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Sample records for primary synovial cells

  1. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Montserrat Blanco; Fontán, Eva María García; Carretero, Miguel Ángel Cańizares; Pińeiro, Ana González

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor with an unknown cause. The diagnosis is established after other primary lung malignancies or metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a well-defined mass in the right upper lobe on a chest X-ray. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) right upper lobectomy was performed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, CD56 and Bcl-2, and focally positive for CD99, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin 7 and 19. The cytogenetic study revealed a SYT genetic reassortment. So, the final pathological diagnosis was primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:27516790

  2. [Primary pharynx synovial sarcoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Qingying, Cui; Youmei, Zhang; Shuai, Fu; Changbin, Zhang; Ming, Li

    2017-04-01

    A case of primary pharynx synovial sarcoma was reported in this paper. A 15-year-old male patient experienced painless pharyngeal swelling that gradually proliferated for 1 month. Special examination showed an 8 cm × 4 cm × 3 cm tumor located in the left pharynx and the supratonsillar crypt. Imaging tests revealed an irregular mass on the left side of the oropharynx and an unclear boundary. Immunohistochemical examination yielded the following results: epithelial membrane antigen (+), cytokeratin (CK)19 (+), CD7(+), vimentin (+), CK10(-), E-cadherin (+), B-cell lymphoma-2 (-), CD2 (-), CD10 (-), CD138 (+), CD99 (+), leukocyte common antigen (+), and Ki-67 (20%+). This condition was pathologically diagnosed as primary pharynx synovial sarcoma.

  3. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare primary pulmonary tumor.

    PubMed

    Falkenstern-Ge, Roger Fei; Kimmich, Martin; Grabner, Andreas; Horn, Heike; Friedel, Godehard; Ott, German; Kohlhäufl, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary sarcomas overall are very uncommon and comprise only 0.5 % of all primary lung malignancies. The diagnosis is established only after sarcoma-like primary lung malignancies and a metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. Synovial sarcoma accounts for ~8 % of soft-tissue sarcomas. Synovial sarcoma arising from the pleura has rarely been reported. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who complained of right-sided chest pain and shortness of breath. Chest CT scan revealed a large heterogeneous mass, occupying most of the right hemithorax. Histologic diagnosis was supplemented by interphase cytogenetic (FISH) analysis. Computed tomography guided Tru-cut biopsy was suspicious for a sarcomatous or fibrous malignancy. However, intraoperative frozen-section diagnostics confirmed the diagnosis of a sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry showed that tumor cells expressed epithelial membrane antigen, CD99 and BCL2. Based on immunohistochemistry, the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was suspected and was confirmed by FISH analysis. The patient was treated with right upper bilobectomy. Due to R1-resection status, postsurgical systemic chemotherapy was administered. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is a rare primary lung tumor. Due to extensive size of the tumor with pleural and mediastinal invasion only a R1-resection status could be achieved by thoracic surgery.

  4. Identification and isolation of synovial dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Allison R; Cavanagh, Lois; Boyce, Amanda; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Peng, Judy; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2007-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis patients, three compartments need to be considered: peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue. Dendritic cells characterized from each compartment have different properties. The methods given are based on cell sorting for isolation of cells, and flow cytometry and immunohistochemical staining for analysis of cells in these compartments.

  5. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  6. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  7. Cell culture-derived HCV cannot infect synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Abd-Elshafy D; Thomas, Pietschmann; Ulf, Müller-Ladner; Elena, Neumann; Anggakusuma, A; Mohamed, Bahgat M; Frank, Pessler; Patrick, Behrendt

    2015-12-08

    Worldwide 170 million individuals are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), up to 45 million of whom are affected by arthropathy. It is unclear whether this is due to viral infection of synovial cells or immune-mediated mechanisms. We tested the capacity of primary synovial fibroblasts to support HCV propagation. Out of the four critical HCV receptors, only CD81 was expressed to any significant extent in OASF and RASF. Consistent with this, pseudotyped HCV particles were unable to infect these cells. Permissiveness for HCV replication was investigated by transfecting cells with a subgenomic replicon of HCV encoding a luciferase reporter. OASF and RASF did not support replication of HCV, possibly due to low expression levels of miR-122. In conclusion, primary human synovial fibroblasts are unable to support propagation of HCV in vitro. HCV-related arthropathy is unlikely due to direct infection of these cells.

  8. Primary synovial chondromatosis of the subtalar joint: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Derek Stensby, J; Fox, Michael G; Kwon, Michael S; Caycedo, Francisco J; Rahimi, Asal

    2017-09-20

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign condition of uncertain etiology manifested by synovial proliferation. In the radiology literature, there is only 1 prior case report of primary synovial chondromatosis involving the subtalar joint with only partial description of the imaging appearance. We present a 28-year-old female with primary synovial chondromatosis of the subtalar joint and conduct a literature review of the imaging features of primary synovial chondromatosis presenting in the feet.

  9. Primary pulmonary biphasic synovial sarcoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz-García, Pedro; Díaz-Palacios, Salvador; Castillo-Canto, Carlos; Gatica-Pérez, Amancio; Sánchez-González, Jesús Armando

    2012-01-01

    Primary synovial sarcomas of the lung are extremely rare, constituting 0.1% to 0.5% of lung cancers. The first case was reported by Gaertner in 1996. We present the case of a 15-year-old female who presented with cough, white-colored secretions, right-sided chest pain and progressive dyspnea. Physical examination revealed increased exertion during breathing with no cyanosis. The presence of right scapular pulmonary condensation syndrome was observed. Chest x-ray demonstrated homogeneous opacity occupying the lower two thirds of the right hemithorax. Posterolateral thoracotomy with right lower and medium lobectomy was performed. Because there was evidence of upper lobe tumor, it was decided to carry out a right pneumonectomy. Histopathological diagnosis was biphasic synovial sarcoma. The presentation of pulmonary synovial sarcoma generally shows a peripheral location with a nonencapsulated and well-circumscribed tumor. Size ranges from 0.6 to 17 cm (mean: 5 cm). Histology is often characterized by a monophasic pattern. Diagnosis is difficult except for a uniform spindle cell pattern. Most synovial sarcomas show immunoreactivity for cytokeratin and/or epithelial membrane antigen. Cytogenetic characteristic of synovial sarcoma are t(X; 18)(p11, q11). Patient prognosis for pulmonary synovial sarcoma is poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of 50%.

  10. Primary synovial sarcoma of the lung as an incidental finding.

    PubMed

    Watzka, Stefan B; Setinek, Ulrike; Prosch, Helmut; Müller, Michael R

    2009-12-01

    Synovial sarcoma of the lung (SSL) is a very rare but aggressive primary lung tumor. Due to its unusual histological features, it can easily be misdiagnosed, if only small biopsies of the tumor are investigated. Here, we review two recent cases of SSL diagnosed and treated in our institution. The first case is a 37-year-old male with a round nodule in the right lower lobe; he underwent a lobectomy. Histologically, the nodule resembled a biphasic tumor. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a translocation t (X; 18), and the diagnosis of primary SSL could be established. The patient is alive and disease-free since 45 months following surgery. The second case is a 41-year-old male with a cystic lesion in the right lower lobe, removed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) segmentectomy. In the tumor tissue, spindle cell-rich and cystic structures could be found, together with epithelial elements. Because the tumor contained also a translocation t (X; 18), it could be diagnosed as monophasic SSL. The patient is alive and disease-free since 11 months. Since rare diseases of the lung may present as subtle and focal changes, complete removal of suspect pulmonary lesions is always advisable.

  11. Management of locally advanced primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ambarish S; Kumar, Rajiv; Purandare, Nilendu; Jiwnani, Sabita; Karimundackal, George; Pramesh, CS

    2017-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma (PMSS) is a relatively rare disease, and patients are treated predominantly with surgery for resectable disease. Management of locally advanced borderline resectable and unresectable PMSS is not only challenging but also lacks standard guidelines. We present three patients with PMSS, who were unresectable or borderline resectable at presentation and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:28360472

  12. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Martin; Zelger, Bettina; Putzer, Daniel; Bonatti, Hugo; Müller, Ludwig; Fiegl, Michael; Geltner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma is a rare malignancy with only a few cases reported so far. A 56-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for an investigation of a nodule in the left middle lung on chest radiography. Computed tomography revealed a mediastinal mass first described as a solitary fibrous tumor. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was established by computed tomography-guided percutaneous needle biopsy. Work up showed no metastasis to distant organs or contralateral pleural cavity. The mass was surgically resected; pathological and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the diagnosis of a monophasic spindle cell synovial sarcoma probably originating from phrenic nerve. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation and is free of recurrence after a follow up of 16 months. PMID:19918499

  13. Synovial fluid and synovial membrane mesenchymal stem cells: latest discoveries and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Moura Neto, Vivaldo; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro

    2014-10-03

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, and even myoblasts. Most studies have focused on finding MSCs in different parts of the body for medical treatment. Every joint structure, including bone, joint fat, articular cartilage, and synovium, potentially contains resident MSCs. Recently, a progenitor cell population has been found in synovial fluid and showed similarities with both bone marrow and synovial membrane MSCs. Synovial fluid MSCs have been studied in healthy persons and osteoarthritic patients in order to explore its potential for treatment of some orthopedic disorders. Here, we briefly review the current knowledge on synovial fluid MSCs, their origin, relation to some orthopedic diseases, and future applications.

  14. Primary Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma: Experience of the CWS Study Group.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Monika; Dantonello, Tobias; Hallmen, Erika; Vokuhl, Christian; Leuschner, Ivo; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Niggli, Felix; Ladenstein, Ruth; Bielack, Stefan S; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koscielniak, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    Prognostic factors for localized synovial sarcoma are well defined. However, few data exist regarding patients with metastases at diagnosis. Poor outcome is described but the optimal therapeutic regimen remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the outcome, identify prognostic factors, and analyze treatment strategies. Patients <21 years with synovial sarcoma and primary distant metastases treated in the consecutive prospective European Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studiengruppe trials 1980-2010 were analyzed. Twenty-nine of 296 patients had primary metastases. Twenty-seven could be included. Median age was 16.7 years. Primaries were mainly located in the limbs (78%) and 74% were ≥10 cm. Metastases involved the lungs in all patients. Two patients presented with synchronous bone metastases. Sixty-three percent of patients achieved a first remission, whereas only 26% maintained it. Relapses were metastatic with pulmonary metastases in nearly all patients. Five-year event-free survival and overall survival (OS) rates were 26% and 30%, respectively. Prognosis was best for patients with oligometastatic lung metastases (5-year OS probability 85%). Prognosis was worse for patients with multiple bilateral lung metastases (5-year OS 13%) and even poorer for those with concurrent bone metastases. Treatment elements associated with superior survival were adequate local therapy of the primary tumor and, if feasible, for metastases, chemotherapy with an ifosfamide/doxorubicin-based regimen. The use of whole lung irradiation was not correlated with better outcomes. The overall prognosis of primary metastatic synovial sarcoma is poor. However, individuals with oligometastatic lung metastases had very good chance for long-term survival when treated with adequate multimodal therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  16. Intermetatarsal bursa primary synovial chondromatosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Manuel; Laks, Shaked; Kafchinski, Lisa; Sundarakumar, Dinesh K; Smith, Crysela M

    2017-09-15

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a benign neoplastic process, occurring mostly in large joints, more rarely in tendon sheaths, and extremely uncommonly in bursae. We describe a patient with primary synovial chondromatosis arising in the fourth intermetatarsal bursa. Knowledge of the bursal anatomy of the forefoot, and of characteristic imaging findings and the pathogenesis of synovial chondromatosis, is essential in including this uncommon entity in the differential when occurring in unusual locations.

  17. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Lung: A Rare Tumor.

    PubMed

    Raj, Prince; Kumar, Parveen; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma of lung is a rare tumor with few case reports in literature. Though named synovial sarcoma due to its resemblance to synovium on light microscopy, it arises from mesenchymal tissue. Here, we present a case of synovial sarcoma of lung in a 7-year old boy, with main emphasis on difficulty faced in the management.

  18. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation.

  19. Involvement of chromosome X in primary cytogenetic change in human neoplasia: nonrandom translocation in synovial sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Turc-Carel, C.; Cin, P.D.; Limon, J.; Rao, U.; Li, F.P.; Corson, J.M.; Zimmerman, R.; Parry, D.M.; Cowan, J.M.; Sandberg, A.A.

    1987-04-01

    A translocation that involves chromosome X (band p11.2) and chromosome 18 (band q11.2) was observed in short-term in vitro cultures of cells from five synovial sarcomas and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma. In four of these tumors, the translocation t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) was reciprocal. The two other tumors had complex translocations: t(X;18;21)(p11.2;q11.2;p13) and t(X;15;18)(p11.2;q23;q11.2). A translocation between chromosomes X and 18 was not detected in other histological types of soft tissue sarcoma. The X;18 rearrangement appears to characterize the synovial sarcoma and is the first description of a primary, nonrandom change in the sex chromosome of a human solid tumor.

  20. Tendon synovial cells secrete fibronectin in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Banes, A.J.; Link, G.W.; Bevin, A.G.; Peterson, H.D.; Gillespie, Y.; Bynum, D.; Watts, S.; Dahners, L.

    1988-01-01

    The chemistry and cell biology of the tendon have been largely overlooked due to the emphasis on collagen, the principle structural component of the tendon. The tendon must not only transmit the force of muscle contraction to bone to effect movement, but it must also glide simultaneously over extratendonous tissues. Fibronectin is classified as a cell attachment molecule that induces cell spreading and adhesion to substratum. The external surface of intact avian flexor tendon stained positively with antibody to cellular fibronectin. However, if the surface synovial cells were first removed with collagenase, no positive reaction with antifibronectin antibody was detected. Analysis of immunologically stained frozen sections of tendon also revealed fibronectin at the tendon synovium, but little was associated with cells internal in tendon. The staining pattern with isolated, cultured synovial cells and fibroblasts from the tendon interior substantiated the histological observations. Analysis of polyacrylamide gel profiles of /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled proteins synthesized by synovial cells and internal fibroblasts indicated that fibronectin was synthesized principally by synovial cells. Fibronectin at the tendon surface may play a role in cell attachment to prevent cell removal by the friction of gliding. Alternatively, fibronectin, with its binding sites for hyaluronic acid and collagen, may act as a complex for boundary lubrication.

  1. THE FORM AND FUNCTION OF SYNOVIAL CELLS IN TISSUE CULTURES

    PubMed Central

    Vaubel, Ernst

    1933-01-01

    1. Synovial cultures are differentiated in tissue cultures from other tissues of mesenchymal origin by their type of growth and cell function. 2. In these respects they are more closely allied to chondroblasts and osteoblasts than to fibroblasts. 3. Synovial cells in tissue cultures develop marked globular cytoplasmic granulations that stain easily with neutral red and sometimes with toluidine blue; they show marked polymorphism with all transitions from round to spindle, polygonal and star shapes and eventually form an epithelial-like membrane, composed of cells with numerous syncytial bridges. 4. In cultures of typically growing synovial cells a mucin-like substance is elaborated. Typical growth and maximal mucin production is best maintained in media containing a minimum of growth-stimulating substances. Transformation of synovial cell growths into fibroblastic growth is accompanied by a loss of mucin production. Dying cells apparently do not produce mucin. 5. Amitotic cell division and the formation of macrophage-like cells were observed. 6. Marked tendency to liquefaction of the plasma about the growths was observed and attributed to the elaboration of a proteolytic ferment. 7. The specific designation "synovioblasts" is proposed for these cells. PMID:19870183

  2. Primary Monophasic Synovial Sarcoma of the Kidney: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Henrique; Pereira, Caio A.D.; Zucca, Luís E.R.; Serrano, Sérgio V.; Silva, Sandra R.M.; Camparoto, Marjori L.; Cárcano, Flavio M.

    2013-01-01

    Primary synovial sarcoma (SS) of the kidney is a rare neoplasm and its presenting features are similar to other common renal tumors, making early diagnosis difficult. To date, few cases have been reported in the literature. Primary renal SSs can exist in either a monophasic or a biphasic pattern, the former being more common and tending to have a better prognosis than the biphasic variant. Herein we describe a case of primary renal SS that was diagnosed based on histopathology and immunohistochemistry after radical nephrectomy. Fusion gene product analysis was also done by FISH and RT-PCR. Patient follow-up and literature review are presented, focused on systemic therapy. We highlight that these tumors should be correctly diagnosed as clinical results and specific treatment are distinct from primary epithelial renal cell carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy should be tailored for each patient in the management of disease, although its role still remains unclear. PMID:24137053

  3. Interferon-alpha and dexamethasone inhibit adhesion of T cells to endothelial cells and synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, K.; Kawakami, A.; Nakashima, M.; Ida, H.; Sakito, S.; Matsuoka, N.; Terada, K.; Sakai, M.; Kawabe, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Ishimaru, T.; Kurouji, K.; Fujita, N.; Aoyagi, T.; Maeda, K.; Nagataki, S.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated whether interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interferon-alpha (IFN-α) and glucocorticoids affected the adhesion of T cells to human umbilical endothelial cells or human synovial cells. About 30% of peripheral blood T cells could bind to unstimulated endothelial cells, but only a few T cells could bind to unstimulated synovial cells. When both endothelial cells and synovial cells were cultured with recombinant IFN-γ (rIFN-γ), the percentage of T cell binding to both types of cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. rIFN-α and dexamethasone blocked the T cell binding to unstimulated endothelial cells. Furthermore, rIFN-α and dexamethasone suppressed T cell binding to both endothelial cells and synovial cells stimulated by IFN-γ, and also inhibited intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on both endothelial cells and synovial cells stimulated by IFN-γ. These results suggest that IFN-α and glucocorticoids may inhibit T cell binding to endothelial cells or synovial cells by modulating adhesion molecule expression on these cells. PMID:1606729

  4. Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma Showing a Prolonged Survival with Multimodality Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hirokazu; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Sumitomo, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Seiji; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Kohei; Nagahiro, Shinji; Yamago, Taito; Toyoda, Yuko; Bando, Yoshimi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to a mass shadow noted on a chest X-ray. Thoracoscopic lobectomy yielded a diagnosis of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma according to the histology and SYT-SSX1 gene analyses. Five months after the thoracic surgery, he developed brain metastasis; therefore, we performed resection of the brain metastatic focus followed by radiotherapy. As a local recurrence in the thoracic cavity concurrently emerged, systemic chemotherapy was also administered. These observations indicated that a multidisciplinary approach may be useful against primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma, although there is presently no established therapeutic strategy due to its rarity and highly aggressive nature.

  5. Discrimination of osteoarthritic and rheumatoid human synovial cells in culture by nuclear image analysis.

    PubMed

    Delage, B; Giroud, F; Monet, J D; Ekindjian, O G; Cals, M J

    1999-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritic (RA) and osteoarthritic (OA) synovial cells in culture differ in their metabolic and proliferative behaviour. To assess links between these properties and nuclear changes, we used image analysis to study chromatin texture, together with nuclear morphometry and densitometry of OA and RA cells in primary culture. Chromatin pattern at the third day (D3) was heterogeneous and granular with chromatin clumps whereas at the final stage (D11) of culture a homogeneous and finely granular chromatin texture was observed. This evolution indicates global chromatin decondensation. These characteristics were more marked for RA than for OA nuclei. At each culture time, RA nuclei could be discriminated with high confidence from OA ones from parameters evaluating the organization of the chromatine texture. Nuclear image analysis is thus a useful tool for investigating synovial cell biology.

  6. Quantification of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers in healthy and osteoarthritic synovial membranes.

    PubMed

    Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; Gimeno-Longas, Maria José; Muiños-López, Emma; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; de Toro, Francisco Javier; Blanco, Francisco Javier

    2011-02-01

    To quantify cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers in synovial membranes from human osteoarthritic (OA) and healthy joints. Synovial membranes from OA and healthy joints were digested with collagenase and the isolated cells were cultured. Synovial membrane-derived cells were phenotypically characterized for differentiation experiments using flow cytometry to detect the expression of mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD117, CD166, and STRO-1) and hematopoietic markers (CD34 and CD45). Chondrogenesis was assessed by staining for proteoglycans and collagen type II, adipogenesis by using a stain for lipids, and osteogenesis by detecting calcium deposits. Coexpression of CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105 was determined using immunofluorescence. Cells expressing MSC markers were diffusely distributed in OA synovial membranes; in healthy synovial membrane these cells were localized in the subintimal zone. More numerous MSC markers in OA synovial membranes were observed in cells also expressing the CD90 antigen. FACS analysis showed that more than 90% of OA synovial membrane-derived cells were positive for CD44, CD73, and CD90, and negative for CD34 and CD45. OA synovial membrane-derived cells were also positive for CD29 (85.23%), CD117 (72.35%), CD105 (45.5%), and STRO-1 (49.46%). Micropellet analyses showed that the culture of cells with transforming growth factor-ß3 stimulated proteoglycan and collagen type II synthesis. Synovial membranes from patients with OA contain more cells positive for CD44, CD90, and CD105 antigens than those from joints with undamaged cartilage.

  7. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma requiring differentiation from pulmonary metastasis of tibial adamantinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Toshiharu; Tsuchida, Shinji; Terauchi, Ryu; Mizoshiri, Naoki; Konishi, Eiichi; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Shimada, Junichi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-10-18

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is rare. We describe a case of PPSS complicated by tibial adamantinoma that required differentiation from lung metastasis. A 39-year-old Japanese woman presented with hemoptysis, dyspnea, and a well-defined tumor measuring 3.0 cm in greatest diameter in the right lower lobe on chest computed tomography (CT). Positron emission tomography/CT with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET/CT) showed mild uptake of FDG (maximum standardized uptake value of 2.0). Her past history included surgery for adamantinoma of the right tibia at age 25 years. We considered the possibility of pulmonary metastasis from the adamantinoma and performed fluoroscopy-assisted thoracoscopic resection of the tumor after CT-guided Lipiodol marking. Histologically, the tumor was composed mainly of a dense proliferation of spindle cells. Immunohistochemical studies were positive for epithelial membrane antigen, B cell lymphoma 2, and transducing-like enhancer of split 1. They were negative for CD34. The synovial sarcoma, X breakpoint 1 gene-fusion transcript was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. It is diagnostic of PPSS. Resection margins were negative. The patient was well without evidence of recurrence or metastasis of the PPSS or adamantinoma at the 30-month and 15-year follow-ups. Clinical and radiological manifestations of PPSS overlap with those of other lung tumors. The solitary pulmonary nodule in this case was indistinguishable from pulmonary metastases of the adamantinoma based on clinical symptoms, epidemiology, chest radiography, CT, and FDG-PET/CT. PPSS was diagnosed only after evaluating gross pathology, histology, immunohistochemistry, and cytogenetics. PPSS should be included in the differential diagnosis of a well-defined homogeneous round or oval lung mass. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PPSS complicated by adamantinoma.

  8. Primary synovial sarcomas of the mediastinum: a clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Suster, Saul; Moran, Cesar A

    2005-05-01

    A series of 15 cases of primary mediastinal neoplasms displaying histopathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features of synovial sarcoma is presented. The patients' ages ranged from 3 to 83 years, with a male-to-female ratio of 2:1. Nine cases presented as anterior mediastinal masses with chest pain, shortness of breath, and pleural effusion, and 6 cases were in paravertebral location in the posterior mediastinum and presented with neck or back pain and pleural effusion. The tumors measured from 5 to 20 cm in greatest diameter and showed a tan white, soft to rubbery cut surface with areas of hemorrhage and necrosis and foci of gelatinous material. Four cases showed areas of cystic degeneration. In 7 cases, the tumors were well circumscribed; in 6 cases, the tumors grossly invaded the pleura, pericardium, heart, great vessels, chest wall, rib, and vertebra. Histologically, 5 cases displayed a biphasic growth pattern, with well-formed glandular elements admixed with a monotonous spindle cell population. Ten cases were exclusively composed of a monotonous atypical spindle cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical studies showed focal positivity of the tumor cells for cytokeratin and/or epithelial membrane antigen, and strong positivity for vimentin and bcl-2 in the spindle cells in all cases studied (10 of 10). Eight cases also showed focal positivity for CD99. Electron microscopic examination in 5 cases showed oval to spindle tumor cells with closely apposed cell membranes, abundant cytoplasmic intermediate filaments and rough endoplasmic reticulum, and immature desmosome-type cell junctions. Ten patients were treated by complete surgical excision and two by partial excision followed by radiation therapy. In 4 patients, the tumors were inoperable and treated with radiation therapy only. Clinical follow-up was available in 5 patients and showed local recurrence with metastases to lung, lymph nodes, and epidural space from 1 to 3 years in 4 cases and liver

  9. Interleukin-17-positive mast cells contribute to synovial inflammation in spondylarthritis.

    PubMed

    Noordenbos, Troy; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Gofita, Ioana; van de Sande, Marleen; Tak, Paul P; Caňete, Juan D; Baeten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Studies comparing spondylarthritis (SpA) to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis suggest that innate immune cells may play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of SpA. Recent observations have indicated a marked synovial mast cell infiltration in psoriatic SpA. We therefore undertook the present study to investigate the potential contribution of mast cells to synovial inflammation in SpA. Synovial tissue and fluid were obtained from patients with either nonpsoriatic or psoriatic SpA (n=82) and patients with RA (n=50). Synovial biopsy tissue was analyzed by immunostaining and used in ex vivo cultures. Synovial fluid was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We observed a strong and specific increase of c-Kit-positive mast cells in the synovium from patients with SpA compared to the synovium from patients with RA synovitis, which was independent of disease subtype (nonpsoriatic versus psoriatic), disease duration, and treatment. Staining of mast cell granules, analysis of synovial fluid, and results in ex vivo tissue culture did not indicate increased degranulation in SpA synovitis. However, mast cells expressed significantly more interleukin-17 (IL-17) in SpA than in RA synovitis, and mast cells constituted the major IL-17-expressing cell population in the SpA synovium. Ex vivo targeting of synovial mast cells with the c-Kit inhibitor imatinib mesylate significantly decreased the production of IL-17 as well as other proinflammatory cytokines in synovial tissue cultures. Analysis of paired pre- and posttreatment synovial tissue samples indicated that the mast cell/IL-17 axis in SpA was not modulated by effective tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockade. The specific and TNF-independent increase in IL-17-expressing mast cells may contribute to the progression of synovial inflammation in peripheral SpA. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. INTRAOCULAR SYNOVIAL SARCOMA.

    PubMed

    Richards, Nikisha Q; Kofler, Julia K; Chu, Charleen T; Stefko, S Tonya

    2017-01-01

    To describe the first reported case of intraocular synovial sarcoma. A 29-year-old man was enucleated for a blind, painful eye. Pathologic examination revealed an unexpected intraocular spindle cell tumor. Immunohistochemical characterization revealed diffuse reactivity of the tumor cells for vimentin and focal positivity for epithelial markers pankeratin and epithelial membrane antigen. Melanoma markers were negative. Fluorescent in situ hybridization studies identified a t(X;18) (p11.2;q11.2) translocation, establishing a final diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. There was no evidence of extraocular extension as the resected margin of the optic nerve was free of tumor. Further imaging studies revealed no extraocular primary site or metastasis. The incidental discovery of an intraocular malignancy in this case underscores the importance of routine histopathologic analysis of all enucleated globes. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of an intraocular synovial sarcoma, either as metastasis or as primary site.

  11. Proliferation of the synovial lining cell layer in suggested metal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burkandt, Andreas; Katzer, Alexander; Thaler, Karlheinz; Von Baehr, Volker; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Rüther, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael; Zustin, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Synovial tissues in joints with prostheses display characteristic morphological changes in cases with aseptic failure, particularly macrophage infiltration. Since proliferation of the synovial lining cell layer represents a feature characteristic of autoimmune joint diseases, the possibility of morphological changes of the synovial lining cell layer in periprosthetic tissues was investigated. Synovial biopsies from five groups of morphologically well-defined lesions (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, aseptic loosened metal-on-polyethylene and metal-on-metal arthroplasty and suggested metal hypersensitivity) were compared using a conventional staining method and immunohistochemistry. The synovial lining cell layer was substantially enlarged in both rheumatoid arthritis and cases suggestive of metal hypersensitivity. Macrophage infiltrates were apparent in rheumatoid arthritis and all specimens from retrieved hip arthroplasties. Although both synovial and subsynovial macrophages were positive for CD163 (indicating synovial M2 macrophages), the remaining fibroblast-like synoviocytes and scattered stromal fibroblasts showed a positive reaction with the D2-40 antibody (indicating fibroblast-like synoviocytes). Furthermore, in contrast to CD163-positive macrophages, the enlarged D2-40-positive fibroblast-like synoviocytes displayed cytoplasmatic tubular projections. Proliferation of the periprosthetic synovial lining cell layer occurred in cases with unexplained groin pain following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty, suggestive of hypersensitivity. Despite some important study limitations, the present observation adds to the evidence that metal hypersensitivity shares characteristic morphological features with autoimmune diseases of the joints.

  12. Fucosyltransferase 1 mediates angiogenesis, cell adhesion and rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that sialyl Lewisy, synthesized by fucosyltransferases, is involved in angiogenesis. Fucosyltransferase 1 (fut1) is an α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase responsible for synthesis of the H blood group and Lewisy antigens. However, the angiogenic involvement of fut 1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST) has not been clearly defined. Methods Assay of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA was performed by enzyme-linked lectin assay. Fut1 expression was determined in RA ST samples by immunohistological staining. We performed angiogenic Matrigel assays using a co-culture system of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) and fut1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. To determine if fut1 played a role in leukocyte retention and cell proliferation in the RA synovium, myeloid THP-1 cell adhesion assays and fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblast proliferation assays were performed. Results Total α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA ST were significantly higher compared to normal (NL) ST. Fut1 expression on RA ST lining cells positively correlated with ST inflammation. HMVECs from a co-culture system with fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts exhibited decreased endothelial cell tube formation compared to control siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. Fut1 siRNA also inhibited myeloid THP-1 adhesion to RA synovial fibroblasts and RA synovial fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions These data show that α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins are upregulated in RA ST compared to NL ST. We also show that fut1 in RA synovial fibroblasts is important in angiogenesis, leukocyte-synovial fibroblast adhesion, and synovial fibroblast proliferation, all key processes in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24467809

  13. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence. PMID:23372956

  14. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-02-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence.

  15. Induction of cytokines and ICAM-1 by proinflammatory cytokines in primary rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts and inhibition by N-acetyl-L-cysteine and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, S; Kato, T; Okamoto, T

    1996-10-01

    The role of transcription factor NF-kappa B in the induction of cytokines and ICAM-1 upon stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines, IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was investigated in primary synovial fibroblasts obtained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B was demonstrated after 30 min of treatment with IL-1 or TNF-alpha. Thereafter, the production of several cytokines including granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor, IL-6 and IL-8, that are known to be abundantly produced in the synovial cavity of RA patients, was greatly augmented. Similarly, cell surface expression of ICAM-1 was induced by the IL-1 or TNF-alpha treatment. Since expression of these genes is induced in rheumatoid synovial tissue, this experimental system is considered to represent the in vivo situation of RA pathophysiology. Using this cell culture system we attempted to modulate the intracellular signaling cascade for NF-kappa B activation and examined the effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), which were previously reported to inhibit NF-kappa B activation. Pretreatment of the primary synovial fibroblasts with NAC inhibited nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B. Subsequently, the induction of these cytokines and ICAM-1 was considerably suppressed. On the other hand, pretreatment with aspirin blocked these phenomena only partially. These observations indicate the pivotal role of NF-kappa B in RA pathogenesis thus highlighting the possibility of a novel therapeutic strategy.

  16. An altered repertoire of T cell receptor V gene expression by rheumatoid synovial fluid T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, C; Marguerie, C; So, A K

    1992-01-01

    The pattern of T cell receptor V gene expression by lymphocytes from rheumatoid synovial fluid and paired peripheral blood samples was compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay. Eight rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had varying durations of disease (from 2 to 20 years) were studied. In all patients there was evidence of a different pattern of V gene expression between the two compartments. Significantly increased expression of at least one V alpha or V beta gene family by synovial fluid T cells was observed in all the patients studied. Three different V alpha (V alpha 10, 15 and 18) and three V beta (V beta 4, 5 and 13) families were commonly elevated. Sequencing of synovial V beta transcripts demonstrated that the basis of increased expression of selected V gene families in the synovial fluid was due to the presence of dominant clonotypes within those families, which constituted up to 53% of the sequences isolated from one particular synovial V gene family. There were considerable differences in the NDJ sequences found in synovial and peripheral blood T cell receptor (TCR) transcripts of the same V beta gene family. These data suggest that the TCR repertoire in the two compartments differs, and that antigen-driven expansion of particular synovial T cell populations is a component of rheumatoid synovitis, and is present in all stages of the disease. PMID:1458680

  17. Primary orbital synovial sarcoma: A clinicopathologic review with a differential diagnosis and discussion of molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Stagner, Anna M; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Fay, Aaron

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities developing in young adults that has rarely been reported in the orbit. Synovial sarcoma is associated with a unique translocation, resulting in an SYT-SSX fusion gene. We analyze 7 published periocular cases, together with the current one, to gain a better appreciation of the features of the tumor in this location and to compare the findings with those derived from nonophthalmic studies. An inferior orbital mass developed in a 31-year-old woman after experiencing periorbital and hemifacial pain for more than a decade. Radiographically, the mass was circumscribed and displayed coarse internal calcifications. A large but subtotal excision with histopathologic examination disclosed a primitive tumor composed of spindled and ovoid cells. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positivity for nuclear transducin-like enhancer of split 1 and membranous CD99, typical for synovial sarcoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization identified a (X,18) translocation in the tumor cells. The patient underwent postoperative adjuvant proton beam radiotherapy with a good response that has been maintained during 1 year of follow-up. Orbital soft-tissue tumors of all types are increasingly identified by their distinctive genetic signatures that offer more specificity than standard immunohistochemical tests.

  18. The synovial microenvironment of osteoarthritic joints alters RNA-seq expression profiles of human primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Eric A; Bonin, Carolina A; Li, Xin; Smith, Jay; Karperien, Marcel; Larson, A Noelle; Lewallen, David G; Cool, Simon M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Krych, Aaron J; Leontovich, Alexey A; Im, Hee-Jeong; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-10-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling degenerative joint disease that prompts pain and has limited treatment options. To permit early diagnosis and treatment of OA, a high resolution mechanistic understanding of human chondrocytes in normal and diseased states is necessary. In this study, we assessed the biological effects of OA-related changes in the synovial microenvironment on chondrocytes embedded within anatomically intact cartilage from joints with different pathological grades by next generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We determined the transcriptome of primary articular chondrocytes derived from anatomically unaffected knees and ankles, as well as from joints affected by OA. The GALAXY bioinformatics platform was used to facilitate biological interpretations. Comparisons of patient samples by k-means, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses together reveal that primary chondrocytes exhibit OA grade-related differences in gene expression, including genes involved in cell-adhesion, ECM production and immune response. We conclude that diseased synovial microenvironments in joints with different histopathological OA grades directly alter gene expression in chondrocytes. One ramification of this finding is that anatomically intact cartilage from OA joints is not an ideal source of healthy chondrocytes, nor should these specimens be used to generate a normal baseline for the molecular characterization of diseased joints. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Acute synovial fluid eosinophilia associated with delayed pressure urticaria: a role for mast cells?

    PubMed

    Miossec, P; Sullivan, T J; Tharp, M D; Volant, A; Le Goff, P

    1987-04-01

    We report a case of exercise induced joint effusion with synovial fluid (SF) eosinophilia of 9,540/mm3 in a patient with delayed pressure urticaria. The SF eosinophilia was an acute but transient event associated with some evidence of local complement activation. Histologic assessment revealed a normal synovial membrane but with no detectable intact mast cells. These observations suggest that mast cells and eosinophils acting in concert can cause joint inflammation.

  20. Occult primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma presenting as recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax and explosive progression

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chenglin; Liu, Chengwu; Pu, Qiang; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a relatively rare neoplasm with highly progressive potential. We present an extremely rare case of PPSS presenting as recurrent pneumothorax with bullous lesions. Bullectomy was performed at the local hospital. Unfortunately, the patient was initially misdiagnosed as atypical carcinoid. Although a negative resection margin was obtained during the first surgery and a remedial operation and chemotherapy followed, the patient developed severe disease progression and died soon after. This report demonstrates that PPSS can easily be misdiagnosed and should be seriously considered in the differential diagnosis of pneumothorax. PMID:27995774

  1. Enzymatic hydrolysis of indometacin farnesil, a prodrug of indomethacin, by carboxylesterase in cultured synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Mishima, M; Kobayashi, S; Hashida, R; Yuzuriha, T; Sato, T; Satoh, T

    1991-05-01

    The hydrolysis of indometacin farnesil (IMF) in the synovial cells of rat and human and the subcellular fractions of rat liver were investigated in relation to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in the synovial cells. The inhibition of PGE2 production in cultured human synovial cells by anti-inflammatory drugs was potent in the order of IND, IMF and acetyl salicylic acid. However, when the cells were pretreated with IMF, the inhibitory activity of IMF was retained even after the compound was washed out from the medium. No duration of the inhibition was seen in the pretreatment of the cells with IND or acetyl salicylic acid. These results suggest that IMF incorporated into the synovial cells was hydrolyzed gradually to IND. In fact, IMF was taken up by rat synovial cells in culture and considerable amount of IND, which increased with culture period, was found out in the cells. Furthermore, the IMF hydrolase activity was found in microsomal and lysosomal fractions of rat liver, and the hydrolase was identified as carboxylesterase by using bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate, a specific inhibitor of carboxylesterase.

  2. Hypermethylated promoter region of DR3, the death receptor 3 gene, in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Takami, Nozomi; Osawa, Kayo; Miura, Yasushi; Komai, Koichiro; Taniguchi, Mariko; Shiraishi, Masahiko; Sato, Keizo; Iguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shiozawa, Kazuko; Hashiramoto, Akira; Shiozawa, Shunichi

    2006-03-01

    To examine the promoter activity and protein expression of the death receptor 3 gene DR3, a member of the apoptosis-inducing Fas gene family, with particular reference to the methylation status of its promoter region in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Genomic DNA was prepared from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from healthy individuals and from patients with RA and synovial cells obtained from patients with RA and osteoarthritis. The methylation status of the DR3 promoter was analyzed by bisulfite genomic sequencing and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction techniques. Gene promoter activity and protein expression were examined using the luciferase reporter and Western blotting techniques. The promoter region of the DR3 gene contained many CpG motifs, including one CpG island that was specifically hypermethylated in synovial cells from patients with RA. Promoter assays showed that the promoter CpG island was essential for the transactivation of the DR3 gene and that forced hypermethylation of the CpG island with the bacterial methylase Sss I in vitro resulted in inhibition of the DR3 gene expression. Furthermore, the expression of DR-3 protein was down-modulated in association with methylation of the promoter CpG island in RA synovial cells. The CpG island in the DR3 gene promoter was specifically methylated to down-modulate the expression of DR-3 protein in rheumatoid synovial cells, which may provide resistance to apoptosis in RA synovial cells.

  3. Differential regulation and expression of hyaluronan synthases in human articular chondrocytes, synovial cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Recklies, A D; White, C; Melching, L; Roughley, P J

    2001-01-01

    Recently three isoforms of hyaluronan synthase (HAS), the enzyme responsible for hyaluronate/hyaluronan (HA) biosynthesis, have been cloned, allowing us to study their expression pattern. Our objective was to determine which of the HAS isoenzymes were expressed in human articular chondrocytes, synovial fibroblasts and osteosarcoma cells, whether their expression could be modulated by growth factors (insulin-like growth factor-1, basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and cytokines [interleukin 1beta1 (IL-1beta)], and whether changes in the rate of HA synthesis by the cells correlated with changes in mRNA levels for one or more of the HAS isoforms. All three HAS isoforms were found to be expressed in the cultured cells analysed in this study, although the relative proportions varied for each cell type. HAS2 mRNA was usually predominant in chondrocytes, whereas synovial cells contained increased amounts of HAS1. HAS3 was always the least abundant message. The rapidly growing osteosarcoma cells contained almost exclusively HAS2 message. HAS usage in uncultured cartilage and synovial tissues was similar to that in the cultured cells, with HAS2 message being the predominant species in cartilage and HAS1 usually being the predominant species in synovium. HA synthesis was stimulated by the growth factors, but the extent of the response was cell-type specific. Synovial cells responded particularly well to IL-1beta, and showed a unique synergistic response when IL-1beta was used in combination with TGF-beta1. This response was much reduced in articular chondrocytes and absent in the osteosarcoma cells. Analysis of changes in HAS message levels indicated that there was often no correlation with the changes in HA secretion following exposure to growth factors. Although HAS-1 mRNA was increased in synovial cells after exposure to TGF-beta1/IL-1beta, the magnitude of the change was far less than the effect on HA synthesis. Our data thus

  4. Comparative study of equine mesenchymal stem cells from healthy and injured synovial tissues: an in vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Fülber, Joice; Maria, Durvanei A; da Silva, Luis Cláudio Lopes Correia; Massoco, Cristina O; Agreste, Fernanda; Baccarin, Raquel Y Arantes

    2016-03-05

    Bone marrow and adipose tissues are known sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in horses; however, synovial tissues might be a promising alternative. The aim of this study was to evaluate phenotypic characteristics and differentiation potential of equine MSCs from synovial fluid (SF) and synovial membrane (SM) of healthy joints (SF-H and SM-H), joints with osteoarthritis (SF-OA and SM-OA) and joints with osteochondritis dissecans (SF-OCD and SM-OCD) to determine the most suitable synovial source for an allogeneic therapy cell bank. Expression of the markers CD90, CD105, CD44, and CD34 in SF-H, SM-H, SF-OA, SM-OA, SF-OCD and SM-OCD was verified by flow cytometry, and expression of cytokeratin, vimentin, PGP 9.5, PCNA, lysozyme, nanog, and Oct4 was verified by immunocytochemistry. MSCs were cultured and evaluated for their chondrogenic, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potential. Final quantification of extracellular matrix and mineralized matrix was determined using AxioVision software. A tumorigenicity test was conducted in Balb-C(nu/nu) mice to verify the safety of the MSCs from these sources. Cultured cells from SF and SM exhibited fibroblastoid morphology and the ability to adhere to plastic. The time elapsed between primary culture and the third passage was approximately 73 days for SF-H, 89 days for SF-OCD, 60 days for SF-OA, 68 days for SM-H, 57 days for SM-OCD and 54 days for SM-OA. The doubling time for SF-OCD was higher than that for other cells at the first passage (P < 0.05). MSCs from synovial tissues showed positive expression of the markers CD90, CD44, lysozyme, PGP 9.5, PCNA and vimentin and were able to differentiate into chondrogenic (21 days) and osteogenic (21 days) lineages, and, although poorly, into adipogenic lineages (14 days). The areas staining positive for extracellular matrix in the SF-H and SM-H groups were larger than those in the SF-OA and SM-OA groups (P < 0.05). The positive mineralized matrix area in the SF-H group was

  5. Osmolarity regulates chondrogenic differentiation potential of synovial fluid derived mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Karri L; Krawetz, Roman J

    2012-06-08

    Cartilage is one of few tissues where adult stem/progenitor cells have not been putatively identified. Recent studies have provided strong evidence that a sub-population of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) derived from the synovial fluid may be able to affect some degree of cartilage repair both in vivo and in vitro/ex vivo, however this does not appear to be the case in patients with arthritis. Previously, it has been found that synovial fluid osmolarity is decreased in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) or Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and these changes in osmolarity have been linked to changes in chondrocyte gene regulation. However, it is yet unknown if changes in osmolarity regulate the gene expression in synovial fluid MPCs (sfMPCs), and by extension, chondrogenesis of this cell population. In the present study we have collected synovial fluid samples from normal, OA and RA knee joints, quantified the osmolarity of the fluid and modified the culture/differentiation media to span a range of osmolarities (264-375 mOsm). Chondrogenesis was measured with Alcian blue staining of cultures in addition to quantitative PCR (qPCR) using probes to Sox9, ACAN and Col2A1. Overall, sfMPCs from arthritic joints demonstrated decreased chondrogenic potential compared to sfMPCs isolated from normal synovial fluid. Furthermore, the sfMPCs retained increased chondrogenic potential if differentiated under the same osmolarity conditions for which they were initially derived within. In conclusion, it does appear the synovial fluid osmolarity regulates the chondrogenic potential of sfMPCs, however, further study is required to elucidate the mechanism by which the changes in osmolarity are sensed by the cells and regulate chondrogenic gene expression.

  6. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Cells and Synovial Membranes of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Elisa; Argentino, Giuseppe; Beri, Ruggero; Lunardi, Claudio; Puccetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; it is characterized by bone erosions and new bone formation. The diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and diagnostic biomarkers are not yet available. The aim of this work was to clarify some aspects of the disease pathogenesis and to identify specific gene signatures in paired peripheral blood cells (PBC) and synovial biopsies of patients with PsA. Moreover, we tried to identify biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice. Methods PBC and synovial biopsies of 10 patients with PsA were used to study gene expression using Affymetrix arrays. The expression values were validated by Q-PCR, FACS analysis and by the detection of soluble mediators. Results Synovial biopsies of patients showed a modulation of approximately 200 genes when compared to the biopsies of healthy donors. Among the differentially expressed genes we observed the upregulation of Th17 related genes and of type I interferon (IFN) inducible genes. FACS analysis confirmed the Th17 polarization. Moreover, the synovial trascriptome shows gene clusters (bone remodeling, angiogenesis and inflammation) involved in the pathogenesis of PsA. Interestingly 90 genes are modulated in both compartments (PBC and synovium) suggesting that signature pathways in PBC mirror those of the inflamed synovium. Finally the osteoactivin gene was upregulared in both PBC and synovial biopsies and this finding was confirmed by the detection of high levels of osteoactivin in PsA sera but not in other inflammatory arthritides. Conclusions We describe the first analysis of the trancriptome in paired synovial tissue and PBC of patients with PsA. This study strengthens the hypothesis that PsA is of autoimmune origin since the coactivity of IFN and Th17 pathways is typical of autoimmunity. Finally these findings have allowed the identification of a possible disease biomarker, osteoactivin, easily detectable in PsA serum. PMID

  7. Recurrent Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Median Nerve: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Jayakrishnan, K N; Acharya, A M

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve in a 39 year old lady with multiple local recurrences over thirteen years with no distant metastasis. The diagnosis of biphasic type of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. At the time of the fourth recurrence below elbow amputation was performed. This case is being reported for its rarity and propensity for local recurrence without distant metastasis.

  8. [Analysis of factors related to the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Sun, Y P; Zheng, Y H; Zhang, Z G

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To analyze related factors on the number of mesenchymal stem cells in the synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and provide an research basis for understanding of the source and biological role of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ. Methods: One hundred and twenty-two synovial fluid samples from 91 temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients who visited in Department of TMJ Center, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University from March 2013 to December 2013 were collected in this study, and 6 TMJ synovial fluid samples from 6 normal volunteers who were studying in the North Campus of Sun Yat-sen University were also collected, so did their clinical information. Then the relation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and the health status of the joints, age of donor, disc perforation, condylar bony destruction, blood containing and visual analogue scale score of pain were investigated using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman rank correlation test. Results: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid had no significant relation with visual analogue scale score of pain (r=0.041, P=0.672), blood containing (P=0.063), condylar bony destruction (P= 0.371). Linear correlation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and age of donor was very week (r=0.186, P=0.043). The number of mesenchymal stem cells up-regulated when the joint was in a disease state (P=0.001). The disc perforation group had more mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid than without disc perforation group (P=0.042). Conclusions: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ has no correlation with peripheral blood circulation and condylar bony destruction, while has close relation with soft tissue structure damage of the joint.

  9. Amyloid arthropathy associated with multiple myeloma: polyarthritis without synovial infiltration of CD20+ or CD38+ cells.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Ogdie, Alexis R; Mayer, Christian T; Kretzschmar, Warren W; Dai, Lie; Elsaman, Ahmed M; Einhorn, Eugene; Krenn, Veit; Schumacher, H Ralph

    2014-03-01

    To describe histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of synovial biopsies of amyloid arthropathy associated with multiple myeloma (MM). Synovial biopsies from affected joints of two patients with MM and amyloid arthropathy were examined with light and electron microscopy, and immunohistochemically for expression of CD3, CD8, CD20, CD38, CD68, Ki-67 and vWF. Results were compared to values from osteoarthritis (OA, n = 26), rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 24) and normal (n = 15) synovial membranes. There was no or only mild lining hyperplasia. Vascular density was not elevated, and there were few Ki-67+ proliferating cells in the stroma. The Krenn synovitis score classified one specimen as "low-grade" and one as "high-grade" synovitis. CD68+ and CD3+ cells were the predominant mononuclear inflammatory cells, whereas CD20+ and CD38+ cells were absent from both synovial membrane and synovial fluid sediment. Electron microscopy demonstrated amyloid phagocytosis by synovial macrophages. In hierarchical clustering the two amyloid arthropathy specimens were more closely related to OA than to RA or normal synovium. This first detailed immunohistological analysis of MM-associated amyloid arthropathy suggests that it is a chronic synovitis that evolves despite the loss of humoral immunity seen in advanced MM. Instead, amyloid phagocytosis by synovial macrophages likely triggers and perpetuates local disease.

  10. Perlecan is required for the chondrogenic differentiation of synovial mesenchymal cells through regulation of Sox9 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Sadatsuki, Ryo; Kaneko, Haruka; Kinoshita, Mayuko; Futami, Ippei; Nonaka, Risa; Culley, Kirsty L; Otero, Miguel; Hada, Shinnosuke; Goldring, Mary B; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Kaneko, Kazuo; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Ishijima, Muneaki

    2017-04-01

    We previously reported that perlecan, a heparan-sulfate proteoglycan (Hspg2), expressed in the synovium at the cartilage-synovial junction, is required for osteophyte formation in knee osteoarthritis. To examine the mechanism underlying this process, we examined the role of perlecan in the proliferation and differentiation of synovial mesenchymal cells (SMCs), using a recently established mouse synovial cell culture method. Primary SMCs isolated from Hspg2(-/-) -Tg (Hspg2(-/-) ;Col2a1-Hspg2(Tg/-) ) mice, in which the perlecan-knockout was rescued from perinatal lethality, lack perlecan. The chondrogenic-, osteogenic-, and adipogenic-potentials were examined in the Hspg2(-/-) -Tg SMCs compared to the control SMCs prepared from wild-type Hspg2(+/+) -Tg (Hspg2(+/+) ;Col2a1-Hspg2(Tg/-) ) littermates. In a culture condition permitting proliferation, both control and Hspg2(-/-) -Tg SMCs showed similar rates of proliferation and expression of cell surface markers. However, in micromass cultures, the cartilage matrix production and Sox9 and Col2a1 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in Hspg2(-/-) -Tg SMCs, compared with control SMCs. The reduced level of Sox9 mRNA was restored by the supplementation with exogenous perlecan protein. There was no difference in osteogenic differentiation between the control and Hspg2(-/-) -Tg SMCs, as measured by the levels of Runx2 and Col1a1 mRNA. The adipogenic induction and PPARγ mRNA levels were significantly reduced in Hspg2(-/-) -Tg SMCs compared to control SMCs. The reduction of PPARγ mRNA levels in Hspg2(-/-) -Tg SMCs was restored by supplementation of perlecan. Perlecan is required for the chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiation from SMCs via its regulation of the Sox9 and PPARγ gene expression, but not for osteogenic differentiation via Runx2. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:837-846, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma diagnosed by fine needle aspiration with cytogenetic confirmation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Cullen A; Barnhart, Amanda; Pettenati, Mark J; Geisinger, Kim R

    2005-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcomas (PPSSs) are rare neoplasins that have been well described in recent years, although there are only very infrequent reports within the cytology literature. Such lesions present a diagnostic challenge on fine needle aspiration (ENA) due to several factors, particularly when the aspirate material displays monophasic, small cell or poorly differentiated morphology. Immunoperoxidase studies on cell block material and confirmation with molecular cytogenetics are important tools to establish the diagnosis and determine appropriate therapy. We report a case of PPSS in a 27-year-old man diagnosed by computed tomography (CT)-guided FNA with confirmation by conventional and molecular cytogenetics. A 27-year-old man presented with several rapidly enlarging, pleura-based masses following a several-month history of recurrent hemopneumothorax. Previous surgical pathology on decorticated pleura was interpreted as a reactive mesothelial proliferation at another institution. Upon referral, CT-guided transthoracic FNA was performed. Smears revealed a highly cellular, dispersed "small round blue cell" neoplasm in a hemorrhagic background. The cytomorphology, in conjunction with a select immunoperoxidase panel, was diagnostic of PPSS. Conventional and molecular cytogenetics subsequently provided confirmation of the diagnosis. PPSSs are uncommon neoplasms seldom diagnosed by FNA, with only very rare reports in the cytology literature. Although their cytomorphology has been well described, monophasic tumors and other morphologic variants present a diagnostic challenge and may be difficult to discern from a variety of neoplastic and reactive/reparative processes. Emphasis should be placed upon securing material at the time of aspiration for immunoperoxidase studies (cell block or core biopsy). In equivocal cases, conventional and/or molecular cytogenetic studies may be needed.

  12. Effect of aloe‑emodin on the proliferation and apoptosis of human synovial MH7A cells; a comparison with methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Motoko; Suzuki, Kaori; Kaneko, Kazuo; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by synovial hyperplasia. Methotrexate (MTX), an antifolate derivative, is used for the treatment of RA, as it exerts antiproliferative efftects on lymphocytes and synovial cells. Aloe‑emodin (AE) is a primary component of anthraquinones in Aloe vera and exerts antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on various tumor cells. In the present study, the effect of AE on the proliferation and apoptosis of MH7A human RA synovial cells was examined. In addition, the effect of AE was compared with that of the established RA therapeutic MTX. MH7A cells were incubated with 5, 10, 20 or 40 µM AE, or 0.01, 0.05, 0.1 or 1 µM MTX, for 24, 48 or 72 h. Subsequently, total cell numbers were assessed using trypan blue staining and Cell Counting kit‑8. Furthermore, MH7A cells incubated with AE or MTX for 48 h were evaluated for apoptosis following Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) staining, and for cell cycle distribution following PI staining. The results indicated that ≥10 µM AE and ≥0.05 µM MTX effectively decreased the numbers of viable MH7A cells. In addition, 40 µM AE and 1 µM MTX induced apoptosis in MH7A cells. Cell cycle analysis revealed that ≥20 µM AE induced G2/M phase arrest, whereas ≥0.1 µM MTX induced S phase arrest. These observations suggested that AE treatment inhibited the growth of MH7A cells by arresting the cell cycle at a different checkpoint compared with MTX treatment. Thus, AE may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA, and may be complimentary to MTX, based on its antiproliferative effect on synovial cells.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: advanced tissue repair or intervention with smouldering synovial activation?

    PubMed

    van Lent, Peter L E M; van den Berg, Wim B

    2013-03-20

    Although it is generally accepted that osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage, other tissues such as synovium in which immunological and inflammatory reactions occur contribute to the development of joint pathology. This sheds new light on the potential mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis. Rather than tissue repair due to local transformation of injected mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes and filling defects in cartilage, such treatment might suppress synovial activation and indirectly ameliorate cartilage damage. Desando and co-workers report in Arthritis Research & Therapy that intra-articular delivery of adipose-derived stem cells attenuates progression of synovial activation and joint destruction in osteoarthritis in an experimental rabbit model. Clinical studies are warranted to see whether this approach might be a novel way to combat development of joint destruction in inflammatory subtypes of osteoarthritis.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: advanced tissue repair or intervention with smouldering synovial activation?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage, other tissues such as synovium in which immunological and inflammatory reactions occur contribute to the development of joint pathology. This sheds new light on the potential mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis. Rather than tissue repair due to local transformation of injected mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes and filling defects in cartilage, such treatment might suppress synovial activation and indirectly ameliorate cartilage damage. Desando and co-workers report in Arthritis Research & Therapy that intra-articular delivery of adipose-derived stem cells attenuates progression of synovial activation and joint destruction in osteoarthritis in an experimental rabbit model. Clinical studies are warranted to see whether this approach might be a novel way to combat development of joint destruction in inflammatory subtypes of osteoarthritis. PMID:23521980

  15. Effects of dexamethasone on human synovial fibroblast-like cells, from osteoarthritic joints, in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Vento, R.; Torregrossa, M.V.; Giuliano, M.; Grecomoro, G.; Piccione, F. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of Dexamethasone (DEX) on cell division and macromolecular synthesis was investigated in a line (Mc Coy cells, A 9) of synovial fibroblast-like cells derived from human osteoarthritic joints. DEX markedly reduced the proliferation of Mc Coy cells in a time and dose-dependent manner. The maximal inhibition was found at 500 nM DEX 24 h after incubation and was accompanied by the appearance of giant macrophage-like cells. After DEX treatment cells showed increased content of DNA, proteins and RNA together with the reduction of ({sup 3}H)-thymidine incorporation into the TCA-precipitable fraction.

  16. Chondrogenic potential of subpopulations of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers derived from human synovial membranes.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes, I; de Toro, F J; Blanco, F J

    2010-11-01

    In this study we analyzed the chondrogenic potential of subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human synovial membranes enriched for CD73, CD106, and CD271 markers. Subpopulations of human synovial membrane MSCs enriched for CD73, CD106, and CD271 markers were isolated using a cytometry sorter and characterized by flow cytometry for MSC markers. The expression of Sox9, Nanog, and Runx2 genes by these cells was measured by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The chondrogenesis of each subpopulation was assessed by culturing the cells in a defined medium to produce spontaneous spheroid formation and differentiation towards chondrocyte-like cells. The examination of the spheroids by histological and immunohistochemical analyses for collagen type II (COL2), aggrecan, collagen type I (COL1), metalloprotease 13 (MMP13), and collagen type X (COLX) levels were performed to assess their chondrogenesis capacity. The adipogenesis and osteogenesis potential of each subpopulation was determined using commercial media; the resulting cells were stained with oil red O or red alizarin to test the degree of differentiation. The subpopulations had different profiles of cells positive for the MSC markers CD44, CD69, CD73, CD90, and CD105 and showed different expression levels of the genes Sox9, Nanog, and Runx2 involved in chondrogenesis, undifferentiation, and osteoblastogenesis, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that COL1, COL2, COLX, MMP13, and aggrecan were expressed in the spheroids as soon as 14 days of culture. The CD271(+) subpopulation expressed the highest levels of COL2 staining compared to the other subpopulations. CD105 and Runx2 were shown by immunohistochemistry and genetic analysis to have significantly higher expression CD271(+) subpopulation than the other subpopulations. Spheroids formed from CD271-enriched and CD73-enriched MSCs from normal human synovial membranes mimic the native cartilage extracellular

  17. HMGB1-mediated autophagy decreases sensitivity to oxymatrine in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yongsong; Xu, Peng; Yang, Le; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Wu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Congshan; Yuan, Qiling; Wang, Bo; Li, Yuanbo; Qiu, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is a type of alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, Sophora flavescens. Although the antitumor activities of OMT have been observed in various cancers, there are no reports regarding the effects of OMT on human synovial sarcoma. In the present study, we analyzed the antitumor activities of OMT in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells and determine whether high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1)-mediated autophagy was associated with its therapeutic effects. We found that OMT exhibited antitumor activity in SW982 cells and facilitated increases in autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA or ATG7 siRNA increased the level of apoptosis, which indicated that OMT-induced autophagy protected cells from the cytotoxicity of OMT. Administration of OMT to SW982 cells increased the expression of HMGB1. When HMGB1 was inhibited via HMGB1-siRNA, OMT-induced autophagy was decreased, and apoptosis was increased. Furthermore, we found that HMGB1-siRNA significantly increased the expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR. OMT-induced autophagy may be mediated by the Akt/mTOR pathway, and HMGB1 plays a vital role in the regulation of autophagy. Therefore, we believe that combining OMT with an inhibitor of autophagy or HMGB1 may make OMT more effective in the treatment of human synovial sarcoma. PMID:27897164

  18. HMGB1-mediated autophagy decreases sensitivity to oxymatrine in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongsong; Xu, Peng; Yang, Le; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Wu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Congshan; Yuan, Qiling; Wang, Bo; Li, Yuanbo; Qiu, Yusheng

    2016-11-29

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is a type of alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, Sophora flavescens. Although the antitumor activities of OMT have been observed in various cancers, there are no reports regarding the effects of OMT on human synovial sarcoma. In the present study, we analyzed the antitumor activities of OMT in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells and determine whether high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1)-mediated autophagy was associated with its therapeutic effects. We found that OMT exhibited antitumor activity in SW982 cells and facilitated increases in autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA or ATG7 siRNA increased the level of apoptosis, which indicated that OMT-induced autophagy protected cells from the cytotoxicity of OMT. Administration of OMT to SW982 cells increased the expression of HMGB1. When HMGB1 was inhibited via HMGB1-siRNA, OMT-induced autophagy was decreased, and apoptosis was increased. Furthermore, we found that HMGB1-siRNA significantly increased the expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR. OMT-induced autophagy may be mediated by the Akt/mTOR pathway, and HMGB1 plays a vital role in the regulation of autophagy. Therefore, we believe that combining OMT with an inhibitor of autophagy or HMGB1 may make OMT more effective in the treatment of human synovial sarcoma.

  19. Neutral amino acid transport in human synovial cells: substrate specificity of adaptative regulation and transinhibition.

    PubMed

    Aussel, C; Rousseau-Loric, S; Cynober, L; Agneray, J; Ekindjian, O G

    1989-10-01

    Neutral amino acid transport was characterized in human synovial cells. The amino acids tested are transported by all three major neutral amino acid transport systems, that is, A, L, and ASC. The model amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was found to be a strong specific substrate for system A in synovial cells. When cells were starved of amino acids, the activity of AIB transport increased, reaching a maximum within 1 h. The stimulation of transport activity was not blocked by cycloheximide and would thus appear to be related to a release from transinhibition. Similarly, the decrease in the activity of AIB transport observed after the addition of alpha-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid (meAIB) appeared to be related to transinhibition. However, using a different approach, that is, amino acid starvation followed by incubation with 10 mM meAIB and transfer to an amino acid-free medium with or without cycloheximide supplementation, a clear increase in AIB uptake, due both to derepression and a release from transinhibition, was observed. Unlike human fibroblasts, the depression of system A in these synovial cells was not serum-dependent. The process of derepression was observed only after preloading with meAIB. Neither AIB nor alanine produced this phenomenon. Moreover, alanine preloading led to a large increase in AIB transport activity due to a release from transinhibition. These observations indicate that the process of derepression and release from transinhibition are specific to the substrates present in the culture medium prior to amino acid starvation.

  20. Differences in synovial fluid cytokine levels but not in synovial tissue cell infiltrate between anti-citrullinated peptide/protein antibody-positive and –negative rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Comparative data on synovial cell infiltrate and cytokine levels in anti citrullinated peptide/protein antibody (ACPA)-positive and ACPA negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are scarce. Our aim was to analyze synovial cell infiltrate and synovial fluid (SF) levels of cytokines in patients with RA according to the presence or absence of ACPA in serum. Methods A cross-sectional study in a single center including consecutive RA patients was performed. Patients were defined as 'ACPA negative' if serum was negative to two different ACPAs [second generation commercial anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (CCP2) and chimeric fibrin/filaggrin citrullinated antibodies]. Parallel synovial tissue (ST) biopsies and SF were obtained by knee arthroscopy. Synovial cell infiltrate and endothelial cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and SF levels of Th1, Th2, Th17 and pro-inflammatory cytokines by Quantibody(R) Human Array. Results A total of 83 patients underwent arthroscopy, with a mean age of 55.9 ± 12 years, and mean disease duration of 45 months (interquartile range, IQR 10.8 to 122). 62% were female and 77% were ACPA positive. No significant differences were found in clinical variables, acute phase reactants, synovial cell infiltrate or lymphoid neogenesis (LN) between ACPA positive and negative patients. However ACPA positive patients had significantly higher levels of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17 F and CC chemokine ligand 20 (CCL-20) than ACPA negative patients. Conclusions In our cohort of patients with RA no significant differences were found in synovial cell infiltrate or synovial LN according to ACPA status. However, ACPA positive patients had higher levels of T-cell derived and pro-inflammatory cytokines than ACPA negative patients. As systemic and local inflammation was similar in the two groups, these findings support a distinct synovial physiopathology. PMID:24485167

  1. Ion channel expression and function in normal and osteoarthritic human synovial fluid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Karri L; Banderali, Umberto; Tailor, Pankaj; Krawetz, Roman J

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic disease affecting the cartilage of over 15% of Canadians. Synovial fluid mesenchymal progenitor cells (sfMPCs) are present in joints and are thought to contribute to healing. OA sfMPCs have a greater proliferative ability but decreased chondrogenic potential. However, little is known about the factors influencing/regulating the differences between normal and OA sfMPCs. Recently, our lab has shown that sfMPC chondrogenic differentiation in vitro is favorably biased toward a similar osmotic environment as they experience in vivo. The current study now examines the expression and functionality of a variety of ion channels in sfMPCs derived from normal individuals and early OA patients. Results indicated that there is differential ion channel regulation at the functional level and expression level in early OA sfMPCs. All ion channels were upregulated in early OA compared to normal sfMPCs with the exception of KCNMA1 at the mRNA level. At the protein level, TRPV4 was over expressed in early OA sfMPCs, while KCNJ12 and KCNMA1 were unchanged between normal and early OA sfMPCs. At the functional level, the inward rectifying potassium channel was under expressed in early OA sfMPCs, however the membrane potential was unchanged between normal and early OA sfMPCs. In the synovial environment itself, a number of differences in ion concentration between normal and early OA synovial fluid were observed. These findings suggest that normal and OA progenitor cells demonstrate functional differences in how they interact with the synovial ion environment.

