.

  6. Cellular Model Simulations of Solidification Structures in Ternary Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsoruji, Ghazi H.

    Solidification processes are an important part of many modem manufacturing processes. They can be found in different casting and welding processes. The solidification structure is very important for the quality of any product manufactured by such processes. This is so because the casting or weldment microstructure determines their mechanical properties. For welding processes, solidification theories can explain the evolution of the fusion zone microstructure and how this microstructure is influenced by the solidification parameters such as the temperature gradient and the solidification rate. In order to investigate the solidification parameters' effect on the microstructure, a numerical model based on Cellular Automaton combined with the finite difference method (CA-FD) is presented in this thesis. The simulation is conducted on a finite three dimensional control volume of the fusion zone. The model takes into account the solute-, curvature-, and kinetic undercooling. The temperatures are assumed to be distributed linearly within the control volume. The model predicts the morphology and density of the microstructure according to different values of the cooling rate and initial temperatures. It is demonstrated that the solidification structure has a columnar morphology at high temperature gradients and low cooling rates. The morphology changes to dendritic as the temperature gradient decreases and/or the cooling rate increases. It is also shown that an increase in the cooling rate results in the densification of the solidification structure. The results demonstrate that an increase in the initial substrate roughness can result in the increase in the density of the solidification structure. The simulation results show an agreement with the constitutional undercooling theory of solidification structures.

  7. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J.-M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guérin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  8. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; ...

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelatedmore » at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global

  9. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is

  10. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; ...

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification.more » We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.« less

  11. Proton Radiography Peers into Metal Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Cooley, Jason C.; Morris, Christopher; Merrill, Frank E.; Hollander, Brian J.; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Ott, Thomas J.; Barker, Martha R.; Tucker, Tim J.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Fezzaa, Kamel; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Clarke, Kester D.; Montalvo, Joel D.; Field, Robert D.; Thoma, Dan J.; Smith, James L.; Teter, David F.

    2013-06-19

    Historically, metals are cut up and polished to see the structure and to infer how processing influences the evolution. We can now peer into a metal during processing without destroying it using proton radiography. Understanding the link between processing and structure is important because structure profoundly affects the properties of engineering materials. Synchrotron x-ray radiography has enabled real-time glimpses into metal solidification. However, x-ray energies favor the examination of small volumes and low density metals. In this study, we use high energy proton radiography for the first time to image a large metal volume (>10,000 mm3) during melting and solidification. We also show complementary x-ray results from a small volume (<1mm3), bridging four orders of magnitude. In conclusion, real-time imaging will enable efficient process development and the control of the structure evolution to make materials with intended properties; it will also permit the development of experimentally informed, predictive structure and process models.

  12. Carburizer Effect on Cast Iron Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janerka, Krzysztof; Kondracki, Marcin; Jezierski, Jan; Szajnar, Jan; Stawarz, Marcin

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents the effect of carburizing materials on cast iron solidification and crystallization. The studies consisted of cast iron preparation from steel scrap and different carburizers. For a comparison, pig iron was exclusively used in a solid charge. Crystallization analysis revealed the influence of the carburizer material on the crystallization curves as well as differences in the solidification paths of cast iron prepared with the use of different charge materials. The carburizers' influence on undercooling during the eutectic crystallization process was analyzed. The lowest undercooling rate was recorded for the melt with pig iron, then for synthetic graphite, natural graphite, anthracite, and petroleum coke (the highest undercooling rate). So a hypothesis was formulated that eutectic cells are created most effectively with the presence of carbon from pig iron (the highest nucleation potential), and then for the graphite materials (crystallographic similarity with the carbon precipitation in the cast iron). The most difficult eutectic crystallization is for anthracite and petroleum coke (higher undercooling is necessary). This knowledge can be crucial when the foundry plant is going to change the solid charge composition replacing the pig iron by steel scrap and the recarburization process.

  13. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Reeves, F. A.; Jeter, L. B.; Sledd, J. D.; Cole, J. M.; Lehoczky, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is a five zone tubular furnace designed for Bridgman-Stockbarger, other techniques of crystal growth involving multiple temperature zones such as vapor transport experiments and other materials science experiments. The five zones are primarily designed to produce uniform hot and cold temperature regions separated by an adiabatic region constructed of a heat extraction plate and an insert to reduce radiation from the hot to the cold zone. The hot and cold zone temperatures are designed to reach 1600 C and 1100 C, respectively. AADSF operates on a Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure (MPESS) within the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle on the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP) missions. Two successful flights, both employing the directional solidification or Bridgman Stockbarger technique for crystal growth have been made, and crystals of HgCdTe and PbSnTe grown in microgravity have been produced on USMP-2 and USMP-3, respectively. The addition of a Sample Exchange Mechanism (SEM) will enable three different samples to be processed on future flights including the USMP-4 mission.

  14. Method for treating materials for solidification

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Martin, Hollis L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for treating materials such as wastes for solidification to form a solid, substantially nonleachable product. Addition of reactive silica rather than ordinary silica to the material when bringing the initial molar ratio of its silica constituent to a desired ratio within a preselected range increases the solubility and retention of the materials in the solidified matrix. Materials include hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and heavy metal species. Amounts of other constituents of the material, in addition to its silica content are also added so that the molar ratio of each of these constituents is within the preselected ranges for the final solidified product. The mixture is then solidified by cement solidification or vitrification. The method can be used to treat a variety of wastes, including but not limited to spent filter aids from waste water treatment, waste sludges, combinations of spent filter aids and waste sludges, combinations of supernate and waste sludges, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, combinations of incinerator ash and offgas blowdown, cementitious wastes and contaminated soils.

  15. Investigation of the Solidification Behavior of NH4Cl Aqueous Solution Based on a Volume-Averaged Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ri; Zhou, Liming; Wang, Jian; Li, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Based on solidification theory and a volume-averaged multiphase solidification model, the solidification process of NH4Cl-70 pct H2O was numerically simulated and experimentally verified. Although researchers have investigated the solidification process of NH4Cl-70 pct H2O, most existing studies have been focused on analysis of a single phenomenon, such as the formation of channel segregation, convection types, and the formation of grains. Based on prior studies, by combining numerical simulation and experimental investigation, all phenomena of the entire computational domain of the solidification process of an NH4Cl aqueous solution were comprehensively investigated for the first time in this study. In particular, the sedimentation of equiaxed grains in the ingot and the induced convection were reproduced. In addition, the formation mechanism of segregation was studied in depth. The calculation demonstrated that the equiaxed grains settled from the wall of the mold and gradually aggregated at the bottom of the mold; when the volume fraction reached a critical value, the columnar grains stopped growing, thus completing the columnar-to-equiaxed transition (CET). Because of solute partitioning, negative segregation occurred at the bottom region of the ingot concentrated with grains, whereas a wide range of positive segregation occurred in the unsolidified, upper part of the ingot. Experimental investigation indicated that the predicted results of the sedimentation of the equiaxed grains in the ingot and the convection types agreed well with the experimental results, thus revealing that the sedimentation of solid phase and convection in the solidification process are the key factors responsible for macrosegregation.

  16. Effect of Marangoni Convection Generated by Voids on Segregation During Low-G and 1-G Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassemi, M.; Fripp, A.; Rashidnia, N.; deGroh, H.

    1999-01-01

    Solidification experiments, especially microgravity solidification experiments are often hampered by the evolution of unwanted voids or bubbles in the melt. Although these voids and/or bubbles are highly undesirable, there are currently no effective means of preventing their formation or eliminating their adverse effects, particularly, during low-g experiments. Marangoni Convection caused by these voids can drastically change the transport processes in the melt and, therefore, introduce enormous difficulties in interpreting the results of the space investigations. Recent microgravity experiments by Matthiesen, Andrews, and Fripp are all good examples of how the presence of voids and bubbles affect the outcome of costly space experiments and significantly increase the level of difficulty in interpreting their results. In this work we examine mixing caused by Marangoni convection generated by voids and bubbles in the melt during both 1-g and low-g solidification experiments. The objective of the research is to perform a detailed and comprehensive combined numerical-experimental study of Marangoni convection caused by voids during the solidification process and to show how it can affect segregation and growth conditions by modifying the flow, temperature, and species concentration fields in the melt. While Marangoni convection generated by bubbles and voids in the melt can lead to rapid mixing that would negate the benefits of microgravity processing, it could be exploited in some terrestrial processing to ensure effective communication between a melt/solid interface and a gas phase stoichiometry control zone. Thus we hope that this study will not only aid us in interpreting the results of microgravity solidification experiments hampered by voids and bubbles but to guide us in devising possible means of minimizing the adverse effects of Marangoni convection in future space experiments or of exploiting its beneficial mixing features in ground-based solidification.

  17. Influence of a magnetic field during directional solidification of MAR-M 246 + Hf superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, J. Barry; Alter, Wendy; Schmidt, Dianne

    1991-01-01

    An area that has been almost totally overlooked in the optimization of properties in directionally solidified superalloys is the control of microstructural features through the application of a magnetic field during solidification. The influence of a magnetic field on the microstructural features of a nickel-base superalloys is investigated. Studies were performed on the dendritic MAR-M 246+Hf alloy, which was solidified under both a 5 K gauss magnetic field and under no-applied-field conditions. The possible influences of the magnetic field on the solidification process were observed by studying variations in microstructural features including volume fraction, surface area, number, and shape of the carbide particles. Stereological factors analyzed also included primary and secondary dendrite arm spacing and the volume fraction of the interdendritic eutectic constituent. Microprobe analysis was performed to determine the chemistry of the carbides, dendrites, and interdendritic constituents, and how it varied between field and no-field solidification samples. Experiments involving periodic application and removal of the magnetic field were also performed in order to permit a comparison with structural variations observed in a MAR-M 246+Hf alloy solidified during KC-135 high-g, low-g maneuvers.

  18. Macrosegregation in Al-7Si alloy caused by abrupt cross-section change during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, M.; Johnson, L.; Lauer, M.; Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    Hypoeutectic Al-7 wt .% Si alloys were directionally solidified vertically downward in cylindrical molds that incorporated an abrupt cross-section decrease (9.5 mm to 3.2 mm diameter) which, after 5 cm, reverted back to 9.5 mm diameter in a Bridgman furnace; two constant growth speeds and thermal gradients were investigated. Thermosolutal convection and cross-section-change-induced shrinkage flow effects on macrosegregation were investigated. Dendrite clustering and extensive radial macrosegregation was seen, particularly in the larger cross-sections, before contraction and after expansion, this more evident at the lower growth speed. This alloy shows positive longitudinal macrosegregation near cross-section decrease followed by negative macrosegregation right after it; the extent of macrosegregation, however, decreases with increasing growth speed. Primary dendrite steepling intensified as solidification proceeded into the narrower section and negative longitudinal macrosegregation was seen on the re-entrant shelves at expansion. A two-dimensional model accounting for both shrinkage and thermo-solutal convection was used to simulate solidification and the resulting mushy-zone steepling and macrosegregation. The experimentally observed longitudinal and radial macrosegregation associated with the cross-section changes during directional solidification of an Al-7Si alloy is well captured by the numerical simulations.

  19. Modeling of the flow-solidification interaction in thin slab casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakhrushev, A.; Wu, M.; Ludwig, A.; Tang, Y.; Hackl, G.; Nitzl, G.

    2012-07-01

    A key issue for modelling the thin slab casting (TSC) is to consider the evolution of the solid shell, which strongly interacts with the turbulent flow and in the meantime is subject to continuous deformation due to the funnel shape (curvature) of the mould. Here an enthalpy-based mixture solidification model with consideration of turbulent flow [Prescott and Incropera, ASME HTD, vol. 280, 1994, pp. 59] is employed, and further enhanced to include the deforming solid shell. The solid velocity in the fully-solidified strand shell and partially-solidified mushy zone is estimated by solving the Laplace's equation. Primary goals of this work are to examine the sensitivity of the modelling result to different model implementation schemes, and to explore the importance of the deforming and moving solid shell in the solidification. Therefore, a 2D benchmark, to mimic the solidification and deformation behaviour of the thin slab casting, is firstly simulated and evaluated. An example of 3D TSC is also presented. Due to the limitation of the current computation resources additional numerical techniques like parallel computing and mesh adaptation are necessarily applied to ensure the calculation accuracy for the full-3D TSC.

  20. Growth of tertiary dendritic arms during the transient directional solidification of hypoeutectic Pb-Sb alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, Emmanuelle S.; Rosa, Daniel M.; Garcia, Amauri; Spinelli, José E.

    2011-12-01

    Despite the importance of a complete characterization of dendritic patterns in castings, the availability of studies on the development of tertiary dendrite arms is scarce in the literature. In the present study, the tip cooling rate, local solidification time, primary and tertiary dendrite arm spacings have been determined in Pb-Sb alloys castings directionally solidified under unsteady-state heat flow conditions. The alloys compositions experimentally examined are widely used in the as-cast condition for the manufacture of positive and negative grids of lead-acid batteries. The initial growth of tertiary dendritic arms from the secondary branches was found to occur only for a Pb-3.5 wt% Sb alloy at cooling rates in the range 0.4-0.2 K/s, with no evidence of this spacing pattern for Pb-Sb alloys having lower solute content. Tertiary dendritic branches have been observed along the entire casting lengths for alloys of the Pb-Sb hypoeutectic range having compositions higher than 4.0 wt% Sb. It is shown that a power function experimental law with a characteristic -0.55 exponent is able to characterize the tertiary spacing evolution with the solidification cooling rate for alloys compositions ≥4.0 wt% Sb. The only exception was the Pb-3.5 wt% Sb alloy for which λ 3 exhibited significant lower values when compared with the experimental values obtained for the other Pb-Sb alloys for a same solidification cooling rate.

  1. Solidification and immobilization of MSWI fly ash through aluminate geopolymerization: Based on partial charge model analysis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lei; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xingbao

    2016-12-01

    This study presents an integrated synopsis of the solidification and immobilization mechanisms of fly ash-based geopolymers. A rational analysis of the ion reactions involved in geopolymerization was conducted using the partial charge model (PCM). The following conclusions were obtained: (1) heavy metal cations cannot be immobilized as counter cations through exchange with Na(+); (2) isomorphous substitution of heavy metals in the geopolymer can be expected from the condensation reaction between the hydrolyzed heavy metal species and aluminosilicate; (3) the hydrolyzed species condensation could result in solidification and immobilization and be promoted by aluminates; and (4) a geopolymer with the highest immobilization and solidification efficiency can be obtained at an intermediate pH value. The partial charges on the framework of Si, Al, and O in the primary building blocks of aluminosilicate and heavy metal-doped aluminosilicate were confirmed through XPS and (29)Si NMR spectroscopy analyses. The effects of activator dosage and types on fly ash-based geopolymers were also investigated, and the results verify the PCM analysis. A geopolymer with the highest strength was produced at an intermediate alkaline dosage. Silicate or aluminate introduced into the activator improved the strength and immobilization efficiency, and aluminate exhibited better performance. Heavy metals bound to the exchangeable or acid-soluble fraction were transformed into aluminosilicate species during geopolymerization.

  2. Pre-Service Primary Science Teachers' Understandings of the Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Solid-Liquid Phase Transition of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalcin, Fatma Aggul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore pre-service primary teachers' understandings of the effect of temperature and pressure on the solid-liquid phase transition of water. In the study a survey approach was used, and the sample consisted of one-hundred and three, third year pre-service primary science teachers. As a tool for data collection, a test…

  3. Solidification Processing of Immiscible Liquids in the Presence of Applied Ultrasonic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Shinwood; Grugel, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    Uniform microstructural development during solidification of immiscible liquids on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Experimental results to evaluate microstructural phase distributions, based on other liquid-liquid immiscibility systems, will also be presented.

  4. Characterization of Transport and Solidification in the Metal Recycling Processes

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C. Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1997-08-06

    The characterization of the transport and solidification of metal in the melting and casting processes is significant for the optimization of the radioactively contaminated metal recycling and refining processes. . In this research project, the transport process in the melting and solidification of metal was numerically predicted, and the microstructure and radionuclide distribution have been characterized by scanning electron microscope/electron diffractive X-ray (SEWEDX) analysis using cesium chloride (CSC1) as the radionuclide surrogate. In the melting and solidification process, a resistance furnace whose heating and cooling rates are program- controlled in the helium atmosphere was used. The characterization procedures included weighing, melting and solidification, weighing after solidification, sample preparation, and SEM/EDX analysis. This analytical methodology can be used to characterize metal recycling and refining products in order to evaluate the performance of the recycling process. The data obtained provide much valuable information that is necessary for the enhancement of radioactive contaminated metal decontamination and recycling technologies. The numerical method for the prediction of the melting and solidification process can be implemented in the control and monitoring system-of the melting and casting process in radioactive contaminated metal recycling. The use of radionuclide surrogates instead of real radionuclides enables the research to be performed without causing harmfid effects on people or the community. This characterization process has been conducted at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University since October 1995. Tests have been conducted on aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) using cesium chloride (CSCI) as a radionuclide surrogate, and information regarding the radionuclide transfer and distribution in melting and solidification process has been obtained. The numerical simulation of

  5. Real-Time Investigation of Solidification of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William; Sen, Subhayu

    1999-01-01

    Casting of metal matrix composites can develop imperfections either as non- uniform distributions of the reinforcement phases or as outright defects such as porosity. The solidification process itself initiates these problems. To identify or rectify the problems, one must be able to detect and to study how they form. Until, recently this was only possible by experiments that employed transparent metal model organic materials with glass beads to simulate the reinforcing phases. Recent results obtained from a Space Shuttle experiment (using transparent materials) will be used to illustrate the fundamental physics that dictates the final distribution of agglomerates in a casting. We have further extended this real time investigation to aluminum alloys using X-ray microscopy. A variety of interface-particle interactions will be discussed and how they alter the final properties of the composite. A demonstration of how a solid-liquid interface is distorted by nearby voids or particles, particle pushing or engulfment by the interface, formations of wormholes, Aggregation of particles, and particle-induced segregation of alloying elements will be presented.

  6. Treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme with cetuximab, radiotherapy and temozolomide (GERT) – phase I/II trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E; Heeger, Steffen; Haselmann, Renate; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Jürgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Background The implementation of combined radiochemotherapy (RCHT) with temozolomide (TMZ) has lead to a significant increase in overall survival times in patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, outcome still remains unsatisfactory. The majority of GBMs show an overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, addition of EGFR-inhibition with cetuximab to the current standard treatment approach with radiotherapy and TMZ seems promising. Methods/design GERT is a one-armed single-center phase I/II trial. In a first step, dose-escalation of TMZ from 50 mg/m2 to 75 mg/m2 together with radiotherapy and cetuximab will be performed. Should safety be proven, the phase II trial will be initiated with the standard dose of 75 mg/m2 of TMZ. Cetuximab will be applied in the standard application dose of 400 mg/m2 in week 1, thereafter at a dose of 250 mg/m2 weekly. A total of 46 patients will be included into this phase I/II trial. Primary endpoints are feasibility and toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall and progression-free survival. An interim analysis will be performed after inclusion of 15 patients into the main study. Patients' enrolment will be performed over a period of 2 years. The observation time will end 2 years after inclusion of the last patient. Discussion The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined RCHT-immunotherapy with TMZ and cetuximab as first-line treatment for patients with primary GBM. PMID:16709245

  7. Solidification science in cast MMCs: The influence of merton flemings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohatgi, Pradeep; Asthana, Rajiv

    2001-09-01

    The solidification science of cast metalmatrix composites (MMC) evolved as a subset of the broad field of solidification of monolithic alloys pioneered by Merton Flemings and his students. As a result of advances in solidification, the cast MMC field has evolved from its early incarnation—employing empirical research to engineer novel materials using versatile and cost-effective casting techniques—to using solidification-science-based approaches to tailor advanced materials for application-specific needs. The current and emerging applications of cast MMCs in a variety of automotive, aerospace, electronic packaging, and consumer-good industries exemplify the maturity of the field and the materials. Innovations in composite-forming techniques and efforts at wider industrial acceptance of MMCs will undoubtedly continue. However, the scientific principles underlying the solidification microstructure evolution that governs the composite properties have become well established, to a great extent, due to Flemings’ early, pioneering work on monolithic alloys and some of his more recent studies on solidification of reinforced metals. This paper reviews some aspects of solidification of discontinuously reinforced cast metals that owe their current understanding to Flemings’ contributions, in particular, the scientific understanding of macro- and microsegregation, fluidity and rheology of multiphase slurries, and stircasting, semi-solid casting, and preform infiltration. Current research to develop and test prototype components made from cast composites, including Al-flyash, Cu-graphite, Al-graphite, Al-alumina, and SiC-Al, is also presented, along with directions for future research.

  8. Improved Crystal Quality By Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.; Wang, Yaz-Hen; Wang, Jian-Bin

    2003-01-01

    Many microgravity directional solidification experiments yielded ingots with portions that grew without contacting the ampoule wall, leading to greatly improved crystallographic perfection. Our long term goals have been: (1) To develop a complete understanding of all of the phenomena of detached solidification.; (2) To make it possible to achieve detached solidification reproducibly; (3) To increase crystallographic perfection through detached solidification. We have three major achievements to report here: (1) We obtained a new material balance solution for the Moving Meniscus Model of detached solidification. This solution greatly clarifies the physics as well as the roles of the parameters in the system; (2) We achieved detached solidification of InSb growing on earth in BN-coated ampoules; (3) We performed an extensive series of experiments on freezing water that showed how to form multiple gas bubbles or tubes on the ampoule wall. However, these did not propagate around the wall and lead to fully detached solidification unless the ampoule wall was extremely rough and non-wetted.

  9. Acupuncture as a primary and independent treatment in the acute phases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yuanyuan; Lu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is an otological emergency defined as a rapid hearing loss, seriously affects patient's social life. To data, no study has reported the treatment by acupuncture alone in the acute phase. In this report, Acupuncture and Moxibustion therapy of excitation-focus transfer is outlined. The patient was a 26-year-old young woman who had an SSHL coupled with ear fullness. The patient had no past medical history, but she had undergone variable emotions and had a history of excessive noise exposure. The patient refused to receive any medicine especially steroids and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. She just only received acupuncture treatment. Her symptoms and outcome measurements were improved every week and completely recovered after the last week. Even though the article presents a single case and is based on self-reports, there are very clear trends on how patients with SSHL responded to acupuncture treatments. PMID:27368045

  10. Characterization of particulate and vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in indoor and outdoor air of primary schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krugly, Edvinas; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Sidaraviciute, Ruta; Ciuzas, Darius; Prasauskas, Tadas; Kauneliene, Violeta; Stasiulaitiene, Inga; Kliucininkas, Linas

    2014-01-01

    The indoor air of schools is considered as one of the most important factors affecting the health of children. The aim of the presented research was to characterize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in indoor and outdoor air of schools. The sampling campaign was conducted during the heating season of 2011/2012. Five primary schools from various urban settings in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. 150 daily samples of particulate and vapor phases were collected during the sampling period. The ultrasonic extractions followed by the gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy (GS/MS) analyses were used for the determination of PAHs. The concentration of total PAHs in the PM2.5 fraction ranged from 20.3 to 131.1 ng m-3, while total suspended particles (TSP) fraction contained from 19.9 to 80.3 ng m-3 of total PAHs. The vapor phase concentration of PAHs ranged from 67.2 to 372.5 ng m-3. The most abundant PAH in both phases was naphthalene. In order to define sources of indoor and outdoor PAHs several source apportionment methods were applied. The analysis revealed that emissions from motor vehicles and fuel burning for heating purposes were the major sources of PAHs in the city of Kaunas.

  11. Segregation effects during solidification in weightless melts. [effects of evaporation and solidification on crystalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, C.

    1975-01-01

    Computer programs are developed and used in the study of the combined effects of evaporation and solidification in space processing. The temperature and solute concentration profiles during directional solidification of binary alloys with surface evaporation were mathematically formulated. Computer results are included along with an econotechnical model of crystal growth. This model allows: prediction of crystal size, quality, and cost; systematic selection of the best growth equipment or alloy system; optimization of growth or material parameters; and a maximization of zero-gravity effects. Segregation in GaAs crystals was examined along with vibration effects on GaAs crystal growth. It was found that a unique segregation pattern and strong convention currents exist in GaAs crystal growth. Some beneficial effects from vibration during GaAs growth were discovered. The implications of the results in space processing are indicated.