  2. Relationship between automated total nucleated cell count and enumeration of cells on direct smears of canine synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    Dusick, Allison; Young, Karen M.; Muir, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Canine osteoarthritis is a common condition seen in veterinary clinical practice and causes considerable morbidity in dogs as they age. Synovial fluid analysis is an important tool for diagnosis and treatment of canine joint disease and obtaining a total nucleated cell count (TNCC) is particularly important. The low volume of fluid obtained during arthrocentesis is often insufficient for obtaining an automated TNCC, thereby limiting sample interpretation. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether estimation of TNCC in canine synovial fluid could be achieved by performing manual cell counts on direct smears of fluid. Fifty eight synovial fluid samples, taken by arthrocentesis from 48 dogs, were included in the study. Direct smears of synovial fluid were prepared, and hyaluronidase added before cell counts were obtained using a commercial laser-based instrument. A protocol was established to count nucleated cells in a specific region of the smear, using a serpentine counting pattern; mean number of nucleated cells/400× field was then calculated. There was a positive correlation between the automated TNCC and mean manual cell count, with more variability at higher TNCC. Regression analysis was performed to estimate TNCC from manual counts. By this method, 78% of the samples were correctly predicted to fall into one of three categories (within the reference interval, mildly to moderately elevated, or markedly elevated) relative to the automated TNCC. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreement was good to excellent. The results of the study suggest that interpretation of canine synovial fluid samples of low volume can be aided by manual cell counting of direct smears. PMID:25439439

  3. In-vitro chondrogenic potential of synovial stem cells and chondrocytes allocated for autologous chondrocyte implantation - a comparison : Synovial stem cells as an alternative cell source for autologous chondrocyte implantation.

    PubMed

    Kubosch, Eva Johanna; Heidt, Emanuel; Niemeyer, Philipp; Bernstein, Anke; Südkamp, Norbert P; Schmal, Hagen

    2017-05-01

    The use of passaged chondrocytes is the current standard for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI). De-differentiation due to amplification and donor site morbidity are known drawbacks highlighting the need for alternative cell sources. Via clinically validated flow cytometry analysis, we compared the expression of human stem cell and cartilage markers (collagen type 2 (Col2), aggrecan (ACAN), CD44) of chondrocytes (CHDR), passaged chondrocytes for ACI (CellGenix™), bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC), and synovial derived stem cells (SDSC). Primary, human BMSC and SDSC revealed similar adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation potential and stem cell marker expression. However, the expression of the chondrogenic markers Col2 and ACAN was statistically significant higher in SDSC. CHDR and SDSC expressed ACAN and CD44 equally, but Col2 was expressed more strongly on the SDSC surface. The marker expression of SDSC from osteoarthritic joints (Kellgren-Lawrence score ≥3) versus normal knees (Kellgren-Lawrence score ≤2) did not differ. Similarly, there was no difference between temporarily frozen and fresh SDSC. Col2 and ACAN surface expression declined with further passaging, whereas CD44 remained unchanged. We observed the same effect after reducing the serum content. When comparing CHDR for ACI with SDSC of the same passage (P2/3), both Col2 and ACAN, correlating with clinical outcome, were expressed higher in SDSC. In summary, SDSC demonstrated high differentiation potential and a stable chondrogenic phenotype. They might therefore be better suitable for ACI than BMSC or passaged CHDR.

  4. Keratin subsets in spindle cell sarcomas. Keratins are widespread but synovial sarcoma contains a distinctive keratin polypeptide pattern and desmoplakins.

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, M.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of individual keratin polypeptides and desmoplakins was immunohistochemically studied in 25 spindle cell sarcomas of different types using acetone-fixed frozen sections. Results revealed that keratins 8 and 18 were present in a high number of tumors: 9 of 9 synovial sarcomas, 5 of 7 leiomyosarcomas, 5 of 5 malignant schwannomas, and 1 of 4 undifferentiated spindle cell sarcomas. In addition to keratins 8 and 18, the glandular component of synovial sarcoma showed prominent reactivity with antibodies to keratins 7 and 19. Also the glandular epithelial cells in synovial sarcoma showed desmoplakin immunoreactivity preferentially in a luminal distribution, but desmoplakin was absent in other spindle cell sarcomas. Furthermore keratin 13 was seen focally in 4 of 9 synovial sarcomas. In contrast, keratins 7, 13, and 19 were practically absent in leiomyosarcomas, malignant schwannomas, and undifferentiated spindle cell sarcomas. The widespread presence of keratins 8 and 18 in various spindle cell sarcomas may reflect aberrant keratin expression in mesenchymal cells, previously described in cultured transformed fibroblasts. The presence of keratins 7 and 19 and desmoplakin is highly associated with morphologically observable epithelial differentiation restricted to synovial sarcoma among spindle cell sarcomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1704194

  5. Effects of hyaluronan treatment on lipopolysaccharide-challenged fibroblast-like synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Kelly S; Johnson, Amanda L; Ruppert, Amy S; Bertone, Alicia L

    2007-01-01

    Numerous investigations have reported the efficacy of exogenous hyaluronan (HA) in modulating acute and chronic inflammation. The current study was performed to determine the in vitro effects of lower and higher molecular weight HA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged fibroblast-like synovial cells. Normal synovial fibroblasts were cultured in triplicate to one of four groups: group 1, unchallenged; group 2, LPS-challenged (20 ng/ml); group 3, LPS-challenged following preteatment and sustained treatment with lower molecular weight HA; and group 4, LPS-challenged following pretreatment and sustained treatment with higher molecular weight HA. The response to LPS challenge and the influence of HA were compared among the four groups using cellular morphology scoring, cell number, cell viability, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, IL-6 production, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) production, and gene expression microarray analysis. As expected, our results demonstrated that LPS challenge induced a loss of characteristic fibroblast-like synovial cell culture morphology (P < 0.05), decreased the cell number (P < 0.05), increased PGE2 production 1,000-fold (P < 0.05), increased IL-6 production 15-fold (P < 0.05), increased MMP3 production threefold (P < 0.05), and generated a profile of gene expression changes typical of LPS (P < 0.005). Importantly, LPS exposure at this concentration did not alter the cell viability. Higher molecular weight HA decreased the morphologic change (P < 0.05) associated with LPS exposure. Both lower and higher molecular weight HA significantly altered a similar set of 21 probe sets (P < 0.005), which represented decreased expression of inflammatory genes (PGE2, IL-6) and catabolic genes (MMP3) and represented increased expression of anti-inflammatory and anabolic genes. The molecular weight of the HA product did not affect the cell number, the cell viability or the PGE2, IL-6, or MMP3 production. Taken together, the anti-inflammatory and

  6. Synovial fluid differential cell count in wear debris synovitis after total knee replacement.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Carlson, Evan M; Tibbo, Meagan E; Josephs, Lee; Scott, Richard D

    2014-12-01

    Determining the cause of synovitis following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be challenging. The differential diagnoses include infection, hemarthrosis, instability, crystalline disease, wear debris or idiopathic causes. Wear particle synovitis can mimic periprosthetic infection with symptoms of pain and effusion. Radiographs and physical exam are often inconclusive in differentiating the two. Synovial fluid analysis is routinely used in evaluating periprosthetic infections. We examined the association between synovial white blood cell count and differentials, and polyethylene wear and osteolysis, to see if fluid analysis can aid in establishing the diagnosis of wear particle synovitis. A cell count and differential was obtained from synovial fluid samples from 54 TKAs undergoing revision for aseptic failure. Explanted polyethylene inserts were analyzed for linear and volumetric wear, oxidation (ketone peak height), and damage features. Analysis was performed to assess the relationship between cell counts and polyethylene wear indicators as well as severity of intra-operative and radiographic osteolysis. Total and percent mononuclear (monocyte and lymphocyte) cell counts were found to be elevated in the presence of documented wear debris synovitis and an association was suggested between their levels and maximum ketone levels. The present study implies that the differential cell count of knee fluid can help distinguish wear debris from infection as a source of synovitis following TKA and identifies the value of the mononuclear cell count as a possible tool to assess abnormal wear rates of the polyethylene insert. Further research into identifying the exact role of monocytes in the wear debris synovitis and osteolytic pathways is warranted. Level II, diagnostic study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synovial cell production of IL-26 induces bone mineralization in spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Heftdal, Line Dam; Andersen, Thomas; Jæhger, Ditte; Woetmann, Anders; Østgård, René; Kenngott, Elisabeth E; Syrbe, Uta; Sieper, Joachim; Hvid, Malene; Deleuran, Bent; Kragstrup, Tue W

    2017-04-02

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) is characterized by inflammation and new bone formation and can be treated by inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-17A. IL-26 is considered a proinflammatory cytokine, predominantly related to Th17 cells. In the present study, we investigate IL-26 expression in SpA patients, and examine the in vitro production of IL-26 by synovial cells and the effects of IL-26 on human osteoblasts. IL-26 was measured by ELISA in plasma and synovial fluid (SF) of 15 SpA patients and in plasma samples from 12 healthy controls. Facet joints from axial SpA patients were stained for IL-26 and analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. Synovial fluid mononuclear cells, C-C motif chemokine receptor 6 memory Th17 cells, and fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) were isolated, and supernatants were analyzed for IL-26 content by ELISA. FLSs were further stained for IL-26 production and the myofibroblast marker α-smooth-muscle-actin (αSMA) and analyzed by flow cytometry. Human osteoblasts were cultured in the presence of IL-26, and the degree of mineralization was quantified. We found that IL-26 levels in SF were increased compared with plasma (P < 0.0001). Moreover, IL-26 expression was found in facet joints of axial SpA patients within the bone marrow. IL-26 secretion was primarily found in αSMA(+) myofibroblasts. In contrast, Th17 cells did not produce detectable amounts of IL-26. Human osteoblasts treated with IL-26 showed increased mineralization compared with untreated osteoblasts (P = 0.02). In conclusion, IL-26 seems to be produced by myofibroblasts in the inflamed synovium and could be a possible facilitator of bone mineralization in SpA.

  8. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparative proteomics study of a synovial cell line stimulated with TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Aburaya, Shunsuke; Morisaka, Hironobu; Takeda, Yumiko; Aoki, Wataru; Kitano, Sachie; Kitano, Masayasu; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Sano, Hajime; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we used proteomic analysis to determine the protein profile in a synovial cell line, MH7A, established from patients with RA. Proteins were extracted from MH7A cells that were or were not stimulated with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and then analyzed on a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry system equipped with a unique long monolithic silica capillary. On the basis of the results of this proteomic analysis, we identified 2650 proteins from untreated MH7A cells and 2688 proteins from MH7A cells stimulated with TNF-α. Next, we selected 269 differentially produced proteins that were detected only under TNF-α stimulation, and classified these proteins by performing gene ontology analysis by using DAVID as a functional annotation tool. In TNF-α-stimulated MH7A cells, we observed substantial production of plasminogen-activator inhibitor 2 and apoptosis-regulating proteins such as BH3-interacting domain death agonist, autophagy protein 5, apolipoprotein E, and caspase-3. These results indicate that the upregulation of plasminogen-activator inhibitor 2 and apoptosis-regulating proteins in synovial cells in response to TNF-α stimulation might represent a predominant factor that contributes to the pathogenesis of RA.

  10. Kingella kingae expresses type IV pili that mediate adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Miller, Sara E; St Geme, Joseph W

    2008-11-01

    Kingella kingae is a gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the respiratory tract and is a common cause of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis. Despite the increasing frequency of K. kingae disease, little is known about the mechanism by which this organism adheres to respiratory epithelium and seeds joints and bones. Previous work showed that K. kingae expresses long surface fibers that vary in surface density. In the current study, we found that these fibers are type IV pili and are necessary for efficient adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells and that the number of pili expressed by the bacterium correlates with the level of adherence to synovial cells but not with the level of adherence to respiratory cells. In addition, we established that the major pilin subunit is encoded by a pilA homolog in a conserved region of the chromosome that also contains a second pilin gene and a type IV pilus accessory gene, both of which are dispensable for pilus assembly and pilus-mediated adherence. Upon examination of the K. kingae genome, we identified two genes in physically separate locations on the chromosome that encode homologs of the Neisseria PilC proteins and that have only a low level homology to each other. Examination of mutant strains revealed that both of the K. kingae PilC homologs are essential for a wild-type level of adherence to both respiratory epithelial and synovial cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that type IV pili and the two PilC homologs play important roles in mediating K. kingae adherence.

  11. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model.

    PubMed

    Mak, J; Jablonski, C L; Leonard, C A; Dunn, J F; Raharjo, E; Matyas, J R; Biernaskie, J; Krawetz, R J

    2016-03-17

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ "super-healer" strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not.

  12. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model

    PubMed Central

    Mak, J.; Jablonski, C. L.; Leonard, C. A.; Dunn, J. F.; Raharjo, E.; Matyas, J. R.; Biernaskie, J.; Krawetz, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ “super-healer” strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not. PMID:26983696

  13. Engineering of Functional Cartilage Tissue Using Stem Cells from Synovial Lining: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    He, Fan; Kish, Vincent L.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells derived from synovial lining—synovial lining-derived stem cells or SDSCs—are a promising cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. We hypothesized that negatively selected SDSCs would form cartilage constructs and conventionally passaged SDSCs would be contaminated with macrophages, inhibiting SDSC-based chondrogenesis. We mixed SDSCs with fibrin gel and seeded the cells into polyglycolic acid scaffolds. After 3 days of incubation with a proliferative growth factor cocktail (containing transforming growth factor β1 [TGF-β1], insulin-like growth factor I [IGF-I], and basic fibroblast growth factor [FGF-2]), the cell-fibrin-polyglycolic acid constructs were transferred into rotating bioreactor systems and cultured with a chondrogenic growth factor cocktail (TGF-β1/IGF-I) for up to 4 weeks. Tissue constructs based on negatively selected SDSCs had cartilaginous characteristics; were rich in glycosaminoglycans and collagen II; exhibited high expression of mRNA and protein for collagen II, aggrecan, and Sox 9; exhibited a negligible level of mRNA and protein for collagens I and X; and had an equilibrium modulus in the range of values measured for native human cartilage. Conventional passage yielded SDSCs with contaminating macrophages, which adversely affected the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage. We thus propose functional cartilage constructs could be engineered in vitro through the use of negatively isolated SDSCs. PMID:18512111

  14. Primary synovial sarcoma of kidney: A rare tumor with an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Dassi, Vimal; Das, Krishanu; Singh, Bhupendra P.; Swain, Sanjaya K.

    2009-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a tumor of the soft tissues with a unique chromosomal translocation t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) that can be detected by polymerase chain reaction in tissue homogenates. Here we present a case of a 20-year-old female presenting PSS of the left kidney with caval thrombus. The diagnosis was corroborated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Similar cases of PSS of kidney with tumor extension in the inferior vena cava are extremely rare and to date, approximately three cases have been reported in the literature. PMID:19672366

  15. A primary intravascular synovial sarcoma causing deep-vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in a 20-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, M.; Sanad, W.; Pfitzner, B.M.; Baumann, G.; Knebel, F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary intravascular synovial sarcoma is a rare malignancy with only a few cases documented in the literature. On presentation, this tumour usually resembles a deep venous thrombosis (dvt) or pulmonary embolism (pe). Here, we report the case of a 20-year-old woman complaining of shortness of breath who had a history of dvt 6 weeks before presentation at our institution. Vascular ultrasound detected a suspicious mass in the right groin, which was identified as a monophasic synovial sarcoma by surgical biopsy. The tumour extended from the right superficial femoral vein into the common iliac vein, profound femoral vein, and great saphenous vein. It caused pe with near-total occlusion of the right pulmonary artery. After initial treatment on the cardiac intensive care unit, the patient was referred to the oncology department for neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy with doxorubicin–ifosfamide according to the Interdisziplinäre Arbeitsgemeinschaft Weichteilsarkome [Interdisciplinary AG Sarcomas] protocol and surgical resection of the tumour. No signs of tumour recurrence were found during the subsequent course of the disease, but the patient died from treatment complications approximately 15 months after initial presentation. This case underlines the importance of screening for malignancies even in young patients presenting with dvt or pe. We also recommend whole-leg compression ultrasonography in patients with suspected dvt or pe (as opposed to venography or simple four-point ultrasound examination in the groin and popliteal fossa) to detect possible underlying causes for thrombosis. PMID:26628882

  16. Rheumatoid arthritis and pigmented villonodular synovitis: comparative analysis of cell polyploidy, cell cycle phases and expression of macrophage and fibroblast markers in proliferating synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Berger, I; Weckauf, H; Helmchen, B; Ehemann, V; Penzel, R; Fink, B; Bernd, L; Autschbach, F

    2005-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) are aggressive diseases with progressive joint destruction. The present study aims to define cell cycle phases, polyploidy and the immunophenotype of proliferating synovial cells in both diseases. Synovial tissues from patients with proliferative-active RA, localized and diffuse PVNS were analysed by DNA flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence with confocal laser scan microscopy. Expression of macrophage markers (CD68/CD163), fibroblast markers (h4Ph/CD55) and Ki67 antigen was examined. Synovial cells positive for either macrophage or fibroblast markers as well as double-labelled cells were found in both RA and PVNS. In RA, CD68/CD163+ synoviocytes were preferentially located in the vicinity of the synovial lining layer, while they were more randomly distributed in PVNS. Of cases with diffuse PVNS, 20% showed an aneuploid cell pattern. All samples of localized PVNS and RA were diploid. Proliferative activity was significantly higher in aneuploid PVNS. In spite of their histologically homogeneous appearance, proliferating synovial cells display a heterogeneous immunophenotype in both RA and PVNS, indicating functional properties of both macrophages and fibroblasts. Aneuploidy seems to be a special feature of diffuse PVNS.

  17. Synovial Stem Cells and Their Responses to the Porosity of Microfibrous Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Benjamin Li-Ping; Tang, Zhenyu; Wang, Aijun; Huang, Fang; Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Dong; Chu, Julia S.; Dixit, Neerav; Yang, Li; Li, Song

    2013-01-01

    Tissue-specific stem cells can be coaxed or harvested for tissue regeneration. In this study, we identified and characterized a new type of stem cells from the synovial membrane of knee joint, named neural crest cell-like synovial stem cells (NCCL-SSCs). NCCL-SSCs showed the characteristics of neural crest stem cells: they expressed markers such as Sox10, Sox17, and S100, were clonable, and could differentiate into neural lineages as well as mesenchymal lineages, although NCCL-SSCs were not derived from neural crest during the development. When treated with transforming growth factor 1 (TGF-1), NCCL-SSCs differentiated into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), lost the expression of Sox17 and the differentiation potential into neural lineages, but retained the potential of differentiating into mesenchymal lineages. To determine the responses of NCCL-SSCs to microfibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering, electrospun composite scaffolds with various porosities were fabricated by co-electrospinning of structural and sacrificial microfibers. The increase of the porosity in microfibrous scaffolds enhanced cell infiltration in vitro and in vivo, but did not affect the morphology and the proliferation of NCCL-SSCs. Interestingly, microfibrous scaffolds with higher porosity increased the expression of chondrogenic and osteogenic genes but suppressed smooth muscle and adipogenic genes. These results suggest that the differentiation of NCCL-SSCs can be controlled by both soluble chemical factors and biophysical factors such as the porosity of the scaffold. Engineering both NCCL-SSCs and scaffolds will have tremendous potential for tissue regeneration. PMID:23523935

  18. Immunomodulatory Effects of Bee Venom in Human Synovial Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Vatanpour, Hossein; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    As in Iranian traditional medicine, bee venom (BV) is a promising treatment for the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which is considered as a problematic human chronic inflammatory disease in the present time. Smoking is considered to be a major risk factor in RA onset and severity. The main aim of this study is to investigate the effects of BV on cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory response in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Cytotoxicity of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and bee venom were determined by the tetrazolium (MTT) method in cultured synovial fibroblastes. The expression of interleukin-1β and sirtuin1 mRNA were analyzed by SYBR green real-time quantitative PCR. Differences between the mean values of treated and untreated groups were assessed by student t-test. Based on MTT assay, CSC and BV did not exert any significant cytotoxic effects up to 40 µg/mL and 10 µg/mL, respectively. Our results showed that interleukin-1β mRNA level was significantly up-regulated by CSC treatments in LPS-stimulated synoviocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, the expressions of IL-1β and Sirt1 were up-regulated even in lower concentrations of BV and attenuated at higher concentrations. Also, BV attenuated the CSC-induced and LPS-induced inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts. Our results support the epidemiological studies indicating pro-inflammatory effects of CSC and anti-inflammatory effects of BV on FLS cell line. PMID:25561937

  19. Differentiation of synovial CD-105(+) human mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocyte-like cells through spheroid formation.

    PubMed

    Arufe, M C; De la Fuente, A; Fuentes-Boquete, I; De Toro, Francisco J; Blanco, Francisco J

    2009-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into several cell lineages, some of which can generate bone, cartilage, or adipose tissue. The presence of MSCs in the synovial membrane was recently reported. Data from comparative studies of MSCs derived from various mesenchymal tissues suggest that MSCs from synovial membranes have a superior chondrogenesis capacity. Previous chondrogenic differentiation studies have used the total population of MSCs, including cells with several MSC markers, such as CD44, CD90, CD105, or CD73. However the chondrogenic capacity of an individual population of MSCs has not been examined. Our aim was to study the chondrogenic capacity of the cellular MSC subset, CD105(+), derived from synovial membrane tissues of patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and normal donors. The tissues were digested with a cocktail of collagenase/dispase and the isolated MSCs were seeded into plates. The subpopulation of CD105(+)-MSCs was separated using a magnetic separator. The MSCs were then differentiated towards chondrocyte-like cells using a specific medium to promote spheroid formation. Spheroids were collected after 14, 28, and 46 days in chondrogenic medium and stained with hematoxylin, eosin, Safranin O or Alcian blue to evaluate the extracellular matrix. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study collagen types I (COLI) and II (COLII) and aggrecan expression. Phenotypic characterization of the isolated CD105(+)-MSCs shows that these cells are also positive for CD90 and CD44, but negatives for CD34 and CD45. In addition, this cellular subset expressed Sox-9. Spheroids appeared after 7 days in culture in the presence of chondrogenic medium. Our studies show no differences between MSCs obtained from OA and normal synovial membranes during chondrogenesis. The morphological analysis of spheroids revealed characteristics typical of chondrocyte cells. The intensity of Safranin O, Alcian blue and aggrecan staining was positive and constant

  20. Brief report: enrichment of activated group 3 innate lymphoid cells in psoriatic arthritis synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Leijten, Emmerik F A; van Kempen, Tessa S; Boes, Marianne; Michels-van Amelsfort, Jocea M R; Hijnen, Dirkjan; Hartgring, Sarita A Y; van Roon, Joel A G; Wenink, Mark H; Radstake, Timothy R D J

    2015-10-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently discovered group of cells that are essential to epithelial homeostasis and are implicated in psoriasis pathogenesis, yet they have never been reported in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). ILC classes and subsets were characterized in the peripheral blood (PB) of healthy controls, patients with psoriasis, and patients with PsA and in the synovial fluid (SF) of patients with PsA and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Cell surface marker expression and intracellular cytokine production following stimulation were analyzed using flow cytometry. ILCs were identified in the SF and were 4-fold more abundant in PsA SF than in PsA PB. Fewer CCR6+ ILCs were found in PsA PB than in healthy control PB, while PsA SF was enriched for CCR6+ ILCs compared to PsA PB and RA SF. Natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp44+ group 3 ILCs were rare in PB and RA SF, but abundant in PsA SF. Increased numbers of interleukin-17A (IL-17A)-producing ILCs were present in PsA SF compared to RA SF. CCR6, NKp44, and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) were expressed on the cell surface of SF ILCs that produced IL-17A. The number of circulating NKp44+, CCR6+, and MCAM+ ILCs in blood was inversely correlated with PsA disease activity. Our findings indicate that PsA SF is enriched for group 3 ILCs that express CCR6 and NKp44, which distinguishes the synovial compartment from RA. The increased IL-17A production by SF ILCs indicates a novel role for ILCs in PsA. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  1. Evaluation of apoptosis induction in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and synovial cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Demian, Soheir R; Abo-Shousha, Seham A; Sultan, Hussein E; Zarka, Wael El

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory destructive disease involving the joint and characterized by T-lymphocyte accumulation within the synovial compartment. It is dominated by the presence of macrophages, plasma cells and synovial fibroblasts which are the main pathogenic factors leading to the destruction of bone and cartilage. The survival of these cells may be promoted by inadequate apoptosis leading to synovial hyperplasia. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the apoptosis levels before and after induction of apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb, both in peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) infiltrating mononuclear cells (MCs) of patients with RA. CD4+ T cell subsets and cell survival assays were also done to investigate correlations between these parameters. The study was conducted on 15 patients with RA, 10 individual volunteers as a control group and 10 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) as a control group for SF evaluations (have defective Fas expression on their cells). Results of this work revealed that in vitro induction of apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb resulted in increase of: percent (%) reduction of cell viability in PBMCs and SFMCs, % reduction of CD4+ T cell subsets and apoptotic cell % in all studied groups than before induction. The increase in the three parameters is only significant in SF of RA group compared to PB while it is non significant in OA group due to the defective Fas expression on OA cells. Our results also showed a significant positive correlation between CD4+ T cell and viability percentages before induction of apoptosis in SF of RA and between apoptosis levels and CD4+ T cell percentage after induction of apoptosis in the SF of RA group. In conclusion, activated T cells infiltrating SF of RA patients have functional Fas antigen which enable them to undergo in vitro apoptosis using anti-Fas mAb. The cytotoxicity of which is more specific to local lesion such as SF of RA patients suggesting that local

  2. Experimental study of super paramagnetic iron oxide labeled synovial mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fang-Yuan; Li, Hong-Hang; Chen, Chang-Hui; Bi, Sheng-Rong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and changes of biological characteristics before and after synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) labelled by super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO). The rabbit SMSCs were isolated, cultured, purified and identified in vitro. After adding the different concentrations of SPIO-labelled liquid, the cells were incubated 24 h in 37°C carbon dioxide incubator. The labeled-cell samples were observed by Prussian blue staining, transmission electron microscope (TEM) and the cell biology before and after the labeling was compared. The blue stained particles could be seen in the cytoplasm; the SPIO label was positive in 95% SMSC cells. With the concentration of the label liquid increasing, the blue-stained cytoplasm became darker. A large number of high electron density particles could be seen in the cytoplasm and in the pinocytosis vesicles by TEM, which suggested SPIO label positive. When the SPIO concentration was (12.5~50) μg/mL, the differences in cell proliferation and cell viability between the SMSCs after labelling and the SMSCs before labelling were not significant; when the concentration was over 100 μg/mL, the cell proliferation and cell viability were inhibited. A certain concentration range of SPIO can safely label the rabbit SMSC according to this study, which is important for solving the problem of tracing SMSCs in the joints.

  3. Tenidap decreases IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic peptide-1 (MCP-1) mRNA expression in the synovial tissue of rabbits with antigen arthritis and in cultured synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, I; Lopez-Armada, M J; Hernandez, P; Sanchez-Pernaute, O; Gutierrez, S; Miguelez, R; Martinez, J; Egido, J; Herrero-Beaumont, G

    1998-01-01

    Since IL-8 and MCP-1 are chemoattractant proteins that participate in the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the arthritic joint, we examined the effects of tenidap, a new anti-inflammatory drug of the oxindole family, on IL-8 and MCP-1 expression in the joints of rabbits with acute antigen arthritis. The model was induced by injecting 5 mg/ml ovalbumin into the knees of 20 preimmunized rabbits. Animals were randomized into two groups: treated with tenidap (15 mg/kg per 12 h), or untreated. The effect of tenidap treatment was evaluated on chemokine production in synovial membranes of rabbits with arthritis and in cultured monocytic and synovial cells (SC). By immunoperoxidase staining, chemokines were localized in the synovial tissue. Chemokine messenger RNA levels in the synovial membranes and in cultured cells were analysed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). At the end of the study, tenidap significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration into the joint cavity (27 ± 4 × 106 cells/ml versus 45 ± 6 × 106 cells/ml in untreated; P < 0.05), and synovial effusion (134 ± 15 μl versus 236 ± 19 μl in untreated; P < 0.005). Untreated rabbits showed synovial membrane up-regulation in mRNA expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 (11- and seven-fold versus healthy rabbits, respectively) that was markedly decreased by tenidap (two- and three-fold versus healthy rabbits, respectively). IL-8 and MCP-1 were localized in the synovial tissue in a perivascular pattern and areas of the interstitium and lining, mostly coinciding with cell infiltration. Tenidap also reduced the accumulation of IL-8 and MCP-1 proteins. In cultured synovial and monocytic cells, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) elicited an increase in gene expression of IL-8 (four- and nine-fold, respectively) and MCP-1 (nine- and four-fold, respectively) that was significantly reversed in both cell types by 10 μm tenidap. These results suggest that the beneficial effect of tenidap in acute

  4. Suppression of Dendritic Cell Maturation and T Cell Proliferation by Synovial Fluid Myeloid Cells from Mice with Autoimmune Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Egelston, Colt; Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Tryniszewska, Beata; Rauch, Tibor A.; Glant, Tibor T.; Mikecz, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether myeloid cells (such as granulocytes) present in the synovial fluid (SF) of arthritic joints have an impact on adaptive immunity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of SF cells, harvested from the joints of mice with proteoglycan (PG)-induced arthritis (PGIA), on dendritic cell (DC) maturation and antigen-specific T-cell proliferation. Methods We monitored DC maturation (MHC class II and CD86 expression) by flow cytometry upon co-culture of DCs with SF or spleen myeloid cells from mice with PGIA. The effects of these myeloid cells on T-cell proliferation were studied using T cells purified from PG-specific T cell receptor transgenic (PG-TCR-Tg) mice. Phenotypic analysis of myeloid cells was performed employing immunostaining, RT-PCR, Western blot, and biochemical assays. Results Inflammatory SF cells significantly suppressed the maturation of DCs upon co-culture. PG-TCR-Tg T cells cultured with antigen-loaded DCs showed dramatic decreases in proliferation in the presence of SF cells. Spleen myeloid cells from arthritic mice did not have suppressive effects. SF cells were unable to suppress CD3/CD28-stimulated proliferation of the same T cells, suggesting a DC-dependent mechanism. SF cells exhibited all of the characteristics of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and exerted suppression primarily through production of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species by granulocyte-like cells. Conclusion SF in the joints of mice with PGIA contains a population of granulocytic MDSCs that potently suppress DC maturation and T-cell proliferation. These MDSCs have the potential to limit the expansion of autoreactive T cells, thus breaking the vicious cycle of autoimmunity and inflammation. PMID:22492217

  5. Stromal cell markers are differentially expressed in the synovial tissue of patients with early arthritis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ivy Y; Karpus, Olga N; Turner, Jason D; Hardie, Debbie; Marshall, Jennifer L; de Hair, Maria J H; Maijer, Karen I; Tak, Paul P; Raza, Karim; Hamann, Jörg; Buckley, Christopher D; Gerlag, Danielle M; Filer, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown increased expression of stromal markers in synovial tissue (ST) of patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, ST expression of stromal markers in early arthritis in relationship to diagnosis and prognostic outcome was studied. ST from 56 patients included in two different early arthritis cohorts and 7 non-inflammatory controls was analysed using immunofluorescence to detect stromal markers CD55, CD248, fibroblast activation protein (FAP) and podoplanin. Diagnostic classification (gout, psoriatic arthritis, unclassified arthritis (UA), parvovirus associated arthritis, reactive arthritis and RA), disease outcome (resolving vs persistent) and clinical variables were determined at baseline and after follow-up, and related to the expression of stromal markers. We observed expression of all stromal markers in ST of early arthritis patients, independent of diagnosis or prognostic outcome. Synovial expression of FAP was significantly higher in patients developing early RA compared to other diagnostic groups and non-inflammatory controls. In RA FAP protein was expressed in both lining and sublining layers. Podoplanin expression was higher in all early inflammatory arthritis patients than controls, but did not differentiate diagnostic outcomes. Stromal marker expression was not associated with prognostic outcomes of disease persistence or resolution. There was no association with clinical or sonographic variables. Stromal cell markers CD55, CD248, FAP and podoplanin are expressed in ST in the earliest stage of arthritis. Baseline expression of FAP is higher in early synovitis patients who fulfil classification criteria for RA over time. These results suggest that significant fibroblast activation occurs in RA in the early window of disease.

  6. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial activity of human synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is a messenger implicated in the destruction and inflammation of joint tissues. Cartilage and synovial membrane from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) have high levels of NO. NO is known to modulate various cellular pathways and, thus, inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) of chondrocytes and induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in multiple cell types. For these reasons, and because of the importance of the synovial membrane in development of OA pathology, we investigated the effects of NO on survival, mitochondrial function, and activity of fibroblastic human OA synovial cells. Methods Human OA synovia were obtained from eight patients undergoing hip joint replacement. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as a NO donor compound and cell viability was evaluated by MTT assays. Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analyzing the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) with flow cytometry using the fluorofore DePsipher. ATP levels were measured by luminescence assays, and the activities of the respiratory chain complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and citrate synthase (CS) were measured by enzymatic assay. Protein expression analyses were performed by western blot. Results SNP at a concentration of 0.5 mM induced cell death, shown by the MTT method at different time points. The percentages of viable cells at 24, 48 and 72 hours were 86.11 ± 4.9%, 74.31 ± 3.35%, and 43.88 ± 1.43%, respectively, compared to the basal level of 100% (*p < 0.05). SNP at 0.5 mM induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane at 12 hours with a decrease in the ratio of polarized cells (basal = 2.48 ± 0.28; SNP 0.5 mM = 1.57 ± 0.11; *p < 0.01). The time course analyses of treatment with SNP at 0.5 mM demonstrated that treatment reliably and

  7. IL-15 Expression on RA Synovial Fibroblasts Promotes B Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Benito-Miguel, Marta; García-Carmona, Yolanda; Balsa, Alejandro; Bautista-Caro, María-Belén; Arroyo-Villa, Irene; Cobo-Ibáñez, Tatiana; Bonilla-Hernán, María Gema; de Ayala, Carlos Pérez; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Martín-Mola, Emilio; Miranda-Carús, María-Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to examine the role of RA Synovial Fibroblast (RASFib) IL-15 expression on B cell survival. Methods Magnetically sorted peripheral blood memory B cells from 15 healthy subjects were cocultured with RASFib. Results RASFib constitutively expressed membrane IL-15. Survival of isolated B cells cultured for 6 days, below 5%, was extended in coculture with RASFib to 52+/−8% (p<0.001). IL-15 neutralizing agents but not isotype controls, reduced this rate to 31+/−6% (p<0.05). Interestingly, rhIL-15 had no effect on isolated B cells but significantly increased their survival in coculture with RASFib. In parallel, B cell IL-15R chains were upregulated in cocultures. BAFF and VCAM-1, that are expressed on RASFib, were tested as potential candidates involved in upregulating B cell IL-15R. Culture of B cells in the presence of rhBAFF or rhVCAM-1 resulted in significantly increased survival, together with upregulation of all three IL-15R chains; in parallel, rhIL-15 potentiated the anti-apoptotic effect of BAFF and VCAM-1. Both BAFF and VCAM-1 neutralizing agents downmodulated the effect of RASFib on B cell survival and IL-15R expression. In parallel, rhIL-15 had a lower effect on the survival of B cells cocultured with RASFib in the presence of BAFF or VCAM-1 neutralizing agents. Peripheral blood B cells from 15 early RA patients demonstrated an upregulated IL-15R and increased survival in cocultures. Conclusion IL-15 expression on RASFib significantly contributes to the anti-apoptotic effect of RASFib on B cells. IL-15 action is facilitated by BAFF and VCAM-1 expressed on RASFib, through an upregulation of IL-15R chains. PMID:22792388

  8. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  9. Rheumatoid synovial fluid T cells are sensitive to APO2L/TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lorenzo, María José; Anel, Alberto; Saez-Gutierrez, Berta; Royo-Cañas, María; Bosque, Alberto; Alava, María Angeles; Piñeiro, Andrés; Lasierra, Pilar; Asín-Ungría, Jaime; Larrad, Luis

    2007-01-01

    The infiltration and accumulation of T cells in the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fluid (SF) are hallmarks of disease. We aimed to assess the functional relevance of FasL and of APO2L/TRAIL in the persistence of T cells in the rheumatoid SF. We have analyzed the expression of the activation markers HLA-DR and CD69 and also of the death receptor Fas/CD95 and death ligands FasL or APO2L/TRAIL in CD3+ lymphocytes from SF of 62 RA patients, together with their sensitivity to anti-Fas mAb or to rAPO2L/TRAIL, using as controls T lymphocytes present in SF of 20 patients with traumatic arthritis. T lymphocytes infiltrated in SF of RA patients have a chronically activated phenotype, but they are resistant to Fas-induced toxicity. However, they are more susceptible to rAPO2L/TRAIL than T cells in the SF of traumatic arthritis patients. In addition, we found very low amounts of bioactive FasL and APO2L/TRAIL associated with exosomes in SF from RA patients as compared with SF from traumatic arthritis patients. The observation on the sensitivity of RA SF T cells to rAPO2L could have therapeutic implications because bioactive APO2L/TRAIL could be beneficial as a RA treatment.

  10. Flavokawain B, a kava chalcone, induces apoptosis in synovial sarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Toshinori; Eskander, Ramez N; Guo, Yi; Kim, Kap Jung; Mefford, Jason; Hopkins, Justin; Bhatia, Nitin N; Zi, Xiaolin; Hoang, Bang H

    2012-07-01

    Synovial sarcomas (SS) are soft tissue sarcomas with poor prognosis, displaying a lack of response to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Although SS cell lines have moderate chemosensitivity to isofamide and doxorubicin therapy, the clinical prognosis is still poor. In this article, we showed that flavokawain B (FKB), a novel chalcone from kava extract, potently inhibits the growth of SS cell lines SYO-I and HS-SY-II through induction of apoptosis. Treatment with FKB increased caspase 8, 9, and 3/7 activity compared to vehicle-treated controls, indicating that both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways were activated. Furthermore, FKB treatment of both cell lines resulted in increased mRNA and protein expression of death receptor-5 and the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic proteins Bim and Puma, while down-regulating the expression of an inhibitor of apoptosis, survivin in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest the natural compound FKB has a pro-apoptotic effect on SS cell lines. FKB may be a new chemotherapeutic strategy for patients with SS and deserves further investigation as a potential agent in the treatment of this malignancy.

  11. Spontaneous generation of functional osteoclasts from synovial fluid mononuclear cells as a model of inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greisen, Stinne R; Einarsson, Halldór Bjarki; Hvid, Malene; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Deleuran, Bent; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    In osteoimmunology, osteoclastogenesis is understood in the context of the immune system. Today, the in vitro model for osteoclastogenesis necessitates the addition of recombinant human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The peripheral joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) are characterized by an immune-mediated inflammation that can lead to bone destruction. Here, we evaluate spontaneous in vitro osteoclastogenesis in cultures of synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) activated only in vivo. SFMCs were isolated and cultured for 21 days at 0.5-1.0 × 10(6) cells/mL in culture medium. SFMCs and healthy control peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with RANKL and M-CSF as controls. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinucleated cells were found in the SFMC cultures after 21 days. These cells expressed the osteoclast genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and integrin β3, formed lacunae on dentin plates and secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and TRAP. Adding RANKL and M-CSF potentiated this secretion. In conclusion, we show that SFMCs from inflamed peripheral joints can spontaneously develop into functionally active osteoclasts ex vivo. Our study provides a simple in vitro model for studying inflammatory osteoclastogenesis. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from the equine synovial fluid and membrane.

    PubMed

    Prado, Aline Ambrogi Franco; Favaron, Phelipe Oliveira; da Silva, Luis Claudio Lopes Correia; Baccarin, Raquel Yvonne Arantes; Miglino, Maria Angelica; Maria, Durvanei Augusto

    2015-11-10

    Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in equines, has been reported for different tissues including bone marrow, adipose, umbilical cord, peripheral blood, and yolk sac. In regard to the MSCs derived from synovial fluid (SF) or membrane (SM), there is data available for humans, dogs, pigs, goats and horses. Especially in equines, these cells have being considered promising candidates for articular regeneration. Herein, we established and characterized MSCs obtained from equine SF and SM. Samples were obtained during arthroscopy and cultured using MEM (Minimum Essential Medium). MSCs were characterized by morphology and expression of specific markers for stem cells, pluripotency, inflammation, and cell cycle. The medium MEM was more effective (97% ± 2) to maintain both cultures. The cultures were composed by adherent cells with fibroblast-like shape, which had a growth pattern represented by a sigmoidal curve. After the expansion, the cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for stem cells, inflammatory, and cell cycle markers, and both lineages showed significant expression of CD45, Oct3/4, Nanog, CD105, CD90, CD34, CD117, CD133, TRA-1-81, VEGF, and LY6a. In contrast, there were differences in the cell cycle phases between the lineages, which was not observed in relation to the mitochondrial electrical potential. Given the large impact that joint pathology has on the athletic performance horses, our results suggested that the SF and SM are promising sources of stem cells with satisfactory characteristics of growth and gene expression that can be used in equine regenerative medicine.

  13. Distribution of T-cell receptor-bearing lymphocytes in the synovial membrane from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chaouni, I; Radal, M; Simony-Lafontaine, J; Combe, B; Sany, J; Rème, T

    1990-12-01

    Using immunohistology and monoclonal antibodies directed to the T-cell receptor (TCR) chains, we have analysed the distribution of TCR-bearing lymphocytes within the membrane of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Alkaline phosphatase staining for TCR alpha beta-bearing lymphocytes showed a distribution paralleling that of the total T cells. Staining for the TCR gamma delta chains revealed a moderate and rather homogeneous distribution of T gamma delta lymphocytes within the RA synovium. As evidenced by simultaneous staining for alpha beta and gamma delta receptors, the relative count of T gamma delta to alpha beta-expressing cells is close to the peripheral count (e.g.5%), and lower than that previously observed in the synovial fluid. Interestingly, the peripheral type V gamma 9-J gamma P rearrangement using the T gamma delta cell subset was relatively decreased in the synovial membrane, as compared to synovial fluid and peripheral blood, suggesting that the T gamma delta distribution in the rheumatoid synovium resembles a thymic-like situation.

  14. A role for plasma kallikrein-kinin system activation in the synovial recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jihong; Agelan, Alexis; Yang, Aizhen; Zuluaga, Viviana; Sexton, Daniel; Colman, Robert W.; Wu, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine whether the activation of plasma kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) mediates synovial recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in arthritis. Methods EPCs were isolated from Lewis rat bone marrow and characterized by the expression of progenitor cell lineage markers and functional property. EPCs were intravenously injected into Lewis rats bearing arthritis, their recruitment and formation of de novo blood vessels in inflamed synovium were evaluated. The role of plasma KKS was examined using a plasma kallikrein inhibitor EPI-KAL2 and an anti-kallikrein antibody 13G11. Transendothelial migration (TEM) assay was used to determine the role of bradykinin and its receptor in EPC mobilization. Results Lewis rat EPCs exhibited strong capacities to form tubes and vacuoles, and expressed higher level of bradykinin type 2 receptor (B2R) and progenitor cell markers CD34 and Sca-1. In Lewis rats bearing arthritis, EPCs were recruited into inflamed synovium at acute phase and formed de novo blood vessels. Inhibition of plasma kallikrein by EPI-KAL2 and 13G11 significantly suppressed synovial recruitment of EPCs and hyperproliferation of synovial cells. Bradykinin concentration-dependently stimulated TEM of EPCs, which was mediated by B2R, as the knockdown of B2R by silencing RNA completely blocked bradykinin-stimulated TEM. Moreover, bradykinin selectively upregulated the expression of homing receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4) in EPCs. Conclusion These observations demonstrate a novel role for plasma KKS activation in the synovial recruitment of EPCs in arthritis, acting via kallirein activation and B2R-dependent mechanisms. B2R might be involved in the mobilization of EPCs via upregulation of CXCR-4. PMID:22739815

  15. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory actions of various functional food materials including glucosamine on synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Yoshie; Someya, Akimasa; Imai, Kensuke; Nagao, Junji; Nagaoka, Isao

    2017-08-01

    The anti-inflammatory actions of glucosamine (GlcN) on arthritic disorders involve the suppression of inflammatory mediator production from synovial cells. GlcN has also been reported to inhibit the activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The present study aimed to determine the cooperative and anti‑inflammatory actions of functional food materials and evaluated the production of interleukin (IL)‑8 and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK in IL-1β-activated synovial cells, incubated with the combination of GlcN and various functional food materials containing L‑methionine (Met), undenatured type II collagen (UC‑II), chondroitin sulfate (CS), methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and agaro-oligosaccharide (AO). The results indicated that Met, UC‑II, CS, MSM and AO slightly or moderately suppressed the IL-1β-stimulated IL‑8 production by human synovial MH7A cells. The same compounds further decreased the IL‑8 level lowered by GlcN. Similarly, they slightly suppressed the phosphorylation level of p38 MAPK and further reduced the phosphorylation level lowered by GlcN. These observations suggest a possibility that these functional food materials exert an anti‑inflammatory action (inhibition of IL‑8 production) in combination with GlcN by cooperatively suppressing the p38 MAPK signaling (phosphorylation).

  16. Meniscus regeneration by syngeneic, minor mismatched, and major mismatched transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stem cells in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Okuno, Makiko; Muneta, Takeshi; Koga, Hideyuki; Ozeki, Nobutake; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Yoshiya, Shinichi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2014-07-01

    We compared the effect of syngeneic and allogeneic transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for meniscus regeneration in a rat model. Synovium was harvested from the knee joints of three strains of rats. The anterior half of the medial meniscus in both knees of F344 rats was removed and 5 million synovial MSCs derived from F344 (syngeneic transplantation), Lewis (minor mismatched transplantation), and ACI (major mismatched transplantation) were injected into the knee of the F344 rats. At 4 weeks, the area of the regenerated meniscus in the F344 group was significantly larger than that in the ACI group. Histological score was significantly better in the F344 and Lewis groups than in the ACI group at 8 weeks. DiI labeled cells could be observed in the knee joint in the F344 group, but were hardly detected in the ACI group at 1 week. The number of macrophages and CD8 T cells at synovium around the meniscus defect was significantly lower in the F344 group than in the ACI group at 1 week. Syngeneic and minor mismatched transplantation of synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration better than major mismatched transplantation in a rat meniscectmized model.

  17. TCR repertoire sequencing identifies synovial Treg cell clonotypes in the bloodstream during active inflammation in human arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Spreafico, Roberto; Consolaro, Alessandro; Leong, Jing Yao; Chua, Camillus; Massa, Margherita; Saidin, Suzan; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Arkachaisri, Thaschawee; Wallace, Carol A; Gattorno, Marco; Martini, Alberto; Lovell, Daniel J; Albani, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The imbalance between effector and regulatory T (Treg) cells is crucial in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis. Immune responses are often investigated in the blood because of its accessibility, but circulating lymphocytes are not representative of those found in inflamed tissues. This disconnect hinders our understanding of the mechanisms underlying disease. Our goal was to identify Treg cells implicated in autoimmunity at the inflamed joints, and also readily detectable in the blood upon recirculation. Methods We compared Treg cells of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis responding or not to therapy by using: (i) T cell receptor (TCR) sequencing, to identify clonotypes shared between blood and synovial fluid; (ii) FOXP3 Treg cell-specific demethylated region DNA methylation assays, to investigate their stability and (iii) flow cytometry and suppression assays to probe their tolerogenic functions. Results We found a subset of synovial Treg cells that recirculated into the bloodstream of patients with juvenile idiopathic and adult rheumatoid arthritis. These inflammation-associated (ia)Treg cells, but not other blood Treg cells, expanded during active disease and proliferated in response to their cognate antigens. Despite the typical inflammatory-skewed balance of immune mechanisms in arthritis, iaTreg cells were stably committed to the regulatory lineage and fully suppressive. A fraction of iaTreg clonotypes were in common with pathogenic effector T cells. Conclusions Using an innovative antigen-agnostic approach, we uncovered a population of bona fide synovial Treg cells readily accessible from the blood and selectively expanding during active disease, paving the way to non-invasive diagnostics and better understanding of the pathogenesis of autoimmunity. PMID:27311837

  18. Influence of electromagnetic fields on the enzyme activity of rheumatoid synovial fluid cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mohamed-Ali, H; Kolkenbrock, H; Ulbrich, N; Sörensen, H; Kramer, K D; Merker, H J

    1994-04-01

    Since positive clinical effects have been observed in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with electromagnetic fields of weak strength and low frequency range (magnetic field strength: 70 microT; frequency: 1.36-14.44 Hz), an attempt was made to analyse the effects of these electromagnetic fields on enzyme activity in monolayer cultures of rheumatoid synovial fluid cells after single irradiation of the cultures for 24 hours. We only investigated the matrix metalloproteinases (collagenase, gelatinase, proteinase 24.11 and aminopeptidases). It was found that electromagnetic fields of such a weak strength and low frequency range do not generally have a uniform effect on the activity of the different proteinases in vitro. While aminopeptidases do not show any great changes in activity, the peptidases hydrolysing N(2,4)-dinitrophenyl-peptide exhibit a distinct increase in activity in the late phase in culture medium without fetal calf serum. In the presence of fetal calf serum this effect is not observed and enzyme activity is diminished. Our experiments do not show whether such a phase-bound increase in the activity of proteinases in vitro is only one finding in a much broader range of effects of electromagnetic fields, or whether it is a specific effect of weak pulsed magnetic fields of 285 +/- 33 nT on enzyme activity after single irradiation. This question requires further elucidation.

  19. Synovial fluid antigen-presenting cells unmask peripheral blood T cell responses to bacterial antigens in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Life, P F; Viner, N J; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1990-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells (MC) from patients with both reactive arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides proliferate in vitro in response to bacteria clinically associated with the triggering of reactive arthritis. In all cases, such SFMC responses are greater than the corresponding peripheral blood (PB) MC responses, often markedly so, and the mechanism for this is unclear. We have investigated this phenomenon by comparing the relative abilities of irradiated non-T cells derived from PB and SF to support autologous T cell responses to ReA-associated bacteria. Seven patients whose SFMC had been shown previously to respond to bacteria were studied. We demonstrate antigen-specific responses of PB T cells to bacteria in the presence of SF non-T cells which are in marked contrast to the minimal responses of either unfractionated PBMC or PB T cells reconstituted with PB non-T cells. We also show that PB, but not SF T cells respond strongly to autologous SF non-T cells in the absence of antigen or mitogen. These findings demonstrate that SF antigen-presenting cells (APC) are potent activators of PB T cells. We conclude that the contrasting responses of SFMC and PBMC to bacterial antigens may be accounted for at least in part by an enhanced ability of SF APC to support T cell proliferative responses. PMID:2311298

  20. Transcriptional network profile on synovial fluid T cells in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fiocco, Ugo; Martini, Veronica; Accordi, Benedetta; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Oliviero, Francesca; Scanu, Anna; Facco, Monica; Boso, Daniele; Gatto, Mariele; Felicetti, Mara; Frallonardo, Paola; Ramonda, Roberta; Piva, Lucia; Zambello, Renato; Agostini, Carlo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Basso, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the study was to quantify the transcriptional profile, as the main T cell lineage-transcription factors on synovial fluid (SF) T cells, in relation to SF cytokines and T cell frequencies (%) of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Reverse phase protein array was employed to identify interleukin (IL)-23Rp19-, FOXP3- and related orphan receptor gamma T (RORγt)- protein and Janus associated tyrosine kinases 1 (JAK1), signal transducer and activator and transcription 1 (STAT1), STAT3 and STAT5 phosphoproteins in total T cell lysates from SF of PsA patients. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-21 and interferon (INF)-γ were measured using a multiplex bead immunoassay in SF from PsA patients and peripheral blood (PB) from healthy controls (HC). Frequencies of CD4(+)CD25(-), CD4(+)CD25(high) FOXP3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(high) CD127(low) Treg, and either mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of FOXP3(+) on CD4(+) Treg or MFI of classic IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) α expression on CD4(+)CD25(-) helper/effector T cells (Th/eff) and Treg cells, were quantified in SF of PsA patients and in PB from HC by flow cytometry (FC). In PsA SF samples, IL-2, IL-21 and IFN-γ were not detectable, whereas IL-6 and IL-1β levels were higher than in SF of non-inflammatory osteoarthritis patients. Higher levels of IL-23R-, FOXP3- and RORγt proteins and JAK1, STAT1, STAT3 and STAT5 were found in total T cells from SF of PsA patients compared with PB from HC. Direct correlations between JAK1 Y1022/Y1023 and STAT5 Y694, and STAT3 Y705 and IL6, were found in SF of PsA patients. Increased proportion of CD4(+)CD25(high) FOXP3(+) and CD4(+)CD25(high) CD127(low) Treg cells and brighter MFI of IL-6Rα were observed both on CD4(+)CD25(high)- and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells in PsA SF. The study showed a distinctive JAK1/STAT3/STAT5 transcriptional network on T cells in the joint microenvironment, outlining the interplay of IL-6, IL-23, IL-1β and γC cytokines in the polarization and plasticity of Th17 and Treg cells

  1. Arthroscopic, histological and MRI analyses of cartilage repair after a minimally invasive method of transplantation of allogeneic synovial mesenchymal stromal cells into cartilage defects in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tomomasa; Sekiya, Ichiro; Muneta, Takeshi; Hatsushika, Daisuke; Horie, Masafumi; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Atsuya; Hishikawa, Shuji; Fujimoto, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Hozumi; Kobayashi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Background aims Transplantation of synovial mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) may induce repair of cartilage defects. We transplanted synovial MSCs into cartilage defects using a simple method and investigated its usefulness and repair process in a pig model. Methods The chondrogenic potential of the porcine MSCs was compared in vitro. Cartilage defects were created in both knees of seven pigs, and divided into MSCs treated and non-treated control knees. Synovial MSCs were injected into the defect, and the knee was kept immobilized for 10 min before wound closure. To visualize the actual delivery and adhesion of the cells, fluorescence-labeled synovial MSCs from transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP) pig were injected into the defect in a subgroup of two pigs. In these two animals, the wounds were closed before MSCs were injected and observed for 10 min under arthroscopic control. The defects were analyzed sequentially arthroscopically, histologically and by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 3 months. Results Synovial MSCs had a higher chondrogenic potential in vitro than the other MSCs examined. Arthroscopic observations showed adhesion of synovial MSCs and membrane formation on the cartilage defects before cartilage repair. Quantification analyses for arthroscopy, histology and MRI revealed a better outcome in the MSC-treated knees than in the non-treated control knees. Conclusions Leaving a synovial MSC suspension in cartilage defects for 10 min made it possible for cells to adhere in the defect in a porcine cartilage defect model. The cartilage defect was first covered with membrane, then the cartilage matrix emerged after transplantation of synovial MSCs. PMID:22309371

  2. Primary synovial sarcoma of the heart: a cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis combining RT-PCR and COBRA-FISH of a case with a complex karyotype.

    PubMed

    Hazelbag, Hans Martin; Szuhai, Károly; Tanke, Hans J; Rosenberg, Carla; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W

    2004-11-01

    Synovial sarcomas usually occur in the soft tissues of the extremities of adolescents and middle-aged patients, in the vicinity of large joints. We present a patient with a synovial sarcoma of the left atrium and ventricle, which is an extremely rare location. Diagnosis was confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), showing the t(X;18) fusion transcript. With a multicolor COmbined Binary RAtio labeling Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (COBRA-FISH) technique, a complex karyotype evolved with identification of derivative chromosomes with multiplex rearrangements. This underscores the importance of molecular analysis of spindle cell tumors in unusual locations. Moreover, it shows that the presumed diagnostic translocation t(X;18) can be embedded in a sequence of other chromosomal rearrangements of which the function is as yet unknown.

  3. Synovial osteolipoma.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Radha; Satya, Josyula Venkata; Afroz, Tameem

    2016-01-01

    Intraarticular synovial osteolipoma is an extremely rare tumor. Only two cases have been reported earlier to the best of our knowledge. It is a rare histological variant of lipoma, which contains mature lamellar bone. The largest tumor reported so far in the joint is 3 cm × 4 cm. Knee is a most common site. We report a large osteolipoma measuring 12 cm × 10 cm in the knee.

  4. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and suppression of inflammatory response by cell stretching in rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kunanusornchai, Wanlop; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-12-01

    Joint mobilization is known to be beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of stretching on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and its role in modulating inflammation in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretching of isolated rabbit synovial fibroblasts for ten min was performed. Stretching-induced AMPK activation, its underlying mechanism, and its anti-inflammatory effect were investigated using Western blot. Static stretching at 20 % of initial length resulted in AMPK activation characterized by expression of phosphorylated AMPK and phosphorylated acetyl-Co A carboxylase. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation peaked 1 h after stretching and declined toward resting activity. Using cell viability assays, static stretching did not appear to cause cellular damage. Activation of AMPK involves Ca(2+) influx via a mechanosensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel, which subsequently raises intracellular Ca(2+) and activates AMPK via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Interestingly, stretching suppressed TNFα-induced expression of COX-2, iNOS, and phosphorylated NF-κB. These effects were prevented by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that mechanical stretching suppressed inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts via a L-type Ca(2+)-channel-CaMKKβ-AMPK-dependent pathway which may underlie joint mobilization's ability to alleviate OA symptoms.

  5. Ceramide, a mediator of interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor α, as well as Fas receptor signalling, induces apoptosis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizushima, N.; Kohsaka, H.; Miyasaka, N.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the effects of ceramide, which is a lipid second messenger of cell surface receptors, including tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1 (IL1), and Fas receptors, on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells.
METHODS—Synovial cells from RA patients and normal skin fibroblasts were cultured with cell permeable ceramide (C2-ceramide). Apoptosis was assessed by microscopic observation of morphological changes, nuclear staining, and DNA electrophoresis. DNA synthesis was examined by thymidine incorporation.
RESULTS—C2-ceramide induced reversible morphological changes of synovial cells such as cell rounding within four hours. Subsequently, irreversible nuclear changes characteristic to apoptosis were observed at 48 hours. DNA synthesis was not promoted. The addition of ceramide exerted similar effects on cultured dermal fibroblasts.
CONCLUSION—Ceramide induced apoptosis in RA synovial cells. Ceramide could be a second messenger specific for apoptosis of RA synovial cells.

 Keywords: ceramide; apoptosis; rheumatoid arthritis PMID:9797556

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of N-acylethanolamines in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells are mediated by TRPV1 and TRPA1 in a COX-2 dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lowin, Torsten; Apitz, Martin; Anders, Sven; Straub, Rainer H

    2015-11-14

    The endocannabinoid system modulates function of immune cells and mesenchymal cells such as fibroblasts, which contribute to cartilage destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to determine the influence of N-acylethanolamines anandamide (AEA), palmitoylethanolamine (PEA) and oleylethanolamine (OEA) on several features of arthritic inflammation in vitro (human material) and in vivo (a mouse model). Immunofluorescence and western blotting were used to detect cannabinoid receptors and related enzymes. Cytokines and MMP-3 were measured by ELISA. Intracellular signaling proteins were detected by proteome profiling. Proliferation was quantified by CTB reagent. Adhesion was assessed by the xCELLigence system. After onset of collagen type II arthritis, mice were treated daily with the FAAH inhibitor JNJ1661010 (20 mg/kg) or vehicle. IL-6, IL-8 and MMP-3 (determined only in synovial fibroblasts (SFs)) were downregulated in primary synoviocytes and SFs of RA and OA after AEA, PEA and OEA treatment. In SFs, this was due to activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in a COX-2-dependent fashion. FAAH inhibition increased the efficacy of AEA in primary synoviocytes but not in SFs. The effects of OEA and PEA on SFs were diminished by FAAH inhibition. Adhesion to fibronectin was increased in a CB1-dependent manner by AEA in OASFs. Furthermore, elevation of endocannabinoids ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis in mice. N-acylethanolamines exert anti-inflammatory effects in SFs. A dual FAAH/COX-2 inhibitor, increasing N-acylethanolamine levels with concomitant TRP channel desensitization, might be a good candidate to inhibit the production of proinflammatory mediators of synovial cells and to reduce erosions.

  7. Synovial fluid mononuclear cells provide an environment for long-term survival of antibody-secreting cells and promote the spontaneous production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kerkman, Priscilla F; Kempers, Ayla C; van der Voort, Ellen I H; van Oosterhout, Maikel; Huizinga, Tom W J; Toes, René E M; Scherer, Hans U

    2016-12-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), observations point to a crucial role for (autoreactive) B cells in disease pathogenesis. Here, we studied whether cells from the synovial environment impact on the longevity of autoreactive B cell responses against citrullinated antigens. Synovial fluid mononuclear cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (SFMC/PBMC) were obtained from patients with established RA and assessed for the presence of B cell subpopulations. Cells spontaneously secreting anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA-IgG) directly ex vivo were detected by antigen-specific Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot (ELISpot) assay. SFMC and PBMC were cultured to assess the degree of spontaneous ACPA-IgG secretion. Cells surviving for several weeks were characterised by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) labelling and Ki-67 staining. Cells spontaneously secreting ACPA-IgG were readily detectable in peripheral blood and synovial fluid (SF) of patients with ACPA-positive RA. SFMC showed an up to 200-fold increase in ex vivo ACPA-IgG secretion compared with PBMC despite lower numbers of B cells in SFMC. ELISpot confirmed the presence of spontaneously ACPA-IgG-secreting cells, accounting for up to 50% (median 12%) of all IgG-secreting cells in SF. ACPA-IgG secretion was remarkably stable in SFMC cultures, maintained upon depletion of the CD20(+) B cell compartment and detectable for several months. CFSE labelling and Ki-67 staining confirmed the long-term survival of non-dividing plasma cells (PCs). This study demonstrates a high frequency of differentiated, spontaneously ACPA-IgG-secreting cells in SF. These cells are supported by SFMC for prolonged survival and autoantibody secretion, demonstrating that the synovial compartment is equipped to function as inflammatory niche for PC survival. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Expression of TIM-3 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufeng; Peng, Dayong; He, Yeteng; Zhang, Hu; Sun, Huaqiang; Shan, Shiying; Song, Yuanlin; Zhang, Shuzhen; Xiao, Hong; Song, Haihan; Zhang, Ming

    2014-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by a chronic inflammatory process that targets the synovial lining of diarthrodial joints. TIM-3 plays a key role in the negative regulation of the immune response. In this study, we investigated the expression of TIM-3 on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from systemic (peripheral blood) and local (synovial fluid) perspectives of RA. Level of TIM-3+ cells from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients as well as peripheral blood of healthy controls was measured by flow cytometry. Results showed that TIM-3 expression was significantly increased in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood of RA (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Furthermore, patients revealed even higher expression of TIM-3 in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in synovial fluid than in peripheral blood. When comparing TIM-3 level with the severity of RA, we identified that the percentage of TIM-3 on both peripheral CD4+ and peripheral CD8+ T cells was negatively correlated with disease activity score 28 (DAS28) of the patients. Similarly, TIM-3 on synovial fluid CD4+ and CD8+ T cells also revealed inverse correlation with DAS28 of the cases. Our data demonstrate a negative correlation between TIM-3 and the disease progression of RA.

  9. Comparison of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous tooth pulp.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Y; Koyama, N; Nakao, K; Osawa, K; Ikeno, M; Yamanaka, S; Okubo, Y; Fujimura, K; Bessho, K

    2016-01-01

    Populations of pluripotent stem cells were isolated from bone marrow, synovial fluid, adult dental pulp, and exfoliated deciduous teeth and their multipotentiality properties compared. Osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic differentiation potentials were examined. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and synovial fluid-derived cells (SFCs) showed the highest levels of osteogenesis as expressed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (0.54±0.094 U/mg protein and 0.57±0.039 U/mg protein, respectively; P=0.60) and by osteocalcin (BGLAP; determined by real-time RT-PCR). SFCs showed the highest levels of chondrogenesis as expressed by ALP activity (1.75±0.097 U/mg protein) and of COL2A1 and COL10A1 by real-time PCR. In terms of adipogenesis, lipid vesicles were observed in the BMMSCs and SFCs. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) exhibited neurogenesis potential, as shown by increases in expression of class III β-tubulin (TUBB3) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on RT-PCR. Variability was found in the differentiation potential corresponding to the tendency of the original tissue to differentiate. It is suggested that the cell type should be selected depending on the regenerative treatment regimen. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Autologous Bioscaffolds based on Different Concentrations of Platelet Rich Plasma and Synovial Fluid as a Vehicle for Mesencymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Garate, Ane; Sánchez, Pello; Delgado, Diego; Bilbao, Ane Miren; Muiños-López, Emma; Granero-Moltó, Froilán; Orive, Gorka; Prosper, Felipe; Pedraz, José Luis; Sánchez, Mikel

    2017-09-27

    In the field of tissue engineering, diverse types of bioscaffolds are being developed currently for osteochondral defect applications. In this work, a novel scaffold based on Platelet Rich Plasma and hyaluronic acid with Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been evaluated to observe its effect on immobilized cells. The bio-scaffolds were prepared by mixing different volumes of synovial fluid (SF) with Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) from patients obtaining 3 formulations at PRP-SF ratios of 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 (vol/vol). The live/dead staining revealed that although the cell number of each type of bioscaffold was different, this constructs provide cells with a suitable environment for their viability and proliferation. Moreover, immobilized MSCs showed their ability to secrete fibrinolytic enzymes, which vary depending on the fibrin amount of the scaffold. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the positive staining for collagen type II in all cases, proving the biologic action of synovial fluid derived MSCs together with the suitable characteristics of the bioscaffold for chondrogenic differentiation. Considering all these aspects, this study demonstrates that these cells-based constructs respresent an attractive method for cell immobilization, achieving completely autologous and biocompatible scaffolds. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 induces interleukin-10 production: immunomodulation of synovial cell cytokine profile and dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    DETANICO, T; RODRIGUES, L; SABRITTO, A C; KEISERMANN, M; BAUER, M E; ZWICKEY, H; BONORINO, C

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines are key modulators of the immune responses that take place in the inflamed synovium of arthritis patients. Consequently, substances that can reverse the inflammatory profile of the inflamed joint are potential tools for clinical management of the disease. Mycobacterial heat shock protein 70 (MTBHSP70) has been found to protect rats from experimentally induced arthritis through the induction of interleukin (IL)-10-producing T cells. In this study, we have demonstrated that MTBHSP70 induces IL-10 production in synoviocytes from arthritis patients and peripheral blood monoculear cells (PBMCs) from both patients and healthy controls. IL-10 production was accompanied by a decrease in tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production by synovial cells. Separation studies showed that the target cells were mainly monocytes. Accordingly, we observed that MTBHSP70 delayed maturation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Our results suggest that MTBHSP may act on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to modulate the cytokine response in arthritis and support an anti-inflammatory role for this protein, suggesting that it may be of therapeutic use in the modulation of arthritis. PMID:14738465

  12. Tumor regression in patients with metastatic synovial cell sarcoma and melanoma using genetically engineered lymphocytes reactive with NY-ESO-1.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F; Morgan, Richard A; Feldman, Steven A; Yang, James C; Sherry, Richard M; Dudley, Mark E; Wunderlich, John R; Nahvi, Azam V; Helman, Lee J; Mackall, Crystal L; Kammula, Udai S; Hughes, Marybeth S; Restifo, Nicholas P; Raffeld, Mark; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Levy, Catherine L; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Schwarz, Susan L; Laurencot, Carolyn; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2011-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes represents an effective cancer treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. The NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigen, which is expressed in 80% of patients with synovial cell sarcoma and approximately 25% of patients with melanoma and common epithelial tumors, represents an attractive target for immune-based therapies. The current trial was carried out to evaluate the ability of adoptively transferred autologous T cells transduced with a T-cell receptor (TCR) directed against NY-ESO-1 to mediate tumor regression in patients with metastatic melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. A clinical trial was performed in patients with metastatic melanoma or metastatic synovial cell sarcoma refractory to all standard treatments. Patients with NY-ESO-1-positive tumors were treated with autologous TCR-transduced T cells plus 720,000 iU/kg of interleukin-2 to tolerance after preparative chemotherapy. Objective clinical responses were evaluated using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Objective clinical responses were observed in four of six patients with synovial cell sarcoma and five of 11 patients with melanoma bearing tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. Two of 11 patients with melanoma demonstrated complete regressions that persisted after 1 year. A partial response lasting 18 months was observed in one patient with synovial cell sarcoma. These observations indicate that TCR-based gene therapies directed against NY-ESO-1 represent a new and effective therapeutic approach for patients with melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. To our knowledge, this represents the first demonstration of the successful treatment of a nonmelanoma tumor using TCR-transduced T cells.

  13. Donor-Matched Comparison of Chondrogenic Potential of Equine Bone Marrow- and Synovial Fluid-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Implications for Cartilage Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Mohammed; Caniglia, Christopher; Misk, Nabil; Dhar, Madhu S.

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to be useful for cartilage tissue regeneration. Bone marrow (BM) and synovial fluid (SF) are promising sources for MSCs to be used in cartilage regeneration. In order to improve the clinical outcomes, it is recommended that prior to clinical use, the cellular properties and, specifically, their chondrogenic potential must be investigated. The purpose of this study is to compare and better understand the in vitro chondrogenic potential of equine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and synovial fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SFMSCs) populated from the same equine donor. BM- and SF-derived MSCs cultures were generated from five equine donors, and the MSCs were evaluated in vitro for their morphology, proliferation, trilineage differentiation, and immunophenotyping. Differences in their chondrogenic potentials were further evaluated quantitatively using glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content and via immunofluorescence of chondrogenic differentiation protein markers, SRY-type HMG box9, Aggrecan, and collagen II. The BMMSCs and SFMSCs were similar in cellular morphology, viability, and immunophenotype, but, varied in their chondrogenic potential, and expression of the key chondrogenic proteins. The SFMSCs exhibited a significant increase in GAG content compared to the BMMSCs (P < 0.0001) in three donors, suggesting increased levels of chondrogenesis. The expression of the key chondrogenic proteins correlated positively with the GAG content, suggesting that the differentiation process is dependent on the expression of the target proteins in these three donors. Our findings suggest that even though SFMSCs were hypothesized to be more chondrogenic relative to BMMSCs, there was considerable donor-to-donor variation in the primary cultures of MSCs which can significantly affect their downstream application. PMID:28149840

  14. Intra articular synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Radha; Tameem, Afroz; Vidyasagar, J V S

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue neoplasm with a characteristic biphasic pattern. Incidence in soft tissues is 5-10%. Intra articularly synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. Fewer than 5% of all synovial sarcomas arise within the joint space. We report a case of intra articular synovial sarcoma in a young male who presented as internal derangement of the knee.

  15. Macrophages in Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Aisling; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J.; Godson, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Synovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage–pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished. Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarization in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarization, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype, and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm. PMID:22566842

  16. Differential roles of SS18-SSX fusion gene and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in synovial sarcoma cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Toernkvist, Maria; Natalishvili, Natalia; Xie Yuntao; Girnita, Ada; D'Arcy, Padraig; Brodin, Bertha; Axelson, Magnus; Girnita, Leonard

    2008-04-11

    Recently we demonstrated that the synovial sarcoma specific fusion gene SS18-SSX is crucial for cyclin D1 expression and is linked to cell proliferation. In this report we explore the role of SS18-SSX and IGF-1R for their potential functions in cellular proliferation and survival in cultured synovial sarcoma cells. We found that targeting of SS18-SSX mRNA by antisense oligonucleotide treatment drastically and rapidly decreased cell proliferation but caused only a slight increase of apoptosis. The synovial sarcoma cells were confirmed to express IGF-1R, and treatment with an IGF-1R inhibitor resulted in substantially reduced cell viability by inducing apoptosis in these cells. Conversely, inhibition of the IGF-1R resulted only in a slight to moderate decrease in DNA synthesis. In conclusion, SS18-SSX and IGF-1R seem to play important but different roles in maintaining malignant growth of synovial sarcoma cells. Whereas SS18-SSX maintains cyclin D1 and cell proliferation, IGF-1R protects from apoptosis.

  17. Diagnostic Value of T-cell Interferon-γ Release Assays on Synovial Fluid for Articular Tuberculosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xin-He; Bian, Sai-Nan; Zhang, Yue-Qiu; Zhang, Li-Fan; Shi, Xiao-Chun; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Liu, Xiao-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge. Articular TB is an important form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and its diagnosis is difficult because of the low sensitivity of traditional methods. The aim of this study was to analyze the diagnostic value of T-SPOT.TB on synovial fluid for the diagnosis of articular TB. Methods: Patients with suspected articular TB were enrolled consecutively between August 2011 and December 2015. T-SPOT.TB was performed on both synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The final diagnosis of articular TB was independent of the T-SPOT.TB result. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and likelihood ratio of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs and PBMCs were analyzed. Results: Twenty patients with suspected articular TB were enrolled. Six were diagnosed with articular TB, and 14 patients were diagnosed with other diseases. Sensitivity and specificity were 83% and 86% for T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs, and 67% and 69% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs were 71% and 92%, respectively. The PPV and NPV were 50% and 82% for T-SPOT.TB on PBMCs. Conclusion: Sensitivity, specificity, and NPV of T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs appeared higher than that on PBMCs, indicating that T-SPOT.TB on SFMCs might be a rapid and accurate diagnostic test for articular TB. PMID:27174325

  18. Increased expression of inducible co-stimulator on CD4+ T-cells in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with failed hip arthroplasties

    PubMed Central

    Matharu, G. S.; Mittal, S.; Pynsent, P. B.; Buckley, C. D.; Revell, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives T-cells are considered to play an important role in the inflammatory response causing arthroplasty failure. The study objectives were to investigate the composition and distribution of CD4+ T-cell phenotypes in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) of patients undergoing revision surgery for failed metal-on-metal (MoM) and metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) hip arthroplasties, and in patients awaiting total hip arthroplasty. Methods In this prospective case-control study, PB and SF were obtained from 22 patients (23 hips) undergoing revision of MoM (n = 14) and MoP (n = 9) hip arthroplasties, with eight controls provided from primary hip osteoarthritis cases awaiting arthroplasty. Lymphocyte subtypes in samples were analysed using flow cytometry. Results The percentages of CD4+ T-cell subtypes in PB were not different between groups. The CD4+ T-cells in the SF of MoM hips showed a completely different distribution of phenotypes compared with that found in the PB in the same patients, including significantly decreased CD4+ T-central memory cells (p < 0.05) and increased T-effector memory cells (p < 0.0001) in the SF. Inducible co-stimulator (ICOS) was the only co-stimulatory molecule with different expression on CD4+ CD28+ cells between groups. In PB, ICOS expression was increased in MoM (p < 0.001) and MoP (p < 0.05) cases compared with the controls. In SF, ICOS expression was increased in MoM hips compared with MoP hips (p < 0.05). Conclusions Increased expression of ICOS on CD4+ T-cells in PB and SF of patients with failed arthroplasties suggests that these cells are activated and involved in generating immune responses. Variations in ICOS expression between MoM and MoP hips may indicate different modes of arthroplasty failure. Cite this article: Professor P. A. Revell. Increased expression of inducible co-stimulator on CD4+ T-cells in the peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with failed hip arthroplasties. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:52–60

  19. The Impact of MicroRNA-223-3p on IL-17 Receptor D Expression in Synovial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moriya, Nozomu; Shibasaki, Seiji; Karasaki, Miki; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease affecting joints. Elevated plasma levels of microRNA-223-3p (miR-223-3p) in patients with RA are implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. This study aimed to analyze the functional role of miR-223-3p in the pathogenesis of RA by overexpressing miR-223-3p in synovial cell lines. Methods Arthritis was induced in the RA model of SKG mice by injection of ß-glucan. The histopathologic features of joints were examined using hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining. Plasma levels of miRNA were determined by panel real-time PCR analysis. Target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs in SKG mice were analyzed using miRNA target prediction algorithms. The dual-luciferase reporter system was used to evaluate the relationship between miR-223-3p and IL-17 receptor D (IL-17RD). The activity of miR-223-3p was analyzed by transfection of plasmid vectors overexpressing miR-223-3p into IL-17RD-expressing NIH3T3 and MH7A cell lines. Il6 and Il17rd mRNA expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. IL-17RD protein expression was analyzed by western blot analysis. Results We identified 17 upregulated miRNAs (fold change > 2.0) in plasma of SKG mice injected with ß-glucan relative to untreated SKG mice. Il17rd was identified as the candidate target gene of miR-223-3p using five miRNA target prediction algorithms. The transfection of plasmid vectors overexpressing miR-223-3p into NIH3T3 and MH7A cells resulted in the downregulation of Il17rd expression and upregulation of Il6 expression. Expression of miR-223-3p and Il6 mRNA in MH7A cells was upregulated; however, that of Il17rd mRNA was downregulated following TNF-α stimulation. IL-17RD expression in synovial tissues from SKG mice and RA patients was inversely correlated with the severity of arthritis. Conclusion This study is the first to demonstrate that miR-223-3p downregulates IL-17RD in both mouse and human cells; miR-223

  20. Dominant and shared T cell receptor beta chain variable regions of T cells inducing synovial hyperplasia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mima, T; Ohshima, S; Sasai, M; Nishioka, K; Shimizu, M; Murata, N; Yasunami, R; Matsuno, H; Suemura, M; Kishimoto, T; Saeki, Y

    1999-09-16

    Previously, we demonstrated the presence of at least two distinct subpopulations of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) employing a cell-transfer experiment using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. One group of patients, whose T cells derived from the rheumatoid joints, induced synovial hyperplasia (SH) in the SCID mice (the positive group). The other group did not display the induction of SH (the negative group). TCR/Vbeta gene usage analysis indicated that some dominant T cell subpopulations were oligoclonally expanding only in the rheumatoid joints, and not in the periphery of the patients of the positive group. Moreover, these T cell subpopulations were not seen in the joints of patients in the negative group or in non-RA patients. In addition, the preferential uses of certain TCR/Vbetas (Vbeta8, Vbeta12, Vbeta13, and Vbeta14) genes were demonstrated in these T cells. In this study, to investigate whether these T cells are driven by a certain antigen(s), the third complementarity determining regions (CDR3s) of TCR/Vbeta, especially Vbeta8 and Vbeta14 PCR products, were cloned and sequenced. As a result, a dominant CDR3 sequence, CASS-PRERAT-YEQ, was found in Vbeta14+ T cells from the rheumatoid joint of a patient (Patient 1) of the positive group with a Vbeta14 skew. The identical CDR3 sequence also predominated in Vbeta14+ T cells from the rheumatoid joint of another patient (Patient 7) of the positive group with a Vbeta14 skew. In addition, in the patients (Patients 4, 7, 8) of the positive group with a Vbeta8 skew, other dominant CDR3 sequences, CASS-ENS-YEQ and CASS-LTEP-DTQ, were found as in the case of Vbeta14. However, no identical CDR3 sequences were detected dominantly in the joints of the patients in the negative group or in non-RA patients. A Vbeta14+ T cell clone (TCL), named G3, with the identical CDR3 sequence, CASS-PRERAT-YEQ, was isolated successfully from Patient 1, and cell transfer of G3 with autologous irradiated peripheral

  1. Acute serum amyloid A induces migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation in synovial cells in vitro and in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Mary; Marrelli, Alessandra; Blades, Mark; McCormick, Jennifer; Maderna, Paola; Godson, Catherine; Mullan, Ronan; FitzGerald, Oliver; Bresnihan, Barry; Pitzalis, Costantino; Veale, Douglas J; Fearon, Ursula

    2010-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (A-SAA), an acute-phase protein with cytokine-like properties, is expressed at sites of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of A-SAA on chemokine-regulated migration and angiogenesis using rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cells and whole-tissue explants in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A-SAA levels were measured by real-time PCR and ELISA. IL-8 and MCP-1 expression was examined in RA synovial fibroblasts, human microvascular endothelial cells, and RA synovial explants by ELISA. Neutrophil transendothelial cell migration, cell adhesion, invasion, and migration were examined using transwell leukocyte/monocyte migration assays, invasion assays, and adhesion assays with or without anti-MCP-1/anti-IL-8. NF-kappaB was examined using a specific inhibitor and Western blotting. An RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model was used to examine the effects of A-SAA on cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis in vivo. High expression of A-SAA was demonstrated in RA patients (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced chemokine expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Blockade with anti-scavenger receptor class B member 1 and lipoxin A4 (A-SAA receptors) significantly reduced chemokine expression in RA synovial tissue explants (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced cell invasion, neutrophil-transendothelial cell migration, monocyte migration, and adhesion (all p < 0.05), effects that were blocked by anti-IL-8 or anti-MCP-1. A-SAA-induced chemokine expression was mediated through NF-kappaB in RA explants (p < 0.05). Finally, in the RA synovial/SCID mouse chimera model, we demonstrated for the first time in vivo that A-SAA directly induces monocyte migration from the murine circulation into RA synovial grafts, synovial cell proliferation, and angiogenesis (p < 0.05). A-SAA promotes cell migrational mechanisms and angiogenesis critical to RA pathogenesis.

  2. AAA-ATPase p97 suppresses apoptotic and autophagy-associated cell death in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaru; Ospelt, Caroline; Kolling, Christoph; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Kono, Michihito; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Michel, Beat A.; Gay, Renate E.; Gay, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Valosin containing protein (p97) is a chaperone implicated in a large number of biological processes including endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation and autophagy. Silencing of p97 in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) increased the amount of polyubiquitinated proteins, whereas silencing of its interaction partner histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) had no effect. Furthermore, silencing of p97 in RASFs increased not only rates of apoptotic cell death induced by TRAIL but also induced an autophagy-associated cell death during ER stress that was accompanied by the formation of polyubiquitinated protein aggregates and large vacuoles. Finally, we demonstrated an anti-arthritic effect of siRNAs targeting p97 in collagen-induced arthritis in rats. Our data indicate that p97 may be a new potential target in the treatment of RA. PMID:27623077

  3. Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome: differential diagnosis of septic arthritis by regular detection of exceedingly high synovial cell counts.

    PubMed

    Löffler, W; Lohse, P; Weihmayr, T; Widenmayer, W

    2017-03-01

    Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne syndrome was diagnosed in a 42-year-old patient, after an unusual persistency of high synovial cell counts had been noticed. Clinical peculiarities and problems with diagnosing septic versus non-septic arthritis are discussed.

  4. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  5. Synovial Sarcoma With Myoid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Qassid, Omar; Ali, Ahmed; Thway, Khin

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor with variable epithelial differentiation, which is defined by the presence of a specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation that generates SS18-SSX fusion oncogenes. Synovial sarcoma typically arises within extremity deep soft tissue (particularly around large joints) of young adults, but has been shown to occur at almost any location. When it arises in more unusual sites, such as the abdomen, it can present a significant diagnostic challenge. We describe a case of intraabdominal monophasic synovial sarcoma that immunohistochemically showed strong expression of smooth muscle actin and calponin but only very scanty cytokeratin, and which showed morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap with other spindle cell neoplasms that can arise at this site, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor and myofibrosarcoma. As correct diagnosis is of clinical and prognostic importance, surgical pathologists should be aware of the potential for synovial sarcoma to occur at a variety of anatomic sites and of its spectrum of immunoreactivity. Synovial sarcoma should be in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasms with myoid differentiation that do not fall into any definite tumor category, for which there should be a relatively low threshold for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess for the specific SS18 gene rearrangement or SS18-SSX fusion transcripts, which remain the diagnostic gold standard. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Novel insights in the regulation of CCL18 secretion by monocytes and dendritic cells via cytokines, Toll-like receptors and rheumatoid synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    van Lieshout, Antoine WT; van der Voort, Robbert; le Blanc, Linda MP; Roelofs, Mieke F; Schreurs, B Willem; van Riel, Piet LCM; Adema, Gosse J; Radstake, Timothy RDJ

    2006-01-01

    Background The T cell attracting chemokine CCL18 is produced by antigen presenting cells and a role for CCL18 has been suggested in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of these conditions, in which abundant CCL18 production is present. Although Th2 cytokines and IL-10 are known to have an effect on CCL18 production, there are several gaps in our knowledge regarding the exact regulation of CCL18 secretion, both in general and in RA. In this study we provide new insights in the regulation of CCL18 secretion by monocytes and dendritic cells. Results In contrast to a large panel of pro-inflammatory stimuli (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-10, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, IL-18, IFN-γ), T cell mimicking molecules (RANKL, CD40L) or TLR driven maturation, the anti-inflammatory IL-10 strongly stimulated DC to secrete CCL18. On freshly isolated monocytes, CCL18 secretion was induced by IL-4 and IL-13, in strong synergy with IL-10. This synergistic effect could already be observed after only 24 hours, indicating that not only macrophages and dendritic cells, but also monocytes secrete CCL18 under these stimulatory conditions. A high CCL18 expression was detected in RA synovial tissue and incubation of monocytes with synovial fluid from RA patients clearly enhanced the effects of IL-4, IL-13 and IL-10. Surprisingly, the effect of synovial fluid was not driven by IL-10 of IL-13, suggesting the presence of another CCL18 inducing factor in synovial fluid. Conclusion In summary, IL-10 synergistically induces CCL18 secretion in combination with IL-4 of IL-13 on monocytes and monocyte derived cells. The effects of IL-14, IL-13 and IL-10 are strongly enhanced by synovial fluid. This synergy may contribute to the high CCL18 expression in RA. PMID:16984635

  7. Single cell cloning and recombinant monoclonal antibodies generation from RA synovial B cells reveal frequent targeting of citrullinated histones of NETs

    PubMed Central

    Corsiero, Elisa; Bombardieri, Michele; Carlotti, Emanuela; Pratesi, Federico; Robinson, William; Migliorini, Paola; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards citrullinated antigens with generation of anti-citrullinated peptide/proteins antibodies (ACPA). Currently, the nature and source of citrullinated antigens driving the humoral autoimmune response within synovial ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) is a crucial unknown aspect of RA pathogenesis. Here we characterised the autoreactive B-cell response of lesional B cells isolated from ELS+RA synovium. Methods Single synovial tissue CD19+cells were Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted and VH/VL Ig genes cloned to generate recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) from patients with ELS+/ACPA+RA. Results RA-rmAbs immunoreactivity analysis provided the following key findings: (1) in a chIP-based array containing 300 autoantigens and in a ‘citrullinome’ multiplex assay, a strong reactivity against citrullinated histones H2A/H2B (citH2A/H2B) was observed in ∼40% of RA-rmAbs, followed by cit-fibrinogen and cit-vimentin; (2) anti-citH2A/H2B-reactive RA-rmAbs (but not anti-citH2A/H2B negative) selectively recognised neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) from peripheral blood and/or RA joint neutrophils; (3) anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET immunobinding was dependent on affinity maturation and was completely abrogated following reversion of hypermutated IgVH/VL genes to germline sequences; (4) ELS+ (not ELS−) RA synovial tissues engrafted into Severe Combined ImmunoDeficiency (SCID) mice released human anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET antibodies in association with the intra-graft expression of CXCL13 and lymphotoxin (LT)-β, two master regulators of ELS. Conclusion We provided novel evidence that B cells differentiated within synovial ELS in the RA joints frequent target deiminated proteins which could be generated during NETosis of RA synovial neutrophils including histones. Thus, NETs could represent a source of citrullinated antigens fuelling the ACPA autoimmune

  8. Single cell cloning and recombinant monoclonal antibodies generation from RA synovial B cells reveal frequent targeting of citrullinated histones of NETs.

    PubMed

    Corsiero, Elisa; Bombardieri, Michele; Carlotti, Emanuela; Pratesi, Federico; Robinson, William; Migliorini, Paola; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards citrullinated antigens with generation of anti-citrullinated peptide/proteins antibodies (ACPA). Currently, the nature and source of citrullinated antigens driving the humoral autoimmune response within synovial ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) is a crucial unknown aspect of RA pathogenesis. Here we characterised the autoreactive B-cell response of lesional B cells isolated from ELS+RA synovium. Single synovial tissue CD19+cells were Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted and VH/VL Ig genes cloned to generate recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) from patients with ELS+/ACPA+RA. RA-rmAbs immunoreactivity analysis provided the following key findings: (1) in a chIP-based array containing 300 autoantigens and in a 'citrullinome' multiplex assay, a strong reactivity against citrullinated histones H2A/H2B (citH2A/H2B) was observed in ∼40% of RA-rmAbs, followed by cit-fibrinogen and cit-vimentin; (2) anti-citH2A/H2B-reactive RA-rmAbs (but not anti-citH2A/H2B negative) selectively recognised neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) from peripheral blood and/or RA joint neutrophils; (3) anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET immunobinding was dependent on affinity maturation and was completely abrogated following reversion of hypermutated IgVH/VL genes to germline sequences; (4) ELS+ (not ELS-) RA synovial tissues engrafted into Severe Combined ImmunoDeficiency (SCID) mice released human anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET antibodies in association with the intra-graft expression of CXCL13 and lymphotoxin (LT)-β, two master regulators of ELS. We provided novel evidence that B cells differentiated within synovial ELS in the RA joints frequent target deiminated proteins which could be generated during NETosis of RA synovial neutrophils including histones. Thus, NETs could represent a source of citrullinated antigens fuelling the ACPA autoimmune response within the RA synovium. Published by

  9. Exosomes from Human Synovial-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Prevent Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shang-Chun; Tao, Shi-Cong; Yin, Wen-Jing; Qi, Xin; Sheng, Jia-Gen; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) represents a debilitating complication following glucocorticoid (GC)-based therapy. Synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSCs) can exert protective effect in the animal model of GC-induced ONFH by inducing cell proliferation and preventing cell apoptosis. Recent studies indicate the transplanted cells exert therapeutic effects primarily via a paracrine mechanism and exosomes are an important paracrine factor that can be directly used as therapeutic agents for tissue engineering. Herein, we provided the first demonstration that the early treatment of exosomes secreted by human synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SMSC-Exos) could prevent GC-induced ONFH in the rat model. Using a series of in vitro functional assays, we found that SMSC-Exos could be internalized into bone marrow derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and enhance their proliferation and have anti-apoptotic abilities. Finally, SMSC-Exos may be promising for preventing GC-induced ONFH. PMID:27766040

  10. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA/AB in human serum are potential indicators of the proliferative capacity of human synovial mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Mitsuru; Katano, Hisako; Otabe, Koji; Komori, Keiichiro; Matsumoto, Yukie; Fujii, Shizuka; Ozeki, Nobutake; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Koga, Hideyuki; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-12-10

    For expansion of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), autologous human serum is safer than fetal bovine serum in clinical situations. One of the problems with the use of autologous human serum is that its proliferative effect on MSCs varies widely between donors. The threefold goals of this study were: (1) to demonstrate an improved method for preparing human serum; (2) to identify growth factors predictive of proliferative potential; and (3) to identify a cytokine to promote MSC proliferation in human serum. Fresh blood was collected using a closed bag system containing glass beads. The bag was shaken at 20 °C for 30 minutes for rapid preparation, or kept stationary at 4 °C for 24 hours for slow preparation. Passage 0 synovial MSCs derived from four donors were cultured with 10 % conventional rapid preparation serum or modified slow preparation serum from four different donors. To perform the colony-forming unit assay, synovial MSCs were cultured in these serums. The protein expression profile in serum was analyzed using cytokine array. The candidate proteins were speculated from the correlation between the colony-forming ability and protein expression. As an evaluation of the candidate proteins, proliferation ability, surface marker phenotype and differentiation capability of synovial MSCs were examined. Compared with rapid preparation serum, slow preparation serum resulted in a significantly higher total colony number and twofold higher expression levels of nine proteins (angiopoietin-1, BDNF, EGF, ENA-78, IGFBP-2, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, PDGF-AB/BB, RANTES and TfR). Colony number was positively correlated with PDGF-AA/AB concentrations. Exogenous PDGF-AA significantly promoted proliferation of synovial MSCs, whereas PDGF receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor decreased it. Addition of PDGFs or PDGFR inhibitor did not affect surface epitopes of synovial MSCs. Pretreatment with PDGFs or PDGFR inhibitor did not affect chondrogenic, adipogenic, or

  11. CD56(+)/CD16(-) Natural Killer cells expressing the inflammatory protease granzyme A are enriched in synovial fluid from patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jaime, P; García-Guerrero, N; Estella, R; Pardo, J; García-Álvarez, F; Martinez-Lostao, L

    2017-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been involved in the pathology of different inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Inflammation is an important regulator of osteoarthritis (OA), but the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating this process are not well defined. To understand the role of NK cells in OA, we have compared the phenotype (CD56 subsets and perforin and granzyme expression) and cytotoxic function of NK cells in peripheral blood and synovial fluid from patients with OA undergoing total knee arthroplasty. In contrast to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs), the majority of NK cells from the synovial fluid were CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells. As expected the expression of the cytolytic mediators perforin and granzyme B in CD56(bright)CD16(-) cells was low and correlated with a poor cytotoxic potential against K562 sensitive target cells. Surprisingly, this low cytotoxic NK cell subset expressed high levels of granzyme A (a protease recently characterized as a key modulator of inflammation in mouse models) in synovial fluid but not in peripheral blood. The presence of the CD56(+)(bright)CD16(-) cells expressing granzyme A correlated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in synovial fluid from OA patients. Our results indicate that NK cells from the synovium of patients with OA, which present an immunoregulatory non-cytotoxic phenotype, show different phenotype comparing with NK cells from peripheral blood, especially expressing granzyme A, a pro-inflammatory molecule which may contribute to the establishment of chronic articular inflammation in this type of patients. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of MicroRNA-146 in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Miyaki, Shigeru; Okubo, Atsuko; Hashimoto, Megumi; Nishida, Keiichiro; Ochi, Mitsuo; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Objective Several microRNA, which are ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs, exhibit tissue-specific or developmental stage–specific expression patterns and are associated with human diseases. The objective of this study was to identify the expression pattern of microRNA-146 (miR-146) in synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The expression of miR-146 in synovial tissue from 5 patients with RA, 5 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and 1 normal subject was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry of tissue sections. Induction of miR-146 following stimulation with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) of cultures of human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) was examined by quantitative PCR and RT-PCR. Results Mature miR-146a and primary miR-146a/b were highly expressed in RA synovial tissue, which also expressed TNFα, but the 2 microRNA were less highly expressed in OA and normal synovial tissue. In situ hybridization showed primary miR-146a expression in cells of the superficial and sublining layers in synovial tissue from RA patients. Cells positive for miR-146a were primarily CD68+ macrophages, but included several CD3+ T cell subsets and CD79a+ B cells. Expression of miR-146a/b was markedly up-regulated in RASFs after stimulation with TNFα and IL-1β. Conclusion This study shows that miR-146 is expressed in RA synovial tissue and that its expression is induced by stimulation with TNFα and IL-1β. Further studies are required to elucidate the function of miR-146 in these tissues. PMID:18438844

  13. Characterisation of synovial fluid and infrapatellar fat pad derived mesenchymal stromal cells: The influence of tissue source and inflammatory stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, John; Wright, Karina; Roberts, Sally; Kuiper, Jan Herman; Mangham, Chas; Richardson, James; Mennan, Claire

    2016-01-01

    The infrapatellar fat pad (FP) and synovial fluid (SF) in the knee serve as reservoirs of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) with potential therapeutic benefit. We determined the influence of the donor on the phenotype of donor matched FP and SF derived MSCs and examined their immunogenic and immunomodulatory properties before and after stimulation with the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Both cell populations were positive for MSC markers CD73, CD90 and CD105, and displayed multipotency. FP-MSCs had a significantly faster proliferation rate than SF-MSCs. CD14 positivity was seen in both FP-MSCs and SF-MSCs, and was positively correlated to donor age but only for SF-MSCs. Neither cell population was positive for the co-stimulatory markers CD40, CD80 and CD86, but both demonstrated increased levels of human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) following IFN-γ stimulation. HLA-DR production was positively correlated with donor age for FP-MSCs but not SF-MSCs. The immunomodulatory molecule, HLA-G, was constitutively produced by both cell populations, unlike indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase which was only produced following IFN-γ stimulation. FP and SF are accessible cell sources which could be utilised in the treatment of cartilage injuries, either by transplantation following ex-vivo expansion or endogenous targeting and mobilisation of cells close to the site of injury. PMID:27073003

  14. Synovial sarcoma in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Israels, S.J.; Chan, H.S.L.; Daneman, A.; Weitzman, S.S.

    1984-04-01

    The clinical and radiologic findings in seven children with synovial sarcoma are described. The five boys and two girls had a mean age at presentation of 4.4 years. All seven had the lesion situated in an extremity. Plain radiographs in four revealed the presence of a soft-tissue mass with no calcification or bone and joint involvement. In two patients studied with computed tomography (CT), the primary lesions had peripheral irregular areas of enhancement with central areas of poor enhancement, reflecting the necrotic, cystic, and hemorrhagic changes found in the centers of these tumors. Although the exact margins of these lesions were difficult to define accurately even with intravenous contrast enhancement, CT is still recommended as the best imaging method for assessing the local extent of the primary tumor and is a useful tool in the planning of appropriate therapy as well as the gauging of the tumor response to ongoing treatment.

  15. Activation of ERK1/2 Causes Pazopanib Resistance via Downregulation of DUSP6 in Synovial Sarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Nobuhiko; Matsunobu, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Fukushi, Jun-ichi; Endo, Makoto; Hatano, Mihoko; Nabeshima, Akira; Fukushima, Suguru; Okada, Seiji; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2017-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a rare high-grade malignant mesenchymal tumour with a relatively poor prognosis despite intensive multimodal therapy. Although pazopanib, a multi-kinase inhibitor, is often used for advanced SS, most cases eventually become resistant to pazopanib. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of acquired pazopanib resistance in SS. To examine acquired pazopanib resistance, two SS cell lines, SYO-1 and HS-SY-II, were isolated after multiple selection steps with increasing concentrations of pazopanib. SYO-1 was also used in vivo. Then, pazopanib-resistant clones were investigated to assess potential mechanisms of acquired pazopanib resistance. Stable pazopanib-resistant clones were established and exhibited enhanced cell cycle progression, cell growth with increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and higher sensitivity than parental cells to a MEK-inhibitor, trametinib, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, addition of low-dose trametinib partially reversed the pazopanib resistance. In the pazopanib-resistant clones, dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) was downregulated. Inhibition of DUSP6 expression in parental HS-SY-II cells partially recapitulated acquired pazopanib resistance. Acquired pazopanib resistance in SS was associated with activation of ERK1/2 through downregulation of DUSP6 expression. Simultaneous treatment with pazopanib and a MEK inhibitor could be a promising strategy to overcome pazopanib resistance in SS. PMID:28350009

  16. Lupus erythematosus cell phenomenon in synovial and peritoneal fluids in systemic lupus erythematosus: smoking guns, crime scenes and a twist.

    PubMed

    Tay, Sen Hee; Nga, Min En; Koh, Dow-Rhoon; Mak, Anselm

    2015-01-01

    The presence of the lupus erythematosus (LE) phenomenon has been generally conceptualized as an in vitro occurrence where numerous damaged cells are present and substantial nucleo-phagocytosis has occurred. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the positive LE cell phenomenon has been shown to indicate active disease with major organ involvement which potentially warrants prompt and heavy immunosuppressive therapy. We report a 36-year-old woman with a known history of SLE who presented with fever, left knee effusion, polyserositis, pancytopenia, low complement and high anti-dsDNA antibody levels whose immunosuppressive treatment was escalated in view of the clinically and serologically active SLE, accompanied by the presence of LE cells in her inflammatory yet sterile left knee synovial fluid. Within 3 days of immunosuppressant escalation, her ascites worsened. While microscopic examination of the ascitic fluid also revealed LE cells, culture of the ascitic fluid later grew Candida parapsilosis. The patient subsequently responded to the addition of anti-fungal therapy into her augmented immunosuppressive regime. Coexistence of the LE cell phenomenon and infection in SLE patients has hitherto not been described. This case illustrates that infection remains to be meticulously excluded despite the presence of the LE phenomenon in the context of clinically and serologically active SLE. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Activation of ERK1/2 Causes Pazopanib Resistance via Downregulation of DUSP6 in Synovial Sarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Nobuhiko; Matsunobu, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Fukushi, Jun-Ichi; Endo, Makoto; Hatano, Mihoko; Nabeshima, Akira; Fukushima, Suguru; Okada, Seiji; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    2017-03-28

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a rare high-grade malignant mesenchymal tumour with a relatively poor prognosis despite intensive multimodal therapy. Although pazopanib, a multi-kinase inhibitor, is often used for advanced SS, most cases eventually become resistant to pazopanib. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of acquired pazopanib resistance in SS. To examine acquired pazopanib resistance, two SS cell lines, SYO-1 and HS-SY-II, were isolated after multiple selection steps with increasing concentrations of pazopanib. SYO-1 was also used in vivo. Then, pazopanib-resistant clones were investigated to assess potential mechanisms of acquired pazopanib resistance. Stable pazopanib-resistant clones were established and exhibited enhanced cell cycle progression, cell growth with increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and higher sensitivity than parental cells to a MEK-inhibitor, trametinib, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, addition of low-dose trametinib partially reversed the pazopanib resistance. In the pazopanib-resistant clones, dual specificity phosphatase 6 (DUSP6) was downregulated. Inhibition of DUSP6 expression in parental HS-SY-II cells partially recapitulated acquired pazopanib resistance. Acquired pazopanib resistance in SS was associated with activation of ERK1/2 through downregulation of DUSP6 expression. Simultaneous treatment with pazopanib and a MEK inhibitor could be a promising strategy to overcome pazopanib resistance in SS.

  18. Expression of cell cycle-related gene products in different forms of primary versus recurrent PVNS.

    PubMed

    Weckauf, Helgard; Helmchen, Birgit; Hinz, Ulf; Meyer-Scholten, Carola; Aulmann, Sebastian; Otto, Herwart F; Berger, Irina

    2004-07-08

    Expression patterns of cell cycle regulating gene products and Ki-67 in proliferating synovial cells of primary and recurrent pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) in localized and diffuse lesions were examined by immunohistochemistry. Alterations of cell cycle-related proteins were seen in 98.7% of analyzed lesions. Both RB- and p53 pathways play a role in cell cycle dysregulation in PVNS. The RB pathway was more frequently altered in primary disease, while alterations of the p53 pathway seemed to be more important in recurrent lesions, regardless of the histomorphological type of disease. Ki-67 proliferation rate was elevated in recurrent tumors. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Valgus and varus deformity after wide-local excision, brachytherapy and external beam irradiation in two children with lower extremity synovial cell sarcoma: case report

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Daniel T; Warner, William C; Neel, Michael D; Merchant, Thomas E

    2004-01-01

    Background Limb-salvage is a primary objective in the management of extremity soft-tissue sarcoma in adults and children. Wide-local excision combined with radiation therapy is effective in achieving local tumor control with acceptable morbidity and good functional outcomes for most patients. Case Presentation Two cases of deformity after wide-local excision, brachytherapy and external beam irradiation for lower-extremity synovial cell sarcoma are presented and discussed to highlight contributing factors, time course of radiation effects and orthopedic management. In an effort to spare normal tissues from the long-term effects of radiation therapy, more focal irradiation techniques have been applied to patients with musculoskeletal tumors including brachytherapy and conformal radiation therapy. As illustrated in this report, the use of these techniques results in the asymmetric irradiation of growth plates and contributes to the development of valgus or varus deformity and leg-length discrepancies. Conclusions Despite good functional outcomes, progressive deformity in both patients required epiphysiodesis more than 3 years after initial management. There is a dearth of information related to the effects of radiation therapy on the musculoskeletal system in children. Because limb-sparing approaches are to be highlighted in the next generation of cooperative group protocols for children with musculoskeletal tumors, documentation of the effects of surgery and radiation therapy will lead to improved decision making in the selection of the best treatment approach and in the follow-up of these patients. PMID:15333137

  20. Microfluidic processing of synovial fluid for cytological analysis.

    PubMed

    Krebs, John C; Alapan, Yunus; Dennstedt, Barbara A; Wera, Glenn D; Gurkan, Umut A

    2017-06-01

    Cytological analysis of synovial fluid is widely used in the clinic to assess joint health and disease. However, in general practice, only the total number of white blood cells (WBCs) are available for cytologic evaluation of the joint. Moreover, sufficient volume of synovial aspirates is critical to run conventional analyses, despite limited volume of aspiration that can normally be obtained from a joint. Therefore, there is a lack of consistent and standardized synovial fluid cytological tests in the clinic. To address these shortcomings, we developed a microfluidic platform (Synovial Chip), for the first time in the literature, to achieve repeatable, cost- and time-efficient, and standardized synovial fluid cytological analysis based on specific cell surface markers. Microfluidic channels functionalized with antibodies against specific cell surface antigens are connected in series to capture WBC subpopulations, including CD4+, CD8+, and CD66b+ cells, simultaneously from miniscule volumes (100 μL) of synovial fluid aspirates. Cell capture specificity was evaluated by fluorescent labeling of isolated cells in microchannels and was around 90% for all three WBC subpopulations. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of synovial fluid viscosity on capture efficiency in the microfluidic channels and utilized hyaluronidase enzyme treatment to reduce viscosity and to improve cell capture efficiency (>60%) from synovial fluid samples. Synovial Chip allows efficient and standardized point-of-care isolation and analysis of WBC subpopulations in miniscule volumes of patient synovial fluid samples in the clinic.

  1. Effect of cyclic tensile load on the regulation of the expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs -1, -3) and structural components in synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Raïf, El Mostafa

    2008-12-01

    Synovial cells are reported to colonize synthetic ligament scaffolds following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction but the process leading to ligamentization is poorly understood. The present study investigated the effect of cyclic tensile strain on the expression of genes involved in matrix remodelling in bovine synovial cells seeded onto an artificial ligament scaffold. Synovial cells were seeded and cultured on polyester scaffolds for 3 weeks and subsequently subjected to cyclic tensile strain of 4.5% for 1 hr at frequency of 1 Hz. Changes in the levels of expression of genes for major ligament components (type I and type III collagen) and also metalloproteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-3), and TIMP-1 were examined using RT-PCR. Additionally, metalloproteinase activity was measured using both zymography and collagenase assays. The gene expression of MMP-3 transcripts in the loaded group was almost 3-fold that observed in control group but no differences were observed in other transcripts. Consistent with these findings, MMP-3 activity increased by 85% under mechanical stimulus, and MMP-1 activity showed no changes. Over expression of MMP-3 under cyclic tensile load may mediate the proteolysis of certain substrates surrounding the ligament scaffold. This will play a critical role in facilitating cell migration, proliferation and tissue remodelling by breaking down the provisional tissue formed by the synovium, and by generating factors that induce angiogenesis and chemotactic cell migration.

  2. Effect of cyclic tensile load on the regulation of the expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs -1, -3) and structural components in synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Raïf, El Mostafa

    2008-01-01

    Synovial cells are reported to colonize synthetic ligament scaffolds following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction but the process leading to ligamentization is poorly understood. The present study investigated the effect of cyclic tensile strain on the expression of genes involved in matrix remodelling in bovine synovial cells seeded onto an artificial ligament scaffold. Synovial cells were seeded and cultured on polyester scaffolds for 3 weeks and subsequently subjected to cyclic tensile strain of 4.5% for 1 hr at frequency of 1 Hz. Changes in the levels of expression of genes for major ligament components (type I and type III collagen) and also metalloproteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-3), and TIMP-1 were examined using RT-PCR. Additionally, metalloproteinase activity was measured using both zymography and collagenase assays. The gene expression of MMP-3 transcripts in the loaded group was almost 3-fold that observed in control group but no differences were observed in other transcripts. Consistent with these findings, MMP-3 activity increased by 85% under mechanical stimulus, and MMP-1 activity showed no changes. Over expression of MMP-3 under cyclic tensile load may mediate the proteolysis of certain substrates surrounding the ligament scaffold. This will play a critical role in facilitating cell migration, proliferation and tissue remodelling by breaking down the provisional tissue formed by the synovium, and by generating factors that induce angiogenesis and chemotactic cell migration. PMID:18208560

  3. Hif-1α Knockdown Reduces Glycolytic Metabolism and Induces Cell Death of Human Synovial Fibroblasts Under Normoxic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Del Rey, Manuel J; Valín, Álvaro; Usategui, Alicia; García-Herrero, Carmen M; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Cuezva, José M; Galindo, María; Bravo, Beatriz; Cañete, Juan D; Blanco, Francisco J; Criado, Gabriel; Pablos, José L

    2017-06-16

    Increased glycolysis and HIF-1α activity are characteristics of cells under hypoxic or inflammatory conditions. Besides, in normal O2 environments, elevated rates of glycolysis support critical cellular mechanisms such as cell survival. The purpose of this study was to analyze the contribution of HIF-1α to the energy metabolism and survival of human synovial fibroblasts (SF) under normoxic conditions. HIF-1α was silenced using lentiviral vectors or small-interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes. Expression analysis by qRT-PCR and western blot of known HIF-1α target genes in hypoxia demonstrated the presence of functional HIF-1α in normoxic SF and confirmed the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a HIF-1α target even in normoxia. HIF-1α silencing induced apoptotic cell death in cultured SF and, similarly, treatment with glycolytic, but not with OXPHOS inhibitors, induced SF death. Finally, in vivo HIF-1α targeting by siRNA showed a significant reduction in the viability of human SF engrafted into a murine air pouch. Our results demonstrate that SF are highly dependent on glycolytic metabolism and that HIF-1α plays a regulatory role in glycolysis even under aerobic conditions. Local targeting of HIF-1α provides a feasible strategy to reduce SF hyperplasia in chronic arthritic diseases.

  4. Upregulated KAT7 in synovial fibroblasts promotes Th17 cell differentiation and infiltration in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shouda; Qi, Xiangbei; Li, Junke; Sang, Linchao

    2017-07-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease involving multiple cellular participants, of which synovial fibroblasts (SFs) are tightly connected with the development and progression of RA. Here, we provide evidence confirming that KAT7, an H4-specific histone acetylase, is upregulated in SFs of RA patients, which is at least attributed to the stimulation by RA-associated proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β or IFN-γ. In addition, KAT7 overexpression in cultured human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (HFLSs) induces IL-6 and TGF-β expression through an epigenetic mechanism, and in vitro T helper 17 (Th17) cell polarization cultured in these supernatants shows promoted cell differentiation. Moreover, KAT7 overexpression in HFLSs induces CCL20 expression via p44/42 MAPK pathway, whereby promoting Th17 cell migration. These two activities of KAT7 in RA SFs indicate its potential roles in accelerating RA pathology. Overall, these results demonstrate some connections between KAT7 upregulated in RA SFs and RA progression and present the inhibition of KAT7 activity as a novel therapeutic target for interfering RA disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Failure of in vitro-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells from the synovial membrane to form ectopic stable cartilage in vivo.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Cosimo; Dell'Accio, Francesco; Luyten, Frank P

    2004-01-01

    We previously reported the identification in a nude mouse assay of molecular markers predictive of the capacity of articular cartilage-derived cells (ACDCs) to form ectopic stable cartilage that is resistant to vascular invasion and endochondral ossification. In the present study, we investigated whether in vitro-differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from the synovial membrane (SM) express the stable-chondrocyte markers and form ectopic stable cartilage in vivo. Chondrogenesis was induced in micromass culture with the addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1). After acquisition of the cartilage phenotype, micromasses were implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. Alternatively, cells were released enzymatically and either replated in monolayer or injected intramuscularly into nude mice. Marker analysis was performed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Cell death was detected with TUNEL assay. Cartilage-like micromasses and released cells expressed the stable-chondrocyte markers at levels comparable with those expressed by stable ACDCs. The released cells lost chondrocyte marker expression by 24 hours in monolayer and failed to form cartilage when injected intramuscularly into nude mice. Instead, myogenic differentiation was detected. When intact TGFbeta1-treated micromasses were implanted subcutaneously, they partially lost their cartilage phenotype and underwent cell death and neoangiogenesis within 1 week. At later time points (15-40 days), we retrieved neither cartilage nor bone, and human cells were not detectable. The chondrocyte-like phenotype of human SM MSCs, induced in vitro under specific conditions, appears to be unstable and is not sufficient to obtain ectopic formation of stable cartilage in vivo. Studies in animal models of joint surface defect repair are necessary to evaluate the stability of the SM MSC chondrocyte-like phenotype within the joint environment.

  6. Primary parapharyngeal and skull base synovial sarcoma in a 13-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis radiologically misdiagnosed as a benign lesion.

    PubMed

    Zahir, Shokouh Taghipour; Sharahjin, Naser Sefidrokh; Dadgarnia, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-06-03

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare form of malignant tumour and accounting approximately for 8% of all soft tissue sarcomas. Head and neck synovial sarcomas are uncommon and parapharyngeal space involvement is extremely rare. We report a case of synovial sarcoma in the parapharyngeal space of a 13-year-old boy with a history of neurofibromatosis presented with odynophagia, ptosis and left submandibular mass. The lesion extended from retrostyloid parapharyngeal space to the skull base and foramen jugular superiorly. The first clinical and radiological impressions were carotid jugular related tumours such as schwannoma and paraganglioma.

  7. Early age renal synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Romero-Rojas, Alfredo Ernesto; Díaz-Pérez, Julio Alexander; Messa-Botero, Oscar Alberto; Neira-Mejia, Fabían Enrique

    2010-01-01

    We report a primary renal Synovial Sarcoma (SS) case and analyze its features. A 15 year old male presented with left abdominal mass and weight loss. CT scan images showed a 13 cm mass located in the lower pole of the left kidney. Renal biopsy recognized an undifferentiated neoplasm, the immunohistochemistry suggesting the probability of neuroectodermic primitive tumor versus SS. Chemotherapy and radical nephrectomy were carried out. Pathological study showed a big multilobulated necrotic tumor 22 x 13 x 12.5 cm. Histopathological study demonstrated a neoplasm composed by immature cells. Currently, patient has survived 1,8 years. A structured bibliographical search was performed in the Medline, Imbiomed and Scielo databases. The final immunohistochemistry studies gave the diagnosis of poorly differentiated renal SS small cell variety. The renal SS is extremely infrequent, with less than 40 cases reported, of which this case reports the earlier age. These tumors, when located in the kidney, represent a great diagnostic challenge that requires adequate clinical, radiological, surgical, and pathological correlation for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  8. Imatinib mesylate induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and inhibits invasion of human pigmented villonodular synovitis fibroblast-like synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Ren, Qiao; Han, Xiao-Rui; Zhang, Xiao-Nan; Wei, Bo; Bai, Xi-Zhuang

    2016-01-01

    Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) is a rare sarcoma-like disorder characterized by synovial lesions proliferation and invasion to articular cartilage for which no effective treatments are available. Imatinib mesylate (IM) is known to exert antitumor activity in some tumors, but its effects on PVNS fibroblast-like synoviocytes (PVNS-FLS) and the specific mechanism involved remain to be established. In the present study, the in vitro effects of IM on cell proliferation and survival rates were investigated in PVNS-FLS. Apoptosis induction was assessed via acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO)/(EB) and Annexin V/PI staining as well as western blotting. The invasion ability of PVNS-FLS was evaluated by Transwell invasion chambers. IM significantly inhibited survival and invasion ability of PVNS-FLS in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The drug-treated cell groups exhibited markedly higher apoptosis, which was blocked upon pretreatment with the specific caspase-9 inhibitor Z-LEHD-FMK. Expression of cleaved caspase-9 was significantly increased and the Bcl-2 family and caspase-3 were activated following treatment with IM. Our results collectively demonstrated that IM has a strong antiproliferative effect on PVNS-FLS in vitro, attributable to induction of mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis in association with activation of caspase-9/-3 and the Bcl-2/Bax family, and exhibits significant inhibition on the invasion ability of PVNS-FLS, suggesting that IM may be useful as a novel treatment of this disease.

  9. Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Density MR with arrows The clinical differential diagnosis of plica syndrome includes lateral epicondylitis (aka tennis elbow ), loose bodies... Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Radiology Corner Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Guarantor: CPT Amit Sanghi, USA, MC FS Contributors: CPT Amit...the case of a 17 year old female with elbow synovial fold syndrome (aka plica synovialis). The etiology is thought to be related to repetitive

  10. Utility of synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Synovial biopsies, gained either by blind needle biopsy or minimally invasive arthroscopy, offer additional information in certain clinical situations where routine assessment has not permitted a certain diagnosis. In research settings, synovial histology and modern applications of molecular biology increase our insight into pathogenesis and enable responses to treatment with new therapeutic agents to be assessed directly at the pathophysiological level. This review focuses on the diagnostic usefulness of synovial biopsies in the light of actual developments. PMID:19951395

  11. Outcome of intensive immunosuppression and autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis is associated with the composition of synovial T cell infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Verburg, R; Flierman, R; Sont, J; Ponchel, F; van Dreunen, L; Levarht, E; Welling, M; Toes, R; Isaacs, J; van Laar, J M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine clinical and immunological correlates of high dose chemotherapy (HDC) + autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA), refractory to conventional treatment. Methods: Serial samples of peripheral blood and synovial tissue were obtained from seven patients with RA treated with HDC and autologous peripheral blood grafts enriched for CD34+ cells. Disease activity was assessed with the Disease Activity Score (DAS), serum concentrations of C reactive protein (CRP), and human immunoglobulin (HIg) scans, and the extent of immunoablation was determined by immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence of synovium. Results: Clinical responders (n = 5) had a larger number of cells at baseline expressing CD3, CD4, CD27, CD45RA, CD45RB, and CD45RO in synovium (p<0.05), higher activity on HIg scans (p = 0.08), and a trend towards higher concentrations of CRP in serum than non-responders (n = 2). Subsequent remissions and relapses in responders paralleled reduction and re-expression, respectively, of T cell markers. A relatively increased expression of CD45RB and CD45RO on synovial CD3+ T cells was seen after HDC + ASCT. No correlations were found between DAS and changes in B cells or macrophage infiltration or synoviocytes. Conclusions: HDC + ASCT results in profound but incomplete immunoablation of both the memory and naïve T cell compartment, which is associated with longlasting clinical responses in most patients. The findings provide strong circumstantial evidence for a role of T cells in established RA, and demonstrate a role for the synovium in post-transplantation T cell reconstitution. PMID:15829573

  12. Agreement of manual cell counts and automated counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) hematology analyzer for analysis of equine synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Van de Water, Eline; Oosterlinck, Maarten; Duchateau, Luc; Pille, Frederik

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the scil Vet abc Plus(+) (SCIL Animal Care Company, Altorf, France), an impedance hematology analyzer, can accurately quantify and differentiate nucleated blood cells (NBCs) in equine synovial fluid. Synovial fluid samples (n=242) in different stages of experimentally induced inflammation were analyzed with and without hyaluronidase pretreatment and compared to manual hemocytometer counts and smear reviews. No significant effect of hyaluronidase pretreatment was observed. Total nucleated cell counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) were significantly higher compared to the manual method (P=0.02), yet the difference was small and clinically irrelevant (ratio manual/automated count equal to 0.97 with 95% CI [0.95, 1.00]). Differential cell counts of the scil Vet abc Plus(+) were not accurate. In conclusion, the scil Vet abc Plus(+) hematology analyzer is highly accurate for quantification, but not accurate for differentiation of NBCs in equine synovial fluid. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Solitary pulmonary nodule: pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Birnbaum, Ariel E; Aswad, Bassam I; Healey, Terrance T

    2014-05-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is an extremely rare primary malignancy of the lung. We present a case of a middle-aged female with PPSS that was initially discovered as an incidental indeterminate nodule on chest radiograph. Following evaluation with computed tomography (CT), the patient went on to positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT for work-up of the solitary pulmonary nodule, which demonstrated mild FDG-avidity and no other evidence of FDG-avid disease. The patient then underwent thoracotomy and right upper lobectomy for definitive treatment. Only after evaluation of the gross pathology, histology, immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics was the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma made. Importantly, the preceding PET/CT, in addition to physical exam of the upper and lower extremities, helped exclude the more common extra-thoracic soft-tissue variety of synovial sarcoma, which frequently metastasizes to lung, carrying a worse prognosis. Discussion of synovial sarcoma and PPSS follows.

  14. Antigen-presenting capacity of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Boots, A M; Wimmers-Bertens, A J; Rijnders, A W

    1994-01-01

    In normal, healthy joints, synovial fibroblasts do not express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. However, in inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, synovial fibroblasts show an abundant expression of MHC class II. Does this increase in expression have functional consequences for antigen presentation to T cells? To date, the precise role of synovial fibroblasts in antigen presentation has not been documented. Here, we show by three different examples that cultured synovial fibroblasts with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-induced MHC class II expression are capable of processing soluble protein for presentation to CD4+ T cells. First, the antigen-presenting cell (APC) function of synovial fibroblasts was studied in an autologous model. From synovial tissue of a RA patient both a fibroblast cell line and a tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific CD4+ T-cell line were generated. A dose-dependent TT response was observed only when TT was presented by IFN-gamma-pretreated synovial fibroblasts. As more direct evidence for MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation, the response of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T-cell clone isolated from rheumatoid synovial fluid was demonstrated in the presence of synovial fibroblasts. The response was DR4Dw4-restricted and could be inhibited by monoclonal antibody (mAb) to HLA-DR. In addition, the lymphokine secretion pattern of the synovial T-cell clone did not differ qualitatively upon antigen-specific stimulation using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or synovial fibroblasts as APC. In order to provide evidence for intracellular antigen processing we next examined the response of a M. leprae-specific T-cell clone with known epitope specificity. Our data suggest that synovial fibroblasts are not passive bystanders, but can become active participants in the development and maintenance of chronic inflammation. PMID:7927499

  15. Altered expression of TPP1 in fibroblast-like synovial cells might be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Yu-Feng; Zhou, Jing-Guo; Zhao, Ming-Cai; Xie, Wen-Guang; Yang, Qi-Bin; Xing, Yan; Zeng, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Hong

    2012-08-01

    We undertook this study to determine whether the altered expression of telomeric proteins TPP1 and POT1 in fibroblast-like synovial cells (FLS) could provide insights into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). FLS were isolated from patients with RA, osteoarthritis (OA) and traumatic joint disease, and cultured in vitro. TPP1 and POT1 mRNA level of FLS were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 42 RA, 23 OA and 13 healthy cases. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blot were used to detect the expression of TPP1 and POT1 protein. Expression of TPP1 and POT1 mRNA was significantly reduced in RA cases (P < 0.001, respectively), and no significant difference was observed between OA and healthy cases (P > 0.05, respectively). Confocal microscopy images showed TPP1 and POT1 proteins mainly located in nucleus of FLS. Western blot demonstrated that TPP1 protein level was significantly reduced in RA cases (P < 0.001), and POT1 protein expression was not statistical significance among RA, OA patients and healthy cases (P > 0.05). Significant negative correlation was observed between level of TPP1 mRNA and titers of anti-CCP antibody (P < 0.001), RF (P < 0.01). Altered expression of TPP1 might contribute to persistent proliferation of FLS in RA, further study on functions of telomeric proteins in RA would be needed.

  16. Modulation of Synovial Fluid-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Intra-Articular and Intraosseous Platelet Rich Plasma Administration

    PubMed Central

    Muiños-López, Emma; Sánchez, Pello; Anitua, Eduardo; Fiz, Nicolás; Aizpurua, Beatriz; Guadilla, Jorge; Padilla, Sabino; Prósper, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of intra-articular (IA) or a combination of intra-articular and intraosseous (IO) infiltration of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) on the cellular content of synovial fluid (SF) of osteoarthritic patients. Thirty-one patients received a single infiltration of PRP either in the IA space (n = 14) or in the IA space together with two IO infiltrations, one in the medial femoral condyle and one in the tibial plateau (n = 17). SF was collected before and after one week of the infiltration. The presence in the SF of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), monocytes, and lymphocytes was determined and quantified by flow cytometry. The number and identity of the MSCs were further confirmed by colony-forming and differentiation assays. PRP infiltration into the subchondral bone (SB) and the IA space induced a reduction in the population of MSCs in the SF. This reduction in MSCs was further confirmed by colony-forming (CFU-F) assay. On the contrary, IA infiltration alone did not cause variations in any of the cellular populations by flow cytometry or CFU-F assay. The SF of osteoarthritic patients contains a population of MSCs that can be modulated by PRP infiltration of the SB compartment. PMID:27818688

  17. Isolation and Characterization of Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Hip Joints: A Comparative Analysis with a Matched Control Knee Group

    PubMed Central

    Hatakeyama, Akihisa; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Tsukamoto, Manabu; Nakashima, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Eiichiro; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the characteristics of MSCs from hip and compare them to MSCs from knee. Methods. Synovial tissues were obtained from both the knee and the hip joints in 8 patients who underwent both hip and knee arthroscopies on the same day. MSCs were isolated from the knee and hip synovial samples. The capacities of MSCs were compared between both groups. Results. The number of cells per unit weight at passage 0 of synovium from the knee was significantly higher than that from the hip (P < 0.05). While it was possible to observe the growth of colonies in all the knee synovial fluid samples, it was impossible to culture cells from any of the hip samples. In adipogenesis experiments, the frequency of Oil Red-O-positive colonies and the gene expression of adipsin were significantly higher in knee than in hip. In osteogenesis experiments, the expression of COL1A1 and ALPP was significantly less in the knee synovium than in the hip synovium. Conclusions. MSCs obtained from hip joint have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. However, in matched donors, adipogenesis and osteogenesis potentials of MSCs from the knees are superior to those from the hips. Knee synovium may be a better source of MSC for potential use in hip diseases. PMID:28115945

  18. Annexin A2 is a target of autoimmune T and B cell responses associated with synovial fibroblast proliferation in patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pianta, Annalisa; Drouin, Elise E; Crowley, Jameson T; Arvikar, Sheila; Strle, Klemen; Costello, Catherine E; Steere, Allen C

    2015-10-01

    In this study, autoantibody responses to annexin A2 were found in 11-15% of 278 patients with Lyme disease, including in those with erythema migrans (EM), an early sign of the illness, and in those with antibiotic-responsive or antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis (LA), a late disease manifestation. In contrast, robust T cell reactivity to annexin A2 peptides was found only in patients with responsive or refractory LA. In LA patients, annexin A2 protein levels, which were higher in the refractory group, correlated with annexin A2 antibody levels in sera and synovial fluid. In addition, in patients with antibiotic-refractory LA who had anti-annexin A2 antibodies, synovial tissue had intense staining for annexin A2 protein, greater synovial fibroblast proliferation and more tissue fibrosis. Thus, a subset of LA patients had T and B cell responses to annexin A2, and in the refractory group, annexin A2 autoantibodies were associated with specific pathologic findings.