  12. Solidification Behavior in Newly Designed Ni-Rich Ni-Ti-Based Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samal, Sumanta; Biswas, Krishanu; Phanikumar, Gandham

    2016-12-01

    The present investigation reports phase and microstructure evolution during solidification of novel Ni-rich Ni-Ti-based alloys, Ni60Ti40, Ni50Cu10Ti40, Ni48Cu10Co2Ti40, and Ni48Cu10Co2Ti38Ta2 during suction casting. The design philosophy of the multicomponent alloys involves judicious selection of alloying elements such as Cu, Co, and Ta in the near Ni60Ti40 eutectic alloy by replacing both Ni and Ti so that phase mixture in the microstructure remains the same from the binary to quinary alloy. The basic objective is to study the effect of addition of Cu, Co, and Ta on the phase evolution and transformation in the Ni-rich Ni-Ti-based alloys. The detailed electron microscopic studies on these suction cast alloys reveal the presence of ultrafine eutectic lamellae between NiTi and Ni3Ti phases along with dendritic NiTi and Ti2Ni phases. It has also been observed that in the binary (Ni60Ti40) alloy, the ordered NiTi (B2) phase transforms to trigonal (R) phase followed by NiTi martensitic phase (M-phase), i.e., B2 → R-phase → M-phase during solid-state cooling. However, the addition of alloying elements such as Cu, Co to the binary (Ni60Ti40) alloy suppresses the martensitic transformation of the ordered NiTi (B2) dendrite. Thus, in the ternary and quaternary alloys, the ordered NiTi (B2) phase is transformed to only trigonal (R) phase, i.e., B2 → R-phase. The secondary precipitate of Ti2Ni has been observed in all of the studied alloys. Interestingly, Ni48Cu10Co2Ti38Ta2 quinary alloy shows the disordered nature of NiTi dendrites. The experimentally observed solidification path is in good agreement with Gulliver-Scheil simulated path for binary alloy, whereas simulated solidification path deviates from the experimental results in case of ternary, quaternary, and quinary alloys.

  13. Deformation of Magma-Filled Bodies during Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. S.; Damjanac, B.

    2007-12-01

    As magma or lava solidifies, volatiles are concentrated in the residual liquid. The result will be expansion (including venting) or pressurization. The mechanism behind this is well-described. A rough hand calculation indicates that an alkali basalt with 4 wt% volatiles would attain attain 12 MPa with 50% crystallization at constant volume. Such pressures would easily be enough to break through the roof of a typical lava tube. If confined in a tunnel deeper in the ground, even in a relatively weak rock, crystallization would be virtually isochoric. However, in a sill at depths of only a few hundred meters, expansion could result in more nearly isobaric crystallization. In either event, before cooling enough to become a brittle solid, the outer portions of the magma would reach a viscoplastic state that could seal in any remaining vapor phase. This would allow pressures to increase further as solidification progressed. Using PELE, a computer code developed to calculate the progress of solidification (Boudreau, 2005), we calculate isochoric and isobaric equilibrium crystallization of alkali basalt and obtain pressures and viscosities as a function of temperature. For an initial pressure of 6 MPa and 0.85 weight percent water, the liquidus is 1433 K. The isochoric pressure reaches 11 MPa at 1293 K with 57% of the mass crystallized; the bulk viscosity is about 3 MPa-s, but that of the residual liquid is only 1 kPa-s. At the same temperature, the isobaric path results in 60% crystallization and a viscosity on the order of 10 kPa-s. A tabular body with these properties would be easily deformed by sagging of the roof if the viscoplastic seal were breached, resulting in a saucer shape. With 91% of the mass crystallized, the isochoric pressure exceeds 28 MPa at 1173 K. By that time, the bulk viscosity of the nearly crystallized mass is on the order of 1025 Pa-s, effectively solid, and the viscosity of the residual liquid (there is also a vapor phase) is about 50 k

  14. Effect of cooling rate during solidification on the structure of high-speed steel powder particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ershova, L.S.; Smirnov, V.P.

    1985-08-01

    The structure and properties of a P/M high-speed steel form during solidification, hot plastic working, and subsequent heat treatment are the focus here. The character of steel structure variation under the action of high cooling rates during solidification has not yet been sufficiently investigated, therefore it is of interest to study the interrelationship between these factors. An R6M5F3 steel powder was produced by the atomization of molten metal in an apparatus constructed at the Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Special Steels, and divided into several fractions. A study was then made of the effect of cooling rate on the phase composition of the steel, degree of alloying of its solid solution and the microstructure and microhardness of the material. As a result of a higher rate of cooling, the amount of metastable M2C carbide inclusions in the structure of P/M R6M5F3 steel increases and the degree of bulk alloying of its grains grows. The increase in the microhardness of powder particles brought about by cooling at a higher rate is due to the formation of finer carbide inclusions during solidification, grain refinement, and an increased degree of alloying of the gamma and alpha solid solutions being formed.

  15. The role of rapid solidification processing in the fabrication of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced composite processing techniques for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites require the flexibility to meet several widespread objectives. The development of uniquely desired matrix microstructures and uniformly arrayed fiber spacing with sufficient bonding between fiber and matrix to transmit load between them without degradation to the fiber or matrix are the minimum requirements necessary of any fabrication process. For most applications these criteria can be met by fabricating composite monotapes which are then consolidated into composite panels or more complicated components such as fiber reinforced turbine blades. Regardless of the end component, composite monotapes are the building blocks from which near net shape composite structures can be formed. The most common methods for forming composite monotapes are the powder cloth, foil/fiber, plasma spray, and arc spray processes. These practices, however, employ rapid solidification techniques in processing of the composite matrix phase. Consequently, rapid solidification processes play a vital and yet generally overlooked role in composite fabrication. The future potential of rapid solidification processing is discussed.

  16. Long-lived magnetism from solidification-driven convection on the pallasite parent body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, James F. J.; Nichols, Claire I. O.; Herrero-Albillos, Julia; Kronast, Florian; Kasama, Takeshi; Alimadadi, Hossein; van der Laan, Gerrit; Nimmo, Francis; Harrison, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that, shortly after the birth of the Solar System, the molten metallic cores of many small planetary bodies convected vigorously and were capable of generating magnetic fields. Convection on these bodies is currently thought to have been thermally driven, implying that magnetic activity would have been short-lived. Here we report a time-series palaeomagnetic record derived from nanomagnetic imaging of the Imilac and Esquel pallasite meteorites, a group of meteorites consisting of centimetre-sized metallic and silicate phases. We find a history of long-lived magnetic activity on the pallasite parent body, capturing the decay and eventual shutdown of the magnetic field as core solidification completed. We demonstrate that magnetic activity driven by progressive solidification of an inner core is consistent with our measured magnetic field characteristics and cooling rates. Solidification-driven convection was probably common among small body cores, and, in contrast to thermally driven convection, will have led to a relatively late (hundreds of millions of years after accretion), long-lasting, intense and widespread epoch of magnetic activity among these bodies in the early Solar System.

  17. Containerless drop tube solidification and grain refinement of NiAl3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Curreri, P. A.; Kelly, M.; Workman, G.; Smith, A. M.; Bond, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of undercooling Ni-Al alloys below the liquidus in order to produce a single phase peritectic structure by containerless drop tube solidification was studied. Containerless process is a technique for both high purity contamination free studies as well as for investigating the undercooling and rapid solidification of alloys by suppression of heterogeneous nucleation on container walls. In order to achieve large undercoolings one must avoid heterogeneous nucleation of crystallization. It was shown that the Marshall Space Flight Center drop tubes ae unique facilities for containerless solidification experiments and large undercoolings are possible with some alloys. The original goal of undercooling the liquid metal well below the liquidus to the peritectic temperature during containerless free to form primarily NiAl3 was achieved. The microstructures were interesting from another point of view. The microstructure from small diameter samples is greatly refined. Small dendrite arm spacings such as these could greatly facilitate the annealing and solid state transformation of the alloy to nearly 10% NiAl3 by reducing the distance over which diffusion needs to occur. This could minimize annealing time and might make it economically feasible to produce NiAl3 alloy.

  18. Transparent Analogs for Alloy Phase Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experiments to add information to data base supporting use of transparent, partially miscible liquids and solids as analogs in studies of alloy solidification. Behavior of these materials observed directly while they undergo liquid/liquid and liquid/solid phase transformations. Light-scattering techniques used to determine phase boundaries. Transparent analogs allow observation of both solidification patterns and processes leading to those patterns, whereas metal alloys require tedious post-solidification metallographic analyses because processes not generally observed. Experiments with transparent substances safer and cheaper since conducted at much lower temperatures.

  19. Improved Crystal Quality by Detached Solidification in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    1999-01-01

    Directional solidification in microgravity has often led to ingots that grew with little or no contact with the ampoule wall. When this occurred, crystallographic perfection was usually greatly improved -- often by several orders of magnitude. Unfortunately, until recently the true mechanisms underlying detached solidification were unknown. As a consequence, flight experiments yielded erratic results. Within the past four years, we have developed a new theoretical model that explains many of the flight results. This model gives rise to predictions of the conditions required to yield detached solidification, both in microgravity and on earth. A discussion of models of detachment, the meniscus models and results of theoretical modeling, and future plans are presented.

  20. Capillary-wave description of rapid directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Korzhenevskii, Alexander L; Bausch, Richard; Schmitz, Rudi

    2012-02-01

    A recently introduced capillary-wave description of binary-alloy solidification is generalized to include the procedure of directional solidification. For a class of model systems a universal dispersion relation of the unstable eigenmodes of a planar steady-state solidification front is derived, which readjusts previously known stability considerations. We moreover establish a differential equation for oscillatory motions of a planar interface that offers a limit-cycle scenario for the formation of solute bands and, taking into account the Mullins-Sekerka instability, of banded structures.

  1. The effect of natural and forced melt convection on dendritic solidification in Ga-In alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, N.; Roshchupkina, O.; Sokolova, O.; Eckert, S.

    2015-05-01

    The directional solidification of Ga-25 wt%In alloys within a Hele-Shaw cell was visualized by means of X-ray radioscopy. The experimental investigations are especially focused on the impact of melt convection on the dendritic growth. Natural convection occurs during a bottom up solidification because lighter solute is rejected at the solid-liquid interface leading to an unstable density stratification. Forced convection was produced by a rotating wheel with two parallel disks containing at their inner sides a set of permanent NdFeB magnets with alternating polarization. The direction of forced melt flow is almost horizontal at the solidification front whereas local flow velocities in the range between 0.1 and 1.0 mm/s were achieved by controlling the rotation speed of the magnetic wheel. Melt flow induces various effects on the grain morphology primarily caused by the convective transport of solute. Our observations show a facilitation of the growth of primary trunks or lateral branches, suppression of side branching, dendrite remelting and fragmentation. The manifestation of all phenomena depends on the dendrite orientation, local direction and intensity of the flow. The forced flow eliminates the solutal plumes and damps the local fluctuations of solute concentration. It provokes a preferential growth of the secondary arms at the upstream side of the primary dendrite arms, whereas the high solute concentration at the downstream side of the dendrites can inhibit the formation of secondary branches completely. Moreover, the flow changes the inclination angle of the dendrites and the angle between primary trunks and secondary arms.

  2. Day-time local phasing of neighbouring segments of the E-ELT primary mirror, based simultaneous multi-λ shearing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leveque, S.; Falldorf, C.; Klattenhoff, R.; Cheffot, A.

    2016-08-01

    In the context of the segmented primary mirror of the E-ELT, the ability to measure the phasing state of neighbouring segments during day-time represents a way to mitigate the risk of potentially time consuming on-sky phasing after segment replacement. This paper presents the concept of a local phasing sensor based on simultaneous multi-wavelength shearing interferometry, as well as experimental results obtained on the ESO M1 test facility.

  3. Interface Shape and Convection During Solidification and Melting of Succinonitrile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Henry C., III; Lindstrom, Tiffany

    1994-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted of the crystal growth of succinonitrile during solidification, melting, and no-growth conditions using a horizontal Bridgman furnace and square glass ampoule. For use as input boundary conditions to numerical codes, thermal profiles on the outside of the ampoule at five locations around its periphery were measured along the ampoule's length. Temperatures inside the ampoule were also measured. The shapes of the s/l interface in various two dimensional planes were quantitatively determined. Though interfaces were nondendritic and noncellular, they were not flat, but were highly curved and symmetric in only one unique longitudinal y-z plane (at x=O). The shapes of the interface were dominated by the primary longitudinal flow cell characteristic of shallow cavity flow in horizontal Bridgman; this flow cell was driven by the imposed furnace temperature gradient and caused a 'radical' thermal gradient such that the upper half of the ampoule was hotter than the bottom half. We believe that due to the strong convection, the release of latent heat does not significantly influence the thermal conditions near the interface. We hope that the interface shape and thermal data presented in this paper can be used to optimize crystal growth processes and validate numerical models.

  4. Interactions of Gas-Phase Nitric/Nitrous Acids and Primary Organic Aerosol in the Atmosphere of Houston, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Griffin, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Anderson, C. H.; Whitlow, S. I.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J.; Rappenglück, B.

    2007-12-01

    Concentrations of aerosol and gas-phase pollutants were measured on the roof of an 18-story building during the Texas Air Quality Study II Radical and Aerosol Measurement Project (TRAMP) from August 15 through September 28, 2006. Aerosol measurements included size-resolved, non-refractory mass concentrations of ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, chloride, and organic aerosol in submicron particles using an Aerodyne quadrupole aerosol mass spectrometer (Q-AMS). Particulate water-soluble organic carbon (PWSOC) was quantified using a mist chamber/total organic carbon analysis system. Concentration data for gas-phase pollutants included those for nitric acid (HNO3), nitrous acid (HONO), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) collected using a mist chamber/ion chromatographic technique, oxides of nitrogen (NOx) collected using a chemiluminescent method, and carbon monoxide (CO) collected using an infrared gas correlation wheel instrument. Coincident increases in nitrate and organic aerosol mass concentrations were observed on many occasions throughout the measurement campaign, most frequently during the morning rush hour. Based on the lack of organic aerosol processing (defined by the ratio of m/z = 44/57 in the Q-AMS spectra), strong correlation with NOx and CO, and a lack of significant increase in PWSOC concentration, the spikes in organic aerosol were likely associated with primary organic aerosol (POA). During these events, gas-phase HNO3 concentration decreases were observed simultaneously with increases in gas-phase HONO concentrations. These data likely indicate uptake of HNO3 and subsequent heterogeneous conversion to HONO involving POA. Preliminary calculations show that HNO3 partitioning could account for the majority of the observed HONO and aerosol nitrate concentrations during these events. Q-AMS chloride and HCl data also indicate uptake of chloride by particles during these events. This phenomenon was also observed during the night, but these nocturnal events were less

  5. Noise and Dynamical Pattern Selection in Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtze, Douglas A.

    1997-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to understand in more detail how a pattern-forming system can adjust its spacing. "Pattern-forming systems," in this context, are nonequilibrium contina whose state is determined by experimentally adjustable control parameter. Below some critical value of the control system then has available to it a range of linearly stable, spatially periodic steady states, each characterized by a spacing which can lie anywhere within some band of values. These systems like directional solidification, where the solidification front is planar when the ratio of growth velocity to thermal gradient is below its critical value, but takes on a cellular shape above critical. They also include systems without interfaces, such as Benard convection, where it is the fluid velocity field which changes from zero to something spatially periodic as the control parameter is increased through its critical value. The basic question to be addressed was that of how the system chooses one of its myriad possible spacings when the control parameter is above critical, and in particular the role of noise in the selection process. Previous work on explosive crystallization had suggested that one spacing in the range should be preferred, in the sense that weak noise should eventually drive the system to that spacing. That work had also suggested a heuristic argument for identifying the preferred spacing. The project had three main objectives: to understand in more detail how a pattern-forming system can adjust its spacing; to investigate how noise drives a system to its preferred spacing; and to extend the heuristic argument for a preferred spacing in explosive crystallization to other pattern-forming systems.

  6. The Waveform Correlation Event Detection System project, Phase II: Testing with the IDC primary network

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.J.; Beiriger, J.I.; Moore, S.G.

    1998-04-01

    Further improvements to the Waveform Correlation Event Detection System (WCEDS) developed by Sandia Laboratory have made it possible to test the system on the accepted Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) seismic monitoring network. For our test interval we selected a 24-hour period from December 1996, and chose to use the Reviewed Event Bulletin (REB) produced by the Prototype International Data Center (PIDC) as ground truth for evaluating the results. The network is heterogeneous, consisting of array and three-component sites, and as a result requires more flexible waveform processing algorithms than were available in the first version of the system. For simplicity and superior performance, we opted to use the spatial coherency algorithm of Wagner and Owens (1996) for both types of sites. Preliminary tests indicated that the existing version of WCEDS, which ignored directional information, could not achieve satisfactory detection or location performance for many of the smaller events in the REB, particularly those in the south Pacific where the network coverage is unusually sparse. To achieve an acceptable level of performance, we made modifications to include directional consistency checks for the correlations, making the regions of high correlation much less ambiguous. These checks require the production of continuous azimuth and slowness streams for each station, which is accomplished by means of FK processing for the arrays and power polarization processing for the three-component sites. In addition, we added the capability to use multiple frequency-banded data streams for each site to increase sensitivity to phases whose frequency content changes as a function of distance.

  7. Numerical simulation and experimental study of transient liquid phase bonding of single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, Adam

    The primary goals of the research in this dissertation are to perform a systematic study to identify and understand the fundamental cause of prolonged processing time during transient liquid phase bonding of difficult-to-bond single crystal Ni-base materials, and use the acquired knowledge to develop an effective way to reduce the isothermal solidification time without sacrificing the single crystalline nature of the base materials. To achieve these objectives, a multi-scale numerical modeling approach, that involves the use of a 2-D fully implicit moving-mesh Finite Element method and a Cellular Automata method, was developed to theoretically investigate the cause of long isothermal solidification times and determine a viable way to minimize the problem. Subsequently, the predictions of the theoretical models are experimentally validated. Contrary to previous suggestions, numerical calculations and experimental verifications have shown that enhanced intergranular diffusivity has a negligible effect on solidification time in cast superalloys and that another important factor must be responsible. In addition, it was found that the concept of competition between solute diffusivity and solubility as predicted by standard analytical TLP bonding models and reported in the literature as a possible cause of long solidification times is not suitable to explain salient experimental observations. In contrast, however, this study shows that the problem of long solidification times, which anomalously increase with temperature is fundamentally caused by departure from diffusion controlled parabolic migration of the liquid-solid interface with holding time during bonding due to a significant reduction in the solute concentration gradient in the base material. Theoretical analyses showed it is possible to minimize the solidification time and prevent formation of stray-grains in joints between single crystal substrates by using a composite powder mixture of brazing alloy and base

  8. Effect of a Transverse Magnetic Field on Stray Grain Formation of Ni-Based Single Crystal Superalloy During Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Weidong; Liu, Huan; Lan, Jian; Li, Chuanjun; Zhong, Yunbo; Li, Xi; Cao, Guanghui; Ren, Zhongming

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a transverse magnetic field on stray grain formation during directional solidification of superalloy was investigated. Experimental results indicated that the transverse magnetic field effectively suppressed the stray grain formation on the side the primary dendrite diverges from the mold wall. Moreover, the quenched experimental results indicated that the solid/liquid interface shape was obviously changed in a transverse magnetic field. The effect of a transverse magnetic field on stray grain formation was discussed.

  9. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  10. Effects of N/C Ratio on Solidification Behaviors of Novel Nb-Bearing Austenitic Heat-Resistant Cast Steels for Exhaust Components of Gasoline Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinhui; Li, Mei; Godlewski, Larry A.; Zindel, Jacob W.; Feng, Qiang

    2017-03-01

    In order to comply with more stringent environmental and fuel consumption regulations, novel Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant cast steels that withstand exhaust temperatures as high as 1,323 K (1,050 °C) is urgently demanded from automotive industries. In the current research, the solidification behavior of these alloys with variations of N/C ratio is investigated. Directional solidification methods were carried out to examine the microstructural development in mushy zones. Computational thermodynamic calculations under partial equilibrium conditions were performed to predict the solidification sequence of different phases. Microstructural characterization of the mushy zones indicates that N/C ratio significantly influenced the stability of γ-austenite and the precipitation temperature of NbC/Nb(C,N), thereby altering the solidification path, as well as the morphology and distribution of NbC/Nb(C,N) and γ-ferrite. The solidification sequence of different phases predicted by thermodynamic software agreed well with the experimental results, except the specific precipitation temperatures. The generated data and fundamental understanding will be helpful for the application of computational thermodynamic methods to predict the as-cast microstructure of Nb-bearing austenitic heat-resistant steels.

  11. Phase selection during crystallization of undercooled liquid eutectic lead-tin alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fecht, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    During rapid solidification substantial amounts of undercooling are in general required for formation of metastable phases. Crystallization at varying levels of undercooling and melting of metastable phases were studied during slow cooling and heating of emulsified PB-Sn alloys. Besides the experimental demonstration of the reversibility of metastable phase equilibra, two different principal solidification paths have been identified and compared with the established metastable phase diagram and predictions from classical nucleation theory. The results suggest that the most probable solidification path is described by the 'step rule' resulting in the formation of metastable phases at low undercooling, whereas the stable eutectic phase mixture crystallizes without metastable phase formation at high undercooling.

  12. Fundamentals of Alloy Solidification Applied to Industrial Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Solidification processes and phenomena, segregation, porosity, gravity effects, fluid flow, undercooling, as well as processing of materials in the microgravity environment of space, now available on space shuttle flights were discussed.

  13. APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT: CHEMFIX TECHNOLOGIES, INC. - SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program, this report evaluates the Chemfix Technologies, Inc. (Chemfix), solidification/stabilization technology for on-site treatment of hazardous waste. The Chemfix ...

  14. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF ORGANICS AND INORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solidification refers to techniques that encapsulate hazardous waste into a solid material of high structural integrity. Encapsulation involves either fine waste particles (microencapsulation) or a large block or container of wastes (macroencapsulation). Stabilization refe...

  15. Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

    1981-12-01

    A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

  16. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION - US ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY SUPERFUND PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation outlines the Superfund program approach to site cleanup, then provides information from actual insitu and exsitu solidification/stabilization remediations to illustrate technology, equipment, field implementation, performance evaluation, cleanup specifications, ...

  17. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION CASE STUDIES AT USEPA SUPERFUND SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oral presentation dicumenting several completed Superfund remediations using solidification/stabilization, both in situ and ex-situ, to treat soils containing metals and organics.
    65 slide presentation.

  18. Observation of alloy solidification using high-speed video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassler, B. T.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.; Gorenflo, R.; Bergman, T.; Stockum, L.

    1992-01-01

    A high-speed video instrumentation system was used to observe solidification of undercooled Ti-51 at. pct Al. The camera system developed by Battelle is capable of operation at rates up to 12,000 frames per second. The system digitizes and stores video images acquired by a 64 x 64 pixel silicon photodiode array. In a joint effort with Vanderbilt University the camera was used to observe three transformations of the undercooled alloys, using containerless processing by electromagnetic levitation. The first was solidification where nucleation was induced at an undercooling of 9 percent Tl, where Tl is the liquidus temperature of the alloy, and the second was solidification where nucleation was spontaneous at an undercooling of 15 percent Tl. The third event was a solid-state nucleation and growth transformation following the solidification at an undercooling of 15 percent Tl.

  19. A benchmark for the validation of solidification modelling algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaschnitz, E.; Heugenhauser, S.; Schumacher, P.

    2015-06-01

    This work presents two three-dimensional solidification models, which were solved by several commercial solvers (MAGMASOFT, FLOW-3D, ProCAST, WinCast, ANSYS, and OpenFOAM). Surprisingly, the results show noticeable differences. The results are analyzed similar to a round-robin test procedure to obtain reference values for temperatures and their uncertainties at selected positions in the model. The first model is similar to an adiabatic calorimeter with an aluminum alloy solidifying in a copper block. For this model, an analytical solution for the overall temperature at steady state can be calculated. The second model implements additional heat transfer boundary conditions at outer faces. The geometry of the models, the initial and boundary conditions as well as the material properties are kept as simple as possible but, nevertheless, close to a realistic solidification situation. The gained temperature results can be used to validate self-written solidification solvers and check the accuracy of commercial solidification programs.

  20. Impact-activated solidification of cornstarch and water suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waitukaitis, Scott Russell

    Liquids typically offer little resistance to impacting objects . Surprisingly, dense suspensions of liquids mixed with micron-sized particles can provide tremendous impact resistance, even though they appear liquid like when left at rest or perturbed lightly. The most well-known example is a dense mixture of cornstarch and water, which can easily provide enough impact resistance to allow a full-grown person to run across its surface. Previous studies have linked this so-called ``shear thickening'' to experiments carried out under steady state shear and attributed it to hydrodynamic interactions or granular dilation. However, neither of these explanations alone can account for the stress scales required to keep a running person above the free surface. This thesis investigates the mechanism for this impact resistance in dense suspensions. We begin by studying impact directly and watching a rod as it strikes the surface of a dense suspension of cornstarch and water. Using high-speed video and embedded force and acceleration sensing, we show that the rod motion leads to the rapid growth of a solid-like object below the impact site. With X-ray videography to see the dynamics of the suspension interior and laser sheet measurements of the surface profile, we show how this solid drags on the surrounding suspension, creating substantial peripheral flow and leading to the rapid extraction of the impactor's momentum. Suspecting that the solidification below the rod may be related to jamming of the particle sub-phase, we carry out 2D experiments with macroscopic disks to show how uniaxial compression of an initially unjammed system can lead to dynamic jamming fronts. In doing so, we show how these fronts are sensitive to the system's initial packing fraction relative to the point at which it jams and also discover that the widths of these fronts are related to a diverging correlation length. Finally, we take these results back to the suspension, where we perform careful, speed

  1. Variable-Temperature-Gradient Device for Solidification Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.

    1985-01-01

    Device for research in solidification and crystal growth allows crystallization of melt observed as occurs. Temperature gradient across melt specimen increased or decreased rapidly while solidification front proceeds at constant speed across sample. Device moves sample at same speed, thereby holding position of liquid/solid interface stationary within field of optical microscope. Device, variabletemperature-gradient microscope stage, used to study crystal growth at constant rate while thermal driving force is varied.

  2. Solidification of a disk-shaped crystal from a weakly supercooled binary melt.

    PubMed

    Rees Jones, David W; Wells, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    The physics of ice crystal growth from the liquid phase, especially in the presence of salt, has received much less attention than the growth of snow crystals from the vapor phase. The growth of so-called frazil ice by solidification of a supercooled aqueous salt solution is consistent with crystal growth in the basal plane being limited by the diffusive removal of the latent heat of solidification from the solid-liquid interface, while being limited by attachment kinetics in the perpendicular direction. This leads to the formation of approximately disk-shaped crystals with a low aspect ratio of thickness compared to radius, because radial growth is much faster than axial growth. We calculate numerically how fast disk-shaped crystals grow in both pure and binary melts, accounting for the comparatively slow axial growth, the effect of dissolved solute in the fluid phase, and the difference in thermal properties between solid and fluid phases. We identify the main physical mechanisms that control crystal growth and show that the diffusive removal of both the latent heat released and the salt rejected at the growing interface are significant. Our calculations demonstrate that certain previous parametrizations, based on scaling arguments, substantially underestimate crystal growth rates by a factor of order 10-100 for low aspect ratio disks, and we provide a parametrization for use in models of ice crystal growth in environmental settings.

  3. Solidification of a disk-shaped crystal from a weakly supercooled binary melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees Jones, David W.; Wells, Andrew J.

    2015-08-01

    The physics of ice crystal growth from the liquid phase, especially in the presence of salt, has received much less attention than the growth of snow crystals from the vapor phase. The growth of so-called frazil ice by solidification of a supercooled aqueous salt solution is consistent with crystal growth in the basal plane being limited by the diffusive removal of the latent heat of solidification from the solid-liquid interface, while being limited by attachment kinetics in the perpendicular direction. This leads to the formation of approximately disk-shaped crystals with a low aspect ratio of thickness compared to radius, because radial growth is much faster than axial growth. We calculate numerically how fast disk-shaped crystals grow in both pure and binary melts, accounting for the comparatively slow axial growth, the effect of dissolved solute in the fluid phase, and the difference in thermal properties between solid and fluid phases. We identify the main physical mechanisms that control crystal growth and show that the diffusive removal of both the latent heat released and the salt rejected at the growing interface are significant. Our calculations demonstrate that certain previous parametrizations, based on scaling arguments, substantially underestimate crystal growth rates by a factor of order 10-100 for low aspect ratio disks, and we provide a parametrization for use in models of ice crystal growth in environmental settings.

  4. Three-dimensional numerical simulation of weld solidification cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Y. H.; Dong, Z. B.; Liu, R. P.; Dong, Z. J.

    2005-04-01

    It is difficult to measure mechanical strain in the vicinity of a moving weld pool owing to the complex solidification process. Computational modelling of the welding process provides an effective method to study the stress/strain distributions of the weldment. In this paper, the driving force to weld solidification cracking, i.e. mechanical strain versus temperature at the trail of a weld molten pool, was modelled with the three-dimensional finite element analysis procedure. The dynamic stress/strain evolutions that contribute to the formation of solidification cracking have been calculated in the cracking susceptible temperature range. In the mechanical model, solidification effects, namely deformation in the weld pool, change of initial temperature for thermal stress/strain calculation, were treated by means of a dynamic element rebirth scheme. Solidification shrinkage was also taken into consideration in simulation. The results of comparison between the calculated driving force and the experimental measurements of the material resistance predict the susceptibility of solidification cracking.

  5. Examination of Multiphase (Zr,Ti)(V,Cr,Mn,Ni)2 Ni-MH Electrode Alloys: Part I. Dendritic Solidification Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettinger, W. J.; Newbury, D. E.; Wang, K.; Bendersky, L. A.; Chiu, C.; Kattner, U. R.; Young, K.; Chao, B.

    2010-08-01

    The solidification microstructures of three nine-element Zr-Ni-based AB2 type C14/C15 Laves hydrogen storage alloys are determined. The selected compositions represent a class of alloys being examined for usage as an MH electrode in nickel metal-hydride batteries that often have their best properties in the cast state. Solidification is accomplished by dendritic growth of hexagonal C14 Laves phase, peritectic solidification of cubic C15 Laves phase, and formation of cubic B2 phase in the interdendritic regions. The B2 phase decomposes in the solid state into a complex multivariate platelike structure containing Zr-Ni-rich intermetallics. The observed sequence C14/C15 upon solidification agrees with predictions using effective compositions and thermodynamic assessments of the ternary systems, Ni-Cr-Zr and Cr-Ti-Zr. Experimentally, the closeness of the compositions of the C14 and C15 phases required the use of compositional mapping with an energy dispersive detector capable of processing a very high X-ray flux to locate regions in the microstructure for quantitative composition measurement and transmission electron microscope examination.

  6. A comparative study of quantitative microsegregation analyses performed during the solidification of the Ni-base superalloy CMSX-10

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Seong-Moon; Jeong, Hi-Won; Ahn, Young-Keun; Yun, Dae Won; Lee, Je-Hyun; Yoo, Young-Soo

    2014-03-01

    Quantitative microsegregation analyses were systematically carried out during the solidification of the Ni-base superalloy CMSX-10 to clarify the methodological effect on the quantification of microsegregation and to fully understand the solidification microstructure. Three experimental techniques, namely, mushy zone quenching (MZQ), planar directional solidification followed by quenching (PDSQ), and random sampling (RS), were implemented for the analysis of microsegregation tendency and the magnitude of solute elements by electron probe microanalysis. The microprobe data and the calculation results of the diffusion field ahead of the solid/liquid (S/L) interface of PDSQ samples revealed that the liquid composition at the S/L interface is significantly influenced by quenching. By applying the PDSQ technique, it was also found that the partition coefficients of all solute elements do not change appreciably during the solidification of primary γ. All three techniques could reasonably predict the segregation behavior of most solute elements. Nevertheless, the RS approach has a tendency to overestimate the magnitude of segregation for most solute elements when compared to the MZQ and PDSQ techniques. Moreover, the segregation direction of Cr and Mo predicted by the RS approach was found to be opposite from the results obtained by the MZQ and PDSQ techniques. This conflicting segregation behavior of Cr and Mo was discussed intensively. It was shown that the formation of Cr-rich areas near the γ/γ′ eutectic in various Ni-base superalloys, including the CMSX-10 alloy, could be successfully explained by the results of microprobe analysis performed on a sample quenched during the planar directional solidification of γ/γ′ eutectic. - Highlights: • Methodological effect on the quantification of microsegregation was clarified. • The liquid composition at the S/L interface was influenced by quenching. • The segregation direction of Cr varied depending on the

  7. Numerical study on morphology and solidification characteristics of successive droplet depositions on a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adaikalanathan, Vimalan

    Successive droplet impingement finds extensive applications in additive manufacturing technologies such as 3D printing, Liquid Metal Jetting and Net Form Manufacturing. Deposition, deformation and solidification of droplets are the constitutive stages in the process which determine the final outcome. Detailed knowledge about the flow behaviour, phase transformation and free surface deformation is required to have a complete understanding and optimization of the process parameters. Experimental research in this field is only limited to imaging techniques and post solidification analysis which only provide superficial information while overlooking most of the governing phenomenon. Knowledge of the physics governing the fluid and thermal behaviours can be applied to study the process with real time data pertaining to flow field, temperature profiles and solidification. However, free surface tracking, surface tension modelling, non-isothermal solidification and convection dominant heat transfer pose mathematical challenges in the solution of the governing equations. Moreover, deposition of droplets on pre-solidified splats or non-flat surfaces requires accurate special attention. The objective of the present work is to model the successive droplet impacts and simultaneous solidification and deformation. The highly non-linear flow field governed by the Navier Stokes equation is solved using a Two Step Projection method. The surface tension effects are accounted for through a Continuum Surface Force technique. One of the crucial elements in the study is the interface tracking algorithm. A Coupled Level Set Volume of Fluid (CLSVOF) method is formulated to give an accurate orientation of the drastically deforming interface and also facilitates generation of multiple droplets in a fixed domain at a user defined frequency, thereby conserving computational resources. The phase change is modelled using an enthalpy formulation of the energy equation with an implicit source term

  8. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Wafer level hermetic packaging based on Cu-Sn isothermal solidification technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhan, Cao; Le, Luo

    2009-08-01

    A novel wafer level bonding method based on Cu-Sn isothermal solidification technology is established. A multi-layer sealing ring and the bonding processing are designed, and the amount of solder and the bonding parameters are optimized based on both theoretical and experimental results. Verification shows that oxidation of the solder layer, voids and the scalloped-edge appearance of the Cu6Sn5 phase are successfully avoided. An average shear strength of 19.5 MPa and an excellent leak rate of around 1.9 × 10-9 atm cc/s are possible, meeting the demands of MIL-STD-883E.

  9. Effects of supercooling in the initial solidification of PbTe-SnTe solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L.; Crouch, R. K.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.; Clark, I. O.; Wagner, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    Deviations from compositions anticipated by the thermal equilibrium phase diagram have been observed in Bridgman-grown crystals of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te, in the first to freeze region of the boule. A set of experiments were conducted to determine the extent of thermal supercooling of Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te in a Bridgman-like configuration. The results of the compositional profiles and the supercooling measurements are consistent with a diffusionless transformation occurring at the onset of solidification, and the length of uncontrolled growth is inversely related to the temperature gradient of the furnace.

  10. Solidification Processing of Immiscible Liquids in the Presence of Applied Ultrasonic Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Fedoseyev, A. I.; Kim, S.

    2001-01-01

    Uniform microstructural distribution during solidification of immiscible liquids (e.g., oil and water; aluminum and lead) on Earth is hampered by inherent density differences between the phases. Microgravity processing minimizes settling but segregation still occurs due to gravity independent wetting and coalescence phenomena. Experiments with the transparent organic, metal analogue, succinonitrile-glycerol system were conducted in conjunction with applied ultrasonic energy. The processing parameters associated with this technique have been evaluated in view of optimizing dispersion uniformity. Characterization of the experimental results in terms of a modeling effort will also be presented,

  11. Atomic structure evolution during solidification of liquid niobium from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Debela, T. T.; Wang, X. D.; Cao, Q. P.; Zhang, D. X.; Wang, S. Y.; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Jiang, J. Z.

    2013-12-12

    Atomic structure transitions of liquid niobium during solidification, at different temperatures from 3200 to 1500 K, were studied by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The local atomic structure variations with temperature are investigated by using the pair-correlation function, the structure factor, the bond-angle distribution function, the Honeycutt–Anderson index, Voronoi tessellation and the cluster alignment methods. Our results clearly show that, upon quenching, the icosahedral short-range order dominates in the stable liquid and supercooled liquid states before the system transforms to crystalline body-center cubic phase at a temperature of about 1830 K.

  12. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2016-05-01

    Sills are an integral part of the formation and development of larger plutons and magma reservoirs. Thus sills are essential for both the transport and the storage of magma in the Earth's crust. However, although cooling and solidification are central to magmatism, their effects on sills have been so far poorly studied. Here, the effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and morphology are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment and systematically varied between each experiment, in order to vary and quantify the amount of solidification between each experiments. The oil is injected directly at the interface between the two gelatine layers. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps of surface-area creation interspersed with periods of momentary arrest. The morphology of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of area creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the area of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. The morphology of sills, such as lobate structures (interpretation of 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basin) and ropy flow structures (field observations) can be related to solidification during emplacement. Moreover, a non-continuous morphology

  13. Crystal morphology and gas evolution during solidification processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marcus Vinicius Andrade

    A theoretical and experimental study of the solidification process has been performed to obtain fundamental understanding relevant to metal casting, solidification of alloys, freezing of biological materials and other areas. The emphasis is on the effect of the morphology of the crystals on the solidification of binary systems and the role of dissolved gas evolution on gas porosity formation. Of specific interest is the effect of gas bubble nucleation and of crystal morphology on the effective thermal conductivity of the solidifying system. An analytical and a semi-analytical method are used to calculate the gas species redistribution due to the movement of the solid-liquid interface during the freezing processes. The gas segregation at the interface strongly depends on the solidification rate (i.e., the interface velocity). The results are important to predict the formation of gas voids in castings and, most importantly, to avoid them. It is found that for a constant solidification rate, bubble nucleation always occurs at the interface despite the magnitude of the interface velocity. On the other hand, when the solidification rate is inversely proportional to the square root of time bubble nucleation can be avoided by ensuring that the initial gas concentration is smaller than a ratio involving the gas solubilities in the liquid and in the solid. An experimental apparatus is designed and constructed to study solidification on a microscopic scale. The temperature gradient and the solidification rate are controlled and aqueous solutions of ammonium chloride of different initial concentrations are frozen in a controlled manner in order to measure the microscopic characteristic lengths of the crystals grown from ammonium chloride solutions of low initial concentrations. Air-saturated water is also solidified and the dissolved gas bubble nucleation observed. Microscopic geometric lengths of the crystal that form the mushy zone are correlated with the velocity of the

  14. Modelling innovative interventions for optimising healthy lifestyle promotion in primary health care: "Prescribe Vida Saludable" phase I research protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Grandes, Gonzalo; Cortada, Josep M; Pombo, Haizea; Balague, Laura; Calderon, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Background The adoption of a healthy lifestyle, including physical activity, a balanced diet, a moderate alcohol consumption and abstinence from smoking, are associated with large decreases in the incidence and mortality rates for the most common chronic diseases. That is why primary health care (PHC) services are trying, so far with less success than desirable, to promote healthy lifestyles among patients. The objective of this study is to design and model, under a participative collaboration framework between clinicians and researchers, interventions that are feasible and sustainable for the promotion of healthy lifestyles in PHC. Methods and design Phase I formative research and a quasi-experimental evaluation of the modelling and planning process will be undertaken in eight primary care centres (PCCs) of the Basque Health Service – OSAKIDETZA, of which four centres will be assigned for convenience to the Intervention Group (the others being Controls). Twelve structured study, discussion and consensus sessions supported by reviews of the literature and relevant documents, will be undertaken throughout 12 months. The first four sessions, including a descriptive strategic needs assessment, will lead to the prioritisation of a health promotion aim in each centre. In the remaining eight sessions, collaborative design of intervention strategies, on the basis of a planning process and pilot trials, will be carried out. The impact of the formative process on the practice of healthy lifestyle promotion, attitude towards health promotion and other factors associated with the optimisation of preventive clinical practice will be assessed, through pre- and post-programme evaluations and comparisons of the indicators measured in professionals from the centres assigned to the Intervention or Control Groups. Discussion There are four necessary factors for the outcome to be successful and result in important changes: (1) the commitment of professional and community partners

  15. SPAR VI Technical Report for Experiment 76-22: Directional Solidification of Magnetic Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirich, R. G.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Samples of eutectic Bi/MnBi were directionally solidified during a low-g interval aboard the SPAR 6 flight and in a l-g environment under identical furnace velocity and thermal conditions. The Bi/MnBi eutectic is characterized by a regular rod eutectic whose morphology may be sensitive to thermo-solutal convection and by its components, MnBi, which is ferromagnetic. Morphological analyses on samples show statistically smaller interrod spacings and rod diameters with respect to samples grown under identical solidification furnace conditions in l-g. An adjustment between the interrod spacing, growth velocity, and total undercooling at the solidification interface is proposed. Morphological analyses on samples grown in l-g indicate little difference between results for different growth orientations with respect to the gravity vector. The magnetic properties are significantly affected, however, by the presence of a nonequilibrium magnetic phase and the nonequilibrium phase transforms to the equilibrium ferromagnetic phase during isothermal heat treatment.

  16. Solidification Behavior and Cooling Curves for Hypereutectic Fe-21 At. Pct B Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junfeng; Jian, Zengyun; Dang, Bo; Zhang, Di; Liu, Feng

    2017-04-01

    The cooling curves for Fe-21 at. pct B hypereutectic alloy were measured, which are correlated with the solidification behaviors. At small undercoolings, the cooling curve has two recalescences, corresponding to L → Fe2B and L → Fe2B + Fe, respectively. At moderate undercoolings, also two recalescences can be observed from the cooling curve, corresponding to L → Fe3B and L + Fe3B → Fe2B + Fe. At large undercoolings, the cooling curve has only one recalescence, corresponding to L → Fe3B + Fe. From TEM analysis, the matrix phase is α-Fe in cases of solidification at small and moderate undercoolings, but is Fe3B in case of large undercooling. HRTEM analysis shows that α-Fe stores deformation energy by irregular atom region, but intermetallic phase (Fe2B or Fe3B) stores deformation energy by increasing grain boundaries and stacking faults, which can explain why α-Fe has good deformation ability and small hardness, but the Fe2B or Fe3B phase on the contrary.

  17. Effect of liquid-liquid structure transition on solidification of Sn57Bi43 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyang; Zhang, Yongxing; Wu, Chen; Geng, Haoran

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the effect of the liquid-liquid structure transition (L-LST) on the solidification behaviors and morphologies of Sn57Bi43 alloy was further studied. The liquid structure of Sn57Bi43 was studied with resistivity, thermal analysis and viscosity method. The obvious turning point is observed on resistivity-temperature, DSC and viscosity-temperature curves of Sn57Bi43 alloy. The resistivity increases linearly with increasing temperature before the turning point. These results indicate that temperature-induced liquid-liquid structure transition occurs at 943-1093 K and is reversible, which may be formed by large cooperative motions for molecular rearrangements. What is more, the results show that the undercooling of the eutectic phase increases and the microstructure becomes finer after solidifying from the melt experiencing L-LST. The spacing of eutectic phase decreases markedly. Based on these results explored the melt structure from different aspects, the nature of discontinuity of structural phase transition can be explored and the effect of L-LST on solidification of Sn57Bi43 alloy is studied.

  18. Solidification Behavior and Cooling Curves for Hypereutectic Fe-21 At. Pct B Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junfeng; Jian, Zengyun; Dang, Bo; Zhang, Di; Liu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The cooling curves for Fe-21 at. pct B hypereutectic alloy were measured, which are correlated with the solidification behaviors. At small undercoolings, the cooling curve has two recalescences, corresponding to L → Fe2B and L → Fe2B + Fe, respectively. At moderate undercoolings, also two recalescences can be observed from the cooling curve, corresponding to L → Fe3B and L + Fe3B → Fe2B + Fe. At large undercoolings, the cooling curve has only one recalescence, corresponding to L → Fe3B + Fe. From TEM analysis, the matrix phase is α-Fe in cases of solidification at small and moderate undercoolings, but is Fe3B in case of large undercooling. HRTEM analysis shows that α-Fe stores deformation energy by irregular atom region, but intermetallic phase (Fe2B or Fe3B) stores deformation energy by increasing grain boundaries and stacking faults, which can explain why α-Fe has good deformation ability and small hardness, but the Fe2B or Fe3B phase on the contrary.

  19. Rapid Solidification of Sn-Cu-Al Alloys for High-Reliability, Lead-Free Solder: Part I. Microstructural Characterization of Rapidly Solidified Solders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Kathlene N.; Choquette, Stephanie M.; Anderson, Iver E.; Handwerker, Carol A.

    2016-12-01

    Particles of Cu x Al y in Sn-Cu-Al solders have previously been shown to nucleate the Cu6Sn5 phase during solidification. In this study, the number and size of Cu6Sn5 nucleation sites were controlled through the particle size refinement of Cu x Al y via rapid solidification processing and controlled cooling in a differential scanning calorimeter. Cooling rates spanning eight orders of magnitude were used to refine the average Cu x Al y and Cu6Sn5 particle sizes down to submicron ranges. The average particle sizes, particle size distributions, and morphologies in the microstructures were analyzed as a function of alloy composition and cooling rate. Deep etching of the samples revealed the three-dimensional microstructures and illuminated the epitaxial and morphological relationships between the Cu x Al y and Cu6Sn5 phases. Transitions in the Cu6Sn5 particle morphologies from faceted rods to nonfaceted, equiaxed particles were observed as a function of both cooling rate and composition. Initial solidification cooling rates within the range of 103 to 104 °C/s were found to be optimal for realizing particle size refinement and maintaining the Cu x Al y /Cu6Sn5 nucleant relationship. In addition, little evidence of the formation or decomposition of the ternary- β phase in the solidified alloys was noted. Solidification pathways omitting the formation of the ternary- β phase agreed well with observed room temperature microstructures.

  20. Effect of arsenic content and quenching temperature on solidification microstructure and arsenic distribution in iron-arsenic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Wen-bin; Song, Bo; Huang, Chuan-gen; Song, Ming-ming; Song, Gao-yang

    2015-07-01

    The solidification microstructure, grain boundary segregation of soluble arsenic, and characteristics of arsenic-rich phases were systematically investigated in Fe-As alloys with different arsenic contents and quenching temperatures. The results show that the solidification microstructures of Fe-0.5wt%As alloys consist of irregular ferrite, while the solidification microstructures of Fe-4wt%As and Fe-10wt%As alloys present the typical dendritic morphology, which becomes finer with increasing arsenic content and quenching temperature. In Fe-0.5wt%As alloys quenched from 1600 and 1200°C, the grain boundary segregation of arsenic is detected by transmission electron microscopy. In Fe-4wt%As and Fe-10wt%As alloys quenched from 1600 and 1420°C, a fully divorced eutectic morphology is observed, and the eutectic Fe2As phase distributes discontinuously in the interdendritic regions. In contrast, the eutectic morphology of Fe-10wt%As alloy quenched from 1200°C is fibrous and forms a continuous network structure. Furthermore, the area fraction of the eutectic Fe2As phase in Fe-4wt%As and Fe-10wt%As alloys increases with increasing arsenic content and decreasing quenching temperature.

  1. Melting and solidification characteristics of a mixture of two types of latent heat storage material in a vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, JikSu; Horibe, Akihiko; Haruki, Naoto; Machida, Akito; Kato, Masashi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the fundamental melting and solidification characteristics of mannitol, erythritol, and their mixture (70 % by mass mannitol: 30 % by mass erythritol) as potential phase-change materials (PCMs) for latent heat thermal energy storage systems, specifically those pertaining to industrial waste heat, having temperatures in the range of 100-250 °C. The melting point of erythritol and mannitol, the melting peak temperature of their mixture, and latent heat were measured using differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal performance of the mannitol mixture was determined during melting and solidification processes, using a heat storage vessel with a pipe heat exchanger. Our results indicated phase-change (fusion) temperatures of 160 °C for mannitol and 113 and 150 °C for the mannitol mixture. Nondimensional correlation equations of the average heat transfer during the solidification process, as well as the temperature and velocity efficiencies of flowing silicon oil in the pipe and the phase-change material (PCM), were derived using several nondimensional parameters.