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived from Hip Joints: A Comparative Analysis with a Matched Control Knee Group.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Akihisa; Uchida, Soshi; Utsunomiya, Hajime; Tsukamoto, Manabu; Nakashima, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Eiichiro; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sakai, Akinori

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the characteristics of MSCs from hip and compare them to MSCs from knee. Methods. Synovial tissues were obtained from both the knee and the hip joints in 8 patients who underwent both hip and knee arthroscopies on the same day. MSCs were isolated from the knee and hip synovial samples. The capacities of MSCs were compared between both groups. Results. The number of cells per unit weight at passage 0 of synovium from the knee was significantly higher than that from the hip (P < 0.05). While it was possible to observe the growth of colonies in all the knee synovial fluid samples, it was impossible to culture cells from any of the hip samples. In adipogenesis experiments, the frequency of Oil Red-O-positive colonies and the gene expression of adipsin were significantly higher in knee than in hip. In osteogenesis experiments, the expression of COL1A1 and ALPP was significantly less in the knee synovium than in the hip synovium. Conclusions. MSCs obtained from hip joint have self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials. However, in matched donors, adipogenesis and osteogenesis potentials of MSCs from the knees are superior to those from the hips. Knee synovium may be a better source of MSC for potential use in hip diseases.

  20. Synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Scott R; Jerrard, David A

    2006-04-01

    AsA prompt and accurate diagnosis of a painful, swollen joint is imperative, primarily in the case of a septic joint, as delayed therapy may result in progression of disease or permanent loss of function. Procurement and analysis of synovial fluid (SF) are paramount in helping the clinician to determine a patient's clinical condition and further course of treatment. Measurement of white blood cell (WBC) counts, crystal analysis by polarized microscopy, and microbiologic studies including Gram stain and culture are the SF parameters that are collectively most important in the ultimate determination by a clinician of the presence or absence of an infectious or inflammatory joint. It is important for the clinician to understand and recognize the limitations of various SF parameters to minimize under-treating patients with potentially serious joint pathology.

  1. Comparison of exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells and synovial membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Wang, Yuchen; Zhao, Bizeng; Niu, Xin; Hu, Bin; Li, Qing; Zhang, Juntao; Ding, Jian; Chen, Yunfeng; Wang, Yang

    2017-03-09

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. In the past decade, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used widely for the treatment of OA. A potential mechanism of MSC-based therapies has been attributed to the paracrine secretion of trophic factors, in which exosomes may play a major role. In this study, we aimed to compare the effectiveness of exosomes secreted by synovial membrane MSCs (SMMSC-Exos) and exosomes secreted by induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs (iMSC-Exos) on the treatment of OA. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs and synovial membrane MSCs were characterized by flow cytometry. iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were isolated using an ultrafiltration method. Tunable resistive pulse-sensing analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and western blots were used to identify exosomes. iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were injected intra-articularly in a mouse model of collagenase-induced OA and the efficacy of exosome injections was assessed by macroscopic, histological, and immunohistochemistry analysis. We also evaluated the effects of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos on proliferation and migration of human chondrocytes by cell-counting and scratch assays, respectively. The majority of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos were approximately 50-150 nm in diameter and expressed CD9, CD63, and TSG101. The injection of iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos both attenuated OA in the mouse OA model, but iMSC-Exos had a superior therapeutic effect compared with SMMSC-Exos. Similarly, chondrocyte migration and proliferation were stimulated by both iMSC-Exos and SMMSC-Exos, with iMSC-Exos exerting a stronger effect. The present study demonstrated that iMSC-Exos have a greater therapeutic effect on OA than SMMSC-Exos. Because autologous iMSCs are theoretically inexhaustible, iMSC-Exos may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of OA.

  2. Hypotonic stress promotes ATP release, reactive oxygen species production and cell proliferation via TRPV4 activation in rheumatoid arthritis rat synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fen; Hui, Zhenhai; Wei, Wei; Yang, Jianyu; Chen, Ziyuan; Guo, Bu; Xing, Fulin; Zhang, Xinzheng; Pan, Leiting; Xu, Jingjun

    2017-04-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and systemic autoimmune-disease with complex and unclear etiology. Hypotonicity of synovial fluid is a typical characteristic of RA, which may play pivotal roles in RA pathogenesis. In this work, we studied the responses of RA synovial fibroblasts to hypotonic stress in vitro and further explored the underlying mechanisms. Data showed that hyposmotic solutions significantly triggered increases in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) of synoviocytes. Subsequently, it caused rapid release of ATP, as well as remarkable production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Meanwhile, hypotonic stimulus promoted the proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. These effects were almost abolished by calcium-free buffer and significantly inhibited by gadolinium (III) chloride (a mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channel blocker) and ruthenium red (a transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) blocker). 4α-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, a specific agonist of TRPV4, also mimicked hypotonic shock-induced responses shown above. In contrast, voltage-gated channel inhibitors verapamil and nifedipine had little influences on these responses. Furthermore, RT-PCR and western blotting evidently detected TRPV4 expression at mRNA and protein level in isolated synoviocytes. Taken together, our results indicated that hypotonic stimulus resulted in ATP release, ROS production, and cell proliferation depending on Ca(2+) entry through activation of TRPV4 channel in synoviocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MR imaging of synovial disorders of the knee.

    PubMed

    Chung, Christine B; Boucher, Ronald; Resnick, Donald

    2009-12-01

    Synovial membranes line the diarthrodial (movable) joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths of the body. The primary function of this specialized, vascular tissue is to serve as a filter system that lubricates and nourishes the articular structures as well as serving as a shock-absorber. The synovium is affected by a variety of disorders that can be localized to a specific articulation or can be systemic in nature. These include inflammatory, infectious, degenerative, traumatic, or neoplastic categories of disease. Further, MR imaging provides an excellent non-invasive tool for the evaluation of the synovium and synovial-based processes. This article will discuss technical considerations pertinent to the MR imaging evaluation of synovial processes in the knee; will review the synovial and bursal anatomy of the knee as well as the imaging characteristics of general synovial abnormalities and their diagnostic implications. In addition, it will review specific synovial processes and their characteristic MR imaging findings.

  4. Synovial Regulatory T Cells Occupy a Discrete TCR Niche in Human Arthritis and Require Local Signals To Stabilize FOXP3 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulou, Eirini; Lom, Hannah; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2015-01-01

    Although there is great interest in harnessing the immunosuppressive potential of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) for treating autoimmunity, a sizeable knowledge gap exists regarding Treg fate in human disease. In juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, we have previously reported that atypical CD25+FOXP3− Treg-like cells uniquely populate the inflamed site. Intriguingly, their proportions relative to CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs associate with arthritis course, suggesting a role in disease. The ontogeny of these FOXP3− Treg-like cells is, however, unknown. In this study, we interrogated clonal relationships between CD4+ T cell subsets in JIA, using high-throughput TCR repertoire analysis. We reveal that FOXP3+ Tregs possess highly exclusive TCRβ usage from conventional T cells, in blood, and also at the inflamed site, where they are clonally expanded. Intriguingly, the repertoires of FOXP3+ Tregs in synovial fluid are highly overlapping with CD25+FOXP3− Treg-like cells, indicating fluctuations in FOXP3 expression in the inflamed joint. Furthermore, cultured synovial Tregs rapidly downregulated FOXP3 protein (but not mRNA), and this process was prevented by addition of synovial fluid from JIA patients, through an IL-6–independent mechanism. Our findings suggest that most Tregs arise from a separate lineage from conventional T cells, and that this repertoire divergence is largely maintained under chronic inflammatory conditions. We propose that subsequent Treg expansions at the inflamed site creates an environment that leads to competition for limited resources within the synovium, resulting in the destabilization of FOXP3 expression in some Tregs. PMID:26561546

  5. Effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines on chondrogenesis of equine mesenchymal stromal cells derived from bone marrow or synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Zayed, M N; Schumacher, J; Misk, N; Dhar, M S

    2016-11-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into cells of mesenchymal lineage, such as chondrocytes, and have potential for use in regeneration of equine articular cartilage. MSCs instilled intra-articularly would be exposed to the inflamed environment associated with equine osteoarthritis (OA), which may compromise their function and ability to heal a cartilaginous defect. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of equine adult MSCs to differentiate into chondrocytes when stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines. MSCs derived from equine bone marrow (BM) and from synovial fluid (SF) were cultured in chondrogenic induction medium containing transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. BM-derived MSCs (BMMSCs) and SF-derived MSCs (SFMSCs) were stimulated with 100 ng/mL interferon (IFN)-γ and 10 ng/mL tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Chondrogenic differentiation was measured quantitatively with the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assay and qualitatively by immunofluorescence (IF) for SOX-9, TGF-β1, aggrecan and collagen II. The viability of equine MSCs was maintained in the presence of IFN-γ and TNF-α, but production of GAGs from both types of MSCs was decreased in stimulated medium. Exposure of BMMSCs to pro-inflammatory cytokines reduced the levels of SOX-9, TGF-β1, aggrecan and collagen II, whereas exposure of SFMSCs to these cytokines reduced the levels of aggrecan only. These data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines do not affect proliferation of MSCs, but could inhibit chondrogenesis of MSCs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Increased autophagy contributes to the inflammatory phenotype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis synovial fluid T cells.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Janneke G C; de Graeff, Nienke; Lotz, Martin; Albani, Salvatore; de Roock, Sytze; van Loosdregt, Jorg

    2017-10-01

    JIA is an autoimmune disease involving disturbed T-cell homeostasis, marked by highly activated effector T cells. Autophagy, a lysosomal degradation pathway, is crucial for maintaining cellular homeostasis by regulating the survival, differentiation and function of a large variety of cells, including T cells. The aim of this study was to examine the rate of autophagy in JIA T cells and to investigate the effect of inhibition of autophagy on the inflammatory phenotype of JIA T cells. Autophagy-related gene expression was analysed in CD4+ T cells from the SF of JIA patients and healthy controls using RNA sequencing. Autophagy was measured by flow cytometry and western blot. The effect of inhibition of autophagy, using HCQ, on the cellular activation status was analysed using flow cytometry and multiplex immunoassay. Autophagy was increased in T cells derived from the site of inflammation compared with cells from the peripheral blood of patients and healthy controls. This increase in autophagy was not induced by JIA SF, but is more likely to be the result of increased cellular activation. Inhibition of autophagy reduced proliferation, cytokine production and activation marker expression of JIA SF-derived CD4+ T cells. These data indicate that autophagy is increased in JIA SF-derived T cells and that targeting autophagy could be a promising therapeutic strategy to restore the disrupted T-cell homeostasis in JIA.

  7. Pericardial synovial sarcoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Mitsuru; Sekine, Yasuo; Koh, Eitetsu; Kume, Yuta; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Sho; Hamada, Hiromichi; Wu, Di; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-11-01

    Primary pericardial synovial sarcoma is a rare disease. We herein report a case of synovial sarcoma that originated in the epicardium. A 13-year-old male visited our hospital with a fever and chest pain. Copious pericardial effusion and a large intrapericardial tumor were detected. An open-chest tumor resection was performed. A solid nodular tumor was observed in the pericardial cavity. The tumor was a polypoid mass that was pedunculated and grew from the inner surface of the pericardium near the origin of the SVC and ascending aorta. Histologically, the tumor cells were uniformly spindle shaped, with an ovoid or oval nucleus, and formed solid, compact sheets and fascicles. A storiform pattern was also observed. Based on the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings, and the fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of rearrangement of the SYT gene, a monophasic synovial sarcoma was diagnosed. We discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this case and review the pertinent literature.

  8. IL-1β impedes the chondrogenic differentiation of synovial fluid mesenchymal stem cells in the human temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjing; Sun, Yangpeng; He, Yiqing; Zhang, Hong; Zheng, Youhua; Yao, Yu; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy has great therapeutic potential for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) cartilage repair. However, the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells in the inflammatory milieu following their delivery remains poorly understood. Synovial fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SFMSCs) are a promising resource for TMJ cartilage repair, as they are easily obtained from patients with TMJ disorders (TMD). In this study, we obtained SFMSCs from patients with TMD and expanded them in vitro; we then stimulated the cells with interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-12p. The cells expressed CD90, CD44, CD105 and CD73, and were negative for CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19 and HLA-DR. They could be induced to differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic and neurogenic lineages in vitro. Only the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were upregulated significantly following stimulation with IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-12p. Furthermore, IL-6 and IL-8 expression was driven mainly by IL-1β-dependent nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway activation, and was independent of IL-8, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-12p. IL-6 and IL-8 expression was inhibited completely by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, BAY11-7082. SRY-box 9 (SOX9) was downregulated and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)13 was upregulated upon chondrogenic differentiation induced in the cells also exposed to IL-1β. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan production was also reduced upon chondrogenic differentiation in the presence of IL-6, but not IL-8. Thus, IL-1β in the inflammatory milieu is crucial in regulating SFMSCs. In doing so, IL-1β impedes the chondrogenic differentiation of SFMSCs. The upregulation of IL-6 and NF-κB pathway activation also contribute to this biological behavior. The findings of our study indicate the potential adverse effects of IL-1β on the chondrogenic differentiation of SFMSCs, and may thus provide new insight into the pathogenesis of TMD. PMID

  9. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). VII. Established lymphoid cell line (IVPat-88) obtained from synovial fluid of a patient with aseptic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, I V; Ghenoiu, O; Tache, M; Stoicescu, M; Cajal, N

    1989-01-01

    Attempts have been made to culture mononuclear cells from synovial fluid of 8 patients with arthropathy, and have led to the development of the lymphoid cell line IVPat-88. Cell line has been propagated by serial passages for more than 14 weeks in continuous culture. The cells grew as single, free-floating individuals, or in dense clumps without adherence to glass or plastic surface. All these cells were identified as altered lymphoblasts because of their growth pattern and uniform morphology, and the presence of Epstein-Barr Viral Capsid Antigen (VCA) in 5 to 10% of the cells. The cell concentration varied during the period of culture from about 300,000 to 1,700,000 cells per ml, and mean doubling time during phases of active growth was 42 and 60 hours in MEM and RPMI 1640 tissue culture media, respectively. The methods used and the characteristics of the cell line are described.

  10. Persistence of collagen type II-specific T-cell clones in the synovial membrane of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Londei, M.; Savill, C.M.; Verhoef, A.; Brennan, F.; Leech, Z.A.; Feldmann, M. ); Duance, V. ); Maini, R.N. )

    1989-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by T-cell infiltration of the synovium of joints. Analysis of the phenotype and antigen specificity of the infiltrating cells may thus provide insight into the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. T cells were cloned with interleukin 2, a procedure that selects for in vivo-activated cells. All clones had the CD4 CDW29 phenotype. Their antigen specificity was tested by using a panel of candidate joint autoantigens. Four of 17 reacted against autologous blood mononuclear cells. Two clones proliferated in response to collagen type II. After 21 months, another set of clones was derived from synovial tissue of the same joint. One of eight clones tested showed a strong proliferative response against collagen type II. The uncloned synovial T cells of a third operation from another joint also responded to collagen type II. The persistence of collagen type II-specific T cells in active rheumatoid joints over a period of 3 years suggests that collagen type II could be one of the autoantigens involved in perpetuating the inflammatory process in rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Pulmonary synovial sarcoma with polypoid endobronchial growth: a case report, immunohistochemical and cytogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Hideki; Masuda, Shinji; Kobayashi, Chikashi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2004-08-01

    A rare case of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma with polypoid endobronchial growth in a 42-year-old Japanese woman is described. Left upper sleeve lobectomy was performed for the polypoid tumor measuring 2.5 cm in the left major bronchus and the patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Three years later, a recurrent tumor was discovered. Microscopically, this tumor was characterized by a proliferation of oval to spindle-shaped cells arranged in sheets and fascicles and covered by the thin normal bronchial epithelium. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for vimentin, and focally positive for pancytokeratin recognized by AE1/AE3, cytokeratin 7 and epithelial membrane antigen. A chimera gene, SYT-SSX1, was detected. Recently, primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an increasingly recognized clinical entity; however, most of these tumors present as a parenchymal mass. The present case is a unique example of primary synovial sarcoma of endobronchial polypoid type. This case suggests that pulmonary synovial sarcoma might originate from bronchial submucosal stromal tissue.

  12. Detection of abnormalities in the superficial zone of cartilage repaired using a tissue engineered construct derived from synovial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ando, Wataru; Fujie, Hiromichi; Moriguchi, Yu; Nansai, Ryosuke; Shimomura, Kazunori; Hart, David A; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2012-09-28

    The present study investigated the surface structure and mechanical properties of repair cartilage generated from a tissue engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells at six months post-implantation compared to those of uninjured cartilage. TEC-mediated repair tissue was cartilaginous with Safranin O staining, and had comparable macro-scale compressive properties with uninjured cartilage. However, morphological assessments revealed that the superficial zone of TEC-mediated tissue was more fibrocartilage-like, in contrast to the middle or deep zones that were more hyaline cartilage-like with Safranin O staining. Histological scoring of the TEC-mediated tissue was significantly lower in the superficial zone than in the middle and deep zones. Scanning electron microscopy showed a thick tangential bundle of collagen fibres at the most superficial layer of uninjured cartilage, while no corresponding structure was detected at the surface of TEC-mediated tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PRG4 was localised in the superficial area of uninjured cartilage, as well as the TEC-mediated tissue. Friction testing showed that the lubrication properties of the two tissues was similar, however, micro-indentation analysis revealed that the surface stiffness of the TEC-repair tissue was significantly lower than that of uninjured cartilage. Permeability testing indicated that the TEC-mediated tissue exhibited lower water retaining capacity than did uninjured cartilage, specifically at the superficial zone. Thus, TEC-mediated tissue exhibited compromised mechanical properties at the superficial zone, properties which need improvement in the future for maintenance of long term repair cartilage integrity.

  13. Delineation of in vitro chondrogenesis of human synovial stem cells following preconditioning using decellularized matrix

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Jingting; Davis, Mary E.; Pei, Ming

    2015-01-01

    As a tissue-specific stem cell for chondrogenesis, synovium-derived stem cells (SDSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage repair. However, a small biopsy can only provide a limited number of cells. Cell senescence from both in vitro expansion and donor age presents a big challenge for stem cell based cartilage regeneration. Here we found that expansion on decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM) full of three-dimensional nanostructured fibers provided SDSCs with unique surface profiles, low elasticity but large volume as well as fibroblast-like shape. dECM expanded SDSCs yielded larger pellets with intensive staining of type II collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycans compared to those grown on plastic flasks while SDSCs grown in ECM yielded 28-day pellets with minimal matrix as evidenced by pellet size and chondrogenic marker staining, which was confirmed by both biochemical data and real-time PCR data. Our results also found lower levels of inflammatory genes in dECM expanded SDSCs that might be responsible for enhanced chondrogenic differentiation. Despite an increase in type X collagen in chondrogenically induced cells, dECM expanded cells had significantly lower potential for endochondral bone formation. Wnt and MAPK signals were actively involved in both expansion and chondrogenic induction of dECM expanded cells. Since young and healthy people can be potential donors for this matrix expansion system and decellularization can minimize immune concerns, human SDSCs expanded on this future commercially available dECM could be a potential cell source for autologous cartilage repair. PMID:25861949

  14. Melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Samet, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melorheostosis is an uncommon, sporadic, sclerosing bone lesion that may affect the adjacent soft tissues. It has been associated with many entities such as osteopoikilosis, soft tissue vascular malformations, bone and soft tissue tumors, nephrotic syndrome, segmental limb contractures, osteosarcoma, desmoid tumor, and mesenteric fibromatosis. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign neoplasia of the hyaline cartilage presenting as nodules in the subsynovial tissue of a joint or tendon sheath. The intra-articular extension of melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis has not been reported before. In this article, the authors describe an unusual case mimicking synovial chondromatosis arising as a result of melorheostosis and their characteristic imaging findings.

  15. Adipose, Bone Marrow and Synovial Joint-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fellows, Christopher R.; Matta, Csaba; Zakany, Roza; Khan, Ilyas M.; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Current cell-based repair strategies have proven unsuccessful for treating cartilage defects and osteoarthritic lesions, consequently advances in innovative therapeutics are required and mesenchymal stem cell-based (MSC) therapies are an expanding area of investigation. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell lineages and exerting paracrine effects. Due to their easy isolation, expansion, and low immunogenicity, MSCs are an attractive option for regenerative medicine for joint repair. Recent studies have identified several MSC tissue reservoirs including in adipose tissue, bone marrow, cartilage, periosteum, and muscle. MSCs isolated from these discrete tissue niches exhibit distinct biological activities, and have enhanced regenerative potentials for different tissue types. Each MSC type has advantages and disadvantages for cartilage repair and their use in a clinical setting is a balance between expediency and effectiveness. In this review we explore the challenges associated with cartilage repair and regeneration using MSC-based cell therapies and provide an overview of phenotype, biological activities, and functional properties for each MSC population. This paper also specifically explores the therapeutic potential of each type of MSC, particularly focusing on which cells are capable of producing stratified hyaline-like articular cartilage regeneration. Finally we highlight areas for future investigation. Given that patients present with a variety of problems it is unlikely that cartilage regeneration will be a simple “one size fits all,” but more likely an array of solutions that need to be applied systematically to achieve regeneration of a biomechanically competent repair tissue. PMID:28066501

  16. Production of Human Monoclonal Rheumatoid Factor Secreting Hybridomas Derived from Rheumatoid Synovial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    antisera to human [gM and human IgG heavy chains , kappa and lambda lightTable 2: Rheumatoid synowal cell tRF subelass speclicity profiles chains , and...antisera to whole mouse Ig including light chains .(ELISA)frompantie MKin Table 1& AD7 RF was a human 1gM k monoclonal antibody without Well IgGI gG2

  17. Juxtafacet Spinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This was a retrospective study. Purpose To study the surgical outcome of synovial cysts of the lumbar spine through posterior laminectomy in combination with transpedicular screw fixation. Overview of Literature Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine contribute significantly to narrowing of the spinal canal and lateral thecal sac and nerve root compression. Cysts form as a result of arthrotic disruption of the facet joint, leading to degenerative spondylolisthesis in up to 40% of patients. Methods Retrospective data from 6 patients, treated during the period of March 2007 to February 2011, were analyzed. All preoperative and postoperative manifestations, extension/flexion radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography records were reviewed. All underwent surgery for synovial cysts with excision and decompression combined with posterior fixation. The result of surgery was evaluated with Macnab's classification. An excellent or good outcome was considered as satisfactory. Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale was used for evaluation of back pain. Results All patients included in this study had excellent outcomes as regarding to improvement of all preoperative manifestations and returning to normal daily activities. Only 2 cases developed postoperative transient cerebro-spinal fluid leak and were treated conservatively and improved during the follow up period. Conclusions Although this study included a small number of cases and we could not have statistically significant results, the good outcome of decompression of synovial cysts combined with posterior fixation and fusion encouraged us to recommend this approach for patients with juxtafacet synovial cysts. PMID:26949457

  18. [Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Campos Arbulú, Ana L; Sadava, Emmanuel E; Sánchez Ruiz, Alejandro; Fernández Vila, Juan M; Dillon, Horacio S; Mezzadri, Norberto A

    2017-01-01

    Primary orbital squamous cell carcinoma is a rare entity. There is little published literature. We report a case of primary squamous cell carcinoma of the orbital soft tissues. Surgical resection offered the best treatment for the patient. Complete resection of the lesion was achieved. The patient received adjuvant radiotherapy due to the proximity of the lesion to the surgical margins. Surgical treatment is feasible and should be considered as part of the surgeon's arsenal. However, therapeutic decisions must be made on a case-by-case basis.

  19. Glucosamine binding to proteins in plasma and synovial fluid and blood cell/plasma partitioning in mouse and man in vitro.

    PubMed

    Persiani, Stefano; Matthews, Anne; Larger, Patrice; Hall, Michael; Rotini, Roberto; Trisolino, Giovanni; Antonioli, Diego; Zaccarelli, Lorenzo; Rovati, Lucio C

    2009-01-01

    Protein binding of [14C]glucosamine (400, 1000 and 4000 ng/ml) was evaluated in human and mouse plasma and in human synovial fluid. Blood cell/plasma partitioning in human and mouse was also determined. There was no measurable protein binding of [14C]glucosamine. Its association with human and mouse blood cells ranged from 43-47% and from 27-29%, respectively. Therefore, the unbound (pharmacologically active) fraction of glucosamine in plasma and at the site of action (the joint) is the same. Protein binding displacement drug-drug interactions are unlikely during the clinical use of crystalline glucosamine sulfate. No corrections are needed, either for unbound fraction when comparing human and mouse pharmacokinetic data or for blood cell/plasma partitioning to assess glucosamine total blood clearance from plasma data in these two species.

  20. BCOR-CCNB3-positive soft tissue sarcoma with round-cell and spindle-cell histology: a series of four cases highlighting the pitfall of mimicking poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Wan-Shan; Liao, I-Chuang; Wen, Mei-Chin; Lan, Howard Haw-Chang; Yu, Shih-Chen; Huang, Hsuan-Ying

    2016-11-01

    BCOR-CCNB3 sarcoma is a genetically defined undifferentiated malignancy with Ewing sarcoma (ES)-like round cells, and preferentially affects the bones of male adolescents. Sarcomas harbouring BCOR-CCNB3 rarely arise from soft tissues; therefore, we aimed to report four cases to expand the clinicopathological spectrum. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and confirmatory sequencing, we detected a BCOR-CCNB3 transcript in primary undifferentiated sarcomas of the deep musculature of four male patients, comprising two teenagers (aged 14 and 17 years) and two adults (aged 34 and 44 years). The tumours originated in the back (n = 2), pelvis (n = 1), and thigh (n = 1), and were 70-140 mm in size (mean, 107 mm). All tumours showed sheets of primitive round or ovoid cells with vesicular nuclei, active mitosis (28-41/10 high-power fields), variably prominent nucleoli, and geographical necrosis. This major component transformed into fascicles of elongated spindle cells with staghorn vessels and a myxoid reticular stroma, accounting for 10-50% of areas. All cases were positive for CD99, three were positive for TLE1, and one was positive for EMA, indicating poorly differentiated synovial sarcomas (PDSSs). Nuclear cyclin B3 reactivity was present in all cases, but not in molecularly confirmed atypical ESs and PDSSs. At the last follow-up (median, 13.5 months), one patient had died of lung metastasis, two were alive with tumours, and one was tumour-free. BCOR-CCNB3-positive sarcomas may primarily occur in soft tissues of adults and show PDSS-mimicking round-cell and spindle-cell histology with aggressive behaviour. Cyclin B3 is useful for selecting candidates for BCOR-CCNB3 molecular testing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Petranovic, Duska; Pilcic, Gorazd; Peitl, Milena; Cubranic, Aleksandar; Valkovic, Toni; Nacinovic, Antica Duletic; Lucin, Ksenija; Jonjic, Nives

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma represents 2.5–7% all of non Hodgkin's lymphomas. Stomach is the most common site of extranodal lymphoma. However, that is not the case with mantle cell lymphoma, which is extremely rare. We present a case of 71-year-old woman admitted to the Internal Clinic of the University Clinical Hospital Center Rijeka, because of stomach discomfort and melena. Endoscopy and computed tomography revealed a polyp in gastric antrum. Histopathologic, immunohistochemic and genetic methods were also performed and the results were consistent with primary gastric mantle cell lymphoma without periepigastric and/or local or distant abdominal lymph node involvement. PMID:22567215

  2. Equine allogeneic umbilical cord blood derived mesenchymal stromal cells reduce synovial fluid nucleated cell count and induce mild self-limiting inflammation when evaluated in an lipopolysaccharide induced synovitis model.

    PubMed

    Williams, L B; Koenig, J B; Black, B; Gibson, T W G; Sharif, S; Koch, T G

    2016-09-01

    Improvement has been reported following intra-articular (i.a.) injection of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in several species. These observations have led to the use of i.a. MSCs in equine practice with little understanding of the mechanisms by which perceived improvement occurs. To evaluate the effect of i.a. allogeneic umbilical cord blood (CB-) derived MSCs using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced synovitis model. We hypothesised that i.a. CB-MSCs would reduce the inflammatory response associated with LPS injection. Randomised, blinded experimental study. Feasibility studies evaluated i.a. LPS or CB-MSCs alone into the tarsocrural joint. In the principal study, middle carpal joint synovitis was induced bilaterally with LPS and then CB-MSCs were injected into one middle carpal joint. Lameness, routine synovial fluid analysis, and synovial fluid biomarkers were evaluated at 0, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h. LPS injection alone resulted in transient lameness and signs of inflammation. In joints untreated with LPS, injection of 30 million CB-MSCs resulted in mild synovitis that resolved without treatment. Mild (grade 1-2) lameness in the CB-MSC-treated limb was observed in 2 horses and severe lameness (grade 4) in the 3rd, 24 h post injection. Lameness did not correlate with synovitis induced by CB-MSC injection. Simultaneous injection of LPS and CB-MSCs resulted in significant reduction in synovial fluid total nucleated, neutrophil and mononuclear cell numbers compared with contralateral LPS-only joints. No difference was detected in other parameters associated with synovial fluid analysis or in synovial fluid biomarkers. The incidence of lameness was only different from baseline at 8 h, where horses were lame in CB-MSC limbs. Allogeneic CB-MSCs reduced synovial fluid cell populations and stimulated mild self-limiting inflammation in the synovitis model. Continued evaluation of the effects of i.a. CB-MSC therapy on synovitis in horses is needed to evaluate anti- and

  3. Slit3 inhibits Robo3-induced invasion of synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The repellent factor family of Slit molecules has been described to have repulsive function in the developing nervous system on growing axons expressing the Robo receptors. However, until today no data are available on whether these repellent factors are involved in the regulation of synovial fibroblast (SF) activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods mRNA expression in primary synovial fibroblasts was quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and protein expression was measured by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Different functional assays were performed with rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASF): proliferation, migration and a novel in-vitro cartilage destruction assay. Results First, we found increased expression of Robo3 expression in RASF compared to normal SF. Interestingly, analysis of data from a recently published genome-wide association study suggests a contribution of ROBO3 gene polymorphisms to susceptibility of RA. Functional assays performed with RASF revealed induction of migration and cartilage destruction by Robo3 and increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)1 and MMP3 expression. Treatment of RASF in early passages with Slit3 led to inhibition of migration whereas RASF in later passages, having reduced Robo3 expression in cell culture, were not inhibited by Slit3 treatment. Here, reduction of Robo3 expression from passage 3 to 10 might reflect an important step in losing repulsive activity of Slit3. Conclusions Taken together, our data showed that deregulation of the Robo3 receptor in synovial fibroblasts in RA correlates with aggressiveness of the fibroblasts. Slit3 reduces the migratory activity of synovial cells from patients with RA, potentially by repulsion of the cells in analogy to the neuronal system. Further studies will be necessary to prove Slit activity in vivo. PMID:20298552

  4. Primary retroperitoneal acinar cell cystadenoma.

    PubMed

    Pesci, Anna; Castelli, Paola; Facci, Enrico; Romano, Luigi; Zamboni, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    In this report, we describe a case of hitherto unreported primary retroperitoneal acinar cell cystadenoma that morphologically and immunophenotypically resembled pancreatic acinar cell cystadenoma. Pancreatic acinar cell cystadenoma is a very uncommon benign lesion characterized by acinar cell differentiation, the evidence of pancreatic exocrine enzyme production, and the absence of cellular atypia. Our case occurred in a 55-year-old woman presenting a 10-cm multilocular cystic lesion in the retroperitoneum thought to be a mucinous cystic neoplasm. At laparotomy, the cystic mass, which showed no connection with any organ, was completely resected with a clinical diagnosis of cystic lymphangioma. The diagnosis of retroperitoneal acinar cell cystadenoma was based on the recognition of morphological acinar differentiation, the immunohistochemical demonstration of the acinar marker trypsin, and the absence of cellular atypia. These peculiar features can be used in the differential diagnosis with all the other cystic lesions of the retroperitoneum.

  5. Effect of soluble products from lectin-stimulated lymphocytes on the growth, adhesiveness, and glycosaminoglycan synthesis of cultured synovial fibroblastic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Anastassiades, T P; Wood, A

    1981-01-01

    Human blood mononuclear cells exposed to concanavalin A or phytohemagglutinin secrete a soluble factor that arrests the growth of human synovial fibroblastic cells in culture. Once the growth-inhibitory effect is initiated it cannot be reversed by washing the fibroblastic cells, by refeeding with nonconditioned fresh serum-containing medium, by trypsinization, EDTA treatment, or a combination of these procedures. Media from nonstimulated mononuclear cells, fibroblastic cells, or the lectins themselves do not contain similar inhibitory activity that can be detected by the present culture systems. This lectin-dependent, growth-inhibitory activity does not have a cytotoxic effect on the fibroblasts but increases their adhesiveness to plastic or glass surfaces, and the cells tend to assume a less fibroblastic morphology. The growth-inhibitory activity is stable in the cold and is nondialyzable or ultrafilterable, but the activity is rapidly lost at temperature between 60 degrees and 70 degrees C and at pH 2.0. The growth-arrested cells secrete more glycosaminoglycan per cell in the medium and synthesize more cell surface glycosaminoglycan than the controls. However, the increased glycosaminoglycan synthesis cannot be explained as being entirely secondary to a cell density effect as it is also observed when adjustments are made for the differences in growth rates. PMID:7276172

  6. Targeting epigenetic misregulation in synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2012-03-20

    Like many sarcomas, synovial sarcoma is driven by a characteristic oncogenic transcription factor fusion, SS18-SSX. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Su et al. elucidate the protein partners necessary for target gene misregulation and demonstrate a direct effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors on the SS18-SSX complex composition, expression misregulation, and apoptosis.

  7. The discovery of the synovial lymphatic stomata and lymphatic reabsorption in knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Ping, Zepeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Chong; Chen, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhongliang; Wang, Jiaxiong; Wang, Li; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Changming; Li, Zhongjie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    To illustrate the mechanism of lymphatic reabsorption in knee joint effusion. The current investigation employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to reveal the ultrastructure of the knee synovial membrane in New Zealand rabbits and human. Ultrastructural changes of the synovial lymphatic stomata were observed by using trypan blue absorption and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) digestion methods, and the animal models of synovitis. New Zealand rabbits and human synovial membranes were composed of two types of synovial cells: type A and type B. No lymphatic stomata were found among type A synovial cells, whereas lymphatic stomata with the diameters ranging 0.74-3.26 µm were found in type B synovial cells, and some stomata were closed. After the NaOH digestion, a number of sieve pores, similar to lymphatic stomata in size and shape, were observed in the dense fibrous connective tissue underneath the type B synovial cells. After injecting trypan blue into the rabbit knee joint cavity, absorption of trypan blue through the lymphatic stomata was observed, suggesting the absorption function of the synovial lymphatic stomata. In the rabbit knee joint synovitis models, the synovial lymphatic stomata diameter enlarged. Some macrophages migrated from the lymphatic stomata, indicating that the synovial lymphatic stomata were involved in the joint effusion absorption and inflammatory response. Our study is the first to report the existence of synovial lymphatic stomata in the New Zealand rabbits and human knee joints. Lymphatic stomata may have an important role in the reabsorption of joint effusion.

  8. CD45RA-Foxp3(low) non-regulatory T cells in the CCR7-CD45RA-CD27+CD28+ effector memory subset are increased in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Fumichika; Saegusa, Jun; Nishimura, Keisuke; Miura, Yasushi; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kumagai, Shunichi; Morinobu, Akio

    2014-07-01

    Increased numbers of regulatory T (Treg) cells are found in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RASF) compared with peripheral blood. However, Treg cells in RASF have been shown to have a decreased capacity to suppress T cells. Here we phenotypically classified CD4+ T cells in RASF into six subsets based on the expression of CD45RA, CCR7, CD27 and CD28, and demonstrated that the CCR7-CD45RA-CD27+CD28+ TEM subset was significantly increased in synovial fluid compared with peripheral blood. In addition, the proportion of Foxp3+ Treg cells in the CCR7-CD45RA-CD27+CD28+ TEM subset was significantly increased in RASF. Furthermore, most of the Foxp3+ Treg cells in RASF were non-suppressive CD45RA-Foxp3(low) non-Treg cells, and the frequency of the non-Treg cells in the CCR7-CD45RA-CD27+CD28+ TEM subset was significantly increased in RASF. Our findings suggest that the pro-inflammatory environment in RA joints may induce the increase of CD45RA-Foxp3(low) non-Treg cells in synovial fluid.

  9. Zone-specific integrated cartilage repair using a scaffold-free tissue engineered construct derived from allogenic synovial mesenchymal stem cells: Biomechanical and histological assessments.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Hiromichi; Nansai, Ryosuke; Ando, Wataru; Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Hart, David A; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2015-11-26

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the zone-specific integration properties of articular cartilage defects treated in vivo with scaffold-free three-dimensional tissue-engineered constructs (TECs) derived from allogenic synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in a porcine model. The TEC derived from the synovial MSCs was implanted into chondral defects in the medial femoral condyle of the knee. The integration boundary of repair tissue with the adjacent host cartilage was morphologically and biomechanically evaluated at 6 months post-implantation. Histological assessments showed that the repair tissue in each zone was well integrated with the adjacent host cartilage, with an apparent secure continuity of the extracellular matrix. There were no significant differences in histological scores between the integration boundary and the center of the repair tissue at every zone. Nonetheless, in all the specimens subjected to mechanical testing, failure occurred at the integration boundary. The average tensile strength of the integration boundary vs normal cartilage was 0.6 vs 4.9, 3.0 vs 12.6, and 5.5 vs 12.8MPa at the superficial, middle, and deep layers, respectively. Thus, these results indicate the most fragile point in the repair tissue remained at the integration boundary in spite of the apparent secure tissue continuity and equivalent histological quality with the center of the repair tissue. Such tissue vulnerability at the surface integration boundary could affect the long-term durability of the tissue repair, and thus, special consideration will be needed in the post-operative rehabilitation programming to enhance the longevity of such repair tissues in response to normal knee loading.

  10. Synovial chondromatosis in raptors.

    PubMed

    Stone, E G; Walser, M M; Redig, P T; Rings, B; Howard, D J

    1999-01-01

    Fourteen raptors, consisting of 13 great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and one red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), from central and north central Minnesota, western Wisconsin, and eastern South Dakota (USA) were admitted to a raptor rehabilitation center between June 1992 and June 1995, with perisynovial and synovial chondromatosis affecting multiple joints. Birds were severely debilitated primarily due to loss of shoulder motion. The etiology of these lesions in raptors is unknown.

  11. Glenohumeral Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old, right hand-dominant man reported to physical therapy with a history of deep anterior left shoulder pain. Radiographs, which were obtained after physical therapy was initiated, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of numerous radio-opaque loose bodies that followed bone signal characteristics dispersed throughout the glenohumeral joint, leading to a diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):809. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0414.

  12. Synergistic Effects of Ethanol and Isopentenyl Pyrophosphate on Expansion of γδ T Cells in Synovial Fluid from Patients with Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Agneta J.; Bindslev, Niels; Johansson, Björn; Berg, Louise

    2014-01-01

    Low to moderate ethanol consumption has been associated with protective effects in autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, RA. An expansion of γδ T cells induced by isopentenyl pyrophosphate, IPP, likewise seems to have a protective role in arthritis. The aim of this project was to test the hypothesis that low doses of ethanol can enhance IPP-induced expansion of synovial fluid γδ T cells from patients with arthritis and may thereby potentially account for the beneficial effects of ethanol on symptoms of the arthritic process. Thus, mononuclear cells from synovial fluid (SF) from 15 patients with arthritis and from peripheral blood (PB) from 15 healthy donors were stimulated with low concentrations of ethanol and IPP for 7 days in vitro. IPP in combination with ethanol 0.015%, 2.5 mM, equivalent to the decrease per hour in blood ethanol concentration due to metabolism, gave a significantly higher fractional expansion of SF γδ T cells compared with IPP alone after 7 days (ratio 10.1+/−4.0, p<0.0008, n = 12) in patients with arthritis. Similar results were obtained for PB γδ T cells from healthy controls (ratio 2.0+/−0.4, p<0.011, n = 15). The augmented expansion of γδ T cells in SF is explained by a higher proliferation (p = 0.0034, n = 11) and an increased survival (p<0.005, n = 11) in SF cultures stimulated with IPP plus ethanol compared to IPP alone. The synergistic effects of IPP and ethanol indicate a possible allosteric effect of ethanol. Similar effects could be seen when stimulating PB with ethanol in presence of risedronate, which has the ability to increase endogenous levels of IPP. We conclude that expansion of γδ T cells by combinatorial drug effects, possibly in fixed-dose combination, FDC, of ethanol in the presence of IPP might give a protective role in diseases such as arthritis. PMID:25090614

  13. Cell source-dependent in vivo immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells derived from the bone marrow and synovial fluid of minipigs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Won-Jae; Hah, Young-Sool; Ock, Sun-A.; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Jeon, Ryong-Hoon; Park, Ji-Sung; Lee, Sang-Il; Rho, Na-Young; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Lee, Sung-Lim

    2015-05-01

    The in vitro differentiation and immunosuppressive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from synovial fluid (SF-MSCs) and bone marrow extract (BM-MSCs) in an isogenic background of minipigs were comparatively analyzed in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The proliferation capacity and expression of pluripotent transcription factors (Oct3/4 and Sox2) were significantly (P<0.05) higher in SF-MSCs than in BM-MSCs. The differentiation capacity of SF-MSCs into adipocytes, osteocytes and neurocytes was significantly (P<0.05) lower than that of BM-MSCs, and the differentiation capacity of SF-MSCs into chondrocytes was significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of BM-MSCs. Systemic injection of BM- and SF-MSCs significantly (P<0.05) ameliorated the clinical symptoms of CIA mice, with SF-MSCs having significantly (P<0.05) higher clinical and histopathological recovery scores than BM-MSCs. Furthermore, the immunosuppressive properties of SF-MSCs in CIA mice were associated with increased levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10, and decreased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and osteoclast-related sRANKL. In conclusion, SF-MSCs exhibited eminent pluripotency and differentiation capacity into chondrocytes, addition to substantial in vivo immunosuppressive capacity by elevating IL-10 and reducing IL-1β levels in CIA mice. - Highlights: • Immunosuppressive capacity of BM-, SM-, and SF-MSCs was evaluated in an RA model. • Proliferation, pluripotency and chondrogenic differentiation capacity were higher in SF-MSCs. • SF-MSCs exhibited improved therapeutic effects than BM-MSCs. • SF-MSCs may have applications as immunosuppressive therapy in autoimmune diseases.

  14. A case report of pancreatic metastasis from synovial sarcoma successfully treated by metastasectomy with adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Yuki; Shigekawa, Minoru; Kegasawa, Tadashi; Suda, Takahiro; Yoshioka, Teppei; Iwahashi, Kiyoshi; Ikezawa, Kenji; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Kajihara, Jun; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Imura, Yoshinori; Outani, Hidetatsu; Naka, Norifumi; Honma, Keiichiro; Morii, Eiichi; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft tissue sarcoma which arises near joints. The most frequent metastasis sites of synovial sarcoma are the lungs, lymph nodes, and bone. Pancreatic metastasis is quite rare; only 3 cases have been reported worldwide to date. We herein present the 4th case of pancreatic metastasis from synovial sarcoma. Methods and Results: A 32-year-old man underwent extended excision of synovial sarcoma in the left pelvis and femur in 2009. In 2013, follow-up contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a 35-mm heterogeneously enhanced mass in the pancreas body. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of the mass revealed a diffuse proliferation of atypical spindle cells in a fascicular arrangement. Because the histology was quite similar to the resected specimen of synovial sarcoma in 2009, the mass was suspected to be a metastasis from synovial sarcoma. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with adjuvant adriamycin/ifosfamide chemotherapy was subsequently performed. Synovial sarcoma-specific SS18-SSX1 (synovial sarcoma translocation, chromosome 18-synovial sarcoma X1) or SS18-SSX2 chimera mRNA was detected in the resected specimen, confirming the diagnosis of metastasis from synovial sarcoma. The patient did well for 30 months without recurrence. Conclusion: This case suggests that pancreatic metastasis from synovial sarcoma can be successfully treated by metastasectomy with adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27684804

  15. A Normative Study of the Synovial Fluid Proteome from Healthy Porcine Knee Joints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid in an articulating joint contains proteins derived from the blood plasma and proteins that are produced by cells within the joint tissues, such as synovium, cartilage, ligament, and meniscus. The proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid and the cellular origins of many synovial fluid components are not fully understood. Here, we present a normative proteomics study using porcine synovial fluid. Using our optimized method, we identified 267 proteins with high confidence in healthy synovial fluid. We also evaluated mRNA expression data from tissues that can contribute to the synovial fluid proteome, including synovium, cartilage, blood, and liver, to better estimate the relative contributions from these sources to specific synovial fluid components. We identified 113 proteins in healthy synovial fluid that appear to be primarily derived from plasma transudates, 37 proteins primarily derived from synovium, and 11 proteins primarily derived from cartilage. Finally, we compared the identified synovial fluid proteome to the proteome of human plasma, and we found that the two body fluids share many similarities, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. Knowing the synovial fluid proteome of a healthy joint will help to identify mechanisms that cause joint disease and pathways involved in disease progression. PMID:25160569

  16. Primary lithium cell life studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capulli, John; Donley, Sam; Deligiannis, Frank; Shen, David

    1990-01-01

    One solution for providing a truly independent power source is to package, within the critical subsystem element, a primary battery that can remain dormant for time periods as long as the mission life, which can be 10-15 years, maximum. When primary power from the spacecraft solar array/battery system is interrupted, the backup battery system, which is connected through a diode to the power input line, would automatically support the load to avoid a power interruption to the critical load for a time period long enough to ensure that ground control could access the satellite and correct the anomaly by sending appropriate commands to the spacecraft. Critical subsystems identified for the application are telemetry and command circuits, volatile computer memory, attitude control circuits, and some critical payloads. Due to volume packaging and weight restrictions that exist on most spacecraft, coupled with the long storage periods required, lithium cell technology was selected for the backup power source. Because of the high energy density (200-400 Wh/kg), long shelf life, and load capability, soluble cathode primary lithium technology was chosen. The most important lithium cell properties that require detail characterization for this application are capacity loss, shelf life, and the voltage delay mechanism. These are functions of storage time and temperature. During storage, a passive film builds up on the lithium electrode. The film protects the lithium electrode from progressive capacity decay but requires time to break down when a load is applied. This phenomenon results in a depressed voltage during the period of film breakdown which can last from fractions of a second to minutes.

  17. Hempseed oil induces reactive oxygen species- and C/EBP homologous protein-mediated apoptosis in MH7A human rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mini; Cho, Jaewook; Shin, Jong-Il; Jeon, Yong-Joon; Kim, Jin-Hyun; Lee, Sung-Joon; Kim, Eun-Soo; Lee, Kyungho

    2014-07-03

    The medicinal efficacy of hempseed (Cannabis sativa L.), which is rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, in atopic dermatitis, inflammation, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been suggested for centuries. Hempseed has been used as a treatment for these diseases in Korean and Chinese folk medicine. The aim of the study is to investigate the effects of hempseed oil (HO) on MH7A human RA fibroblast-like synovial cells. MH7A cells were used to study the anti-rheumatoid effects of hempseed (Cannabis sativa L., cv. Cheungsam/Cannabaceae) oil by investigating cell viability, apoptosis, lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis. HO treatment reduced the survival rate of MH7A cells and promoted apoptotic cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Both lipid accumulation and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in HO-treated MH7A cells. Co-treatment with the antioxidant Tiron effectively abrogated the cytotoxic effects of HO; the ROS level was reduced, cell viability was recovered, and apoptotic cell death was significantly diminished. Moreover, HO-treated cells exhibited increased expression of the major ER stress markers, glucose-regulated protein 78 and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). The siRNA-mediated knockdown of CHOP prevented HO-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that HO treatment induced lipid accumulation, ROS production, CHOP expression, and apoptosis in MH7A cells, and that CHOP functions as an anti-rheumatoid factor downstream of HO in MH7A cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules are highly effective in the control of inflammation in synovial cells and a chronic arthritis model

    PubMed Central

    Boechat, Antônio Luiz; de Oliveira, Catiúscia Padilha; Tarragô, Andrea Monteiro; da Costa, Allyson Guimarães; Malheiro, Adriana; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease in the word, affecting 1% of the population. Long-term prognosis in RA was greatly improved following the introduction of highly effective medications such as methotrexate (MTX). Despite the importance of this drug in RA, 8%–16% of patients must discontinue the treatment because of adverse effects. Last decade, we developed a promising new nanocarrier as a drug-delivery system, lipid-core nanocapsules. Objective The aim of the investigation reported here was to evaluate if methotrexate-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules (MTX-LNC) reduce proinflammatory and T-cell-derived cytokines in activated mononuclear cells derived from RA patients and even in functional MTX-resistant conditions. We also aimed to find out if MTX-LNC would reduce inflammation in experimentally inflammatory arthritis at lower doses than MTX solution. Methods Formulations were prepared by self-assembling methodology. The adjuvant arthritis was induced in Lewis rats (AIA) and the effect on edema formation, TNF-α levels, and interleukin-1 beta levels after treatment was evaluated. Mononuclear cells obtained from the synovial fluid of RA patients during articular infiltration procedures were treated with MTX solution and MTX-LNC. For in vitro experiments, the same dose of MTX was used in comparing MTX and MTX-LNC, while the dose of MTX in the MTX-LNC was 75% lower than the drug in solution in in vivo experiments. Results Formulations presented nanometric and unimodal size distribution profiles, with D[4.3] of 175±17 nm and span of 1.6±0.2. Experimental results showed that MTX-LNC had the same effect as MTX on arthritis inhibition on day 28 of the experiment (P<0.0001); however, this effect was achieved earlier, on day 21 (P<0.0001), by MTX-LNC, and this formulation had reduced both TNF-α (P=0.001) and IL-1α (P=0.0002) serum levels by the last day of the experiment. Further, the MTX-LNC were more effective at reducing the

  19. Synovial Sarcoma in Head and Neck: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Adriano Santana; Azevedo, Amanda Canário Andrade; Magalhães, Fabíola Moreira; Andrade, Nilvano Alves de

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Synovial sarcoma is a malignant tumor of mesenchymal pluripotent cells. Objectives We present a case of synovial sarcoma in the posterolateral wall of the oropharynx. Resumed report The patient, a 23-year-old woman, was admitted with a history of dysphagia and difficulty in breathing for 8 months, resulting in progressive deterioration and onset of snoring, muffled voice, and local pain. An oropharyngeal tumor in the left posterolateral wall touched the base of the ipsilateral tongue. The patient underwent endoscopic pharyngectomy to remove the lesion. Pathologic examination revealed synovial sarcoma with positive margins, and Mohs technique was proposed for margin control. The margins were disease-free, without the need for total laryngectomy. The pharynx was reconstructed with a microvascular forearm flap. The patient developed postoperative stability. Conclusion Despite its name, synovial sarcoma is rarely sourced directly from synovial membranes. It is most commonly found in the vicinity of large joints. The location at the head and neck, a location poor in synovial tissue, is unusual. Synovial sarcoma in the head and neck has an aggressive nature and poor prognosis. Resection with negative margins remains the foundation of therapy, which is not so easily achieved in the head and neck. It is important for the otorhinolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon to be familiar with this aggressive tumor, which carries high mortality and morbidity. The appropriate diagnosis and treatment can improve prognosis and patient survival. PMID:25992071

  20. TNFα modulates protein degradation pathways in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Connor, Alison M; Mahomed, Nizar; Gandhi, Rajiv; Keystone, Edward C; Berger, Stuart A

    2012-03-14

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory and destructive disease of the joint. The synovial lining consists of two main types of cells: synovial fibroblasts and macrophages. The macrophage-derived cytokine TNFα stimulates RA synovial fibroblasts to proliferate and produce growth factors, chemokines, proteinases and adhesion molecules, making them key players in the RA disease process. If proteins are not correctly folded, cellular stress occurs that can be relieved in part by increased degradation of the aberrant proteins by the proteasome or autophagy. We hypothesized that the activity of the protein degradation pathways would be increased in response to TNFα stimulation in RA synovial fibroblasts compared with control fibroblasts. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers were examined in synovial fibroblasts by immunoblotting and PCR. Use of the autophagy and proteasome protein degradation pathways in response to TNFα stimulation was determined using a combination of experiments involving chemical inhibition of the autophagy or proteasome pathways followed by immunoblotting for the autophagy marker LC3, measurement of proteasome activity and long-lived protein degradation, and determination of cellular viability. RA synovial fibroblasts are under acute ER stress, and the stress is increased in the presence of TNFα. Autophagy is the main pathway used to relieve the ER stress in unstimulated fibroblasts, and both autophagy and the proteasome are more active in RA synovial fibroblasts compared with control fibroblasts. In response to TNFα, the autophagy pathway but not the proteasome is consistently stimulated, yet there is an increased dependence on the proteasome for cell viability. If autophagy is blocked in the presence of TNFα, an increase in proteasome activity occurs in RA synovial fibroblasts but not in control cells. TNFα stimulation of synovial fibroblasts results in increased expression of ER stress markers. Survival of synovial

  1. Prednisolone phosphate-containing TRX-20 liposomes inhibit cytokine and chemokine production in human fibroblast-like synovial cells: a novel approach to rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Harigai, Takashi; Hagiwara, Hitomi; Ogawa, Yumi; Ishizuka, Takanobu; Kaneda, Shinichi; Kimura, Junji

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the potential of using prednisolone phosphate (PSLP)-containing 3,5-dipentadecyloxybenzamidine hydrochloride (TRX-20) liposomes to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we examined their ability to bind human fibroblast-like synovial (HFLS) cells and their effects in these cells. To test for binding, Lissamine rhodamine B-1, 2-dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (rhodamine)-labelled PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes were added to HFLS cells, and the fluorescence intensity of the rhodamine bound to the cells was evaluated. Rhodamine-labelled PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20 were used as a negative control. To evaluate the uptake of liposomes by the HFLS cells, we used TRX-20 liposomes containing 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (HPTS) and p-xylene-bis-pyridinium bromide (DPX), and observed the cells by fluorescence microscopy. The effects of the PSLP in TRX-20 liposomes on HFLS cells were assessed by the inhibition of the production of two inflammatory cytokines (interleukin 6 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor) and one inflammatory chemokine (interleukin 8). The interaction of the PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes with HFLS cells was approximately 40 times greater than that of PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20. PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes bound to HFLS cells primarily via chondroitin sulfate. TRX-20 liposomes taken up by the cell were localized to acidic compartments. Furthermore, the PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes inhibited the production of the inflammatory cytokines and the chemokine more effectively than did the PSLP-containing liposomes without TRX-20. These results indicate that PSLP-containing TRX-20 liposomes show promise as a novel drug delivery system that could enhance the clinical use of glucocorticoids for treating RA.

  2. Hyaluronate synthesis by synovial villi in organ culture. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.L.; Christine, T.A.

    1983-06-01

    Individual canine synovial villi were used to establish short-term synovial organ cultures. These villi incorporated /sup 3/H-glucosamine into highly-polymerized /sup 3/H-hyaluronic acid (/sup 3/H-HA), which was the only /sup 3/H-glycosaminoglycan identified in the culture medium. Some /sup 3/H-HA, and larger amounts of other /sup 3/H-glycosaminoglycans, were recovered from cultured tissues. Culture medium /sup 3/H-HA content was proportional to the surface area of cultured villi. Organ cultures of nonvillous synovium were compared with villi; nonvillous cultures synthesized less /sup 3/H-HA per mm2 of their synovial intimal surface than villi. These cultures complement cell culture techniques for in vitro studies of synovial lining cell function.

  3. Cytoskeletal dynamics in rabbit synovial fibroblasts: II. Reformation of stress fibers in cells rounded by treatment with collagenase-inducing agents.

    PubMed

    Aggeler, J

    1990-01-01

    Modulation of the synthesis and secretion of extracellular matrix proteins and matrix-degrading metalloproteases by rabbit synovial fibroblasts is an important model system for studying the control of tissue-specific gene expression. Induction of collagenase expression is correlated with changes in cell shape and actin filament distribution, but the role of the cellular cytoskeleton in the sustained synthesis and secretion of metalloproteases has not been closely examined. When cells were allowed to respread after rounding by trypsin or cytochalasin, two known metalloprotease inducers, reformation of stress fibers was observed within 2 h in the presence of serum. In the absence of serum, trypsin-treated cells did not respread substantially, even after 24 h in culture. In contrast, cytochalasin-treated cells recovered almost as rapidly in the absence as in the presence of serum, showing reformation of well-formed microfilament bundles within 30 min of drug removal, especially at the spreading cell edges. High resolution electron-microscopic views of detergent-extracted cytoskeletons confirmed the rapid rebundling of peripheral microfilaments. Acrylamide-treated cells fell between these two extremes, spreading slowly in the absence of serum, but almost as rapidly as cytochalasin-treated cells in its presence. Reestablishment of normal intermediate filament distribution generally lagged slightly behind actin for all treatments, and intermediate filaments always appeared to spread back into the cellular cytoplasm within the confines of the reforming peripheral microfilament bundles. No obvious interaction between these two cytoskeletal elements was observed after any treatment, and no specific role for intermediate filaments in modulating gene expression in these cells is suggested by these results. The serum dependence displayed after trypsin or acrylamide treatment may be due to the disturbances in fibronectin synthesis observed in these cells and is consistent with

  4. Proteomic analysis of human osteoarthritis synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized mainly by progressive degradation of the hyaline cartilage. Patients with osteoarthritis often postpone seeking medical help, which results in the diagnosis being made at an advanced stage of cartilage destruction. Sustained efforts are needed to identify specific markers that might help in early diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and in improving therapeutic outcomes. We employed a multipronged proteomic approach, which included multiple fractionation strategies followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis to explore the proteome of synovial fluid obtained from osteoarthritis patients. In addition to the total proteome, we also enriched glycoproteins from synovial fluid using lectin affinity chromatography. Results We identified 677 proteins from synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis of which 545 proteins have not been previously reported. These novel proteins included ADAM-like decysin 1 (ADAMDEC1), alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP), CD84, fibulin 1 (FBLN1), matrix remodelling associated 5 (MXRA5), secreted phosphoprotein 2 (SPP2) and spondin 2 (SPON2). We identified 300 proteins using lectin affinity chromatography, including the glycoproteins afamin (AFM), attractin (ATRN), fibrillin 1 (FBN1), transferrin (TF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and vasorin (VSN). Gene ontology analysis confirmed that a majority of the identified proteins were extracellular and are mostly involved in cell communication and signaling. We also confirmed the expression of ANPEP, dickkopf WNT signaling pathway inhibitor 3 (DKK3) and osteoglycin (OGN) by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis of osteoarthritis synovial fluid samples. Conclusions We present an in-depth analysis of the synovial fluid proteome from patients with osteoarthritis. We believe that the catalog of proteins generated in this study will further enhance our knowledge regarding the

  5. A challenging case of metastatic intra-abdominal synovial sarcoma with unusual immunophenotype and its differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Changchien, Yi-Che; Katalin, Uhrin; Fillinger, János; Fónyad, László; Papp, Gergő; Salamon, Ferenc; Sápi, Zoltán

    2012-01-01

    The primary and metastatic gastrointestinal synovial sarcoma is rare with a wide differential diagnosis. It usually expresses cytokeratins EMA, BCL2 with an occasional CD99, and S100 positivity but not desmin. We present a case of metastatic synovial sarcoma with unusual immunophenotype causing diagnostic challenges. The tumor cells showed focal cytokeratin, EMA, and, unexpectedly, desmin positivity. Additional intranuclear TLE-1 positivity and negativity for CD34 and DOG-1 were also identified. A diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma was confirmed by using FISH break-apart probe. RT-PCR revealed the SYT-SSX1 fusion gene. Intra-abdominal synovial sarcoma, either primary or metastatic, with unusual desmin positivity raises the diagnostic challenge, since a wide range of differential diagnoses could show a similar immunophenotype (leiomyosarcoma, desmoid tumor, myofibroblastic tumor, and rarely GIST etc.). Typical morphology and focal cytokeratin/EMA positivity should alert to this tumor, and FISH and RT-PCR remain the gold standard for the confirmation.

  6. [Effects of Bushen Shuji Granule on IL-6 in the culture fluid sample of fibroblast cells from the synovial liquid of the ankylosing spondylitis patients].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jun-Ling; Yan, Xiao-Ping

    2012-02-01

    To explore the effects of Bushen Shuji Granule (BSG) on inhibiting the interleukin 6 (IL-6) level in the synovial fluid sample of fibroblast cells from the ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. Using serum pharmacologic method, the IL-6 level in the culture fluid sample of fibroblast cells was observed by ELISA method with different concentrations of medicated serum containing BSG. The IL-6 level at the mRNA level was detected using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The vehicle serum and sulfasalazine (SSZ) serum were taken as controls. Results of ELISA showed the IL-6 level in the AS group was more than that in the vehicle serum group with obvious statistical difference. BSG could obviously inhibited the IL-6 level, showing statistical difference when compared with the vehicle serum group. Besides, obvious dose-dependent correlation existed between BSG and its inhibition on fibroblast proliferation. And the IL-6 level at the mRNA level in the AS group was higher than that in the vehicle serum group, showing statistical difference by semi-quantitative analysis. BSG could play its clinical role of anti-inflammation and anti-fibrosis through inhibiting the IL-6 level in the culture fluid sample of fibroblast cells.

  7. Erythropoietin and interleukin-1beta modulate nitrite production in a Swiss 3T3 cell model of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Baig, S; Patel, Y; Coussons, P; Grant, R

    2002-11-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO), a haemopoietic growth factor and a primary regulator of erythropoiesis, is widely used to treat anaemia in various chronic complications of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Fibroblast-like cells, found in the pannus tissue of joints, are thought to contribute to the inflammatory pathology of RA. Thus for the current study we investigated the effects of recombinant human EPO (rHuEPO) on NO metabolism, using an interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-stimulated Swiss 3T3 fibroblast monolayer as a model for fibroblast activity in RA. The results show that, over 3 days, both alone and in combination with the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1beta (10 ng/ml), rHuEPO (25 micro-units/ml) induced significant production of nitrite in cell culture supernatants. This is an indicator of NO production by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which is a well-documented mediator of metalloproteinase-mediated tissue remodelling in RA. It therefore appears that, through modulation of NOS-dependent NO production, rHuEPO may influence remodelling of connective tissue in RA, independently of its established erythropoietic role.

  8. Rheological properties of synovial fluids.

    PubMed

    Fam, H; Bryant, J T; Kontopoulou, M

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid is the joint lubricant and shock absorber [Semin. Arthritis Rheum. 32 (2002), 10-37] as well as the source of nutrition for articular cartilage. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the rheological properties of synovial fluid as they relate to its chemical composition. Given its importance in the rheology of synovial fluid, an overview of the structure and rheology of HA (hyaluronic acid) is presented first. The rheology of synovial fluids is discussed in detail, with a focus on the possible diagnosis of joint pathology based on the observed differences in rheological parameters and trends. The deterioration of viscoelastic properties of synovial fluid in pathological states due to effects of HA concentration and molecular weight is further described. Recent findings pertaining to the composition and rheology of periprosthetic fluid, the fluid that bathes prosthetic joints in vivo are reported.

  9. Thymoquinone inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammation and cell adhesion in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts by ASK1 regulation.

    PubMed

    Umar, Sadiq; Hedaya, Omar; Singh, Anil K; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2015-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine produced by monocytes/macrophage that plays a pathological role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we investigate the effect of thymoquinone (TQ), a phytochemical found in Nigella sativa, in regulating TNF-α-induced RA synovial fibroblast (RA-FLS) activation. Treatment with TQ (1-5μM) had no marked effect on the viability of human RA-FLS. Pre-treatment of TQ inhibited TNF-α-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 production and ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and cadherin-11 (Cad-11) expression in RA-FLS (p<0.01). Evaluation of the signaling events showed that TQ inhibited TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK expression, but had no inhibitory effect on NF-κB pathway, in RA-FLS (p<0.05; n=4). Interestingly, we observed that selective down-regulation of TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK activation by TQ is elicited through inhibition of apoptosis-regulated signaling kinase 1 (ASK1). Furthermore, TNF-α selectively induced phosphorylation of ASK1 at Thr845 residue in RA-FLS, which was inhibited by TQ pretreatment in a dose dependent manner (p<0.01). Pre-treatment of RA-FLS with ASK1 inhibitor (TC ASK10), blocked TNF-α induced expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and Cad-11. Our results suggest that TNF-α-induced ASK1-p38/JNK pathway is an important mediator of cytokine synthesis and enhanced expression of adhesion molecule in RA-FLS and TQ, by selectively inhibiting this pathway, may have a potential therapeutic value in regulating tissue destruction observed in RA.