  2. Solidification effects on sill formation: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2014-10-01

    Sills represent a major mechanism for constructing continental Earth's crust because these intrusions can amalgamate and form magma reservoirs and plutons. As a result, numerous field, laboratory and numerical studies have investigated the conditions that lead to sill emplacement. However, all previous studies have neglected the potential effect magma solidification could have on sill formation. The effects of solidification on the formation of sills are studied and quantified with scaled analogue laboratory experiments. The experiments presented here involved the injection of hot vegetable oil (a magma analogue) which solidified during its propagation as a dyke in a colder and layered solid of gelatine (a host rock analogue). The gelatine solid had two layers of different stiffness, to create a priori favourable conditions to form sills. Several behaviours were observed depending on the injection temperature and the injection rate: no intrusions (extreme solidification effects), dykes stopping at the interface (high solidification effects), sills (moderate solidification effects), and dykes passing through the interface (low solidification effects). All these results can be explained quantitatively as a function of a dimensionless temperature θ, which describes the experimental thermal conditions, and a dimensionless flux ϕ, which describes their dynamical conditions. The experiments reveal that sills can only form within a restricted domain of the (θ,ϕ) parameter space. These experiments demonstrate that contrary to isothermal experiments where cooling could not affect sill formation, the presence of an interface that would be a priori mechanically favourable is not a sufficient condition for sill formation; solidification effects restrict sill formation. The results are consistent with field observations and provide a means to explain why some dykes form sills when others do not under seemingly similar geological conditions.

  3. Preparation of the initial solid liquid interface and melt in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Thi, H.; Drevet, B.; Debierre, J. M.; Camel, D.; Dabo, Y.; Billia, B.

    2003-06-01

    The preparation of the initial conditions (solid-liquid interface morphology and solute segregation in the liquid phase) on which growth is started is a very critical step in directional-solidification experiments. Dedicated experiments on Al-1.5 wt% Ni consisting in directional melting followed by thermal stabilisation with different lengths, show that precise control is in practice not straightforward. Indeed, in the mushy zone created by melting the original solid sample, temperature gradient zone melting (TGZM) causes migration of solute-rich liquid droplets and channels. A model is proposed to describe this process and validate the physical interpretation of the experiments through numerical simulation. Knowing the status of the preparation, the intriguing observations in the partially melted region of the Al-1.5 wt% Ni alloys solidified in the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility of European Space Agency during the LMS and STS-95 space missions can now be explained. Finally, the influence of initial interface morphology and melt segregation on directional-solidification transient is discussed, based on a comparison of Al-Ni alloys with hypoeutectic Al-Li alloys previously grown on Earth and in space. It follows that for experiments achieved on original rods with equiaxed microstructure, the efficiency of the preparatory melting and stabilisation phases can be evaluated from the solute macrosegregation profile in the region in between the non-melted solid and directional solidification. The major conclusion is that when the melt is mixed by fluid flow, the initial conditions are near to their asymptotic state at the end of TGZM whereas, when solute diffusion is the mode of transport into the bulk liquid, the condition of homogeneous melt becomes limiting and too much time-consuming to be fulfilled, which in particular holds for the 3D-experiments carried out in the reduced-gravity environment of space.

  4. Study of Magnetic Damping Effect on Convection and Solidification Under G-Jitter Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, H. C.

    2001-01-01

    As shown in space flight experiments, g-jitter is a critical issue affecting solidification processing of materials in microgravity. This study aims to provide, through extensive numerical simulations and ground based experiments, an assessment of the use of magnetic fields in combination with microgravity to reduce the g-jitter induced convective flows in space processing systems. Analytical solutions and 2-D and 3-D numerical models for g-jitter driven flows in simple solidification systems with and without the presence of an applied magnetic field have been developed and extensive analyses were carried out. A physical model was also constructed and PIV measurements compared reasonably well with predictions from numerical models. Some key points may be summarized as follows: (1) the amplitude of the oscillating velocity decreases at a rate inversely proportional to the g-jitter frequency and with an increase in the applied magnetic field; (2) the induced flow oscillates at approximately the same frequency as the affecting g-jitter, but out of a phase angle; (3) the phase angle is a complicated function of geometry, applied magnetic field, temperature gradient and frequency; (4) g-jitter driven flows exhibit a complex fluid flow pattern evolving in time; (5) the damping effect is more effective for low frequency flows; and (6) the applied magnetic field helps to reduce the variation of solutal distribution along the solid-liquid interface. Work in progress includes developing numerical models for solidification phenomena with the presence of both g-jitter and magnetic fields and developing a ground-based physical model to verify numerical predictions.

  5. Metastable bcc phase formation in the Nb-Cr-Ti system

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, D.J.; Perepezko, J.H.

    1994-08-01

    Metastable disordered bcc phases have been formed from the melt in the Nb-Cr-Ti system where primary Laves phases would develop under equilibrium solidification conditions. Three vertical temperature-composition sections in the ternary system incorporating NbCr, were evaluated: the Nb-Cr binary, the TiCr{sub 2}-NbCr{sub 2} isoplethal section, and the NbCr{sub 2}-Ti plethal section. In the rapid solidification of NbCr{sub 2}, metastable bcc phase formation was not observed, but deviations from NbCr{sub 2} stoichiometry or alloying with Ti was found to promote bcc phase formation by decreasing the required liquid undercooling to reach the metastable bcc liquidus and solidus. The metastable phases were characterized through x-ray diffraction (XRD), and systematic deviations from Vegard`s Rule have been defined in the three plethal sections. The metastable bcc phases decompose at temperatures >800{degrees}C to uniformly refined microstructures. As a result, novel microstructural tailoring schemes are possible through the metastable precursor microstructures.

  6. The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lola, Chanceaux; Thierry, Menand

    2015-04-01

    The effects of solidification on sill propagation dynamics and geometry are studied by means of analogue laboratory experiments. Hot fluid vegetable oil (a magma analogue), that solidifies during its propagation, is injected as a sill in a colder layered gelatine solid (an elastic host rock analogue). The injection flux and temperature are maintained constant during an experiment. In order to vary the importance of solidification and quantify its effect on sill propagation, the injection flux and temperature are systematically varied between each experiment. Depending on the importance of solidification effects, two extreme behaviours for sill propagation dynamics and geometry are observed. When solidification effects are small (high injection temperatures and fluxes), the propagation is continuous and the sill has a regular and smooth surface. Inversely, when solidification effects are important (low injection temperatures and fluxes), sill propagation is discontinuous and occurs by steps. After each propagation step, the sill stalls, thickens progressively by storing hot fluid vegetable oil beneath the partially solidified intrusion, without growing neither in length nor in breadth, and after a pause, the propagation initiates again, soon followed by a new episode of momentary arrest. The geometry of these sills displays folds, ropy structures on their surface, and lobes with imprints of the leading fronts that correspond to each step of surface creation. These experiments show that for a given, constant injected volume, as solidification effects increase, the surface of the sills decreases, their thickness increases, and the number of propagation steps increases. In the same way lower solidification effects promote larger sill surfaces, lower thicknesses, and a lower number of propagation steps. These results have various geological and geophysical implications. Regarding the geometry of sills, 3D seismic studies in sedimentary basins reveal sills with lobate

  7. In Situ Study of Microstructure Evolution in Solidification of Hypereutectic Al-Si Alloys with Application of Thermal Analysis and Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sediako, Dimitry G.; Kasprzak, Wojciech

    2015-09-01

    Understanding of the kinetics of solid-phase evolution in solidification of hypereutectic aluminum alloys is a key to control their as-cast microstructure and resultant mechanical properties, and in turn, to enhance the service characteristics of actual components. This study was performed to evaluate the solidification kinetics for three P-modified hypereutectic Al-19 pct Si alloys: namely, Al-Si binary alloy and with the subsequent addition of 2.8 pct Cu and 2.8 pct Cu + 0.7 pct Mg. Metallurgical evaluation included thermodynamic calculations of the solidification process using the FactSage™ 6.2 software package, as well as experimental thermal analysis, and in situ neutron diffraction. The study revealed kinetics of solid α-Al, solid Si, Al2Cu, and Mg2Si evolution, as well as the individual effects of Cu and Mg alloying additions on the solidification path of the Al-Si system. Various techniques applied in this study resulted in some discrepancies in the results. For example, the FactSage computations, in general, resulted in 281 K to 286 K (8 °C to 13 °C) higher Al-Si eutectic temperatures than the ones recorded in the thermal analysis, which are also ~278 K (~5 °C) higher than those observed in the in situ neutron diffraction. None of the techniques can provide a definite value for the solidus temperature, as this is affected by the chosen calculation path [283 K to 303 K (10 °C to 30 °C) higher for equilibrium solidification vs non-equilibrium] for the FactSage analysis; and further complicated by evolution of secondary Al-Cu and Mg-Si phases that commenced at the end of solidification. An explanation of the discrepancies observed and complications associated with every technique applied is offered in the paper.

  8. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage. PMID:28098147

  9. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 2: Software documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The software developed for the solidification model is presented. A link between the calculations and the FORTRAN code is provided, primarily in the form of global flow diagrams and data structures. A complete listing of the solidification code is given.

  10. Direct observation of spatially isothermal equiaxed solidification of an Al-Cu alloy in microgravity on board the MASER 13 sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Houltz, Y.; Li, J.; Lockowandt, C.; Henriksson, K.; Melville, N.; Browne, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, isothermal equiaxed solidification of a metallic alloy has been observed in situ in space, providing unique benchmark experimental data. The experiment was completed on board the MASER 13 sounding rocket, launched in December 2015, using a newly developed isothermal solidification furnace. A grain-refined Al-20 wt%Cu sample was fully melted and solidified during 360 s of microgravity and the solidification sequence was recorded using time-resolved X-radiography. Equiaxed nucleation, dendritic growth, solutal impingement, and eutectic transformation were thus observed in a gravity-free environment. Equiaxed nucleation was promoted through application of a controlled cooling rate of -0.05 K/s producing a 1D grain density of 6.5 mm-1, uniformly distributed throughout the field of view (FOV). Primary growth slowed to a visually imperceptible level at an estimated undercooling of 7 K, after which the cooling rate was increased to -1.0 K/s for the remainder of solidification and eutectic transformation, ensuring the sample was fully solidified inside the microgravity time window. The eutectic transformation commenced at the centre of the FOV proceeding radially outwards covering the entire FOV in 3 s Microgravity-based solidification is compared to an identical pre-flight ground-based experiment using the same sample and experiment timeline. The ground experiment was designed to minimise gravity effects, by choice of a horizontal orientation for the sample, so that any differences would be subtle. The first equiaxed nucleation occurred at an apparent undercooling of 0.6 K less than the equivalent event during microgravity. During primary equiaxed solidification, as expected, no buoyant grain motion was observed during microgravity, compared to modest grain rotation and reorientation observed during terrestrial-based solidification. However, when the cooling rate was increased from -0.05 K/s to -1.0 K/s during the latter stages of solidification, in

  11. Initial solidification phenomena in continuous casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Adam

    Continuous casting is the main process route for the mass production of steel today, yielding in excess of 560 million tons annually, corresponding to 80% of total steel production worldwide. As with any process, as improvements are introduced and quality is enhanced, there is the ever greater push to reduce problems that were once minor. The restrictions on quality for certain products require that defects be kept to a minimum. Currently, the industry has developed a wealth of experience in how to deal with slabs with oscillation marks. However, these practices are circumventions of the symptoms of the problems, not solutions for the causes. By understanding the formation mechanism, one can then develop practices based on a logical consideration oft he causes. The goals of this current work were to develop a mold simulator that could replicate the surface quality of industrial slabs. The techniques developed allowed for a more detailed examination of the heat transfer interactions during continuous casting, such that the variations of heat flux due to irregular solidification could be observed. It is shown that the mechanisms proposed in the literature are not individually sufficient for the formation of an oscillation mark, but several are necessary and must occur in concert for one to form. A mechanism is proposed for the formation of oscillation marks based upon the experimental results. This hypothesis is formulated as a series of necessary conditions that must be satisfied for an oscillation mark to be formed. This hypothesis is described, and shown to be in agreement with the trends observed and reported in the literature. It can explain both the overflow- and depression-type mark seen in industrial slabs. Additionally, this hypothesis was successfully used as a method of predicting the locations of oscillation marks on cast shells based upon the mold heat transfer measurements.

  12. Solidification of supercooled water in the vicinity of a solid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schremb, Markus; Tropea, Cameron

    2016-11-01

    An experimental approach utilizing a Hele-Shaw cell for the investigation of the solidification of a supercooled liquid in contact with a solid wall is presented. The setup is based on an idea presented by Marín et al. [A. G. Marín et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 054301 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.054301], who investigated the planar freezing of a sessile drop without supercooling. This apparatus overcomes optical distortions present when observing the freezing of sessile drops, arising due to reflections and refraction of light on the drop surface. The facility is used to investigate the freezing process of water drops, supercooled down to -20∘C , and to qualitatively demonstrate that the growth behavior is uninfluenced by the use of the Hele-Shaw cell. Different features during freezing, which are known for sessile water drops, are also observed with the Hele-Shaw cell. The growth morphology within the first phase of solidification is categorized according to the initial drop supercooling. Furthermore, freezing velocities within this phase are related to data available in the literature for the growth of single ice dendrites.

  13. Influence of Lanthanum on Solidification, Microstructure, and Mechanical Properties of Eutectic Al-Si Piston Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, R.; Asmael, M. B. A.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of Lanthanum (La) concentration on the solidification parameters of the α-Al, Al-Si, and Al-Cu phases and on the microstructure, tensile, and hardness properties of eutectic Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy were systematically investigated. The solidification parameters were examined using computer-aided cooling curve thermal analysis (CA-CCTA). The cooling curve and microstructure analysis showed that La altered the Si structure. The nucleation and growth temperatures of eutectic Si decreased when 0.3 wt.% La was added, and a high depression temperature was obtained with 1.0 wt.% La. High amounts of La considerably modified the Si structure and decreased the area and aspect ratio by 69.9 and 51%, respectively. The thermal analysis result recorded a faster freezing time with the La addition and a 36% alteration in the secondary dendrite arm spacing. Two secondary or ternary La-rich intermetallic phases were formed with needle- and plate-like structures. Furthermore, the mechanical properties were investigated by hardness and tensile tests with different La concentrations. The addition of small amounts of La (0.1 wt.%) significantly improved the ultimate tensile strength and quality index of the Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy. In addition, the hardness value of Al-11Si-Cu increased by 7-8% with the increasing amount of La added.

  14. Effect of dendrite coarsening on the solidification of interdendritic liquid in iron alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'Inskii, V. A.; Kostyleva, L. V.; Goremykina, S. S.

    2010-05-01

    The solidification of the interdendritic liquid in austenitic 110G13L steel and white cast iron is studied. In the absence of dendrite coarsening, the solidification mechanism of the interdendritic liquid in the manganese steel is shown to change and solidification occurs in the form of polycrystalline aggregates around dendrites from different centers. The relation between the standard solidification of the interdendritic liquid and the dendrite coarsening in iron alloys is grounded.

  15. A three-dimensional cellular automata model coupled with finite element method and thermodynamic database for alloy solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Qin, R. S.; Chen, D. F.

    2013-08-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) cellular automata (CA) model has been developed for the simulation of microstructure evolution in alloy solidification. The governing rule for the CA model is associated with the phase transition driving force which is obtained via a thermodynamic database. This determines the migration rate of the non-equilibrium solid-liquid (SL) interface and is calculated according to the local temperature and chemical composition. The curvature of the interface and the anisotropic property of the surface energy are taken into consideration. A 3D finite element (FE) method is applied for the calculation of transient heat and mass transfer. Numerical calculations for the solidification of Fe-1.5 wt% C alloy have been performed. The morphological evolution of dendrites, carbon segregation and temperature distribution in both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions are studied. The parameters affecting the growth of equiaxed and columnar dendrites are discussed. The calculated results are verified using the analytical model and previous experiments. The method provides a sophisticated approach to the solidification of multi-phase and multi-component systems.

  16. Validated thermodynamic prediction of AlP and eutectic (Si) solidification sequence in Al-Si cast alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S. M.; Schmid-Fetzer, R.

    2016-03-01

    The eutectic microstructure in hypoeutectic Al-Si cast alloys is strongly influenced by AlP particles which are potent nuclei for the eutectic (Si) phase. The solidification sequence of AlP and (Si) phases is, thus, crucial for the nucleation of eutectic silicon with marked impact on its morphology. This study presents this interdependence between Si- and P-compositions, relevant for Al-Si cast alloys, on the solidification sequence of AlP and (Si). These data are predicted from a series of thermodynamic calculations. The predictions are based on a self-consistent thermodynamic description of the Al-Si-P ternary alloy system developed recently. They are validated by independent experimental studies on microstructure and undercooling in hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys. A constrained Scheil solidification simulation technique is applied to predict the undercooling under clean heterogeneous nucleation conditions, validated by dedicated experimental observations on entrained droplets. These specific undercooling values may be very large and their quantitative dependence on Si and P content of the Al alloy is presented.

  17. Solidification Dynamics of Silver Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    1999-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the initial superheat condition of the drop the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  18. Solidification Dynamics of Spherical Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, Richard N.; Brush, Lucien N.

    2006-01-01

    Silver drops (99.9%, 4, 5, 7, and 9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105 meter drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and pure argon atmospheres. By varying a drop s initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approx. 4.6s of free fall time. Comparison of the experimental observations is made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with cooling of the drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Analysis reveals the relative importance ,of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  19. Solidification Dynamics of Metal Drops in a Free Fall Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grugel, R. N.; Brush, L. N.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of experimental observations were made with numerical solutions to a model of the heat transfer and solidification kinetics associated with the cooling of a molten drop during free fall, particularly with regard to the fraction of liquid transformed. Experimentally, silver drops (99.9%, 4-9 mm diameter) were levitated, melted, and released to fall through Marshall Space Flight Center's 105m drop tube in helium - 6% hydrogen and argon atmospheres. By systematically varying the drops initial superheat the extent of solidification prior to impact ranged from complete to none during the approximately 4.6s of free fall time. Analysis reveals the relative importance of the initial parameters affecting the cooling and solidification rates within the drop. A discussion of the conditions under which the actual observations deviate from the assumptions used in the model is presented.

  20. Why solidification has an S-shaped history

    PubMed Central

    Bejan, A.; Lorente, S.; Yilbas, B. S.; Sahin, A. Z.

    2013-01-01

    Here we show theoretically that the history of solid growth during “rapid” solidification must be S-shaped, in accord with the constructal law of design in nature. In the beginning the rate of solidification increases and after reaching a maximum it decreases monotonically as the volume of solid tends toward a plateau. The S-history is a consequence of four configurations for the flow of heat from the solidification front to the subcooled surroundings, in this chronological order: solid spheres centered at nucleation sites, needles that invade longitudinally, radial growth by conduction, and finally radial lateral conduction to interstices that are warming up. The solid volume (Bs) vs time (t) is an S-curve because it is a power law of type Bs ~ tn where the exponent n first increases and then decreases in time (n = 3/2, 2, 1, …). The initial portion of the S curve is not an exponential.

  1. Linear Stability of Binary Alloy Solidification for Unsteady Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2010-01-01

    An extension of the Mullins and Sekerka (MS) linear stability analysis to the unsteady growth rate case is considered for dilute binary alloys. In particular, the stability of the planar interface during the initial solidification transient is studied in detail numerically. The rapid solidification case, when the system is traversing through the unstable region defined by the MS criterion, has also been treated. It has been observed that the onset of instability is quite accurately defined by the "quasi-stationary MS criterion", when the growth rate and other process parameters are taken as constants at a particular time of the growth process. A singular behavior of the governing equations for the perturbed quantities at the constitutional supercooling demarcation line has been observed. However, when the solidification process, during its transient, crosses this demarcation line, a planar interface is stable according to the linear analysis performed.

  2. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Ti-6Al-4V Laser Welds Using Solidification and Heat-Affected Zone Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2017-03-01

    Temperature histories of Ti-6Al-4V laser welds are presented, which are calculated using numerical-analytical basis functions and boundary constraints based on measured solidification and heat-affected zone cross sections. These weld temperature histories can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, which include numerical models for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these temperature histories can be used parametrically for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification and heat-affected zone boundaries.

  3. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Ti-6Al-4V Laser Welds Using Solidification and Heat-Affected Zone Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.

    2017-02-01

    Temperature histories of Ti-6Al-4V laser welds are presented, which are calculated using numerical-analytical basis functions and boundary constraints based on measured solidification and heat-affected zone cross sections. These weld temperature histories can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, which include numerical models for prediction of solid-state phase transformations and mechanical response. In addition, these temperature histories can be used parametrically for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that uses three-dimensional constraint conditions whose two-dimensional projections are mapped within transverse cross sections of experimentally measured solidification and heat-affected zone boundaries.

  4. Analysis and calculation of macrosegregation in a casting ingot. MPS solidification model. Volume 3: Operating manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maples, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The operation of solidification model 1 is described. Model 1 calculates the macrosegregation in a rectangular ingot of a binary alloy as a result of horizontal axisymmetric bidirectional solidification. The calculation is restricted to steady-state solidification; there is no variation in final local average composition in the direction of isotherm movement. The physics of the model are given.

  5. X-ray imaging and controlled solidification of Al-Cu alloys toward microstructures by design

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Amy J.; Tourret, Damien; Imhoff, Seth D.; Gibbs, Paul J.; Fezzaa, Kamel; Cooley, Jason C.; Lee, Wah -Keat; Deriy, Alex; Patterson, Brian M.; Papin, Pallas A.; Clarke, Kester D.; Field, Robert D.; Smith, James L.

    2015-01-30

    X-ray imaging, which permits the microscopic visualization of metal alloy solidification dynamics, can be coupled with controlled solidification to create microstructures by design. This x-ray image shows a process-derived composite microstructure being made from a eutectic Al-17.1 at.%Cu alloy by successive solidification and remelting steps.

  6. Mathematical modeling of solidification phenomena in electromagnetically stirred melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, Gregory Michael

    A methodology is presented to simulate the electromagnetic, heat transfer, and fluid flow phenomena for two dimensional electromagnetic solidification processes. For computation of the electromagnetic field, the model utilizes the mutual inductance technique to limit the solution domain to the molten metal and magnetic shields, commonly present in solidification systems. The temperature and velocity fields were solved using the control volume method in the metal domain. The developed model employs a two domain formulation for the mushy zone. Mathematical formulations are presented for turbulent flow in the bulk liquid and the suspended particle region, along with rheological behavior. An expression has been developed---for the first time---to describe damping of the flow in the suspended particle region as a result of the interactions between the particles and the turbulent eddies. The flow in the fixed particle region is described using Darcy's law. Calculations were carried out for globular and dendritic solidification morphologies of an electromagnetically-stirred melt in a bottom-chill mold. The coherency solid fraction for the globular solidification morphology was taken to be 0.5, while the coherency for dendritic morphology was 0.25. The results showed the flow intensity in the suspended particle region was reduced by an order of magnitude. The effect of the heat extraction rate on solidification time was investigated using three different heat transfer coefficients. The results showed that the decrease in solidification time is nonlinear with respect to increasing heat transfer coefficient. The influence of the final grain size on the damping of the flow in the suspended particle region was examined, and it was found that larger grain sizes reduce the extent of flow damping.

  7. Formation of shrinkage porosity during solidification of steel: Numerical simulation and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedler, M.; Michelic, S.; Bernhard, C.

    2016-07-01

    The phase transformations in solidification of steel are accompanied by shrinkage and sudden changes in the solubility of alloying elements, resulting in negative side effects as micro- and macrosegregation and the formation of gas and shrinkage porosities. This paper deals with the numerical and experimental simulation of the formation of shrinkage porosity during the solidification of steel. First the physical basics for the mechanism of shrinkage pore formation will be discussed. The main reason for this type of porosity is the restraint of fluid flow in the mushy zone which leads to a pressure drop. The pressure decreases from the dendrite tip to the root. When the pressure falls below a critical value, a pore can form. The second part of the paper deals with different approaches for the prediction of the formation of shrinkage porosity. The most common one according to these models is the usage of a simple criterion function, like the Niyama criterion. For the computation of the porosity criterion the thermal gradient, cooling rate and solidification rate must be known, easily to determine from numerical simulation. More complex simulation tools like ProCAST include higher sophisticated models, which allow further calculations of the shrinkage cavity. Finally, the different approaches will be applied to a benchmark laboratory experiment. The presented results deal with an ingot casting experiment under variation of taper. The dominant influence of mould taper on the formation of shrinkage porosities can both be demonstrated by the lab experiment as well as numerical simulations. These results serve for the optimization of all ingot layouts for lab castings at the Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy.

  8. Subcritical-supercritical bifurcation crossover in directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.; Williams, L.; Cummins, H. )

    1994-12-01

    The Mullins-Sekerka planar-cellular instability in directional solidification should be subcritical when the partition coefficient [ital k][lt]0.45 and latent heat is ignored. However, Merchant and Davis [Phys. Rev. Lett. [bold 63], 573 (1989)] predicted that as the solute concentration is reduced, the increasingly important thermal diffusion field would lead to a crossover from a subcritical to a supercritical bifurcation. We have performed directional solidification experiments on a series of succinonitrile samples containing different concentrations of Coumarin 152, and have found preliminary evidence for the predicted crossover at a concentration [ital C][sub [ital t

  9. Performance of a Solidification Furnace Developed for Sounding Rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Chen Y.; Boschetti, Cesar; Ribeiro, Manuel F.; Toledo, Rafael C.; Freitas, Filipe E.; Bandeira, Iraja N.

    2011-11-01

    Brazil has a Microgravity Program mainly based on experiments using sounding rockets. This paper presents a brief account of the Program and the experiments made on the Brazilian rockets. Up to now three missions carrying a total of 26 experiments were made. In all flights a fast solidification furnace, capable of producing temperatures up to 900°C, was tested with semiconductor and metal alloys. This paper describes the construction and the performance of that furnace during the last parabolic flight, occurred in 2010. The solidification furnace is now qualified and ready to be used by other institutions in sounding rocket flights.

  10. Polymer solidification national program. Letter report on FY 1992 activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1993-04-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed several new and innovative polymer processes for the solidification of low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes streams. Polyethylene and modified sulfur cement solidification technologies have undergone steady, gradual development at BNL over the past nine years. During this time they have progressed through each of the stages necessary for logical technology maturation: from process conception, parameter optimization, waste form testing, evaluation of long-term durability, economic analysis, and scale-up feasibility. This technology development represents a significant investment which can potentially provide DOE with both short- and long-term savings.

  11. The use of fluidized bed combuster ash in the solidification of high oil and grease sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.G.; Stine, E.F. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    It has been common practice at petroleum refineries to dispose of oil sludges (containing oil, grease solids and water) in onsite pits. Remediation of these pits has typically involved in-situ solidification of the sludges using mixtures of Portland cement and fly ash. While this leaves the oily material in place, the resulting form is less permeable than the resulting sludge and has significant strength to support a cap. The supported cap reduces the infiltration rate of water to contact the solidified sludges. Due to the cumulative impact of the solidification and capping process the mobility of these materials is therefore reduced. Since 1991 an oil refinery has been investigating the closure of several large storm water impoundment ponds. These ponds contain sediments that are high in oil and grease and mostly low in solids. Oil and grease content ranges from 1.5 to 20% by EPA Method 9071. Consistencies and liquid content of the sediments vary from a very wet free flowing emulsion to a congealed sludge with about 70% solids. The primary concern of closure was to solidify the residues while still maintaining the low leachability and mobility of both metals and volatile organic hydrocarbons (VOCs).

  12. Solidification of Magnesium (AM50A) / vol%. SiCp composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Hu, H.

    2012-01-01

    Magnesium matrix composite is one of the advanced lightweight materials with high potential to be used in automotive and aircraft industries due to its low density and high specific mechanical properties. The magnesium composites can be fabricated by adding the reinforcements of fibers or/and particles. In the previous literature, extensive studies have been performed on the development of matrix grain structure of aluminum-based metal matrix composites. However, there is limited information available on the development of grain structure during the solidification of particulate-reinforced magnesium. In this work, a 5 vol.% SiCp particulate-reinforced magnesium (AM50A) matrix composite (AM50A/SiCp) was prepared by stir casting. The solidification behavior of the cast AM50A/SiCp composite was investigated by computer-based thermal analysis. Optical and scanning electron microscopies (SEM) were employed to examine the occurrence of nucleation and grain refinement involved. The results indicate that the addition of SiCp particulates leads to a finer grain structure in the composite compared with the matrix alloy. The refinement of grain structure should be attributed to both the heterogeneous nucleation and the restricted primary crystal growth.

  13. Potential Flow Interactions With Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buddhavarapu, Sudhir S.; Meiburg, Eckart

    1999-01-01

    The effect of convective melt motion on the growth of morphological instabilities in crystal growth has been the focus of many studies in the past decade. While most of the efforts have been directed towards investigating the linear stability aspects, relatively little attention has been devoted to experimental and numerical studies. In a pure morphological case, when there is no flow, morphological changes in the solid-liquid interface are governed by heat conduction and solute distribution. Under the influence of a convective motion, both heat and solute are redistributed, thereby affecting the intrinsic morphological phenomenon. The overall effect of the convective motion could be either stabilizing or destabilizing. Recent investigations have predicted stabilization by a flow parallel to the interface. In the case of non-parallel flows, e.g., stagnation point flow, Brattkus and Davis have found a new flow-induced morphological instability that occurs at long wavelengths and also consists of waves propagating against the flow. Other studies have addressed the nonlinear aspects (Konstantinos and Brown, Wollkind and Segel)). In contrast to the earlier studies, our present investigation focuses on the effects of the potential flow fields typically encountered in Hele-Shaw cells. Such a Hele-Shaw cell can simulate a gravity-free environment in the sense that buoyancy-driven convection is largely suppressed, and hence negligible. Our interest lies both in analyzing the linear stability of the solidification process in the presence of potential flow fields, as well as in performing high-accuracy nonlinear simulations. Linear stability analysis can be performed for the flow configuration mentioned above. It is observed that a parallel potential flow is stabilizing and gives rise to waves traveling downstream. We have built a highly accurate numerical scheme which is validated at small amplitudes by comparing with the analytically predicted results for the pure

  14. In situ X-ray observations of gas porosity interactions with dendritic microstructures during solidification of Al-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, A. G.; Browne, D. J.; Houltz, Y.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2016-03-01

    In situ X-radiography solidification experiments were performed on Al-based alloys, using both synchrotron and laboratory-based X-ray sources, in conjunction with a gradient furnace and a newly developed isothermal furnace, respectively. The effect of gas porosity nucleation and growth within the semi-solid mush during both columnar and equiaxed solidification was thereby observed. In all experimental cases examined, gas porosity was observed to nucleate and grow within the field-of-view (FOV) causing various levels of distortion to the semi-solid mush, and thereafter disappearing from the sample leaving no permanent voids within the solidified microstructure. During columnar growth, a single bubble caused severe remelting and destruction of primary trunks leading to secondary fragmentation and evidence of blocking of the columnar front. Equiaxed solidification was performed under microgravity-like conditions with restricted grain motion in the FOV. The degree to which the nucleated gas bubbles affected the surrounding grain structure increased with increasing solid fraction. However, bubble sphericity remained unaffected by apparent solid fraction or grain coherency.

  15. Assessment of cement kiln dust (CKD) for stabilization/solidification (S/S) of arsenic contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Wazne, Mahmoud; Yoon, In-Ho; Grubb, Dennis G

    2008-11-30

    A stabilization/solidification (S/S) process for arsenic (As) contaminated soils was evaluated using cement kiln dust (CKD). Laboratory-prepared slurries, made of either kaolinite or montmorillonite, and field soils spiked with either As(3+) or As(5+) were prepared and treated with CKD ranging from 10 to 25 wt%. Sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate at 0.1 wt% were used to simulate arsenite (As(3+)) and arsenate (As(5+)) source contamination in soils, respectively. The effectiveness of treatment was evaluated at curing periods of 1- and 7-days based on the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). As-CKD and As-clay-CKD slurries were also spiked at 10 wt% to evaluate As immobilization mechanism using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analyses. Overall, the TCLP results showed that only the As(5+) concentrations in kaolinite amended with 25 wt% CKD after 1 day of curing were less than the TCLP regulatory limit of 5mg/L. Moreover, at 7 days of curing, all As(3+) and As(5+) concentrations obtained from kaolinite soils were less than the TCLP criteria. However, none of the CKD-amended montmorillonite samples satisfied the TCLP-As criteria at 7 days. Only field soil samples amended with 20 wt% CKD complied with the TCLP criteria within 1 day of curing, where the source contamination was As(5+). XRPD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) results showed that Ca-As-O and NaCaAsO(4).7.5H(2)O were the primary phases responsible for As(3+) and As(5+) immobilization in the soils, respectively.

  16. Liquidus Temperatures and Solidification Behavior in the Copper-Niobium System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, D.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Williams, G.

    1998-01-01

    The copper-niobium phase diagram has been under active debate; thus, a corroboratory experimental study is needed. In this investigation, the melts of Cu-Nb alloys at compositions ranging from 5 lo 86 wt% Nb were processed in different environments and solidified at relatively low rates of 50-75 C/s to determine liquidus temperatures and to study solidification behavior. For all samples processed under very clean conditions, only Nb dendrites in a Cu matrix were observed; while in the presents of oxygen impurities, the alloys containing 5-35 wt% Nb exhibited microstructure of Nb-rich spheroids and Nb dendrites in the Cu matrix. The results obtained from clean conditions are in fair agreement with the Cu-Nb phase diagram having an S-shaped, near-horizontal appearances of the liquidus. The formation of Nb-rich droplets at slow cooling rates is discussed in terms of a stable liquid miscibility gap induced by oxygen.

  17. The solidification products of levitated Fe83B17 studied by high-energy x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quirinale, D. G.; Rustan, G. E.; Kreyssig, A.; Lapidus, S. H.; Kramer, M. J.; Goldman, A. I.

    2016-11-01

    Detailed high-energy x-ray diffraction studies were performed to gain insight into the evolution of phase formation in undercooled Fe83B17 and the mechanism for the stabilization of face-centered cubic (fcc) Fe in the presence of Fe23B6. Fe83B17 solidifies directly into either the equilibrium Fe2B + Fe phases or the metastable Fe23B6 + Fe phases. When formed, the metastable Fe23B6 phase either rapidly transforms into the equilibrium Fe2B phase within the solidification plateau or can persist down to ambient temperature. Here, we detail these different solidification behaviors in a set of thermal cycles taken from one sample and demonstrate the absence of a direct correlation with cooling rate and thermal history. We show that the coherent growth of Fe23B6 and fcc Fe suppresses the allotropic transition from fcc Fe to bcc Fe. The temperature evolution of the phase fractions and lattice parameters is also presented.

  18. Influence of solidification variables on the cast microstructure and porosity in directionally solidified Mar-M247

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesell, Harry Smith, III

    The solidification microstructure is critical in determining the amount and distribution of porosity that develops during the freezing of castings. As the solidification velocity Vs increases, the microstructural length scales (primary and secondary dendrite arm spacings) decrease; thus (1) the mushy zone permeability would be expected to decrease; and (2) nucleated pores would be increasingly isolated. Although the first effect would tend to increase the observed porosity, the second effect would tend to decrease the porosity. As solidification velocity decreases, the cooling rate decreases allowing additional time for carbide growth. Large carbide size may block feeding in the intercellular spaces increasing observed porosity. To better understand these competitive mechanisms, a series of controlled unidirectional experiments were performed on bars of nickel-base superalloy Mar-M247. Samples were produced with constant dendrite arm spacing throughout an extended length of each cast bar. The axial thermal gradient and withdrawal velocity imposed on each casting were varied between castings to produce a range of microstructures from aligned cellular dendritic to aligned dendritic to misaligned dendritic. Macrosegregation effects along the lengths of the bars were evaluated and the resultant impact upon the density along the lengths of each casting was also characterized. The density measurements were found to be very sensitive to both (1) compositional macrosegregation in these castings and (2) internal porosity. Statistical analyses of microporosity in castings were based upon metallographic measurements. The development of microporosity in the unidirectionally solidified castings is shown to be dependent upon the hydrogen gas content of the samples and the imposed solidification velocity through the sample's cast microstructures. An optimum intermediate withdrawal velocity of 0.005--0.01 cm/s was found, which led to closely spaced dendrite arms, a large number of

  19. Gas- and particle-phase primary emissions from in-use, on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Andrew A.; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Presto, Albert A.; Gordon, Timothy D.; Lipsky, Eric M.; Karve, Mrunmayi; Gutierrez, Alváro; Robertson, William H.; Zhang, Mang; Brandow, Christopher; Chang, Oliver; Chen, Shiyan; Cicero-Fernandez, Pablo; Dinkins, Lyman; Fuentes, Mark; Huang, Shiou-Mei; Ling, Richard; Long, Jeff; Maddox, Christine; Massetti, John; McCauley, Eileen; Miguel, Antonio; Na, Kwangsam; Ong, Richard; Pang, Yanbo; Rieger, Paul; Sax, Todd; Truong, Tin; Vo, Thu; Chattopadhyay, Sulekha; Maldonado, Hector; Maricq, M. Matti; Robinson, Allen L.

    2014-05-01

    Tailpipe emissions from sixty-four unique light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGVs) spanning model years 1987-2012, two medium-duty diesel vehicles and three heavy-duty diesel vehicles with varying levels of aftertreatment were characterized at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit and Heavy-Duty Engine Testing Laboratories. Each vehicle was tested on a chassis dynamometer using a constant volume sampler, commercial fuels and standard duty cycles. Measurements included regulated pollutants such as carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate matter (PM). Off-line analyses were performed to speciate gas- and particle-phase emissions. The data were used to investigate trends in emissions with vehicle age and to quantify the effects of different aftertreatment technologies on diesel vehicle emissions (e.g., with and without a diesel particulate filter). On average, newer LDGVs that met the most recent emissions standards had substantially lower emissions of regulated gaseous pollutants (CO, THC and NOx) than older vehicles. For example, THC emissions from the median LDGV that met the LEV2 standard was roughly a factor of 10 lower than the median pre-LEV vehicle; there were also substantial reductions in NOx (factor of ∼100) and CO (factor of ∼10) emissions from pre-LEV to LEV2 vehicles. However, reductions in LDGV PM mass emissions were much more modest. For example, PM emission from the median LEV2 vehicle was only a factor of three lower than the median pre-LEV vehicle, mainly due to the reductions in organic carbon emissions. In addition, LEV1 and LEV2 LDGVs had similar PM emissions. Catalyzed diesel particulate filters reduced CO, THC and PM emissions from HDDVs by one to two orders of magnitude. Comprehensive organic speciation was performed to quantify priority air toxic emissions and to estimate the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potential. The data suggest that the SOA production from cold

  20. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

  1. Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Genau, Amber Lynn

    2004-01-01

    Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

  2. STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION OF CERCLA AND RCRA WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook provides U.S. EPA regional staff responsible for reviewing CERCLA remedial action plans and RCRA permit applications with a tool for interpreting information on stabilization/solidification treatment. As a practical day-to-day reference guide, it will also provide t...

  3. Digested sewage sludge solidification by converter slag for landfill cover.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung-Ho; Cho, Jin-Kyu; Yim, Soobin

    2005-04-01

    A new technology for solidification of digested sewage sludge referred to as converter slag solidification (CSS) has been developed using converter slag as the solidifying agent and quick lime as the solidifying aid. The CSS technology was investigated by analyzing the physicochemical properties of solidified sludge and determining its microstructural characteristics. The feasibility of using solidified sludge as a landfill cover material was considered in the context of the economical recycling of waste. Sludge solidified using the CSS technology exhibited geotechnical properties that are appropriate for replacing currently used cover soil. Microscopic analyses using XRD, SEM and EDS revealed that the main hydrated product of solidification was CSH (CaO . SiO2 . nH2O), which may play an important role in the effective setting process. Negligible leaching of heavy metals from the solidified sludge was observed. The solidification process of the hydrated sludge, slag and quicklime eliminated the coliform bacteria. Recycled sewage sludge solidified using CCS technology could be used as an effective landfill cover.

  4. Hazcon Solidification Process, Douglassville, Pa.: Applications Analysis Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the HAZCON solidification technology and its applicability as an on-site treatment method for waste site cleanup. A Demonstration was held at the Douglassville, Pennsylvania Superfund site in the fall of 1987. Operational data and sampling and an...

  5. The Effect of Solidification Rate on Morphological Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekerka, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    At low solidification rates, the criterion for the onset of morphological instability parallels closely the criterion of constitutional supercooling. At somewhat larger rates of solidification, however, the results of the perturbation theory of morphological instability differ significantly from the predictions of constitutional supercooling. This arises because the critical wave length for instability decreases as solidification rate increases and thus the effects of capillarity (solid-liquid surface tension) play a strong stabilizing role. This gives rise to the concept of absolute stability, according to which the system will always be stable for a sufficiently large rate of solidification. This enhanced stabilization by capillarity is present only so long as local equilibrium is maintained at the solid-liquid interface. If the interfacial temperature drops below its equilibrium value by an amount dependent on growth rate, oscillatory morphological instabilities can occur. The differences among these various stability criteria are illustrated by means of some simple two-dimensional diagrams that should supplant the conventional plots of (temperature gradient)/(growth rate) vs. alloy concentration.

  6. Experimental Study of Sudden Solidification of Supercooled Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The two independent methods of measurement of the mass of ice created at sudden solidification of supercooled water are described. One is based on the calorimetric measurement of heat that is necessary for melting the ice and the second interprets the volume change that accompanies the water freezing. Experimental results are compared with the…

  7. Elaboration of AlSi10Mg casting alloys using directional solidification processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghedjati, Khadoudja; Fleury, Eric; Hamani, Mohamed Seghir; Benchiheub, Mostefa; Bouacha, Khaider; Bolle, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    The effects of pulling velocity on the solidification behavior and microstructural parameters of AlSi10Mg alloys prepared in a Bridgman-type directional solidification furnace were investigated. The microstructure, particularly the secondary dendritic arm spacing (SDAS), and the Brinell hardness (BH) of the solidified AlSi10Mg alloys were characterized for samples with cylindrical shapes and different conicities ( θ = 0°, 5°, and 10°). Microstructural studies revealed an increased density of α-Al phase dendrites and a decreased interdendritic distance with increasing pulling velocity. The dendrites were found to be preferentially oriented along the pulling direction for low pulling velocities. For larger pulling velocities, the dendrites grew first in the cooling direction but then broke as others nucleated and coarsened. The HB values of the solidified samples increased as the pulling velocity increased. In regard to sample conicity, smaller dendrites were observed for an apex angle of θ = 5°, resulting in the largest HB value. This result was interpreted in terms of the favorable orientation of the dendrite along the pulling direction.

  8. Carbon concentration and particle precipitation during directional solidification of multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijun; Nakano, Satoshi; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2008-04-01

    The content and uniformity of carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) precipitates have an important impact on the efficiency of solar cells made of multicrystalline silicon. We established a dynamic model of SiC particle precipitation in molten silicon based on the Si-C phase diagram. Coupling with a transient global model of heat transfer, computations were carried out to clarify the characteristics of carbon segregation and particle formation in a directional solidification process for producing multicrystalline silicon for solar cells. The effects of impurity level in silicon feedstock and solidification process conditions on the distributions of substitutional carbon and SiC precipitates in solidified silicon ingots were investigated. It was shown that the content of SiC particles precipitated in solidified ingots increases markedly in magnitude as well as in space with increase in carbon concentration in silicon feedstock when it exceeds 1.26×10 17 atoms/cm 3. The distribution of SiC precipitates can be controlled by optimizing the process conditions. SiC precipitates are clustered at the center-upper region in an ingot solidified in a fast-cooling process but at the periphery-upper region for a slow-cooling process.

  9. Numerical modeling of solidification morphologies and segregation patterns in cast dendritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.

    1999-11-26

    A comprehensive stochastic model for simulating the evolution of dendritic crystals during the solidification of binary alloys was developed. The model includes time-dependent calculations for temperature distribution, solute redistribution in the liquid and solid phases, curvature, and growth anisotropy without further assumptions on the nucleation and growth of dendritic crystals. Stochastic procedures previously developed by Nastac and Stefanescu for simulating dendritic grains were used to control the nucleation and growth of dendrites. A numerical algorithm based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach was developed to explicitly track the sharp solid/liquid (S/L) interface on a fixed Cartesian grid. Two-dimensional mesoscopic calculations (i.e., at the dendrite tip length scale) were performed to simulate the evolution of columnar and equiaxed dendritic morphologies including the formation of the columnar-to-equiaxed transition. The effects of solutal and curvature undercoolings on the evolution of both the dendrite morphology and segregation patterns during the solidification of binary alloys were analyzed in detail.

  10. Modeling diffusion-governed solidification of ternary alloys - Part 2: Macroscopic transport phenomena and macrosegregation.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Li, J; Ludwig, A; Kharicha, A

    2014-09-01

    Part 1 of this two-part investigation presented a multiphase solidification model incorporating the finite diffusion kinetics and ternary phase diagram with the macroscopic transport phenomena (Wu et al., 2013). In Part 2, the importance of proper treatment of the finite diffusion kinetics in the calculation of macrosegregation is addressed. Calculations for a two-dimensional (2D) square casting (50 × 50 mm(2)) of Fe-0.45 wt.%C-1.06 wt.%Mn considering thermo-solutal convection and crystal sedimentation are performed. The modeling result indicates that the infinite liquid mixing kinetics as assumed by classical models (e.g., the Gulliver-Scheil or lever rule), which cannot properly consider the solute enrichment of the interdendritic or inter-granular melt at the early stage of solidification, might lead to an erroneous estimation of the macrosegregation. To confirm this statement, further theoretical and experimental evaluations are desired. The pattern and intensity of the flow and crystal sedimentation are dependent on the crystal morphologies (columnar or equiaxed); hence, the potential error of the calculated macrosegregation caused by the assumed growth kinetics depends on the crystal morphology. Finally, an illustrative simulation of an engineering 2.45-ton steel ingot is performed, and the results are compared with experimental results. This example demonstrates the model applicability for engineering castings regarding both the calculation efficiency and functionality.

  11. Increased corrosion resistance of the AZ80 magnesium alloy by rapid solidification.

    PubMed

    Aghion, E; Jan, L; Meshi, L; Goldman, J

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Mg-alloys are being considered as implantable biometals. Despite their excellent biocompatibility and good mechanical properties, their rapid corrosion is a major impediment precluding their widespread acceptance as implantable biomaterials. Here, we investigate the potential for rapid solidification to increase the corrosion resistance of Mg alloys. To this end, the effect of rapid solidification on the environmental and stress corrosion behavior of the AZ80 Mg alloy vs. its conventionally cast counterpart was evaluated in simulated physiological electrolytes. The microstructural characteristics were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The corrosion behavior was evaluated by immersion, salt spraying, and potentiodynamic polarization. Stress corrosion resistance was assessed by Slow Strain Rate Testing. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of rapidly solidified ribbons is significantly improved relative to the conventional cast alloy due to the increased Al content dissolved in the α-Mg matrix and the correspondingly reduced presence of the β-phase (Mg17 Al12 ). Unfortunately, extrusion consolidated solidified ribbons exhibited a substantial reduction in the environmental performance and stress corrosion resistance. This was mainly attributed to the detrimental effect of the extrusion process, which enriched the iron impurities and increased the internal stresses by imposing a higher dislocation density. In terms of immersion tests, the average corrosion rate of the rapidly solidified ribbons was <0.4 mm/year compared with ∼2 mm/year for the conventionally cast alloy and 26 mm/year for the rapidly solidified extruded ribbons.