  10. Glucosamine Downregulates the IL-1β-Induced Expression of Proinflammatory Cytokine Genes in Human Synovial MH7A Cells by O-GlcNAc Modification-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Takako; Sakamoto, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the major joint diseases, and the synovial inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of OA. Glucosamine (GlcN) is widely used as a dietary supplement for OA, and is expected to exert the antiinflammatory action in OA. However, the detailed mechanism for the antiinflammatory action of GlcN remains poorly understood. In this study, to elucidate the molecular mechanism involved in the GlcN-medicated regulation of synovial cell activation, we comprehensively analyzed the effect of GlcN on the gene expression using a human synovial cell line MH7A by DNA microarray. The results indicated that GlcN significantly downregulates the expression of 187 genes (≤1/1.5-fold) and upregulates the expression of 194 genes (≥1.5-fold) in IL-1β-stimulated MH7A cells. Interestingly, pathway analysis indicated that among the 10 pathways into which the GlcN-regulated genes are categorized, the 4 pathways are immune-related. Furthermore, GlcN suppressed the expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes (such as IL-6, IL-8, IL-24 and TNF-α genes). In addition, GlcN-mediated O-GlcNAc modification was involved in the downregulation of TNF-α and IL-8 genes but not IL-6 and IL-24 genes, based on the effects of alloxan, an O-GlcNAc transferase inhibitor. Thus, GlcN likely exerts an antiinflammatroy action in OA by suppressing the expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes in synovial MH7A cells by O-GlcNAc modification-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:27776166

  11. Biphasic synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jesús; García, María-Dolores; Marigil, Miguel; Abascal, Manuel; Lopez, Jose-Ignacio; Ligorred, Luis

    2006-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is a rare tumor. We report a case of a 38-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed a firm mobile mass, 25 cm in diameter, in the left lower abdominal wall. The tumor was first thought to be a sarcoma arising from the omentum or mesentery. During surgery, a large tumor was found attached to the inner surface of the abdominal wall and compressing the gastrointestinal tract. On microscopic examination the tumor corresponded to a biphasic synovial sarcoma immunoreactive for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3, 7 and 19), epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen in the epithelial tumor cells, for E-cadherin especially in their glandular structure, vimentin, CD99, and CD56 in the spindle cell component and for bcl-2 protein. The tumor recurred at the same site, and clinical course progressed to death 3 months after the initial diagnosis.

  12. Thymoquinone inhibits TNF-α-induced inflammation and cell adhesion in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts by ASK1 regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Umar, Sadiq; Hedaya, Omar; Singh, Anil K.; Ahmed, Salahuddin

    2015-09-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine produced by monocytes/macrophage that plays a pathological role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In this study, we investigate the effect of thymoquinone (TQ), a phytochemical found in Nigella sativa, in regulating TNF-α-induced RA synovial fibroblast (RA-FLS) activation. Treatment with TQ (1–5 μM) had no marked effect on the viability of human RA-FLS. Pre-treatment of TQ inhibited TNF-α-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 production and ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and cadherin-11 (Cad-11) expression in RA-FLS (p < 0.01). Evaluation of the signaling events showed that TQ inhibited TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK expression, but had no inhibitory effect on NF-κB pathway, in RA-FLS (p < 0.05; n = 4). Interestingly, we observed that selective down-regulation of TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-JNK activation by TQ is elicited through inhibition of apoptosis-regulated signaling kinase 1 (ASK1). Furthermore, TNF-α selectively induced phosphorylation of ASK1 at Thr845 residue in RA-FLS, which was inhibited by TQ pretreatment in a dose dependent manner (p < 0.01). Pre-treatment of RA-FLS with ASK1 inhibitor (TC ASK10), blocked TNF-α induced expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and Cad-11. Our results suggest that TNF-α-induced ASK1-p38/JNK pathway is an important mediator of cytokine synthesis and enhanced expression of adhesion molecule in RA-FLS and TQ, by selectively inhibiting this pathway, may have a potential therapeutic value in regulating tissue destruction observed in RA. - Highlights: • Evolving evidence suggests that ASK1 plays a central role in rheumatic arthritis (RA). • TNF-α activates ASK1, which regulate downstream signaling through JNK/p38 activation in RA-FLS. • ASK1 may be used as a potential therapeutic target in RA. • Thymoquinone was able to selectively inhibit TNF-α-induced phosphorylation of ASK1 in RA-FLS. • Thymoquinone might serve as a potential small

  13. Synovial chondromatosis of the right side temporomandibular joint extending to the middle cranial fossa: A case report with 7-year postoperative follow up and expression of a biomarker of cell proliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroyuki; Kayamori, Kou; Wake, So; Sato, Fumiaki; Kino, Koji; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with cranial extension is rare. Here, we report 7-year follow-up of a case with immunohistochemical examination of cell proliferative activity. Presentation of case The patient was a 72-year-old man. Severe bone resorption of the glenoid fossa was apparent on CT images. Pathological findings by biopsy led to diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the right side TMJ. Extirpation of the tumor was performed via temporopreauricular incision under general anesthesia. PCNA expression was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The lesion had penetrated into the middle cranial fossa, but the cranial dura mater was intact. Expression of PCNA was confirmed. Discussion The PCNA expression suggested that growth activity caused expansion of the lesion to the skull base. Conclusion We were able to follow up this case for a long period without recurrence postoperatively. PMID:26855075

  14. Fibroblast-like synovial cells from normal and inflamed knee joints differently affect the expression of pain-related receptors in sensory neurones: a co-culture study.

    PubMed

    von Banchet, Gisela Segond; Richter, Jonny; Hückel, Marion; Rose, Christina; Bräuer, Rolf; Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2007-01-01

    Innervation of the joint with thinly myelinated and unmyelinated sensory nerve fibres is crucial for the occurrence of joint pain. During inflammation in the joint, sensory fibres show changes in the expression of receptors that are important for the activation and sensitization of the neurones and the generation of joint pain. We recently reported that both neurokinin 1 receptors and bradykinin 2 receptors are upregulated in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurones (the cell bodies of sensory fibres) in the course of acute and chronic antigen-induced arthritis in the rat. In this study, we begin to address mechanisms of the interaction between fibroblast-like synovial (FLS) cells and sensory neurones by establishing a co-culture system of FLS cells and DRG neurones. The proportion of DRG neurones expressing neurokinin 1 receptor-like immunoreactivity was not altered in the co-culture with FLS cells from normal joints but was significantly upregulated using FLS cells from knee joints of rats with antigen-induced arthritis. The proportion of DRG neurones expressing bradykinin 2 receptors was slightly upregulated in the presence of FLS cells from normal joints but upregulation was more pronounced in DRG neurones co-cultured with FLS cells from acutely inflamed joints. In addition, the expression of the transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) receptor, which is involved in inflammation-evoked thermal hyperalgesia, was mainly upregulated by co-culturing DRG neurones with FLS cells from chronically inflamed joints. Upregulation of neurokinin 1 receptors but not of bradykinin 2 and TRPV1 receptors was also observed when only the supernatant of FLS cells from acutely inflamed joint was added to DRG neurones. Addition of indomethacin to co-cultures inhibited the effect of FLS cells from acutely inflamed joints on neurokinin 1 receptor expression, suggesting an important role for prostaglandins. Collectively, these data show that FLS cells are able to induce an upregulation of

  15. Expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) extracellular domain in pichia pastoris and functional analysis in synovial fibroblasts and NIT3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ding, Tianbing; Zhang, Jian; Su, Jin; Li, Fuyang; Liu, Xinping; Ma, Wenyu; Yao, Libo

    2006-10-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a kind of protein tyrosine kinases associated with cell proliferation and tumor metastasis, and collagen, identified as a ligand for DDR2, up-regulates matrix metallloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) and MMP-2 expression in cellular matrix. To investigate the roles of DDR2 in destruction of cartilage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and tumor metastasis, we tried to express extracellular domain of DDR2 fused with a His tag to increase protein solubility and facilitate purification (without signal peptide and transmembrane domain, designated DR) in Pichia pastoris, purify the expressed protein, and characterize its function, for purpose of future application as a specific DDR2 antagonist. Two clones of relative high expression of His-DR were obtained. After purification by a Ni-NTA (nitric-tri-acetic acid) chromatographic column, soluble fused His-DR over 90% purity were obtained. Competitive binding inhibition assay demonstrated that expressed His-DR could block the binding of DDR2 and natural DDR2 receptors on NIT3T3 and synovial cell surfaces. Results of RT-PCR, Western blotting, and gelatinase zymography showed that His-DR was capable of inhibiting MMP-1 and MMP-2 secretion from NIT3T3 cells and RA synoviocytes stimulated by collagen II. For MMP-1, the inhibitory effect was displayed at the levels of mRNA and protein, whereas for MMP-2 it was demonstrated at the level of protein physiological activity. All these findings suggested that the fused expressed His-DR inhibited the activity of natural DDR2, and relevant MMP-1 and MMP-2 expression in synoviocytes and NIH3T3 cells provoked by collagen II.

  16. Effects of Cellular 11β-hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 1 on LPS-induced Inflammatory Responses in Synovial Cell Line, SW982

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Nam; Shim, Jung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyzes the conversion of inactive cortisone into active cortisol, which has pleiotropic roles in various biological conditions, such as immunological and metabolic homeostasis. Cortisol is mainly produced in the adrenal gland, but can be locally regenerated in the liver, fat, and muscle. Its diverse actions are primarily mediated by binding to the glucocorticoid receptor. SW982, a human synovial cell line, expresses 11β-HSD type 1, but not type 2, that catalyzes the conversion of cortisone to cortisol. In this study, therefore, we investigated the control of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses by prereceptor regulation-mediated maintenance of cortisol levels. Preliminarily, cell seeding density and incubation period were optimized for analyzing the catalytic activity of SW982. Additionally, cellular 11β-HSD1 still remained active irrespective of monolayer or spheroid culture conditions. Inflammatory stimulants, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and LPS, did not affect the catalytic activity of 11β-HSD1, although a high dose of LPS significantly decreased its activity. Additionally, autocrine effects of cortisol on inflammatory responses were investigated in LPS-stimulated SW982 cells. LPS upregulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-1β, in SW982 cells, while cortisol production, catalyzed by cellular 11β-HSD1, downregulated LPS-stimulated cytokines. Furthermore, suppression of NFκB activation-mediated pro-inflammatory responses by cortisol was revealed. In conclusion, the activity of cellular 11β-HSD1 was closely correlated with suppression of LPS-induced inflammation. Therefore, these results partly support the notion that prereceptor regulation of locally regenerated cortisol could be taken into consideration for treatment of inflammation-associated diseases, including arthritis. PMID:28680378

  17. A protocol for the culture and isolation of murine synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinjun; Ouyang, Qingqing; Hu, Ziyou; Huang, Qin; Wu, Jing; Wang, Ran; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    The culture of synovial fibroblasts (SFs) is one of the most effective tools for investigating the pathology and physiology of synovial tissues and should prove useful for identifying the importance of SFs in disease as well as for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for several chronic joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, thus far, a detailed protocol for the primary culture and isolation of murine SFs has not been established. Therefore, the present study describes an easy and convenient method for isolating and culturing SFs from C57BL/6 mice. This protocol can be divided into 4 stages: Isolation of synovial tissues, isolation of SFs, seeding of SFs for growth in culture and purity analysis of SFs using the four cell markers, vimentin, cluster of differentiation 90.2 (CD90.2; Thy-1.2), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (CD106). This method is efficient and a purified population of SFs can be obtained 10 days after the initiation of culture. PMID:27446536

  18. Occasional presence of herpes viruses in synovial fluid and blood from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Rubén; Ordoñez, Graciela; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Pineda, Benjamín; Sotelo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Viral agents have been suspected as participants of immune-mediated disorders. In the case of rheumatic diseases, the synovial joint cavity represents a secluded area of inflammation which could harbor etiological agents. We analyzed by polymerase chain reaction the possible presence of DNA from various herpes viruses in blood and synovial fluid from patients with either rheumatoid arthritis (n = 18), axial spondyloarthritis (n = 11), or osteoarthritis (n = 8). Relevant findings were as follows: DNA from varicella zoster virus was found in synovial fluid but not in blood mononuclear cells from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 45 % of patients with axial spondyloarthritis but not in patients with osteoarthritis. Also, DNA from herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 was found both in the blood and in the synovial fluid from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our results indicate the occasional presence of DNA from herpes viruses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or with axial spondyloarthritis. However, these findings might represent a parallel epiphenomenon of viral activation associated either with immunosuppressive therapy or with primary immune disturbances, rather than the etiological participation of herpes viruses in these disorders.

  19. Imatinib mesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, Charlotta; Joutsiniemi, Saima; Lindstedt, Ken A.; Juutilainen, Timo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K. . E-mail: kari.eklund@hus.fi

    2006-08-18

    Synovial fibroblast is the key cell type in the growth of the pathological synovial tissue in arthritis. Here, we show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of PDGF-receptor signalling by imatinib mesylate (1 {mu}M) completely abrogated the PDGF-stimulated proliferation and inhibited approximately 70% of serum-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Similar extent of inhibition was observed when PDGF was neutralized with anti-PDGF antibodies, suggesting that imatinib mesylate does not inhibit pathways other than those mediated by PDGF-receptors. No signs of apoptosis were detected in synovial fibroblasts cultured in the presence of imatinib. These results suggest that imatinib mesylate specifically inhibits PDGF-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, and that inhibition of PDGF-receptors could represent a feasible target for novel antirheumatic therapies.

  20. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  1. Synovial cell death is regulated by TNF-α-induced expression of B-cell activating factor through an ERK-dependent increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Lee, Jiyoung; Um, Sung Hee; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2017-04-06

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) has a role in the maturation and maintenance of B cells and is associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we investigated whether tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced BAFF expression controls the survival of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and whether their survival can be regulated by TNF-α-mediated upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α using MH7A synovial cells transfected with the SV40 T antigen. More TNF-α-treated cells died compared with the control. Survival was increased by incubation with Z-VAD but inhibited after transfection with BAFF-siRNA. Both BAFF and HIF-1α expression were enhanced when MH7A cells were treated with TNF-α. TNF-α-induced BAFF expression decreased in response to HIF-1α-siRNA, whereas it increased under hypoxia or by overexpressing HIF-1α. The HIF-1α binding site on the BAFF promoter (-693 to -688 bp) was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay to detect the -750 to -501 bp and -800 to -601 bp regions. The BAFF promoter increased in response to TNF-α treatment or overexpression of HIF-1α. However, TNF-α-induced BAFF expression and promoter activity decreased after treatment with the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Cell death was enhanced by PD98059 but was inhibited by overexpression of HIF-1α. Taken together, our results demonstrate that BAFF expression to control synovial cell survival was regulated by HIF-1α binding to the BAFF promoter, and suggest for the first time that HIF-1α might be involved in the production of inflammatory cytokines to regulate the physiological function of rheumatic FLS.

  2. Active compound of Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. down-regulates the expression of genes involved in joint erosion in a human synovial fibroblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongsa, Rujirek; Ongchai, Siriwan; Boonsing, Phorani; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Panthong, Ampai; Reutrakul, Vichai

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the synovium. It is involved in up-regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), resulting in joint inflammation and erosion. Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. has long been used to reduce joint pain and inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory activities of an active compound of Z. cassumunar, (E)-4-(3',4'-dimethoxyphenyl)but-3-en-1-ol (compound D), against cytokine-induced up-regulation of catabolic genes involved in cartilage degradation in RA. Synovial fibroblast cell line, SW982, was cultured in media containing interleukin-1β (IL-1β), in the presence or absence of compound D at the concentration range of 1 to 100 µM. After 24 hours, the cells were analyzed for the expressions of MMPs, IL-1β and interleukin-1β-converting enzyme (ICE) by RT-PCR. MMPs activities in the culture media were analyzed by zymographic techniques. Dexamethasone was used as the positive control. It was found that compound D at the concentration of 10 - 100 µM significantly decreased the mRNA expressions of MMP-1, -2, -3, and -13 which was induced by IL-1β (P<0.05) concomitantly with a decrease in activities of these MMPs in the culture media. An increase in the mRNA expression of IL-1β and ICE was also suppressed by compound D. The results suggest that the potent activities of this compound may be involved in the reduction of IL-1β protein synthesis in both pro-form and active form which played an important role in up-regulation of MMPs. This study first revealed the chondroprotective activity of Z. cassumunar in the transcriptional level by suppressing cytokine-induced catabolic genes which caused cartilage erosion in RA.

  3. Alpinia galanga extracts downregulate interleukin-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinases expression in human synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Choocheep, Kanyamas; Phitak, Thanyaluck; Pompimon, Wilart; Kongtawelert, Prachya

    2011-03-01

    Alpinia galanga has been used as alternative medicine for anti-rheumatic activities. However, the precise action of the extract on arthritic diseases is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of A. galanga extracts on the expression of genes involved in catabolic activities in an interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced human synovial fibroblast as an inflammatory model. Confluent primary human synovial fibroblasts were treated for 24 h with A. galanga hexane extracts in the presence of recombinant human IL-1β. MMPs in the culture medium were monitored by gelatin zymography. Total RNA was isolated from the cell lysate and analyzed via semi-quantitative RT-PCR. After treatment with A. galanga extracts, MMP-2 activity in the culture medium was significantly reduced. In addition, MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, and Cox-2 expression were downregulated. These data suggest that the decrease of gene expression and production of MMPs in synovial fibroblasts against inflammatory stimuli could be due to the effects of the A. galanga extracts. Therefore, A. galanga extracts might be a promising therapeutic agent for arthritis.

  4. The effect of depth of centrifuged synovial fluid on leukocyte esterase test for periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Ruangsomboon, Pakpoom; Chinprasertsuk, Sriprapa; Khejonnit, Varanya; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

    2017-03-17

    Centrifugation of aspirated synovial fluid before leukocytes esterase (LE) testing for diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) may make blood tinged specimens interpretable. We aimed to establish the proper sampling depth of centrifuged specimens for LE testing as one diagnostic criterion and also AS-D chloroacetate esterase (CAE) staining testing as an adjunctive tool. A definite PJI knee joint group and an aseptic primary total knee arthroplasty control group were studied quasi-experimentally (N = 46). At 2000 g for 15 minutes, 3 ml of synovial fluid was centrifuged. LE strip testing and median synovial WBC count were performed at 2, 4, and 6 mm depths. CAE staining test characterized LE particles. ROC curve, area under the curve, and significant differences were determined. The proper predictive depth to diagnose PJI was sought by forward stepwise logistic regression. All fresh blood-tinged specimens had uncertain interpretations. Centrifugation increased interpretability (55% to 100%). ROC curve and area under the curve at 2, 4, and 6 mm depths were 0.822, 0.804, and 0.786, respectively. The cut point of ++ to diagnose PJI was statistically significant (p < 0.05) at all depths. P-values of forward stepwise logistic regression at 2, 4, and 6 mm were 0.001, 0.752, and 0.756, respectively. CAE staining confirmed extracellular LE release by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). A specimen at < 2 mm from the surface of centrifuged synovial fluid at a grading of ++ or more for PJI diagnosis is proper for LE testing. CAE staining testing adjunctively characterizes LE particles and cell morphology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Synovial Osteochondromatosis at the Carpometacarpal Joint of the Thumb

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Hiroyoshi; Nishimura, Takahiro; Amagai, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Mayu; Miyamoto, Osamu; Nakama, Sueo

    2017-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC) is a benign tumor characterized by synovial connective tissue metaplasia. SOC commonly affects major joints including the knee followed by the hip, elbow, and wrist. SOC cases in the hand are not reported as often as SOC of major joints. Particularly SOC of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb is rare. We report on a 57-year-old female with primary SOC of the carpometacarpal joint of her left thumb. Surgical excision was performed and the patient had no symptoms with full range of motion of her left thumb. At 3 years of follow-up, there was no recurrence. PMID:28168072

  6. Identification of potential mutations and genomic alterations in the epithelial and spindle cell components of biphasic synovial sarcomas using a human exome SNP chip.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yan; Wang, Ning; Pang, Li-Juan; Zou, Hong; Hu, Jian-Ming; Zhao, Jin; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Chun-Xia; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Yuan, Xiang-Lin; Li, Feng

    2015-10-27

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is one of the most aggressive soft-tissue sarcomas and is noted for late local recurrence and metastasis. It is of uncertain histological origin and exhibits a biphasic histopathological form involving both the mesenchyme and epithelium. Thus, its diagnosis and therapy remain a huge challenge for clinicians and pathologists. This study aimed to determine whether differential morphological-associated genomic changes could aid in ascertaining the histogenesis of SS and to determine whether these sarcomas showed some specific mutated genes between epithelial and spindle cells that would promote tumor invasion and metastasis. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of mesenchymal and epithelial components in 12 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biphasic SS samples using the Illumina human exon microarray. Exome capture sequencing was performed to validate the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-chip data, and de novo data were generated using a whole-exome chip with the Illumina exon microarray. Fisher's exact test based on PLINK analysis of the SNP-chip data. Here, the SNP-chip data showed that 336 SNPs had association P-values of less than 0.05 by chi-square test. We identified 23 significantly mutated genes between epithelial and spindle cell regions of SSs. Fifteen gene mutations were specific for the spindle cell component (65.2 %) and eight for the epithelial cell component (34.8 %). Most of these genes have not been previously reported in SS, and neuroguidin (NGDN), RAS protein activator like 3 (RASAL3), KLHL34 and MUM1L1 have not previously been linked to cancer; only one gene (EP300) has been reported in SS. Genomic analyses suggested that the differential SNPs in genes used for functional enrichment are mainly related to the inflammatory response pathway, adhesion, ECM-receptor interactions, TGF-β signaling, JAK-STAT signaling, phenylalanine metabolism, the intrinsic pathway and formation of fibrin. This study investigated novel

  7. Correlation between plasma, synovial fluid and articular cartilage Interleukin-18 with radiographic severity in 33 patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youhua; Xu, Dawei; Long, Long; Deng, Xiaolong; Tao, Ran; Huang, Guicheng

    2014-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease characterized by cartilage degeneration, secondary synovial membrane inflammation and subchondral bone changes. In recent years, many studies have confirmed that interleukin-18 (IL-18) is involved in the inflammatory process of inflammatory joint diseases. In the present study, we investigated IL-18 levels in plasma, synovial fluid and articular cartilage of patients with primary knee OA (n = 33) to analyze their relationship with radiographic severity. Compared to healthy controls (n = 15), OA patients had higher plasma and synovial fluid IL-18 concentrations(45.8 ± 22.1 vs. 23.7 ± 13.6 pg/ml, P<0.001 and 75.2 ± 40.1 vs. 28.3 ± 11.6 pg/ml, P<0.001) as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Also,the percentage of immunofluorescent IL-18 positive cells in articular cartilage was significantly increased in OA compared to controls (46.5 ± 10.3 vs. 2.9 ± 1.7, P<0.001). Moreover, plasma, synovial fluid and articular cartilage IL-18 significantly positively correlated with radiographic severity, respectively (r = 0.663, P<0.001, r = 0.56, P = 0.001 and r = 0.884, P<0.001). Subsequent analysis revealed that plasma, synovial fluid and articular cartilage IL-18 levels positively correlated with each other (r = 0.632, P<0.001, r = 0.489, P = 0.004 and r = 0.620, P<0.001). These data suggested that plasma, synovial fluid and articular cartilage IL-18 levels were significantly increased in OA patients, and these elevated levels were positively correlated with radiographic severity. Accordingly, our study supports the role of IL-18 in the pathophysiology of OA.

  8. Dendritic cell analysis in primary immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Bigley, Venetia; Barge, Dawn; Collin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Dendritic cells are specialized antigen-presenting cells which link innate and adaptive immunity, through recognition and presentation of antigen to T cells. Although the importance of dendritic cells has been demonstrated in many animal models, their contribution to human immunity remains relatively unexplored in vivo. Given their central role in infection, autoimmunity, and malignancy, dendritic cell deficiency or dysfunction would be expected to have clinical consequences. Recent findings Human dendritic cell deficiency disorders, related to GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) and interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) mutations, have highlighted the importance of dendritic cells and monocytes in primary immunodeficiency diseases and begun to shed light on their nonredundant roles in host defense and immune regulation in vivo. The contribution of dendritic cell and monocyte dysfunction to the pathogenesis of primary immunodeficiency disease phenotypes is becoming increasingly apparent. However, dendritic cell analysis is not yet a routine part of primary immunodeficiency disease workup. Summary Widespread uptake of dendritic cell/monocyte screening in clinical practice will facilitate the discovery of novel dendritic cell and monocyte disorders as well as advancing our understanding of human dendritic cell biology in health and disease. PMID:27755182

  9. Clinical manifestations of synovial cysts.

    PubMed

    Burt, T B; MacCarter, D K; Gelman, M I; Samuelson, C O

    1980-08-01

    Although synovial cysts are most commonly associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, they may occur in many other conditions. The clinical manifestations of these cysts are numerous and may result from pressure, dissection or acute rupture. Vascular phenomena occur when popliteal cysts compress vessels, and result in venous stasis with subsequent lower extremity edema or thrombophlebitis. Rarely, popliteal cysts may cause arterial compromise with intermittent claudication. Neurological sequelae include pain, paresthesia, sensory loss, and muscle weakness or atrophy. When synovial cysts occur as mass lesions they may mimic popliteal aneurysms or hematomas, adenopathy, tumors or even inguinal hernias. Cutaneous joint fistulas, septic arthritis or osteomyelitis, and spinal cord and bladder compression are examples of other infrequent complications. Awareness of the heterogeneous manifestations of synovial cysts may enable clinicians to avoid unnecessary diagnostic studies and delay in appropriate management. Arthrography remains the definitive diagnostic procedure of choice, although ultrasound testing may be useful.

  10. Postlaminectomy Bilateral Lumbar Intraspinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ik; Lee, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts are included in the difference diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Developing imaging modalities has result in increased reporting about these lesions. However, the case of bilateral new lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy has been rarely reported. We report of a rare case with bilateral lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy, requiring surgical excision. PMID:27799997

  11. Expression of CD44 on rheumatoid synovial fluid lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, D; Murphy, A; Hall, N; Omary, M B; Kearns, G; Long, A; Casey, E B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate the involvement of the adhesion molecule CD44 in the homing of lymphocytes to synovial tissue, by examining the density of expression and molecular mass of CD44 on rheumatoid synovial fluid lymphocytes. METHODS--Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid lymphocytes were isolated by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation. CD44 expression was analysed by two colour flow cytometry of CD3 positive T lymphocytes with calculation of mean fluorescence intensity. Expression of activation markers M21C5, M2B3, interleukin (IL)-2 receptor and transferrin receptor was quantitated. In addition, CD44 molecular mass was examined by Western blot in six patients. RESULTS--CD44 expression was markedly increased on synovial fluid T lymphocytes of rheumatoid patients relative to peripheral blood lymphocytes from the same individuals. CD44 molecular mass on peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 88 kDa, but that on synovial fluid lymphocytes was only 83 kDa. CD44 expression correlated significantly with expression of activation markers M21C5, M2B3, and the IL-2 receptor. CONCLUSIONS--Alterations in density of expression or of the molecular mass of CD44 could contribute to local tissue injury, either directly by facilitating adhesion, or indirectly through effects on other adhesion molecules. Images PMID:7545382

  12. Effect of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 on Equine Synovial Fluid Chondroprogenitor Expansion and Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchessi, Marta; Chen, Yuwen; Durgam, Sushmitha; Pondenis, Holly; Stewart, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been identified in the synovial fluid of several species. This study was conducted to characterize chondroprogenitor (CP) cells in equine synovial fluid (SF) and to determine the effect of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) on SF-CP monolayer proliferation and subsequent chondrogenesis. We hypothesized that FGF-2 would stimulate SF-CP proliferation and postexpansion chondrogenesis. SF aspirates were collected from adult equine joints. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays were performed during primary cultures. At first passage, SF-cells were seeded at low density, with or without FGF-2. Following monolayer expansion and serial immunophenotyping, cells were transferred to chondrogenic pellet cultures. Pellets were analyzed for chondrogenic mRNA expression and cartilage matrix secretion. There was a mean of 59.2 CFU/mL of SF. FGF-2 increased the number of population doublings during two monolayer passages and halved the population doubling times. FGF-2 did not alter the immunophenotype of SF-CPs during monolayer expansion, nor did FGF-2 compromise chondrogenesis. Hypertrophic phenotypic markers were not expressed in control or FGF-2 groups. FGF-2 did prevent the development of a “fibroblastic” cell layer around pellet periphery. FGF-2 significantly accelerates in vitro SF-CP expansion, the major hurdle to clinical application of this cell population, without detrimentally affecting subsequent chondrogenic capacity. PMID:26839571

  13. Adrenomedullin Regulates IL-1β Gene Expression in F4/80+ Macrophages during Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shotaro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory processes; however, the role and expression of AM in synovial inflammation have not been determined. To investigate the expression and role of AM in inflamed synovial tissue (ST), the gene expression profiles of AM in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of a murine patellar surgical dislocation model were characterized. In addition, the effects of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and AM in cultured synovial cells were also examined. CD11c+ macrophages were found to be elevated in ST of the surgically dislocated patella. Higher gene expression of CD11c, IL-1β, AM, receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 (RAMP2), and 3 (RAMP3) was also observed in ST obtained from the dislocated side. AM expression was also significantly increased in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages in response to IL-1β treatment. Synovial macrophages also highly expressed RAMP3 compared to fibroblasts and this expression was further stimulated by exogenously added IL-1β. Further, the treatment of the F4/80-positive cell fraction obtained from ST with AM inhibited IL-1β expression. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that AM was produced by synovial fibroblasts and macrophages in inflamed ST and that increased levels of AM may exert anti-inflammatory effects on synovial macrophages. PMID:28299347

  14. Primary Lithium-Thionyl Chloride Cell Evaluation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    AD A09466 0 AFWAL-TR-80-2076 PRIMARY LITHIUM THIONYL - CHLORIDE CELL EVALUATION Dr. A.E. Zolla R.R. Waterhouse D.J. DeBiccari G.L. Griffin, Jr. Altus...dS.,_b,I ......... S TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Primary Lithium - Thionyl Chloride Final 9/79 - 4/80 Cell Evaluation, 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...the high performance characteristics of the Altus lithium - thionyl chloride cell. In particular features such as the inherent high energy density, the

  15. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  16. Poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma in the wrist - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Daniela Cristina Caetano; Menezes, Carla Kellen da Silva; Bastos, Thales Costa; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Francesconi, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are rare malignant tumors affecting mainly young adults, presenting as a slow growth mass located in deep soft tissues of extremities, near the joints. In this report a 34-year-old male patient, presented an ulcerovegetative lesion on the right wrist which was completely excised. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed synovial sarcomas with poorly differentiated cells. This patient presented 11 months later with ipsilateral axillary lymph node metastasis, which emphasizes the unfavorable prognosis of this synovial sarcoma variant. The indolent growth pattern of this sarcoma justifies the well circumscribed initial stages, which progressively infiltrate adjacent structures with lung metastasis (80%) and lymph node involvement (20%) and thus corroborates the importance of early diagnosis and proper treatment. PMID:25184926

  17. TRPV1 mediates cell death in rat synovial fibroblasts through calcium entry-dependent ROS production and mitochondrial depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Fen; Sun Wenwu; Zhao Xiao Ting; Cui Zongjie Yang Wenxiu

    2008-05-16

    Synoviocyte hyperplasia is critical for rheumatoid arthritis, therefore, potentially an important target for therapeutics. It was found in this work that a TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, and acidic solution (pH 5.5) induced increases in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in synoviocytes isolated from a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis. The increases in both [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} and ROS production were completely abolished in calcium-free buffer or by a TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Further experiments revealed that capsaicin and pH 5.5 solution caused mitochondrial membrane depolarization and reduction in cell viability; such effects were inhibited by capsazepine, or the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. Both capsaicin and pH 5.5 buffer induced apoptosis as shown by nuclear condensation and fragmentation. Furthermore, RT-PCR readily detected TRPV1 mRNA expression in the isolated synoviocytes. Taken together, these data indicated that TRPV1 activation triggered synoviocyte death by [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} elevation, ROS production, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

  18. Osteochondral repair using a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells and a hydroxyapatite-based artificial bone.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Moriguchi, Yu; Ando, Wataru; Nansai, Ryosuke; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A; Gobbi, Alberto; Kita, Keisuke; Horibe, Shuji; Shino, Konsei; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Norimasa

    2014-09-01

    For an ideal osteochondral repair, it is important to facilitate zonal restoration of the subchondral bone and the cartilage, layer by layer. Specifically, restoration of the osteochondral junction and secure integration with adjacent cartilage could be considered key factors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of a combined material comprising a scaffold-free tissue-engineered construct (TEC) derived from synovial mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and a hydroxyapatite (HA) artificial bone using a rabbit osteochondral defect model. Osteochondral defects were created on the femoral groove of skeletally mature rabbits. The TEC and HA artificial bone were hybridized to develop a combined implant just before use, which was then implanted into defects (N=23). In the control group, HA alone was implanted (N=18). Histological evaluation and micro-indentation testing was performed for the evaluation of repair tissue. Normal knees were used as an additional control group for biomechanical testing (N=5). At hybridization, the TEC rapidly attached onto the surface of HA artificial bone block, which was implantable to osteochondral defects. Osteochondral defects treated with the combined implants exhibited more rapid subchondral bone repair coupled with the development of cartilaginous tissue with good tissue integration to the adjacent host cartilage when assessed at 6 months post implantation. Conversely, the control group exhibited delayed subchondral bone repair. In addition, the repair cartilaginous tissue in this group had poor integration to adjacent cartilage and contained clustered chondrocytes, suggesting an early osteoarthritis (OA)-like degenerative change at 6 months post implantation. Biomechanically, the osteochondral repair tissue treated with the combined implants at 6 months restored tissue stiffness, similar to normal osteochondral tissue. The combined implants significantly accelerated and improved osteochondral repair

  19. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  20. Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Steven T; Querfeld, Christiane

    2006-01-01

    Primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) encompass a clinically and biologically heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) defined by clonal proliferation of skin-homing malignant T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. They account for up to 75% to 80% of all cutaneous lymphomas. The current WHO-EORTC classification of cutaneous lymphomas with primary cutaneous manifestations lists 13 entities. The most common subtypes-mycosis fungoides, Sézary syndrome, primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and lymphomatoid papulosis-which represent approximately 95% of CTCLs, will be discussed in the following review. Each entity has unique biological characteristics and clinical course. Topical and/or systemic therapies are employed based on the stage of the disease and the tempo of progression.

  1. Immunostaining for SYT protein discriminates synovial sarcoma from other soft tissue tumors: analysis of 146 cases.

    PubMed

    He, Rui; Patel, Rajiv M; Alkan, Serhan; Hammadeh, Rasheed; Weiss, Sharon W; Goldblum, John R; Venkataraman, Girish; Baila, Horea

    2007-05-01

    Synovial sarcoma in its classic biphasic form can be distinguished readily from other soft tissue lesions; however, monophasic and poorly differentiated forms are diagnostically more problematic. For this reason, we assessed the efficacy of immunostaining for SYT and SSX1 proteins, the gene products resulting from unique synovial sarcoma translocation, to distinguish synovial sarcoma from other soft tissue lesions. A total number of 146 cases were analyzed, including 47 synovial sarcoma cases (all of which were verified by FISH to have t(X; 18) translocation and SYT-SSX fusion gene) and 99 soft tissue tumors of various types. A polyclonal IgG antibody against SYT was used to stain formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues. Forty-one out of 47 (87%) synovial sarcoma displayed strong positive nuclear staining (ranging from 80 to 90% of the tumor cells) for SYT antibody. Nineteen of 99 (19%) non-synovial sarcoma cases showed variable nuclear and cytoplasmic staining with SYT, which ranged from 20 to 60% of tumor nuclei, and included malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (5/25), solitary fibrous tumor (2/14), Ewing sarcoma (2/6), low grade fibromyxoid tumor (2/4), extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (2/6), gastrointestinal tumor (4/17), epithelioid sarcoma (2/2). The remaining non-synovial sarcomas were negative. This is the first study demonstrating SYT protein expression in tissue sections of synovial sarcoma. This method could provide an easy, rapid and widely applicable means of assisting in the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma, particularly when material and/or resources are unavailable for PCR or FISH-based testing. However, as variable weak staining for SYT may be encountered in a small percentage of non-synovial sarcoma sarcomas, a positive interpretation should be made only when the staining is strong, nuclear and present in the majority of cells.

  2. Synovial Joints: from Development to Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tieshi; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Temple, Joseph D.; Willcockson, Helen H.; Ye, Ping; Esposito, Alessandra; Xu, Fuhua; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Synovial joint morphogenesis occurs through the condensation of mesenchymal cells into a non-cartilaginous region known as interzone, and the specification of progenitor cells that commit to the articular fate. Although several signaling molecules are expressed by the interzone, the mechanism is poorly understood. For treatments of cartilage injuries, it is critical to discover the presence of joint progenitor cells in adult tissues and their expression gene pattern. Potential stem cells niches have been found in different joint regions, such as the surface zone of articular cartilage, synovium and groove of Ranvier. Inherited joint malformation as well as joint degenerating conditions are often associated with other skeletal defects, and may be seen as the failure of morphogenic factors to establish the correct microenvironment in cartilage and bone. Therefore, exploring how joints form can help us understand how cartilage and bone are damaged and to develop drugs to reactivate this developing mechanism. PMID:25431159

  3. Synovial sarcoma: defining features and diagnostic evolution.

    PubMed

    Thway, Khin; Fisher, Cyril

    2014-12-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm with variable epithelial differentiation, with a propensity to occur in young adults and which can arise at almost any site. It is generally viewed and treated as a high-grade sarcoma. As one of the first sarcomas to be defined by the presence of a specific chromosomal translocation leading to the production of the SS18-SSX fusion oncogene, it is perhaps the archetypal "translocation-associated sarcoma," and its translocation remains unique to this tumor type. Synovial sarcoma has a variety of morphologic patterns, but its chief forms are the classic biphasic pattern, of glandular or solid epithelial structures with monomorphic spindle cells and the monophasic pattern, of fascicles of spindle cells with only immunohistochemical or ultrastructural evidence of epithelial differentiation. However, there is significant morphologic heterogeneity and overlap with a variety of other neoplasms, which can cause diagnostic challenge, particularly as the immunoprofile is varied, SS18-SSX is not detected in 100% of SSs, and they may occur at unusual sites. Correct diagnosis is clinically important, due to the relative chemosensitivity of SS in relation to other sarcomas, for prognostication and because of the potential for treatment with specific targeted therapies in the near future. We review SS, with emphasis on the diagnostic spectrum, recent immunohistochemical and genetic findings, and the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Synovial membrane involvement in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints: a light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Dijkgraaf, L C; Liem, R S; de Bont, L G

    1997-03-01

    To study the light microscopic characteristics of the synovial membrane of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints to evaluate synovial membrane involvement in the osteoarthritic process. Synovial membrane biopsies were obtained during unilateral arthroscopy in 40 patients. Thirty-one temporomandibular joints were diagnosed with osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis subgroups were defined on the basis of the presence of symptoms related to disk displacement and perforation. The control group consisted of nine temporomandibular joints that were not involved by osteoarthritis. During light microscopic examination of the synovial membranes, several light microscopic variables were recorded. Differences between groups and between subgroups were tested with chi 2 or Fisher's exact tests with Mann-Whitney U tests and with Student's t tests. In the osteoarthritis group, the number of synovial intima cell layers was significantly higher, and fibrous intima matrix and fibrous subintima were found significantly more frequently than in the control group. Moreover, in the osteoarthritis group, intima cell hypertrophy in combination with a closely packed cell composition was found significantly more often in the first year of clinical signs and symptoms, whereas intima hyperplasia, fibrous intima matrix, dense surface material, and subintima elastic fibers were found significantly more frequently in the first 2 years of clinical signs and symptoms. The findings in this study suggest that osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint may initially result in synovial intima hyperplasia and cell hypertrophy, and subsequently in deposition of fibrous material in the intima matrix. Eventually, fibrosis of the subintimal tissue may occur in combination with degeneration and subsequent normalization of the synovial intima cell layer. Overall, fibrosis was the most characteristic feature of synovial membranes of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints. In conclusion, the involvement of the

  5. Clonal heterogeneity of synovial fluid T lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Duby, A.D.; Sinclair, A.K.; Osborne-Lawrence, S.L. ); Zeldes, W.; Kan, Li; Fox, D.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Although substantial evidence suggests that synovial T lymphocytes are critical in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), little is known regarding their antigenic specificities, antigen receptor gene rearrangements, and mechanisms of activation. To assess the extend of expansion of specific clones among RA synovial fluid T cells, Southern blot analyses of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were performed on 40 RA synovial fluid T-cell clones, as well as on fresh and polyclonally activated T cells from RA synovial fluid, RA peripheral blood, and normal peripheral blood. Two of the clones had identical TCR rearrangement patterns, but the remainder were unique. The nonclonal RA T-cell samples showed the same pattern of TCR {beta}-chain rearrangement that was observed among normal peripheral blood T cells, indicating no dominant clonal T-cell population in these samples. It was noted that with sufficient exposure of autoradiograms of the Southern blots, discrete TCR gene rearrangements, representing in some cases common D{sub {beta}}J{sub {beta}} (D, diversity; J, joining) rearrangements, were evident in T cells from peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with RA, as well as T cells from RA synovial fluid. Taken together, the findings indicate that only a minor degree of oligoclonality can be demonstrated among T lymphocytes from RA synovial fluid.

  6. Primary processes in sensory cells: current advances.

    PubMed

    Frings, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    In the course of evolution, the strong and unremitting selective pressure on sensory performance has driven the acuity of sensory organs to its physical limits. As a consequence, the study of primary sensory processes illustrates impressively how far a physiological function can be improved if the survival of a species depends on it. Sensory cells that detect single-photons, single molecules, mechanical motions on a nanometer scale, or incredibly small fluctuations of electromagnetic fields have fascinated physiologists for a long time. It is a great challenge to understand the primary sensory processes on a molecular level. This review points out some important recent developments in the search for primary processes in sensory cells that mediate touch perception, hearing, vision, taste, olfaction, as well as the analysis of light polarization and the orientation in the Earth's magnetic field. The data are screened for common transduction strategies and common transduction molecules, an aspect that may be helpful for researchers in the field.

  7. Synovial sarcoma mimicking benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Larque, Ana B; Bredella, Miriam A; Nielsen, G Petur; Chebib, Ivan

    2017-07-08

    To assess the radiographic and clinicopathologic features of synovial sarcoma of the nerve that were clinically or radiologically interpreted as benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Five patients with synovial sarcoma arising from the peripheral nerve and interpreted clinically and radiologically as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were identified. Clinicopathologic and imaging features were evaluated. There were three females and two males, ranging in age from 28 to 50 (mean 35.8) years. Most patients (4/5) complained of a mass, discomfort or pain. MR images demonstrated a heterogeneous, enhancing, soft tissue mass contiguous with the neurovascular bundle. On histologic examination, most tumors were monophasic synovial sarcoma (4/5). At the time of surgery, all tumors were noted to arise along or within a peripheral nerve. All patients were alive with no evidence of disease with median follow-up of 44 (range 32-237) months. For comparison, approximately 775 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities were identified during the same time period. Primary synovial sarcoma of the nerve can mimic peripheral nerve sheath tumors clinically and on imaging and should be included in the differential diagnosis for tumors arising from peripheral nerves.

  8. T cell-B cell interactions in primary immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Tangye, Stuart G; Deenick, Elissa K; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Ma, Cindy S

    2012-02-01

    Regulated interactions between cells of the immune system facilitate the generation of successful immune responses, thereby enabling efficient neutralization and clearance of pathogens and the establishment of both cell- and humoral-mediated immunological memory. The corollary of this is that impediments to efficient cell-cell interactions, normally necessary for differentiation and effector functions of immune cells, underly the clinical features and disease pathogenesis of primary immunodeficiencies. In affected individuals, these defects manifest as impaired long-term humoral immunity and susceptibility to infection by specific pathogens. In this review, we discuss the importance of, and requirements for, effective interactions between B cells and T cells during the formation of CD4(+) T follicular helper cells and the elicitation of cytotoxic function of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as how these processes are abrogated in primary immunodeficiencies due to loss-of-function mutations in defined genes. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Failure of cell cleavage induces senescence in tetraploid primary cells.

    PubMed

    Panopoulos, Andreas; Pacios-Bras, Cristina; Choi, Justin; Yenjerla, Mythili; Sussman, Mark A; Fotedar, Rati; Margolis, Robert L

    2014-10-15

    Tetraploidy can arise from various mitotic or cleavage defects in mammalian cells, and inheritance of multiple centrosomes induces aneuploidy when tetraploid cells continue to cycle. Arrest of the tetraploid cell cycle is therefore potentially a critical cellular control. We report here that primary rat embryo fibroblasts (REF52) and human foreskin fibroblasts become senescent in tetraploid G1 after drug- or small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced failure of cell cleavage. In contrast, T-antigen-transformed REF52 and p53+/+ HCT116 tumor cells rapidly become aneuploid by continuing to cycle after cleavage failure. Tetraploid primary cells quickly become quiescent, as determined by loss of the Ki-67 proliferation marker and of the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator/late cell cycle marker geminin. Arrest is not due to DNA damage, as the γ-H2AX DNA damage marker remains at control levels after tetraploidy induction. Arrested tetraploid cells finally become senescent, as determined by SA-β-galactosidase activity. Tetraploid arrest is dependent on p16INK4a expression, as siRNA suppression of p16INK4a bypasses tetraploid arrest, permitting primary cells to become aneuploid. We conclude that tetraploid primary cells can become senescent without DNA damage and that induction of senescence is critical to tetraploidy arrest.

  10. Production of nitric oxide in the synovial membrane of rheumatoid and osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    We have demonstrated spontaneous nitric oxide (NO) production by primary synovial cultures from rheumatoid (RA) and osteoarthritis patients. Increased NO production followed addition of staphylococcal enterotoxin B. Immunochemical double staining with specific anti-human inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and nonspecific esterase (NSE), or anti- CD68 (markers for tissue macrophages) showed that although many lining layer cells in RA synovium expressed iNOS, most (approximately 90%) were NSE- and CD68-, with only a minor population (approximately 10%) which were iNOS+, CD68+/NSE+. These data demonstrate the capacity for high output of NO by human synovial tissue and show that, although human macrophages can express high levels of iNOS, the majority of cells expressing iNOS are fibroblasts. We also report that synoviocytes, and macrophage cell lines, cultured with the NO donor, S- nitroso-acetyl penicillamine, produced high concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. These results suggest that NO may mediate pathology in RA through the induction of TNF-alpha production. PMID:8879223

  11. Battery cell for a primary battery

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkinen, A.

    1984-12-11

    A battery cell for a primary battery, particularly a flat cell battery to be activated on being taken into use, e.g., when submerged into water. The battery cell comprises a positive current collector and a negative electrode. A separator layer which, being in contact with the negative electrode, is disposed between said negative electrode and the positive current collector. A depolarizing layer containing a depolarizing agent is disposed between the positive current collector and the separate layer. An intermediate layer of a porous, electrically insulating, and water-absorbing material is disposed next to the positive current collector and arranged in contact with the depolarizing agent.

  12. Mantle cell lymphoma: primary oral presentation.

    PubMed

    Ainscough, S; Power, A M; Brown, A N

    2017-01-01

    Mantle-cell lymphoma is an uncommon lymphoid malignancy of B-cells. It is often aggressive and prognosis is poor. A 69-year-old gentleman with a history of ischaemic heart disease was referred from primary care with a painless right floor of mouth swelling that had been present for 1 month. He otherwise completely asymptomatic. Incisional biopsy of the lesion was undertaken and marker studies demonstrated mantle cell lymphoma. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography and bone marrow biopsy showed widespread but low volume involvement. The patient was referred to the haematology multidisciplinary team for further assessment and treatment.

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of IL-17A-Treated Synovial Fibroblasts from the Human Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Toshio; Ogura, Naomi; Akutsu, Miwa; Kawashima, Mutsumi; Watanabe, Suguru; Ito, Ko; Kondoh, Toshirou

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts contribute to the inflammatory temporomandibular joint under pathogenic stimuli. Synovial fibroblasts and T cells participate in the perpetuation of joint inflammation in a mutual activation feedback, via secretion of cytokines and chemokines that stimulate each other. IL-17 is an inflammatory cytokine produced primarily by Th17 cells which plays critical role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here, we investigated the roles of IL-17A in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) using genome-wide analysis of synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with TMD. IL-17 receptors were expressed in synovial fibroblasts as assessed using real-time PCR. Microarray analysis indicated that IL-17A treatment of synovial fibroblasts upregulated the expression of IL-6 and chemokines. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of IL-6, CXCL1, IL-8, and CCL20 was significantly higher in IL-17A-treated synovial fibroblasts compared to nontreated controls. IL-6 protein production was increased by IL-17A in a time- and a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, IL-17A simulated IL-6 protein production in synovial fibroblasts samples isolated from three patients. Furthermore, signal inhibitor experiments indicated that IL-17-mediated induction of IL-6 was transduced via activation of NFκB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt. These results suggest that IL-17A is associated with the inflammatory progression of TMD. PMID:26839464

  14. CD271(+) stromal cells expand in arthritic synovium and exhibit a proinflammatory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Del Rey, Manuel J; Faré, Regina; Usategui, Alicia; Cañete, Juan D; Bravo, Beatriz; Galindo, María; Criado, Gabriel; Pablos, José L

    2016-03-15

    CD271(+) stromal cells (SCs) with multipotent stem cell capacity have been identified in synovial tissues, but their functional significance is unknown. We analyzed the distribution of CD271(+) cells in inflammatory synovial tissues as well as their ex vivo immunomodulatory and inflammatory phenotypes. CD271 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in synovial tissues and by flow cytometry in primary adherent synovial cell cultures from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA), and non-inflammatory control tissues. Isolation of CD271(+) synovial SCs was carried out by magnetic cell sorting. Allogeneic T-cell/SC cocultures were performed to analyze the regulatory capacity of these cells on T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. The production of inflammatory mediators was analyzed in cultures of sorted CD271(+)/(-) SCs. The capacity of CD271(+)/(-) SCs to induce inflammatory cell recruitment in vivo was evaluated in subcutaneous implants in immunodeficient mice. CD271(+) SC were detected in non-inflammatory as well as in arthritic synovial tissues with a specific perivascular distribution. CD271(+) SC density was increased in RA and OA compared with normal synovial tissues. T-cell proliferation and cytokine synthesis were similarly modified by CD271(+) and CD271(-) SCs. Sorted CD271(+) SCs from OA synovial tissues released significantly more interleukin (IL)-6, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, and MMP-3 than CD271(-) SCs. In immunodeficient mice, implants of CD271(+) SCs induced significantly higher myeloid cell infiltration than CD271(-) SCs. Our results demonstrate that CD271(+) perivascular SCs expand in RA and OA synovial tissues. CD271(+) cells showed enhanced proinflammatory properties ex vivo and in vivo, whereas immunoregulatory properties were equivalent in CD271(+) and CD271(-) SC.

  15. [Therapeutic options for synovial sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Telekes, András

    2015-05-31

    Synovial sarcomas account for approximately 5 to 10% of soft tissue sarcomas and 0.05 to 0.1% of all malignant neoplasms. They predominantly affect the extremities but can occur in any part of the body. More than 50% of the patients are expected to develop metastatic disease within 3-5 years. In some patients disease recurrence may develop after 20 years. The 5-year overall survival rate is 10% for patients with metastatic disease and 76% for patients with localized one. Age, tumour size, histological subtype, and adjuvant radiotherapy influence prognosis. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy has not been proven yet. There are several ongoing clinical trials to determine the efficacy of active agents used for therapy of locally advanced, relapsed/refractory or metastatic disease. Better understanding of the biological behaviour of synovial sarcomas would provide the future way for the targeted therapy in combination with conventional treatments.

  16. Synovial Fluid Analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluid Analysis Related tests: Glucose Tests , Uric Acid , Gram Stain , Susceptibility Testing , White Blood Cell Count , Red Blood ... to look for microbes if infection is suspected. Gram stain allows for the direct observation of bacteria or ...

  17. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  18. Plasma and synovial fluid microRNAs as potential biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous small noncoding RNAs regulating the activities of target mRNAs and cellular processes, are present in human plasma in a stable form. In this study, we investigated whether miRNAs are also stably present in synovial fluids and whether plasma and synovial fluid miRNAs could be biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Methods We measured concentrations of miR-16, miR-132, miR-146a, miR-155 and miR-223 in synovial fluid from patients with RA and OA, and those in plasma from RA, OA and healthy controls (HCs) by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, miRNAs in the conditioned medium of synovial tissues, monolayer fibroblast-like synoviocytes, and mononuclear cells were examined. Correlations between miRNAs and biomarkers or disease activities of RA were statistically examined. Results Synovial fluid miRNAs were present and as stable as plasma miRNAs for storage at -20°C and freeze-thawing from -20°C to 4°C. In RA and OA, synovial fluid concentrations of miR-16, miR-132, miR-146a, and miR-223 were significantly lower than their plasma concentrations, and there were no correlation between plasma and synovial fluid miRNAs. Interestingly, synovial tissues, fibroblast-like synoviocytes, and mononuclear cells secreted miRNAs in distinct patterns. The expression patterns of miRNAs in synovial fluid of OA were similar to miRNAs secreted by synovial tissues. Synovial fluid miRNAs of RA were likely to originate from synovial tissues and infiltrating cells. Plasma miR-132 of HC was significantly higher than that of RA or OA with high diagnosability. Synovial fluid concentrations of miR-16, miR-146a miR-155 and miR-223 of RA were significantly higher than those of OA. Plasma miRNAs or ratio of synovial fluid miRNAs to plasma miRNAs, including miR-16 and miR-146a, significantly correlated with tender joint counts and 28-joint Disease Activity Score. Conclusions Plasma miRNAs had

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in rheumatoid synovial membrane and cartilage/pannus junction.

    PubMed

    Chu, C Q; Field, M; Abney, E; Zheng, R Q; Allard, S; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1991-12-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been shown to promote tissue repair and have immunosuppressive actions, and has been proposed to have a role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Using immunohistochemical techniques with rabbit F(ab')2 antibodies raised against recombinant human TGF-beta 1, we have detected TGF-beta 1 in the synovial tissue and cartilage/pannus junction (CPJ) from 18/18 patients with RA. TGF-beta 1 was found predominantly in the thickened synovial lining layer in RA, but also detected in a perivascular pattern in the synovial interstitium as well as in occasional cells in the lymphoid aggregates. At the CPJ it was found both in cells at the distinct junction as well as in the transitional region of the diffuse fibroblastic zone. The cells staining for TGF-beta 1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining as being from the monocyte/macrophage series as well as the type B synovial lining cells. TGF-beta 1 was also detected in the synovial membrane sections from 4/4 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus/mixed connective tissue disease and 5/8 patients with osteoarthritis, in a similar distribution to that seen in RA, and in the lining layer of 1/7 normal synovial membranes. These results add to histological evidence confirming that TGF-beta 1 is present in RA synovial cells and those from other arthritides. The distributions of TGF-beta 1 in RA synovial membrane reflects its known actions, as it can be detected at the CPJ, where it could induce repair, and close to activated cells upon which it may exert an immunosuppressive action.

  20. Lysyl oxidase is involved in synovial hyperplasia and angiogenesis in rats with collagen‑induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Wan, Juan; Li, Qiuyan; Zhang, Mingzhu; Wan, Qiaofeng; Ji, Chen; Li, Haibo; Liu, Rongqing; Han, Mei

    2017-09-07

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) serves an important role in remodeling the extracellular matrix and angiogenesis in various types of cancer; however, whether LOX is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis remains unknown. In order to investigate this in the present study, β‑aminopropionitrile, an inhibitor of LOX, was injected intraperitoneally into rats with type II collagen‑induced arthritis (CIA). Subsequently, synovial hyperplasia was examined by hematoxyl in and eosin staining, and the microvascular density (MVD) and expression levels of LOX, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 in the synovial membrane and fluid were determined by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, respectively. The enzyme activity of LOX was evaluated by the Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide method. The results demonstrated an increased amount of rough synovial membranes, higher MVD in these membranes and more synovial cell layers in CIA rats compared with in the control rats. In addition, higher enzymatic activity of LOX and higher expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 were revealed in CIA rats compared with in the control rats. Notably, β‑aminopropionitrile inhibited paw swelling and the decreased the arthritis index, the MVD in the synovial membranes and the expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9. Furthermore, the expression level of LOX in the synovial membranes was positively associated with the MVD and the expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9, suggesting that LOX promotes synovial hyperplasia and angiogenesis and that LOX may be a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Standardized cryopreservation of human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Thomas V; Mathew, Aby J; Thompson, Maria L; Ehrhardt, Rolf O

    2014-09-02

    Cryopreservation is the use of low temperatures to preserve structurally intact living cells. The cells that survive the thermodynamic journey from the 37 °C incubator to the -196 °C liquid nitrogen storage tank are free from the influences of time. Thus, cryopreservation is a critical component of cell culture and cell manufacturing protocols. Successful cryopreservation of human cells requires that the cells be derived from patient samples that are collected in a standardized manner, and carefully handled from blood draw through cell isolation. Furthermore, proper equipment must be in place to ensure consistency, reproducibility, and sterility. In addition, the correct choice and amount of cryoprotectant agent must be added at the correct temperature, and a controlled rate of freezing (most commonly 1 °C/min) must be applied prior to a standardized method of cryogenic storage. This appendix describes how human primary cells can be frozen for long-term storage and thawed for growth in a tissue culture vessel.

  2. Tofacitinib regulates synovial inflammation in psoriatic arthritis, inhibiting STAT activation and induction of negative feedback inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, W; McGarry, T; Orr, C; McCormick, J; Veale, D J; Fearon, U

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease, characterised by synovitis and destruction of articular cartilage/bone. Janus-kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signalling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of PsA. Objectives To examine the effect of tofacitinib (JAK inhibitor) on proinflammatory mechanisms in PsA. Methods Primary PsA synovial fibroblasts (PsAFLS) and ex vivo PsA synovial explants were cultured with tofacitinib (1 µM). PhosphoSTAT3 (pSTAT3), phosphoSTAT1 (pSTAT1), suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), protein inhibitor of activated Stat3 (PIAS3) and nuclear factor kappa B cells (NFκBp65) were quantified by western blot. The effect of tofacitinib on PsAFLS migration, invasion, Matrigel network formation and matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)2/9 was quantified by invasion/migration assays and zymography. Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IFN-gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, IL-17, IL-10, MMP3 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) were assessed by ELISA. Results Tofacitinib significantly decreased pSTAT3, pSTAT1, NFκBp65 and induced SOCS3 and PIAS3 expression in PsAFLS and synovial explant cultures (p<0.05). Functionally, PsAFLS invasion, network formation and migration were inhibited by tofacitinib (all p<0.05). In PsA explant, tofacitinib significantly decreased spontaneous secretion of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, MMP9/MMP2, MMP3 (all p<0.05) and decreased the MMP3/TIMP3 ratio (p<0.05), with no effect observed for IP-10 or IL-10. Conclusions This study further supports JAK-STAT inhibition as a therapeutic target for the treatment of PsA. PMID:26353790

  3. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis. PMID:11207665

  4. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

  5. Serum and Synovial Fluid Serum Amyloid A Response in Equine Models of Synovitis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Elsa K; Brandon Wiese, R; Graham, Megan R; Tyler, Amelia J; Settlage, Julie M; Werre, Stephen R; Petersson-Wolfe, Christina S; Kanevsky-Mullarky, Isis; Dahlgren, Linda A

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the serum and synovial fluid serum amyloid A (SAA) response in equine models of synovitis and septic arthritis and to compare handheld and validated immunoturbidometric assays for SAA quantification. Controlled, experimental study. Healthy adult horses (n = 9). Synovitis (n = 4) and septic arthritis (n = 5) were induced using lipopolysaccharide and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively, and serial serum and synovial fluid samples were collected. Serial synovial fluid cytology was performed for both models and synovial fluid from the septic arthritis model was submitted for bacterial culture. Serum and synovial fluid SAA were quantified by handheld test and immunoturbidometric assay. Cytologic and SAA data were compared within and between models (mixed model ANOVA) and results of SAA assays were compared using category-by-category analysis (weighted kappa coefficient). Synovial fluid total nucleated cell counts and total protein increased significantly following induction of both models. Serum and synovial fluid SAA remained normal in synovitis horses and increased significantly in septic arthritis horses. Serum SAA increased more rapidly than synovial fluid SAA. Agreement was 98% when SAA concentrations were low (<50 μg/mL) but the assays diverged when concentrations were greater than ∼100 μg/mL. Overall, there was good category-by-category agreement between SAA assays (weighted kappa = 0.824). Serum and synovial fluid SAA may be useful adjuncts in diagnosing septic arthritis in horses. SAA concentrations for the assays diverged and examination using a larger sample size is needed before direct numeric comparisons between the assays can be made. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. [Synovialitis of the arthrofibrotic type: criteria of a new synovialitis type for the diagnosis of arthrofibrosis].

    PubMed

    Krenn, V; Ruppert, M; Knöß, P; Kendoff, D; Poremba, C; Thomsen, M; Skutek, M; Hassenpflug, J; Ascherl, R; Krukemeyer, M G; Matziolis, G; Thomas, P; Gehrke, T

    2013-04-01

    After rheumatologic conservative medical therapy has been exhausted in degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases, arthroplastic operations are an important option to restore quality of life. Endoprosthesis-associated arthrofibrosis is a severe fibrosing disease of the synovial membrane after endoprosthetic operations. Neither the morphological substrate nor histopathological criteria have been described. The aim was to describe the histopathological substrate of arthrofibrosis and to define histological and immunohistochemical criteria of arthrofibrosis on the basis of tissue samples derived from revision. In histopathological analyses arthrofibrosis revealed a synovialitis with varying fibrosis, without detectable ossification and without minimal wear particle reaction (so-called synovialitis of arthrofibrotic type, SAT). A 3-stage grading was determined based on the cellular density of the fibrous tissue (fibroblast cellularity). In 191 cases with SAT, grade 1 was found in 24.1 % (n = 46), grade 2 was found in 51.8 % (n = 99) and grade 3 was found in 24.1 % (n = 46). The control group consisted of 29 cases with synovialitis of indifferent type (type IV membrane). If SAT grades 2 and 3 are summed together, i.e. the distance between the fibroblasts was less than two cell lengths, the difference of the fibroblast cellularity compared with the type IV membrane was significant (p < 0.001). Above SAT grade 2 the diagnosis of arthrofibrosis could be made with a sensitivity 0.7592 and specificity 0.8276. The SM-alpha-actin cytoplasmic positivity of fibroblasts indicates a myofibroblast phenotype and the β-catenin positivity suggests a resemblance to fibromatosis or a keloid-like process. In the quantitative evaluation of the β-catenin positive fibroblasts, there was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between type IV membrane and SAT. A threshold value of 20 beta-catenin positive cells per microscopic high power field (HPF) was determined

  7. B cell suppression in primary glomerular disease.

    PubMed

    Rood, Ilse M; Hofstra, Julia M; Deegens, Jeroen K J; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2014-03-01

    Membranous nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and minimal change disease (MCD) are the most common causes of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. For many years prednisone, alkylating agents, and calcineurin inhibitors have been the standard of therapy for these patients. More effective or better tolerated treatment modalities are needed. B cell targeted therapy was recently introduced in clinical practice. In this review, we briefly summarize the current standard therapy and discuss the efficacy of B cell targeted therapy in primary glomerular diseases. Observational, short-term studies suggest that rituximab is effective and comparable to standard therapy in maintaining remissions in patients with frequently relapsing or steroid-dependent MCD or FSGS. In contrast, response is limited in patients with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome. Rituximab also induces remissions in patients with membranous nephropathy. Controlled clinical trials on kidney endpoints are urgently needed to position B cell targeted therapy in clinical practice.

  8. Synovial inflammation in patients with different stages of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ene, Răzvan; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana; Ene, Patricia; Cîrstoiu, Monica Mihaela; Cîrstoiu, Florin Cătălin

    2015-01-01

    The synovium is an intra-articular mesenchymal tissue and essential for the normal joint function. It is involved in many pathological characteristic processes and sometimes specific for this distinctive tissue. In this study, we refer to synovial proliferative disorders according to the stage of osteoarthritis (OA) disease. Forty-three patients with knee OA were treated in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency University Hospital of Bucharest, Romania, in the last two years. In all cases, we used at least five criteria for the knee OA: knee pain, knee joint tenderness, no palpable warmth over the knee, stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels. In all the cases the synovial tissue was selected by the orthopedic surgeon. X-ray examination was taken in every case of the affected joint. Patients who were considered to have early OA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsy of the symptomatic joint. Synovial tissue samples from patients with late OA were obtained at the time of knee joint arthroplasty. Microscopic examination in early osteoarthritis revealed for more than half of patients with synovial biopsy through arthroscopic technique having synovitis lesions with mononuclear infiltrates, diffuse fibrosis, thickening of the lining layer, macrophages appearance and neoformation vessels also. The synovitis seen in advanced OA knees tends to be diffuse and is not mandatory localized to areas of chondral defects, although an association has been reported between chondral defects and associated synovitis in the knee medial tibio-femoral compartment. The overexpression of mediators of inflammation and the increased mononuclear cell infiltration were seen in early OA, compared with late OA.

  9. Spontaneous hemorrhage into a lumbar synovial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Jose F.; Ramos, Ana; Lobato, Ramiro D.; Lagares, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts frequently present with back pain, chronic radiculopathy and/or progressive symptoms of spinal canal compromise. These cysts generally appear in the context of degenerative lumbar spinal disease. Few cases of spontaneous hemorrhage into synovial cysts have been reported in the literature. PMID:20174835

  10. Place of radiotherapy in the treatment of synovial sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.H.; Harwood, A.R.; Cummings, B.J.; Fornasier, V.; Langer, F.; Quirt, I.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews 36 patients with synovial sarcoma; 18 were referred within three months of surgery. None had undergone en bloc excision and all were treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Local control and survival were analyzed with respect to Tumor Node Metastasis Classification, histology, site of primary and surgical procedure. Eight patients with T1-2N0M0 tumors were alive and well (minimum two year follow-up) following excision and radiotherapy; 7 had a normally functional extremity. In contrast, only one of 8 patients with T3N0M0 tumors is alive and well. Seven of 8 patients with well or moderately differentiated histology were alive and well whereas no patient with poorly differentiated histologies survived. Six of 7 patients were alive and well if their tumor was distal to the elbow or knee whereas none of those who had a primary thigh synovial sarcoma survived. Eighteen patients were referred with recurrent disease and 2 were salvaged. A management policy is proposed for synovial sarcoma with the integrated use of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy; it emphasizes optimal cure rates and a functional extremity reserving amputation for salvage.

  11. Inflammatory Cell Distribution in Primary Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, Rachel; Roberts, Claudia; Waterboer, Tim; Steele, Jane; Marsden, Jerry; Steven, Neil M.; Blackbourn, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cutaneous carcinoma associated with older age, immunodeficiency and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) integrated within malignant cells. The presence of intra-tumoural CD8+ lymphocytes reportedly predicts better MCC-specific survival. In this study, the distribution of inflammatory cells and properties of CD8+ T lymphocytes within 20 primary MCC specimens were characterised using immunohistochemistry and multicolour immunofluorescent staining coupled to confocal microscopy. CD8+ cells and CD68+ macrophages were identified in 19/20 primary MCC. CD20+ B cells were present in 5/10, CD4+ cells in 10/10 and FoxP3+ cells in 7/10 specimens. Only two specimens had almost no inflammatory cells. Within specimens, inflammatory cells followed the same patchy distribution, focused at the edge of sheets and nodules and, in some cases, more intense in trabecular areas. CD8+ cells were outside vessels on the edge of tumour. Those few within malignant sheets typically lined up in fine septa not contacting MCC cells expressing MCPyV large T antigen. The homeostatic chemokine CXCL12 was expressed outside malignant nodules whereas its receptor CXCR4 was identified within tumour but not on CD8+ cells. CD8+ cells lacked CXCR3 and granzyme B expression irrespective of location within stroma versus malignant nodules or of the intensity of the intra-tumoural infiltrate. In summary, diverse inflammatory cells were organised around the margin of malignant deposits suggesting response to aberrant signaling, but were unable to penetrate the tumour microenvironment itself to enable an immune response against malignant cells or their polyomavirus. PMID:24961933

  12. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, A.; Ullrich, P. V.; Cimniak, A. F. V.; Follo, M.; Nestel, S.; Heimrich, B.; Nazarenko, I.; Stark, G. B.; Bannasch, H.; Braig, D.; Eisenhardt, S. U.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. PMID:27069481

  13. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research.

    PubMed

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Follo, M; Nestel, S; Heimrich, B; Nazarenko, I; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients.

  14. Effect of Tibial Plateau Fracture on Lubrication Function and Composition of Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Brooke L.; Antonacci, Jennifer M.; Temple-Wong, Michele M.; Hui, Alexander Y.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Bugbee, William D.; Schwartz, Alexandra K.; Girard, Paul J.; Sah, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Intra-articular fractures may hasten posttraumatic arthritis in patients who are typically too active and too young for joint replacement. Current orthopaedic treatment principles, including recreating anatomic alignment and establishing articular congruity, have not eliminated posttraumatic arthritis. Additional biomechanical and biological factors may contribute to the development of arthritis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate human synovial fluid for friction-lowering function and the concentrations of putative lubricant molecules following tibial plateau fractures. Methods: Synovial fluid specimens were obtained from the knees of eight patients (twenty-five to fifty-seven years old) with a tibial plateau fracture, with five specimens from the injured knee as plateau fracture synovial fluid and six specimens from the contralateral knee as control synovial fluid. Each specimen was centrifuged to obtain a fluid sample, separated from a cell pellet, for further analysis. For each fluid sample, the start-up (static) and steady-state (kinetic) friction coefficients in the boundary mode of lubrication were determined from a cartilage-on-cartilage biomechanical test of friction. Also, concentrations of the putative lubricants, hyaluronan and proteoglycan-4, as well as total protein, were determined for fluid samples. Results: The group of experimental samples were obtained at a mean (and standard deviation) of 11 ± 9 days after injury from patients with a mean age of 45 ± 13 years. Start-up and kinetic friction coefficients demonstrated similar trends and dependencies. The kinetic friction coefficients for human plateau fracture synovial fluid were approximately 100% higher than those for control human synovial fluid. Hyaluronan concentrations were ninefold lower for plateau fracture synovial fluid compared with the control synovial fluid, whereas proteoglycan-4 concentrations were more than twofold higher in plateau fracture synovial

  15. Synovial fluid findings in children with knee monoarthritis in lyme disease endemic areas.

    PubMed

    Deanehan, Julia K; Nigrovic, Peter A; Milewski, Matthew D; Tan Tanny, Sharman P; Kimia, Amir A; Smith, Brian G; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2014-01-01

    Although Lyme and septic arthritis of the knee may have similar clinical presentations, septic arthritis requires prompt identification and treatment to avoid joint destruction. We sought to determine whether synovial fluid cell counts alone can discriminate between Lyme, septic, and other inflammatory arthritis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children aged 1 to 18 years with knee monoarthritis who presented to 1 of 2 pediatric emergency departments located in Lyme endemic areas. We included children who had both a synovial fluid culture and an evaluation for Lyme disease. Septic arthritis was defined as a positive synovial fluid culture or synovial fluid pleocytosis (white blood cell [WBC] ≥40,000 cells/μL) with a positive blood culture. Lyme arthritis was defined as positive Lyme serology without a positive bacterial culture. All other children were considered to have other inflammatory arthritis. We compared the synovial fluid counts by arthritis type. We identified 384 children with knee monoarthritis, of whom 19 (5%) had septic arthritis, 257 (67%) had Lyme arthritis and 108 (28%) had other inflammatory arthritis. Children with other inflammatory arthritis had lower synovial WBC and absolute neutrophil count, as well as percent neutrophils, than those with either Lyme or septic arthritis. There were no significant differences in the synovial fluid WBC, absolute neutrophil count, and percent neutrophils for children with Lyme and septic arthritis. In Lyme endemic areas, synovial fluid results alone do not differentiate septic from Lyme arthritis. Therefore, other clinical or laboratory indicators are needed to direct the care of patients with knee monoarthritis.

  16. Primary Mediastinal B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pileri, Stefano A.; Gaidano, Gianluca; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Falini, Brunangelo; Gaulard, Philippe; Zucca, Emanuele; Pieri, Federica; Berra, Eva; Sabattini, Elena; Ascani, Stefano; Piccioli, Milena; Johnson, Peter W. M.; Giardini, Roberto; Pescarmona, Edoardo; Novero, Domenico; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Marafioti, Teresa; Alonso, Miguel A.; Cavalli, Franco

    2003-01-01

    Although primary mediastinal (thymic) large B-cell lymphoma has been primarily studied, its precise phenotype, molecular characteristics, and histogenesis are still a matter of debate. The International Extranodal Lymphoma Study Group collected 137 such cases for extensive pathological review. Histologically, the lymphomatous growth was predominantly diffuse with fibrosis that induced compartmentalized cell aggregation. It consisted of large cells with varying degrees of nuclear polymorphism and clear to basophilic cytoplasm. On immunohistochemistry, the following phenotype was observed: CD45+, CD20+, CD79a+, PAX5/BSAP+, BOB.1+, Oct-2+, PU.1+, Bcl-2+, CD30+, HLA-DR+, MAL protein+/−, Bcl-6+/−, MUM1/IRF4+/−, CD10−/+, CD21−, CD15−, CD138−, CD68−, and CD3−. Immunoglobulins were negative both at immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Molecular analysis, performed in 45 cases, showed novel findings. More than half of the cases displayed BCL-6 gene mutations, which usually occurred along with functioning somatic IgVH gene mutations and Bcl-6 and/or MUM1/IRF4 expression. The present study supports the concept that a sizable fraction of cases of this lymphoma are from activated germinal center or postgerminal center cells. However, it differs from other aggressive B-cell lymphomas in that it shows defective immunoglobulin production despite the expression of OCT-2, BOB.1, and PU.1 transcription factors and the lack of IgVH gene crippling mutations. PMID:12507907

  17. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  18. Testicular Synovial Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nesrine, Mejri; Sellami, Rym; Doghri, Raoudha; Rifi, Hela; Raies, Henda; Mezlini, Amel

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case of testicular synovial sarcoma with molecular genetic analysis. A 24-year-old male presented with painless scrotal mass. Ultrasonography showed a heterogeneous mass of 66 mm × 34 mm in size involving the inguinal region. Histological examination of a surgical biopsy showed a grade III monophasic growth pattern of spindle cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated positive staining for pancytokeratine and epithelial membrane antigen. Cytogenetic analysis showed the presence of CYT-SSX1 mutation, and CT scan showed non-specific pleural micro-nodules with a size of 7.5 mm. The patient had an extended left orchidectomy but was lost to follow-up for 1 year. A local recurrent scrotal mass of 32 mm × 25 mm, multiple inguinal lymph nodes, and increased pleural nodules, which were confirmed by histological examination, were treated with three cycles of adriamycine and ifosfamide chemotherapy, surgical resection, and radiotherapy with complete response. After 3 months, the patient developed local recurrence and pulmonary metastases that did not respond to second-line chemotherapy based on gemcitabine and paclitaxel. The patient had dyspnea at the time of this writing and chest pain, and is under third-line chemotherapy based on Deticene after 30 months of following up. This patient died on November 16, 2012 after a resperatory failure and malignant pelural effusion. Synovial sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumor and it should be aggressively treated to improve prognosis. Although our patient has shown numerous factors of bad prognosis, he has had a relatively long survival time. PMID:23691490

  19. Testicular synovial sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nesrine, Mejri; Sellami, Rym; Doghri, Raoudha; Rifi, Hela; Raies, Henda; Mezlini, Amel

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports a case of testicular synovial sarcoma with molecular genetic analysis. A 24-year-old male presented with painless scrotal mass. Ultrasonography showed a heterogeneous mass of 66 mm × 34 mm in size involving the inguinal region. Histological examination of a surgical biopsy showed a grade III monophasic growth pattern of spindle cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated positive staining for pancytokeratine and epithelial membrane antigen. Cytogenetic analysis showed the presence of CYT-SSX1 mutation, and CT scan showed non-specific pleural micro-nodules with a size of 7.5 mm. The patient had an extended left orchidectomy but was lost to follow-up for 1 year. A local recurrent scrotal mass of 32 mm × 25 mm, multiple inguinal lymph nodes, and increased pleural nodules, which were confirmed by histological examination, were treated with three cycles of adriamycine and ifosfamide chemotherapy, surgical resection, and radiotherapy with complete response. After 3 months, the patient developed local recurrence and pulmonary metastases that did not respond to second-line chemotherapy based on gemcitabine and paclitaxel. The patient had dyspnea at the time of this writing and chest pain, and is under third-line chemotherapy based on Deticene after 30 months of following up. This patient died on November 16, 2012 after a resperatory failure and malignant pelural effusion. Synovial sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumor and it should be aggressively treated to improve prognosis. Although our patient has shown numerous factors of bad prognosis, he has had a relatively long survival time.

  20. Increase in the expression of alpha E beta 7, characteristic of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes, on T cells in the lung epithelium of patients with interstitial lung diseases and in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, M; Witt, C; Hüge, W; Müller, B

    1996-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium contains a distinct group of lymphocytes (iIEL). The majority of iIEL are T cells characterized by a phenotype different from PBL. This phenotypic peculiarity has led to the hypothesis that iIEL, develop in a thymus-independent fashion, that they may develop locally in the gut epithelium itself and that they have the distinct function of providing a first line of defense in the gut. We looked at the expression of the gut-associated surface molecule alpha E beta 7 on T cells in inflamed tissues outside the gut epithelium. The already high frequency of 41.8% alpha E beta 7+ T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage from healthy lungs rises to a median of 61% in a fibrotic lung. In synovial fluid the percentage of T cells expressing alpha E beta 7 was diverse; it was not as high as in the lung but was elevated compared to PBL levels. In both tissues, the increase in alpha E beta 7 expression correlated with an increase in CD8+ cells. We discuss our data in the context of a model in which iIEL can leave the gut epithelium and become involved in inflammatory processes, possibly related to autoimmune disease.

  1. First-in-Human Treatment With a Dendritic Cell-targeting Lentiviral Vector-expressing NY-ESO-1, LV305, Induces Deep, Durable Response in Refractory Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma Patient.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Seth M; Lu, Hailing; Gnjatic, Sacha; Somaiah, Neeta; O'Malley, Ryan B; Jones, Robin L; Hsu, Frank J; Ter Meulen, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Effective induction of antitumor T cells is a pivotal goal of cancer immunotherapy. To this end, lentiviral vectors (LV) are uniquely poised to directly prime CD8 T-cell responses via transduction of dendritic cells in vivo and have shown promise as active cancer therapeutics in preclinical tumor models. However, until now, significant barriers related to production and regulation have prevented their widespread use in the clinic. We developed LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting, integration-deficient, replication incompetent LV from the ZVex platform, encoding the full-length cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. LV305 is currently being evaluated in phase 1 and 2 trials in metastatic recurrent cancer patients with NY-ESO-1 positive solid tumors as a single agent and in combination with anti-PD-L1. Here we report on the first patient treated with LV305, a young woman with metastatic, recurrent, therapy-refractive NY-ESO-1 synovial sarcoma. The patient developed a robust NY-ESO-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell response after 3 intradermal injections with LV305, and subsequently over 85% disease regression that is continuing for >2.5 years posttherapy. No adverse events >grade 2 occurred. This case demonstrates that LV305 can be safely administered and has the potential to induce a significant clinical benefit and immunologic response in a patient with advanced stage cancer.

  2. Patellar Subluxation With Early-Phase Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon M

    2016-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, monoarticular disease process that affects the synovial membrane of the joint, the synovial sheath, or the bursa around the joint. The etiology is unknown, but it has been associated with trauma in some cases. Although it is a benign lesion, if left untreated, it may lead to early secondary osteoarthritis of the joint. The knee joint is affected in 50% to 65% of cases, followed by the elbow and the hip. This article reports a 30-year-old active woman who presented to the author's clinic with a large infrapatellar mass that caused lateral subluxation of the patella, swelling, and episodic pain with crepitations 14 months after direct trauma to the knee. Clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy revealed a large infrapatellar mass causing lateral subluxation of the patella with no loose bodies. Hoffa's disease, para-articular osteochondroma, and early-phase synovial chondromatosis were considered in the differential diagnosis. The histopathologic and clinical features were consistent with early synovial chondromatosis. The patient underwent local excision of the mass through a medial parapatellar arthrotomy. At 5 years of follow-up, she had no recurrence of the lesion or progression of the disease. Early diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis with local excision offers a reliable cure. However, long-term follow-up is advised because of the high recurrence rates as well as the risk of metaplastic transformation.

  3. Next Generation Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC)–Based Cartilage Repair Using Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineered Constructs Generated with Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Ando, Wataru; Moriguchi, Yu; Sugita, Norihiko; Yasui, Yukihiko; Koizumi, Kota; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A.; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Because of its limited healing capacity, treatments for articular cartilage injuries are still challenging. Since the first report by Brittberg, autologous chondrocyte implantation has been extensively studied. Recently, as an alternative for chondrocyte-based therapy, mesenchymal stem cell–based therapy has received considerable research attention because of the relative ease in handling for tissue harvest, and subsequent cell expansion and differentiation. This review summarizes latest development of stem cell therapies in cartilage repair with special attention to scaffold-free approaches. PMID:27340513

  4. Gene therapy of primary T cell immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2013-08-10

    Gene therapy of severe combined immunodeficiencies has been proven to be effective to provide sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiencies. This has been achieved for 2 forms of SCID, i.e SCID-X1 (γc deficiency) and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Occurrence of gene toxicity generated by integration of first generation retroviral vectors, as observed in the SCID-X1 trials has led to replace these vectors by self inactivated (SIN) retro(or lenti) viruses that may provide equivalent efficacy with a better safety profile. Results of ongoing clinical studies in SCID as well as in other primary immunodeficiencies, such as the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, will be thus very informative.

  5. Synovial expression of IL-15 in rheumatoid arthritis is not influenced by blockade of tumour necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Ernestam, Sofia; af Klint, Erik; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Sundberg, Erik; Engström, Marianne; Klareskog, Lars; Ulfgren, Ann-Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Blockade of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is an effective treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but both non-responders and partial responders are quite frequent. This suggests that other pro-inflammatory cytokines may be of importance in the pathogenesis of RA and as possible targets for therapy. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF blockade (infliximab) on the synovial expression of IL-15 in RA in relation to different cell types and expression of other cytokines, to elucidate whether or not IL-15 is a possible target for therapy, independently of TNF blockade. Two arthroscopies with multiple biopsies were performed on nine patients with RA and knee-joint synovitis before and after three infusions of infliximab (3 mg/kg). Synovial biopsies were analysed with immunohistochemistry for expression of IL-15, TNF, IL-1α, IL-1ß and IFN-γ, and for the cell surface markers CD3, CD68 and CD163. Stained synovial biopsy sections were evaluated by computerized image analysis. IL-15 expression was detected in all synovial biopsies taken at baseline. After infliximab therapy, the expression of IL-15 was increased in four patients and reduced in five. Synovial expression of IL-15 was not correlated with any CD marker or with the presence of any other cytokine. Synovial cellularity was decreased after 8 to 10 weeks of treatment with a significant reduction of the CD68-positive synovial cells, whereas no significant change was seen in the number of CD3-positive T cells and CD163-expressing macrophages. The number of TNF-producing cells in the synovial tissue at baseline was correlated with a good response to therapy. Thus, in this study the synovial expression of IL-15 in RA was not consistently influenced by TNF blockade, being apparently independent of TNF expression in the synovium. Consequently, we propose that IL-15 should remain as a therapeutic target in RA, regardless of the response to TNF blockade. PMID:16507118

  6. Primary oat cell carcinoma of the larynx

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar, E.A. III; Robbins, K.T.; Stephens, J.; Dimery, I.W.; Batsakis, J.G.

    1987-02-01

    The aggressiveness of small (oat) cell carcinoma of the larynx presents a therapeutic challenge to the oncologist. Since the first description of this type of carcinoma in 1972, 52 patients have been reported in the literature and a variety of treatment regimens have been used. The purpose of this study was to report two new cases and review all previous reports to determine the disease's biological behavior, clinical manifestations, and optimum treatment. Thirty-five percent of the tumors were transglottic, and 27% were supraglottic. Fifty-four percent of patients had regional metastases at initial presentation and 17.6% had distant metastases. The median survival was 10 months for all patients. Patients who were treated with chemotherapy with or without other modalities had the best 2-year survival rates (52.2%). Forty-one percent of patients had regional recurrence only, 12.5% had regional recurrence and distant metastases, and 2% developed distant metastases only. We conclude that patients with oat cell carcinoma of the larynx should be treated with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Surgery is best reserved for persistent and recurrent disease at the primary site and neck.

  7. Local fibroblast proliferation but not influx is responsible for synovial hyperplasia in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Saito, Tetsuya; Kawahata, Kimito; Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji; Inagaki, Yutaka; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-12

    Synovial fibroblasts play crucial roles in inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). How they accumulate in the RA joints remains unclear. This study was conducted to discern whether cellular influx from the outside of the joints and local proliferation are responsible for synovial fibroblast accumulation in an animal model of RA. We found that synovial fibroblasts were identified as GFP+ cells using collagen type I alpha 2 (Col1a2)-GFP transgenic reporter mice. Then, bone marrow transplantation and parabiosis techniques were utilized to study the cellular influx. Irradiated wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from Col1a2-GFP mice. Col1a2-GFP and wild-type mice were conjoined for parabiosis. The transplanted mice and the parabionts were subjected to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). We found no GFP+ cells in the hyperplastic synovial tissues from the transplanted mice with CAIA and from the wild-type parabionts with CAIA. Furthermore, normal and CAIA synovial tissues from Col1a2-GFP mice and from fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) transgenic mice, in which cells in S/G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle express Azami-Green, were studied for Ki67, a cellular proliferation marker, and vimentin, a fibroblast marker, expression. The percentages of Ki67+/GFP+ and Azami-Green+/vimentin+ cells in the CAIA synovial tissues were higher than those in the untreated synovial tissues (34% vs. 0.40% and 19% vs. 0.26%, respectively). These findings indicate that local fibroblast proliferation but not cellular influx is responsible for the synovial hyperplasia in CAIA. Suppression of proliferation of the local synovial fibroblasts should be a promising treatment for RA. - Highlights: • We studied how synovial fibroblasts accumulate in joints in a murine model of RA. • Bone marrow-derived cells did not accumulate in arthritic joints. • Synovial fibroblasts did not accumulate in arthritic joints via

  8. Inhibition of forkhead box class O family member transcription factors in rheumatoid synovial tissue.

    PubMed

    Ludikhuize, J; de Launay, D; Groot, D; Smeets, T J M; Vinkenoog, M; Sanders, M E; Tas, S W; Tak, P P; Reedquist, K A

    2007-07-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent activation of protein kinase B (PKB) has been observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissue, and mechanisms that interfere with this process are protective in animal models of arthritis. PKB can regulate cell survival and proliferation via phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of forkhead box class O (FoxO) transcription factors. The present study was undertaken to examine whether FoxO transcription factors are differentially inactivated in RA synovial tissue, and whether this inactivation correlates with laboratory and clinical parameters of disease activity. The expression and phosphorylation of FoxO family members were assessed in synovial biopsy tissue from 12 patients with RA and 9 patients with inflammatory osteoarthritis (OA), by immunohistochemistry and quantitative computer-assisted image analysis. Immunoblotting was used to assess the interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)- and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced phosphorylation of FoxO1 and FoxO4 in cultured fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and macrophages. FoxO1, FoxO3a, and FoxO4 were expressed and phosphorylated in synovial tissue from both RA patients and OA patients. In RA synovial tissue, phosphorylation of FoxO1 was observed in both FLS and macrophages, FoxO3a in T lymphocytes, and FoxO4 in macrophages alone. Following stimulation with IL-1beta and TNFalpha, FoxO1 and FoxO4 were phosphorylated in both RA and OA FLS and synovial macrophages, respectively. Inactivation of FoxO4 was significantly enhanced in the RA as compared with the OA synovial sublining. There was a strong negative correlation between inactivation of FoxO4 in RA synovial tissue and increased serum C-reactive protein levels and a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate in RA patients. All 3 FoxO family members examined were phosphorylated in both RA and OA synovial tissue; in particular, inactivation of FoxO4 was significantly enhanced in macrophages from RA synovial tissue. Thus

  9. Uncalcified Synovial Chondromatosis in the Pisotriquetral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Kon; Lee, Gi-Jun; Yu, Sun-O; Kim, Jung-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare lesion in the wrist, but some cases in the distal radioulnar joint have been reported and previous case reports emphasize joint calcifications, shown on preoperative plain radiographs. We report an extremely uncommon case of synovial chondromatosis in the pisotriquetral joint, in which radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging did not demonstrate apparent calcified bodies. In our case, for the accurate diagnosis and treatment, surgical exploration of the joint and synovectomy with removal of loose bodies was performed. PMID:26330969

  10. Hyaluronic acid modulates gene expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human fibroblast-like synovial cells from advanced-stage osteoarthritis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Tsang; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wang, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Haw-Chang; Hou, Sheng-Mou; Young, Tai-Horng

    2010-04-01

    Intraarticular injection of hyaluronan (hyaluronic acid; HA) is the common way to treat osteoarthritis (OA) of knees. This treatment cannot only maintain the viscoelastic properties of knee but also release the OA pain. However, the exact molecular mechanism is unknown. In this study, after human synovial cells were stimulated with HA and Hylan (Synvisc) for 24 h, real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) was used to detect the alteration of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene expression, which were specific genes related to pathogenesis of OA knees. Our results illustrated that both HA and Hylan might not cause cytotoxicity or apoptosis of synovial cells in serum deprivation environment. The gene expressions of TGF-beta1 and VEGF were significantly increased at the concentration of 0.1 mg/mL HA and 0.1 mg/mL Hylan, respectively (alpha < 0.05). The synovial cells with treatment of 0.1 mg/mL Hylan decreased the CTGF gene expression (0.66-fold) and VEGF (0.78-fold) compared to 0.1 mg/mL HA (alpha < 0.05). We suggested that the profile of CTGF, TGF-beta1, and VEGF gene expressions in our study might provide the rational mechanism for the therapeutic effect of hyaluronan on OA knees.

  11. Synovial inflammation does not change in the absence of effective treatment: implications for the use of synovial histopathology as biomarker in early phase clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Baeten, D; Houbiers, J; Kruithof, E; Vandooren, B; Van den Bosch, F; Boots, A M; Veys, E M; Miltenburg, A M M; De Keyser, F

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the impact on synovial histopathology of changes in clinical disease activity in the absence of effective treatment. Methods Twelve patients with active RA not receiving effective treatment were studied over a 14 week period. Synovial biopsy specimens obtained at baseline and week 14 were analysed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Results Over the course of 14 weeks, there was a trend towards a decrease of the DAS28, with 7/12 patients being good or moderate DAS28 responders despite the absence of effective treatment. Patients' assessment of global disease activity and swollen joint count both decreased significantly. Histologically, there was a decrease of lining layer hyperplasia and lymphoid aggregates, a similar trend for vascularity, but there was no effect on global synovial infiltration. Accordingly, there was no decrease of the cellular infiltration with T lymphocytes (CD3, CD4, CD8), B lymphocytes (CD20), plasma cells (CD38), dendritic cells (CD1a, CD83), and even an increase of CD163+ sublining macrophages, with a similar trend for CD68+ sublining macrophages. The changes in DAS28 scores in these patients did not correlate with changes in histological variables, with the exception of an inverse correlation with plasma cells. Remarkably, even in the DAS28 responders, no significant changes in synovial inflammatory infiltration were noted. Conclusions Despite variations in global disease activity, synovial inflammatory infiltration did not change significantly in the absence of effective treatment. The lack of a placebo effect on synovial markers of treatment response such as sublining macrophages can facilitate conclusive early phase trials with small numbers of patients with RA. PMID:16414969

  12. First-in-Human Treatment With a Dendritic Cell-targeting Lentiviral Vector-expressing NY-ESO-1, LV305, Induces Deep, Durable Response in Refractory Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma Patient.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Seth M; Lu, Hailing; Gnjatic, Sacha; Somaiah, Neeta; O'Malley, Ryan B; Jones, Robin L; Hsu, Frank J; Ter Meulen, Jan

    2017-09-18

    Effective induction of antitumor T cells is a pivotal goal of cancer immunotherapy. To this end, lentiviral vectors (LV) are uniquely poised to directly prime CD8 T-cell responses via transduction of dendritic cells in vivo and have shown promise as active cancer therapeutics in preclinical tumor models. However, until now, significant barriers related to production and regulation have prevented their widespread use in the clinic. We developed LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting, integration-deficient, replication incompetent LV from the ZVex platform, encoding the full-length cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1. LV305 is currently being evaluated in phase 1 and 2 trials in metastatic recurrent cancer patients with NY-ESO-1 positive solid tumors as a single agent and in combination with anti-PD-L1. Here we report on the first patient treated with LV305, a young woman with metastatic, recurrent, therapy-refractive NY-ESO-1 synovial sarcoma. The patient developed a robust NY-ESO-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cell response after 3 intradermal injections with LV305, and subsequently over 85% disease regression that is continuing for >2.5 years posttherapy. No adverse events >grade 2 occurred. This case demonstrates that LV305 can be safely administered and has the potential to induce a significant clinical benefit and immunologic response in a patient with advanced stage cancer.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/.

  13. The effect of bacterial products on synovial fibroblast function: hypermetabolic changes induced by endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Robert B.; Castor, C. William

    1972-01-01

    The effects of bacterial products on selected synovial fibroblast functions were studied. Extracts of commonly encountered microorganisms were prepared by sonic or mechanical disruption. “Purified” endotoxins were prepared from selected organisms, and in some cases were purchased commercially. Normal fibroblasts were derived from synovial connective tissue obtained from amputations or arthrotomy. The cells were grown as a monolayer on glass and were nourished by a semisynthetic nutrient medium. Extracts of Gram-negative bacteria, applied to fibroblast cultures, markedly increased hyaluronic acid production, glucose utilization, and lactate output. Treatment of the extracts with heat at 100°C for ½ hr decreased their effectiveness by approximately 40%. Purified Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin stimulated synovial fibroblasts to an extent comparable to that caused by heat-treated whole extracts. The lipid moiety of the endotoxin molecule appeared to account for much of the stimulatory activity of the endotoxin. Extracts of commonly encountered Gram-positive cocci, yeast, and Mycoplasma had no stimulating capabilities. Corynebacterial extracts, however, had definite stimulating potential. Endotoxin-synovial cell interaction experiments demonstrated that endotoxin was bound to fibroblasts. Reassay of the endotoxin after extraction from the cells showed that it retained its stimulatory potential. The metabolic phenomena stimulated by bacterial products duplicate the major known actions of connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP). The observations made in this study suggest that bacterial products may participate in a fundamental way in the activation process, and indicate a possible role for bacterial products in synovial inflammation in humans. PMID:4259829

  14. Differential expression of the urokinase receptor (CD87) in arthritic and normal synovial tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Z; Haines, G K; Koch, A E

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR; CD87) exhibits a possible pathogenic role in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. METHODS: A semiquantitative, indirect immunoperoxidase histochemical analysis was performed on frozen synovial tissue sections. The recently characterised monoclonal antibody 10G7 recognising transfectants bearing u-PAR was used. Synovial tissue was obtained from 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 10 patients with osteoarthritis, and four normal subjects. RESULTS: u-PAR was expressed on 70-90% of synovial tissue lining cells and subsynovial, interstitial macrophages from the arthritis patients, but only on a few myeloid cells from the normal subjects. It was also present on more endothelial cells from the rheumatoid and osteoarthritis patients, than from normal synovial tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Plasminogen activators are important in joint destruction underlying arthritis. The up-regulated expression of u-PAR in diseased versus normal synovial tissue suggests a role for this antigen in the inflammatory and angiogenic mechanisms underlying rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Images PMID:9215148

  15. Regulation and function of SIRT1 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Engler, Anna; Tange, Clare; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Gay, Renate E; Gay, Steffen; Ospelt, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and destruction of synovial joints. The function of sirtuin (SIRT)1 in RA is inconclusive. In human synovial cells, SIRT1 was shown to promote cytokine production and apoptosis resistance. However, deletion of SIRT1 aggravated inflammatory arthritis in mice and increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in murine macrophages. In the current study, we investigated the regulation, expression, and function of SIRT1 in RA, in particular its role in adhesion and proliferation of human RA synovial fibroblasts (RASF). We found that expression of SIRT1 was increased in vivo in synovial tissues of RA smokers and in vitro by stimulation of RASF with TNFα, but decreased upon treatment with cigarette smoke extract. Synovial tissues of RA smokers showed higher leukocytic infiltration that positively correlated with enhanced levels of SIRT1. Global transcriptome analysis revealed that SIRT1 modulates expression of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory response and cell adhesion. In functional studies, silencing of SIRT1 reduced proliferation and leukocytic adhesion to RASF but showed inconsistent results in the regulation of adhesion to plastic. In conclusion, SIRT1 modulates the proliferative and potentially also adhesive properties of RASF and can therefore promote progression of RA. SIRT1 is upregulated by TNFα but decreased upon CSE treatment of RASF. Upregulation of SIRT1 in RA smokers correlates with increased leukocytic infiltration. SIRT1 modulates expression of genes regulating cell adhesion and inflammation. SIRT1 regulates proliferation of RASF.

  16. SIGIRR/TIR-8 is an inhibitor of Toll-like receptor signaling in primary human cells and regulates inflammation in models of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Stefan K; Kong, Philip; Inglis, Julia; Williams, Richard O; Garlanda, Cecilia; Mantovani, Alberto; Yazdi, Amir S; Brennan, Fionula; Feldmann, Marc; Foxwell, Brian M J

    2010-08-01

    Single-immunoglobulin interleukin-1 receptor-related (SIGIRR), which is also known as Toll/interleukin-1 receptor 8 (TIR-8), is a member of the TIR domain-containing family of receptors and was first characterized as an inhibitor of interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. In the Dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis model, SIGIRR(-/-) mice were shown to have increased inflammation and to be more susceptible to endotoxin challenge. Increasing evidence implicates TLR and IL-1R signaling in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of SIGIRR in regulating inflammation in disease-relevant models. Primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) were used to overexpress SIGIRR as well as to knock down endogenously expressed SIGIRR using small interfering RNAs. SIGIRR was also overexpressed in synovial cells derived from RA patients. To investigate the role of SIGIRR in vivo, zymosan-induced arthritis (ZIA) and collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA) were induced in SIGIRR-knockout mice. SIGIRR overexpression inhibited TLR-induced cytokine production in macrophages and DCs, while SIGIRR knockdown resulted in increased cytokine production following TLR stimulation. Moreover, SIGIRR overexpression inhibited the spontaneous release of cytokines by human RA synovial cells. The role of SIGIRR as an inhibitor of inflammation was confirmed in vivo, since SIGIRR(-/-) mice developed a more severe disease in both the ZIA and CAIA models. Our study is the first to show the expression pattern and function of SIGIRR in primary human cells. Furthermore, this investigation defines the role of SIGIRR in disease-relevant cell types and demonstrates that SIGIRR is a potential therapeutic target for RA.

  17. Sudden onset of paraplegia secondary to an unusual presentation of pediatric synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ailing; Guo, Fuyou

    2016-12-01

    Spinal synovial sarcoma (SS) is an extremely rare malignant tumor in children. We report an unusual pediatric synovial sarcoma located in the thoracic spine at T9-T10 levels. A 10-year-old boy was admitted with a 1-month history of progressive back pain and low fever for 7 days as well as sudden onset of paraplegia for 1 day. The primary diagnosis was considered for spinal inflammatory abscess; subsequently, the patient underwent total resection with a good recovery and confirmed SS by SYT-SSX gene translocation. The possibility of sudden paraplegia caused by unusual SS involved in the spine should be highlighted.

  18. Sealed Primary Lithium-Inorganic Electrolyte Cell.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Primary batteries , Reliability(Electronics), Lithium compounds, Aluminum compounds, Chlorides , Thionyl chloride , Battery components, Storage, Life tests, Explosions, Hazards, Temperature, Ventilation

  19. Raman spectroscopy of synovial fluid as a tool for diagnosing osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Jacobson, Jon A.; Miller, Bruce S.; Urquhart, Andrew G.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-05-01

    For many years, viscosity has been the primary method used by researchers in rheumatology to assess the physiochemical properties of synovial fluid in both normal and osteoarthritic patients. However, progress has been limited by the lack of methods that provide multiple layers of information, use small sample volumes, and are rapid. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the biochemical composition of synovial fluid collected from 40 patients with clinical evidence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) at the time of elective surgical treatment. Severity of knee osteoarthritis was assessed by a radiologist using Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) scores from knee joint x rays, while light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to examine synovial fluid (SF) aspirates (2 to 10 μL), deposited on fused silica slides. We show that Raman bands used to describe protein secondary structure and content can be used to detect changes in synovial fluid from osteoarthritic patients. Several Raman band intensity ratios increased significantly in spectra collected from synovial fluid in patients with radiological evidence of moderate-to-severe osteoarthritis damage. These ratios can be used to provide a ``yes/no'' damage assessment. These studies provide evidence that Raman spectroscopy would be a suitable candidate in the evaluation of joint damage in knee osteoarthritis patients.

  20. Raman Spectroscopy of Synovial Fluid as a Tool for Diagnosing Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Jacobson, Jon A.; Miller, Bruce S.; Urquhart, Andrew G.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, viscosity has been the primary method used by researchers in rheumatology to assess the physiochemical properties of synovial fluid in both normal and osteoarthritic patients. However, progress has been limited by the lack of methods that provide multiple layers of information, use small sample volumes, and are rapid. In this blinded study, Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the biochemical composition of synovial fluid collected from forty patients with clinical evidence of knee osteoarthritis at the time of elective surgical treatment. Severity of knee osteoarthritis was assessed by a radiologist using Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) scores from knee joint x-rays, while light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to examine synovial fluid aspirates (2–10 µL), deposited on fused silica slides. We show that Raman bands used to describe protein secondary structure and content can be used to detect changes in synovial fluid from osteoarthritic patients. Several Raman band intensity ratios increased significantly in spectra collected from synovial fluid in patients with radiological evidence of osteoarthritis damage. These ratios can be used to provide a “yes/no” damage assessment. Additionally, two ratios increased with K/L score and showed moderate correlative trends. These studies provide evidence that Raman spectroscopy would be a suitable candidate in the evaluation of joint damage in knee osteoarthritis patients. PMID:19566306

  1. Endometrial Synovial-like Metaplasia Associated With Levonorgestrel-releasing Intrauterine System.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Colin J R; Leake, Robyn

    2015-11-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (L-IUS) is widely used in contraception and in the treatment of menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, adenomyosis, and endometriosis. L-IUS is also increasingly considered in the management of endometrial neoplasia and its precursors. Histologic changes in the endometrium can be due to the effects of high-dose progestogen or may be caused by the local irritant or mechanical effects of an intrauterine foreign body. In the present study, we describe a novel endometrial alteration associated with L-IUS that most closely resembles synovial metaplasia reported at other extra-articular anatomic sites. Eleven cases were identified with a mean age of 49.6 yr. In most patients L-IUS was used for management of menorrhagia or endometrial hyperplasia. Endometrial synovial-like metaplasia was always a focal finding and was associated with areas of surface epithelial erosion. The synovial-like cells showed a distinctive palisaded arrangement with orientation perpendicular to the endometrial surface. Multinucleate cells were present in 2 cases, but granulomas were not identified. The synovial-like cells were vimentin immunoreactive and a variable proportion of cells expressed CD68. Only focal CD10 staining was seen and there was no expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or cytokeratin. In summary, L-IUS may be associated with a distinctive synovial-like metaplastic alteration which most likely represents a stromal reaction to an intrauterine foreign body following endometrial surface erosion. The synovial-like cells appear to comprise histiocytes and modified fibroblasts or stromal cells similar to this process in other sites.

  2. Primary Sarcomas of Thyroid Gland–Series of Three Cases with Brief Review of Spindle Cell Lesions of Thyroid

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Meeta; Rani, Poonam; Khurana, Nita; Mishra, Anurag

    2017-01-01

    Primary Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma (MFH-T) and Leiomyosarcoma (LMS-T) of the thyroid gland are extremely rare tumors. Very few cases have been reported in the literature. Both entities occur more commonly in women than men. The closest clinical and histological differential diagnosis is anaplastic carcinoma of thyroid. We present three cases of rare primary sarcomas of thyroid gland. Case-1 was a 63-year-old woman and Case-2 was a 52-year-old woman. Both of them presented with a rapidly increasing thyroid mass clinically mimicking anaplastic carcinoma (AC-T). Both the patients developed pulmonary metastasis and succumbed to the illness soon after the diagnosis of MFH-T was made. Case 3 was 65-year-old woman with neck swelling since six months diagnosed as LMS-T. The present communication adds three new cases to the literature on sarcomas of thyroid gland with an emphasis on differential diagnosis of spindle cell lesions of thyroid. MFH-T and LMS-T needs to be differentiated from AC-T, metastatic sarcomas, spindle cell variant of medullary carcinoma, synovial sarcoma, fibrosarcoma; final diagnosis rests on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:28384879

  3. Effect of Toll-Like Receptor 4 on Synovial Injury of Temporomandibular Joint in Rats Caused by Occlusal Interference

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jingjing; Yang, Yingying; Sun, Shuzhen; Xie, Jianli; Lin, Xuefen; Ji, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Synovitis is an important disease that causes intractable pain in TMJ. Some investigations suggested that the increasing expression of IL-1β secreted by synovial lining cells plays an important role in synovial inflammation and cartilage destruction in TMJ. In our previous research, the results demonstrated that TLR4 is involved in the expression of IL-1β in SFs from TMJ with lipopolysaccharide stimulation. However, the inflammatory response that occurred in synovial membrane is not caused by bacterial infection. In the current study, we investigated whether or not TLR4 participates in the inflammatory responses and the expression of IL-1β in synovial membrane of rats induced by occlusal interference. The results showed that obvious inflammation changes were observed in the synovial membranes and the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β was increased at both mRNA and protein levels in the occlusal interference rats. In addition, the inflammation reactions and the increased expression of IL-1β could be restrained by treatment with TAK-242, a blocker of TLR4 signaling. The results prompted us that the activation of TLR4 may be involved in the inflammatory reactions and increased expression of IL-1β in patients with synovitis and participate in the mechanisms of the initiation and development of synovial injury by regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators like IL-1β in synovial membranes. PMID:27413256

  4. Discoidin domain receptor 2 is associated with the increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in synovial fibroblasts of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Yu, Jiangtian; Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yuanqiang; Liu, Xinping; Sun, Tiezheng; Lu, Houshan; Miyazawa, Keiji; Yao, Libo

    2009-10-01

    Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) by collagen matrix in the synovial fibroblasts of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is critical event in the progressive joint destruction. Our previous study indicated that a collagen receptor, discoidin receptor 2 (DDR2), was highly expressed in the synovial fibroblasts of RA. However, the functional role of DDR2 in the regulation of MMP-13 production in synovial fibroblasts has not been elucidated. In this study, we initially demonstrated that the DDR2 and MMP-13 proteins are both highly expressed in the synovial lining layer of RA. MMP-13 mRNA and protein in synovial fibroblasts of RA were preferentially induced by collagen type II compared with MMP-1. Furthermore, stable overexpression of wild type DDR2 in murine synoviocytes dramatically augments the production of MMP-13. The activation of DDR2 also mediates the up-regulation of MMP-13 promoter activity in 293T cells. Inhibitor specific for extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK MAPK) cascade was shown to decrease MMP-13 level induced by collagen II in RA synovial fibroblasts and DDR2-induced MMP-13 promoter activity. Runx2 and activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding sites in MMP-13 promoter region are required for DDR2-induced transcription. The data in this study suggest that DDR2-mediated MMP-13 induction by collagen matrix in synovial fibroblasts of RA contributed to articular cartilage destruction.

  5. Are serum amyloid A or D-lactate useful to diagnose synovial contamination or sepsis in horses?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Claire S; Singer, Ellen R; Piviani, Martina; Rubio-Martinez, Luis M

    2017-08-01

    Synovial sepsis in horses is life threatening and accurate diagnosis allowing prompt treatment is warranted. This study assessed the diagnostic value of serum amyloid A (SAA) and D-lactate in blood and synovial fluid (SF) as diagnostic markers of synovial sepsis in horses and correlated them with total nucleated cell count (TNCC), percentage of neutrophils (%N) and total protein (TP) in SF. Blood and SF SAA and D-lactate concentrations were determined in a case-control observational study including 112 horses (38 with synovial contamination or sepsis (SCS), 66 with non-septic intra-synovial pathology (NSISP) and 8 controls). Blood and SF SAA were significantly higher in SCS than in NSISP and control horses. SAA values were similar in NSISP and control horses. SF SAA was moderately correlated with synovial TNCC, TP and blood SAA. Blood and SF SAA were 82.4 per cent and 80 per cent sensitive and 88.9 per cent and 73 per cent specific for diagnosis of SCS, with cut-off values of 60.7 and 1.14 µg/ml, respectively. Blood and SF D-lactate concentrations were not significantly different between groups. This study shows that blood and SF SAA concentrations can aid to distinguish SCS from non-septic synovial pathology; however, D-lactate was not useful. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Collective cell migration of primary zebrafish keratocytes.

    PubMed

    Rapanan, Jose L; Cooper, Kimbal E; Leyva, Kathryn J; Hull, Elizabeth E

    2014-08-01

    Fish keratocytes are an established model in single cell motility but little is known about their collective migration. Initially, sheets migrate from the scale at ~145 μm/h but over the course of 24h the rate of leading edge advance decreases to ~23 μm/h. During this period, leader cells retain their ability to migrate rapidly when released from the sheet and follower cell area increases. After the addition of RGD peptide, leader cell lamellae are lost, altering migratory forces within the sheet, resulting in rapid retraction. Leader and follower cell states interconvert within minutes with changes in cell-cell adhesions. Leader cells migrate as single cells when they detach from the leading edge and single cells appear to become leader cells if they rejoin the sheet. Follower cells rapidly establish leader cell morphology during closing of holes formed during sheet expansion and revert to follower cell morphology after hole-closure. Inhibition of Rho associated kinase releases leader cells and halts advancement of the leading edge suggesting an important role for the intercellular actomyosin cable at the leading edge. In addition, the presence of the stationary scale orients direction of sheet migration which is characterized by a more uniform advance of the leading edge than in some cell line systems. These data establish fish keratocyte explant cultures as a collective cell migration system and suggest that cell-cell interactions determine the role of keratocytes within the migrating sheet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The Zinc Finger Transcription Factors Osr1 and Osr2 Control Synovial Joint Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Lan, Yu; Liu, Han; Jiang, Rulang

    2011-01-01

    Synovial joints enable smooth articulations between different skeletal elements and are essential for the motility of vertebrates. Despite decades of extensive studies of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of limb and skeletal development, the molecular mechanisms governing synovial joint formation are still poorly understood. In particular, whereas several signaling pathways have been shown to play critical roles in joint maintenance, the mechanism controlling joint initiation is unknown. Here we report that Osr1 and Osr2, the mammalian homologs of the odd-skipped family of zinc finger transcription factors that are required for leg joint formation in Drosophila, are both strongly expressed in the developing synovial joint cells in mice. Whereas Osr1−/− mutant mice died at midgestation and Osr2−/− mutant mice had only subtle defects in synovial joint development, tissue-specific inactivation of Osr1 in the developing limb mesenchyme in Osr2−/− mutant mice caused fusion of multiple joints. We found that Osr1 and Osr2 function is required for maintenance of expression of signaling molecules critical for joint formation, including Gdf5, Wnt4 and Wnt9b. In addition, joint cells in the double mutants failed to upregulate expression of the articular cartilage marker gene Prg4. These data indicate that Osr1 and Osr2 function redundantly to control synovial joint formation. PMID:21262216

  8. Relevance of synovial fluid chondroitin sulphate as a biomarker to monitor polo pony joints.

    PubMed

    Baccarin, Raquel Y A; Rasera, Luciane; Machado, Thaís S L; Michelacci, Yara M

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the metacarpophalangeal joint is the most common articular disease in polo ponies leading to early retirement. A biomarker that would discriminate between pathological and physiological changes secondary to exercise could be helpful in OA prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of polo training on synovial fluid biomarkers of inflammation and cartilage turnover in polo ponies of different skill levels. Synovial fluid samples were collected from metacarpophalangeal joints of polo ponies before and during the polo season (320 d). Nucleated cells, soluble protein, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), glycosaminoglycans (GAG), and urea were measured. The main synovial fluid GAG are chondroitin sulphate (CS, ~25 μg/mL) and hyaluronic acid (HA, ~400 μg/mL). After a polo match, a transitory increase in protein and PGE2, but not CS and HA, occurred (expressed as urea ratio), returning to basal levels in 24 h. During the polo season, the number of synovial fluid nucleated cells was always in the normal range. Increases in protein and HA occurred during the initial 40 to 80 d, returning to basal levels afterwards. In contrast, in polo prospects the concentration of CS steadily increased during the season. Long-term follow-up revealed that the synovial fluid CS was significantly higher in polo ponies that developed joint diseases within 24 months following our study. In conclusion, CS seems to be an early marker of articular cartilage damage.

  9. Distribution of lymphatic vessels in normal and arthritic human synovial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H; Edwards, J; Banerji, S; Prevo, R; Jackson, D; Athanasou, N

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Synovial tissues from 5 normal controls, 14 patients with RA, and 16 patients with OA were studied. Lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using antibodies directed against the lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) and recognised blood vessel endothelial markers (factor VIII, CD34, CD31). Results: Lymphatic vessels were found in all zones of the normal, OA, and RA synovial membrane. Few lymphatic vessels were seen in the sublining zone in normal and OA synovium which did not show villous hypertrophy. However, in both RA synovium and OA synovium showing villous hypertrophy and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate, numerous lymphatic vessels were seen in all zones of the synovial membrane, including the sublining zone of the superficial subintima. Conclusions: Lymphatic vessels are present in normal and arthritic synovial tissues and are more numerous and prominent where there is oedema and an increase in inflammatory cells in the subintima, particularly in RA. This may reflect increased transport of hyaluronan and leucocyte trafficking in inflamed synovial tissues. PMID:14644866

  10. Expression of IL-19 and its receptors in RA: potential role for synovial hyperplasia formation.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, N; Kuroiwa, T; Ikeuchi, H; Hiramatsu, N; Maeshima, A; Kaneko, Y; Hiromura, K; Nojima, Y

    2008-06-01

    IL-19 is a novel cytokine of the IL-10 family. In this study, we sought to examine whether IL-19 plays a role in the pathogenesis of RA. Expression of IL-19, IL-20 receptor 1 (IL-20R1) and IL-20R2 was examined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis in rheumatoid synovium. The effects of IL-19 on synovial cells established from rheumatoid synovium (RASCs), with regard to IL-6 production and signal transducers and activators of transcription3 (STAT3) activation, were examined by ELISA and western blot analysis, respectively. The effect of IL-19 on RASC apoptosis was examined by Hoechst staining, flow cytometry analysis of annexin V binding and caspase-3 activity. IL-19, IL-20R1 and IL-20R2 mRNA were detected by RT-PCR in synovial tissues from RA patients. Immunohistochemical analysis showed IL-19 was predominantly expressed in the hyperplastic lining layers of RA synovial tissues. The majority of IL-19-positive cells were vimentin-positive and CD68-positive synovial cells, serving as markers of fibroblasts and macrophages, respectively. IL-20R1 and IL-20R2 (IL-20Rs) were expressed in both the lining and sublining layers of RA synovium. In RASC, IL-19 was induced by lipopolysaccharide stimulation and constitutive expression of IL-20Rs was observed, suggesting IL-19 has an autocrine action. In terms of this function, IL-19 induced STAT3 activation and increased IL-6 production by RASC above the medium control. Moreover, IL-19 significantly reduced RASC apoptosis induced by serum starvation. These data suggest that IL-19, produced by synovial cells, promotes joint inflammation in RA by inducing IL-6 production and decreasing synovial cell apoptosis.

  11. Synovial effusion and synovial fluid biomarkers in psoriatic arthritis to assess intraarticular tumor necrosis factor-α blockade in the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was theevaluation of synovial effusion (SE), synovial fluid (SF) and synovial tissue (ST) biomarkers in relation to disease activity indexes to assess the response to intraarticular (IA) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Systemic and local disease activity indexes (disease activity score (DAS); the Ritchie articular index (mRAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP); Thompson articular (THOMP) and joint articular (KJAI)-Index ) and ST samples were assessed at baseline, throughout treatment, and during the follow-up in 14 patients affected with PsA who underwent IA injections (0.5 ml to 12.5 mg) in the knee joint of etanercept (E) or placebo (P) once every two weeks for a 10-week period. Total SF white blood cell (WBC) counts (WBC/μl) and SF cytokine/chemokine (CK/CCK) levels were measured before IA-E at baseline, after IA-E, and as long as there were adequate amounts of SF for knee aspiration (post). Characterization of synovial mononuclear cell infiltration and synovial vessels was carried out in 8 out of 14 knees by staining serial sections of synovial tissue biopsies for CD45, CD3, CD68, CD31 and CD105. Results At baseline, CRP and/or ESR were significantly correlated with SF-CK (interleukin- (IL-)1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-8) and CCK (CCL3). Post-IA injections, there was a decrease in SE in the knees in which aspiration following IA-E injection was possible as well as a significant reduction in SF WBC/μl and in SF-CK (IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6 and IL-22). Pre- and post-IA-E injections, there were significant correlations between ST markers and SF-CK (IL-1β with CD45; IL-1β and IL-6 with CD31) and between SF-CCK (CCL4 and CCL3 with CD3). At the end of the study, there was a significant reduction in disease activity indexes (CRP, DAS, RAI, THOMP, KJAI) as well as in the ST markers (CD45; CD3). Conclusions Synovial effusion regression is a reliable indicator

  12. T-cell primary leptomeningeal lymphoma in cerebellopontine angle

    PubMed Central

    Briongos-Figuero, Laisa Socorro; Gómez-Traveso, Tamara; Pérez-Castrillon, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Primary meningeal lymphomas are very rare and those derived from T cells are even more infrequent (less than 5% of primary central nervous system lymphomas). Cerebellopontine angle involvement in the primary T-cell lymphoma is exceptional. Clinical presentation depends on the type of lesions, and histological diagnosis is needed. We present a rare case of a 50-year-old woman who presented with clinical cerebellar syndrome with posterior opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome. Necropsy evaluation revealed primary diffuse leptomeningeal non-Hodgkin's T-cell lymphoma. PMID:25750225

  13. Efficient Gene Editing in Primary Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yvonne Y

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in T-cell therapy for cancer, viral infections, and autoimmune diseases highlight the broad therapeutic potential of T-cell engineering. However, site-specific genetic manipulation in primary human T cells remains challenging. Two recent studies describe efficient genome editing in T cells using CRISPR and TALEN approaches.

  14. Genesis and morphogenesis of limb synovial joints and articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Rebekah S.; Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Limb synovial joints are intricate structures composed of articular cartilage, synovial membranes, ligaments and an articular capsule. Each joint has a unique shape, organization and biomechanical function, and articular cartilage itself is rather complex and organized in distinct zones, including the superficial zone that produces lubricans and contains stem/progenitor cells. There has been a great of interest for many years to decipher the mechanisms by which the joints form and come to acquire such unique structural features and diversity. Decades ago, classic embryologists discovered that the first overt sign of joint formation at each prescribed limb site is the appearance of a dense and compact population of mesenchymal cells collectively called the interzone. Work carried out since by several groups has provided evidence that the interzone cells do actively participate in joint tissue formation over developmental time. This minireview provides a succinct but comprehensive description of the many and important recent advances in this field of research. These includes: studies using various conditional reporter mice to genetically trace and track the origin, fate and possible function of joint progenitor cells; studies on the involvement and roles in signaling pathways and transcription factors in joint cell determination and functioning; and studies using advanced methods of gene expression analyses to uncover novel genetic determinants of joint formation and diversity. The overall advances are impressive, and the findings are not only of obvious interest and importance, but have major implications to conceive future translational medicine tools to repair and regenerate defective, overused or aging joints. PMID:25172830

  15. Cultured human synovial fibroblasts rapidly metabolize kinins and neuropeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Bathon, J M; Proud, D; Mizutani, S; Ward, P E

    1992-01-01

    Kinins and substance P have been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of their abilities to induce vasodilation, edema, and pain. The relative biological potencies of these peptides in vivo would depend at least in part upon their rates of catabolism in the joint. We hypothesized that human synovial lining cells may regulate intraarticular levels of kinins and neuropeptides via degradation by cell surface-associated peptidases. We exposed intact human synovial fibroblasts to kinins and substance P, in the presence or absence of specific peptidase inhibitors, and measured the amount of intact substrate remaining and degradation product(s) generated over time. Aminopeptidase M (AmM; EC 3.4.11.2), neutral endopeptidase-24.11 (NEP-24.11; EC 3.4.24.11), and dipeptidyl(amino)peptidase IV (DAP IV; EC 3.4.14.5) were identified on the cell surface of synovial cells. Bradykinin degradation was due entirely to NEP-24.11 (1.39 +/- 0.29 nmol/min per well). Lysylbradykinin was also degraded by NEP-24.11 (0.80 +/- 0.19 nmol/min per well); however, in the presence of phosphoramidon, AmM-mediated conversion to bradykinin (3.74 +/- 0.46 nmol/min per well) could be demonstrated. The combined actions of NEP-24.11 (0.93 +/- 0.15 nmol/min per well) and DAP IV (0.84 +/- 0.18 nmol/min per well) were responsible for the degradation of substance P. AmM (2.44 +/- 0.33 nmol/min per well) and NEP-24.11 (1.30 +/- 0.45 nmol/min per well) were responsible for the degradation of the opioid peptide, [Leu5]enkephalin. The identity of each of the three peptidases was confirmed via synthetic substrate hydrolysis, inhibition profile, and immunological identification. The profiles of peptidase enzymes identified in cells derived from rheumatoid and osteoarthritic joints were identical. These data demonstrate the human synovial fibroblast to be a rich source of three specific peptidases and suggest that it may play a prominent role in regulating peptide levels in the joint

  16. Expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-δ), IL-10, IL-12 and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) mRNA in synovial fluid cells from patients in the early and late phases of rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

    PubMed Central

    BUCHT, A.; LARSSON, P.; WEISBROT, L.; THORNE, C.; PISA, P.; SMEDEGÅRD, G.; KEYSTONE, E C; GRÖNBERG, A.

    1996-01-01

    The expression of immunoregulatory cytokines was investigated in freshly isolated synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with RA, using a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. IFN-γ, TGF-β, IL-10 and IL-12 (p40) transcripts were detected in SFMC of patients with early disease (<1 year duration) as well as in patients with long standing arthritis (>1 year). The expression of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-12 mRNA was increased in SFMC compared with RA PBMC. In addition, the expression was higher in RA SFMC than in PBMC from healthy control individuals. Immunoassay analysis of the secreted IL-12 heterodimer demonstrated increased levels in RA SF compared with levels found in serum from RA patients and control individuals. High levels of TGF-β mRNA were found in SFMC, but a significantly decreased TGF-β/β2-microglobulin (β2-M) ratio was found compared with PBMC from both patients and control individuals. IL-4 mRNA could not be detected, either in SFMC or in PBMC. Cytokine expression in RA PBMC did not differ from control PBMC, with the exception of a decreased TGF-β/β2-M ratio in RA patients with early disease. Our findings of IFN-7 mRNA and IL-12, but undetectable levels of IL-4 mRNA, suggest that the synovitis is characterized by a type 1 immune response. The presence of TGF-β and IL-10 mRNA indicates that immunosuppressive cytokines may also operate in the inflamed joint, although their level of expression may not be sufficient for down-modulation of immune activation. PMID:8608632

  17. Exosomes derived from miR-140-5p-overexpressing human synovial mesenchymal stem cells enhance cartilage tissue regeneration and prevent osteoarthritis of the knee in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Shi-Cong; Yuan, Ting; Zhang, Yue-Lei; Yin, Wen-Jing; Guo, Shang-Chun; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease throughout the world. Exosomes derived from miR-140-5p-overexpressing synovial mesenchymal stem cells (SMSC-140s) may be effective in treating OA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from SMSC-140 (SMSC-140-Exos) would enhance the proliferation and migration abilities of articular chondrocytes (ACs) without harming extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion. METHODS: SMSCs were transfected with or without miR-140-5p. Exosomes derived from SMSCs or SMSC-140s (SMSC-Exos or SMSC-140-Exos) were isolated and identified. Proliferation, migration and ECM secretion were measured in vitro and compared between groups. The mechanism involving alternative Wnt signalling and activation of Yes-associated protein (YAP) was investigated using lentivirus, oligonucleotides or chemical drugs. The preventative effect of exosomes in vivo was measured using Safranin-O and Fast green staining and immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS: Wnt5a and Wnt5b carried by exosomes activated YAP via the alternative Wnt signalling pathway and enhanced proliferation and migration of chondrocytes with the side-effect of significantly decreasing ECM secretion. Highly-expressed miR-140-5p blocked this side-effect via RalA. SMSC-140-Exos enhanced the proliferation and migration of ACs without damaging ECM secretion in vitro, while in vivo, SMSC-140-Exos successfully prevented OA in a rat model. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the promising potential of SMSC-140-Exos in preventing OA. We first found a potential source of exosomes and studied their merits and shortcomings. Based on our understanding of the molecular mechanism, we overcame the shortcomings by modifying the exosomes. Such exosomes derived from modified cells hold potential as future therapeutic strategies. PMID:28042326

  18. Sulfated glycosaminoglycans and glucosamine may synergize in promoting synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F; Russell, A L; Seed, M P

    2000-05-01

    High-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (HA) produced by the synovium may function physiologically to aid preservation of cartilage structure and prevent arthritic pain; both the size and concentration of HA in synovial fluid are diminished in osteoarthritis (OA). Glucosamine therapy for OA can be expected to increase synovial HA production by providing rate-limiting substrate. In addition, certain sulfated glycosaminoglycans and polysaccharides - including chondroitin sulfate (CS), dermatan sulfate, and pentosan polysulfate - stimulate synovial HA production, apparently owing to a hormone-like effect triggered by the binding of these polymers to membrane proteins of synovial cells. Surprisingly, a significant proportion of orally administered CS is absorbed as intact polymers - apparently by pinocytosis. These considerations may rationalize clinical studies concluding that oral CS provides slow-onset but durable pain relief and functional improvement in OA. The possibility that oral glucosamine and CS may interact in a complementary or synergistic fashion to improve synovial fluid HA content in OA should be assessed in clinical studies, and the potential of adjunctive CS administration to improve the clinical response achievable with optimal intakes of glucosamine should likewise be evaluated. In light of the fact that the synovium virtually functions as a 'placenta' for cartilage, focusing on synovium as the target for therapeutic intervention in OA may be a rational strategy.

  19. In vitro methods to culture primary human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Raouf, Afshin; Sun, Yu Jia

    2013-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that much like leukemia, breast tumors are maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor cells that have stem cell properties. These cancer stem cells are envisaged to be responsible for tumor formation and relapse. Therefore, knowledge about their nature will provide a platform to develop therapies to eliminate these breast cancer stem cells. This concept highlights the need to understand the mechanisms that regulate the normal functions of the breast stem cells and their immediate progeny as alterations to these same mechanisms can cause these primitive cells to act as cancer stem cells. The study of the primitive cell functions relies on the ability to isolate them from primary sources of breast tissue. This chapter describes processing of discarded tissue from reduction mammoplasty samples as sources of normal primary human breast epithelial cells and describes cell culture systems to grow single-cell suspensions prepared from these reduction samples in vitro.

  20. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature. PMID:27563476

  1. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Shaul; Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  2. Chemerin induces CCL2 and TLR4 in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, Kristina; Bauer, Sabrina; Schäffler, Andreas; Walter, Roland; Neumann, Elena; Buechler, Christa; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Frommer, Klaus W

    2012-02-01

    Chemerin stimulates migration of leukocytes to sites of inflammation and also increases inflammatory signaling in chondrocytes suggesting a function of chemerin in joint inflammation. Synovial fibroblasts (SF) are critically involved in synovitis and subsequent cartilage destruction. Here, we analyzed whether synovial fibroblasts express chemerin and its receptor CMKLR1. Further, the role of chemerin in synovial fibroblast chemotaxis, proliferation, insulin response and release of inflammatory proteins was studied. Synovial tissue sections were labeled with chemerin antibody and chemerin was measured in synovial fluid by ELISA. Chemerin mRNA and protein as well as CMKLR1 expression were determined in SFs from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Effects of chemerin on cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), and on proliferation, migration and insulin signaling were analyzed appropriately. SFs expressed CMKLR1 and chemerin mRNA, and chemerin protein was found in cell supernatants of synovial fibroblasts. Immunohistochemistry detected chemerin in synovial tissue predominantly localized within the lining layer. Chemerin was present in synovial fluids of RA, OA and psoriatic arthritis patients in similar concentrations. Chemerin neither increased IL-6 levels nor MMP-2 or -9 activity in SFs. Also, it did not act as a chemoattractant for these cells. With respect to intracellular signaling, neither basal nor insulin-mediated phosphorylation of Akt was affected. However, chemerin significantly increased TLR4 mRNA and synthesis of CCL2 in SFs while CCL4 and -5 were not altered. Cell proliferation of SFs, however, was modestly reduced by chemerin. These data show that human SFs express both chemerin and its receptor. As chemerin enhanced expression of TLR4 and induced release of CCL2 in SFs, a role of this protein in innate immune system-associated joint inflammation is proposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Btk inhibition suppresses agonist-induced human macrophage activation and inflammatory gene expression in RA synovial tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Linda M; Fine, Jay S; van Es, Inge E; Tang, Man Wai; Smith, Michael; Woods, John; Narula, Satwant; DeMartino, Julie; Tak, Paul P; Reedquist, Kris A

    2015-08-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is required for B lymphocyte and myeloid cell contributions to pathology in murine models of arthritis. Here, we examined the potential contributions of synovial Btk expression and activation to inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Btk was detected by immunohistochemistry and digital image analysis in synovial tissue from biologically naive RA (n=16) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (n=12) patients. Cell populations expressing Btk were identified by immunofluorescent double labelling confocal microscopy, quantitative (q-) PCR and immunoblotting. The effects of a Btk-specific inhibitor, RN486, on gene expression in human macrophages and RA synovial tissue explants (n=8) were assessed by qPCR, ELISA and single-plex assays. Btk was expressed at equivalent levels in RA and PsA synovial tissue, restricted to B lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells. RN486 significantly inhibited macrophage IL-6 production induced by Fc receptor and CD40 ligation. RN486 also reduced mRNA expression of overlapping gene sets induced by IgG, CD40 ligand (CD40L) and RA synovial fluid, and significantly suppressed macrophage production of CD40L-induced IL-8, TNF, MMP-1 and MMP-10, LPS-induced MMP-1, MMP-7 and MMP-10 production, and spontaneous production of IL-6, PDGF, CXCL-9 and MMP-1 by RA synovial explants. Btk is expressed equivalently in RA and PsA synovial tissue, primarily in macrophages. Btk activity is needed to drive macrophage activation in response to multiple agonists relevant to inflammatory arthritis, and promotes RA synovial tissue cytokine and MMP production. Pharmacological targeting of Btk may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of RA and other inflammatory diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Characterization of cancer stem cells and primary cilia in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gate, David; Danielpour, Moise; Bannykh, Serguei; Town, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, a tumor of the cerebellum, is the most common pediatric central nervous system malignancy. These tumors are etiologically linked to mutations in the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway, which signals through the primary, non-motile cilium. The growth of these aggressive tumors relies on self-renewal of tumor-propagating cells known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). Previous reports have implicated CD133-expressing cells as CSCs in brain tumors, while those expressing CD15 have been shown to propagate medulloblastoma. Here, we demonstrate that CD133+ and CD15+ cells are distinct medulloblastoma populations. CD15+ cells comprise approximately 0.5-1% of total human medulloblastoma cells, display CSC properties in culture and are detected in the Smoothened A1 transgenic mouse model of medulloblastoma. Additionally, we report on a medulloblastoma patient with enriched CD15+ cells in recurrent vs primary medulloblastoma. We also demonstrate that human medulloblastoma cells critically rely on establishment of primary cilia to drive Shh-mediated cell division. Primary cilia are found in external granule cells of human fetal cerebellum and in 12/14 medulloblastoma samples. Yet, CD15+ medulloblastoma cells lack primary cilia, suggesting that this CSC population signals independently of Shh. These results are important when considering the effects of current and prospective treatment modalities on medulloblastoma CSC populations.

  5. Quantitative imaging by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound reveals a linear relationship between synovial vascular perfusion and the recruitment of pathogenic IL-17A-F(+)IL-23(+) CD161(+) CD4(+) T helper cells in psoriatic arthritis joints.

    PubMed

    Fiocco, Ugo; Stramare, Roberto; Martini, Veronica; Coran, Alessandro; Caso, Francesco; Costa, Luisa; Felicetti, Mara; Rizzo, Gaia; Tonietto, Matteo; Scanu, Anna; Oliviero, Francesca; Raffeiner, Bernd; Vezzù, Maristella; Lunardi, Francesca; Scarpa, Raffaele; Sacerdoti, David; Rubaltelli, Leopoldo; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea; Grisan, Enrico

    2017-02-01

    To develop quantitative imaging biomarkers of synovial tissue perfusion by pixel-based contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), we studied the relationship between CEUS synovial vascular perfusion and the frequencies of pathogenic T helper (Th)-17 cells in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) joints. Eight consecutive patients with PsA were enrolled in this study. Gray scale CEUS evaluation was performed on the same joint immediately after joint aspiration, by automatic assessment perfusion data, using a new quantification approach of pixel-based analysis and the gamma-variate model. The set of perfusional parameters considered by the time intensity curve includes the maximum value (peak) of the signal intensity curve, the blood volume index or area under the curve, (BVI, AUC) and the contrast mean transit time (MTT). The direct ex vivo analysis of the frequencies of SF IL17A-F(+)CD161(+)IL23(+) CD4(+) T cells subsets were quantified by fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). In cross-sectional analyses, when tested for multiple comparison setting, a false discovery rate at 10%, a common pattern of correlations between CEUS Peak, AUC (BVI) and MTT parameters with the IL17A-F(+)IL23(+) - IL17A-F(+)CD161(+) - and IL17A-F(+)CD161(+)IL23(+) CD4(+) T cells subsets, as well as lack of correlation between both peak and AUC values and both CD4(+)T and CD4(+)IL23(+) T cells, was observed. The pixel-based CEUS assessment is a truly measure synovial inflammation, as a useful tool to develop quantitative imaging biomarker for monitoring target therapeutics in PsA.

  6. Immunolocalization of keratan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, and chondroitin-6-sulfate in periprosthetic breast capsules exhibiting synovial metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Raso, D S; Schulte, B A

    1996-07-01

    The distribution of various proteoglycans and basement membrane components within 10 breast capsules with synovial metaplasia was assessed immunohistochemically. Immunoreactive keratan sulfate and chondroitin-4-sulfate were present in many of the synovial metaplasia lining cells, suggesting active secretion of these proteoglycans into the intraprosthetic space. In contrast, chondroitin-6-sulfate was confined to the extracellular matrix of the underlying supporting fibrous capsule. Type IV collagen and laminin were not associated with the synovial metaplasia lining, thus confirming the absence of a basement membrane, as previously indicated by morphologic analysis. As with tendon reconstruction, the development and maintenance of a synovial metaplasia lining that secretes lubricating factors such as proteoglycans may be beneficial for decreased capsular contracture.

  7. Assessment of rheumatoid activity based on clinical features and blood and synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, M; Kendall, M J; Young, D W; Meynell, M J; Hawkins, C F

    1976-01-01

    Joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis has been assessed, and the most useful guides to disease activity were determined by analysis of synovial fluid and blood together with the history of joint disability. The patient's own evaluation of the amount of pain suffered was the most useful clinical assessment. Differential cell count and glucose estimations were the most helpful guides in the synovial fluid, while C-reactive protein in the serum most accurately reflected disease activity. The effects of systemic steroids on these indices were studied, and the differences between seronegative and seropositive patients noted. PMID:942273

  8. Primary cells - A forecast of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazkany, H.; Peled, E.; Raz, B.

    Of the several existing methods of exploratory forecasting the method of trend extrapolation has been chosen. This method is built upon the assumption that excepting technological revolution, technological characteristics develop in an orderly manner and that development trends are predictable. Attention is given to the Leclanche cell, the alkaline cell, the zinc silver oxide cell, the magnesium cell, the mercury cell, zinc-air cells, and Li cells. It is found that safe commercial high rate cells will have an energy density which is 10 to 20 percent lower than the value corresponding to the maximum capability of the technology. Cells with about 500-630 W-hr/kg are expected to penetrate the market at 1990. Low and high temperature performance and shelf life have almost reached the desirable levels and no vast improvement is expected or needed. Power density is expected to grow to the 500-1000 W/kg range (pulses), but safety problems must be resolved before commercialization.

  9. HYDROGEN-OXYGEN PRIMARY EXTRATERRESTRIAL (HOPE) FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The HOPE (Hydrogen-Oxygen Primary Extraterrestrial) Fuel Cell Program is a multi-phase effort to advance the state-of-the-art of fuel cells by...configuration fuel cell module. The HOPE spacecraft, fuel supply tanks, pneumatics, and thermal systems were designed and fabricated to provide...verify water removal, thermal design, and 30-day shelf-life of the fuel cell . The 35-cell module was subjected to a series of performance tests

  10. Acute Liver Failure Due to Budd-Chiari Syndrome in the Setting of Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jonathan G; Newton, Kelly; Vinayak, Ajeet G

    2015-04-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the heart, specifically cardiac sarcomas, are rare and mainly diagnosed at autopsy. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome is a recognized cause of acute liver failure and has been associated with several rare cardiac tumors: atrial myxoma, caval rhabdomyosarcoma, and primary cardiac adenocarcinoma. We present the first case of a fatal, highly differentiated cardiac synovial sarcoma that presented as acute liver failure from Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  11. Hyaluronan and synovial joint: function, distribution and healing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a viscous solution found in the cavities of synovial joints. The principal role of synovial fluid is to reduce friction between the articular cartilages of synovial joints during movement. The presence of high molar mass hyaluronan (HA) in this fluid gives it the required viscosity for its function as lubricant solution. Inflammation oxidation stress enhances normal degradation of hyaluronan causing several diseases related to joints. This review describes hyaluronan properties and distribution, applications and its function in synovial joints, with short review for using thiol compounds as antioxidants preventing HA degradations under inflammation conditions. PMID:24678248

  12. Primary lithium-thionyl chloride cell evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolla, A. E.; Waterhouse, R.; Debiccari, D.; Griffin, G. L.

    1980-08-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the Altus 1350AH cell performance against the Minuteman Survival Ground Power requirements. Twelve cells of the 17 inch diameter, 1-3/8 inch heights were fabricated and tested during this study. Under discharge rates varying from C/100 to C/400 at ambient temperature, the volumetric and gravimetric energy density performance requirements of 15 watt hours per cubic inch and 150 watt hours per pound were exceeded in all cases. All other performance requirements of voltage, current, configuration, capacity volume, weight, electrolyte leakage (none), and maintainability (none required), were met or exceeded. The abuse testing demonstrated the Altus Cell's ability to safely withstand short circuit by external shorting, short circuit by penetration with a conductive object, forced discharge, and forced charging of a cell. Disposal of discharged cells by incineration is an environmentally safe and efficient method of disposal.

  13. Immunoglobulin characteristics and RNAseq data of FcRL4+ B cells sorted from synovial fluid and tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Amara, Khaled; Clay, Elizabeth; Yeo, Lorraine; Ramsköld, Daniel; Spengler, Julia; Sippl, Natalie; Cameron, James; Israelsson, Lena; Titcombe, Philip J; Grönwall, Caroline; Sahbudin, Ilfita; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Malmström, Vivianne; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar

    2017-08-01

    This manuscript is a companion paper to Amara et al. [1]. Data shown here include detailed clinical characteristics from anonymized patients, the Ig subclass data generated from B cells sorted from four individual patients, tables detailing variable gene region sequences from sorted cells linked to the patient information and the sequence yields from individual patients. Furthermore a URL link to the RNAseq datasets submitted to GEO is included.

  14. Synovial perlecan is required for osteophyte formation in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Haruka; Ishijima, Muneaki; Futami, Ippei; Tomikawa-Ichikawa, Naoki; Kosaki, Keisuke; Sadatsuki, Ryo; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri

    2013-04-24

    The osteophyte associated with osteoarthritis (OA) is a bony outgrowth formed at the margins of the affected joint through endochondral ossification-like processes. However, the mechanism of osteophyte formation and its pathogenesis are unclear. Perlecan (Hspg2), a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is expressed in many extracellular tissues and plays critical roles in skeletal development and diseases. The aim of the present study is to identify the role of synovial perlecan in osteophyte formation using perinatal lethality rescued perlecan-knockout mice (Hspg2(-/-)-Tg) wherein perlecan expression is lacking in the synovial and other tissues, except for cartilage. We analyzed the development of osteophytes in joints of Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice in two different animal models: the surgical OA model, in which the medial collateral ligament was transected and the medial meniscus was resected, and the TGF-β-induced osteophyte formation model. In the surgical OA model, the osteophyte size and maturation were significantly reduced in the OA joints of Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice compared with control mice, while OA developed on the medial side of the knee joints with no differences in the cartilage degradation score or synovitis score between control and Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice. The reduced osteophyte formation in Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice was associated with reduced cell proliferation and chondrogenesis. In the TGF-β model, the osteophyte size and maturation were also significantly reduced in Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice compared with control mice. Our findings suggest that synovial perlecan plays an important role in osteophyte development in OA, and they provide insights that may facilitate the development of OA therapy.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinases in the formation of human synovial joint cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J C; Wilkinson, L S; Soothill, P; Hembry, R M; Murphy, G; Reynolds, J J

    1996-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in tissue remodelling in growth and development. A histochemical study of human fetal limbs was undertaken to assess the presence, and consequently the possible role, of MMPs and their inhibitor TIMP-1 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1) in synovial joint cavity formation. Cryostat sections of fetal limbs from 7 to 14 wk gestation were stained with specific antibodies to collagenase (MMP-1), gelantinases A (MMP-2) and B (MMP-9), stromelysin (MMP-3) and TIMP-1. Immunoreactive (IR) MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-3 were seen chiefly in chondrocytes, but in all cases in zones distant from the joint line before cavity formation. IR-MMP-1 and MMP-2 were also localised both in synovium and on the articular surfaces of joints after cavity formation. In addition IR-MMP-2 was seen in a "collar' of perichondrium alongside the hypertrophic zone of chondrocytes and weakly in bone marrow spaces. IR-MMP-9 was seen in neutrophil leucocytes and in bone marrow spaces. IR-TIMP-1 was generally distributed in connective tissue cells. No IR-MMP (1, 2,3 or 9) was seen along potential joint lines before or at the time of cavity formation, nor was there aspecific decrease in IR-TIMP-1 at this site. These findings confirm a role for metalloproteinases in developmental processes such as cartilage remodelling and bone marrow space formation. MMP-1 and MMP-2 may be involved in the remodelling of developing synovial tissue and the articular surfaces subsequent to cavity formation. However, we have failed to find evidence to indicate that the loss of tissue strength at the joint line which allows synovial joint cavity formation relates to high local levels of MMPS. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8621334

  16. Sealed Primary Lithium-Inorganic Electrolyte Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-02-01

    Battery , Thionyl Chloride , Lithium , Lithium Aluminum Chloride , Hermetic Lithium Battery , D Cell, Voltage-Delay, Shelf Life, High Energy Density Battery ... lithium - thionyl chloride , inorganic electrclyte system is one of the highest energy density systems known to date (1-4). The cells contain an Li anoae, a...However, this is not tne case with te thionyl chloride system. A completely discharged battery , while sitting on

  17. Sealed Primary Lithium-Inorganic Electrolyte Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-01

    Thionyl Chloride , Lithium , Lithium Aluminum Chloride , Hermetic Lithium Battery, D Cell I Voltage-Delay 1 Shelf Life 1 High_ Energy Density...and the propagation of the thermal runaway en- countered in the thionyl cells. For our initial studies we restricted ourselves to the stable...types of sulfur e.g. rhombic (^) and monoclinic (A ). 3. Thionyl Chloride (SOCI2) The thermogram of SOCI2 (0.161 gm) at 50C/min heating rate is

  18. Primary cell uses neither liquid nor fused electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, F.; Herman, A. M.; Rembaum, A.

    1967-01-01

    Dry, solid state primary battery cell establishes an electrode reaction by a charge transfer mechanism without liquid phase ionization of electrolyte compounds. The charge transfer complex is sufficiently conductive to permit the passage of useful current.

  19. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Veland, Iben R; Schwab, Albrecht; Cammer, Michael; Satir, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) is compartmentalized to the primary cilium to activate signaling pathways that regulate reorganization of the cytoskeleton required for lamellipodium formation and directional migration in the presence of a specific ligand gradient. We summarize selected methods in analyzing ciliary function in directional cell migration, including immunofluorescence microscopy, scratch assay, and chemotaxis assay by micropipette addition of PDGFRα ligands to cultures of fibroblasts. These methods should be useful not only in studying cell migration but also more generally in delineating response pathways in cells with primary cilia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary Cutaneous Mantle Cell Lymphoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuoccolo, L. D.; Castro Perez, G. A.; Sorin, I.; Bravo, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    Primary cutaneous mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare cutaneous proliferation of naive pregerminal CD-5 positive B cells in the skin with no extracutaneous involvement. Overexpression of cyclin D1 is pathognomonic of this condition, and surgery and radiation therapy are the most common therapeutic options. In this case, we describe the clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular characteristics of a new case of primary cutaneous MCL. PMID:23762653

  1. Mimicry of lyme arthritis by synovial hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Hospach, Toni; Langendörfer, M; Kalle, T V; Tewald, F; Wirth, T; Dannecker, G E

    2011-12-01

    To report on the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma due to similar clinical and radiological signs and symptoms. A 15-year-old boy presented at the age of 9 with recurrent rather painless swelling of the right knee. Altogether four episodes lasting for 1-2 weeks each occurred over a period of 18 months before medical advice was sought. Physical examination revealed only a slightly limited range of motion. Living in an endemic area of borreliosis, he reported a tick bite 6 months prior to onset of his symptoms with erythema migrans and was treated for 10 days with amoxicillin. Serology revealed two positive unspecific bands in IgG immunoblot (p41 and 66) with slight positivity for ELISA. Ultrasound revealed synovial thickening and increased fluid. Despite the weak positive serology a diagnosis of lyme arthritis could not be excluded and intravenous antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone was started. After two further relapses antiinflammatory therapy including intraarticular steroids were introduced with no long lasting effect. A chronical disease developed with alternate periods of swelling and almost complete remission. Ultrasound as well as MRI demonstrated ongoing signs of synovitis, therefore after further progression, a diagnostic arthroscopy was performed showing an inconspicuous knee joint. A second MRI showed focal suprapatellar enhancement and was followed by open arthrotomy revealing a histopathological proven synovial cavernous juxtaarticular hemangioma. To our knowledge, the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma has not yet been reported despite obvious clinical similarities. In conclusion, in children and adolescents synovial hemangioma has to be considered in differential diagnosis of recurrent knee swelling. Early diagnosis is important to prevent prolonged suffering from chronic joint swelling with probable joint damages, unnecessary treatment procedures and as well school and sports

  2. Synovial fat necrosis associated with ischemic pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Smukler, N M; Schumacher, H R; Pascual, E; Brown, S; Ryan, W E; Sadeghian, M R

    1979-05-01

    A 59-year-old man with ischemic pancreatic disease, polyarthritis, and cutaneous nodules has shown histopathologic findings indicative of disseminated fat necrosis in a percutaneous biopsy specimen from the right knee. The histopathologic findings in the synovium included necrotic fat cells, distorted fat cells and adjacent lymphocytes, lipid laden histiocytes, and giant cells. In prior histopathologic studies of the joint involvement associated with this disorder, fat cell necrosis has been found only in the periarticular tissues, and the synovium has appeared normal or showed nonspecific inflammation. However, the present study shows that the synovial membrane may also be the site of fat necrosis and an associated inflammatory reaction; thus patients with this disorder may manifest arthritis in addition to periarthritis.

  3. [Alizarin red S staining of calcium compound crystals in synovial fluid].

    PubMed

    Shoji, K

    1993-04-01

    In order to study the clinical value of alizarin red S staining of calcium compound crystals in synovial fluid, the optimum conditions for staining and the detectable threshold of the crystals were examined. The staining of crystals was mainly affected by the concentration of the dye and pH of the solution. The best results were obtained with an alizarin red S concentration of 1.5-3.0% for hydroxyapatite (HA) and 2.0-3.0% for calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal. The optimal pH of the solution was 4.0-6.0 for HA and 4.0-5.5 for CPPD crystal. For the detection of crystals phagocytosed by synovial fluid leukocytes, staining was enhanced by the addition of chloral hydrate to the dye solution which increased the permeability of the cell membrane. The detectable threshold levels of HA and CPPD crystal in synovial fluid by alizarin red S staining were 0.1 micrograms/ml and 0.5 micrograms/ml, respectively. These results suggest that alizarin red S staining is suitable for screening calcium compound crystals in synovial fluid, because it is more sensitive than other methods, such as polarized microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Alizarin red S staining was performed on 148 synovial fluids from patients with various joint diseases. The staining was positive in 100% of synovial fluids from patients with CPPD deposition disease, in 54% of fluids with osteoarthritis, and in 39% of fluids with rheumatoid arthritis. In osteoarthritis, the increase in the proportion of positive cases was found to be in accordance with the radiological grading of the joints.

  4. Trex-1 deficiency in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, Michel; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Schumann, Gerald G; Gay, Renate E; Gay, Steffen

    2010-09-01

    To explore whether the increased expression of long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1; L1) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) is associated with decreased expression of Trex-1, an exonuclease involved in the metabolization of L1 DNA:RNA hybrids. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to detect L1-related p40 protein (L1-ORF1p) binding sequences in RASFs. Luciferase activity was measured in the synovial fibroblasts following cotransfection of the episomal plasmid with pJM105 expressing L1-ORF1p and pGL3-TS3 carrying the target sequence for L1-ORF1p. This luciferase reporter assay was used to compare the activity between RASFs and osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) and to assess correlations of luciferase activity with the expression of Trex-1 measured by flow cytometry. The expression of Trex-1 mRNA and protein was also compared using real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analyses. The role of Trex-1 in the L1-ORF1p-mediated luciferase activity assay was studied using interfering RNAs (iRNA) and a Trex-1 expression vector. Increased luciferase activity occurred after cotransfection of synovial fibroblasts with pJM105 and pGL3-TS3. L1-ORF1p activity was increased in RASFs as compared with OASFs, and this was correlated inversely with the expression of Trex-1. Levels of Trex-1 mRNA and protein were lower in RASFs than in OASFs. After transfection of the L1 expression plasmid, Trex-1 mRNA levels increased in OASFs, but not in RASFs. The addition of iRNA against Trex-1, however, resulted in an enhancement of L1-ORF1p activity in OASFs to the levels measured in RASFs. Overexpression of Trex-1 inhibited 5-azacytidine-induced expression of p38δ MAPK, a gene carrying the TS3 sequence. The deficiency of Trex-1 in RASFs allows a longer half-life of gene products encoded by active endogenous L1 retrotransposons. This pathway may play a role in diseases in which the cells

  5. Canine intrathoracic sarcoma with ultrastructural characteristics of human synovial sarcoma - case report.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Ser; Burchell, R K; Roady, P J; Fredrickson, R L; Gal, A

    2017-08-16

    Canine joint sarcomas, designated synovial sarcomas, are uncommon malignant mesenchymal neoplasms that occur in the large joints of the extremities of middle-aged, large-breed dogs. We report the diagnosis of an intrathoracic sarcoma with ultrastructural characteristics reminiscent of human synovial sarcoma in a dog. A 7-year-old female spayed Tibetan terrier crossbred dog was presented for acute severe labored breathing and diagnosed with an intrathoracic neoplastic mass. The neoplasm resulted in the accumulation of substantial amounts of viscous pleural fluid that led to dyspnea. The neoplastic mass consisted of interweaving bundles of large pleomorphic mesenchymal cells, supported by an alcian blue positive myxomatous matrix. The neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically negative for cytokeratin and CD18. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the neoplastic cells had desmosome junctions, short microvilli-like structures and ample amounts of rough endoplasmic reticulum resembling type B-like synoviocytes and synovial sarcoma as reported in people. Despite complete surgical excision of the neoplastic mass, clinical signs recurred after a month and led to the euthanasia of the dog. Currently, there are no immunohistochemical markers specific for synovial sarcoma. Canine neoplasms with transmission electron microscopy characteristics resembling type B-like synoviocytes should be considered similar to the human sarcomas that carry the specific translocations between chromosomes X and 18.

  6. Primary cell culture of human adenocarcinomas--practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Lerescu, Lucian; Tucureanu, Cătălin; Caraş, Iuliana; Neagu, Stefan; Melinceanu, Laura; Sălăgeanu, Aurora

    2008-01-01

    Cell culture is one of the major tools for oncology research, being an excellent system in which to study the biochemistry and molecular biology associated with individual cancer types and to understand cancer cell physiology. Progress in understanding the biology of any type of carcinoma has been impeded by the inability to culture adequately malignant cells from most epithelial tissues. The ultimate in vitro tumor model would completely reflect the in vivo tumor microenvironment in function and mechanism. Unfortunately, such a model does not currently exist. Homogeneous cell lines that can be continuously propagated on plastic surfaces have been extensively used as a surrogate for tumor environment; however they are very different from the in vivo tumor cells. Model systems involving primary culture represent the situation most closely related to the original tissue although they have a number of disadvantages over cell lines, such as the limited ability to repeat studies with a well characterized culture system that can be used in multiple laboratories. The primary culture may contain many types of stromal and infiltrating cell types potentially complicating the interpretation of data. Yet, their properties better reflect the cellular interactions present in intact tissue. The present article reviews the critical steps in obtaining, routine maintenance and cryopreservation of primary tumor cell cultures, based on information from literature and personal experience on the subject. The article also includes an updated protocol for primary tumor cell isolation and culture.

  7. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

    PubMed

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites.

  8. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites. PMID:25120735

  9. Effect of antifreeze proteins on frozen primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Koushafar, H; Rubinsky, B

    1997-03-01

    Recent studies show that prostate adenocarcinoma cells can survive cryosurgery and that cell destruction depends on the specific thermal parameters used during freezing. The goal of this preliminary study is to determine whether certain chemical compounds, known as antifreeze proteins, can induce complete human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cell destruction by freezing, regardless of the thermal parameters used. The study also examines the mechanism by which antifreeze proteins bring about cell destruction. Antifreeze proteins were added to solutions containing human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells. The cells were frozen with controlled thermal parameters using a directional solidification apparatus attached to a light microscope. Cell viability was determined after thawing as a function of antifreeze protein concentration and cooling rate during freezing. The dose response study shows that for all the cooling rates tested, 10-mg/mL solutions of antifreeze protein cause the complete destruction of human primary prostatic adenocarcinoma cells frozen to a temperature at which, without these proteins, the cells survive freezing. Light microscopy shows that the lethal effect of the antifreeze proteins is related to the formation of intracellular ice in the frozen cells. CONCLUSIONS; This preliminary study has demonstrated that antifreeze proteins have the ability to generate complete destruction of prostatic adenocarcinoma cells frozen to high subzero temperatures irrespective of the cooling rates used during freezing. This suggests that introducing antifreeze proteins into undesirable tissues prior to freezing may increase the efficacy and the control over tissue destruction by cryosurgery.

  10. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shotaro; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were characterized. Specifically, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to evaluate the expression of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and NGF in CD11b+ and CD11b– cells isolated from the ST of a murine OA model. The effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on the expression of NGF in cultured synovial cells were also examined. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NGF in the ST of STR/Ort was higher than that in C57/BL6J mice. Compared to the CD11b– cell fraction, higher expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected in the CD11b+ cell fraction, whereas no differences in the expression of NGF were detected between the two cell fractions. Notably, TNF-α upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages and IL-1β upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β and TNF-α may regulate NGF signaling in OA joints and be suitable therapeutic targets for treating OA pain. PMID:27635406

  11. The exocyst localizes to the primary cilium in MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Katherine K; Wilson, Patricia D; Snyder, Richard W; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Guo, Wei; Burrow, Christopher R; Lipschutz, Joshua H

    2004-06-18

    Primary cilia play a role in the maintenance of tubular epithelial differentiation and ciliary dysfunction can result in abnormal cyst formation, such as occurs in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). We previously showed that the exocyst, an eight-protein complex involved in the biogenesis of polarity from yeast to mammals, is centrally involved in cyst formation [Mol. Biol. Cell. 11 (2000) 4259]. Here we show that the exocyst complex localizes to the primary cilium in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) tubular epithelial cells. We further show that the exocyst is overexpressed in both cell lines and primary cell cultures of ADPKD origin, suggesting that the exocyst may be involved in the pathogenesis of ADPKD.

  12. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is expressed in synovial fluid granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, J; Forslund, T; Sundqvist, T; Skogh, T

    2002-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the NO-producing potential of synovial fluid (SF) cells. SF from 15 patients with arthritis was compared with blood from the same individuals and with blood from 10 healthy controls. Cellular expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was analysed by flow cytometry. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure l-arginine and l-citrulline. Nitrite and nitrate were measured colourimetrically utilizing the Griess' reaction. Compared to whole blood granulocytes in patients with chronic arthritis, a prominent iNOS expression was observed in SF granulocytes (P < 0.001). A slight, but statistically significant, increase in iNOS expression was also recorded in lymphocytes and monocytes from SF. l-arginine was elevated in SF compared to serum (257 +/- 78 versus 176 +/- 65 micro mol/l, P = 0.008), whereas a slight increase in l-citrulline (33 +/- 11 versus 26 +/- 9 micro mol/l), did not reach statistical significance. Great variations but no significant differences were observed comparing serum and SF levels of nitrite and nitrate, respectively, although the sum of nitrite and nitrate tended to be elevated in SF (19.2 +/- 20.7 versus 8.6 +/- 6.5 micro mol/l, P = 0.054). Synovial fluid leucocytes, in particular granulocytes, express iNOS and may thus contribute to intra-articular NO production in arthritis.

  13. Cathode catalyst for primary phosphoric fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, F.

    1980-01-01

    Alkylation of Vulcan XC-72 provided the most stable bond type for linking CoTAA to the surface of the carbon; this result is based on data obtained by cyclic voltammetry, pulse voltammetry and by release of 14C from bonded CoTAA. Half-cell tests at 100 C in 85% phosphoric acid showed that CoTAA bonded to the surface of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) via an alkylation procedure is a more active catalyst than is platinum based on a factor of two improvement in Tafel slope; dimeric CoTAA has catalytic activity equal to platinum. Half-cell tests also showed that bonded CoTAA catalysts do not suffer a loss in potential when air is used as a fuel rather than oxygen. Commercially available PTFE was shown to be stable for four months in 200 C 85% phosphoric acid based on lack of change in surface wetting properties, IR and physical characteristics. When stressed electrochemically in 150 C 85% phosphoric acid, PTFE also showed no changes after one month.

  14. HDAC and Proteasome Inhibitors Synergize to Activate Pro-Apoptotic Factors in Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Barrott, Jared J.; Yao, Ren Jie; Poulin, Neal M.; Brodin, Bertha A.; Jones, Kevin B.; Underhill, T. Michael; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional cytotoxic therapies for synovial sarcoma provide limited benefit, and no drugs specifically targeting its driving SS18-SSX fusion oncoprotein are currently available. Patients remain at high risk for early and late metastasis. A high-throughput drug screen consisting of over 900 tool compounds and epigenetic modifiers, representing over 100 drug classes, was undertaken in a panel of synovial sarcoma cell lines to uncover novel sensitizing agents and targetable pathways. Top scoring drug categories were found to be HDAC inhibitors and proteasomal targeting agents. We find that the HDAC inhibitor quisinostat disrupts the SS18-SSX driving protein complex, thereby reestablishing expression of EGR1 and CDKN2A tumor suppressors. In combination with proteasome inhibition, HDAC inhibitors synergize to decrease cell viability and elicit apoptosis. Quisinostat inhibits aggresome formation in response to proteasome inhibition, and combination treatment leads to elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress, activation of pro-apoptotic effector proteins BIM and BIK, phosphorylation of BCL-2, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and suppression of tumor growth in a murine model of synovial sarcoma. This study identifies and provides mechanistic support for a particular susceptibility of synovial sarcoma to the combination of quisinostat and proteasome inhibition. PMID:28056055

  15. Cricoarytenoid Articulation in Elderly Japanese With Special Reference to Morphology of the Synovial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto-Hirano, Ai; Honkura, Yohei; Shibata, Shunichi; Abe, Shin-ichi; Murakami, Gen; Katori, Yukio

    2016-03-01

    To clarify composite fibers and cells in the synovial tissues of the cricoarytenoid joint (CA joint). Routine histology and immunohistrochemistry using sagittal or nearly sagittal sections obtained from 18 elderly cadaveric specimens. The CA joint capsule was thin and contained few elastic fibers. A limited supportive ligament, namely, a thickened fascia of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscles, was sometimes evident on the lateral aspect of the CA joint. However, even in the weaker medial aspect of the joint, no marked destruction of the synovial tissues was found. The CA joint always contained synovial folds--a short medial fold and long lateral folds--but these contained no or few macrophages, lymphocytes, and blood capillaries. In 2 exceptional specimens showing inflammatory cell infiltration in the submucosal tissue of the larynx, the macrophage-rich area extended toward the capsule and medial synovial fold. The lateral aspect of the CA joint was likely to be supported mechanically by the muscle-associated tissues. Strong support of the arytenoid by muscles might reduce the degree of CA joint injury with age. However, some patients with hoarseness due to mucosal inflammation of the larynx might have accompanying synovitis and subsequent cartilage injury in the CA joint. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Chromosome Conformation Capture in Primary Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Cortesi, Alice; Bodega, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    3D organization of the genome, its structural and regulatory function of cell identity, is acquiring prominent features in epigenetics studies; more efforts have been done to develop techniques that allow studying nuclear structure. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) has been set up in 2002 from Dekker and from that moment great investments were made to develop genomics variants of 3C technology (4C, 5C, Hi-C) providing new tools to investigate the shape of the genome in a more systematic and unbiased manner. 3C method allows scientists to fix dynamic and variable 3D interactions in nuclear space, and consequently to study which sequences interact, how a gene is regulated by different and distant enhancer, or how a set of enhancer could regulate transcriptional units; to follow the conformation that mediates regulation change in development; and to evaluate if this fine epigenetic mechanism is impaired in disease condition.

  17. PRIMARY MARROW DERIVED STROMAL CELLS: ISOLATION AND MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. “MSC” also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSC do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we will describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded byproduct of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We will also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs – both primary and immortalized cell lines. PMID:23959984

  18. Primary marrow-derived stromal cells: isolation and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Torok-Storb, Beverly; Pillai, Manoj M

    2013-01-01

    Marrow stromal cells (MSCs) are relatively rare cells difficult to visualize in marrow biopsies or detect in aspirated marrow. Under specific conditions MSC can be expanded in vitro and the population can give rise to several mesenchymal lineages. "MSC" also refers to mesenchymal stem cells which implies that all cells in the population are multipotent. It is generally agreed that while there may be a few multipotent stem cells in an MSC population the majority are not stem cells. In either case MSCs do not produce hematopoietic cells. Although MSCs have been isolated and characterized from several tissues, bone marrow is their most common source for research and clinical use. Primary MSC populations can be derived from bone marrow mononuclear cells with relative ease, but it is important to recognize the cellular heterogeneity within a culture and how this may vary from donor to donor. In this chapter, we describe methodology to derive primary MSCs from bone marrow screens, an otherwise discarded by-product of bone marrow harvests used for clinical transplantation. We also describe some useful techniques to characterize and manipulate MSCs-both primary and immortalized cell lines.

  19. Genesis and morphogenesis of limb synovial joints and articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Decker, Rebekah S; Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Limb synovial joints are intricate structures composed of articular cartilage, synovial membranes, ligaments and an articular capsule. Together, these tissues give each joint its unique shape, organization and biomechanical function. Articular cartilage itself is rather complex and organized in distinct zones, including the superficial zone that produces lubricants and contains stem/progenitor cells. For many years there has been great interest in deciphering the mechanisms by which the joints form and come to acquire such unique structural features and diversity. Decades ago, classic embryologists discovered that the first overt sign of joint formation at each prescribed limb site was the appearance of a dense and compact population of mesenchymal cells collectively called the interzone. Work carried out since then by several groups has provided evidence that the interzone cells actively participate in joint tissue formation over developmental time. This minireview provides a succinct but comprehensive description of the many important recent advances in this field of research. These include studies using various conditional reporter mice to genetically trace and track the origin, fate and possible function of joint progenitor cells; studies on the involvement and roles in signaling pathways and transcription factors in joint cell determination and functioning; and studies using advanced methods of gene expression analyses to uncover novel genetic determinants of joint formation and diversity. The overall advances are impressive, and the findings are not only of obvious interest and importance but also have major implications in the conception of future translational medicine tools to repair and regenerate defective, overused or aging joints. Copyright © 2014 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Primary cilia mechanics affects cell mechanosensation: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Khayyeri, Hanifeh; Barreto, Sara; Lacroix, Damien

    2015-08-21

    Primary cilia (PC) are mechanical cell structures linked to the cytoskeleton and are central to how cells sense biomechanical signals from their environment. However, it is unclear exactly how PC mechanics influences cell mechanosensation. In this study we investigate how the PC mechanical characteristics are involved in the mechanotransduction process whereby cilium deflection under fluid flow induces strains on the internal cell components that regulate the cell׳s mechanosensitive response. Our investigation employs a computational approach in which a finite element model of a cell consisting of a nucleus, cytoplasm, cortex, microtubules, actin bundles and a primary cilium was used together with a finite element representation of a flow chamber. Fluid-structure interaction analysis was performed by simulating perfusion flow of 1mm/s on the cell model. Simulations of cells with different PC mechanical characteristics, showed that the length and the stiffness of PC are responsible for the transmission of mechanical stimuli to the cytoskeleton. Fluid flow deflects the cilium, with the highest strains found at the base of the PC and in the cytoplasm. The PC deflection created further strains on the cell nucleus but did not influence microtubules and actin bundles significantly. Our results indicate that PC deflection under fluid flow stimulation transmits mechanical strain primarily to other essential organelles in the cytoplasm, such as the Golgi complex, that regulate cells' mechanoresponse. The simulations further suggest that cell mechanosensitivity can be altered by targeting PC length and rigidity.

  1. Synovial Cyst Mimicking an Intraspinal Sacral Mass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old female had a three-week history of severe low back pain radiating down the posterior left buttocks and left leg exacerbated by standing and walking. Lumbar spine MRI revealed cystic mass with similar intensity to cerebrospinal fluid located on dorsolateral left side of the sacral spinal canal inferior to the S1 pedicle. There was compression of left exiting S1 and traversing S2 nerve roots. Neurosurgery consult was requested to evaluate the cystic mass in the sacral spinal canal. After clinical evaluation, an unusually located synovial cyst was thought possible. Cyst contents were heterogeneous, suggestive of small hemorrhage and acute clinical history seemed reasonable. Left S1 and partial left S2 hemilaminectomy was performed and an epidural, partially hemorrhagic cyst was removed. There was no obvious connection to the ipsilateral L5-S1 facet joint. Pathology revealed synovial cyst, and the patient's leg pain was improved postoperatively. This synovial cyst was unusual as it had no connection with the facet joint intraoperatively and its location in the sacral canal was uncommon. PMID:24716025

  2. Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and follicle center B-cell lymphomas that despite the excellent prognosis have cutaneous recurrences very commonly. The most aggressive forms include the primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, consisting in two major groups: the leg type, with poor prognosis, and others, the latter representing a heterogeneous group of lymphomas from which specific entities are supposed to be individualized over time, such as intravascular large B-cell lymphomas. Treatment may include surgical excision, radiotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids, interferon, monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, depending on the type of lymphoma and on the type and location of the skin lesions. In subtypes with good prognosis is contraindicated overtreatment and in those associated with a worse prognosis the recommended therapy relies on CHOP-like regimens associated with rituximab, assisted or not with local radiotherapy. We review the primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, remembering the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, classification, and prognostic factors and presenting the available therapies. PMID:26560215

  3. Primary cell culture method for the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyunhee; Ghil, Sungho

    2015-10-01

    Honeybees are among the most important pollinators in nature, and honeybee-associated products are useful in various areas, including the food industry. However, honeybees may be infected by various types of pathogens. The study of honeybee-associated diseases would greatly benefit from a successful cell culture system, but although some honeybee cell culture techniques have been introduced, these methods have not yet been fully established. Here, we describe a primary cell culture method for the honeybee, Apis mellifera. We isolated, sterilized, and seeded egg cells into non-coated cell culture dishes to generate cell aggregates. After approximately 10 d, aggregates were dissociated and seeded to cell culture dishes. Cell passages were continuously performed, with sub-culturing every 3-4 d. The cells expressed non-adherent phenotypes. Their growth increased with the passage number when they were cultured in growth medium based on L-15 insect medium but not Schneider's insect medium. Finally, polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the cells originated from A. mellifera. Our results suggest that the culturing methods described herein are appropriate for isolating primary cells from honeybee eggs. These methods could thus facilitate the study of honeybee-associated pathogenesis, development, and toxicology.

  4. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  5. Targeting EZH2-mediated methylation of H3K27 inhibits proliferation and migration of Synovial Sarcoma in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jacson K.; Cote, Gregory M.; Gao, Yan; Choy, Edwin; Mankin, Henry J.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma genetically defined by the fusion oncogene SS18-SSX. It is hypothesized that either SS18-SSX disrupts SWI/SNF complex inhibition of the polycomb complex 2 (PRC2) methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homologue 2 (EZH2), or that SS18-SSX is able to directly recruit PRC2 to aberrantly silence target genes. This is of potential therapeutic value as several EZH2 small molecule inhibitors are entering early phase clinical trials. In this study, we first confirmed EZH2 expression in the 76% of human synovial sarcoma samples. We subsequently investigated EZH2 as a therapeutic target in synovial sarcoma in vitro. Knockdown of EZH2 by shRNA or siRNA resulted in inhibition of cell growth and migration across a series of synovial sarcoma cell lines. The EZH2 selective small-molecule inhibitor EPZ005687 similarly suppressed cell proliferation and migration. These data support the hypothesis that targeting EZH2 may be a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of synovial sarcoma; clinical trials are initiating enrollment currently. PMID:27125524

  6. Primary cutaneous blastoid mantle cell lymphoma-case report.

    PubMed

    Estrozi, Bruna; Sanches, José A; Varela, Paulo C S; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-06-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) commonly involves extranodal sites, usually as a manifestation of disseminated disease. In rare cases, MCLs may arise as a primary tumor in the skin. Blastoid mantle cell lymphoma (BV-MCL) is a rare variant and has a more aggressive clinical course. The phenotype of BV-MCL is characterized as CD20+, CD5+, cyclin D1+, CD23-, and CD10-. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization shows a characteristic t(11;14) fusion pattern. We report a case of a BV-MCL arising in skin as primary cutaneous MCL with the characteristic immunophenotype and translocation.

  7. Synovial fluid lactic acid levels in septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Riley, T V

    1981-01-01

    Synovial fluid lactic acid estimations were carried out on 50 samples by gas liquid chromatography. Specimens from 4 patients with bacteria arthritis, other than gonococcal, had a mean lactic acid concentration of 215 mg/dl. One patient with gonococcal arthritis had a synovial fluid lactic acid of 30 mg/dl. Forty-one patients with inflammatory arthritis and 4 patients with degenerative arthritis had mean synovial fluid lactic acid levels of 27 and 23 mg/dl respectively. The estimation of synovial fluid lactic acid is reliable in differentiating septic arthritis from inflammatory and degenerative arthritis except when the infecting organism is NEisseria gonorrhoeae.

  8. Atlantoaxial Joint Synovial Cyst: Diagnosis and Percutaneous Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Velan, Osvaldo; Rabadan, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-11-15

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  9. Secretory phospholipases A2 induce cytokine release from blood and synovial fluid monocytes.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Massimo; Granata, Francescopaolo; Oriente, Alfonso; Gentile, Marco; Petraroli, Angelica; Balestrieri, Barbara; Marone, Gianni

    2002-01-01

    Secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) are released in the blood of patients with various inflammatory diseases and exert proinflammatory activities by releasing arachidonic acid (AA), the precursor of eicosanoids. We examined the ability of four sPLA2 to activate blood and synovial fluid monocytes in vitro. Monocytes were purified from blood of healthy donors or from synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis by negative immunoselection and by adherence to plastic dishes, respectively. The cells were incubated with group IA, IB, IIA and III sPLA2 and the release of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-12 was determined by ELISA. Group IA, IB and IIA sPLA2 induced a concentration-dependent release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 from blood monocytes. These sPLA2 activated IL-12 production only in monocytes preincubated with IFN-gamma. Group IA and IIA sPLA2 also induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 release from synovial fluid monocytes. TNF-alpha and IL-6 release paralleled an increase in their mRNA expression and was independent from the capacity of sPLA2 to mobilize AA. These results indicate that sPLA2 stimulate cytokine release from blood and synovial fluid monocytes by a mechanism at least partially unrelated to their enzymatic activity. This effect may concur with the generation of AA in the proinflammatory activity of sPLA2 released during inflammatory diseases.

  10. Monophasic synovial sarcoma of the greater omentum: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Alcalá Serrano, F J; Hernández Hernández, J R; Montenegro Dámaso, T; López-Tomassetti Fernández, E

    2017-07-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant spindle cell neoplasm normally arising from tissues around joints, bursa and tendon sheaths. Several reports involving the gastrointestinal tract, mainly the oesophagus and stomach, have been documented; however, the omentum remains an extremely unusual location. Monophasic type is composed exclusively of spindle cells arranged in fascicles. Establishing the correct diagnosis of these tumours could be challenging because of the similarities with gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours with similar histology.

  11. Culturing primary rat inner medullary collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Faust, Dörte; Geelhaar, Andrea; Eisermann, Beate; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussmann, Enno; Klussman, Enno

    2013-06-21

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) facilitates water reabsorption by renal collecting duct principal cells and thereby fine-tunes body water homeostasis. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R) on the surface of the cells and thereby induces synthesis of cAMP. This stimulates cellular signaling processes leading to changes in the phosphorylation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein kinase A phoshorylates AQP2 and thereby triggers the translocation of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane facilitating water reabsorption from primary urine. Aberrations of AVP release from the pituitary or AVP-activated signaling in principal cells can cause central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, respectively; an elevated blood plasma AVP level is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic heart failure and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Here, we present a protocol for cultivation of primary rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, which express V2R and AQP2 endogenously. The cells are suitable for elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying the control of AQP2 and thus to discover novel drug targets for the treatment of diseases associated with dysregulation of AVP-mediated water reabsorption. IMCD cells are obtained from rat renal inner medullae and are used for experiments six to eight days after seeding. IMCD cells can be cultured in regular cell culture dishes, flasks and micro-titer plates of different formats, the procedure only requires a few hours, and is appropriate for standard cell culture laboratories.

  12. Culturing Primary Rat Inner Medullary Collecting Duct Cells

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Dörte; Geelhaar, Andrea; Eisermann, Beate; Eichhorst, Jenny; Wiesner, Burkhard; Rosenthal, Walter; Klussman, Enno

    2013-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) facilitates water reabsorption by renal collecting duct principal cells and thereby fine-tunes body water homeostasis. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R) on the surface of the cells and thereby induces synthesis of cAMP. This stimulates cellular signaling processes leading to changes in the phosphorylation of the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Protein kinase A phoshorylates AQP2 and thereby triggers the translocation of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane facilitating water reabsorption from primary urine. Aberrations of AVP release from the pituitary or AVP-activated signaling in principal cells can cause central or nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, respectively; an elevated blood plasma AVP level is associated with cardiovascular diseases such as chronic heart failure and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. Here, we present a protocol for cultivation of primary rat inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, which express V2R and AQP2 endogenously. The cells are suitable for elucidating molecular mechanisms underlying the control of AQP2 and thus to discover novel drug targets for the treatment of diseases associated with dysregulation of AVP-mediated water reabsorption. IMCD cells are obtained from rat renal inner medullae and are used for experiments six to eight days after seeding. IMCD cells can be cultured in regular cell culture dishes, flasks and micro-titer plates of different formats, the procedure only requires a few hours, and is appropriate for standard cell culture laboratories. PMID:23852264

  13. Of Mice and Men: Opportunities to Use Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Synovial Sarcoma for Preclinical Cancer Therapeutic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin B.; Haldar, Malay; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Lessnick, Stephen L.; Sharma, Sunil; Capecchi, Mario R.; Randall, R. Lor

    2016-01-01

    Background Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue malignancy with a predilection for adolescents and young adults. Despite recent improvements in the understanding of its character and etiology, few therapeutic advances have been made. The mortality rate is high among the young population it affects. The low incidence of most subtypes of sarcoma, such as synovial sarcoma, makes disease-specific trials difficult to organize. The biological differences between sarcoma subtypes make inclusion of multiple types in general trials unsatisfactory as well. Methods A review of the literature regarding targetable pathways in synovial sarcoma was undertaken. A strategy has been devised to utilize available technologies in order to prioritize drug trial planning. Results Cell culture and xenograft research with synovial sarcoma cell lines have identified some critical pathways that may be targetable. Promising therapeutic strategies include newer cytotoxic chemotherapies, antiangiogenic agents, anti-IGF1R pathway agents, anti-Bcl-2/proapoptotic agents, and histone deacetylase complex inhibitors. Conclusions We propose to prioritize potential therapeutic strategies via preclinical testing of agents in a genetic mouse model of synovial sarcoma. Preclinical optimization of treatment regimens can guide the development of more focused patient trials. PMID:21666582

  14. Fine needle aspiration of secondary synovial sarcoma of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Murro, Diana; Slade, Jamie Macagba; Syed, Sahr; Gattuso, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    Synovial sarcomas (SS) of the head and neck region are extremely rare and arise in only 5% of cases. We present a case of secondary SS of the thyroid originally diagnosed as medullary carcinoma on fine needle aspiration (FNA). A 41-year-old man presented with several weeks of dysphonia and a left thyroid mass. FNA of the thyroid nodule showed a cellular smear composed of loosely cohesive oval to spindle-shaped cells with irregular nuclear borders, finely granular chromatin, and inconspicuous nucleoli. The patient was diagnosed with medullary carcinoma and underwent a total thyroidectomy. Intro-operatively, the mass was found to arise from the tracheoesophageal groove with spread to the left thyroid. Microscopic examination of the thyroid tumor revealed a dense spindle cell proliferation with abundant mitoses, scant cords and nests of epithelial cells and foci of necrosis. The spindle cells were positive for bcl2 and vimentin and the epithelial cells were positive for cytokeratin 8/18 and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). Both spindle and epithelial cells were negative for thyroglobulin, calcitonin, synaptophysin and chromogranin. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) demonstrated translocation (X;18)(p11;q11), confirming the diagnosis of SS. The patient underwent a total laryngopharyngoesophagectomy with subsequent adjuvant therapy and is currently disease free. Only 6 cases of histologically confirmed primary SS of the thyroid have been reported. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of FISH-confirmed secondary SS of the thyroid and also the first case of SS arising from the tracheoesophageal groove.

  15. Genomic Responses of Mouse Synovial Fibroblasts During Tumor Necrosis Factor-Driven Arthritogenesis Greatly Mimic Those in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ntougkos, Evangelos; Chouvardas, Panagiotis; Roumelioti, Fani; Ospelt, Caroline; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D; Gay, Steffen; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Kollias, George

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant activation of synovial fibroblasts is a key determinant in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aims of this study were to produce a map of gene expression and epigenetic changes occurring in this cell type during disease progression in the human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-transgenic model of arthritis and to identify commonalities with human synovial fibroblasts. We used deep sequencing to probe the transcriptome, the methylome, and the chromatin landscape of cultured mouse arthritogenic synovial fibroblasts at 3 stages of disease, as well as synovial fibroblasts stimulated with human TNF. We performed bioinformatics analyses at the gene, pathway, and network levels, compared mouse and human data, and validated selected genes in both species. We found that synovial fibroblast arthritogenicity was reflected in distinct dynamic patterns of transcriptional dysregulation, which was especially enriched in pathways of the innate immune response and mesenchymal differentiation. A functionally representative subset of these changes was associated with methylation, mostly in gene bodies. The arthritogenic state involved highly active promoters, which were marked by histone H3K4 trimethylation. There was significant overlap between the mouse and human data at the level of dysregulated genes and to an even greater extent at the level of pathways. This study is the first systematic examination of the pathogenic changes that occur in mouse synovial fibroblasts during progressive TNF-driven arthritogenesis. Significant correlations with the respective human RA synovial fibroblast data further validate the human TNF-transgenic mouse as a reliable model of the human disease. The resource of data generated in this work may serve as a framework for the discovery of novel pathogenic mechanisms and disease biomarkers. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  16. The Primary Cilium in Cell Signaling and Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud III, Edward J; Yoder, Bradley

    2006-01-01

    The primary cilium is a microtubule-based antenna-like structure that emanates from the surface of virtually all cells in the mammalian body. It is anchored to the cell by the basal body, which develops from the mother centriole of the centrosome in a manner that is coordinately regulated with the cell cycle. The primary cilium is a sensory organelle that receives both mechanical and chemical signals from other cells and the environment, and transmits these signals to the nucleus to elicit a cellular response. Recent studies revealed that multiple components of the Sonic hedgehog and plateletderived growth factor receptor-A signal transduction pathways localize to the primary cilium, and that loss of the cilium blocks ligand-induced signaling by both pathways. In light of the major role that these pathways play in numerous types of cancer, we anticipate that the emerging discoveries being made about the function of the primary cilium in signaling pathways that are critical for embryonic development and tissue homeostasis in adults will also provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. (Cancer Res 2006; 66 13): 6463-7)

  17. Arsenic is Cytotoxic and Genotoxic to Primary Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hong; Huang, ShouPing; Martin, Sarah; Wise, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic originates from both geochemical and numerous anthropogenic activities. Exposure of the general public to significant levels of arsenic is widespread. Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen. Long-term exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water have been linked to bladder, lung, kidney, liver, prostate, and skin cancer. Among them, lung cancer is of great public concern. However, little is known about how arsenic causes lung cancer and few studies have considered effects in normal human lung cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of arsenic in human primary bronchial fibroblast and epithelial cells. Our data show that arsenic induces a concentration-dependent decrease in cell survival after short (24 h) or long (120 h) exposures. Arsenic induces concentration-dependent but not time-dependent increases in chromosome damage in fibroblasts. No chromosome damage is induced after either 24 h or 120 h arsenic exposure in epithelial cells. Using neutral comet assay and gamma-H2A.X foci forming assay, we found that 24 h or 120 h exposure to arsenic induces increases in DNA double strand breaks in both cell lines. These data indicate that arsenic is cytotoxic and genotoxic to human lung primary cells but lung fibroblasts are more sensitive to arsenic than epithelial cells. Further research is needed to understand the specific mechanisms involved in arsenic-induced genotoxicity in human lung cells. PMID:24291234

  18. Clitoria ternatea flower petals: Effect on TNFR1 neutralization via downregulation of synovial matrix metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Rana; Sultana, Sahin; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2017-08-19

    Clitoria ternatea Linn. (C. ternatea) is a traditionally used herb in arthritis, and its anti-arthritic activity has been attributed to polyphenols (e.g. quercetins) from its flower petal. The present study was designed to investigate whether C. ternatea or quercetin-3ß-D-glucoside (QG) support the antibody mediated TNFα-receptor 1 (TNFR1) neutralization to ameliorate arthritis in mice. Development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in male Swiss mice (20-22g, 3-4 weeks of age) was followed by estimation of synovial polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) accumulation (in terms of myeloperoxidase activity), synovial and systemic release of cytokines, chemokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), biochemical estimation of synovial free radical generation and antioxidant status, as well as immunoblot assessment of synovial TNFR1, toll-like receptor 2(TLR2), cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression; and zymographic analysis of synovial matrix-metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) activity. CIA was induced from day 2 post-secondary immunizations as evidenced from arthritic scores and joint swelling in parallel to increased inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in synovial joints. Long term supplementation with extract from Clitoria ternatea flower petals CTE (50mg/kg) and QG (2.5mg/kg) upto 24 days post booster immunization augmented anti-arthritic potential of TNFR1 neutralization with anti-TNFR1 antibody (10μg per mice) in terms of reduced MPO activity, decrease in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS)/ reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production in parallel to significant (p<0.05) reduction in TNFR1, TLR2, iNOS, COX-2 and MMP-2 expression. CTE and QG possess potential anti-arthritic activity which targets synovial MMP-2 in arthritic joints and TNFR1 targeting followed by CTE or QG treatment might become a combinatorial approach in future therapeutic research in

  19. Lysis of primary hepatic tumours by lymphokine activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, K H; Shu, S Y; Lee, C S; Chu, C T; Yang, C S; Chang, K J

    1987-01-01

    Lymphokine activated killer cell is a newly described lytic system against a variety of solid tumours and is distinct in several respects from the classic cytolytic T cell and the natural killer systems. This study was conducted to evaluate the lytic activity of lymphokine activated killer cells against fresh autologous and allogeneic, as well as cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Lymphokine activated killer cell was generated by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with various concentrations of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2, Cetus, USA) for various periods of time. A four hour 51Cr release assay was used to measure cytotoxicity. The results show that fresh and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells were only slightly susceptible to natural killer cells. Normal hepatocytes were resistant to lymphokine activated killer-mediated lysis. Lymphokine activated killer cells could be generated from mononuclear cells of hepatocellular carcinoma patients and normal subjects with lytic activity against fresh autologous and allogeneic and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells, but lymphokine activated killer cells from the former was less efficient than that from the latter. It is concluded that the adoptive immunotherapy with combined rIL-2 and lymphokine activated killer may be worth trying in early cases of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:3030899

  20. Pulp tissue from primary teeth: new source of stem cells

    PubMed Central

    TELLES, Paloma Dias; MACHADO, Maria Aparecida de Andrade Moreira; SAKAI, Vivien Thiemy; NÖR, Jacques Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    SHED (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth) represent a population of postnatal stem cells capable of extensive proliferation and multipotential differentiation. Primary teeth may be an ideal source of postnatal stem cells to regenerate tooth structures and bone, and possibly to treat neural tissue injury or degenerative diseases. SHED are highly proliferative cells derived from an accessible tissue source, and therefore hold potential for providing enough cells for clinical applications. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about dental pulp stem cells and discuss tissue engineering approaches that use SHED to replace irreversibly inflamed or necrotic pulps with a healthy and functionally competent tissue that is capable of forming new dentin. PMID:21625731

  1. Quantitative assessment of the rheumatoid synovial microvascular bed by gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, K.; Cookson, J.; Blades, S.; Coumbe, A.; Blake, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the relation between rate of synovial membrane enhancement, intra-articular pressure (IAP), and histologically determined synovial vascularity in rheumatoid arthritis, using gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
METHODS—Dynamic gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI was performed in 31 patients with knee synovitis (10 patients IAP study, 21 patients vascular morphometry study). Rate of synovial membrane enhancement was quantified by line profile analysis using the image processing package ANALYZE. IAP was measured using an intra-compartmental pressure monitor system. Multiple synovial biopsy specimens were obtained by a blind biopsy technique. Blood vessels were identified immunohistochemically using the endothelial cell marker QBend30 and quantified (blood vessel numerical density and fractional area).
RESULTS—Median blood vessel numerical density and fractional area were 77.5/mm2 (IQR; 69.3-110.7) and 5.6% (IQR; 3.4-8.5) respectively. The rate of synovial membrane enhancement (median 2.74 signal intensity units/s, IQR 2.0-3.8) correlated with both blood vessel numerical density (r = 0.46, p < 0.05) and blood vessel fractional area (r = 0.55, p < 0.02). IAP did not influence the rate of enhancement.
CONCLUSIONS—Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI may prove to be a valuable technique for evaluating drugs that influence angiogenesis.

 Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging; rheumatoid arthritis; synovitis; vascularity PMID:9640130

  2. Enhanced expression of heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) activation in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue. Differential regulation of hsp70 expression and hsf1 activation in synovial fibroblasts by proinflammatory cytokines, shear stress, and antiinflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Schett, G; Redlich, K; Xu, Q; Bizan, P; Gröger, M; Tohidast-Akrad, M; Kiener, H; Smolen, J; Steiner, G

    1998-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsp) have been repeatedly implicated to participate in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Herein, we investigated the regulation of synovial hsp70 expression by analyzing the DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) as well as inducible hsp70 expression. Experiments were performed both on synovial tissue and on synovial fibroblast-like cells (SFC). Gel mobility shift analysis revealed increased HSF1 activation, and Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed increased hsp70 expression in RA synovial tissue, but not in synovial tissue derived from patients with osteoarthritis. Proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha, IL-6), but not IFN-gamma or TGF-beta, induced activation of HSF1-DNA binding and hsp70 expression in cultivated SFC. Activation of HSF1 in SFC was accompanied by hyperphosphorylation and nuclear translocation of HSF1. Furthermore, shear stress also induced a complete heat shock response in cultivated synovial cells. In contrast, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs triggered only an incomplete heat shock response, with HSF1 activation but not hsp70 induction, whereas steroids and immunosuppressive drugs did not affect the heat shock response at all. In summary, these data suggest that induction of hsp70 expression in rheumatoid synovial tissue is based on transcriptional activation of HSF1 due to the presence of proinflammatory cytokines (and possibly also shear stress). PMID:9664071

  3. Primary cells and stem cells in drug discovery: emerging tools for high-throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Eglen, Richard; Reisine, Terry

    2011-04-01

    Many drug discovery screening programs employ immortalized cells, recombinantly engineered to express a defined molecular target. Several technologies are now emerging that render it feasible to employ more physiologically, and clinically relevant, cell phenotypes. Consequently, numerous approaches use primary cells, which retain many functions seen in vivo, as well as endogenously expressing the target of interest. Furthermore, stem cells, of either embryonic or adult origin, as well as those derived from differentiated cells, are now finding a place in drug discovery. Collectively, these cells are expanding the utility of authentic human cells, either as screening tools or as therapeutics, as well as providing cells derived directly from patients. Nonetheless, the growing use of phenotypically relevant cells (including primary cells or stem cells) is not without technical difficulties, particularly when their envisioned use lies in high-throughput screening (HTS) protocols. In particular, the limited availability of homogeneous primary or stem cell populations for HTS mandates that novel technologies be developed to accelerate their adoption. These technologies include detection of responses with very few cells as well as protocols to generate cell lines in abundant, homogeneous populations. In parallel, the growing use of changes in cell phenotype as the assay readout is driving greater use of high-throughput imaging techniques in screening. Taken together, the greater availability of novel primary and stem cell phenotypes as well as new detection technologies is heralding a new era of cellular screening. This convergence offers unique opportunities to identify drug candidates for disorders at which few therapeutics are presently available.

  4. Nonhematopoietic cells are the primary source of bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kassmer, Susannah H; Bruscia, Emanuela M; Zhang, Ping-Xia; Krause, Diane S

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bone marrow (BM)-derived cells differentiate into nonhematopoietic cells of multiple tissues. To date, it remains unknown which population(s) of BM cells are primarily responsible for this engraftment. To test the hypothesis that nonhematopoietic stem cells in the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells, either wild-type hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic BM cells were transplanted into irradiated surfactant-protein-C (SPC)-null mice. Donor-derived, SPC-positive type 2 pneumocytes were predominantly detected in the lungs of mice receiving purified nonhematopoietic cells and were absent from mice receiving purified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We conclude that cells contained in the nonhematopoietic fraction of the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells. These nonhematopoietic cells may represent a primitive stem cell population residing in adult BM.

  5. Nonhematopoietic Cells are the Primary Source of Bone Marrow-Derived Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kassmer, Susannah H.; Bruscia, Emanuela M.; Zhang, Ping-Xia; Krause, Diane S.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bone marrow (BM)-derived cells differentiate into nonhematopoietic cells of multiple tissues. To date, it remains unknown which population(s) of BM cells are primarily responsible for this engraftment. To test the hypothesis that nonhematopoietic stem cells in the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells, either wild-type hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic BM cells were transplanted into irradiated surfactant-protein-C (SPC)-null mice. Donor-derived, SPC-positive type 2 pneumocytes were predominantly detected in the lungs of mice receiving purified nonhematopoietic cells and were absent from mice receiving purified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We conclude that cells contained in the nonhematopoietic fraction of the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells. These nonhematopoietic cells may represent a primitive stem cell population residing in adult BM. PMID:22162244

  6. Monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Betal, Dibendu; Babu, Ramesh; Mehmet, Veysi

    2009-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are a rare form of soft tissue sarcomas. We present a case of a 62 year-old male presenting with a left thyroid lump initially though to be a thyroid adenoma but subsequently diagnosed as a monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx. We discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this case. PMID:19335917

  7. Monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx: a case report.

    PubMed

    Betal, Dibendu; Babu, Ramesh; Mehmet, Veysi

    2009-03-31

    Synovial sarcomas are a rare form of soft tissue sarcomas. We present a case of a 62 year-old male presenting with a left thyroid lump initially though to be a thyroid adenoma but subsequently diagnosed as a monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx. We discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this case.

  8. Normal human synovial fluid: osmolality and exercise-induced changes.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, M; Bloebaum, R D; Ross, S D; Campbell, P; Sarmiento, A

    1985-12-01

    We measured the osmolality of human synovial fluid in the knees of healthy young adults following minimum activity and exercise. These results were compared with each subject's blood-serum osmolality. The synovial fluid was hyperosmolal with minimum activity, decreasing to blood-serum levels after exercise.

  9. Single-molecule imaging of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, Joachim; Kaminski, Tim P.; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Jerosch, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Human synovial fluid contains a high concentration of hyaluronan, a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that provides viscoelasticity and contributes to joint lubrication. In osteoarthritis synovial fluid, the concentration and molecular weight of hyaluronan decrease, thus impairing shock absorption and lubrication. Consistently, substitution of hyaluronan (viscosupplementation) is a widely used treatment for osteoarthritis. So far, the organization and dynamics of hyaluronan in native human synovial fluid and its action mechanism in viscosupplementation are poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here, we introduce highly sensitive single molecule microscopy to analyze the conformation and interactions of fluorescently labeled hyaluronan molecules in native human synovial fluid. Our findings are consistent with a random coil conformation of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid, and point to specific interactions of hyaluronan molecules with the synovial fluid matrix. Furthermore, single molecule microscopy is capable of detecting the breakdown of the synovial fluid matrix in osteoarthritis. Thus, single molecule microscopy is a useful new method to probe the structure of human synovial fluid and its changes in disease states like osteoarthritis.

  10. Synovial chondromatosis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Howard, M O; Nieves, M A; Miles, K G

    1996-04-01

    A case of synovial chondromatosis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was found in June 1993. In radiographs of bilateral swelling of the scapulohumeral joint we observed numerous mineralized foci in the soft tissue. The foci were identified by light microscopy as cartilaginous metaplasia. This is the first report of synovial chondromatosis in an owl.

  11. Osteoarthritic synovial fluid rheology and correlations with protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Madkhali, Anwar; Chernos, Michael; Grecov, Dana; Kwok, Ezra

    2016-11-09

    Osteoarthritis is a common, localized joint disease that causes pain, stiffness and reduced mobility. Osteoarthritis is particularly common in the knees. The effects of osteoarthritis on the rheology of synovial fluid in the knees are not fully understood and consequently require further study. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of protein content on synovial fluid shear rheology. A secondary study outcome will include study of the temperature dependence of synovial fluid behaviour. 38 osteoarthritic synovial fluid samples were studied under shear flow. Shear properties were correlated with protein concentration. Viscosupplement was used as a comparison and to verify measurement reliability. The effects of temperature were investigated at 20, 29 and 37°C. Shear rheological properties were found to vary widely between samples, however all samples demonstrated clear non-Newtonian shear thinning behaviour. In general viscoelastic properties were lower in osteoarthritic samples than previously studied healthy synovial fluid. A moderate correlation was observed between synovial fluid dynamic moduli at a frequency of 2.5 Hz and protein concentration. Temperature was found to affect the rheology of osteoarthritic synovial fluid and was fitted with the Arrhenius model. Increased protein concentration has been correlated with decreased shear rheological parameters. Temperature dependence of synovial fluid was also demonstrated and modelled for use in Part 2 of this article.

  12. [Synovial sarcoma of the infratemporal fossa].

    PubMed

    Tamarit Conejeros, José Manuel; Estrems Navas, Paloma; Estellés Ferriol, Enrique; Dalmau Galofre, José

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is the fourth most common type of sarcoma. It is usually found in the knee or ankle joints, and is exceptional in the head and neck. Most cases are diagnosed in men between 20 and 40 years of age. Diagnosis is often casual due to the infrequent nature of this tumour and its non-specific clinical and radiological characteristics. Confirmation is therefore based on immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. We report a case of biphasic sinovial sarcoma located in the infratemporal fossa treated at our hospital and we make a review of the literature. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Primary non-hodgkin B cell lymphoma in a man.

    PubMed

    Alhabshi, Sh M I; Ismail, Z; Arasaratnam, Sh A

    2011-03-01

    Malignant breast lymphoma is a rare condition and primary breast lymphoma is extremely rare in the male population. We present a case of a 26-year-old man (transgender) who presented with a large palpable mass in the right breast. This mass was rapidly growing in size associated with right axillary lymphadenopathy. Ultrasound and MRI findings were consistent with BIRADS IV lesion which was suspicious of malignancy. Core biopsy was performed and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of primary non Hodgkin B cell lymphoma of the breast.

  14. The Rheological Properties of the Biopolymers in Synovial Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Wetsch, Julie; Oates, Katherine M. N.; Colby, Ralph H.

    2005-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid and the synovial fluid model indicate that the fluids are highly viscoeleastic and rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  15. Temporomandibular joint biomechanical restrictions: the fluid and synovial membrane.

    PubMed

    Cascone, P; Vetrano, S; Nicolai, G; Fabiani, F

    1999-07-01

    The authors analyze the functions of the synovial membrane and the chemical-physical properties of synovial fluid. In particular they evaluate the role played by synovial fluid in the complex mechanism of the temporomandibular joint. Every single part that belongs to the temporomandibular joint, together with the stomatognathic apparatus, plays a specific and particular role according to the dynamics and to the preservation of the correct temporomandibular joint physiology. The physiological postural and functional relationship between the various parts of the temporomandibular joint is guaranteed by a number of biomechanical restrictions that lead and influence the regular execution of the articular movements. The most involved biomechanical restrictions in the temporomandibular joint are the temporomandibular ligament, the lateral disc ligament, the bilaminar zone or retrodiscal tissue, the synovial membrane, and the synovial fluid.

  16. Cytotoxicity and accumulation of ergot alkaloids in human primary cells.

    PubMed

    Mulac, Dennis; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-04-11

    Ergot alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced by fungi of the species Claviceps. Toxic effects after consumption of contaminated grains are described since mediaeval times. Of the more than 40 known ergot alkaloids six are found predominantly. These are ergotamine, ergocornine, ergocryptine, ergocristine, ergosine and ergometrine, along with their corresponding isomeric forms (-inine-forms). Toxic effects are known to be induced by an interaction of the ergot alkaloids as neurotransmitters, like dopamine or serotonin. Nevertheless data concerning cytotoxic effects are missing and therefore a screening of the six main ergot alkaloids was performed in human primary cells in order to evaluate the toxic potential. As it is well known that ergot alkaloids isomerize easily the stability was tested in the cell medium. Based on these results factors were calculated to correct the used concentration values to the biologically active lysergic (-ine) form. These factors range from 1.4 for the most stable compound ergometrine to 5.0 for the most unstable ergot alkaloid ergocristine. With these factors, reflecting the instability, several controverse literature data concerning the toxicity could be explained. To evaluate the cytotoxic effects of ergot alkaloids, human cells in primary culture were used. These cells remain unchanged in contrast to cell lines and the data allow a better comparison to the in vivo situation than using immortalized cell lines. To characterize the effects on primary cells, renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC) and normal human astrocytes (NHA) were used. The parameters necrosis (LDH-release) and apoptosis (caspase-3-activation, DNA condensation and fragmentation) were distinguished. The results show that depending on the individual structure of the peptide ergot alkaloids the toxic properties change. While ergometrine as a lysergic acid amide did not show any effect, the peptide ergot alkaloids revealed a different toxic potential. Of

  17. Release of endogenous anti-inflammatory complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H protects synovial fibroblasts during rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    FRIESE, M A; MANUELIAN, T; JUNNIKKALA, S; HELLWAGE, J; MERI, S; PETER, H H; GORDON, D L; EIBEL, H; ZIPFEL, P F

    2003-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology predominantly affecting cells and tissues of synovial joints. Here we show that the two important complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H play a protective anti-inflammatory role in rheumatoid arthritis. Expression analyses at the mRNA- and protein level show in vitro expression and secretion of both regulators by synovial fibroblasts derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Similarly the two regulators are synthesized in vivo in diseased synovial tissue, and in particular synovial lining cells express high levels of FHL-1. The anti-inflammatory role of these regulators in rheumatoid arthritis is highlighted by their induction with IFN-γ and dexamethasone, whilst the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α had no effect. Transient transfection experiments with various FHL-1/factor H promoter-luciferase reporter constructs into cells of distinct origin show independent cell and tissue specific promoter regulated transcription of these two regulators. The inducible expression, specifically of FHL-1 has physiological consequences. By binding directly to surfaces the released proteins protect cells from inflammatory damage and complement-mediated cell lysis. This study shows a novel protective and anti-inflammatory role of the two important complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H in rheumatoid arthritis and suggests a disease controlling role of the two proteins. PMID:12780697

  18. Release of endogenous anti-inflammatory complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H protects synovial fibroblasts during rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Friese, M A; Manuelian, T; Junnikkala, S; Hellwage, J; Meri, S; Peter, H H; Gordon, D L; Eibel, H; Zipfel, P F

    2003-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown aetiology predominantly affecting cells and tissues of synovial joints. Here we show that the two important complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H play a protective anti-inflammatory role in rheumatoid arthritis. Expression analyses at the mRNA- and protein level show in vitro expression and secretion of both regulators by synovial fibroblasts derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Similarly the two regulators are synthesized in vivo in diseased synovial tissue, and in particular synovial lining cells express high levels of FHL-1. The anti-inflammatory role of these regulators in rheumatoid arthritis is highlighted by their induction with IFN-gamma and dexamethasone, whilst the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha had no effect. Transient transfection experiments with various FHL-1/factor H promoter-luciferase reporter constructs into cells of distinct origin show independent cell and tissue specific promoter regulated transcription of these two regulators. The inducible expression, specifically of FHL-1 has physiological consequences. By binding directly to surfaces the released proteins protect cells from inflammatory damage and complement-mediated cell lysis. This study shows a novel protective and anti-inflammatory role of the two important complement regulators FHL-1 and factor H in rheumatoid arthritis and suggests a disease controlling role of the two proteins.

  19. Autotaxin expression from synovial fibroblasts is essential for the pathogenesis of modeled arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Oikonomou, Nikos; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Sevastou, Ioanna; Nikolaidou-Katsaridou, Nefeli; Zhao, Zhenwen; Mersinias, Vassilis; Armaka, Maria; Xu, Yan; Masu, Masayuki; Mills, Gordon B.; Gay, Steffen; Kollias, George

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive arthropathy characterized by chronic synovial inflammation that imposes a substantial socioeconomic burden. Under the influence of the proinflammatory milieu, synovial fibroblasts (SFs), the main effector cells in disease pathogenesis, become activated and hyperplastic, releasing proinflammatory factors and tissue-remodeling enzymes. This study shows that activated arthritic SFs from human patients and animal models express significant quantities of autotaxin (ATX; ENPP2), a lysophospholipase D that catalyzes the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX expression from SFs was induced by TNF, and LPA induced SF activation and effector functions in synergy with TNF. Conditional genetic ablation of ATX in mesenchymal cells, including SFs, resulted in disease attenuation in animal models of arthritis, establishing the ATX/LPA axis as a novel player in chronic inflammation and the pathogenesis of arthritis and a promising therapeutic target. PMID:22493518

  20. Macroscopic and microscopic features of synovial membrane inflammation in the osteoarthritic knee: correlating magnetic resonance imaging findings with disease severity.

    PubMed

    Loeuille, Damien; Chary-Valckenaere, Isabelle; Champigneulle, Jacqueline; Rat, Anne-Christine; Toussaint, Frédéric; Pinzano-Watrin, Astrid; Goebel, Jean Christophe; Mainard, Didier; Blum, Alain; Pourel, Jacques; Netter, Patrick; Gillet, Pierre

    2005-11-01

    To determine the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), macroscopic, and microscopic characteristics of synovial membrane inflammation, to study the relationship between disease severity and the degree of synovial inflammation on MRI and on macroscopic and microscopic examination, and to look for colocalization of chondral lesions and synovial inflammation. Thirty-nine patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) were classified into 2 groups according to the severity of cartilage lesions as revealed by chondroscopy. Group 1 (n = 14) had mild cartilage lesion(s) without exposure of subchondral bone. Group 2 (n = 25) had severe cartilage lesion(s) with focal or diffuse exposure of subchondral bone. Synovitis was evaluated on T1-weighted MRI sequences according to the degree of synovial thickening on a 4-point scale (ranging from 0 to 3) in 5 regions of interest. Synovial membrane was macroscopically scored, and biopsies were performed on the 5 preselected sites for histologic scoring. The mean +/- SD synovial thickening score on MRI was 1.55 +/- 0.90, with no significant difference between groups 1 and 2. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility of the total synovial score was excellent, and interobserver reproducibility of the MRI grade was good. Synovitis was diffuse and associated with chondral lesions only in the medial femorotibial compartment (r = 0.49, P = 0.001). The degree of synovial thickening on MRI correlated with qualitative macroscopic analysis (r(s) = 0.58, P < 0.001) and with microscopic features (synovial lining cells [r(s) = 0.23, P < 0.007], surface fibrin deposition [r(s) = 0.12, P < 0.01], fibrosis [r(s) = 0.31, P < 0.006], edema [r(s) = 0.17, P = 0.07], congestion [r(s) = 0.30, P < 0.005], and infiltration [r(s) = 0.46, P < 0.0001]). Fibrin and infiltration parameters were more severe in end-stage disease (P = 0.009 and P = 0.02, respectively). Synovitis may be present from the onset of OA and may be evaluated on MRI. MRI evaluation of synovitis could be

  1. Dumb-bell shaped poorly differentiated pelvic synovial sarcoma with molecular confirmation: a rare presentation of an uncommon disease entity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Roumina; Kumar, Sandeep; Rao, Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    Pelvic localization of synovial sarcoma is a rare phenomenon and to the best of our knowledge its presentation as a large "dumb-bell"-shaped abdomino-pelvic mass showing extension to the thigh has never been reported in the literature. We report a case of a young adult presenting with retention of urine and was found to have a large abdomino-pelvic mass causing bony destruction and compression of pelvic viscera. A biopsy revealed a cellular tumor composed of spindle to oval cells arranged in a hemangiopericytomatous pattern. Histopathology was suggestive of poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was positive for vimentin, CD 99, Bcl2, Mic2 and focally for EMA and negative for CD 34, CK, desmin, synaptophysin, and WT1. Due to equivocal IHC findings molecular analysis was done which confirmed the diagnosis as synovial sarcoma.

  2. Primary antitumor immune response mediated by CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Corthay, Alexandre; Skovseth, Dag K; Lundin, Katrin U; Røsjø, Egil; Omholt, Hilde; Hofgaard, Peter O; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Bogen, Bjarne

    2005-03-01

    Gene-targeted mice have recently revealed a role for lymphocytes and interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) in conferring protection against cancer, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we have characterized a successful primary antitumor immune response initiated by naive CD4+ T cells. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-negative myeloma cells injected subcutaneously into syngeneic mice were surrounded within 3 days by macrophages that captured tumor antigens. Within 6 days, naive myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells became activated in draining lymph nodes and subsequently migrated to the incipient tumor site. Upon recognition of tumor-derived antigenic peptides presented on MHC-II by macrophages, the myeloma-specific CD4+ T cells were reactivated and started to secrete cytokines. T cell-derived IFNgamma activated macrophages in close proximity to the tumor cells. Tumor cell growth was completely inhibited by such locally activated macrophages. These data indicate a mechanism for immunosurveillance of MHC-II-negative cancer cells by tumor-specific CD4+ T cells through collaboration with macrophages.

  3. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  4. Primary Mediastinal Large B-cell Lymphoma Exhibiting Endobronchial Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Midori; Fukuda, Minoru; Horio, Kensuke; Suyama, Takayuki; Kitazaki, Takeshi; Hashiguchi, Kohji; Fukuda, Masaaki; Shigematsu, Kazuto; Nakamura, Yoichi; Honda, Takuya; Ashizawa, Kazuto; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma (PMLBCL) is one of the subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We experienced a rare case of PMLBCL that exhibited endobronchial involvement. A 33-year-old Japanese female with the chief complaints of epigastralgia, back pain, and nausea visited a primary care hospital. Computed tomography of the chest and abdomen demonstrated a bulky mass in the left anterior mediastinum, multiple pulmonary nodules, axillary lymph node swelling, and a pancreatic tumor. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed a white-tinged irregularly shaped endobronchial tumor accompanied by capillary vessel dilation in the left upper lobar bronchus. Taken together, these findings resulted in a diagnosis of PMLBCL. PMID:27803409

  5. Primary small-cell carcinoma of the breast

    PubMed Central

    Dao, Tuoc; Howard, Evan; Bredeweg, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Early diagnosis of rare breast cancers is expected to occur more frequently as screening compliance improves and diagnostic modalities become more sensitive. Well-defined treatment algorithms exist for the management of ductal and lobular carcinomas; however, less information is available to guide the treatment of atypical breast cancers. This case report describes a 38-year-old African American woman with primary small cell carcinoma of the breast and her treatment.

  6. A Literature Revision in Primary Cutaneous B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Selva, R La; Violetti, S Alberti; Delfino, C; Grandi, V; Cicchelli, S; Tomasini, C; Fierro, M T; Berti, E; Pimpinelli, N; Quaglino, P

    2017-01-01

    The term “Primary Cutaneous B-Cell Lymphoma” (PCBCL) comprehends a variety of lymphoproliferative disorders characterized by a clonal proliferation of B-cells primarily involving the skin. The absence of evident extra-cutaneous disease must be confirmed after six-month follow-up in order to exclude a nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with secondary cutaneous involvement, which may have a completely different clinical behavior and prognosis. In this article, we have summarized the clinico-pathological features of main types of PCBCL and we outline the guidelines for management based on a review of the available literature. PMID:28400634

  7. Primary B-cell malignant lymphoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Canver, C C

    1993-10-01

    A 52-year-old asymptomatic man was evaluated for two right lung lesions discovered on a chest roentgenogram during a routine physical examination. A computed tomographic scan revealed the absence of mediastinal nodal involvement. Guided-needle aspiration cytology was inconclusive. A subsequent right thoracotomy was necessary to perform biopsy of these masses, which proved to be B-cell malignant lymphomas of the lung. This case represents a rare example of a primary low-grade B-cell pulmonary lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, with its distinct clinicopathologic features.

  8. Primary and secondary room temperature molten salt electrochemical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, G. F.; Dymek, C. J., Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Three novel primary cells which use room temperature molten salt electrolytes are examined and found to have high open circuit potentials in the 1.75-2.19 V range, by comparison with the Al/AlCl3-MEICl concentration cell; their cathodes were of FeCl3-MEICl, WCl6-MEICl, and Br2/reticulated vitreous carbon together with Pt. Also, secondary electrochemical cell candidates were examined which combined the reversible Al/AlCl3-MEICl electrode with reversible zinc and cadmium molten salt electrodes to yield open circuit potentials of about 0.7 and 1.0 V, respectively. Room temperature molten salts' half-cell reduction potentials are given.

  9. Assessment of cell viability in primary neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Aras, Mandar A; Hartnett, Karen A; Aizenman, Elias

    2008-07-01

    This unit contains five protocols for assaying cell viability in vitro using primary neuronal cultures, including a novel method for use with transfected neurons. Three of the assays are based on the principle that cell death cascades alter membrane permeability. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay measures the amount of the cytoplasmic enzyme released into the bathing medium, while the trypan blue and propidium iodide assays measure the ability of cells to exclude dye from their cytoplasm. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay measures the mitochondrial activity of viable cells by quantifying the conversion of the tetrazolium salt to its formazan product. Finally, the fifth assay details the measurement of luciferase expression as an indication of neuronal viability within a relatively small population of transfected neurons.

  10. T regulatory cells distinguish two types of primary hypophysitis.

    PubMed

    Mirocha, S; Elagin, R B; Salamat, S; Jaume, J C

    2009-03-01

    Numerous cases of primary hypophysitis have been described over the past 25 years with, however, little insight into the cause(s) of this disease. In order to guide treatment, a better understanding of the pathogenesis is needed. We studied the pathogenesis of primary hypophysitis by analysing systematically the immune response at the pituitary tissue level of consecutive cases of 'lymphocytic' hypophysitis who underwent pituitary biopsy. In order to investigate further the pathogenesis of their diseases we characterized two cases at clinical, cellular and molecular levels. We show here, for the first time, that lymphocytic hypophysitis probably encompasses at least two separate entities. One entity, in agreement with the classical description of lymphocytic hypophysitis, demonstrates an autoimmune process with T helper 17 cell dominance and lack of T regulatory cells. The other entity represents a process in which T regulatory cells seem to control the immune response, which may not be self- but foreign-targeted. Our data suggest that it may be necessary to biopsy suspected primary hypophysitis and to analyse pituitary tissue with immune markers to guide treatment. Based on our results, hypophysitis driven by an immune homeostatic process should not be treated with immunosuppression, while autoimmune-defined hypophysitis may benefit from it. We show here for the first time two different pathogenic processes classified under one disease type and how to distinguish them. Because of our findings, changes in current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches may need to be considered.

  11. Erythropoietin (EPO)-receptor signaling induces cell death of primary myeloma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Våtsveen, Thea Kristin; Sponaas, Anne-Marit; Tian, Erming; Zhang, Qing; Misund, Kristine; Sundan, Anders; Børset, Magne; Waage, Anders; Brede, Gaute

    2016-08-31

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable complex disease characterized by clonal proliferation of malignant plasma cells in a hypoxic bone marrow environment. Hypoxia-dependent erythropoietin (EPO)-receptor (EPOR) signaling is central in various cancers, but the relevance of EPOR signaling in multiple myeloma cells has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Myeloma cell lines and malignant plasma cells isolated from bone marrow of myeloma patients were used in this study. Transcript levels were analysed by quantitative PCR and cell surface levels of EPOR in primary cells by flow cytometry. Knockdown of EPOR by short interfering RNA was used to show specific EPOR signaling in the myeloma cell line INA-6. Flow cytometry was used to assess viability in primary cells treated with EPO in the presence and absence of neutralizing anti-EPOR antibodies. Gene expression data for total therapy 2 (TT2), total therapy 3A (TT3A) trials and APEX 039 and 040 were retrieved from NIH GEO omnibus and EBI ArrayExpress. We show that the EPOR is expressed in myeloma cell lines and in primary myeloma cells both at the mRNA and protein level. Exposure to recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) reduced viability of INA-6 myeloma cell line and of primary myeloma cells. This effect could be partially reversed by neutralizing antibodies against EPOR. In INA-6 cells and primary myeloma cells, janus kinase 2 (JAK-2) and extracellular signal regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK-1/2) were phosphorylated by rhEPO treatment. Knockdown of EPOR expression in INA-6 cells reduced rhEPO-induced phospo-JAK-2 and phospho-ERK-1/2. Co-cultures of primary myeloma cells with bone marrow-derived stroma cells did not protect the myeloma cells from rhEPO-induced cell death. In four different clinical trials, survival data linked to gene expression analysis indicated that high levels of EPOR mRNA were associated with better survival. Our results demonstrate for the first time active EPOR signaling in malignant plasma cells. EPO

  12. Transport Mechanism of Nicotine in Primary Cultured Alveolar Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Mikihisa; Nagahiro, Machi; Yumoto, Ryoko

    2016-02-01

    Nicotine is absorbed from the lungs into the systemic circulation during cigarette smoking. However, there is little information concerning the transport mechanism of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells. In this study, we characterized the uptake of nicotine in rat primary cultured type II (TII) and transdifferentiated type I-like (TIL) epithelial cells. In both TIL and TII cells, [(3)H]nicotine uptake was time and temperature-dependent, and showed saturation kinetics. [(3)H]Nicotine uptake in these cells was not affected by Na(+), but was sensitive to extracellular and intracellular pH, suggesting the involvement of a nicotine/proton antiport system. The uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in these cells was potently inhibited by organic cations such as clonidine, diphenhydramine, and pyrilamine, but was not affected by substrates and/or inhibitors of known organic cation transporters such as carnitine, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and tetraethylammonium. In addition, the uptake of [(3)H]nicotine in TIL cells was stimulated by preloading the cells with unlabeled nicotine, pyrilamine, and diphenhydramine, but not with tetraethylammonium. These results suggest that a novel proton-coupled antiporter is involved in the uptake of nicotine in alveolar epithelial cells and its absorption from the lungs into the systemic circulation.

  13. Control of hair cell excitability by vestibular primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brugeaud, Aurore; Travo, Cécile; Demêmes, Danielle; Lenoir, Marc; Llorens, Jordi; Puel, Jean-Luc; Chabbert, Christian

    2007-01-01

    In the rat utricle, synaptic contacts between hair cells and the nerve fibers arising from the vestibular primary neurons form during the first week after birth. During that period, the sodium-based excitability that characterizes neonate utricle sensory cells is switched off. To investigate whether the establishment of synaptic contacts was responsible for the modulation of the hair cell excitability, we used an organotypic culture of rat utricle in which the setting of synapses was prevented. Under this condition, the voltage-gated sodium current and the underlying action potentials persisted in a large proportion of non-afferented hair cells. We then studied whether impairment of nerve terminals in utricle of adult rats may also affect hair cell excitability. We induced selective and transient damages of afferent terminals using glutamate excitotoxicity in vivo. The efficiency of the excitotoxic injury was attested by selective swellings of the terminals and underlying altered vestibular behavior. Under this condition, the sodium-based excitability transiently recovered in hair cells. These results indicate that the modulation of hair cells excitability depends on the state of the afferent terminals. In adult utricle hair cells this property may be essential to set the conditions required for restoration of the sensory network after damage. This is achieved via re-expression of a biological process that occurs during synaptogenesis. PMID:17392466

  14. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on primary activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Claudia P; Morrow, Kevin; Velasco, Cruz; Wyczechowska, Dorota D; Naura, Amarjit S; Rodriguez, Paulo C

    2013-03-01

    Tobacco smoking predisposes the development of diseases characterized by chronic inflammation and T cell dysfunction. In this study, we aimed to determine the direct effects of cigarette smoke on primary T cells and to identify the corresponding molecular mediators. Activated T cells cultured in the presence of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) displayed a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation, which associated with the induction of cellular apoptosis. T cell apoptosis by CSE was independent of caspases and mediated through reactive oxygen and nitrogen species endogenously contained within CSE. Additional results showed that exposure of T cells to CSE induced phosphorylation of the stress mediator eukaryotic-translation-initiation-factor 2 alpha (eIF2α). Inhibition of the phosphorylation of eIF2α in T cells prevented the cellular apoptosis induced by CSE. Altogether, the results show the direct effects of CSE on T cells, which advance in the understanding of how cigarette smoking promotes chronic inflammation and immune dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigating the cell death mechanisms in primary prostate cancer cells using low-temperature plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, A. M.; Packer, J. R.; Simms, M. S.; Mann, V. M.; Frame, F. M.; Maitland, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas have shown considerable promise as a potential cancer therapy. An atmospheric pressure plasma driven with kHz kV excitation, operated with helium and oxygen admixtures is used to investigate the interaction with prostate cancer cells. The cytopathic effect was verified first in two commonly used prostate cancer cell lines (BPH-1 and PC-3 cells) and further extended to examine the effects in paired normal and tumour prostate epithelial cells cultured directly from patient tissues. Through the formation of reactive species in cell culture media, and potentially other plasma components, we observed high levels of DNA damage, together with reduced cell viability and colony-forming ability. We observed differences in response between the prostate cell lines and primary cells, particularly in terms of the mechanism of cell death. The primary cells ultimately undergo necrotic cell death in both the normal and tumour samples, in the complete absence of apoptosis. In addition, we provide the first evidence of an autophagic response in primary cells. This work highlights the importance of studying primary cultures in order to gain a more realistic insight into patient efficacy. EPSRC EP/H003797/1 & EP/K018388/1, Yorkshire Cancer Research: YCR Y257PA.

  16. Primary thyroid spindle cell tumors: spindle cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaomei; Xia, Chunyan; Liu, Huimin; Zhu, Weijian

    2015-01-01

    Primary thyroid spindle cell tumors or spindle cell component in the thyroid tumors are very rare. The spindle tumor cells were positive for thyroid papillary carcinoma markers. So these tumors were diagnosed as spindle cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). To further delineate clinico-pathological features of primary thyroid spindle cell tumors and discuss differential diagnosis, we reported a 67-year-old man with a mass in the right thyroid without clinical symptom. Microscopy revealed that an encapsulated tumor with lot criss spindle cells arranged in bundles. Nuclear grooves were easy to see and rare displayed pseudoinclusions. Immunohistochemical studied showed that the spindle cells were all strong positive for TTF-1, Pax-8, thyroglobulin. Rare follicular were seen in the periphery of the tumor near the thyroid tissue. The cells formed follicular but the spindle tumor cells were positive for pan-keratins. The pathological diagnosis was primary thyroid spindle cell tumors, suspected spindle cell variant of PTC. Primary thyroid spindle cell tumors were presence and without the unified name. The further reports and more discussion were need about these tumors.

  17. Pathologic finding of increased expression of interleukin-17 in the synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wang, Jun C; Liang, Toong H; Zhu, Ming H; Wang, Jia Y; Fu, Xue L; Zhou, Jie R; Zheng, Song G; Chan, Paul; Han, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease of chronic systemic inflammatory disorder that will affect multiple tissues and organs such as skin, heart or lungs; but it principally attacks the joints, producing a nonsuppurative inflammatory and proliferative synovitis that often progresses to major damaging of articular cartilage and joint ankylosis. Although the definite etiology is still unknown, recent studies suggest that T-helper cells (Th17) may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of RA. And interleukin-17 (IL-17), which is a cytokine of Th17 cells, may be a key factor in the occurrence of RA. The binding of IL-17 to specific receptor results in the expression of fibroblasts, endothelial and epithelial cells and also synthesis of several major factors such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β that result in the structural damage of RA joints. Though some previous studies have shown that IL-17 exists in the synovium of RA, few has definite proof quantitatively by pathology about its existence in synovial membrane. This study comprised of 30 RA patients and 10 healthy control, pathologic study of the synovial membrane showed increased expression of IL-17 in the synovial tissue of RA patients, the intensity is compatible with clinical severity of disease as validated by DAS28 score and disease duration. Northern blot study also confirmed the increased expression of IL-17 in the synovial tissues. This study sheds further light that IL-17 may be a key factor in the pathogenesis of RA and a determinant of disease severity. PMID:23826419

  18. High-throughput RNAi screening in vitro: From cell lines to primary cells

    PubMed Central

    OVCHARENKO, DMITRIY; JARVIS, RICHARD; HUNICKE-SMITH, SCOTT; KELNAR, KEVIN; BROWN, DAVID

    2005-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are being used to induce sequence-specific gene silencing in cultured cells to study mammalian gene function. Libraries of siRNAs targeting entire human gene classes can be used to identify genes with specific cellular functions. Here we describe high-throughput siRNA delivery methods to facilitate siRNA library screening experiments with both immortalized and primary cells. We adapted chemical reverse transfection for immortalized adherent cell lines in a 96-well format. The method is fast, robust, and exceptionally effective for many cell types. For primary cells and immortalized cells that are recalcitrant to lipofection-based methods, we developed electropermeabilization (electroporation) conditions that facilitate siRNA delivery to a broad range of cell types, including primary human T-cells, hMSC, NHA, NDHF-Neo, HUVEC, DI TNC1, RPTEC, PC12, and K562 cells. To enable high-throughput electropermeabilization of primary cells, we developed a novel 96-well electroporation device that provides highly efficient and reproducible delivery of siRNAs. The combination of high-throughput chemical reverse transfection and electroporation makes it possible to deliver libraries of siRNAs to virtually any cell type, enabling gene function analysis and discovery on a genome scale. PMID:15923380

  19. High-throughput RNAi screening in vitro: from cell lines to primary cells.

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Jarvis, Richard; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Kelnar, Kevin; Brown, David

    2005-06-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are being used to induce sequence-specific gene silencing in cultured cells to study mammalian gene function. Libraries of siRNAs targeting entire human gene classes can be used to identify genes with specific cellular functions. Here we describe high-throughput siRNA delivery methods to facilitate siRNA library screening experiments with both immortalized and primary cells. We adapted chemical reverse transfection for immortalized adherent cell lines in a 96-well format. The method is fast, robust, and exceptionally effective for many cell types. For primary cells and immortalized cells that are recalcitrant to lipofection-based methods, we developed electropermeabilization (electroporation) conditions that facilitate siRNA delivery to a broad range of cell types, including primary human T-cells, hMSC, NHA, NDHF-Neo, HUVEC, DI TNC1, RPTEC, PC12, and K562 cells. To enable high-throughput electropermeabilization of primary cells, we developed a novel 96-well electroporation device that provides highly efficient and reproducible delivery of siRNAs. The combination of high-throughput chemical reverse transfection and electroporation makes it possible to deliver libraries of siRNAs to virtually any cell type, enabling gene function analysis and discovery on a genome scale.

  20. Cell-to-Cell Contact and Nectin-4 Govern Spread of Measles Virus from Primary Human Myeloid Cells to Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Li, Ni; Mark, Anna C.; Mateo, Mathieu; Cattaneo, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles is a highly contagious, acute viral illness. Immune cells within the airways are likely first targets of infection, and these cells traffic measles virus (MeV) to lymph nodes for amplification and subsequent systemic dissemination. Infected immune cells are thought to return MeV to the airways; however, the mechanisms responsible for virus transfer to pulmonary epithelial cells are poorly understood. To investigate this process, we collected blood from human donors and generated primary myeloid cells, specifically, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and dendritic cells (DCs). MDMs and DCs were infected with MeV and then applied to primary cultures of well-differentiated airway epithelial cells from human donors (HAE). Consistent with previous results obtained with free virus, infected MDMs or DCs were incapable of transferring MeV to HAE when applied to the apical surface. Likewise, infected MDMs or DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on small-pore (0.4-μm) support membranes did not transfer virus. In contrast, infected MDMs and DCs applied to the basolateral surface of HAE grown on large-pore (3.0-μm) membranes successfully transferred MeV. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that MDMs and DCs are capable of penetrating large-pore membranes but not small-pore membranes. Further, by using a nectin-4 blocking antibody or recombinant MeV unable to enter cells through nectin-4, we demonstrated formally that transfer from immune cells to HAE occurs in a nectin-4-dependent manner. Thus, both infected MDMs and DCs rely on cell-to-cell contacts and nectin-4 to efficiently deliver MeV to the basolateral surface of HAE. IMPORTANCE Measles virus spreads rapidly and efficiently in human airway epithelial cells. This rapid spread is based on cell-to-cell contact rather than on particle release and reentry. Here we posit that MeV transfer from infected immune cells to epithelial cells also occurs by cell-to-cell contact rather than through cell

  1. Evaluation of high-energy lithium thionyl chloride primary cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    An advanced commercial primary lithium cell (LiSoCl2) was evaluated in order to establish baseline data for improved lithium batteries for aerospace applications. The cell tested had nominal capacity of 6 Ah. Maximum energy density at low rates (less than C/30, where C is the cell capacity in amp-hrs and 30 corresponds to a 30 hr discharge time) was found to be near 300 Wh/kg. An equation which predicts the operating voltage of these cells as a function of current and state of charge is presented. Heat generation rates of these cells were determined as a function of current in a calorimeter. It was found that heat rates could be theoretically predicted with some degree of accuracy at currents less than 1 amp or the C/6 rate. No explosions were observed in the cells during the condition of overdischarge or reversal nor during high rate discharge. It was found, however, that the cells can vent when overdischarge currents are greater than C/30 and when discharge rates are greater than 1.5C.

  2. Highly efficient baculovirus-mediated multigene delivery in primary cells

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Maysam; Bellon-Echeverria, Itxaso; Rizk, Aurélien; Ehsaei, Zahra; Cianciolo Cosentino, Chiara; Silva, Catarina S.; Xie, Ye; Boyce, Frederick M.; Davis, M. Wayne; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.; Taylor, Verdon; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Berger, Imre; Berger, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Multigene delivery and subsequent cellular expression is emerging as a key technology required in diverse research fields including, synthetic and structural biology, cellular reprogramming and functional pharmaceutical screening. Current viral delivery systems such as retro- and adenoviruses suffer from limited DNA cargo capacity, thus impeding unrestricted multigene expression. We developed MultiPrime, a modular, non-cytotoxic, non-integrating, baculovirus-based vector system expediting highly efficient transient multigene expression from a variety of promoters. MultiPrime viruses efficiently transduce a wide range of cell types, including non-dividing primary neurons and induced-pluripotent stem cells (iPS). We show that MultiPrime can be used for reprogramming, and for genome editing and engineering by CRISPR/Cas9. Moreover, we implemented dual-host-specific cassettes enabling multiprotein expression in insect and mammalian cells using a single reagent. Our experiments establish MultiPrime as a powerful and highly efficient tool, to deliver multiple genes for a wide range of applications in primary and established mammalian cells. PMID:27143231

  3. Primary cerebellar extramedullary myeloid cell tumor mimicking oligodendroglioma.

    PubMed

    Ho, D M; Wong, T T; Guo, W Y; Chang, K P; Yen, S H

    1997-10-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumors (EMCTs) are tumors consisting of immature cells of the myeloid series that occur outside the bone marrow. Most of them are associated with acute myelogenous leukemia or other myeloproliferative disorders, and a small number occur as primary lesions, i.e., are not associated with hematological disorders. Occurrence inside the cranium is rare, and there has been only one case of primary EMCT involving the cerebellum reported in the literature. The case we report here is a blastic EMCT occurring in the cerebellum of a 3-year-old boy who had no signs of leukemia or any hematological disorder throughout the entire course. The cerebellar tumor was at first misdiagnosed as an "oligodendroglioma" because of the uniformity and "fried egg" artifact of the tumor cells. The tumor disappeared during chemotherapy consisting of 12 treatments. However, it recurred and metastasized to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shortly after the therapy was completed. A diagnosis of EMCT was suspected because of the presence of immature myeloid cells in the CSF, and was confirmed by anti-myeloperoxidase and anti-lysozyme immunoreactivity of the cerebellar tumor. The patient succumbed 1 year and 3 months after the first presentation of the disease.

  4. CXCR4 heterogeneity in primary cells: possible role of ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Lapham, Cheryl K; Romantseva, Tatiana; Petricoin, Emmanuel; King, Lisa R; Manischewitz, Jody; Zaitseva, Marina B; Golding, Hana

    2002-12-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is a primary coreceptor for the HIV-1 virus. The predicted molecular weight (MW) of glycosylated CXCR4 is 45-47 kDa. However, immunoblots of whole cell lysates from human lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and the Jurkat T-lymphocyte line revealed multiple MW isoforms of CXCR4. Three of the bands could be precipitated by anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies (101 and 47 kDa) or coprecipitated with CD4 (62 kDa). Expression of these isoforms was enhanced by infection with a recombinant vaccinia virus encoding CXCR4. In immunoblots of two-dimensional gels, antiubiquitin antibodies reacted with the 62-kDa CXCR4 species from monocytes subsequent to coprecipitation with anti-CD4 antibodies. Culturing of monocytes and lymphocytes with lactacystin enhanced the amount of the 101-kDa CXCR4 isoform in immunoblots by three- to sevenfold. In lymphocytes, lactacystin also increased cell-surface expression of CXCR4, which correlated with enhanced fusion with HIV-1 envelope-expressing cells. Similar increases in the intensity of the 101-kDa isoform were seen after treatment with the lysosomal inhibitors monensin and ammonium chloride. Antiubiquitin antibodies reacted with multiple proteins above 62 kDa, which were precipitated with anti-CXCR4 antibodies. Our data indicate that ubiquitination may contribute to CXCR4 heterogeneity and suggest roles for proteasomes and lysosomes in the constitutive turnover of CXCR4 in primary human cells.

  5. Brucella pinnipedialis in hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) primary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anett Kristin; Godfroid, Jacques; Nymo, Ingebjørg Helena

    2016-01-25

    Marine Brucella spp. have been isolated from numerous pinniped and cetacean species, but pathological findings in association with infection with Brucella pinnipedialis in pinnipeds have been sparse. The capacity of brucellae to survive and replicate within host macrophages underlies their important ability to produce chronic infections, but previous work has shown that B. pinnipedialis spp. are rapidly eliminated from hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) alveolar macrophages. To investigate if multiplication could take place in other hooded seal cell types, primary epithelial cells were isolated, verified to express the epithelial marker cytokeratin and challenged with three different strains of B. pinnipedialis; B. pinnipedialis sp. nov., B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain B17, and B. pinnipedialis hooded seal strain 22F1. All strains were steadily eliminated and the amounts of intracellular bacteria were reduced to less than one-third by 48 h post infection. Intracellular presence was verified using immunocytochemistry. So far, intracellular multiplication in seal cells has not been documented for B. pinnipedialis. The lack of intracellular survival in macrophages, as well as in epithelial cells, together with the fact that pathological changes due to B. pinnipedialis infection is not yet identified in seals, suggests that the bacteria may only cause a mild, acute and transient infection. These findings also contribute to substantiate the hypothesis that seals may not be the primary host of B. pinnipedialis and that the transmission to seals are caused by other species in the marine environment.

  6. Synovial sarcoma presenting with huge mediastinal mass: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Synovial sarcoma presenting in the mediastinum is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, data addressing optimal therapy is limited. Herein we present a case where an attempt to downsize the tumor to a resectable state with chemotherapy was employed. Case presentation A 32 year female presented with massive pericardial effusion and unresectable huge mediastinal mass. Computed axial tomography scan - guided biopsy with adjunctive immunostains and molecular studies confirmed a diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. Following three cycles of combination Ifosfamide and doxorubicin chemotherapy, no response was demonstrated. The patient refused further therapy and had progression of her disease 4 months following the last cycle. Conclusion Synovial sarcoma presenting with unresectable mediastinal mass carry a poor prognosis. Up to the best of our knowledge there are only four previous reports where primary chemotherapy was employed, unfortunately; none of these cases had subsequent complete surgical resection. Identification of the best treatment strategy for patients with unresectable disease is warranted. Our case can be of benefit to medical oncologists and thoracic surgeons who might be faced with this unique and exceedingly rare clinical scenario. PMID:23800262

  7. Long-Term Outcomes for Synovial Sarcoma Treated With Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Zagars, Gunar K.; Ballo, Matthew T.; Patel, Shreyaskumar R.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Benjamin, Robert S.; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate prognostic factors and treatment outcomes in patients with localized synovial sarcoma treated with conservation surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2003, 150 patients with nonmetastatic synovial sarcoma were treated with conservation surgery and RT. The majority of patients (81%) were aged >20 years. Sixty-eight percent received postoperative RT, and 32% received preoperative RT. Forty-eight percent received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 13.2 years. Overall survival (OS) rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 76%, 57%, and 51%, respectively. Corresponding disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 59%, 52%, and 52%, respectively. Tumor size >5 cm predicted worse OS, DFS, disease-specific survival (DSS), and higher rate of distant metastases (DM). Age >20 years predicted worse DFS and DSS but not OS. Local control (LC) was 82% at 10 years. Positive or unknown resection margins predicted inferior LC rates. Forty-four percent developed DM by 10 years. Only 1% developed nodal metastases. Analysis of outcomes by treatment decade showed no significant differences with respect to LC and DM rates. Conclusions: Synovial sarcoma is adequately controlled at the primary site by conservation surgery and RT. Elective nodal irradiation is not indicated. Rates of development of DM and subsequent death from disease remain high, with no significant improvement in outcomes for this disease in the past four decades.

  8. Identification of cytotoxic agents disrupting synovial sarcoma oncoprotein interactions by proximity ligation assay

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Aimée N.; Ji, Jennifer X.; Ma, Limin; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Brodin, Bertha A.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional cytotoxic therapies for synovial sarcoma provide limited benefit. Drugs specifically targeting the product of its driver translocation are currently unavailable, in part because the SS18-SSX oncoprotein functions via aberrant interactions within multiprotein complexes. Proximity ligation assay is a recently-developed method that assesses protein-protein interactions in situ. Here we report use of the proximity ligation assay to confirm the oncogenic association of SS18-SSX with its co-factor TLE1 in multiple human synovial sarcoma cell lines and in surgically-excised human tumor tissue. SS18-SSX/TLE1 interactions are disrupted by class I HDAC inhibitors and novel small molecule inhibitors. This assay can be applied in a high-throughput format for drug discovery in fusion-oncoprotein associated cancers where key effector partners are known. PMID:27120803

  9. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Apoptosis in Primary Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gyan, Emmanuel; Tournilhac, Olivier; Halty, Christelle; Veyrat-Masson, Richard; Akil, Saïda; Berger, Marc; Hérault, Olivier; Callanan, Mary; Bay, Jacques-Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disorder with an increased infectious risk remaining one of the main causes of death. Development of therapies with higher safety profile is thus a challenging issue. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) is an omega-3 fatty acid, a natural compound of normal cells, and has been shown to display antitumor potency in cancer. We evaluated the potential in vitro effect of DHA in primary CLL cells. DHA induces high level of in vitro apoptosis compared to oleic acid in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Estimation of IC50 was only of 4.813 µM, which appears lower than those reported in solid cancers. DHA is highly active on CLL cells in vitro. This observation provides a rationale for further studies aiming to understand its mechanisms of action and its potent in vivo activity. PMID:26734128

  10. Malignant transformation in synovial chondromatosis of the knee?

    PubMed

    Hallam, P; Ashwood, N; Cobb, J; Fazal, A; Heatley, W

    2001-10-01

    Although it has been reported, malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis is rare. We report a case of malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis in a knee to a low-grade chondrosarcoma, which was treated with synovial excision and total knee replacement. We also present a literature review of the subject. The case illustrates that malignant transformation should be suspected in chronic cases with a sudden exacerbation of symptoms and that interpretation of histology in cartilage lesions is difficult. It also demonstrates that even when guided biopsy techniques are used, the sampling error of a needle biopsy in any large lesion is unavoidable.

  11. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion

    PubMed Central

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  12. Synovial osteochondromatosis and sclerosing osteosarcoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Tas, O; De Cock, H; Lemmens, P; Pool, R R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic and histological features of synovial osteochondromatosis in multiple joints and an unrelated sclerosing osteosarcoma of the left tibia in a cat are reported. Radiographic evaluation showed signs of several nodular radiopacities in both stifles and both shoulders. Pathologic transverse fractures of the left tibia and fibula were also present. A midfemoral amputation of the left hindlimb was performed and treatment consisted of lifelong administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Histological evaluation confirmed synovial osteochondromatosis of the left stifle and sclerosing osteosarcoma of the left tibia. This is the first report of a feline patient with bilateral synovial osteochondromatosis that describes the clinical, radiographic and histological aspects of this disease.

  13. Second Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Primary Graft Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schriber, Jeffrey; Agovi, Manza-A.; Ho, Vincent; Ballen, Karen K.; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Gupta, Vikas; Maziarz, Richard T.; Hale, Gregory A.; Litzow, Mark R.; Logan, Brent; Bornhauser, Martin; Giller, Roger H.; Isola, Luis; Marks, David I.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2010-01-01

    Failure to engraft donor cells is a devastating complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We describe the results of 122 patients reported to the National Marrow Donor Program between 1990 and 2005, who received a second unrelated donor HCT after failing to achieve an absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 500/ μL without recurrent disease. Patients were transplanted for leukemia (n=83), myelodysplastic disorders (n=16), severe aplastic anemia (n=20) and other diseases (n=3). The median age was 29 years. Twenty-four patients received second grafts from a different unrelated donor. Among 98 patients who received a second graft from the same donor, 28 received products that were previously collected and cryopreserved for the first transplantation. One-year overall survival after second transplant was 11% with 10 patients alive at last follow up. We observed no differences between patients who received grafts from the same or different donors, or in those who received fresh or cryopreserved product. The outcomes after a second allogeneic HCT for primary graft failure are dismal. Identifying risk factors for primary graft failure can decrease the incidence of this complication. Further studies are needed to test whether early recognition and hastened procurement of alternative grafts can improve transplant outcomes for primary graft failure. PMID:20172038

  14. Primary retroperitoneal Merkel cell carcinoma: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz-Sandoval, Osvaldo A.; Cuellar-Hubbe, Mario; Lino-Silva, Leonardo S.; Salcedo-Hernández, Rosa A.; López-Basave, Horacio N.; Padilla-Rosciano, Alejandro E.; León-Takahashi, Alberto M.; Herrera-Gómez, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Background Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma that affects elderly patients and typically arises in sun-exposed skin. The disease is very rare and only few cases present with no apparent skin lesion. In the retroperitoneum there are only two cases reported in the literature. Case presentation We report a case of a 54-year-old Mexican male with MCC, which presented as a large retroperitoneal mass. Pathological and immunohistochemical analysis of the transabdominal CT-guided biopsy specimen revealed a MCC. The patient underwent preoperative chemotherapy followed by a laparotomy and the mass was successfully excised. Discussion There are two possible explanations for what occurred in our patient. The most plausible theory is the retroperitoneal mass could be a massively enlarged lymph node where precursor cells became neoplastic. This would be consistent with a presumptive diagnosis of primary nodal disease. Moreover, metastasis to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes has been reported as relatively common when compared to other sites such as liver, bone, brain and skin. The less probable theory is the non-described “regression” phenomena of a cutaneous MCC, but we are not found a primary skin lesion. Conclusion Preoperative chemotherapy and excision of the primary tumor is the surgical treatment of choice for retroperitoneal MCC. We propose that further studies are needed to elucidate the true efficacy of chemotherapy in conventional and unconventional patients with MCC. PMID:26708276

  15. Primary intra-abdominal synovial sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Travaglini, Grazia; Biagetti, Simona; Alfonsi, Simona; Bearzi, Italo; Marmorale, Cristina

    2013-09-03

    Il caso clinico che vi presentiamo riguarda la straordinaria localizzazione intra-addominale di un sinovial-sarcoma. Questo tumore dei tessuti molli generalmente interessa le piccole e grandi articolazioni. Sono state descritte altre localizzazioni a livello intra-addominale e retroperitoneale. La nostra paziente si ricovera per una tumefazione dolente dell’addome, alla TC addome si evidenzia una voluminosa massa intra-addominale che comprime e disloca i parenchimi e visceri circostanti e che affiora ai tessuti più superficiali della parete addominale. La biopsia eco-guidata della lesione, insieme allo studio immunoistochimico, permette di porre la diagnosi di sinovial-sarcoma. La paziente viene candidata ad un trattamento chemioterapico a scopo neoadiuvante. Per il sopraggiungere di anemizzazione da sanguinamento della neoplasia, valutata anche la risposta parziale al trattamento sistemico, si pone indicazione all’intervento chirurgico. La massa con peduncolo vascolare maggiore costituito dai vasi gastroepiploici di destra, viene completamente asportata. L’esame definitivo conferma la diagnosi di Sinovial-Sarcoma bifasico. L’indagine genetica condotta sul campione conservato in formalina non ha permesso, a causa della difficoltà di estrarre ed amplificare un quantitativo adeguato di RNA, di identificare la traslocazione (X; 18) (p 11.2; q 11.2) specifica del Sinovial-Sarcoma. La paziente è stata dimessa dopo un decorso clinico regolare. Il follow-up ad un anno non ha mostrato ripresa di malattia ma dopo 18 mesi alla TC torace-addome di rivalutazione si evidenzia la ripresa di malattia a livello intra-addominale e la presenza di metastasi polmonari bilaterali.

  16. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Millahn, Axel; Stiewe, Thorsten; Krause, Michael; Stabla, Kathleen; Ross, Petra; Huynh, Minh; Illmer, Thomas; Mernberger, Marco; Barckhausen, Christina; Neubauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML), generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1) in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC) driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16) and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:25901794

  17. Primary Tumor and MEF Cell Isolation to Study Lung Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shengli; Maziveyi, Mazvita; Alahari, Suresh K

    2015-05-20

    In breast tumorigenesis, the metastatic stage of the disease poses the greatest threat to the affected individual. Normal breast cells with altered genotypes now possess the ability to invade and survive in other tissues. In this protocol, mouse mammary tumors are removed and primary cells are prepared from tumors. The cells isolated from this procedure are then available for gene profiling experiments. For successful metastasis, these cells must be able to intravasate, survive in circulation, extravasate to distant organs, and survive in that new organ system. The lungs are the typical target of breast cancer metastasis. A set of genes have been discovered that mediates the selectivity of metastasis to the lung. Here we describe a method of studying lung metastasis from a genetically engineered mouse model.. Furthermore, another protocol for analyzing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from the mouse embryo is included. MEF cells from the same animal type provide a clue of non-cancer cell gene expression. Together, these techniques are useful in studying mouse mammary tumorigenesis, its associated signaling mechanisms and pathways of the abnormalities in embryos.

  18. Serglycin in Quiescent and Proliferating Primary Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reine, Trine M.; Vuong, Tram T.; Rutkovskiy, Arkady; Meen, Astri J.; Vaage, Jarle; Jenssen, Trond G.; Kolset, Svein O.

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans are fundamental components of the endothelial barrier, but the functions of the proteoglycan serglycin in endothelium are less described. Our aim was to describe the roles of serglycin in processes relevant for endothelial dysfunction. Primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were cultured in vitro and the expression of proteoglycans was investigated. Dense cell cultures representing the quiescent endothelium coating the vasculature was compared to sparse activated cell cultures, relevant for diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. Secretion of 35S- proteoglycans increased in sparse cultures, and we showed that serglycin is a major component of the cell-density sensitive proteoglycan population. In contrast to the other proteoglycans, serglycin expression and secretion was higher in proliferating compared to quiescent HUVEC. RNAi silencing of serglycin inhibited proliferation and wound healing, and serglycin expression and secretion was augmented by hypoxia, mechanical strain and IL-1β induced inflammation. Notably, the secretion of the angiogenic chemokine CCL2 resulting from IL-1β activation, was increased in serglycin knockdown cells, while angiopoietin was not affected. Both serglycin and CCL2 were secreted predominantly to the apical side of polarized HUVEC, and serglycin and CCL2 co-localized both in perinuclear areas and in vesicles. These results suggest functions for serglycin in endothelial cells trough interactions with partner molecules, in biological processes with relevance for diabetic complications, cardiovascular disease and cancer development. PMID:26694746

  19. Basal cells are the progenitors of primary tracheal epithelial cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, J.R.; Terzaghi-Howe, M. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN )

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify the cells from the rat tracheal epithelium which attach and proliferate in primary culture. When cells isolated from tracheas by enzymatic digestion were held in suspension at 37C for several hours most of the differentiated cells dies. The kinetics of this selective cell death were not dependent on the constituents of the holding medium. With time in suspension, the colony forming efficiency of the surviving cells increased two- to threefold. Comparison of the growth curves of cells held or plated directly showed no difference in the number of cells in the proliferating populations. Using two lectins, it was possible to monitor the loss of specific populations in suspension. BS1-B4 is a marker for basal cells and UEA-1 is a secretory cell marker. Only those cells that were BS1-B4 positive survived in suspension. Further, the colonies that formed in primary culture were positive for this marker. Single cell suspensions of cells were sorted by flow cytometry and a fivefold increase in the colony forming efficiency of BS1-B4 positive cells compared to that of the negative cells was observed. These findings suggest that the cells that survived in suspension and proliferated in culture originated from the basal cells of the trachea.

  20. Cell longevity and sustained primary growth in palm stems.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, P Barry; Huggett, Brett A

    2012-12-01

    Longevity, or organismal life span, is determined largely by the period over which constituent cells can function metabolically. Plants, with modular organization (the ability continually to develop new organs and tissues) differ from animals, with unitary organization (a fixed body plan), and this difference is reflected in their respective life spans, potentially much longer in plants than animals. We draw attention to the observation that palm trees, as a group of monocotyledons without secondary growth comparable to that of lignophytes (plants with secondary growth from a bifacial cambium), retain by means of sustained primary growth living cells in their trunks throughout their organismal life span. Does this make palms the longest-lived trees because they can grow as individuals for several centuries? No conventional lignophyte retains living metabolically active differentiated cell types in its trunk for this length of time, even though the tree as a whole can exist for millennia. Does this contrast also imply that the long-lived cells in a palm trunk have exceptional properties, which allows this seeming immortality? We document the long-life of many tall palm species and their inherent long-lived stem cell properties, comparing such plants to conventional trees. We provide a summary of aspects of cell age and life span in animals and plants. Cell replacement is a feature of animal function, whereas conventional trees rely on active growth centers (meristems) to sustain organismal development. However, the long persistence of living cells in palm trunks is seen not as evidence for unique metabolic processes that sustain longevity, but is a consequence of unique constructional features. This conclusion suggests that the life span of plant cells is not necessarily genetically determined.

  1. Attachment of human primary osteoblast cells to modified polyethylene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Poulsson, Alexandra H C; Mitchell, Stephen A; Davidson, Marcus R; Johnstone, Alan J; Emmison, Neil; Bradley, Robert H

    2009-04-09

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has a long history of use in medical devices, primarily for articulating surfaces due to its inherent low surface energy which limits tissue integration. To widen the applications of UHMWPE, the surface energy can be increased. The increase in surface energy would improve the adsorption of proteins and attachment of cells to allow tissue integration, thereby allowing UHMWPE to potentially be used for a wider range of implants. The attachment and function of human primary osteoblast-like (HOB) cells to surfaces of UHMWPE with various levels of incorporated surface oxygen have been investigated. The surface modification of the UHMWPE was produced by exposure to a UV/ozone treatment. The resulting surface chemistry was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the topography and surface structure were probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which showed an increase in surface oxygen from 11 to 26 atom % with no significant change to the surface topography. The absolute root mean square roughness of both untreated and UV/ozone-treated surfaces was within 350-450 nm, and the water contact angles decreased with increasing oxygen incorporation, i.e., showing an increase in surface hydrophilicity. Cell attachment and functionality were assessed over a 21 day period for each cell-surface combination studied; these were performed using SEM and the alamarBlue assay to study cell attachment and proliferation and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis to confirm extracellular mineral deposits, and total protein assay to examine the intra- and extracellular protein expressed by the cells. HOB cells cultured for 21 days on the modified UHMWPE surfaces with 19 and 26 atom % oxygen incorporated showed significantly higher cell densities compared to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) from day 3 onward. This indicated that the cells attached and proliferated more

  2. Primary Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jonathan N.; Nakamura, Leah Y.; Pacelli, Anna; Humphreys, Mitchell R.; Castle, Erik P.

    2010-01-01

    Nine patients treated with primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the prostate were identified among 29,783 cases of prostate cancer evaluated at Mayo Clinic from January 15, 1970, until January 2, 2009. A PubMed search of the English-language literature published from January 1, 1980, to January 1, 2010, was then performed using the key words signet ring cell and prostate, identifying 42 cases. This study reviews those cases, along with the additional 9 reported herein, and evaluates clinical characteristics, histologic diagnoses, treatment modalities, and outcomes. Mean age at diagnosis was 68 years (range, 50-85 years), and mean prostate-specific antigen level was 95.3 ng/mL (range, 1.9-536.0 ng/mL; to convert to μg/L, multiply by 1). Most patients (66%) had non–stage IV carcinoma, the most common Gleason sum was 8 (33%), and mean survival was 29 months. The presence of a primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the prostate was best confirmed by negative findings on gastrointestinal work-up, a positive stain for prostate-specific acid phosphatase, and negative carcinoembryonic antigen test results. PMID:21123640

  3. Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of the colon and rectum.

    PubMed

    Arifi, Samia; Elmesbahi, Omar; Amarti Riffi, Afaf

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal primary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare entity accounting for nearly 1% of all colorectal carcinomas. It is an independent prognostic factor associated with less favorable outcome. This aggressiveness is mainly due to the intrinsic biology of these tumors. Here is an overview of the literature related to clinicopathological features, molecular biology, and management of SRCC of the colon and the rectum. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. BRCA1 haploinsufficiency for replication stress suppression in primary cells.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Shailja; Bade, Sangeeta; Le Guillou, Morwenna; Burke, Karly; Reed, Rachel; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Su, Ying; Ting, David T; Polyak, Kornelia; Richardson, Andrea L; Feunteun, Jean; Garber, Judy E; Livingston, David M

    2014-11-17

    BRCA1-a breast and ovarian cancer suppressor gene-promotes genome integrity. To study the functionality of BRCA1 in the heterozygous state, we established a collection of primary human BRCA1(+/+) and BRCA1(mut/+) mammary epithelial cells and fibroblasts. Here we report that all BRCA1(mut/+) cells exhibited multiple normal BRCA1 functions, including the support of homologous recombination- type double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR), checkpoint functions, centrosome number control, spindle pole formation, Slug expression and satellite RNA suppression. In contrast, the same cells were defective in stalled replication fork repair and/or suppression of fork collapse, that is, replication stress. These defects were rescued by reconstituting BRCA1(mut/+) cells with wt BRCA1. In addition, we observed 'conditional' haploinsufficiency for HR-DSBR in BRCA1(mut/+) cells in the face of replication stress. Given the importance of replication stress in epithelial cancer development and of an HR defect in breast cancer pathogenesis, both defects are candidate contributors to tumorigenesis in BRCA1-deficient mammary tissue.

  5. Recurrence of synovial chondromatosis of the Hoffa's body.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-12-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of Hoffa's body is uncommon. Recurrences usually result from incomplete removal of the loose bodies or diseased synovium at the initial surgery. We report a patient with synovial chondromatosis localized into the Hoffa's body who presented with anterior knee pain and mechanical symptoms. At the first arthroscopy, all pathological tissue was removed. At 1-year follow-up, clinical and radiographic examinations were normal. Symptoms recurred at 3 years, when a bony mass in the Hoffa's body was evident on MRI. The mass was removed through a mini-arthrotomy. Histology excluded malignancy. At 10-year follow-up, the patient remained free of symptoms. Synovial chondromatosis can occur with unusual patterns of recurrence. The growth of a large size mass confined to fat pad without intra-articular involvement does not allow to exclude the diagnosis of recurrent synovial chondromatosis.

  6. Reduction of CD147 surface expression on primary T cells leads to enhanced cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Biegler, Brian; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2012-12-01

    CD147 is a ubiquitously expressed membrane glycoprotein that has numerous functional associations in health and disease. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CD147 participates in these processes are unclear. Establishing physiologically relevant silencing of CD147 in primary T cells could provide clues essential for elucidating some aspects of CD147 biology. To date, achieving the knockdown of CD147 in primary T cells has remained elusive. Utilizing RNA interference and the Nucleofector transfection system, we were able to reduce the expression of CD147 in primary T cells. Comparison of basic functions, such as proliferation and CD25 expression, were then made between control populations and populations with reduced expr