  12. Orientation-field models for polycrystalline solidification: Grain coarsening and complex growth forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbuly, Bálint; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gyula I.; Henry, Hervé; Plapp, Mathis; Gránásy, László

    2017-01-01

    We compare two versions of the phase-field theory for polycrystalline solidification, both relying on the concept of orientation fields: one by Kobayashi et al. [Physica D 140 (2000) 141] [15] and the other by Henry et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86 (2012) 054117] [22]. Setting the model parameters so that the grain boundary energies and the time scale of grain growth are comparable in the two models, we first study the grain coarsening process including the limiting grain size distribution, and compare the results to those from experiments on thin films, to the models of Hillert, and Mullins, and to predictions by multiphase-field theories. Next, following earlier work by Gránásy et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 206105; Phys. Rev. E 72 (2005) 011605] [17,21], we extend the orientation field to the liquid state, where the orientation field is made to fluctuate in time and space, and employ the model for describing of multi-dendritic solidification, and polycrystalline growth, including the formation of "dizzy" dendrites disordered via the interaction with foreign particles.

  13. Cooling rate dependence of solidification for liquid aluminium: a large-scale molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Hou, Z Y; Dong, K J; Tian, Z A; Liu, R S; Wang, Z; Wang, J G

    2016-06-29

    The effect of the cooling rate on the solidification process of liquid aluminium is studied using a large-scale molecular dynamics method. It is found that there are various types of short-range order (SRO) structures in the liquid, among which the icosahedral (ICO)-like structures are dominant. These SRO structures are in dynamic fluctuation and transform each other. The effect of the cooling rate on the microstructure is very weak at high temperatures and in supercooled liquids, and it appears only below the liquid-solid transition temperature. Fast cooling rates favour the formation of amorphous structures with ICO-like features, while slow cooling rates favour the formation of FCC crystalline structures. Furthermore, FCC and HCP structures can coexist in crystalline structures. It is also found that nanocrystalline aluminium can be achieved at appropriate cooling rates, and its formation mechanism is thoroughly investigated by tracing the evolution of nanoclusters. The arrangement of FCC and HCP atoms in the nanograins displays various twinned structures as observed using visualization analysis, which is different from the layering or phase separation structures observed in the solidification of Lennard-Jones fluids and some metal liquids.

  14. Getting in shape: molten wax drop deformation and solidification at an immiscible liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Beesabathuni, Shilpa N; Lindberg, Seth E; Caggioni, Marco; Wesner, Chris; Shen, Amy Q

    2015-05-01

    The controlled production of non-spherical shaped particles is important for many applications such as food processing, consumer goods, adsorbents, drug delivery, and optical sensing. In this paper, we investigated the deformation and simultaneous solidification of millimeter size molten wax drops as they impacted an immiscible liquid interface of higher density. By varying initial temperature and viscoelasticity of the molten drop, drop size, impact velocity, viscosity and temperature of the bath fluid, and the interfacial tension between the molten wax and bath fluid, spherical molten wax drops impinged on a cooling water bath and were arrested into non-spherical solidified particles in the form of ellipsoid, mushroom, disc, and flake-like shapes. We constructed cursory phase diagrams for the various particle shapes generated over a range of Weber, Capillary, Reynolds, and Stefan numbers, governed by the interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal effects. We solved a simplified heat transfer problem to estimate the time required to initiate the solidification at the interface of a spherical molten wax droplet and cooling aqueous bath after impact. By correlating this time with the molten wax drop deformation history captured from high speed imaging experiments, we elucidate the delicate balance of interfacial, inertial, viscous, and thermal forces that determine the final morphology of wax particles.

  15. Effective transport rates and transport-induced melting and solidification in mushy layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    Mushy layers are known to occur in magma chambers, sea-ice, and metal castings. They are often modeled as a porous layer in which a fluid and solid matrix exist in thermal and compositional equilibria. In nonreactive porous media, both advective and diffusive transport rates for heat and solute differ. In mushy layers, however, the temperature and composition of the fluid phase are constrained by the liquidus relationship giving rise to effective transport rates that are intermediate between those for heat and solute in passive porous layers. The transport of heat and solute, even if the invading fluid is itself in equilibrium, is also accompanied by a degree of solidification or melting due to the difference in the transport rates for these two quantities. In this paper, analytical expressions for the effective velocity and diffusivity in a mushy layer and for the degree of melting or solidification accompanying the passage of a front with a different temperature and composition are derived and compared with the predictions of a numerical model and found to be in very good agreement. Characteristic parameters for a few mushy systems are calculated and appropriate transport and melting/freezing regimes are indicated.

  16. Transient Simulation of Mold Heat Transfer and Solidification Phenomena of Continuous Casting of Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bealy, Mostafa Omar

    2016-10-01

    A comprehensive model of heat transfer and solidification phenomena has been developed including microstructure evolution and fluctuation macrosegregation in continuously cast steel slabs with an objective of evaluation of various mold cooling conditions. The study contains plant trials, metallographic examinations, and formulation of mathematical modeling. The plant trials involved sample collection from three slab casters in use at two different steel plants. The metallographic study combined measurements of dendrite arm spacings and macrosegregation analysis of collected samples. A one-dimensional mathematical model has been developed to characterize the thermal, solidification phases, microstructure evolution, interdendritic strain, and therefore, the macrosegregation distributions. Two cooling approaches were proposed in this study to evaluate the Newtonian heat transfer coefficient in various mold regions. The first approach is a direct estimation approach (DEA), whereas the second one is a coupled approach of the interfacial resistor model and direct estimation approach (CIR/DEA). The model predictions and standard analytical models as well as the previous measurements were compared to verify and to calibrate the model where good agreements were obtained. The comparison between the model predictions and the measurements of dendrite arm spacings and fluctuated carbon concentration profiles were performed to determine the model accuracy level with different cooling approaches. Good agreements were obtained by different accuracy levels with different cooling approaches. The model predictions of thermal parameters and isotherms were analyzed and discussed.

  17. Rapid solidification of high-conductivity copper alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Theodore Atlas

    1989-01-01

    The main objective was to develop improved copper alloys of high strength and high thermal and electric conductivity. Chill block melt spinning was used to produce binary alloys of Cu-Cr and Cu-Zr, and ternary alloys of Cu-Cr-Ag. By quenching from the liquid state, up to 5 atomic percent of Cr and Zr were retained in metastable extended solid solution during the rapid solidification process. Eutectic solidification was avoided and the full strengthening benefits of the large volume fraction of precipitates were realized by subsequent aging treatment. The very low solid solubility of Cr and Zr in Cu result in a high conductivity Cu matrix strengthened by second phase precipitates. Tensile properties on as-cast and aged ribbons were measured at room and elevated temperatures. Precipitate coarsening of Cr in Cu was studied by changes in electrical resistance during aging. X-ray diffraction was used to measure the lattice parameter and the degree of supersaturation of the matrix. The microstructures were characterized by optical and electron microscopy.

  18. Morphology Evolution of Primary Particles in Lspsf Rheocasting Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong-Min; Yang, Xiang-Jie

    Experimental and microstructure simulation approaches were taken to investigate the morphological evolutions of primary particles in an Al-20wt% pct Cu alloy under LSPSF (low superheat pouring with a shear field) rheocasting conditions. The results indicate that crystals are globular and present in non-entrapped eutectic, after 3s of solidification. The morphology of these crystals during the subsequent free growth is determined by both the number of free crystals and the cooling intensity of melt. Analyzed results from microstructure simulation and two stability models suggest that the primary globular particles formed in the earlier stage of solidification can attain growth stability up to a larger size scale.

  19. Interface dynamics and anisotropy effects in directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cheveigné, S.; Guthmann, C.

    1992-02-01

    A study of the dynamics of the cellular solid-liquid interface in directional solidification of dilute CBr{4} alloy has allowed us to observe a number of secondary instabilities (travelling states, optical modes, anomalous cells, etc.) some of which were well known and traditionally attributed to the effect of crystalline anisotropy. However, most of these instabilities are also observed in a hydrodynamic analog of directional solidification, directional viscous fingering (M. Rabaud, S. Michalland and Y. Couder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64 (1990) 184). This analogy enables us to discuss the interplay of crystalline anisotropy and of the dynamics generic to one-dimensional systems in directional solidification. Une étude de la dynamique de l'interface cellulaire en solidification directionnelle d'un alliage binaire dilué de CBr4 nous a permis d'observer un certain nombre d'instabilités secondaires (propagation de cellules inclinées, modes optiques, cellules anormales, etc.) dont certaines étaient bien connues et traditionnellement attribuées à des effets de l'anisotropie cristalline. Cependant, la plupart de ces instabilités sont observables dans une expérience qui est l'analogue hydrodynamique de la solidification directionnelle, la digitation visqueuse dirigée ou instabilité de l'imprimeur (M. Rabaud, S. Michalland and Y. Couder, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64 (1990) 184). Cette analogie va nous permettre de discuter les rôles respectifs de l'anisotropie cristalline et de la dynamique propre aux systèmes uni-dimentionnels.

  20. Analysis of weld solidification cracking in cast nickel aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Santella, M.L.; Feng, Z.

    1995-09-01

    A study of the response of several nickel aluminide alloys to SigmaJig testing was done to examine their weld solidification cracking behavior and the effect of Zr concentration. The alloys were based on the Ni-8Al-7.7Cr-1.5Mo-0.003B wt% composition and contained Zr concentrations of 3, 4.5, and 6 wt%. Vacuum induction melted ingots with a diameter of 2.7 in and weight about 18 lb were made of each alloy, and were used to make 2 x 2 x 0.030 in specimens for the Sigmajig test. The gas tungsten arc welds were made at travel speeds of 10, 20, and 30 ipm with heat inputs of 2--2.5 kJ/in. When an arc was established before traveling onto the test specimen centerline cracking was always observed. This problem was overcome by initiating the arc directly on the specimens. Using this approach, the 3 wt% Zr alloy withstood an applied stress of 24 ksi without cracking at a welding speed of 10 ipm. This alloy cracked at 4 ksi applied at 20 ipm, and with no applied load at 30 ipm. Only limited testing was done on the remaining alloys, but the results indicate that resistance to solidification cracking increases with Zr concentration. Zirconium has limited solid solubility and segregates strongly to interdendritic regions during solidification where it forms a Ni solid solution-Ni{sub 5}Zr eutectic. The volume fraction of the eutectic increases with Zr concentration. The solidification cracking behavior of these alloys is consistent with phenomenological theory, and is discussed in this context. The results from SigmaJig testing are analyzed using finite element modeling of the development of mechanical strains during solidification of welds. Experimental data from the test substantially agree with recent analysis results.

  1. Direct formation of peritectic phase but no primary phase appearance within Ni83.25Zr16.75 peritectic alloy during free fall

    PubMed Central

    Lü, P.; Wang, H. P.

    2016-01-01

    Ni83.25Zr16.75 peritectic alloy was containerlessly solidified in a drop tube. When the droplet diameter exceeds a critical value (Dcrit), Ni7Zr2 phase primarily solidifies, followed by the peritectic reaction of Ni7Zr2 + L → Ni5Zr. Once the droplet diameter is smaller than the critical value (Dcrit), peritectic phase Ni5Zr directly solidifies from the undercooled melt by completely suppressing the nucleation and growth of Ni7Zr2 phase, which is ascribed to high undercooling and cooling rate. Additionally, peritectic phase Ni5Zr grows equiaxially in the sample solidified in a DSC at a cooling rate of 0.167 K/s. PMID:26935165

  2. Annealing of directionally solidified alloys revisited: No loss of solidification texture in Earth’s inner core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khatatbeh, Yahya; Bergman, Michael I.; Lewis, Daniel J.; Mason, Zachary; Zhu, Laura; Rosenstock, Sarita

    2013-10-01

    Bergman et al. (2010) found experimental evidence for recrystallization and loss of solidification texture during annealing of directionally solidified hexagonal close-packed (hcp) Zn-rich Sn alloys. They suggested that this could support the model of Alboussiere et al. (2010) and Monnereau et al. (2010), in which the Earth’s inner core translates convectively eastwards with enhanced solidification in the western hemisphere and melting in the eastern, because as inner core material translates eastwards and anneals it might lose texture, as inferred seismically. The 2010 study hypothesized that the alloys recrystallized rather than coarsened via diffusion due to the very low solubility of Sn in the Zn-rich phase. This study tests this hypothesis by annealing directionally solidified hcp Zn-rich Al alloys, in which there is greater solubility. Indeed, we find the Zn-rich Al alloys coarsen without recrystallization or fundamental change in texture. However, in contrast to the 2010 study the current study also did not find recrystallization in Zn-rich Sn alloys. This might tend to support models such as those by Cormier (2007) and Aubert et al. (2008) where long term mantle control over fluid flow near the base of the outer core might result in a weaker solidification texture in the eastern hemisphere. Although we do believe the results of the previous study are valid because they were repeatable at that time, it shows that there is something subtle that we cannot yet account for, and it remains unclear whether there is loss of solidification texture due to annealing of Earth’s inner core.

  3. Solidification of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatzman, E.

    1982-01-01

    The internal structure of white dwarfs is discussed. Highly correlated plasmas are reviewed. Implications for phase separation in the core of cooling white dwarfs are considered. The consequences for evolution of white dwarfs are addressed.

  4. Three-dimensional Dendritic Needle Network model with application to Al-Cu directional solidification experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, D.; Karma, A.; Clarke, A. J.; Gibbs, P. J.; Imhoff, S. D.

    2015-06-11

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) extension of a previously proposed multi-scale Dendritic Needle Network (DNN) approach for the growth of complex dendritic microstructures. Using a new formulation of the DNN dynamics equations for dendritic paraboloid-branches of a given thickness, one can directly extend the DNN approach to 3D modeling. We validate this new formulation against known scaling laws and analytical solutions that describe the early transient and steady-state growth regimes, respectively. Finally, we compare the predictions of the model to in situ X-ray imaging of Al-Cu alloy solidification experiments. The comparison shows a very good quantitative agreement between 3D simulations and thin sample experiments. It also highlights the importance of full 3D modeling to accurately predict the primary dendrite arm spacing that is significantly over-estimated by 2D simulations.

  5. Three-dimensional Dendritic Needle Network model with application to Al-Cu directional solidification experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Tourret, D.; Karma, A.; Clarke, A. J.; ...

    2015-06-11

    We present a three-dimensional (3D) extension of a previously proposed multi-scale Dendritic Needle Network (DNN) approach for the growth of complex dendritic microstructures. Using a new formulation of the DNN dynamics equations for dendritic paraboloid-branches of a given thickness, one can directly extend the DNN approach to 3D modeling. We validate this new formulation against known scaling laws and analytical solutions that describe the early transient and steady-state growth regimes, respectively. Finally, we compare the predictions of the model to in situ X-ray imaging of Al-Cu alloy solidification experiments. The comparison shows a very good quantitative agreement between 3D simulationsmore » and thin sample experiments. It also highlights the importance of full 3D modeling to accurately predict the primary dendrite arm spacing that is significantly over-estimated by 2D simulations.« less

  6. On the effect of natural convection on the thermal-microstructural evolution in gray cast-iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celentano, Diego J.; Cruchaga, Marcela A.; Schulz, Bernd J.

    2006-04-01

    A coupled analysis involving natural convection, thermal balance, and microstructural evolution that take place in the solidification process of a hypoeutectic gray cast iron is presented in this work. The microstructural formulation used in this study includes classical models of primary-austenite and eutectic (gray and white) transformations. The influence of both natural convection and heat-transfer conditions on the thermal-microstructural response is particularly assessed in a simple cylindrical casting system. The evolutions of temperature and different microstructural variables are compared and validated with available experimental measurements.

  7. Determination of crystal growth rates during rapid solidification of polycrystalline aluminum by nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiacker, K.; McKeown, J. T.; Liu, C.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Campbell, G. H.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.

    2016-08-01

    In situ investigations of rapid solidification in polycrystalline Al thin films were conducted using nano-scale spatio-temporal resolution dynamic transmission electron microscopy. Differences in crystal growth rates and asymmetries in melt pool development were observed as the heat extraction geometry was varied by controlling the proximity of the laser-pulse irradiation and the associated induced melt pools to the edge of the transmission electron microscopy support grid, which acts as a large heat sink. Experimental parameters have been established to maximize the reproducibility of the material response to the laser-pulse-related heating and to ensure that observations of the dynamical behavior of the metal are free from artifacts, leading to accurate interpretations and quantifiable measurements with improved precision. Interface migration rate measurements revealed solidification velocities that increased consistently from ˜1.3 m s-1 to ˜2.5 m s-1 during the rapid solidification process of the Al thin films. Under the influence of an additional large heat sink, increased crystal growth rates as high as 3.3 m s-1 have been measured. The in situ experiments also provided evidence for development of a partially melted, two-phase region prior to the onset of rapid solidification facilitated crystal growth. Using the experimental observations and associated measurements as benchmarks, finite-element modeling based calculations of the melt pool evolution after pulsed laser irradiation have been performed to obtain estimates of the temperature evolution in the thin films.

  8. Effect of microgravity and magnetic field on the metallic and crystalline structure of magnetostrictive SmFe2 synthesized by unidirectional solidification.

    PubMed

    Okutani, Takeshi; Nagai, Hideaki; Mamiya, Mikito; Shibuya, Masachika; Castillo, Martin

    2006-09-01

    The Sm-2Fe molten alloy with 1:2 molar ratio was unidirectionally solidified in both microgravity and normal gravity in concurrence with a magnetic flux (0-0.12 T). The compound SmFe2 was produced by the unidirectional solidification in microgravity with a magnetic flux of 0T and exhibited a lamellar microstructure. The average lamellar thickness was 30 mum and each lamella possessed a <111> crystallographic alignment along major axis aligned in the direction of cooling. Unidirectional solidification in microgravity with a magnetic field of 0.04 T produced crystalline SmFe2 and Fe phases. The microstructure of this product was lamellar with an average lamellar thickness of 17 mum and no crystalline alignment. Unidirectional solidification in microgravity with a magnetic flux ranging from 0.06 to 0.12 T and in normal gravity with a magnetic flux ranging from 0 to 0.12 T produced crystalline Sm2Fe17 and Fe. During unidirectional solidification in microgravity without a magnetic flux, few nucleation sites were formed and rapid crystal growth occurred, consequently forming large-grain SmFe2. The produced SmFe2 had a lamellar structure with a dominant <111> crystallographic alignment in the direction of cooling. Convection in the molten state and where a magnetic flux was present caused homogeneous nucleation, forming Sm2Fe17 with a disordered structure and crystalline alignment coinciding with the formation of the dendritic Fe.

  9. Dynamical microstructure formation in 3D directional solidification of transparent model alloys: in situ characterization in DECLIC Directional Solidification Insert under diffusion transport in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeon, N.; Mota, F. L.; Chen, L.; Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. M.; Guérin, R.; Karma, A.; Billia, B.; Trivedi, R.

    2015-06-01

    To clarify and characterize the fundamental physical mechanisms active in the dynamical formation of three-dimensional (3D) arrays of cells and dendrites under diffusive growth conditions, in situ monitoring of series of experiments on transparent model alloy succinonitrile - 0.24 wt% camphor was carried out under low gravity in the DECLIC Directional Solidification Insert on-board the International Space Station. These experiments offered the very unique opportunity to in situ observe and characterize the whole development of the microstructure in extended 3D patterns. The experimental methods will be first briefly described, including in particular the observation modes and the image analysis procedures developed to quantitatively characterize the patterns. Microgravity environment provided the conditions to get quantitative benchmark data: homogeneous patterns corresponding to homogeneous values of control parameters along the whole interface were obtained. The sequence of microstructure formation will be presented as well as the evolution of the primary spacing which is one of the most important pattern characteristic. Time evolution of this primary spacing during the microstructure development will be analysed to identify the mechanisms of spacing selection and adjustment; the importance of the macroscopic interfacial curvature will be pointed out.

  10. Study of Magnetic Damping Effect on Convection and Solidification Under G-Jitter Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, H. C., III

    1999-01-01

    As shown by NASA resources dedicated to measuring residual gravity (SAMS and OARE systems), g-jitter is a critical issue affecting space experiments on solidification processing of materials. This study aims to provide, through extensive numerical simulations and ground based experiments, an assessment of the use of magnetic fields in combination with microgravity to reduce the g-jitter induced convective flows in space processing systems. We have so far completed asymptotic analyses based on the analytical solutions for g-jitter driven flow and magnetic field damping effects for a simple one-dimensional parallel plate configuration, and developed both 2-D and 3-D numerical models for g-jitter driven flows in simple solidification systems with and without presence of an applied magnetic field. Numerical models have been checked with the analytical solutions and have been applied to simulate the convective flows and mass transfer using both synthetic g-jitter functions and the g-jitter data taken from space flight. Some useful findings have been obtained from the analyses and the modeling results. Some key points may be summarized as follows: (1) the amplitude of the oscillating velocity decreases at a rate inversely proportional to the g-jitter frequency and with an increase in the applied magnetic field; (2) the induced flow approximately oscillates at the same frequency as the affecting g-jitter, but out of a phase angle; (3) the phase angle is a complicated function of geometry, applied magnetic field, temperature gradient and frequency; (4) g-jitter driven flows exhibit a complex fluid flow pattern evolving in time; (5) the damping effect is more effective for low frequency flows; and (6) the applied magnetic field helps to reduce the variation of solutal distribution along the solid-liquid interface. Work in progress includes numerical simulations and ground-based measurements. Both 2-D and 3-D numerical simulations are being continued to obtain further

  11. P21waf-1/cip-1/sdi-1 is expressed at G1 phase in primary culture of hepatocytes from old rats, presumably preventing the cells from entering the S phase of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Sawada, N; Kojima, T; Obata, H; Saitoh, M; Isomura, H; Kokai, Y; Satoh, M; Mori, M

    1996-11-21

    To elucidate whether p21waf-1/cip-1/sdi-1 expression is associated with loss of growth potential of hepatocytes of old rats, we determined p21waf-1/cip-1/sdi-1 expression of hepatocytes from old (30 months) rats during the cell cycle in primary culture. A high level of expression of p21waf-1/cip-1/sdi-1 was detected at the G1 phase in old-rat hepatocytes, but after the S phase in young-rat hepatocytes. Consistently, the incidence of the cells positive for p21waf-1/cip-1/sdi-1 in nuclei before entering the S phase was significantly higher in old-rat hepatocytes than in young-rat hepatocytes. These results account for the loss of growth potential of old-rat hepatocytes in vitro and the marked retardation of regeneration of liver in old rats in vivo.

  12. Evolution of local atomic structure during solidification of Al2Au liquid: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, L H; Lou, H B; Wang, X D; Debela, T T; Cao, Q P; Zhang, D X; Wang, S Y; Wang, C Z; Jiang, J Z

    2014-04-01

    The local atomic structure evolution in Al2Au alloy during solidification from 2000 K to 400 K was studied by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and analyzed using the structure factor, pair correlation functions, bond angle distributions, the Honeycutt-Anderson (HA) index and Voronoi tessellation methods. It was found that the icosahedral-like clusters are negligible in the Al2Au stable liquid and supercooled liquid states, and the most abundant clusters are those having HA indices of 131 and 120 or Voronoi indices of < 0,4,4,0 >, < 0,3, 6,0 > and < 0,4,4,2 > with coordination numbers of 8, 9 and 10, respectively. These clusters are similar to the local atomic structures in the CaF2-type Al2Au crystal, revealing the existence of structure heredity between liquid and crystalline phase in Al2Au alloy. (C) 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach for numerical simulation of nodular cast iron solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasic, E.; Huang, C.; Jakumeit, J.; Hediger, F.

    2015-06-01

    The ongoing increase in the size and capacity of state-of-the-art wind power plants is highlighting the need to reduce the weight of critical components, such as hubs, main shaft bearing housings, gear box housings and support bases. These components are manufactured as nodular iron castings (spheroid graphite iron, or SGI). A weight reduction of up to 20% is achievable by optimizing the geometry to minimize volume, thus enabling significant downsizing of wind power plants. One method for enhancing quality control in the production of thick-walled SGI castings, and thus reducing tolerances and, consequently, enabling castings of smaller volume is via a casting simulation of mould filling and solidification based on a combination of microscopic model and VoF-multiphase approach. Coupled fluid flow with heat transport and phase transformation kinetics during solidification is described by partial differential equations and solved using the finite volume method. The flow of multiple phases is described using a volume of fluid approach. Mass conservation equations are solved separately for both liquid and solid phases. At the micro-level, the diffusion-controlled growth model for grey iron eutectic grains by Wetterfall et al. is combined with a growth model for white iron eutectic grains. The micro-solidification model is coupled with macro-transport equations via source terms in the energy and continuity equations. As a first step the methodology was applied to a simple geometry to investigate the impact of mould-filling on the grey-to-white transition prediction in nodular cast iron.

  14. Growth directions of microstructures in directional solidification of crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, J; Georgelin, M; Pocheau, A

    2008-07-01

    In directional solidification, as the solidification velocity increases, the growth direction of cells or dendrites rotates from the direction of the thermal gradient to that of a preferred cristalline orientation. Meanwhile, their morphology varies with important implications for microsegregation. Here, we experimentally document the growth directions of these microstructures in a succinonitrile alloy in the whole accessible range of directions, velocities, and spacings. For this, we use a thin sample made of a single crystal on which the direction of the thermal gradient can be changed. This allows a fine monitoring of the misorientation angle between thermal gradient and preferred crystalline orientation. Data analysis shows evidence of an internal symmetry which traces back to a scale invariance of growth directions with respect to a Péclet number. This enables the identification of the relationship between growth directions and relevant variables, in fair agreement with experiment. Noticeable variations of growth directions with misorientation angles are evidenced and linked to a single parameter.

  15. Solidification zoning and metallographic cooling rates of chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, J.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1981-01-01

    The cooling rates of chondrites have been determined according to the cooling rate method of Wood (1967) which involves the measurement of the concentration of nickel in the interiors of taenite grains of various sizes. The present paper presents an investigation of the effect of zoning produced during solidification on the use of the Wood method. Cooling rate curves were obtained in a computer simulation based on a model of kamacite formation on the outer edge of a taenite sphere of uniform initial composition, followed by the inward radial progression of the kamacite-taenite interface. When a concentration gradient produced by solidification is present in the initial conditions, deviations from the cooling rate curves for uniform 10% Ni are obtained only at cooling rates greater than 1000 K/million years, which would result in an overestimation of the cooling rates based on observed Ni gradients in grains of radius greater than 20 microns.

  16. Precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution prepared by solidification under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Jie, J.C.; Wang, H.W.; Zou, C.M.; Wei, Z.J.; Li, T.J.

    2014-01-15

    The precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution containing 21.6 at.% Mg prepared by solidification under 2 GPa was investigated. The results show that the γ-Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} phase is formed and the β′ phase cannot be observed in the solid solution during ageing process. The precipitation of γ and β phases takes place in a non-uniform manner during heating process, i.e. the γ and β phases are first formed in the interdendritic region, which is caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of Mg atoms in the solid solution solidified under high pressure. Peak splitting of X-ray diffraction patterns of Al(Mg) solid solution appears, and then disappears when the samples are aged at 423 K for different times, due to the non-uniform precipitation in Al–Mg solid solution. The direct transformation from the γ to β phase is observed after ageing at 423 K for 24 h. It is considered that the β phase is formed through a peritectoid reaction of α + γ → β which needs the diffusion of Mg atoms across the interface of α/γ phases. - Highlights: • The γ phase is formed and the β′ phase is be observed in Al(Mg) solid solution. • Peak splitting of XRD pattern of Al(Mg) solid solution appears during aged at 150 °C. • The β phase is formed through a peritectoid reaction of α + γ → β.

  17. Phase Dependency of the Human Primary Motor Cortex and Cholinergic Inhibition Cancelation During Beta tACS

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Andrea; Pogosyan, Alek; Nowak, Magdalena; Tan, Huiling; Ferreri, Florinda; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The human motor cortex has a tendency to resonant activity at about 20 Hz so stimulation should more readily entrain neuronal populations at this frequency. We investigated whether and how different interneuronal circuits contribute to such resonance by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) at motor (20 Hz) and a nonmotor resonance frequency (7 Hz). We tested different TMS interneuronal protocols and triggered TMS pulses at different tACS phases. The effect of cholinergic short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was abolished by 20 Hz tACS, linking cortical beta activity to sensorimotor integration. However, this effect occurred regardless of the tACS phase. In contrast, 20 Hz tACS selectively modulated MEP size according to the phase of tACS during single pulse, GABAAergic short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and glutamatergic intracortical facilitation (ICF). For SICI this phase effect was more marked during 20 Hz stimulation. Phase modulation of SICI also depended on whether or not spontaneous beta activity occurred at ~20 Hz, supporting an interaction effect between tACS and underlying circuit resonances. The present study provides in vivo evidence linking cortical beta activity to sensorimotor integration, and for beta oscillations in motor cortex being promoted by resonance in GABAAergic interneuronal circuits. PMID:27522077

  18. Investigation of Solidification of High Strength Steel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    apparatus for rheocasting high temperature alloys in a vacuum or inert atmosphere was constructed. Cu10%Sn and Fe-3%C-4%Si alloys were successfully... rheocast . The size and shape of the primary solid particles at .4 to .5 fraction solid after the first 30 minutes of mixing in the mushy zone are not...700 micrometers in size, and spheroidal in shape. The thixotropic nature of the rheocast Cu-10%Sn samples when reheated and sheared suggests the possibility of thixocasting the alloy. (Modified author abstract)

  19. Directional solidification at ultra-high thermal gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemings, M. C.; Lee, D. S.; Neff, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    A high gradient controlled solidification (HGC) furnace was designed and operated at gradients up to 1800 C/cm to continuously produce aluminum alloys. Rubber '0' rings for the water cooling chamber were eliminated, while still maintaining water cooling directly onto the solidified metal. An HGC unit for high temperature ferrous alloys was also designed. Successful runs were made with cast iron, at thermal gradients up to 500 C/cm.

  20. Further analysis of field effects on liquids and solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiler, R. F.; Miller, R. I.; Chen, W. S.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical calculations of the magnitude of external field effects on liquids are presented to describe how external fields can influence the substructure of the field. Quantitative estimates of magnetic and gravitational effects are reported on melts of metals and semiconductors. The results are condensed in tables which contain the input data for calculation of the field effects on diffusion coefficient, solidification rate and for calculation of field forces on individual molecules in the melt.

  1. [Application of solidification technology in ecological protection of rural riverbank].

    PubMed

    Fu, Rong-bing; Chen, Xiao-hua; Luo, Qi-shi; Zhang, Shu-jiu; Li, Xiao-ping; Geng, Chun-nü

    2008-08-01

    A self-developed binder was used for the solidification of construction refuse piles and whole soil matrix, and a technology of this solidification combining with grass-planting was adopted to ecologically protect the rural riverbanks at Tianshan Village of Shanghai. This technology and other ecological engineering techniques were also employed to reconstruct the ecological environment of a sewage pond at the Village. The results showed that the solidified piles had an anti-compression strength of up to 7.3 MPa, with good hydraulic permeability, fast hardening rate, and low drying shrinkage, which met the requirements for ecological safety. The solidified stakes could be used at a low temperature of above -18 degrees C with addition of certain anti-freezing agents. The riverbank underpinned with the solidified stakes had higher anti-compressive strength, higher ability of anti-soil erosion, and better hydraulic permeability; and its soil had the similar moisture content to bare riverbank soil, with no detrimental effects on the root growth of planted grass. After soil solidification, the shearing strength of the riverbank increased by 50 times, and its soil loss was only 5% of the bare riverbank. In the first 10 days after adopting this technology, parts of Cynodon dactylon roots on the surface of solidified soil matrix began to extend into soil; after one month, 60% of the roots penetrated into deeper soil layer; and 11 months later, the grass roots completely grew in-depth in the soil. The combination of our solidification technique with vegetation reconstruction satisfied the requirements of both stabilizing riverbank and improving riparian habitat.

  2. Intense magnetic field generation by solidification and crustal delamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neufeld, J. A.; Bryson, J. F. J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent paleomagnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that asteroidal magnetic fields are a common feature of the early solar system [1,2]. The iron cores of different asteroids may solidify in different ways [3]. For the IVA iron meteorite parent body the rapid cooling rates and correlation with Ni concentrations further suggest that their parent body was entirely metal, and that solidification of their parent asteroid proceeded from the top down. Here we present model constraints on the thermo-chemical evolution of such rapidly cooled iron asteroids. We show that the temperature of the liquid is rapidly well mixed, and equal to the composition-dependent freezing point, and that thermal convection contributes only at early times to generation of intense magnetic fields and is therefore not sufficient to explain the generation of a dynamo. Instead, we propose that viscous delamination [4] at the base of the solidifying, dense crust provides a sufficient buoyancy flux to generate a magnetic field with properties consistent with those inferred from paleomagnetic measurements of the two IVA meteorites [5]. A model that captures the aggregate effect of episodic delamination events predicts the evolution of the crust and the formation and growth of the asteroid core, the intensity and directional evolution of the magnetic field through time, and the times at which magnetic field generation ceases and total asteroid solidification occur. These predictions can be compared directly with recent measurements of IVA iron meteorites [5] with implications for top-down solidification, the solid structure of the IVA parent core, and magnetic field generation both on the IVA parent body, and wider implications for top-down core solidification generally. [1] Weiss et al. Space Sci. Rev. 152, 341-390 (2010). [2] Tarduno et al. Science. 338, 939-942 (2012). [3] Williams Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 284, 564-569 (2009) [4] Molnar et al. Geophys. J. Int. 133, 568-584 (1998) [5] Bryson et

  3. Fluid mechanics and solidification investigations in low-gravity environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtl, G. H.; Lundquist, C. A.; Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Fluid mechanics of gases and liquids and solidification processes were investigated under microgravity conditions during Skylab and Apollo-Soyuz missions. Electromagnetic, acoustic, and aerodynamic levitation devices, drop tubes, aircraft parabolic flight trajectories, and vertical sounding rockets were developed for low-g simulation. The Spacelab 3 mission will be carried out in a gravity gradient flight attitude; analyses of sources of vehicle dynamic accelerations with associated g-levels and angular rates will produce results for future specific experiments.

  4. Development Of A Magnetic Directional-Solidification Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aldrich, Bill R.; Lehoczky, Sandor L.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes development of directional-solidification furnace in which axial magnetic field is imposed by surrounding ring permanent magnets and/or electromagnets and pole pieces. Furnace provides controlled axial temperature gradients in multiple zones, through which ampoule containing sample of material to be solidified is translated at controlled speed by low-vibration, lead-screw, stepping-motor-driven mechanism. Intended for use in low-gravity (spaceflight) experiments on melt growth of high-purity semiconductor crystals.

  5. Phase stability in binary Ti-Al

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, C. D.; Hofmeister, W. H.; Bayuzick, R. J.

    1991-01-01

    Binary Ti-Al samples containing from 46 to 54 at. pct Al were solidified while undercooled by various amounts using electromagnetic levitation techniques. A detailed thermal history of these samples was obtained with sampling rates as high as 500 KHz during recalescence. This very high sampling rate was essential to resolve the thermal events. Primary alpha solidification was observed in samples containing from 51 to 54 at. pct Al that were undercooled less than about 100 K at solidification. Primary beta solidification was found for all undercoolings tested in samples containing less than 51 at. pct Al and for undercoolings greater than about 100 K in samples containing 51 to 54 at. pct Al.

  6. Microstructural development of rapid solidification in Al-Si powder

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Feng

    1995-09-26

    The microstructure and the gradient of microstructure that forms in rapidly solidificated powder were investigated for different sized particles. High pressure gas atomization solidification process has been used to produce a series of Al-Si alloys powders between 0.2 μm to 150 μm diameter at the eutectic composition (12.6 wt pct Si). This processing technique provides powders of different sizes which solidify under different conditions (i.e. interface velocity and interface undercooling), and thus give different microstructures inside the powders. The large size powder shows dendritic and eutectic microstructures. As the powder size becomes smaller, the predominant morphology changes from eutectic to dendritic to cellular. Microstructures were quantitatively characterized by using optical microscope and SEM techniques. The variation in eutectic spacing within the powders were measured and compared with the theoretical model to obtain interface undercooling, and growth rate during the solidification of a given droplet. Also, nucleation temperature, which controls microstructures in rapidly solidified fine powders, was estimated. A microstructural map which correlates the microstructure with particle size and processing parameters is developed.

  7. Solidification of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanumanth, G. S.; Irons, G. A.

    1996-08-01

    The solidification behavior of ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is different from that of the bare matrix, not only because of the presence of the ceramic particles, but also due to their redistribution in the melt that results in nonhomogeneous thermophysical properties. The MMCs comprised of 10-to 15-μm SiC particles of varying volume fractions, dispersed uniformly in a modified aluminum A356 alloy by the melt stirring technique, were solidified unidirectionally in a thermocouple-instrumented cylindrical steel mold. The cooling rates were continually monitored by measuring temperatures at different depths in the melt, and the solidified MMCs were sectioned into disks and chemically analyzed for SiC volume fraction. The results point out that the cooling rate increased with increasing volume fraction of SiC particles. A small increase in the bulk SiC volume fraction of the cast MMC was observed due to particle settling during solidification. A one-dimensional enthalpy model of MMC solidification was formulated, wherein particle settling occurring in the solidifying matrix was coupled to the enthalpy equation by means of the Richardson-Zaki hindered settling correlation. A comparative study of simulations with experiments suggested that the thermal response of SiC particles used in this study was similar to that of single crystals, and their presence increased the effective thermal conductivity of the composite.

  8. Research on metal solidification in zero-g state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Larson, D. J., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The containerless solidification of several pure metals and metallic alloys was studied in a low gravity environment. The tests were performed in the MSFC 4.2 s drop tower using a rapid wire melting apparatus designed and built for this purpose. Pure iron and nickel, and alloys of iron-nickel, iron-carbon, nickel-aluminum and tungsten-rhenium were all melted and solidified at a gravity level of approximately 100.000/-4 g. Interpretation of the results has led to an appreciation of the factors controlling the successful execution of this drop test experiment and to a delineation of the limits of applicability of the apparatus. Preliminary metallurgical evaluations are presented of the overall shapes, lattice parameters, surface microstructure,, cross-sectional microstructures, solidification and transformation sequences, evaporative segregation, and localized solute redistribution observed in the low-gravity specimens. The effects of low gravity on metallic solidification are discussed with particular emphasis on observations of spontaneous undercooling and evaporative segregation in uncontained melts.

  9. Prediction of grain structures in various solidification processes

    SciTech Connect

    Rappaz, M.; Gandin, C.A.; Desbiolles, J.L.; Thevoz, P.

    1996-03-01

    Grain structure formation during solidification can be simulated via the use of stochastic models providing the physical mechanisms of nucleation and dendrite growth are accounted for. With this goal in mind, a physically based cellular automaton (CA) model has been coupled with finite element (FE) heat flow computations and implemented into the code 3-MOS. The CA enmeshment of the solidifying domain with small square cells is first generated automatically from the FE mesh. Within each time-step, the variation of enthalpy at each node of the FE mesh is calculated using an implicit scheme and a Newton-type linearization method. After interpolation of the explicit temperature and of the enthalpy variation at the cell location, the nucleation and growth of grains are simulated using the CA algorithm. This algorithm accounts for the heterogeneous nucleation in the bulk and at the surface of the ingot, for the growth and preferential growth directions of the dendrites, and for microsegregation. The variation of volume fraction of solid at the cell location are then summed up at the FE nodes in order to find the new temperatures. This CAFE model, which allows the prediction and the visualization of grain structures during and after solidification, is applied to various solidification processes: the investment casting of turbine blades, the continuous casting of rods, and the laser remelting or welding of plates. Because the CAFE model is yet two-dimensional (2-D), the simulation results are compared in a qualitative way with experimental findings.

  10. Morphological stability during solidification of silicon incorporating metallic impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.; Mathews, Jay; Recht, Daniel; Smith, Matthew; Gradečak, Silvija; Aziz, Michael J.

    2014-04-01

    We study the stability of a planar solidification front during pulsed laser melting-induced rapid solidification of silicon containing high concentrations of ion-implanted metallic impurities. We calculate the critical impurity concentration for destabilizing plane-front solidification, and introduce the "amplification coefficient," which is an empirical parameter describing the degree of amplification that must occur between the time the planar liquid-solid interface first becomes unstable, and the time of formation of morphological features of interface breakdown that is later observed in the microstructure. By connecting our calculations to experimental observations from the literature, we determine this parameter for Au, Co, Cr, Fe, Ga, In, and Zn in (100) Si and Ti in (111) Si, and find that it increases with impurity diffusive speed vD approximately as vD0.56. We present an approximate but simple method of estimating the maximum impurity concentration that may be incorporated in a surface layer of a given thickness without the appearance of cellular breakdown.

  11. Lava Flows on Io: Modelling Cooling After Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    We have modeled the cooling of lava bodies on Io after solidification of the lava, a process that has been little explored since Carr (1986). With recent estimates of lava flow thicknesses on Io ranging from 1 m to 10 m, the modeling of thermal emission from active volcanism must take into account the cooling behaviour after the solidification of the lava, which we model using a finite-element model. Once a lava body is fully solidified, the surface temperature decreases faster, as heat loss is no longer buffered by release of latent heat. This is significant as observed surface temperature is often the only clue available to determine lava surface age. We also find that cooling from the base of the lava is an important process that accelerates the solidification of a flow and therefore subsequent cooling. It is necessary to constrain the cooling process in order to better understand temperature-area relationships on Io's surface and to carry out stochastic modelling of lava flow emplacement.

  12. Transient Effects in Planar Solidification of Dilute Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    The initial transient during planar solidification of dilute binary alloys is studied in the framework of the boundary integral method that leads to the non-linear Volterra integral governing equation. An analytical solution of this equation is obtained for the case of a constant growth rate which constitutes the well-known Tiller's formula for the solute transient. The more physically relevant, constant ramping down temperature case has been studied both numerically and analytically. In particular, an asymptotic analytical solution is obtained for the initial transient behavior. A numerical technique to solve the non-linear Volterra equation is developed and the solution is obtained for a family of the governing parameters. For the rapid solidification condition, growth rate spikes have been observed even for the infinite kinetics model. When recirculating fluid flow is included into the analysis, the spike feature is dramatically diminished. Finally, we have investigated planar solidification with a fluctuating temperature field as a possible mechanism for frequently observed solute trapping bands.

  13. Microstructural development during directional solidification of peritectic alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lograsso, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Despite the widespread commercial use of peritectic alloys (e.g., steels, brass, bronze, intermetallic compounds, Co based superalloys and A3B type superconductors), the characterization of the microstructural development during directional solidification of peritectics has historically lagged behind similar efforts directed towards other types of binary invariant reactions such as eutectic or monotectic. A wide variety of possible microstructures has been shown to form in peritectics depending upon the imposed temperature gradient, G, the solidification velocity, V, as well as the presence or absence of convection in the melt. This has important technological implications since many commercially important alloys exhibit peritectics and processing methods such as casting and welding often involve widely changing conditions. It has been the aim of this project to examine, in a systematic fashion, both experimentally and theoretically, the influence of gravitationally driven convection on segregation and microstructural development during solidification in peritectic systems under terrestrial conditions. The scientific results of the project will be used to establish ground based data in support of a meaningful microgravity flight experiment.

  14. Application of a white-light interferometric measuring system as co-phasing the segmented primary mirrors of the high-aperture telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Helun; Li, Huaqiang; Xian, Hao; Huang, Jian; Wang, Shengqian; Jiang, Wenhan

    2008-03-01

    For the optical system of the telescope, with the increase in telescope size, the manufacture of monolithic primary becomes increasingly difficult. Instead, the use of segmented mirrors, where many individual mirrors (the segments) work together to provide an image quality and an aperture equivalent to that of a large monolithic mirror, is considered a more appropriate strategy. But with the introduction of the large telescope mirror comprised of many individual segments, the problem of insuring a smooth continuous mirror surface (co-phased mirrors) becomes critical. One of the main problems is the measurement of the vertical displacement between the individual segments (piston error), for such mirrors, the segment vertical misalignment (piston error) between the segments must be reduced to a small fraction of the wavelength (<100nm) of the incoming light. The measurements become especially complicated when the piston error is in order of wavelength fractions. To meet the performance capabilities, a novel method for phasing the segmented mirrors optics system is described. The phasing method is based on a high-aperture Michelson interferometer. The use of an interferometric technique allows the measuring of segment misalignment during the daytime with high accuracy, which is a major design guideline. The innovation introduced in the optical design of the interferometer is the simultaneous use of monochromatic light and multiwavelength combination white-light source in a direct method for improving the central fringe identification in the white-light interferometric phasing system. With theoretic analysis, we find that this multiwavelength combination technique can greatly increase the visibility difference between the central fringe and its adjacent side fringes, and thus it offers an increased signal resolution. So make the central fringe identification become easier, and enhance the measure precision of the segment phasing error. Consequently, it is suitable for

  15. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-02-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  16. Orientations of dendritic growth during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong Nyung

    2017-03-01

    Dendrites are crystalline forms which grow far from the limit of stability of the plane front and adopt an orientation which is as close as possible to the heat flux direction. Dendritic growth orientations for cubic metals, bct Sn, and hcp Zn, can be controlled by thermal conductivity, Young's modulus, and surface energy. The control factors have been elaborated. Since the dendrite is a single crystal, its properties such as thermal conductivity that influences the heat flux direction, the minimum Young's modulus direction that influences the strain energy minimization, and the minimum surface energy plane that influences the crystal/liquid interface energy minimization have been proved to control the dendritic growth direction. The dendritic growth directions of cubic metals are determined by the minimum Young's modulus direction and/or axis direction of symmetry of the minimum crystal surface energy plane. The dendritic growth direction of bct Sn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction. The primary dendritic growth direction of hcp Zn is determined by its maximum thermal conductivity direction and the minimum surface energy plane normal direction and the secondary dendrite arm direction of hcp Zn is normal to the primary dendritic growth direction.

  17. Rapid solidification of levitation melted Ni-Sn alloy droplets with high undercooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiohara, Yuh; Flemings, Merton C.; Wu, Yanzhong; Piccone, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results obtained by high-speed optical temperature sensing for the rapid solidification of highly undercooled, levitation-melted Ni-Sn alloy droplets are presented. These data suggest a solidification model proceeding according to overlapping steps: (1) dendritic growth within the bulk undercooled melt, (2) continued recalescence as supersaturation of the interdendritic liquid dissipates, (3) fine-scale remelting within the dendrites, (4) ripening of the fine structure, and (5) solidification of remaining liquid at the end of recalescence.

  18. Solidification Studies from the Electrostatic Levitation System at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert W.; Robinson, Michael B.; Savage, Larry

    2000-01-01

    Electrostatic levitation (ESL) provides a means to study molten materials in a high-purity environment, free from contact with a container. Many phenomena important to materials science can be studied in the ESL. Solidification of metals, alloys and undercooled materials represent an important topic for research in the ESL. Recent studies of metals and alloys during solidification in the ESL are reported. Measurements include time, temperature and transformation of metallic glass-forming alloys, solidification velocities, and microstructure,

  19. Biological profiling of the ToxCast Phase II Chemical Library in Primary Human Cell Co-Culture Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA’s ToxCast research project was developed to address the need for high-throughput testing of chemicals and a pathway-based approach to hazard screening. Phase I of ToxCast tested over 300 unique compounds (mostly pesticides and antimicrobials). With the addition of Ph...

  20. Using a Learning Cycle to Deepen Chinese Primary Students' Concept Learning of the "Phases of the Moon"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the internal conditions of students' concept learning and builds a learning cycle' based on the "phases of the Moon" (MP) to, deepen students' understanding. The learning cycle of MP developed in this study includes three basic learning links, which are: cognitive conflict, abstraction and generalization, and…

  1. Magnetostrictive gradient in Tb0.27Dy0.73Fe1.95 induced by high magnetic field gradient applied during solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pengfei; Liu, Tie; Dong, Meng; Yuan, Yi; Wang, Kai; Wang, Qiang

    2016-09-01

    We investigated how high magnetic field gradients affected the magnetostrictive performance of Tb0.27Dy0.73Fe1.95 during solidification. At high applied magnetic field gradients, the magnetostriction exhibited a gradient distribution throughout the alloy. Increasing the magnetic field gradient also increased the magnetostriction gradient. We attributed the graded magnetostrictive performance to the gradient distribution of (Tb, Dy)Fe2 phase in the alloy and its orientation.

  2. Undercooling and solidification behavior in the InSb-Sb system. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Use of the droplet emulsion technique has been successful in studying the undercooling and crystallization behavior of Sb, InSb, and an InSb-Sb eutectic alloy. Both droplet size and imposed cooling rate were influential in controlling the extent of liquid undercooling. The droplet surface coating was of significant importance in determining the resultant solidification product structure through its effect on nucleation kinetics. The maximum undercooling for pure Sb was extended from 0.08 to 0.23 T sub m. While simple crushing techniques provided a dramatic increase in droplet undercooling over the bulk material, emulsification treatments both enhanced this undercooling and allowed successful formation of a metastable simple cubic Sb phase. This phase was stable to temperatures approaching the melting point. The simple cubic phase was detected in droplet samples processed using DTA, air and water quenching, and drop tube processing under a helium gas atmosphere. A deviation in the InSb parent ingot composition limited interpretation of the line compound results, however, emulsification techniques extended the undercooling of this material to 0.17 T sub L and provided a stable, protective surface coating for the droplets. Emulsification of the eutectic alloy was effective at producing various levels of undercooling from 0.1 to 0.2 T sub E. Microstructural examination revealed a normal-type eutectic structure in the undercooled droplets indicating that solidification occurred within the coupled zone and that this zone is somewhat symmetric about the eutectic composition.

  3. Chiral solidification of a phospholipid monolayer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The formation of chiral solidlike domains observed by Weiss and McConnell (1984) in monolayers of depalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) floating on an air-water interface is investigated theoretically. It is proposed that the diffusion tensor for the two-dimensional fluidlike phase of the DPPC molecules has a chiral component acting perpendicular to the concentration gradient and coupled to the rotational motion of a pinwheellike molecule by the viscous forces. Diagrams are provided, and numerical estimates of the forces involved are shown to be in agreement with the observed behavior of the structures.

  4. The Solidification Velocity of Undercooled Nickel and Titanium Alloys with Dilute Solute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Algoso, Paul R.; Altgilbers, A. S.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    The study of solidification velocity is important for two reasons. First, understanding the manner in which the degree of undercooling of the liquid and solidification velocity affect the microstructure of the solid is fundamental. Second, there is disagreement between theoretical predictions of the relationship between undercooling and solidification velocity and experimental results. Thus, the objective of this research is to accurately and systematically quantify the solidification velocity as a function of undercooling for dilute nickel-and titanium-based alloys. The alloys chosen for study cover a wide range of equilibrium partition coefficients, and the results are compared to current theory.

  5. IT-36PHASE 1/2 STUDY OF THE COMBINATION OF INDOXIMOD AND TEMOZOLOMIDE FOR ADULT PATIENTS WITH TEMOZOLOMIDE-REFRACTORY PRIMARY MALIGNANT BRAIN TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Zakharia, Yousef; Johnson, Theodore; Colman, Howard; Vahanian, Nicholas; Link, Charles; Kennedy, Eugene; Sadek, Ramses; Kong, Feng-Ming; Vender, John; Munn, David; Rixe, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a key immune-modulatory enzyme that inhibits CD8+ T cells and enhances the suppressor activity of Tregs. IDO is expressed in 50 to 90% of glioblastoma (GBM) and is correlated with poor prognosis. IDO pathway inhibitors such as indoximod (1-Methyl-D-tryptophan) can improve anti-tumor T cell response slowing the tumor growth in vivo. We have demonstrated a synergistic effect of indoximod when combined with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation in a syngeneic orthotopic brain tumor model. This phase 1 study is designed to determine maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of indoximod in combination with TMZ in GBM followed by an expansion phase 2 testing the preliminary activity of the combination in relevant situations with the addition of bevacizumab or stereotactic radiosurgery. METHODS: After progression to standard front line-therapy, patients with GBM are enrolled in a dose escalation study of indoximod (600, 1000 or 1200 mg twice daily given orally) with a standard fixed dose of TMZ. In the phase 2 part, patients are separated into 3 cohorts: cohort 2a: indoximod with TMZ, cohort 2b: indoximod with TMZ and bevacizumab (for patients who are currently on bevacizumab), cohort 2c: indoximod with TMZ and stereotactic radiosurgery. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The study uses a 3 + 3 dose escalation design, until reaching the MTD or the maximal specified dose. Sample size in phase 2 is based on the primary endpoint of 6 months progression free survival (PFS). CORRELATIVE STUDIES: Assessment of primary tumor samples for IDO expression, evaluation of serum for potential biomarkers of IDO pathway activity (kynurenine and tryptophan) and a pharmacokinetic analysis will be performed. RESULTS: Study is ongoing. Updates are to be presented at the meeting.

  6. Solidified structure and leaching properties of metallurgical wastewater treatment sludge after solidification/stabilization process.

    PubMed

    Radovanović, Dragana Đ; Kamberović, Željko J; Korać, Marija S; Rogan, Jelena R

    2016-01-01

    The presented study investigates solidification/stabilization process of hazardous heavy metals/arsenic sludge, generated after the treatment of the wastewater from a primary copper smelter. Fly ash and fly ash with addition of hydrated lime and Portland composite cement were studied as potential binders. The effectiveness of the process was evaluated by unconfined compressive strength (UCS) testing, leaching tests (EN 12457-4 and TCLP) and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) test. It was found that introduction of cement into the systems increased the UCS, led to reduced leaching of Cu, Ni and Zn, but had a negative effect on the ANC. Gradual addition of lime resulted in decreased UCS, significant reduction of metals leaching and high ANC, due to the excess of lime that remained unreacted in pozzolanic reaction. Stabilization of more than 99% of heavy metals and 90% of arsenic has been achieved. All the samples had UCS above required value for safe disposal. In addition to standard leaching tests, solidificates were exposed to atmospheric conditions during one year in order to determine the actual leaching level of metals in real environment. It can be concluded that the EN 12457-4 test is more similar to the real environmental conditions, while the TCLP test highly exaggerates the leaching of metals. The paper also presents results of differential acid neutralization (d-AN) analysis compared with mineralogical study done by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The d-AN coupled with Eh-pH (Pourbaix) diagrams were proven to be a new effective method for analysis of amorphous solidified structure.

  7. Regulatory impact analysis: Benefits and costs of proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for inorganic chemicals. Phase 2, March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-31

    National Primary Drinking Water Regulations are proposed for 30 synthetic organic chemicals, termed the SOCs. The document presents an analysis of the projected national costs and benefits associated with the proposed regulations in compliance with Executive Order 12291. It also includes an analysis of cost impacts on small water systems in compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The 30 SOCs fall into three groups. For a group of three 'miscellaneous' contaminants (acrylamide, epichlorohydrin, and PCBs), it is simply not possible to estimate occurrence due to a lack of data. Total national costs and benefits for all three are not anticipated to be very significant.

  8. Skaergaard vs Sudbury: Solidification Times and Crystal Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.; Mittal, T.; Currier, R. M.; Jordon, E.

    2010-12-01

    The overall cooling time of a batch of magma is intimately reflected in the nature of the crystal sizes. The thinner are dikes and sills the finer grained are the crystals they display. And the spatial variations in crystal size and abundance record the spatial progression of solidification. Chilled margins are fine grained because of rapid solidification, and a progressive inward increase in crystal size is perfectly predictable by coupling a law of crystal growth with a suitable solidification front-based cooling model. When observed crystal sizes are much larger than predicted, as in finding phenocrysts near or in chilled margins, this is a clear indication of crystals grown and entrained prior to final emplacement and solidification. This is exactly the process exhibited by volcanics carrying swarms of large crystals. But in plutonic rocks there is frequent confusion over what crystal sizes to expect, especially when the pluton size and shape is poorly known, and there is often an unexpressed feeling that fine grained (i.e., non-phenocryst bearing) bodies almost regardless of size somehow cool fundamentally different than large bodies, especially layered intrusions. An invaluable standard state body to which to compare the crystal sizes of other large bodies is the Sudbury impact melt sheet. Formed in a few minutes, the 3km thick 200 km wide superheated melt sheet cooled and crystallized to produce a systematic and predictable internal variation in crystal size and abundance (Zieg & Marsh, 2002, JPet). Buried by 3km of fallback debris, the sheet took about 100,000 to solidify. The Skaergaard intrusion is of a similar thickness (3.4-4 km), but is much less extensive, being more like a thin-edged elliptical laccolith (Norton et. al., 1984, JGR) or a fault-bounded loaf of bread (7.75 x 10.55 x 3.7 km; Nielsen, 2004, JPet). In spite of its limited extent, the extent is large enough for solidification of the thickest parts time to approach that of an infinite sheet

  9. Numerical investigation of a binary solidification design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Scott Wayne

    This exposition presents the development and application of a methodology for control of unidirectional solidification of a binary alloy. In particular, it is desired to produce a casting that has a uniform cast structure throughout its entire length. Furthermore, the methodology allows the specification, a priori, of the cast structure with respect to both scale, i.e., fine or coarse, and morphology, i.e., dentritic or cellular. This specification is in the form of a map that relates solidification characteristics, i.e., scale and morphology, to the solidification velocity and liquid-side interfacial temperature gradient. Thus design is accomplished by controlling these two parameters during the solidification process. With this in mind, the goal of what is termed the binary solidification design problem is the prediction of a set of boundary temperatures and heat fluxes which when applied will result in the desired interfacial motion and temperature gradient and therefore cast structure. Mathematical models for problems of this type lead to what are termed ill-posed systems in that they may not exhibit existence, uniqueness, or continuous dependence on boundary data. The resolution of this class of problems requires advanced techniques to overcome the instabilities encountered due to their ill-posed nature. The methodology developed herein employs the classical weight residual approach in a innovative manner. Normally, in the solution of a parabolic partial differential equation, such as the heat equation, a spatial series expansion with time varying coefficients is utilized along with a minimization technique to reduce the partial differential equation to a set of first order ordinary differential equations. This set can be solved using any number of numerical technique, i.e., Runge-Kutta, to obtain the temporal variation of the coefficients. These types of time stepping techniques eventually lead to the onset of instability when employed for the resolution of

  10. Design of a white-light interferometric measuring system for co-phasing the primary mirror segments of the next generation of ground-based telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Helun; Xian, Hao; Jiang, Wenhan; Rao, Changhui; Wang, Shengqian

    2007-12-01

    With the increase of telescope size, the manufacture of monolithic primaries becomes increasingly difficult. Instead, the use of segmented mirrors, where many individual mirrors (the segments) work together to provide good image quality and an aperture equivalent to that of a large monolithic mirror, is considered a more appropriate strategy. But, with the introduction of large telescope mirror comprised of many individual segments, the problem of insuring a smooth continuous mirror surface (co-phased mirrors) becomes critical. One of the main problems arising in the co-phasing of the segmented mirrors telescope is the problem of measurements of the vertical displacements between the individual segments (piston errors). Because of such mirrors to exhibit diffraction-limited performance, a phasing process is required in order to guarantee that the segments have to be positioned with an accuracy of a fraction of a wavelength of the incoming light.The measurements become especially complicated when the piston error is in order of wavelength fractions. To meet the performance capabilities, a novel method for phasing the segmented mirrors optical system is described. The phasing method is based on a high-aperture Michelson interferometer. The use of an interferometric technique allows the measurement of segment misalignment during daytime with high accuracy, which is a major design guideline. The innovation introduced in the optical design of the interferometer is the simultaneous use of both monochromatic and white-light sources that allows the system to measure the piston error with an uncertainty of 6nm in 50µm range. The description about the expected monochromatic and white-light illumination interferograms and the feasibility of the phasing method are presented here.

  11. Rapid Solidification Behavior of Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-C Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Sathees; Makaya, Advenit; Fredriksson, Hasse; Savage, Steven

    2007-12-01

    The rapid solidification behavior of alloys in the Fe-Cr-Mn-Mo-Si-C system was investigated for different compositions and cooling rates. The C content was varied and alloying additions of Mo and B were studied with respect to their effect on the microstructure. The alloys were cast as either melt-spun ribbons or as 1-mm-thick plates after levitation or as rods 2 to 4 mm in diameter by injection into copper molds. A homogeneous single-phase structure was obtained for the alloy of composition 72.8Fe-8Cr-6Mn-5Si-5Mo-3.2C (wt pct), for a sample diameter of 2.85 mm, at a cooling rate of ≈1100 K/s. The single-phase structure was identified as a metastable solid solution, exhibiting the characteristics of the ɛ phase. Upon reheating, decomposition of the single-phase structure into fine bainite plates and secondary carbides was observed between 600 °C and 700 °C. The annealed structure obtained showed high hardness values (>850 HV).

  12. Hexagonal-Rod Growth Mechanism and Kinetics of the Primary Cu6Sn5 Phase in Liquid Sn-Based Solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z. H.; Cao, H. J.; Yang, H. F.; Li, M. Y.; Yu, Y. X.

    2016-11-01

    A hexagonal-rod growth mechanism is proposed to describe the growth behavior of the primary Cu6Sn5 phase in liquid Sn-based solder. After Sn-6.5 at.%Cu solder had been maintained at 250°C for 10 h, a large number of hexagonal-rod-type Cu6Sn5 grains were found to have separated within it. Our observations show that these hexagonal rods had side facets in the { 10overline{1} 0}_{η } family and round ends close to the {0002}η family. Moreover, the nucleation of the hexagonal rods was studied, and the corresponding growth kinetics found to be governed by a Cu-supply-controlled mechanism rather than an interfacial-reaction-controlled or Cu-diffusion-limited mechanism. More importantly, the anisotropic growth of the Cu6Sn5 phase was confirmed to be the dominant reason for production of these primary hexagonal rods with high aspect ratio. This may represent an avenue for synthesis of nanosized Cu6Sn5 single crystals for use as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries. Additionally, our Cu6Sn5 hexagonal-rod growth mechanism may provide insight into morphological and kinetic studies on interfacial Cu6Sn5 grains and similar intermetallics.

  13. A Phase I Study of the Combination of Sorafenib With Temozolomide and Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Primary and Recurrent High-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Robert B.; Kamrava, Mitchell; Sheng, Zhi; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Dougherty, Erin; Marinucchi, Michelle; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Hegarty, Sarah; Hyslop, Terry; Andrews, David W.; Glass, Jon; Friedman, David P.; Green, Michael R.; Camphausen, Kevin; Dicker, Adam P.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Despite recent advances in the management of high-grade and recurrent gliomas, survival remains poor. Antiangiogenic therapy has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of high-grade gliomas both in preclinical models and in clinical trials. We sought to determine the safety and maximum tolerated dose of sorafenib when combined with both radiation and temozolomide in the primary setting or radiation alone in the recurrent setting. Methods and Materials: This was a preclinical study and an open-label phase I dose escalation trial. Multiple glioma cell lines were analyzed for viability after treatment with radiation, temozolomide, or sorafenib or combinations of them. For patients with primary disease, sorafenib was given concurrently with temozolomide (75 mg/m{sup 2}) and 60 Gy radiation, for 30 days after completion of radiation. For patients with recurrent disease, sorafenib was combined with a hypofractionated course of radiation (35 Gy in 10 fractions). Results: Cell viability was significantly reduced with the combination of radiation, temozolomide, and sorafenib or radiation and sorafenib. Eighteen patients (11 in the primary cohort, 7 in the recurrent cohort) were enrolled onto this trial approved by the institutional review board. All patients completed the planned course of radiation therapy. The most common toxicities were hematologic, fatigue, and rash. There were 18 grade 3 or higher toxicities. The median overall survival was 18 months for the entire population. Conclusions: Sorafenib can be safely combined with radiation and temozolomide in patients with high-grade glioma and with radiation alone in patients with recurrent glioma. The recommended phase II dose of sorafenib is 200 mg twice daily when combined with temozolomide and radiation and 400 mg with radiation alone. To our knowledge, this is the first publication of concurrent sorafenib with radiation monotherapy or combined with radiation and temozolomide.

  14. Selection of doublet cellular patterns in directional solidification through spatially periodic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Losert, W.; Stillman, D.A.; Cummins, H.Z.; Kopczynski, P.; Rappel, W.; Karma, A.

    1998-12-01

    Pattern formation at the solid-liquid interface of a growing crystal was studied in directional solidification using a perturbation technique. We analyzed both experimentally and numerically the stability range and dynamical selection of cellular arrays of {open_quotes}doublets{close_quotes} with asymmetric tip shapes, separated by alternate deep and shallow grooves. Applying an initial periodic perturbation of arbitrary wavelength to the unstable planar interface allowed us to force the interface to evolve into doublet states that would not otherwise be dynamically accessible from a planar interface. We determined systematically the ranges of wavelength corresponding to stable singlets, stable doublets, and transient unstable patterns. Experimentally, this was accomplished by applying a brief UV light pulse of a desired spatial periodicity to the planar interface during the planar-cellular transient using the model alloy Succinonitrile-Coumarin 152. Numerical simulations of the nonlinear evolution of the interface were performed starting from a small sinusoidal perturbation of the steady-state planar interface. These simulations were carried out using a computationally efficient phase-field symmetric model of directional solidification with recently reformulated asymptotics and vanishing kinetics [A. Karma and W.-J. Rappel, Phys. Rev. E {bold 53} R3017 (1996); Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 77}, 4050 (1996); Phys. Rev. E {bold 57}, 4323 (1998)], which allowed us to simulate spatially extended arrays that can be meaningfully compared to experiments. Simulations and experiments show remarkable qualitative agreement in the dynamic evolution, steady-state structure, and instability mechanisms of doublet cellular arrays. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Characteristics of medium carbon steel solidification and mold flux crystallization using the multi-mold simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Yong; Ko, Eun-yi; Choi, Joo; Sohn, Il

    2014-11-01

    An oscillating multi-mold simulator with embedded thermocouples was used to study the initial solidification of medium carbon steels and crystallization characteristics of the mold flux. Casting speed variations in the simulator from 0.7 m/min to 1.4 m/min at fixed oscillation frequency and stroke resulted in higher copper mold temperatures. Frequency modifications from 2.5 Hz to 5.0 Hz and stroke changes from 8.1 mm to 5.4 mm at fixed casting speeds also resulted in higher copper mold temperatures. Surface profile analysis of as-cast steel strips showed characteristic oscillation marks comparable to the narrow faces of the industrial cast slabs. The apparent effect of casting variables on the temperature and surface profiles during the solidification of the medium carbon steels could be correlated to the variations in the negative strip time and subsequent changes in the extent of mold flux infiltration. Back scattered scanning electron microscope analysis of the full length of the retrieved flux film after casting showed cuspidine crystallization ratio that increased from the upper to lower portion of the flux film. This dynamic crystallization and growth of the cuspidine phase increases as the flux is sustained at high temperatures for longer periods. Additional experiments with industrial fluxes designed for soft cooling of medium carbon steel grades showed comparable infiltration thickness of the flux, but the crystallization characteristics were significantly different, which could have a significant impact on the heat transfer rate and mechanism through the flux film.

  16. Solidification of highly undercooled Sn-Pb alloy droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, M. G.; Flemings, M. C.; Shiohara, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental work on undercooling and structure of tin-lead droplets emulsified in oil is described. The droplets, predominantly in the size range of 10 to 20 microns, were cooled at rates (just before nucleation) ranging from about 0.1 to 1 million K/s. The higher cooling rates were obtained by a newly developed technique of quenching the emulsified droplets in a cold liquid. Measured undercoolings (at the lower cooling rates) ranged up to about 100 K. Structures obtained depend strongly on undercooling, cooling rate before and after nucleation, and alloy composition. Droplets containing up to 5 wt pct Pb were apparently single phase when undercooled and rapidly quenched. Droplets in the composition range of about 25-90 wt pct Pb solidified dendritically, even at the most rapid quench rates employed, apparently because these alloys undercooled only slightly before nucleation of the primary phase.

  17. A new unsteady-state method of determining two-phase relative permeability illustrated by CO2-brine primary drainage in berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongyu; DiCarlo, David A.

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a new unsteady-state method for measuring two-phase relative permeability by obtaining local values of the three key parameters (saturation, pressure drop, and phase flux) versus time during a displacement. These three parameters can be substituted to two-phase Darcy Buckingham equation to directly determine relative permeability. To obtain the first two, we use a medical X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) scanner to monitor saturation in time and space, and six differential pressure transducers to measure the overall pressure drop and the pressure drops of five individual sections (divided by four pressure taps on the core) continuously. At each scanning time, the local phase flux is obtained by spatially integrating the saturation profile and converting this to the flux using a fractional flow framework. One advantage of this local method over most previous methods is that the capillary end effect is experimentally avoided; this improvement is crucial for experiments using low viscosity fluids such as supercritical and gas phases. To illustrate the new method, we conduct five CO2-brine primary drainage experiments in a 60.8 cm long and 116 mD Berea sandstone core at 20 °C and 1500 psi. In return, we obtain hundreds of unsteady-state CO2 and brine relative permeability data points that are consistent with steady-state relative permeability data from the same experiments. Due to the large amount of relative permeability data obtained by the new unsteady-state method, the uncertainties of the exponents in the Corey-type fits decrease by up to 90% compared with the steady-state method.

  18. Automated determination of aliphatic primary amines in wastewater by simultaneous derivatization and headspace solid-phase microextraction followed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Llop, Anna; Pocurull, Eva; Borrull, Francesc

    2010-01-22

    This paper presents a fully automated method for determining ten primary amines in wastewater at ng/L levels. The method is based on simultaneous derivatization with pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFBAY) and headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography coupled to ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (GC-IT-MS-MS). The influence of main factors on the efficiency of derivatization and of HS-SPME is described in detail and optimized by a central composite design. For all species, the highest enrichment factors were achieved using a 85 microm polyacrylate (PA) fiber exposed in the headspace of stirred water samples (750 rpm) at pH 12, containing 360 g/L of NaCl, at 40 degrees C for 15 min. Under optimized conditions, the proposed method achieved detection limits ranging from 10 to 100 ng/L (except for cyclohexylamine). The optimized method was then used to determine the presence of primary amines in various types of wastewater samples, such as influent and effluent wastewater from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and a potable water treatment plant. Although the analysis of these samples revealed the presence of up to 1500 microg/L of certain primary amines in influent industrial wastewater, the concentration of these compounds in the effluent and in municipal and potable water was substantially lower, at low microg/L levels. The new derivatization-HS-SPME-GC-IT-MS-MS method is suitable for the fast, reliable and inexpensive determination of primary amines in wastewater in an automated procedure.

  19. Widmannstätten laths in Ti48Al2Cr2Nb alloy by undercooled solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yi; Hu, Rui Yang, Guang; Kou, Hongchao; Zhang, Tiebang; Wang, Jun; Li, Jinshan

    2015-09-15

    Widmannstätten laths in Ti48Al2Cr2Nb alloy were obtained by containerless electromagnetic levitation during undercooled solidification rather than heat treatments in most cases. The nucleation of γ{sub Widmannstätten} is confirmed by the thermal history of the second recalescence behaviour. High dislocation density, stacking faults and dislocation slip are observed by transmission electron microscopy. By quantitative analysis of the transformation energy, the driving force for γ{sub Widmannstätten} in the solid state phase transformation is calculated, compared with that of heat treatments. Meanwhile, the proper undercoolings (ΔT = 257–300 K), post-solidification cooling rates (11.1–29.1 K/s), the fine lamellar colony sizes (306–467 μm) and proper undercoolings in the solid state phase transformation are in favour of promoting the formation of Widmannstätten laths at moderate undercoolings. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Widmannstätten laths were observed in undercooled TiAl alloy. • The influencing factors were discussed in undercooled TiAl alloy. • An analysis of the nucleation of γ{sub Widmannstätten} is carried out.

  20. Solidification fronts in large magma chambers: insights from the anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The emplacement of hot viscous magma into the cold rigid crust causes a thermal disturbance within both the country rock and the magma. With time, heat loss from the molten interior to the walls causes solidification at the floor, roof and margins of the magma chamber. As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of heat is lost via conduction through the roof of the intrusion. In basaltic sills and layered mafic intrusions (LMIs), this solidification front is manifest in the deposition of mineral assemblages and compositions that become progressively more evolved from the floor of the intrusion upwards (the 'Layered Series'; LS) and from the roof downwards (the UBS) such that the most chemically evolved rocks are found in the interior of the magma body at a 'Sandwich Horizon'. The formation of a UBS, as typified by the Skaergaard Intrusion, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique LMIs for which little or no UBS exists. Convection of the molten magma, reinjection and mixing of new magma, compaction of cumulates, and porous flow of interstitial liquid, among other processes, can affect the final location and composition of the most differentiated liquids; but ultimately, all are linked to the nature of heat loss from the magma chamber. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution of several classic LMIs as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series; 'UBS'). For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate