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Sample records for primary water experimental

  1. Biogasification of water hyacinth and primary sludge in an experimental digester

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Biljetina, R.; Srivastava, V.J.; Hayes, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the results of research which is part of a multidisciplinary program sponsored by the Gas Research Institute. The use of water hyacinth and other aquatic plants for wastewater treatment and subsequent conversion of the biomass and sludge to methane was evaluated. Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate advanced biogasification concepts and to establish a data base for the design of an integrated experimental test unit (ETU). 14 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Imaging of primary and secondary radiation-Modelling and experimental results of a radioactive source and a water phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamage, K. A. A.; Taylor, G. C.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper the contribution of primary and secondary radiation from a water phantom to a pinhole volume, as a result of three neutron sources (Cf, AmBe and 5 MeV mono-energetic) and two gamma sources (Cs and Co), is separately estimated using the PTRAC particle tracking option available in MCNP. Also in this paper imaging of the mixed radiation field produced by a Van de Graaf accelerator (when a water phantom is present) is described. In the model, a spherical tally volume, 2 cm in diameter, was placed equidistantly from a radioactive source and 30×30×15 cm3 water phantom. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to investigate the level of primary and secondary radiation contributing to the pinhole volume directly from the source and from interactions in the phantom respectively. The spatial distribution of counts clearly discriminated the source and the phantom. The results have shown that the percentage of neutrons reflected from the phantom with energies above 1 MeV increases with mean energy of the source. This method has significant potential to characterise secondary radiation in proton therapy, where it would help to verify the location and the energy delivered during the treatment.

  3. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of primary paper sludge using a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst: Experimental vs thermodynamic equilibrium results.

    PubMed

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-02-01

    H2, CH4, CO and CO2 yields were measured during supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of primary paper waste sludge (PWS) at 450°C. Comparing these yields with calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values offer an improved understanding of conditions required to produce near-equilibrium yields. Experiments were conducted at different catalyst loads (0-1g/gPWS) and different reaction times (15-120min) in a batch reactor, using either K2CO3 or Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 as catalyst. K2CO3 up to 1g/gPWS increased the H2 yield significantly to 7.5mol/kgPWS. However, these yields and composition were far from equilibrium values, with carbon efficiency (CE) and energy recovery (ER) of only 29% and 20%, respectively. Addition of 0.5-1g/gPWS Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 resulted in high H2 and CH4 yields (6.8 and 14.8mol/kgPWS), CE of 84-90%, ER of 83% and a gas composition relatively close to the equilibrium values (at hold times of 60-120min).

  4. EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL WATERING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Finkel, M.P.

    1964-04-01

    A device for watering experimental animals confined in a battery of individual plastic enclosures is described. It consists of a rectangular plastic enclosure having a plurality of fluid-tight compartments, each with a drinking hole near the bottom and a filling hole on the top. The enclosure is immersed in water until filled, its drinking holes sealed with a strip of tape, and it is then placed in the battery. The tape sealing prevents the flow of water from the device, but permits animals to drink by licking the drinking holes. (AEC)

  5. Biogasification of water hyacinth and primary sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Biljetina, R.; Srivastava, V.J.; Hayes, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the results of research to evaluate the use of water hyacinth for wastewater treatment and subsequent conversion of hyacinth and sludge to methane by anaerobic digestion. Laboratory studies have been directed toward evaluating advanced biogasification concepts and establishing a data base for the design and operation of an experimental test unit (ETU). Kinetic experiments have been conducted using continuously stirred tank reactors and a novel non-mixed vertical flow reactor (NMVFR) receiving a hyacinth/sludge blend at retention times of 15 down to 2.1 days. The data suggest that the best performance is achieved in the NMVFR which has longer solids and organism retention. A larger-scale experimental test unit (4.5 m/sup 3/) was used to validate laboratory experiments and to evaluate larger-scale equipment used for chopping, slurry preparation, mixing, and effluent dewatering. The ETU is currently being operated on a 2:1 blend (dry wt basis) of water hyacinth and primary sludge. Performance is good without major operational problems. Results are presented. 12 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Water, acidosis, and experimental pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Andriole, Vincent T.

    1970-01-01

    The effect of water restriction and ammonium chloride acidosis on the course of Escherichia coli pyelonephritis was determined in the nonobstructed kidney of the rat. To alter the chemical composition of the renal medulla, water intake was reduced in rats to one-half the normal daily intake. Water restriction increased the incidence of coliform pyelonephritis. Systemic acidosis, produced by giving a 300 mM solution of ammonium chloride, increased urinary osmolality to values comparable to water restriction and also predisposed to pyelonephritis. However, when rats were fed the same solution of ammonium chloride but were allowed access to tap water ad lib., urinary osmolality values were comparable to those observed in normal animals, and susceptibility to pyelonephritis was reduced or eliminated despite a degree of systemic acidosis similar to that observed in rats fed ammonium chloride solution without access to tap water. These results suggest that water diuresis may overcome the inactivation of complement produced by ammonium chloride acidosis and that renal medullary hypertonicity, produced by either water restriction or ammonium chloride acidosis, is a major determinant of this tissue's unique susceptibility to infection. PMID:4902827

  7. Children's Understanding of Experimental Contrast and Experimental Control: An Inventory for Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterhaus, Christopher; Koerber, Susanne; Sodian, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Experimentation skills are a central component of scientific thinking, and many studies have investigated whether and when primary-school children develop adequate experimentation strategies. However, the answers to these questions vary substantially depending on the type of task that is used: while discovery tasks, which require children to…

  8. Unlocking water markets: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Rabotyagov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Water markets are frequently referred to as a promising approach to alleviate stress on water systems, especially as future hydrologic assessments suggest increasing demand and less reliable supply. Yet, despite decades of advocacy by water resource economists, water markets (leases and sales of water rights between willing buyers and sellers) have largely failed to develop in the western US. Although there are a number of explanations for this failure, we explore one potential reason that has received less attention : farmers as sellers may have preferences for different elements of a water market transaction that are not captured in the relative comparison of their profits from farming and their profits from agreeing to a deal. We test this explanation by recruiting irrigators with senior water rights in the upper Yakima River Basin in Washington state to participate in a series of experimental auctions. In concept, the Yakima Basin is well situated for water market transactions as it has significant water shortages for junior water users ~15% of years and projections show these are likely to increase in the future. Participants were asked a series of questions about the operation of a hypothetical 100-acre timothy hay farm including the type of buyer, how the water bank is managed, the lease type, and the offer price. Results from 7 sessions with irrigators (n=49) and a comparison group of undergraduates (n=38) show that irrigators are more likely to accept split-season than full-season leases (controlling for differences in farm profits) and are more likely to accept a lease from an irrigation district and less likely to accept an offer from a Developer. Most notably, we find farmers were far more likely than students to reject offers from buyers even though it would increase their winnings from the experiment. These results could be used in ongoing water supply policy debates in the Yakima Basin to simulate the amount of water that could be freed by water

  9. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  10. THF water hydrate crystallization: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarakonda, Surya; Groysman, Alexander; Myerson, Allan S.

    1999-08-01

    Supersaturated solutions of THF-water hydrate system were experimentally studied before and during crystallization, to examine the system's behavior in the metastable zone and observe any anomalies suggesting cluster formation. Nucleation induction time measurements, with and without additives, were performed to screen potential growth inhibitors. Shifts in the onset points of crystallization for water and THF-water mixtures with additives were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Aspartame was among one of the few successfully screened inhibitors. Preliminary on-line crystal size distribution (CSD) measurements were performed on this system to monitor the crystal size during crystallization. The CSD data was also used to compute the hydrate crystal growth rates, which were found to be in the order of 145 μm/h.

  11. Environment, Teacher Manual, Primary, Idea 3, Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Project, Grafton, IL.

    The Environmental Education Project Center has developed these guidelines for teaching a unit in environmental studies. It is their intention that the teacher and student cooperatively plan the approach and content to be used during the course of study. In this unit about water, teacher resource information and student material are combined to…

  12. Responses of subepilimnetic primary producers to experimental lake acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    Subepilimnetic phytoplankton communities were found to increase in abundance during experimental acidification with sulfuric acid of two Canadian Shield lakes, Lake 223 and Lake 302S, at the Experimental Lakes Area (ELA) in northwestern Ontario. As epilimnetic pH declined in Lake 223, small, edible species of phytoplankton increased more than larger, less edible taxa. Species diversity ultimately decreased when epilimnetic acidity reached the target pH 5.0. In Lake 302S algal populations, Chrysochromulina spp. and Chlamydomonas sp., reached [open quotes]bloom[close quotes] conditions below the epilimnion in the third and fourth summers, respectively, of sulfuric acid additions as pH declined from above pH 6 to pH 5.6 and 5.4. Meta- and hypolimnetic waters of these lakes did not experience similar declines in pH. All responses in Lake 223 and Lake 302S were in contrast to communities in 5-10 ELA lakes not undergoing acidification. Vertical depth profiles of chlorophyll fluorescence were used to follow trends in subepilimnetic communities during the first four years of sulfuric acid additions to Lake 302S. Fluorescence was found to reliably predict chlorophyll a concentrations (r[sup 2] = 0.80-0.94). Characteristics of subepilimnetic communities and the habitats in which they were located were studied at the ELA. Many were mixed with photosynthetic bacteria. Fluorometric techniques with DCMU (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethyl urea)) were used to determine which fluorescence maxima contained viable algal populations. In situ inorganic carbon uptake rates for the algal-dominated communities below the epilimnion were similar to rates by epilimnetic communities. Enclosure experiments demonstrated that growth and inorganic carbon uptake rates of subepilimnetic algal populations were light-limited.

  13. Response of plant community structure and primary productivity to experimental drought and flooding in an Alaskan fen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Churchill, A.C.; Turetsky, Merritt R.; McGuire, Anthony; Hollingsworth, Teresa N.

    2014-01-01

    Northern peatlands represent a long-term net sink for atmospheric CO2, but these ecosystems can shift from net carbon (C) sinks to sources based on changing climate and environmental conditions. In particular, changes in water availability associated with climate control peatland vegetation and carbon uptake processes. We examined the influence of changing hydrology on plant species abundance and ecosystem primary production in an Alaskan fen by manipulating the water table in field treatments to mimic either sustained flooding (raised water table) or drought (lowered water table) conditions for 6 years. We found that water table treatments altered plant species abundance by increasing sedge and grass cover in the raised water table treatment and reducing moss cover while increasing vascular green area in the lowered water table treatment. Gross primary productivity was lower in the lowered treatment than in the other plots, although there were no differences in total biomass or vascular net primary productivity among the treatments. Overall, our results indicate that vegetation abundance was more sensitive to variation in water table than total biomass and vascular biomass accrual. Finally, in our experimental peatland, drought had stronger consequences for change in vegetation abundance and ecosystem function than sustained flooding.

  14. Impaired primary antibody response in experimental nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Garin, E H; Sausville, P J; Richard, G A

    1983-01-01

    The primary antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) is reduced in rats with aminonucleoside of puromycin (AP) nephrosis, as measured by haemagglutination and IgM antibody forming spleen cells (AFC). Since rats immunized 1 day after AP administration had a normal antibody response, these studies suggest that the impaired immune response in nephrotic rats is not due to a direct effect of AP but that it is secondary to the nephrotic state. PMID:6347472

  15. Environmental Science. An Experimental Programme for Primary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linke, R. D.

    An experimental course covering some of the fundamental principles and terminology associated with environmental science and the application of these principles to various contemporary problems is summarized in this report. The course involved a series of lectures together with a program of specific seminar and discussion topics presented by the…

  16. AEM investigations of primary water SCC in nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, J.S.; Perry, D.J.; Lewis, N.; Thompson, C.D.; Yang, W.J.S.

    1997-08-01

    The microstructure of nickel alloys, particularly the grain boundary composition and intergranular precipitates, plays an important role in high temperature primary water stress corrosion cracking (SCC) performance. Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) was used to examine SCC cracks in Alloys 600 and X-750 to investigate the role of grain boundary precipitates, dislocations and oxides in primary water SCC (PWSCC). Analysis of oxides by AEM and ESCA/Auger indicates that the crack tip oxides are different than the oxides formed on the outer surfaces. Comparison of heats with good and poor SCC resistance has identified metallurgical features that affect cracking. These AEM results show that the mechanism of PWSCC in nickel-base alloys does not involve void formation or blunting of the crack tip near intergranular carbides. The role of grain boundary composition, the interaction of cracks with carbides and other intergranular precipitates, and observations from AEM examinations ahead of the crack tip are discussed in relation to the mechanism of SCC.

  17. EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

    2008-05-01

    The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The

  18. Water movement through an experimental soil liner

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Panno, S.V.; Hensel, B.R.; Rehfeldt, K.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01

    A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (???1 x 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 x 15 x 0.9m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20,037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water break through at the base of the liner occurs. Estimated saturated hydraulic conductivities were 2.5 x 10-9, 4.0 x 10-8, and 5.0 x 10-8 cm s-1 based on measurements of water infiltration into the liner by large- and small-ring infiltrometers and a water balance analysis, respectively. Also investigated in this research was the variability of the liner's hydraulic properties and estimates of the transit times for water and tracers. Small variances exhibited by small-ring flux data suggested that the liner was homogeneous with respect to infiltration fluxes. The predictions of water and tracer breakthrough at the base of the liner ranged from 2.4-12.6 y, depending on the method of calculation and assumptions made. The liner appeared to be saturated to a depth between 18 and 33 cm at the end of the first year of monitoring. Transit time calculations cannot be verified yet, since breakthrough has not occurred. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement established by the U.S. EPA.A field-scale soil liner was constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the U.S. EPA saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement (??? 1 ?? 10-7 cm s-1). The 8 ?? 15 ?? 0.9 m liner was constructed in 15 cm compacted lifts using a 20.037 kg pad-foot compactor and standard engineering practices. Water infiltration into the liner has been monitored for one year. Monitoring will continue until water

  19. Martian mantle primary melts - An experimental study of iron-rich garnet lherzolite minimum melt composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertka, Constance M.; Holloway, John R.

    1988-01-01

    The minimum melt composition in equilibrium with an iron-rich garnet lherzolite assemblage is ascertained from a study of the liquidus relations of iron-rich basaltic compositions at 23 kb. The experimentally determined primary melt composition and its calculated sodium content reveal that Martian garnet lherzolite minimum melts are picritic alkali olivine basalts. Martian primary melts are found to be more picritic than terrestrial garnet lherzolite primary melts.

  20. Aeromonas primary wound infection of a diver in polluted waters.

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S W; Daily, O P; Hunt, W S; Seidler, R J; Allen, D A; Colwell, R R

    1979-01-01

    Two separate species of Aeromonas, A. sobria (not listed as a species in Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 8th ed.) and A. hydrophila, were primary pathogens isolated from the leg wound of a diver conducting operations in polluted waters. This is the first recorded instance of a primary infection of soft tissue in a human caused by two species of Aeromonas, one of which was resistant to tetracycline. Because of the very rapid development of this wound infection, cytotoxicity of these organisms was examined in several biological systems. A. sobria was hemolytic for sheep erythrocytes, cytotoxic for Y-1 adrenal cells, and enterotoxic in rabbit ligated intestinal loops, whereas A. hydrophila was hemolytic and cytotoxic. Pertinent clinical, bacteriological, and environmental features of the case are presented. PMID:500794

  1. Experimental Activities in Primary School to Learn about Microbes in an Oral Health Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mafra, Paulo; Lima, Nelson; Carvalho, Graça S.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental science activities in primary school enable important cross-curricular learning. In this study, experimental activities on microbiology were carried out by 16 pupils in a Portuguese grade-4 classroom (9-10?years old) and were focused on two problem-questions related to microbiology and health: (1) do your teeth carry microbes? (2) why…

  2. Upper Washita River Experimental Watersheds: Nutrient Water Quality Data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality datasets were acquired by the USDA-ARS in three large research watersheds in Oklahoma: the Southern Great Plains Research Watershed (SGPRW), and the Little Washita River and Fort Cobb Reservoir Experimental Watersheds (LWREW and FCREW, respectively). Water quality data in the SGPRW we...

  3. Experimental Study of Sudden Solidification of Supercooled Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bochnícek, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    The two independent methods of measurement of the mass of ice created at sudden solidification of supercooled water are described. One is based on the calorimetric measurement of heat that is necessary for melting the ice and the second interprets the volume change that accompanies the water freezing. Experimental results are compared with the…

  4. Experimental Observation of Dark Solitons on Water Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-13

    Experimental observation of dark solitons on water surface A. Chabchoub1,∗, O. Kimmoun2, H. Branger3, N. Hoffmann1, D. Proment4, M. Onorato4,5, and N...observation of dark solitons on the water surface. It takes the form of an amplitude drop of the carrier wave which does not change shape in propagation...The shape and width of the soliton depend on the water depth, carrier frequency and the amplitude of the background wave. The experimental data

  5. Water safety education among primary school children in Grenada.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Rachele; Giganti, Mark J; Weiner, Allison; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a common cause of death among children. Successful prevention interventions currently used in developed countries are often not transferable into developing countries due to differences in both environment and resources. In this study, we adapted a water safety education programme developed by the American Red Cross for primary school students in Grenada. Water safety knowledge before and after the training session was assessed using a nine-question evaluation tool. Following the training, a survey was administered to all teachers to assess the adaptability and effectiveness of the WHALE Tales training. Fifty-six students (30% males) completed the training. The age range was between 5 and 12 years old. Participants' water safety knowledge increased 15% (p < 0.01). Mean scores of correct answers increased for every grade level, ranging from a 5% increase for first graders to 33% increase for second graders. The findings from this study suggested that implementation of such a programme is effective. With cultural modifications and outsourcing, we believe this adapted programme would be successful in Grenada and other similar settings.

  6. Experimental water droplet impingement data on modern aircraft surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, Michael; Breer, Marlin D.; Craig, Neil C.; Bidwell, Colin S.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Preliminary experimental and analytical impingement efficiency data are presented for a NLF(1)-0414F airfoil, s swept MS(1)-0317 airfoil, a swept NACA 0012 wingtip and for a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  7. Discriminating secondary from primary water in volcanic glass using thermogravimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giachetti, T.; Gonnermann, H. M.; Gardner, J. E.; Shea, T.; Daniller-Varghese, M.

    2013-12-01

    Matrix-glass water in pyroclasts can include both primary (magmatic) and secondary (meteoric) water. Quantitative discrimination between magmatic and meteoric water is essential to interpret magma degassing processes, but remains challenging. Analyses of D/H isotopic ratios or water speciation help assess whether a texturally intact glass has been rehydrated, but we yet to correct for the extent of rehydration quantitatively, largely because the diffusivity of water at low temperatures (<400°C) is poorly understood. We present new results on the rehydration of rhyolitic pumices using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). TGA quantifies precisely the mass lost from volatile exsolution (almost exclusively water in our case, as determined by both mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy) from a given sample heated to a specified temperature at specified rate. TGA has been used previously to discriminate between magmatic and meteoric water in silicic glasses, under the assumption that exsolution of meteoric water only occurs at T<550°C. Analyzed samples include crystal-free rhyolitic Plinian pumices from Glass Mountain (1.1 ka), Valles Caldera (50-60 ka) and Long Valley caldera (760 ka). All samples were crushed to <125 μm grains, and analyzed by TGA for temperatures up to 1000°C, using a heating rate of 20°C/min. The total weight loss attributed to water ranges from 1.3 wt% in pumice from Glass Mountain to >4.5 wt% in pumice from Valles Caldera. For all samples, >80% of the total water is lost far below 550°C, the first derivative of the mass loss always showing a major degassing peak between 210-320°C, followed by a smaller peak between 430-670°C. Moreover, the TGA curve of an obsidian from Glass Mountain, first dehydrated by heating the sample to 1000°C, and then experimentally hydrated to 3.9 wt% at high temperature and pressure (i.e., containing only ';magmatic' water), also shows that ~85% of the water is lost below 550°C, with a major peak around 380

  8. 75 FR 53267 - National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Revisions to the Total Coliform Rule; Extension of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 141 and 142 RIN 2040-AD94 National Primary Drinking Water Regulations: Revisions to... 30 days the public comment period for a proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulation, the... inquiries, contact Sean Conley, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (MC 4607M), U.S....

  9. An experimental study on recovering heat from domestic drain water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Mohamad; Al Shaer, Ali; Haddad, Ahmad; Khaled, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    This paper concerns an experimental study on a system of heat recovery applied to domestic drain water pipes. The concept suggested consists of using the heat still present in the drain water as a preheating/heating source to the cold water supply of the building. To proceed, an appropriate experimental setup is developed and a coil heat exchanger is used as heat transfer device in the recovery system. Several scenarios are simulated and corresponding parameters are recorded and analyzed. It was shown that the suggested recovery concept can considerably preheat the cold water supply and then decrease the energy consumption. Particularly, up to 8.6 kW of heat were recovered when the cold water supply is initially at 3 °C.

  10. Experimental observation of negative effective gravity in water waves.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinhua; Yang, Jiong; Zi, Jian; Chan, C T; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array of resonators composing of bottom-mounted split tubes, resulting in the prohibition of water wave propagation. It is found that when negative gravity occurs, the averaged displacement of water surface in a unit cell of the array has a phase difference of π to that along the boundary of the unit cell, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide a mechanism to block water waves and may find applications in wave energy conversion and coastal protection.

  11. Experimental Observation of Negative Effective Gravity in Water Waves

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xinhua; Yang, Jiong; Zi, Jian; Chan, C. T.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The gravity of Earth is responsible for the formation of water waves and usually difficult to change. Although negative effective gravity was recently predicted theoretically in water waves, it has not yet been observed in experiments and remains a mathematical curiosity which is difficult to understand. Here we experimentally demonstrate that close to the resonant frequency of purposely-designed resonating units, negative effective gravity can occur for water waves passing through an array of resonators composing of bottom-mounted split tubes, resulting in the prohibition of water wave propagation. It is found that when negative gravity occurs, the averaged displacement of water surface in a unit cell of the array has a phase difference of π to that along the boundary of the unit cell, consistent with theoretical predictions. Our results provide a mechanism to block water waves and may find applications in wave energy conversion and coastal protection. PMID:23715132

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Ocampo, Ruben P.; Bellah, Wendy

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  13. Simulation and Experimental Study on Cavitating Water Jet Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wei; He, Kai; Cai, Jiannan; Hu, Shaojie; Li, Jiuhua; Du, Ruxu

    2017-01-01

    Cavitating water jet technology is a new kind of water jet technology with many advantages, such as energy-saving, efficient, environmentally-friendly and so on. Based on the numerical simulation and experimental verification in this paper, the research on cavitating nozzle has been carried out, which includes comparison of the cleaning ability of the cavitating jet and the ordinary jet, and comparison of cavitation effects of different structures of cavitating nozzles.

  14. Evaluation used underground water drain pipes of experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, T.; Ohara, J.; Fujisawa, K.; Nakano, R.; Tabata, Y.

    2010-12-01

    The landslide measures in Japan, using the method of landslide reduce groundwater. The method is to drill a horizontal boring. Typically, this construction method 5mm diameter hole was opened in four directions was opened by drilling a 40mm VP pipe made of 90mm is inserted into the hole. Currently, the pipe has been used experimentally in the field. First, in this study, we have constructed a model to observe the water flowing through the pipe. Water gathering and water leakage obtained from two experiments using the model. Drainage performance has been evaluated from the results.

  15. Experimental study of the constituents of space wash water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, D. F.; Colombo, G. V.

    1975-01-01

    This report presents experimental data, obtained under controlled conditions, which quantify the various constituents of human origin that may be expected in space wash water. The experiments were conducted with a simulated crew of two male and two female subjects. The data show that the expected wash water contaminants originating from human secretions are substantially lower than theoretical projections indicated. The data presented are immediately useful and may have considerable impact on the tradeoff comparisons among various unit processes and systems under consideration by NASA for recycling space wash water.

  16. No Evidence of Complementary Water Use along a Plant Species Richness Gradient in Temperate Experimental Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Dörte; Gockele, Annette; Ravenek, Janneke M.; Roscher, Christiane; Strecker, Tanja; Weigelt, Alexandra; Buchmann, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Niche complementarity in resource use has been proposed as a key mechanism to explain the positive effects of increasing plant species richness on ecosystem processes, in particular on primary productivity. Since hardly any information is available for niche complementarity in water use, we tested the effects of plant diversity on spatial and temporal complementarity in water uptake in experimental grasslands by using stable water isotopes. We hypothesized that water uptake from deeper soil depths increases in more diverse compared to low diverse plant species mixtures. We labeled soil water in 8 cm (with 18O) and 28 cm depth (with ²H) three times during the 2011 growing season in 40 temperate grassland communities of varying species richness (2, 4, 8 and 16 species) and functional group number and composition (legumes, grasses, tall herbs, small herbs). Stable isotope analyses of xylem and soil water allowed identifying the preferential depth of water uptake. Higher enrichment in 18O of xylem water than in ²H suggested that the main water uptake was in the upper soil layer. Furthermore, our results revealed no differences in root water uptake among communities with different species richness, different number of functional groups or with time. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis of increased complementarity in water use in more diverse than in less diverse communities of temperate grassland species. PMID:25587998

  17. No evidence of complementary water use along a plant species richness gradient in temperate experimental grasslands.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Dörte; Gockele, Annette; Ravenek, Janneke M; Roscher, Christiane; Strecker, Tanja; Weigelt, Alexandra; Buchmann, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Niche complementarity in resource use has been proposed as a key mechanism to explain the positive effects of increasing plant species richness on ecosystem processes, in particular on primary productivity. Since hardly any information is available for niche complementarity in water use, we tested the effects of plant diversity on spatial and temporal complementarity in water uptake in experimental grasslands by using stable water isotopes. We hypothesized that water uptake from deeper soil depths increases in more diverse compared to low diverse plant species mixtures. We labeled soil water in 8 cm (with 18O) and 28 cm depth (with ²H) three times during the 2011 growing season in 40 temperate grassland communities of varying species richness (2, 4, 8 and 16 species) and functional group number and composition (legumes, grasses, tall herbs, small herbs). Stable isotope analyses of xylem and soil water allowed identifying the preferential depth of water uptake. Higher enrichment in 18O of xylem water than in ²H suggested that the main water uptake was in the upper soil layer. Furthermore, our results revealed no differences in root water uptake among communities with different species richness, different number of functional groups or with time. Thus, our results do not support the hypothesis of increased complementarity in water use in more diverse than in less diverse communities of temperate grassland species.

  18. Decreased growth-induced water potential: A primary cause of growth inhibition at low water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Wu, Yajun; Boyer, J.S.

    1997-06-01

    Cell enlargement depends on a growth-induced difference in water potential to move water into the cells. Water deficits decrease this potential difference and inhibit growth. To investigate whether the decrease causes the growth inhibition, pressure was applied to the roots of soybean seedlings and the growth and potential difference were monitored in the stems. In water-limited plants, the inhibited stem growth increased when the roots were pressurized and it reverted to the previous rate when the pressure was released. The pressure around the roots was perceived as an increased turgor in the stem in small cells next to the xylem, but not in outlying cortical cells. This local effect implied that water transport was impeded by the small cells. The diffusivity for water was much less in the small cells than in the outlying cells. The small cells thus were a barrier that caused the growth-induced potential difference to be large during rapid growth, but to reverse locally during the early part of a water deficit. Such a barrier may be a frequent property of meristems. Because stem growth responded to the pressure-induced recovery of the potential difference across this barrier, we conclude that a decrease in the growth-induced potential difference was a primary cause of the inhibition.

  19. Treatment Technology to Meet the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations for Inorganics: Part 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorg, Thomas J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This article is the third in a series summarizing existing treatment technology to meet the inorganic National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations. This report deals specifically with treatment methods for removing cadmium, lead, and silver from drinking water. (CS)

  20. Water sources for subduction zone volcanism: new experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Pawley, A R; Holloway, J R

    1993-04-30

    Despite its acknowledged importance, the role of water in the genesis of subduction zone volcanism is poorly understood. Amphibole dehydration in subducting oceanic crust at a single pressure is assumed to generate the water required for melting, but experimental constraints on the reaction are limited, and little attention has been paid to reactions involving other hydrous minerals. Experiments on an oceanic basalt at pressure-temperature conditions relevant to subducting slabs demonstrate that amphibole dehydration is spread over a depth interval of at least 20 kilometers. Reactions involving other hydrous minerals, including mica, epidote, chloritoid, and lawsonite, also release water over a wide depth interval, and in some subduction zones these phases may transport water to deep levels in the mantle.

  1. The Strategy to Survive Primary Malaria Infection: An Experimental Study on Behavioural Changes in Parasitized Birds

    PubMed Central

    Mukhin, Andrey; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Platonova, Elena; Kobylkov, Dmitry; Vakoliuk, Irina; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2016-01-01

    Avian malaria parasites (Haemosporida, Plasmodium) are of cosmopolitan distribution, and they have a significant impact on vertebrate host fitness. Experimental studies show that high parasitemia often develops during primary malaria infections. However, field studies only occasionally reveal high parasitemia in free-living birds sampled using the traditional methods of mist-netting or trapping, and light chronic infections predominate. The reason for this discrepancy between field observation and experimental data remains insufficiently understood. Since mist-netting is a passive capture method, two main parameters determine its success in sampling infected birds in wildlife, i. e. the presence of parasitized birds at a study site and their mobility. In other words, the trapping probability depends on the survival rate of birds and their locomotor activity during infection. Here we test (1) the mortality rate of wild birds infected with Plasmodium relictum (the lineage pSGS1), (2) the changes in their behaviour during presence of an aerial predator, and (3) the changes in their locomotor activity at the stage of high primary parasitemia.We show that some behavioural features which might affect a bird's survival during a predator attack (time of reaction, speed of flush flight and take off angle) did not change significantly during primary infection. However, the locomotor activity of infected birds was almost halved compared to control (non-infected) birds during the peak of parasitemia. We report (1) the markedly reduced mobility and (2) the 20% mortality rate caused by P. relictum and conclude that these factors are responsible for the underrepresentation of birds in mist nets and traps during the stage of high primary parasitemia in wildlife. This study indicates that the widespread parasite, P. relictum (pSGS1) influences the behaviour of birds during primary parasitemia. Experimental studies combined with field observations are needed to better understand the

  2. Influences on water-hammer wave shape: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traudt, T.; Bombardieri, C.; Manfletti, C.

    2016-09-01

    Water-hammer phenomena are of strong interest in a number of different industrial fields, amongst which the space industry. Here the priming of feedlines during start-up of an engine as well as the rapid closing of valves upon shutdown may lead to pressure peaks symptomatic of a water-hammer wave. Test benches used to conduct tests on future as well as current engines are also sensitive to water-hammer waves traveling along their feedlines. To enhance the understanding of water-hammer, we investigated different configurations and their influence on the wave shape in the frequency domain. The configurations feature a coiled pipe setup with a support structure and without a support structure. Two other phenomena will be presented. We found a beat phenomenon which is likely to be the so called Poisson-coupling beat. Finally we will show that the second water-hammer peak can reach pressures a lot higher than the first peak by additive interference of the primary and secondary water-hammer wave.

  3. Fabrication of experimental three-meter space telescope primary and secondary mirror support structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishler, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication of prototype titanium alloy primary and secondary mirror support structures for a proposed experimental three-meter space telescope is discussed. The structure was fabricated entirely of Ti-6Al-4V tubing and plate. Fabrication included the development of procedures including welding, forming, and machining. Most of the structures was fabricated by gas-shielding tungsten-arc (GTA) welding with several major components fabricated by high frequency resistance (HFR) welding.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Quantification of coupled water and water vapor fluxes in very dry soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madi, Raneem; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions with deep groundwater and very dry soils, vapor movement in the vadose zone may be a major component in the total water flux. Therefore, the coupled movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat transport in the unsaturated zone should be explicitly considered to quantify subsurface water fluxes in such regions. Only few studies focused on the importance of vapor water diffusion in dry soils and in many water flow studies in soil it was neglected. We are interested in the importance of water vapor diffusion and condensation in very dry sand. A version of Hydrus-1D capable of solving the coupled water vapor and heat transport equations will be used to do the numerical modeling. The soil hydraulic properties will be experimentally determined. A soil column experiment was developed with negligible liquid flow in order to isolate vapor flux for testing. We have used different values of initial water contents trying to generate different scenarios to assess the role of the water vapor transport in arid and semi-arid soils and how it changes the soil water content using different soil hydraulic parametrization functions. In the session a preliminary experimental and modelling results of vapor and water fluxes will be presented.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. III Appendix III to Part 265—EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  6. Primary School Pupils' Perceptions of Water in the Context of STS Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havu-Nuutinen, Sari; Karkkainen, Sirpa; Keinonen, Tuula

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on pupils' perceptions of water issues. The instructional situations take place in a Finnish primary school and aim at introducing the Science-Technology-Society (STS) study approach. The primary aim of this study is, in the context of STS instruction, to describe issues that pupils associate with water. This paper involves…

  7. Influence of dispersants on petroleum bioavailability to primary producers in a brackish water food chain

    SciTech Connect

    Younghans-Haug, C.O.; Wolfe, M.F.; Tjeerdema, R.S.; Sowby, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Petroleum is transported and processed within biologically rich brackish environments worldwide. Past research has investigated disposition of chemically dispersed oil in mammals, fish, and higher invertebrates, yet little is known about how chemical dispersion influences petroleum behavior within primary producers within brackish water food chains. One concern is whether chemical dispersion influences petroleum bioavailability to primary producers and the potential for increased petroleum bioaccumulation. This research examines changes in petroleum bioavailability to the euryhaline phytoplankton Isochrysis galbana by measuring bioconcentration factors (BCFS) including uptake and deputation rates for dispersed and undispersed brackish water oil spills. Isochrysis is a major food source for zooplankton which are consumed by a multitude of larval fish having both ecological and commercial importance. Prudhoe Bay Crude oil, Corexit 9527, and {sup 14}C-naphthalene were used for these studies. Constant-concentration flow-through exposures were employed for the uptake and BCF experiments. Work was performed below the ``no observable effect concentration`` to eliminate stress-induced metabolic altercations that could in themselves influence petroleum behavior. Exposure chamber and experimental design will be discussed, and study results presented. Understanding how chemical dispersion alters petroleum behavior within the lowest levels of the food chain leads to better delineation of consumer risks.

  8. Experimental investigation on water quality standard of Yangtze River water source heat pump.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zenghu; Tong, Mingwei; Kun, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Due to the surface water in the upper reaches of Yangtze River in China containing large amounts of silt and algae, high content of microorganisms and suspended solids, the water in Yangtze River cannot be used for cooling a heat pump directly. In this paper, the possibility of using Yangtze River, which goes through Chongqing, a city in southwest China, as a heat source-sink was investigated. Water temperature and quality of the Yangtze River in the Chongqing area were analyzed and the performance of water source heat pump units in different sediment concentrations, turbidity and algae material conditions were tested experimentally, and the water quality standards, in particular surface water conditions, in the Yangtze River region that adapt to energy-efficient heat pumps were also proposed. The experimental results show that the coefficient of performance heat pump falls by 3.73% to the greatest extent, and the fouling resistance of cooling water in the heat exchanger increases up to 25.6% in different water conditions. When the sediment concentration and the turbidity in the river water are no more than 100 g/m3 and 50 NTU respectively, the performance of the heat pump is better, which can be used as a suitable river water quality standard for river water source heat pumps.

  9. Experimental study on oblique water entry of projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chenggong; Wang, Cong; Wei, Yingjie; Zhang, Xiaoshi; Sun, Tiezhi

    2016-10-01

    An experimental study of oblique water entry of projectiles with different noses has been conducted using high-speed photography technology. The images of the initial water entry impact, cavity evolution, and the closure and shedding of vortices of cavity are presented in the paper. The results reveal that for high-speed oblique water entry (the initial impact velocity >50 m/s), the cavity attached to the projectile is symmetrical and free from the influence of gravity. The shedding of the water-vapor-air mixture in the tail of the cavity produces vortices which disappear in the rear of the projectile trajectory. Particular attention is given to the velocity attenuation of the projectile after water entry. The results show that there is a transition point at the time corresponding to the surface seal of the cavity during the velocity attenuation after oblique water entry, and the rates of velocity attenuation are different before and after this transition point. Additionally, the chronophotography of the cavity evolution shows that the time when the surface seal of the cavity occurs decreases with the increase of the initial impact velocity of the projectile.

  10. Experimental long term evolution of breathers in water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-05-01

    Oceanic rogue waves may occur, due to the modulation instability, also referred to as the Benjamin-Feir instability. This instability can be also discussed within the framework of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS), which describes the dynamics of unstable packets in deep-water. In particular, through exact breather solutions of the NLS. Breathers are currently under intensive study, since their recent experimental observation in optics, water waves and in plasma proved the validity of the NLS to describe strong localizations in nonlinear dispersive media. We present evolution characteristics of breather, propagating over a long propagation distance in deep-water. In addition, we present several analytical and promising techniques, based on the theory of nonlinear wave theory, how an early stage of breather dynamics may be detected, before the occurrence of strong wave focusing.

  11. The impact of educational videotapes on water contact behaviour of primary school students in the Dongting Lakes region, China.

    PubMed

    Yuan, L; Manderson, L; Tempongko, M S; Wei, W; Aiguo, P

    2000-08-01

    Multimedia has become increasingly important in educational programmes in schools in all societies, and has potential value for health education. We developed a video and a comic book on the transmission and prevention of schistosomiasis for use in primary schools in endemic areas of China. The material was designed to increase children's knowledge of schistosomiasis as an environmental disease and to encourage them to reduce their contact with unsafe water sources. To test the effectiveness of the video and booklet, a quasi-experimental study was conducted among 1,739 children in 50 primary schools in the Dongting Lake region. A self-administered questionnaire pre- and post-intervention showed a significant increase in knowledge about schistosomiasis in the intervention schools. Significantly, this change was associated with a decrease in contact with unsafe water sources, as established from water contact observations. This behavioural change suggests the value of short, targeted educational interventions to decrease risk of infection.

  12. Optimization of the water chemistry of the primary coolant at nuclear power plants with VVER

    SciTech Connect

    Barmin, L. F.; Kruglova, T. K.; Sinitsyn, V. P.

    2005-01-15

    Results of the use of automatic hydrogen-content meter for controlling the parameter of 'hydrogen' in the primary coolant circuit of the Kola nuclear power plant are presented. It is shown that the correlation between the 'hydrogen' parameter in the coolant and the 'hydrazine' parameter in the makeup water can be used for controlling the water chemistry of the primary coolant system, which should make it possible to optimize the water chemistry at different power levels.

  13. Calculation of water-bearing primary basalt and estimation of source mantle conditions beneath arcs: PRIMACALC2 model for WINDOWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Ariskin, Alexey A.

    2014-04-01

    present a new method for estimating the composition of water-bearing primary arc basalt and its source mantle conditions. The PRIMACALC2 model uses a thermodynamic fractional crystallization model COMAGMAT3.72 and runs with an Excel macro to examine the mantle equilibrium and trace element calculations of a primary basalt. COMAGMAT3.72 calculates magma fractionation in 0-10 kb at various compositions, pressure, oxygen fugacity, and water content, but is only applicable for forward calculations. PRIMACALC2 first calculates the provisional composition of a primary basalt from an observed magma. The basalt composition is then calculated by COMAGMAT3.72 for crystallization. Differences in elemental concentrations between observed and the closest-match calculated magmas are then adjusted in the primary basalt. Further iteration continues until the calculated magma composition converges with the observed magma, resulting in the primary basalt composition. Once the fitting is satisfied, back calculations of trace elements are made using stepwise addition of fractionated minerals. Mantle equilibrium of the primary basalt is tested using the Fo-NiO relationship of olivine in equilibrium with the primary basalt, and thus with the source mantle. Source mantle pressure, temperature, and degree of melting are estimated using petrogenetic grids based on experimental data obtained in anhydrous systems. Mantle melting temperature in a hydrous system is computed by adjusting T with a parameterization for a water-bearing system. PRIMACALC2 can be used either in dry or water-bearing arc magmas and is also applicable to mid-ocean ridge basalts and nonalkalic ocean island basalts.

  14. Primary Datasets for Case Studies of River-Water Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulder, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Level 6 (final-year BSc) students undertook case studies on between-site and temporal variation in river-water quality. They used professionally-collected datasets supplied by the Environment Agency. The exercise gave students the experience of working with large, real-world datasets and led to their understanding how the quality of river water is…

  15. Experimental study of spatiotemporally localized surface gravity water waves.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Akhmediev, N; Hoffmann, N P

    2012-07-01

    We present experimental results on the study of spatiotemporally localized surface wave events on deep water that can be modeled using the Peregrine breather solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. These are often considered as prototypes of oceanic rogue waves that can focus wave energy into a single wave packet. For small steepness values of the carrier gravity waves the Peregrine breathers are relatively wide, thus providing an excellent agreement between the theory and experimental results. For larger steepnesses the focusing leads to temporally and spatially shorter events. Nevertheless, agreement between measurements and the Peregrine breather theory remains reasonably good, with discrepancies of modulation gradients and spatiotemporal symmetries being tolerable. Lifetimes and travel distances of the spatiotemporally localized wave events determined from the experiment are in good agreement with the theory.

  16. A Teacher's Guide to the Study of Water for Primary Youngsters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laskey, Marilyn

    Compiled in this teacher's guide are suggestions for a unit approach to the study of water in the primary grades. Designed to be utilized with related student documents, it contains the text or script of these works: THE ABC's OF WATER, SE 016 491 and A TRIP TO THE WATER PLANT, SE 016 488. Also, it includes unit objectives; teaching procedures; a…

  17. Primary cell cultures from sea urchin ovaries: a new experimental tool.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Silvia; Di Benedetto, Cristiano; Sugni, Michela; Candia Carnevali, M Daniela

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, primary cell cultures from ovaries of the edible sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus were developed in order to provide a simple and versatile experimental tool for researches in echinoderm reproductive biology. Ovary cell phenotypes were identified and characterized by different microscopic techniques. Although cell cultures could be produced from ovaries at all stages of maturation, the cells appeared healthier and viable, displaying a higher survival rate, when ovaries at early stages of gametogenesis were used. In terms of culture medium, ovarian cells were successfully cultured in modified Leibovitz-15 medium, whereas poor results were obtained in minimum essential medium Eagle and medium 199. Different substrates were tested, but ovarian cells completely adhered only on poly-L-lysine. To improve in vitro conditions and stimulate cell proliferation, different serum-supplements were tested. Fetal calf serum and an originally developed pluteus extract were detrimental to cell survival, apparently accelerating processes of cell death. In contrast, cells cultured with sea urchin egg extract appeared larger and healthier, displaying an increased longevity that allowed maintaining them for up to 1 month. Overall, our study provides new experimental bases and procedures for producing successfully long-term primary cell cultures from sea urchin ovaries offering a good potential to study echinoid oogenesis in a controlled system and to investigate different aspects of echinoderm endocrinology and reproductive biology.

  18. Design comparison of experimental storm water detention systems treating concentrated road runoff.

    PubMed

    Nanbakhsh, Hassan; Kazemi-Yazdi, Sara; Scholz, Miklas

    2007-07-15

    The aim was to assess the treatment efficiencies of experimental storm water detention (extended storage) systems based on the Atlantis Water Management Limited detention cells receiving concentrated runoff that has been primarily treated by filtration with different inert aggregates. Randomly collected gully pot liquor was used in stead of road runoff. To test for a 'worst case scenario', the experimental system received higher volumes and pollutant concentrations in comparison to real detention systems under real (frequently longer but diluted) runoff events. Gravel (6 and 20 mm), sand (1.5 mm), Ecosoil (inert 2 mm aggregate provided by Atlantis Water Management Limited), block paving and turf were tested in terms of their influence on the water quality. Concentrations of five-day at 20 degrees C ATU biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in contrast to suspended solids (SS) were frequently reduced to below international secondary wastewater treatment standards. The denitrification process was not completed. This resulted in higher outflow than inflow nitrate-nitrogen concentrations. An analysis of variance indicated that some systems were similar in terms of most of their treatment performance variables including BOD and SS. It follows that there is no advantage in using additional aggregates with high adsorption capacities in the primary treatment stage.

  19. Experimental stability analysis of different water-based nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Laura; Colla, Laura; Bobbo, Sergio; Barison, Simona; Agresti, Filippo

    2011-12-01

    In the recent years, great interest has been devoted to the unique properties of nanofluids. The dispersion process and the nanoparticle suspension stability have been found to be critical points in the development of these new fluids. For this reason, an experimental study on the stability of water-based dispersions containing different nanoparticles, i.e. single wall carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), titanium dioxide (TiO2) and copper oxide (CuO), has been developed in this study. The aim of this study is to provide stable nanofluids for selecting suitable fluids with enhanced thermal characteristics. Different dispersion techniques were considered in this study, including sonication, ball milling and high-pressure homogenization. Both the dispersion process and the use of some dispersants were investigated as a function of the nanoparticle concentration. The high-pressure homogenization was found to be the best method, and the addition of n-dodecyl sulphate and polyethylene glycol as dispersants, respectively in SWCNHs-water and TiO2-water nanofluids, improved the nanofluid stability.

  20. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED..., STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES Pt. 265, App. III Appendix III to Part 265—EPA Interim Primary...

  1. Kinetics and advanced digester design for anaerobic digestion of water hyacinth and primary sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Chynoweth, D.P.; Dolenc, D.A.; Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Jerger, D.E.; Srivastava, V.J.

    1982-01-01

    A research program centered around a facility located at Walt Disney World (WDW) is in progress to evaluate the use of water hyacinth (WH) for secondary and tertiary wastewater treatment, to optimize growth of WH under these conditions, and to convert the resultant primary sludge (PS) and WH to methane via anaerobic digestion. This article describes the status of the biogasification component of this program, which includes baseline and advanced digestion experiments with individual feeds and blends and the design of an experimental test unit (ETU) to be installed at WDW. Experiments with several blends demonstrated that methane yields can be predicted from the fractional content and methane yield of each component. The process was found to adhere to the Monod kinetic model for microbial growth, and associated kinetic parameters were developed for various feed combinations. A novel upflow digester is achieving significantly higher conversion than a stirred-tank digester. Of several pretreatment techniques used, only alkaline treatment resulted in increased biodegradability. A larger scale (4.5 m/sup 3/) experimental test unit is being designed for installation at WDW in 1982. 13 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Recent Experimental Advances to Determine (noble) Gases in Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipfer, R.; Brennwald, M. S.; Huxol, S.; Mächler, L.; Maden, C.; Vogel, N.; Tomonaga, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In aquatic systems noble gases, radon, and bio-geochemically conservative transient trace gases (SF6, CFCs) are frequently applied to determine water residence times and to reconstruct past environmental and climatic conditions. Recent experimental breakthroughs now enable ● to apply the well-established concepts of terrestrial noble gas geochemistry in waters to the minute water amounts stored in sediment pore space and in fluid inclusions (A), ● to determine gas exchange processes on the bio-geochemical relevant time scales of minutes - hours (B), and ● to separate diffusive and advective gas transport in soil air (C). A. Noble-gas analysis in water samples (< 1 g) facilitates determining the solute transport in the pore space and identifying the origin of bio- and geogenic fluids in (un) consolidated sediments [1]. Advanced techniques that combine crushing and sieving speleothem samples in ultra-high-vacuum to a specific grain size allow to separate air and water-bearing fluid inclusions and thus enables noble-gas-based reconstruction of environmental conditions from water masses as small as 1mg [2]. B. The coupling of noble gas analysis with approaches of gas chromatography permits combined analysis of noble gases and other gases species (e.g., SF6, CFCs, O2, N2) from a single water sample. The new method substantially improves ground water dating by SF6 and CFCs as excess air is quantified from the same sample and hence can adequately be corrected for [3]. Portable membrane-inlet mass spectrometers enable the quasi-continuous and real-time analysis of noble gases and other dissolved gases directly in the field, allowing, for instance, quantification of O2 turnover rates on small time scales [4]. C. New technical developments perfect 222Rn analysis in water by the synchronous the determination of the short-lived 220Rn. The combined 220,222Rn analysis sheds light on the emanation behaviour of radon by identifying soil water content to be the crucial

  3. Primary experimental studies on mid-infrared FEL irradiation on dental substances at BFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junbiao, Zhu; Yonggui, Li; Nianqing, Liu; Guoqing, Zhang; Minkai, Wang; Gan, Wu; Xuepin, Yan; Yuying, Huang; Wei, He; Yanmei, Dong; Xuejun, Gao

    2001-12-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) with its characteristics of wide wavelength tunability, ultrashort pulse time structure, and high peak power density is predominantly superior to all other conventional lasers in applications. Several experimental studies on mid-infrared FEL irradiation on dental enamel and dentine were performed at the Beijing FEL. Experimental aims were to investigate changes in the hardness, ratios of P to Ca and Cs before and after irradiation on samples with a characteristic absorption wavelength of 9.66 μm, in the colors of these sample surfaces after irradiation with different wavelengths around the peak wavelength. The time dependence of temperature of the dentine sample was measured with its ps pulse effects compared to that with a continuous CO 2 laser. FTIR absorption spectra in the range of 2.5-15.4 μm for samples of these hard dental substances and pure hydroxyapatite were first examined to decide their chemical components and absorption maximums. Primary experimental results will be presented.

  4. Experimental study on plunging breaking waves in deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ho-Joon; Chang, Kuang-An; Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Na, Byoungjoon

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a unique data set that combines measurements of velocities and void fraction under an unsteady deep water plunging breaker in a laboratory. Flow properties in the aerated crest region of the breaking wave were measured using modified particle image velocimetry (PIV) and bubble image velocimetry (BIV). Results show that the maximum velocity in the plunging breaker reached 1.68C at the first impingement of the overturning water jet with C being the phase speed of the primary breaking wave, while the maximum velocity reached 2.14C at the beginning of the first splash-up. A similarity profile of void fraction was found in the successive impinging and splash-up rollers. In the highly foamy splashing roller, the increase of turbulent level and vorticity level were strongly correlated with the increase of void fraction when the range of void fraction was between 0 and 0.4 (from the trough level to approximately the center of the roller). The levels became constant when void fraction was greater than 0.5. The mass flux, momentum flux, kinetic energy, potential energy, and total energy were computed and compared with and without the void fraction being accounted for. The results show that all the mean and turbulence properties related to the air-water mixture are considerably overestimated unless void fraction is considered. When including the density variation due to the air bubbles, the wave energy dissipated exponentially a short distance after breaking; about 54% and 85% of the total energy dissipated within one and two wavelengths beyond the breaking wave impingement point, respectively.

  5. 75 FR 30401 - National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Announcement of the Results of EPA's Review of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... AGENCY RIN 2040-AE90 National Primary Drinking Water Regulations; Announcement of the Results of EPA's Review of Existing Drinking Water Standards and Request for Public Comment and/or Information on Related Issues; Extension of the Comment Period AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION:...

  6. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 265 - EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false EPA Interim Primary Drinking Water Standards III Appendix III to Part 265 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Water Standards Parameter Maximum level (mg/l) Arsenic 0.05 Barium 1.0 Cadmium 0.01 Chromium...

  7. Perceptions of the Water Cycle among Primary School Children in Botswana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taiwo, A. A.; Motswiri, M. J.; Masene, R.

    1999-01-01

    Describes qualitative and quantitative methods used to elucidate the nature of the perception of the water cycle held by Botswana primary-grade pupils in three different geographic areas. Concludes that the students' perception of the water cycle was positively influenced by schooling but negatively impacted upon, to some extent, by the untutored…

  8. Water-Free Shale Stimulation: Experimental Studies of Electrofracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.; Geilikman, M. B.; Gardner, W. P.; Broome, S. T.; Glover, S.; Williamson, K.; Su, J.

    2015-12-01

    Electrofracturing is a water-free stimulation method that might be applicable to hydrocarbon reservoirs. This method of dynamic fragmentation uses high-voltage pulses applied to rock via a pair of electrodes. Fragmentation occurs through two general processes (Cho et al, 2006): 1) electrohydraulic shock and 2) internal breakdown inside bulk solid dielectrics. In the first process, electrical current passing through brackish or salty water found naturally in the formation generates a shock wave of sufficient magnitude to crush/fail the rock as the wave travels through it. In the second process, the electric current flows through the rock preferentially along mineral interfaces; tensile and branching cracks are induced at the boundary interfaces either by heating and differential expansion, or by a shock wave induced by the electrical impulse itself. Both processes have been examined experimentally on rocks and on concrete starting in the late 1980's.In light of the "shale revolution" that has reinvigorated the North American petroleum resource base over the last decade, we developed a laboratory based experimental system to study coupled deformation and gas flow during high-voltage pulse application at elevated confining pressure (to 70 MPa). We deformed twelve samples using 6.5 μs full width at half maximum exponential voltage pulses from 80 to 200 kV. Exponential decay loading was shown to fracture shale at pressure, producing a 5-8 order-of-magnitude increase in permeability (initiating in the nD range) with significant fracturing. Fractures were documented using CT and SEM. The preponderance of fractures are parallel to bedding with fractures often extending from end to end in the samples, which were up to 9 cm in length. The bedding-parallel fractures are adjacent to, or off centered to, the input pulse location. Fractures oblique to bedding planes are present as well, but are fewer in number. The test system, and experimental and observational methods and

  9. Simplified, rapid, and inexpensive estimation of water primary productivity based on chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zhou, Wei; Chen, Weixian; Xie, Wei; Jiang, Liping; Liang, Qinlang; Huang, Mingjun; Wu, Zongwen; Wang, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Primary productivity in water environment relies on the photosynthetic production of microalgae. Chlorophyll fluorescence is widely used to detect the growth status and photosynthetic efficiency of microalgae. In this study, a method was established to determine the Chl a content, cell density of microalgae, and water primary productivity by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fo. A significant linear relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fo and Chl a content of microalgae, as well as between Fo and cell density, was observed under pure-culture conditions. Furthermore, water samples collected from natural aquaculture ponds were used to validate the correlation between Fo and water primary productivity, which is closely related to Chl a content in water. Thus, for a given pure culture of microalgae or phytoplankton (mainly microalgae) in aquaculture ponds or other natural ponds for which the relationship between the Fo value and Chl a content or cell density could be established, Chl a content or cell density could be determined by measuring the Fo value, thereby making it possible to calculate the water primary productivity. It is believed that this method can provide a convenient way of efficiently estimating the primary productivity in natural aquaculture ponds and bringing economic value in limnetic ecology assessment, as well as in algal bloom monitoring.

  10. Intraocular pressure fluctuation after water drinking test in primary angle-closure glaucoma and primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Yi-Chieh; Teng, Mei-Ching; Lin, Pei-Wen; Tsai, Jen-Chia; Lai, Ing-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Context: Only a few studies have assessed intraocular pressure (IOP) changes during the water drinking test (WDT) in patients with primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG). Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate IOP changes during WDT in patients with PACG versus primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Settings and Design: This was a prospective and single tertiary center study. Materials and Methods: PACG and POAG patients (n = 15 each) without prior glaucoma surgery were enrolled and subjected to WDT, wherein they consumed an amount of water proportional to their body weight within 10 min. IOP was measured at baseline and every 15 min for 1 h after water intake. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup comparisons were performed using Mann–Whitney U-test for continuous variables and Chi-square test for categorical variables. Wilcoxon signed-ranks test was used for comparisons of IOP before and after water intake in the two groups. Regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with IOP fluctuations during WDT. Results: IOP changes over 1 h after water intake showed no significant differences between groups. The mean maximum fluctuation from baseline was 3.61 ± 2.49 and 3.79 ± 1.91 mmHg, respectively, in the PACG and POAG groups. The mean peak IOP was 19.17 ± 4.32 and 19.87 ± 3.44 mmHg in the PACG and PAOG groups, respectively. The axial length and anterior chamber depth showed no correlations with IOP fluctuations. Conclusions: We found similar IOP fluctuation curves and peak IOP values in both PACG and POAG patients subjected to WDT. These findings suggest that WDT is a useful test to induce IOP peaks in both POAG and PACG patients. PMID:28112134

  11. Experimental study of choking flow of water at supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, Altan

    Future nuclear reactors will operate at a coolant pressure close to 25 MPa and at outlet temperatures ranging from 500°C to 625°C. As a result, the outlet flow enthalpy in future Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWR) will be much higher than those of actual ones which can increase overall nuclear plant efficiencies up to 48%. However, under such flow conditions, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water is not fully known, e.g., pressure drop, forced convection and heat transfer deterioration, critical and blowdown flow rate, etc. Up to now, only a very limited number of studies have been performed under supercritical conditions. Moreover, these studies are conducted at conditions that are not representative of future SCWRs. In addition, existing choked flow data have been collected from experiments at atmospheric discharge pressure conditions and in most cases by using working fluids different than water which constrain researchers to analyze the data correctly. In particular, the knowledge of critical (choked) discharge of supercritical fluids is mandatory to perform nuclear reactor safety analyses and to design key mechanical components (e.g., control and safety relief valves, etc.). Hence, an experimental supercritical water facility has been built at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal which allows researchers to perform choking flow experiments under supercritical conditions. The facility can also be used to carry out heat transfer and pressure drop experiments under supercritical conditions. In this thesis, we present the results obtained at this facility using a test section that contains a 1 mm inside diameter, 3.17 mm long orifice plate with sharp edges. Thus, 545 choking flow of water data points are obtained under supercritical conditions for flow pressures ranging from 22.1 MPa to 32.1 MPa, flow temperatures ranging from 50°C to 502°C and for discharge pressures from 0.1 MPa to 3.6 MPa. Obtained data are compared with the data given in

  12. Physico-chemical quality of drinking water in villages of Primary Health Centre, Waghodia, Gujarat (India).

    PubMed

    Desai, Gaurav; Vasisth, Smriti; Patel, Maharshi; Mehta, Vaibhav; Bhavsar, Bharat

    2012-07-01

    16 water samples were collected to study the physical and chemical quality of water of main source of drinking water in the villages of Primary Health Centre, Waghodia of Vadodara district of Gujarat. The values recommended by Indian Standard for Drinking Water (IS 10500:1991) were used for comparison of observed values. The study indicates that the contamination problem in these villages is not alarming at present, but Waghodia being industrial town, ground water quality may deteriorate with passage of time, which needs periodical monitoring. The study provides the local area baseline data which may be useful for the comparison of future study.

  13. Experimental facility for the study of acoustic emission registered in the primary circuit components of WWER power units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, V. G.; Hovakimyan, T. H.; Yeghoyan, E. A.; Hovhannisyan, H. T.; Mayilyan, D. G.; Petrosyan, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the creation of a facility for the experimental study of a phenomenon of background acoustic emission (AE), which is detected in the main circulation loop (MCL) of WWER power units. The analysis of the operating principle and the design of a primary feed-and-blow down system (FB) deaerator of NPP as the most likely source of continuous acoustic emission is carried out. The experimental facility for the systematic study of a phenomenon of continuous AE is developed. A physical model of a thermal deaerator is designed and constructed. A thermal monitoring system is introduced. An automatic system providing acoustic signal registration in a low frequency (0.03-30 kHz) and high frequency (30-300 kHz) bands and study of its spectral characteristics is designed. Special software for recording and processing of digitized electrical sensor signals is developed. A separate and independent principle of study of the most probable processes responsible for the generation of acoustic emission signals in the deaerator is applied. Trial series of experiments and prechecks of acoustic signals in different modes of the deaerator model are conducted. Compliance of basic technological parameters with operating range of the real deaerator was provided. It is shown that the acoustic signal time-intensity curve has several typical regions. The pilot research showed an impact of various processes that come about during the operation of the deaerator physical model on the intensity of the AE signal. The experimental results suggest that the main sources of generation of the AE signals are the processes of steam condensation, turbulent flow of gas-vapor medium, and water boiling.

  14. Microbial Biodiversity: Approaches to Experimental Design and Hypothesis Testing in Primary Scientific Literature from 1975 to 1999

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Cindy E.; Bardin, Marc; Berge, Odile; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Fromin, Nathalie; Girardin, Hélène; Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Lebaron, Philippe; Thiéry, Jean M.; Troussellier, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Research interest in microbial biodiversity over the past 25 years has increased markedly as microbiologists have become interested in the significance of biodiversity for ecological processes and as the industrial, medical, and agricultural applications of this diversity have evolved. One major challenge for studies of microbial habitats is how to account for the diversity of extremely large and heterogeneous populations with samples that represent only a very small fraction of these populations. This review presents an analysis of the way in which the field of microbial biodiversity has exploited sampling, experimental design, and the process of hypothesis testing to meet this challenge. This review is based on a systematic analysis of 753 publications randomly sampled from the primary scientific literature from 1975 to 1999 concerning the microbial biodiversity of eight habitats related to water, soil, plants, and food. These publications illustrate a dominant and growing interest in questions concerning the effect of specific environmental factors on microbial biodiversity, the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of this biodiversity, and quantitative measures of population structure for most of the habitats covered here. Nevertheless, our analysis reveals that descriptions of sampling strategies or other information concerning the representativeness of the sample are often missing from publications, that there is very limited use of statistical tests of hypotheses, and that only a very few publications report the results of multiple independent tests of hypotheses. Examples are cited of different approaches and constraints to experimental design and hypothesis testing in studies of microbial biodiversity. To prompt a more rigorous approach to unambiguous evaluation of the impact of microbial biodiversity on ecological processes, we present guidelines for reporting information about experimental design, sampling strategies, and analyses of results in

  15. Microbial biodiversity: approaches to experimental design and hypothesis testing in primary scientific literature from 1975 to 1999.

    PubMed

    Morris, Cindy E; Bardin, Marc; Berge, Odile; Frey-Klett, Pascale; Fromin, Nathalie; Girardin, Hélène; Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Lebaron, Philippe; Thiéry, Jean M; Troussellier, Marc

    2002-12-01

    Research interest in microbial biodiversity over the past 25 years has increased markedly as microbiologists have become interested in the significance of biodiversity for ecological processes and as the industrial, medical, and agricultural applications of this diversity have evolved. One major challenge for studies of microbial habitats is how to account for the diversity of extremely large and heterogeneous populations with samples that represent only a very small fraction of these populations. This review presents an analysis of the way in which the field of microbial biodiversity has exploited sampling, experimental design, and the process of hypothesis testing to meet this challenge. This review is based on a systematic analysis of 753 publications randomly sampled from the primary scientific literature from 1975 to 1999 concerning the microbial biodiversity of eight habitats related to water, soil, plants, and food. These publications illustrate a dominant and growing interest in questions concerning the effect of specific environmental factors on microbial biodiversity, the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of this biodiversity, and quantitative measures of population structure for most of the habitats covered here. Nevertheless, our analysis reveals that descriptions of sampling strategies or other information concerning the representativeness of the sample are often missing from publications, that there is very limited use of statistical tests of hypotheses, and that only a very few publications report the results of multiple independent tests of hypotheses. Examples are cited of different approaches and constraints to experimental design and hypothesis testing in studies of microbial biodiversity. To prompt a more rigorous approach to unambiguous evaluation of the impact of microbial biodiversity on ecological processes, we present guidelines for reporting information about experimental design, sampling strategies, and analyses of results in

  16. Primary-secondary pumping conversion: Retrofit of an existing campus chilled water distribution system

    SciTech Connect

    Sczomak, D.P.; Nguyen, P.N.

    1996-08-01

    The chilled water distribution system within an existing 8,300 ton (29,200 kW) capacity regional chilled water plant at Michigan State University (MSU) is being converted from a primary pumping arrangement to a primary-secondary arrangement. The plant presently provides chilled water for air conditioning to twelve remote buildings. In the future, MSU plans to increase the plant`s capacity to 10,800 tons (38,000 kW) in order to serve seven more buildings. The addition of buildings to the distribution system has caused the existing primary pumps to be incapable of producing enough pressure to offset system losses at design flow rates. The existing system has become unable to concurrently provide adequate flow, design supply water temperature and efficient chiller operation due to the distribution system deficiencies. The primary-secondary pumping conversion will include modifications to the distribution piping, the addition of five variable speed secondary pumps, additions and modifications to the control systems, the trimming of impellers on six of the existing primary pumps and replacement of two primary pumps. The campus central control system will be utilized to provide automatic chiller staging, interface with the packaged secondary pump control systems, and control of the building interconnections. The total construction cost is approximately $1,400,000 and is scheduled for completion prior to the 1996 cooling season. Provisions have been made for two additional secondary pumps to accommodate the connection of additional buildings to the distribution system in the future.

  17. Does Improved Water Access Increase Child School Attendance? A Quasi-Experimental Approach From Rural Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Y.; Cook, J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of improved water access on child school attendance using two years of primary panel data from a quasi-experimental study in Oromiya, Ethiopia. A predominant form of child labor in rural poor households in least developed countries is water collection. Girls are often the primary water collectors for households, and because of the time intensive nature of water collection improved water access may allow for time to be reallocated to schooling (Rosen and Vincent 1999; Nankhuni and Findeis 2004). Understanding how improved water access may increase schooling for girls has important development policy implications. Indeed, abundant research on returns to education suggests increased schooling for girls is tied to improved future child and maternal health, economic opportunities, and lower fertility rates (Handa 1996; Schultz 1998; Michaelowa 2000). The literature to date finds that improved water access leads to increased schooling; however, there still exists a clear gap in the literature for understanding this relationship for two reasons. First, only four studies have directly examined the relationship between improved water access and schooling in sub-Saharan Africa, and analyses have been limited due to the use of cross-sectional data and research designs (Nankhuni and Findeis 2004; Koolwal and Van de Walle 2010; Ndiritu and Nyangan 2011; Nauges and Strand 2011). Indeed, only two studies have attempted to control for the endogenous nature of water access. Second, all studies use a binary school enrollment indicator from household surveys, which may suffer from response bias and may be an imperfect measure for actual schooling. Respondents may feel pressured to report that their children are enrolled in school if, like in Ethiopia, there are compulsory education laws. This may result in an overestimation of school enrollment. In addition, most children from rural poor households combine work and school, and a binary indicator does

  18. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: II. Experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-04-28

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol-water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0-1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol-water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s(-1)-10 K h(-1)) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ(g). Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χg ≥ 0.20), ice (χ(g) ≤ 0.32), and/or "distorted ice" (0 < χ(g) ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ(g) ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol-water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ(g) ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ(g) < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ(g) ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ(g) < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ(g) ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ(g) ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ(g) ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol-water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex "phase" behavior

  19. Glass polymorphism in glycerol–water mixtures: II. Experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A.; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol–water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0–1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol–water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s–1–10 K h–1) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ g. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χ g ≥ 0.20), ice (χ g ≤ 0.32), and/or “distorted ice” (0 < χ g ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ g ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol–water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ g ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ g < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ g ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ g < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ g ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ g ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ g ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol–water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex

  20. Potable water quality monitoring of primary schools in Magura district, Bangladesh: children's health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Aminur; Hashem, Abul; Nur-A-Tomal, Shahruk

    2016-12-01

    Safe potable water is essential for good health. Worldwide, school-aged children especially in the developing countries are suffering from various water-borne diseases. In the study, drinking water supplies for primary school children were monitored at Magura district, Bangladesh, to ensure safe potable water. APHA standard analytical methods were applied for determining the physicochemical parameters of the water samples. For determination of the essential physicochemical parameters, the samples were collected from 20 randomly selected tube wells of primary schools at Magura. The metal contents, especially arsenic (As), iron (Fe), and manganese (Mn), in the water samples were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The range of physicochemical parameters found in water samples were as follows: pH 7.05-9.03, electrical conductivity 400-2340 μS/cm, chloride 10-640 mg/L, hardness 200-535 mg/L as CaCO3, and total dissolved solids 208-1216 mg/L. The level of metals in the tube well water samples were as follows: As 1 to 55 μg/L, Fe 40 to 9890 μg/L, and Mn 10 to 370 μg/L. Drinking water parameters of Magura district did not meet the requirement of the World Health Organization drinking water quality guideline, or the Drinking Water Quality Standards of Bangladesh.

  1. Experimental Studies of Nanobubbles at Solid-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua

    2013-11-01

    When a hydrophobic substrate is in contact with water, gas bubbles thinner than 100 nm can form at the interface and stay for long time under ambient conditions. These nanobubbles have significant influence on a range of interfacial processes. For example, they give rise to hydrodynamic slip on the boundary, initiate the rupture of thin liquid films, facilitate the long-ranged interactions between hydrophobic surfaces, and enhance the attachment of a macroscopic bubble to the substrate. Experimentally, it is nontrivial to characterize such small fragile bubbles and unravel their fundamental physical properties. Based on our established procedure for the nanobubble formation, we have systematically studied the formation, stability and response of nanobubbles to external fields (e.g. sonication, pressure drop and temperature rise). By following the bubble morphology by atomic force microscopy, we show that the loss or gain of the nanobubble volume is achieved mainly by the change in the bubble height. The pinning on the three-phase boundary has significant implication on the properties of nanobubbles under various conditions. This talk will cover the effects of the substrate structures on the nanobubble formation, and the response of nanobubbles to the gas dissolution, the temperature increase, the extended gentle ultrasound or the substantial pressure drop in the environment. We acknowledge the support from Australian Research Council (FFT120100473).

  2. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%–90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132–300 tungsten wires with 5–10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (∼50 TW) and total radiated energy (∼500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  3. Immunomodulatory effect of water soluble extract separated from mycelium of Phellinus linteus on experimental atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming a popular treatment for modulating diverse immune disorders. Phellinus linteus (P. linteus) as one of the CAMs has been used to modulate cancers, inflammation and allergic activities. However, little evidence has been shown about its underlying mechanism of action by which it exerts a beneficial role in dermatological disease in vivo. In this study, we examined the immunomodulatory effects of P. linteus on experimental atopic dermatitis (AD) and elucidated its action mechanism. Methods The immunomodulatory effect of total extract of P. linteus on IgE production by human myeloma U266B1 cells was measured by ELISA. To further identify the effective components, P. linteus was fractionated into methanol soluble, water soluble and boiling water soluble extracts. Each extract was treated to U266B1 cells and primary B cells to compare their inhibitory effects on IgE secretion. To test the in vivo efficacy, experimental atopic dermatitis (AD) was established by alternative treatment of DNCB and house dust mite extract into BALB/c mice. Water soluble extract of P. linteus (WA) or ceramide as a positive control were topically applied to ears of atopic mouse every day for 2 weeks and progression of the disease was estimated by the following criteria: (a) ear thickness, clinical score, (b) serum total IgE, IgG and mite specific IgE level by ELSIA, (c) histological examination of ear tissue by H&E staining and (d) cytokine profile of total ear cells and CD4+ T cells by real time PCR and ELSIA. Results Treatment of total extracts of P. linteus to U266B1 inhibited IgE secretion. Among the diverse extracts of P. linteus, water soluble extract of P. linteus (WA) significantly reduced the IgE production in primary B cells and B cell line U266B1. Moreover, treatment of WA reduced AD symptoms such as ear swelling, erythema, and dryness and decreased recruitment of lymphocyte into the inflamed site. Interestingly WA

  4. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Vaporization on Nanostructured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Jorge, Jr.

    This dissertation summarizes results of an experimental exploration of heat transfer during vaporization of a water droplet deposited on a nanostructured surface at a temperature approaching and exceeding the Leidenfrost point for the surface and at lower surface temperatures 10-40 degrees C above the saturated temperature of the water droplet at approximately 101 kPa. The results of these experiments were compared to those performed on bare smooth copper and aluminum surfaces in this and other studies. The nanostructured surfaces were composed of a vast array of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanocrystals grown by hydrothermal synthesis on a smooth copper substrate having an average surface roughness of approximately 0.06 micrometer. Various nanostructured surface array geometries were produced on the copper substrate by performing the hydrothermal synthesis for 4, 10 and 24 hours. The individual nanostructures were randomly-oriented and, depending on hydrothermal synthesis time, had a mean diameter of about 500-700 nm, a mean length of 1.7-3.3 micrometers,and porosities of approximately 0.04-0.58. Surface wetting was characterized by macroscopic measurements of contact angle based on the droplet profile and calculations based on measurements of liquid film spread area. Scanning electron microscope imaging was used to document the nanoscale features of the surface before and after the experiments. The nanostructured surfaces grown by hydrothermal synthesis for 4 and 24 hours exhibited contact angles of approximately 10, whereas the surfaces grown for 10 hours were superhydrophilic, exhibiting contact angles typically less than 3 degrees. In single droplet deposition experiments at 101 kPa, a high-speed video camera was used to document the droplet-surface interaction. Distilled and degassed water droplets ranging in size from 2.5-4.0 mm were deposited onto the surface from heights ranging from approximately 0.2-8.1 cm, such that Weber numbers spanned a range of approximately 0

  5. Experimental constraints on CO2 and H2O in the Martian mantle and primary magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, John R.; Domanik, Kenneth J.; Cocheo, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    We present new data on the stability of hornblende in a Martian mantle composition, on CO2 solubility in iron-rich basaltic magmas, and on the solubility of H2O in an alkalic basaltic magma. These new data are combined with a summary of data from the literature to present a summary of the current state of our estimates of solubilities of H2O and CO2 in probable Martian magmas and the stability of hornblende in a slightly hydrous mantle. The new results suggest that hornblende stability is not sensitive to the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratio (mg#) of the mantle, that is the results for terrestrial mantle compositions are similar to the more iron-rich Martian composition. Likewise, CO2 solubility in iron-rich tholeiitic basaltic magmas is similar to iron-poor terrestrial compositions. The solubility of H2O has been measured in an alkalic basaltic (basanite) composition for the first time, and it is significantly lower than predicted for models of water solubility in magmas. The lack of mg# dependence observed in hornblende stability and on CO2 solubility that in many cases terrestrial results can be applied to Martian compositions. This conclusion does not apply to other phenomena such as primary magma compositions and major mantle mineral mineralogy.

  6. Bioremediating oil spills in nutrient poor ocean waters using fertilized clay mineral flakes: some experimental constraints.

    PubMed

    Warr, Laurence N; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J; Basirico, Laura M; Olson, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity.

  7. Bioremediating Oil Spills in Nutrient Poor Ocean Waters Using Fertilized Clay Mineral Flakes: Some Experimental Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Warr, Laurence N.; Friese, André; Schwarz, Florian; Schauer, Frieder; Portier, Ralph J.; Basirico, Laura M.; Olson, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    Much oil spill research has focused on fertilizing hydrocarbon oxidising bacteria, but a primary limitation is the rapid dilution of additives in open waters. A new technique is presented for bioremediation by adding nutrient amendments to the oil spill using thin filmed minerals comprised largely of Fullers Earth clay. Together with adsorbed N and P fertilizers, filming additives, and organoclay, clay flakes can be engineered to float on seawater, attach to the oil, and slowly release contained nutrients. Our laboratory experiments of microbial activity on weathered source oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill in the Gulf of Mexico show fertilized clay treatment significantly enhanced bacterial respiration and consumption of alkanes compared to untreated oil-in-water conditions and reacted faster than straight fertilization. Whereas a major portion (up to 98%) of the alkane content was removed during the 1 month period of experimentation by fertilized clay flake interaction; the reduced concentration of polyaromatic hydrocarbons was not significantly different from the non-clay bearing samples. Such clay flake treatment could offer a way to more effectively apply the fertilizer to the spill in open nutrient poor waters and thus significantly reduce the extent and duration of marine oil spills, but this method is not expected to impact hydrocarbon toxicity. PMID:23864952

  8. Experimental research of "microcable in a microconduct" system stability to effect of freezing water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Vladimir A.; Burdin, Vladimir A.; Nikulina, Tatiana G.; Alekhin, Ivan N.; Gavryushin, Sergey A.; Nikulin, Aleksey G.; Praporshchikov, Denis E.

    2011-12-01

    Results of experimental researches of "optical microcable in a microduct" system stability to effect of freezing water are presented. It is shown this system is steadier to water freezing in comparison to lighten optical cable in protective polymer tube.

  9. Attitudes of primary health care physician managers toward research: a pre-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Saulat; Henary, Basem

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary health care (PHC) is underdeveloped and scarce, especially in developing countries. It is important to understand the attitudes and aspirations of PHC physicians for the promotion of research. The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of PHC physician managers toward research in Qassim province and to identify barriers that impede performing research in the PHC system. The study was based on social cognitive theory framework, and was pre-experimental with a 'one-group pre-test-post-test' design. The study participants were physician managers in PHC administration, Qassim. The participants' attitudes were measured by adapting statements from the Attitude Towards Research scale. The intervention was the 1-day training program 'Introduction to Research in Primary Health Care'. A total of 23 PHC physicians participated in the study. The mean age of the participants was 45.4 (±1.6) years, and the mean years of work experience was 16.2 (±2.2) years. Only one participant had an article published in a peer-reviewed journal. The results of the study showed that PHC physicians had a baseline positive attitude toward research that was further enhanced after participating in an introductory research-training program. During the pre-test, out of the total score of 63, the mean score on attitude toward research was 48.35 (±6.8) while the mean total attitude score in the post-test was 49.7 (±6.6). However, the difference was not statistically significant at P<0.05. The item with the highest score regarded the role of research in the improvement of health care services, while the lowest-scoring item was about support from administration to conduct research. The participants recognised lack of skills, lack of training and inadequate resources as major barriers in conducting research. Our study results suggest that the PHC physicians' positive attitudes toward research can be further improved through in-service training. To promote research in PHC

  10. Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of the Physics of Water Rockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Fernandez-Francos, J.; Galdo-Vega, M.

    2010-01-01

    A simple rocket can be made using a plastic bottle filled with a volume of water and pressurized air. When opened, the air pressure pushes the water out of the bottle. This causes an increase in the bottle momentum so that it can be propelled to fairly long distances or heights. Water rockets are widely used as an educational activity, and several…

  11. Primary events regulating stem growth at low water potentials. [Glycine max (L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Nonami, Hiroshi; Boyer, J.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Cell enlargement is inhibited by inadequate water. As a first step toward understanding the mechanism, all the physical parameters affecting enlargement were monitored to identify those that changed first, particularly in coincidence with the inhibition. The osmotic potential, turgor, yield threshold turgor, growth-induced water potential, wall extensibility, and conductance to water were measured in the elongating region, and the water potential was measured in the xylem of stems of dark-grown soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seedlings. The results indicate that the primary event during the growth inhibition was the change in the growth-induced water potential. Because the growth limitation subsequently shifted to the low wall extensibility and tissue conductance for water, the initial change in potential may have set in motion subsequent metabolic changes that altered the characteristics of the wall and cell membranes.

  12. Critical soil water period for primary production in Chihuahuan Desert ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In desert ecosystems where water is the main limiting factor, it is expected that net primary production (NPP) is largely determined by precipitation. However, precipitation alone often explains only a small portion of the variation in NPP, and the critical precipitation period for NPP varies by pla...

  13. Recent experimental advances on hydrophobic interactions at solid/water and fluid/water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hongbo; Shi, Chen; Huang, Jun; Li, Lin; Liu, Guangyi; Zhong, Hong

    2015-03-15

    Hydrophobic effects play important roles in a wide range of natural phenomena and engineering processes such as coalescence of oil droplets in water, air flotation of mineral particles, and folding and assembly of proteins and biomembranes. In this work, the authors highlight recent experimental attempts to reveal the physical origin of hydrophobic effects by directly quantifying the hydrophobic interaction on both solid/water and fluid/water interfaces using state-of-art nanomechanical techniques such as surface forces apparatus and atomic force microscopy (AFM). For solid hydrophobic surfaces of different hydrophobicity, the range of hydrophobic interaction was reported to vary from ∼10 to >100 nm. With various characterization techniques, the very long-ranged attraction (>100 nm) has been demonstrated to be mainly attributed to nonhydrophobic interaction mechanisms such as pre-existing nanobubbles and molecular rearrangement. By ruling out these factors, intrinsic hydrophobic interaction was measured to follow an exponential law with decay length of 1-2 nm with effective range less than 20 nm. On the other hand, hydrophobic interaction measured at fluid interfaces using AFM droplet/bubble probe technique was found to decay with a much shorter length of ∼0.3 nm. This discrepancy of measured decay lengths is proposed to be attributed to inherent physical distinction between solid and fluid interfaces, which impacts the structure of interface-adjacent water molecules. Direct measurement of hydrophobic interaction on a broader range of interfaces and characterization of interfacial water molecular structure using spectroscopic techniques are anticipated to help unravel the origin of this rigidity-related mismatch of hydrophobic interaction and hold promise to uncover the physical nature of hydrophobic effects. With improved understanding of hydrophobic interaction, intrinsic interaction mechanisms of many biological and chemical pathways can be better

  14. Bioavailability of fluoride in drinking water: a human experimental study.

    PubMed

    Maguire, A; Zohouri, F V; Mathers, J C; Steen, I N; Hindmarch, P N; Moynihan, P J

    2005-11-01

    It has been suggested that systemic fluoride absorption from drinking water may be influenced by the type of fluoride compound in the water and by water hardness. Using a human double-blind cross-over trial, we conducted this study to measure c(max), T(max), and Area Under the Curve (AUC) for plasma F concentration against time, following the ingestion of naturally fluoridated hard and soft waters, artificially fluoridated hard and soft waters, and a reference water. Mean AUC over 0 to 8 hours was 1330, 1440, 1679, 1566, and 1328 ng F.min.mL(-1) for naturally fluoridated soft, naturally fluoridated hard, artificially fluoridated soft, artificially fluoridated hard, and reference waters, respectively, with no statistically significant differences among waters for AUC, c(max), or T(max). Any differences in fluoride bioavailability between drinking waters in which fluoride is present naturally or added artificially, or the waters are hard or soft, were small compared with large within- and between-subject variations in F absorption. Abbreviations used: F, fluoride; AUC, Area under the Curve for plasma F concentration against time; AUC(0-3), Area under the Curve for plasma F concentration against time for 0 to 3 hours following water ingestion; AUC(0-8), Area under the Curve for plasma F concentration against time for 0 to 8 hours following water ingestion; c(max), maximum plasma F concentration corrected for baseline plasma F and dose (i.e., F concentration of individual waters); T(max), time of c(max).

  15. Growth of the Maize Primary Root at Low Water Potentials 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Robert E.; Hsiao, Theodore C.; Silk, Wendy Kuhn

    1990-01-01

    Primary roots of maize (Zea mays L. cv WF9 × Mo17) seedlings growing in vermiculite at various water potentials exhibited substantial osmotic adjustment in the growing region. We have assessed quantitatively whether the osmotic adjustment was attributable to increased net solute deposition rates or to slower rates of water deposition associated with reduced volume expansion. Spatial distributions of total osmotica, soluble carbohydrates, potassium, and water were combined with published growth velocity distributions to calculate deposition rate profiles using the continuity equation. Low water potentials had no effect on the rate of total osmoticum deposition per unit length close to the apex, and caused decreased deposition rates in basal regions. However, rates of water deposition decreased more than osmoticum deposition. Consequently, osmoticum deposition rates per unit water volume were increased near the apex and osmotic potentials were lower throughout the growing region. Because the stressed roots were thinner, osmotic adjustment occurred without osmoticum accumulation per unit length. The effects of low water potential on hexose deposition were similar to those for total osmotica, and hexose made a major contribution to the osmotic adjustment in middle and basal regions. In contrast, potassium deposition decreased at low water potentials in close parallel with water deposition, and increases in potassium concentration were small. The results show that growth of the maize primary root at low water potentials involves a complex pattern of morphogenic and metabolic events. Although osmotic adjustment is largely the result of a greater inhibition of volume expansion and water deposition than solute deposition, the contrasting behavior of hexose and potassium deposition indicates that the adjustment is a highly regulated process. PMID:16667622

  16. Influence of oxide films on primary water stress corrosion cracking initiation of alloy 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panter, J.; Viguier, B.; Cloué, J.-M.; Foucault, M.; Combrade, P.; Andrieu, E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study alloy 600 was tested in simulated pressurised water reactor (PWR) primary water, at 360 °C, under an hydrogen partial pressure of 30 kPa. These testing conditions correspond to the maximum sensitivity of alloy 600 to crack initiation. The resulting oxidised structures (corrosion scale and underlying metal) were characterised. A chromium rich oxide layer was revealed, the underlying metal being chromium depleted. In addition, analysis of the chemical composition of the metal close to the oxide scale had allowed to detect oxygen under the oxide scale and particularly in a triple grain boundary. Implication of such a finding on the crack initiation of alloy 600 is discussed. Significant diminution of the crack initiation time was observed for sample oxidised before stress corrosion tests. In view of these results, a mechanism for stress corrosion crack initiation of alloy 600 in PWR primary water was proposed.

  17. Learning to Teach Geography for Primary Education: Results of an Experimental Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankman, Marian; Schoonenboom, Judith; van der Schee, Joop; Boogaard, Marianne; Volman, Monique

    2016-01-01

    Students training to become primary school teachers appear to have little awareness of the core concepts of geography (teaching). To ensure that future primary school teachers are able to develop their pupils' geographical awareness, a six weeks programme was developed. The characteristics of this programme -- named Consciously Teaching Geography…

  18. Water erosion monitoring and experimentation for global change studies

    SciTech Connect

    Poesen, J.W.; Boardman, J.; Wilcox, B.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the need for monitoring the effects of climatic change on soil erosion. The importance of monitoring not only runoff, but monitoring and experimental studies at the larger scale of hillslope and catchments is stressed.

  19. Finite element and wavefront error analysis of the primary mirror of an experimental telescope with reverse engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo-Kai; Huang, Po-Hsuan

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the finite element and wavefront error analysis with reverse engineering of the primary mirror of a small space telescope experimental model. The experimental space telescope with 280mm diameter primary mirror has been assembled and aligned in 2011, but the measured system optical performance and wavefront error did not achieve the goal. In order to find out the root causes, static structure finite element analysis (FEA) has been applied to analyze the structure model of the primary mirror assembly. Several assuming effects which may cause deformation of the primary mirror have been proposed, such as gravity effect, flexures bonding effect, thermal expansion effect, etc. According to each assuming effect, we establish a corresponding model and boundary condition setup, and the numerical model will be analyzed by finite element method (FEM) software and opto-mechanical analysis software to obtain numerical wavefront error and Zernike polynomials. Now new assumption of the flexures bonding effect is proposed, and we adopt reverse engineering to verify this effect. Finally, the numerically synthetic system wavefront error will be compared with measured system wavefront error of the telescope. By analyzing and realizing these deformation effects of the primary mirror, the opto-mechanical design and telescope assembly workmanship will be refined, and improve the telescope optical performance.

  20. Biodiversity effects on the water balance of an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimer, Sophia; Kreutziger, Yvonne; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Beßler, Holger; Engels, Christof; Oelmann, Yvonne; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wirth, Christian; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Plant species richness increases aboveground biomass production in biodiversity experiments. Biomass production depends on and feeds back to the water balance, but it remains unclear how plant species richness influences soil water contents and water fluxes (actual evapotranspiration (ETa), downward flux (DF), and upward flux (UF)). Our objective was to determine the effects of plant species and functional richness and functional identity on soil water contents and water fluxes for two soil depths (0-0.3 and 0.3.-0.7 m). To achieve this, we used a water balance model in connection with Bayesian hierarchical modeling. We monitored soil water contents on 86 plots of a grassland plant diversity experiment in Jena, Germany between July 2002 and January 2006. In the field experiment, plant species richness (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) and functional group composition (0-4 functional groups: legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall herbs, non-leguminous small herbs) were manipulated in a factorial design. Climate data (air temperature, precipitation, wind velocity, relative humidity, global radiation, soil moisture) was measured at a central climate station between July 2002 and December 2007. Root biomass data from July 2006 was available per plot. Missing water contents per plot and depth were estimated in weekly resolution for the years 2003-2007 with a Bayesian hierarchical model using measured water contents per plot and centrally measured soil moisture. To obtain ETa, DF, and UF of the two different soil depths, we modified a soil water balance model which had been developed for our study site. The model is based on changes in soil water content between subsequent observation dates and modeled potential evapotranspiration which was partitioned between soil layers according to percentage of root biomass. The presence of specific functional groups significantly changed water contents and fluxes with partly opposing effects in the two soil depths. Presence of grasses

  1. Upwelling-Induced Primary Productivity in Coastal Waters of the Black Sea: Impact on Algorithms for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Joel C.; Brink, Kenneth K.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen; Sosik, Heidi M.

    1997-01-01

    This research program was a collaborative effort to investigate the impact of rapid changes in the water column during coastal upwelling, on biological and optical properties. These properties are important for constructing region or event-specific algorithms for remote sensing of pigment concentration and primary productivity and for comparing these algorithms with those used for the development of large scale maps from ocean color. We successfully achieved the primary objective of this research project which was to study in situ the dynamics of rapid spatial and temporal changes in properties of the water column during, coastal upwelling off the Crimean Coast in the Black Sea. The work was a collaborative effort between a group of biological and physical oceanographers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and from two oceanographic research institutions in the Crimea, Ukraine, located near the study site, the Marine Hydrophysical Institute (MHI) and the Institute of Biology of the Southern Seas (IBSS). The site was an ideal experimental model, both from a technical and economic standpoint, because of the predictable summer upwelling that occurs in the region and because of the availability of both a ship on call and laboratory and remote sensing facilities at the nearby marine institutes. We used a combination of shipboard measurements and remote sensing to investigate the physical evolution of rapid upwelling events and their impact on photoplankton and water column optical properties. The field work involved a two day cruise for mooring, deployment and a three day baseline survey cruise, followed by an eleven day primary cruise during, a summer upwelling event (anticipated by monitoring local winds and tracked by remote sensing imaging). An MHI ship was outfitted and used for these purposes.

  2. Oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water - An experimental study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.

    1990-01-01

    The oxygen isotope fractionation between analcime and water is studied to test the feasibility of using zeolites as low-temperature thermometers. The fractionation of oxygen isotopes between natural analcime and water is determined at 300, 350, and 400 C, and at fluid pressures ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 kbar. Also, isotope ratios for the analcime framework, the channel water, and bulk water are obtained. The results suggest that the channel water is depleted in O-18 relative to bulk water by a constant value of about 5 percent, nearly independent of temperature. The analcime-water fractionation curve is presented, showing that the exchange has little effect on grain morphology and does not involve recrystallization. The exchange is faster than any other observed for a silicate. The exchange rates suggest that zeolites in active high-temperature geothermal areas are in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient fluids. It is concluded that calibrated zeolites may be excellent low-temperature oxygen isotope geothermometers.

  3. Experimental research on water-jet guided laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ling; Wang, Yang; Yang, Lijun; Chu, Jiecheng

    2007-01-01

    The water-jet guided laser processing is a new compound micro-machining process in which the laser beam passes through the water-jet by full reflection onto the workpiece. In this paper, a new key component:the coupling unit was designed and which would form a long, slim, high-pressure and stable water-jet. The couple unit made the fluid field in the chamber symmetry; the coupling quality of the laser beam and the water-jet could be easily detected by CCD camera. For its excellent surface quality, the nozzle with a \\fgr 0.18mm hole got better machining effect than other nozzles. Aiming at finding optimum machining parameters, experiments were carried out. The results showed the attenuation of laser energy bore relation to water-jet stability. The energy intensity distributed over the water-jet cross section nearly homogeneous and the laser energy nearly did not decrease in long working distance. When water-jet pressure was high, efficient cooling of the workpiece prevented burrs, cracks and heat affected zone from forming. During cutting Si wafer process, nearly no cracking was found; Adjusting reasonable laser parameters grooving 65Mn, the machining accuracy would combine with the speed.

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Thermodynamics of the Reaction of Titania and Water at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quynhgiao N.; Myers, Dwight L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    The transpiration method was used to determine the volatility of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in water vapor-containing environments at temperatures between 1473 and 1673 K. Water contents ranged from 0 to 76 mole % in oxygen or argon carrier gases for 20 to 250 hr exposure times. Results indicate that oxygen is not a key contributor to volatilization and the primary reaction for volatilization in this temperature range is: TiO2(s) + H2O(g) = TiO(OH)2(g). Data were analyzed with both the second and third law methods to extract an enthalpy and entropy of formation. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of TiO(OH)2(g) were computed using B3LYP density functional theory, and the enthalpy of formation was computed using the coupled-cluster singles and doubles method with a perturbative correction for connected triple substitutions [CCSD(T)]. Thermal functions are calculated using both a structure with bent and linear hydroxyl groups. Calculated second and third heats show closer agreement with the linear hydroxyl group, suggesting more experimental and computational spectroscopic and structural work is needed on this system.

  5. Experimental remote sensing of subsurface temperature in natural ocean water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.; Caputo, B.; Johnson, R. L.; Hoge, F. E.

    1977-01-01

    The first successful depth-resolved remote sensing measurements of subsurface ocean water temperature were obtained by spectral analysis of the 3400 per cm O-H stretching Raman band of liquid water. Raman spectral data were obtained from a research vessel at various depths from the surface to 10 meters below the surface in a tidal estuary. The temperature inferred from the spectra was consistent with ground truth temperature to within the shot noise limited accuracy of plus or minus 2 C. The performance of a future fully developed airborne laser Raman water temperature measurement system is estimated on the basis of these first tests.

  6. Is litter decomposition 'primed' by primary producer-release of labile carbon in terrestrial and aquatic experimental systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, A. Margarida P. M.; Kritzberg, Emma S.; Rousk, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    It is possible that recalcitrant organic matter (ROM) can be 'activated' by inputs of labile organic matter (LOM) through the priming effect (PE). Investigating the PE is of major importance to fully understand the microbial use of ROM and its role on carbon (C) and nutrient cycling in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In aquatic ecosystems it is thought that the PE is triggered by periphytic algae release of LOM. Analogously, in terrestrial systems it is hypothesized that the LOM released in plant rhizospheres, or from the green crusts on the surface of agricultural soils, stimulate the activity and growth of ROM decomposers. Most previous studies on PE have utilised pulse additions of single substrates at high concentrations. However, to achieve an assessment of the true importance of the PE, it is important to simulate a realistic delivery of LOM. We investigated, in a series of 2-week laboratory experiments, how primary producer (PP)-release of LOM influence litter degradation in terrestrial and aquatic experimental systems. We used soil (terrestrial) and pond water (aquatic) microbial communities to which litter was added under light and dark conditions. In addition, glucose was added at PP delivery rates in dark treatments to test if the putative PE in light systems could be reproduced. We observed an initial peak of bacterial growth rate followed by an overall decrease over time with no treatment differences. In light treatments, periphytic algae growth and increased fungal production was stimulated when bacterial growth declined. In contrast, both fungal growth and algal production were negligible in dark treatments. This reveals a direct positive influence of photosynthesis on fungal growth. To investigate if PP LOM supplements, and the associated fungal growth, translate into a modulated litter decomposition, we are using stable isotopes to track the use of litter and algal-derived carbon by determining the δ13C in produced CO2. Fungi and bacteria

  7. Experimental Analysis of the Mechanism of Hearing under Water

    PubMed Central

    Chordekar, Shai; Kishon-Rabin, Liat; Kriksunov, Leonid; Adelman, Cahtia; Sohmer, Haim

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of human hearing under water is debated. Some suggest it is by air conduction (AC), others by bone conduction (BC), and others by a combination of AC and BC. A clinical bone vibrator applied to soft tissue sites on the head, neck, and thorax also elicits hearing by a mechanism called soft tissue conduction (STC) or nonosseous BC. The present study was designed to test whether underwater hearing at low intensities is by AC or by osseous BC based on bone vibrations or by nonosseous BC (STC). Thresholds of normal hearing participants to bone vibrator stimulation with their forehead in air were recorded and again when forehead and bone vibrator were under water. A vibrometer detected vibrations of a dry human skull in all similar conditions (in air and under water) but not when water was the intermediary between the sound source and the skull forehead. Therefore, the intensities required to induce vibrations of the dry skull in water were significantly higher than the underwater hearing thresholds of the participants, under conditions when hearing by AC and osseous BC is not likely. The results support the hypothesis that hearing under water at low sound intensities may be attributed to nonosseous BC (STC). PMID:26770975

  8. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, D. J.; Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2014-08-18

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2013. It is the fifth report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011), a report released June 2012 examined water year 2011 (Poch et al. 2012), and a report released April 2013 examined water year 2012 (Poch et al. 2013).

  9. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, Diane; Poch, Leslie A.; Veselka, Thomas D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2014-06-01

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2013. It is the fifth report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011), a report released June 2012 examined water year 2011 (Poch et al. 2012), and a report released April 2013 examined water year 2012 (Poch et al. 2013).

  10. Root resorption of primary molars without successor teeth. An experimental study in the beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bi-Chen; Zhao, Yu-Ming; Yang, Jie; Ge, Li-Hong

    2012-04-01

    Tooth agenesis is a common craniofacial congenital malformation in humans, but little is known about the mechanisms of root resorption in this condition. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of root resorption in primary molars without successors. An animal model without permanent tooth germs was established by surgery in beagles. The times of onset of primary molar root resorption, with and without successors, were compared. The distribution of immune cells, odontoclasts, and their activating factors were determined by histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Root resorption of primary mandibular molars without successors began later than physiological resorption. In primary molars without permanent germs, odontoclasts and immune cells were present mainly in the apical pulp at the start of root resorption, whereas in control teeth receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-positive cells were found mainly in the region of the periodontal ligament. CD14(+) and CD3(+) cells were found in both the pulp and the periodontal ligament region. These results suggest that the dental pulp of primary molars, as well as immune cells, may play an important role in root resorption in primary molars without permanent tooth germs.

  11. Experimental Verification of Range-Dependent Inversion: Shallow Water Experiment 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Experimental Verification of Range-Dependent Inversion: Shallow Water Experiment 2006 Subramaniam D. Rajan Scientific Solutions, Inc., 99...dependent shallow water environment. OBJECTIVES Modal dispersion data are input to inversion schemes that estimate sediment properties in a range...suitable data during the Shallow Water 2006 experiment to verify the feasibility of estimating the range dependent sediment properties from modal dispersion

  12. Isolation of the etiological agent of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis from artifically heated waters.

    PubMed

    Stevens, A R; Tyndall, R L; Coutant, C C; Willaert, E

    1977-12-01

    To determine whether artificial heating of water by power plant discharges facilitates proliferation of the pathogenic free-living amoebae that cause primary amoebic meningoencephalitis, water samples (250 ml) were taken from discharges within 3,000 feet (ca. 914.4 m) of power plants and were processed for amoeba culture. Pathogenic Naegleria fowleri grew out of water samples from two of five lakes and rivers in Florida and from one of eight man-made lakes in Texas. Pathogenic N. fowleri did not grow from water samples taken from cooling towers and control lakes, the latter of which had no associated power plants. The identification of N. fowleri was confirmed by pathogenicity in mice and by indirect immunofluorescence analyses, by using a specific antiserum.

  13. Extensive tissue-specific transcriptomic plasticity in maize primary roots upon water deficit

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Nina; Marcon, Caroline; Paschold, Anja; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Lithio, Andrew; Brandt, Ronny; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Nettleton, Dan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Water deficit is the most important environmental constraint severely limiting global crop growth and productivity. This study investigated early transcriptome changes in maize (Zea mays L.) primary root tissues in response to moderate water deficit conditions by RNA-Sequencing. Differential gene expression analyses revealed a high degree of plasticity of the water deficit response. The activity status of genes (active/inactive) was determined by a Bayesian hierarchical model. In total, 70% of expressed genes were constitutively active in all tissues. In contrast, <3% (50 genes) of water deficit-responsive genes (1915) were consistently regulated in all tissues, while >75% (1501 genes) were specifically regulated in a single root tissue. Water deficit-responsive genes were most numerous in the cortex of the mature root zone and in the elongation zone. The most prominent functional categories among differentially expressed genes in all tissues were ‘transcriptional regulation’ and ‘hormone metabolism’, indicating global reprogramming of cellular metabolism as an adaptation to water deficit. Additionally, the most significant transcriptomic changes in the root tip were associated with cell wall reorganization, leading to continued root growth despite water deficit conditions. This study provides insight into tissue-specific water deficit responses and will be a resource for future genetic analyses and breeding strategies to develop more drought-tolerant maize cultivars. PMID:26463995

  14. Experimental investigation of the stability of the floating water bridge.

    PubMed

    Montazeri Namin, Reza; Azizpour Lindi, Shiva; Amjadi, Ahmad; Jafari, Nima; Irajizad, Peyman

    2013-09-01

    When a high voltage is applied between two beakers filled with deionized water, a floating bridge of water is formed in between exceeding the length of 2 cm when the beakers are pulled apart. Currently two theories regarding the stability of the floating water bridge exist, one suggesting that the tension caused by electric field in the dielectric medium is holding the bridge and the other suggesting surface tension to be responsible for the vertical equilibrium. We construct experiments in which the electric field and the geometry of the bridge are measured and compared with predictions of theories of the floating water bridge stability. We use a numerical simulation for estimation of the electric field. Our results indicate that the two forces of dielectric and surface tensions hold the bridge against gravity simultaneously and, having the same order of magnitude, neither of the two forces are negligible. In bridges with larger diameters, the effect of dielectric tension is slightly more in the vertical equilibrium than surface tension. Results show that the stability can be explained by macroscopic forces, regardless of the microscopic changes in the water structure.

  15. Experimental shock lithification of water-bearing rock powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, C. C.; Jercinovic, M. J.; Keil, K.; See, T.

    1982-01-01

    The geology and morphology of the terrestrial planets and their moons have been profoundly affected by impact cratering. Some of these bodies contain substantial quantities of water or ice in their regoliths. It is pointed out that the effects of impacts into water-bearing target rocks are not well understood, and may be significantly different from those produced by identical impacts on a desiccated surface. The present investigation has the objective to determine the effects of water on targets of powdered rock and to seek evidence of impact-induced hydration or clay formation. Samples of andesitic basalt were crushed and sieved, and experiments were conducted on the material smaller than 150 micrometers. These experiments show that the water content of a powdered rock target can strongly affect its physical condition following an impact. A relatively small component (5-15 wt %) of water or ice in planetary surface material could inhibit or prevent lithification throughout much of the shocked volume at an impact site.

  16. Upper Washita River experimental watersheds: Multiyear stability of soil water content profiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scaling in situ soil water content time series data to a large spatial domain is a key element of watershed environmental monitoring and modeling. The primary method of estimating and monitoring large-scale soil water content distributions is via in situ networks. It is critical to establish the s...

  17. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; West, C.D.; Moraga, F.

    1998-11-01

    An overview is provided on cavitation threshold measurement experiments for water and mercury. Various aspects to be considered that affect onset determination are discussed along with design specifications developed for construction of appropriate apparatus types. Both static and transient-cavitation effects were studied using radically different apparatus designs. Preliminary data are presented for cavitation thresholds for water and mercury over a range of temperatures in static and high-frequency environments. Implications and issues related to spallation neutron source target designs and operation are discussed.

  18. Experimental investigation of primary and corner shock boundary layer interactions at mild back pressure ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funderburk, M.; Narayanaswamy, V.

    2016-08-01

    Unstart of rectangular inlets occurs as a result of interactions between shock-induced separation units along the floor/ceiling, corner, and sidewalls. While a significant body of literature exists regarding the individual flow interactions at the inlet floor/ceiling (called primary separation) and sidewalls, limited efforts have focused on the mean and dynamic features of the corner separation. Experiments are conducted to investigate primary and corner shock boundary layer interactions (SBLI) with the objectives of elucidating the flow interactions that occur in the corner, and characterizing the interaction between the corner and primary separation units at mild back pressure ratios. Surface streakline flow visualization and high-frequency wall static pressure measurements are performed along the centerline and corner regions of shock-induced flow separation generated by a 12° compression ramp in a Mach 2.5 flow. Sidewall fences that extend upstream of the leading edge of the flat plate generate corner separation of adequate size to determine the mean flow structures, characterize the unsteady motions, and investigate the mechanisms that drive the unsteadiness of primary and corner SBLI. Results show that the corner and primary SBLI units differ fundamentally in both their mean and unsteady features and their response to upstream and downstream flow perturbations. These observations suggest that the two behave as independent units at this relatively low shock-induced back pressure ratio.

  19. Superoxygenated Water as an Experimental Sample for NMR Relaxometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nestle, Nikolaus; Dakkouri, Marwan; Rauscher, Hubert

    2004-01-01

    The increase in NMR relaxation rates as a result of dissolved paramagnetic species on the sample of superoxygenated drinking water is demonstrated. It is concluded that oxygen content in NMR samples is an important issue and can give rise to various problems in the interpretation of both spectroscopic and NMR imaging or relaxation experiments.

  20. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the physics of water rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Fernández-Francos, J.; Galdo-Vega, M.

    2010-09-01

    A simple rocket can be made using a plastic bottle filled with a volume of water and pressurized air. When opened, the air pressure pushes the water out of the bottle. This causes an increase in the bottle momentum so that it can be propelled to fairly long distances or heights. Water rockets are widely used as an educational activity, and several mathematical models have been proposed to investigate and predict their physics. However, the real equations that describe the physics of the rockets are so complicated that certain assumptions are usually made to obtain models that are easier to use. These models provide relatively good predictions but fail in describing the complex physics of the flow. This paper presents a detailed theoretical analysis of the physics of water rockets that concludes with the proposal of a physical model. The validity of the model is checked by a series of field tests. The tests showed maximum differences with predictions of about 6%. The proposed model is finally used to investigate the temporal evolution of some significant variables during the propulsion and flight of the rocket. The experience and procedure described in this paper can be proposed to graduate students and also at undergraduate level if certain simplifications are assumed in the general equations.

  1. Primary and Secondary Aerosol Investigation from Different Sea-Waters in the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'anna, B.; Marchand, N.; Sellegri, K.; Sempéré, R.; Mas, S.; George, C.; Meme, A.; Frihi, A.; Pey, J.; Schwier, A.; Delmont, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a special marine environment characterized by low biological activity and high anthropogenic pressure. It is often difficult to discriminate the contribution of Primary and Secondary Aerosol formed at the sea-air interface from background level of the aerosol. We therefore decided to study the sea-air exchanges in a controlled environment provided by a 2m3simulation chamber, using freshly collected sea-water samples from the SEMEX site (43°15'64 N, 05°20'01 E) near Marseille bay. Two types of experiments were conducted for 4 weeks testing 3 different sea-waters. Primary sea-aerosol was generated by bubble-bursting method, then introduced in the simulation chamber and exposed to atmospheric oxidants (O3, OH) and light to simulated primary aerosol aging. A second set of experiments focused on secondary particle formation upon illumination and/or ozone exposure of the sea-water surface (15l of sea-water were deposited in a pyrex container located inside the simulation chamber). New particle formation was only observed for relatively high DOC level of the sea-water sample. Particles detection and analysis was followed by a PSM (1nm size), a CPC (2.5nm size), a SMPS (granulometry), a CCN chamber for hygroscopicity studies, a TOF-AMS (Aerodyne) for chemical analysis of the sub-micrometer fraction. Off-line analysis included TEM-EDX samples for morphology and size distribution studies and a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fischer) for the molecular identification of the organic fraction. VOCs were measured on-line by PTR-HR-MS. The seawater samples were filtered at 60μm before use and were daily analyzed for chemical (colored dissolved organic matter, particulate matter and related polar compounds, transparent polysaccharides and nutrients concentration) and biological (chlorophyll a, virus, phytoplankton and zooplankton) analyses.

  2. Antimicrobial effect of ozonated water, sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine gluconate in primary molar root canals

    PubMed Central

    Goztas, Zeynep; Onat, Halenur; Tosun, Gul; Sener, Yagmur; Hadimli, Hasan Huseyin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to determine the antimicrobial effect of ozonated water, ozonated water with ultrasonication, sodium hypochloride and chlorhexidine (CHX) in human primary root canals contaminated by Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis). Materials and Methods: Fifty-eight extracted human primary molar teeth were used. Crowns were cut off using a diamond saw under water-cooling. One hundred roots were obtained and mechanically prepared. The roots were then sterilized by autoclaving in water for 15 min at 121°C. All samples were contaminated with E. faecalis for 24 h and the root canals were randomly divided into five groups (n = 20). Group I: 25 mg/L of Ozonated water (O3aq), Group II: 25 mg/L of O3aq with ultrasonication, Group III: 2.5% Sodium hypochloride (NaOCl), Group IV: 2% CHX and Group V: Positive control. The canal of each specimen was irrigated for 4 min and positive control was untreated. All root canals were agitated with sterile saline solution. The saline solution was collected from canals with sterile paper points. For each specimen, the paper points were transposed to eppendorf vials containing 2 ml of brain heart infusion. According to bacterial proliferation, the mean values of optical density were achieved by ELİSA (Biotek EL ×800, Absorbance Microplate Reader, ABD) and the data were analyzed. Results: NaOCI, CHX and two types of O3aq were found statistically different than positive control group. NaOCI irrigation was found significantly most effective. Conclusions: NaOCl, CHX and O3aq applications provide antibacterial effect in vitro conditions in primary root canals. PMID:25512726

  3. Responses of growth and primary metabolism of water-stressed barley roots to rehydration.

    PubMed

    Sicher, Richard C; Timlin, Dennis; Bailey, Bryan

    2012-05-01

    Barley seedlings were grown in pots in controlled environment chambers and progressive drought treatments were imposed 11 d after sowing. Soil water content decreased from 92 to 10% following 14 d without watering. Increases of biomass in shoots and roots slowed after 4 and 9 d of water stress, respectively. Thirty barley root metabolites were monitored in this study and 85% were significantly altered by drought. Sucrose, raffinose, glucose, fructose, maltose, malate, asparagine and proline increased and myo-inositol, glycerate, alanine, serine, glycine and glutamate decreased during drought. Primary metabolism was likely involved in various crucial processes during water stress including, osmotic adjustment, nitrogen sequestration and ammonia detoxification. Rates of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance recovered in 2 d and shoot growth commenced the 3rd day after rehydration. Root growth also exhibited a lag after rehydration but this was attributed to high nutrient concentrations during water stress. Malate and proline recovered within 1 d but serine was only partially reversed 6 d after rehydration. Malate, aspartate and raffinose decreased below well-watered, control levels following rehydration. Variation in the magnitude and time necessary for individual compounds to fully recover after rehydration suggested the complexity of metabolic processes initiated by re-watering.

  4. The risk of biomaterial-associated infection after revision surgery due to an experimental primary implant infection.

    PubMed

    Engelsman, Anton F; Saldarriaga-Fernandez, Isabel C; Nejadnik, M Reza; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Francis, Kevin P; Ploeg, Rutger J; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C

    2010-10-01

    The fate of secondary biomaterial implants was determined by bio-optical imaging and plate counting, after antibiotic treatment of biomaterials-associated-infection (BAI) and surgical removal of an experimentally infected, primary implant. All primary implants and tissue samples from control mice showed bioluminescence and were culture-positive. In an antibiotic treated group, no bioluminescence was detected and only 20% of all primary implants and no tissue samples were culture-positive. After revision surgery, bioluminescence was detected in all control mice. All the implants and 80% of all tissue samples were culture-positive. In contrast, in the antibiotic treated group, 17% of all secondary implants and 33% of all tissue samples were culture-positive, despite antibiotic treatment. The study illustrates that due to the BAI of a primary implant, the infection risk of biomaterial implants is higher in revision surgery than in primary surgery, emphasizing the need for full clearance of the infection, as well as from surrounding tissues prior to implantation of a secondary implant.

  5. Combustion of oil on water: an experimental program

    SciTech Connect

    1982-02-01

    This study determined how well crude and fuel oils burn on water. Objectives were: (1) to measure the burning rates for several oils; (2) to determine whether adding heat improves the oils' combustibility; (3) to identify the conditions necessary to ignite fuels known to be difficult to ignite on ocean waters (e.g., diesel and Bunker C fuel oils); and (4) to evaluate the accuracy of an oil-burning model proposed by Thompson, Dawson, and Goodier (1979). Observations were made about how weathering and the thickness of the oil layer affect the combustion of crude and fuel oils. Nine oils commonly transported on the world's major waterways were tested. Burns were first conducted in Oklahoma under warm-weather conditions (approx. 30/sup 0/C) and later in Ohio under cold-weather conditions (approx. 0/sup 0/C to 10/sup 0/C).

  6. Experimentally measured MTF's associated with imaging through turbid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, N.; Strand, M.; Holloway, J., Jr.; Price, B.; Brown, D.

    1988-01-01

    One factor which affects the ability to image an underwater object from the atmosphere is water turbidity. The performance of an imaging system is often expressed by the limiting resolution which is determined from the contrast transfer function (CTF). The image quality is usually expressed in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF). This paper presents the results from carefully controlled laboratory experiments to determine the CTFs and the MTFs of a turbid water medium for Jackson turbidity units (JTUs) ranging from 0 to 24. MTFs are generated from a narrow strip target and CTFs are generated from standard resolution bar targets. MTF results are compared with earlier work and CTFs calculated from MTFs are compared with measured CTFs.

  7. Experimental Values of the Surface Tension of Supercooled Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, P. T.

    1951-01-01

    The results of surface-tension measurements for supercooled water are presented. A total of 702 individual measurements of surface tension of triple-distilled water were made in the temperature range, 27 to -22.2 C, with 404 of these measurements at temperatures below 0 C. The increase in magnitude of surface tension with decreasing temperature, as indicated by measurements above 0 C, continues to -22.2 C. The inflection point in the surface-tension - temperature relation in the vicinity of 0 C, as indicated by the International Critical Table values for temperatures down to -8 C, is substantiated by the measurements in the temperature range, 0 to -22.2 C. The surface tension increases at approximately a linear rate from a value of 76.96+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -8 C to 79.67+/-0.06 dynes per centimeter at -22.2 C.

  8. Experimental evaluation of water-jet dissection in endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cuschieri, A

    1994-01-01

    The problems associated with high-velocity high-pressure water-jet dissection were investigated by in-vivo experiments using endoscopic equipment. Three problems were identified: backspray with fouling of the optic, poor control of the depth of cut, and detachment of tissue fragments and isolated cells which contaminate the operative field. The first two problems have been resolved by adoption of a hooded hand-piece and the incorporation of an adjustable back stop. A "dry" system which enables the evacuation of the back spray may deal with the problem of contamination of the operative field by detached cells but further in-vivo experiments are needed to confirm this. Until then, water-jet cutting is considered unsafe for both open and endoscopic surgery in patients undergoing extirpative procedures for cancer because of the risk of tumour seeding within the peritoneal cavity.

  9. Desert Life, Experimental Edition Prepared for Testing in the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelby, Betty; And Others

    This unit and teacher's guide were prepared for use with primary grade children. The activities include the construction of a desert terrarium, the study of cacti, and the use of animal sort cards. A special section is devoted to the way parents can help with the unit. A detailed list of needed materials is provided in the guide. This work was…

  10. Quasi-Experimental Estimates of Class Size Effect in Primary Schools in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubowski, Maciej; Sakowski, Pawel

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we analyze class size effects in the case of primary schools in Poland. We use two empirical strategies to avoid endogeneity bias. First, we use average class size in a grade as an instrumental variable for actual class size. This allows us to control for within school selection of pupils with different abilities to classes of…

  11. Theoretical and Experimental Study of the Primary Current Distribution in Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazquez Aranda, Armando I.; Henquin, Eduardo R.; Torres, Israel Rodriguez; Bisang, Jose M.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment is described to determine the primary current distribution in parallel-plate electrochemical reactors. The electrolyte is simulated by conductive paper and the electrodes are segmented to measure the current distribution. Experiments are reported with the electrolyte confined to the interelectrode gap, where the current…

  12. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Primary Roots of Alhagi sparsifolia in Response to Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Xinwu; Zhang, Chao; Jia, Shirong; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Background Alhagi sparsifolia is a typical desert phreatophyte and has evolved to withstand extreme dry, cold and hot weather. While A. sparsifolia represents an ideal model to study the molecular mechanism of plant adaption to abiotic stress, no research has been done in this aspect to date. Here we took advantage of Illumina platform to survey transcriptome in primary roots of A. sparsifolia under water stress conditions in aim to facilitate the exploration of its genetic basis for drought tolerance. Methodology and Principal Findings We sequenced four primary roots samples individually collected at 0, 6, 24 and 30h from the A. sparsifolia seedlings in the course of 24h of water stress following 6h of rehydration. The resulting 38,763,230, 67,511,150, 49,259,804 and 54,744,906 clean reads were pooled and assembled into 33,255 unigenes with an average length of 1,057 bp. All-unigenes were subjected to functional annotation by searching against the public databases. Based on the established transcriptome database, we further evaluated the gene expression profiles in the four different primary roots samples, and identified numbers of differently expressed genes (DEGs) reflecting the early response to water stress (6h vs. 0h), the late response to water stress (24h vs. 0h) and the response to post water stress rehydration (30h vs. 24h). Moreover, the DEGs specifically regulated at 6, 24 and 30h were captured in order to depict the dynamic changes of gene expression during water stress and subsequent rehydration. Functional categorization of the DEGs indicated the activation of oxidoreductase system, and particularly emphasized the significance of the ‘Glutathione metabolism pathway’ in response to water stress. Conclusions This is the first description of the genetic makeup of A. sparsifolia, thus providing a substantial contribution to the sequence resources for this species. The identified DEGs offer a deep insight into the molecular mechanism of A. sparsifolia

  13. Rate determination of supercritical water gasification of primary sewage sludge as a replacement for anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Nikolas; Wickramathilaka, Malithi; Hendry, Doug; Miller, Andrew; Espanani, Reza; Jacoby, William

    2012-11-01

    Supercritical water gasification of primary sewage sludge sampled from a local facility was undertaken at different solids content. The performance of the process was compared with the anaerobic digestion system in use at the facility where the samples were taken. The mass and composition of the vapor products documented showed that the process generates more energy per gram of feed while rapidly destroying more volatile solids relative to the anaerobic digestion process. However, the energy input requirements are greater for supercritical water gasification. This study defines parameters for a model of the gasification reaction using the power law and Arrhenius equation. The activation energy was estimated to be 15 kJ/mol, and the reaction order was estimated to be 0.586. This model allows estimation of the size of a supercritical water reactor needed to replace the anaerobic digesters that are currently used at the wastewater treatment plant.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.

    1945-01-01

    The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed.

  15. The secret bread tests: selective primary health care or experimentation on human-beings?

    PubMed

    Kamien, M

    1987-01-01

    This is a case history which describes an attempt to fortify the bread of Australian Aborigines in an isolated area of New South Wales. The medically successful intervention was accomplished by the publication of scientific enquiry and by attention to the culture of Aborigines. Paradoxically the long-term failure of the project was also due to the power of the written word and the neglect of the culture of the more densely populated and politically dominant white community. The need for doctors to be aware of the different approaches of primary health care and selective primary health care is stressed so that a general practitioner who provides health care for minority groups of the Fourth World can better define his role and relevance.

  16. Experimental study on mixing efficiency in water supply rectangular tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, A.; Medina, V.; Mujal, A.

    2009-04-01

    Phenomenon of mixing in drinking water storage tanks and reservoirs has a direct effect on the quality of water. Creation of poor mixing zones and volume stratification can have negative effects in public health. The design of a storage tank must consider the conditions of the inlet and outlets, and also their orientation (vertical or horizontal) to prevent the formation of these zones. Experiments done in a reduced scaled-model with a rectangular base and three different inlets (two waterfalls and a pipe inlet) had the objective to decide which of these inlets achieved the best mixing efficiency. Four situations were considered while three entrances, two unsteady: filling and drawing, and two steady with different outlets. Moreover the effects of columns that support the roof of the tank were studied by running the three entrances with and without columns in the four situations. Neglecting the viscous scale effects, the time taken to mix the volume stored depends on the distance between the inlet and the opposite wall as though as its orientation. Taking into account the whole tank columns have a negative effect on mixing efficiency although they divide the flux and create local zones of turbulence around them, increasing local mixing. Using a digital treating image technique the results are found in a quantitative way.

  17. MICROBIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF DRINKING WATER SYSTEMS RECEIVING GROUNDWATER AND SURFACE WATER AS THE PRIMARY SOURCES OF WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Earlier descriptions of water distribution systems (WDS) microbial communities have relied on culturing techniques. These techniques are known to be highly selective in nature, but more importantly, they tend to grossly underestimate the microbial diversity of most environments. ...

  18. Simulation of Water Balance and Forest Treatment Effects at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wemple, Beverley C.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2005-10-30

    The watershed model DHSVM was applied to the small watersheds WS1,2,3 in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest (HJA), Oregon and tested for skill in simulating observed forest treatment effects on streamflow. These watersheds in the rain-snow transition zone underwent road and clearcut treatments during 1959-66 and subsequent natural regeneration. DHSVM was applied with 10 m and 1 hr resolution to 1958-98, most of the period of record. Water balance for old-growth WS2 indicated that evapotranspiration and streamflow were unlikely to be the only loss terms, and groundwater recharge was included to account for about 12% of precipitation; this term was assumed zero in previous studies. After limited calibration, overall efficiency in simulating hourly streamflow exceeded 0.7, and mean annual error was less than 10%. Model skill decreased at the margins, with overprediction of low flows and underprediction of high flows. However, statistical analyses of simulated and observed peakflows yielded similar characterizations of treatment effects. Primary simulation weaknesses were snowpack accumulation, snowmelt under rain-on-snow conditions, and production of quickflow. This challenging test of DHSVM moved the model closer to a practical tool for forest management.

  19. Numerical and experimental study on the flow distribution in a water manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Gwansik; Jong Lee, Pil; Kang, Jong Hoon

    2016-03-01

    This study presents water distribution analysis of the device for spraying cooling water through specific nozzles numerically and experimentally. Numerical analysis was performed using the 3-D incompressible, multi-phase flow model, for different Reynolds numbers of 4 × 105, 8 × 105. Experimental analysis was performed at real-size, under the same conditions. The calculated results and the measured results for the distribution of flow were matched relatively well. The distribution of the nozzle flow depends on the Reynolds number.

  20. Experimental Studies of NGNP Reactor Cavity Cooling System With Water

    SciTech Connect

    Corradini, Michael; Anderson, Mark; Hassan, Yassin; Tokuhiro, Akira

    2013-01-16

    This project will investigate the flow behavior that can occur in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) with water coolant under the passive cooling-mode of operation. The team will conduct separate-effects tests and develop associated scaling analyses, and provide system-level phenomenological and computational models that describe key flow phenomena during RCCS operation, from forced to natural circulation, single-phase flow and two-phase flow and flashing. The project consists of the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct separate-effects, single-phase flow experiments and develop scaling analyses for comparison to system-level computational modeling for the RCCS standpipe design. A transition from forced to natural convection cooling occurs in the standpipe under accident conditions. These tests will measure global flow behavior and local flow velocities, as well as develop instrumentation for use in larger scale tests, thereby providing proper flow distribution among standpipes for decay heat removal. Task 2. Conduct separate-effects experiments for the RCCS standpipe design as two-phase flashing occurs and flow develops. As natural circulation cooling continues without an ultimate heat sink, water within the system will heat to temperatures approaching saturation , at which point two-phase flashing and flow will begin. The focus is to develop a phenomenological model from these tests that will describe the flashing and flow stability phenomena. In addition, one could determine the efficiency of phase separation in the RCCS storage tank as the two-phase flashing phenomena ensues and the storage tank vents the steam produced. Task 3. Develop a system-level computational model that will describe the overall RCCS behavior as it transitions from forced flow to natural circulation and eventual two-phase flow in the passive cooling-mode of operation. This modeling can then be used to test the phenomenological models developed as a function of scale.

  1. Microstructural characterization on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in PWR primary water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Kim, Hong Pyo; Hwang, Seong Sik

    2013-09-01

    Stress corrosion cracks in Alloy 600 compact tension specimens tested at 325 °C in a simulated primary water environment of a pressurized water reactor were analyzed using microscopic equipment. Oxygen diffused into the grain boundaries just ahead of the crack tips from the external primary water. As a result of oxygen penetration, Cr oxides were precipitated on the crack tips and the attacked grain boundaries. The oxide layer in the crack interior was revealed to consist of double (inner and outer) layers. Cr oxides were found in the inner layer, with NiO and (Ni,Cr) spinels in the outer layer. Cr depletion (or Ni enrichment) zones were created in the attacked grain boundary, the crack tip, and the interface between the crack and matrix, which means that the formation of Cr oxides was due to the Cr diffusion from the surrounding matrix. The oxygen penetration and resultant metallurgical changes around the crack tip are believed to be significant factors affecting the PWSCC initiation and growth behaviors of Alloy 600. For interpretation of color in Fig. 4, the reader is referred to the web version of this article.

  2. Water use efficiency in a primary subtropical evergreen forest in Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qing-Hai; Fei, Xue-Hai; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Sha, Li-Qing; Liu, Yun-Tong; Zhou, Wen-Jun; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Lu, Zhi-Yun; Luo, Kang; Gao, Jin-Bo; Liu, Yu-Hong

    2017-01-01

    We calculated water use efficiency (WUE) using measures of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET) from five years of continuous eddy covariance measurements (2009–2013) obtained over a primary subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest in southwestern China. Annual mean WUE exhibited a decreasing trend from 2009 to 2013, varying from ~2.28 to 2.68 g C kg H2O−1. The multiyear average WUE was 2.48 ± 0.17 (mean ± standard deviation) g C kg H2O−1. WUE increased greatly in the driest year (2009), due to a larger decline in ET than in GPP. At the diurnal scale, WUE in the wet season reached 5.1 g C kg H2O−1 in the early morning and 4.6 g C kg H2O−1 in the evening. WUE in the dry season reached 3.1 g C kg H2O−1 in the early morning and 2.7 g C kg H2O−1 in the evening. During the leaf emergence stage, the variation of WUE could be suitably explained by water-related variables (relative humidity (RH), soil water content at 100 cm (SWC_100)), solar radiation and the green index (Sgreen). These results revealed large variation in WUE at different time scales, highlighting the importance of individual site characteristics. PMID:28216656

  3. A study of the mechanism of primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600

    SciTech Connect

    Gourgues, A.F.; Andrieu, E.; Scott, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Two aspects of the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 in pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary water have been studied in detail. Results are presented showing that grain boundaries of Alloy 600 are embrittled to a depth of several microns by exposure to primary water in an unstressed condition. It has been established that this embrittlement is not reversible by high temperature degassing and cannot be directly due to hydrogen. The results seem to support the hypothesis that oxygen atom penetration of grain boundaries is possible. However, no evidence of formation of grain boundary gas bubbles or oxides has been found. It is envisaged that this embrittlement process could sequentially act at the tip of a growing stress corrosion crack. The second phenomenon under study has been the plastic deformation behavior of Alloy 600 since it is known that cold work and stress have an important effect on stress corrosion cracking sensitivity. Results of plastic deformation during cyclic straining at various controlled strain rates are presented showing that Alloy 600 is not very sensitive to loading history and that cold work is of an essentially kinematic nature.

  4. Water use efficiency in a primary subtropical evergreen forest in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qing-Hai; Fei, Xue-Hai; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Sha, Li-Qing; Liu, Yun-Tong; Zhou, Wen-Jun; Wu, Chuan-Sheng; Lu, Zhi-Yun; Luo, Kang; Gao, Jin-Bo; Liu, Yu-Hong

    2017-02-01

    We calculated water use efficiency (WUE) using measures of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET) from five years of continuous eddy covariance measurements (2009–2013) obtained over a primary subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest in southwestern China. Annual mean WUE exhibited a decreasing trend from 2009 to 2013, varying from ~2.28 to 2.68 g C kg H2O‑1. The multiyear average WUE was 2.48 ± 0.17 (mean ± standard deviation) g C kg H2O‑1. WUE increased greatly in the driest year (2009), due to a larger decline in ET than in GPP. At the diurnal scale, WUE in the wet season reached 5.1 g C kg H2O‑1 in the early morning and 4.6 g C kg H2O‑1 in the evening. WUE in the dry season reached 3.1 g C kg H2O‑1 in the early morning and 2.7 g C kg H2O‑1 in the evening. During the leaf emergence stage, the variation of WUE could be suitably explained by water-related variables (relative humidity (RH), soil water content at 100 cm (SWC_100)), solar radiation and the green index (Sgreen). These results revealed large variation in WUE at different time scales, highlighting the importance of individual site characteristics.

  5. Improvement of PNPI experimental industrial plant based on CECE process for heavy water detritiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S. D.; Alekseev, I. A.; Fedorchenko, O. A.; Vasyanina, T. V.; Konoplev, K. A.; Arkhipov, E. A.; Uborsky, V. V.

    2008-07-15

    An updated experimental industrial plant of PNPI for the development of CECE technology is described. Experimental results for heavy water detritiation in different operating modes are shown. The effect of pressure, temperatures and gas flow rate on the detritiation factor for the CECE process is presented. (authors)

  6. The performance of constructed wetlands treating primary, secondary and dairy soiled water in Ireland (a review).

    PubMed

    Healy, M G; O' Flynn, C J

    2011-10-01

    In Ireland, no database detailing the design, influent loading rates or performance of constructed wetlands (CWs) exists. On account of this, they are designed without any protocol based on empirical data. The aim of this paper was to provide the first published data on the performance of free-water surface flow (FWSF) CWs treating primary and secondary-treated municipal wastewater, and agricultural dairy soiled water (DSW) in Ireland. In total, the performance of thirty-four FWSF CWs, comprising fourteen CWs treating primary-treated municipal wastewater, thirteen CWs treating secondary-treated municipal wastewater, and seven CWs treating DSW, were examined. In most CWs, good organic, suspended solids (SS) and nutrient removal was measured. At an average organic loading rate (OLR) of 10 and 9 g biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) m(-2) d(-1), CWs treating primary and secondary wastewater removed 95 and 84% of influent BOD. Constructed wetlands treating DSW had an average BOD removal of 98%. At average SS loading rates of 6 and 14 g m(-2) d(-1), CWs treating primary and secondary wastewater had a 96 and an 82% reduction, and produced a final effluent with a concentration of 14 and 13 mg L(-1). Constructed wetlands treating DSW produced a final effluent of 34 mg L(-1) (94% reduction). Similar to other studies, all CWs examined had variable performance in ammonium-N (NH(4)(+)-N) removal, with average removals varying between 37% (for CWs treating secondary wastewater) and 88% (for CWs treating DSW). Variable ortho-phosphorus (PO(4)(3-)-P) removal was attributable to different durations of operation, media types and loading rates.

  7. Lead in drinking water: sampling in primary schools and preschools in south central Kansas.

    PubMed

    Massey, Anne R; Steele, Janet E

    2012-03-01

    Studies in Philadelphia, New York City, Houston, Washington, DC, and Greenville, North Carolina, have revealed high lead levels in drinking water. Unlike urban areas, lead levels in drinking water in suburban and rural areas have not been adequately studied. In the study described in this article, drinking water in primary schools and preschools in five suburban and rural south central Kansas towns was sampled to determine if any exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) guidance level for schools and child care facilities of 20 parts per billion (ppb). The results showed a total of 32.1% of the samples had detectable lead levels and 3.6% exceeded the U.S. EPA guidance level for schools and child care providers of 20 ppb. These results indicate that about one-third of the drinking water consumed by children age six and under in the five suburban and rural south central Kansas towns studied has some lead contamination, exposing these children to both short-term and long-term health risks. The authors suggest a need for increased surveillance of children's drinking water in these facilities.

  8. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, D. J.; Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2015-09-01

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year (WY) 2014. It is the sixth report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011), a report released June 2012 examined water year 2011 (Poch et al. 2012), a report released April 2013 examined water year 2012 (Poch et al. 2013), and a report released June 2014 examined water year 2013 (Graziano et al. 2014).

  9. Experimental critical parameters of plutonium metal cylinders flooded with water

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Forty-nine critical configurations are reported for experiments involving arrays of 3 kg plutonium metal cylinders moderated and reflected by water. Thirty-four of these describe systems assembled in the laboratory, while 15 others are derived critical parameters inferred from 46 subcritical cases. The arrays included 2x2xN, N = 2, 3, 4, and 5, in one program and 3x3x3 configurations in a later study. All were three-dimensional, nearly square arrays with equal horizontal lattice spacings but a different vertical lattice spacing. Horizontal spacings ranged from units in contact to 180 mm center-to-center; and vertical spacings ranged from about 80 mm to almost 400 mm center-to-center. Several nearly-equilateral 3x3x3 arrays exhibit an extremely sensitive dependence upon horizontal separation for identical vertical spacings. A line array of unreflected and essentially unmoderated canned plutonium metal units appeared to be well subcritical based on measurements made to assure safety during the manual assembly operations. All experiments were performed at two widely separated times in the mid-1970s and early 1980s under two programs at the Rocky Flats Plant`s Critical Mass Laboratory.

  10. [National primary standard of absorbed dose rate to water using a graphite calorimeter].

    PubMed

    Morishita, Yuichiro

    2013-01-01

    The calibration service in terms of absorbed dose to water started from 2011 after establishment of the national primary standard using a graphite calorimeter at the national metrology institute of Japan (NMIJ) and JCSS accreditation of the association for nuclear technology in medicine (ANTM). Accordingly, a new dosimetry protocol was introduced as JSMP12, in which details of the national standard were also described. This report presents a short review of the standard, a key comparison result, and a comparison result of calibration coefficients by JSMP01 and JSMP12.

  11. Primary experimental results of wire-array Z-pinches on PTS

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X. B. Zhou, S. T. Ren, X. D. Dan, J. K. Wang, K. L. Zhang, S. Q. Li, J. Xu, Q. Cai, H. C. Duan, S. C. Ouyang, K. Chen, G. H. Ji, C. Wang, M. Feng, S. P. Yang, L. B. Xie, W. P. Deng, J. J.

    2014-12-15

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a multiterawatt pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ∼10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. In this paper, primary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 14.4-26.4 mm, and consisting of 132∼276 tungsten wires with 5∼10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to determine the characteristics of x-ray radiations and to obtain self-emitting images of imploding plasmas. X-ray power up to 80 TW with ∼3 ns FWMH is achieved by using nested wire arrays. The total x-ray energy exceeds 500 kJ and the peak radiation temperature is about 150 eV. Typical velocity of imploding plasmas goes around 3∼5×10{sup 7} cm/s and the radial convergence ratio is between 10 and 20.

  12. Combined Experimental and Theoretical Approach to the Kinetics of Magnetite Crystal Growth from Primary Particles

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is now recognized that nucleation and growth of crystals can occur not only by the addition of solvated ions but also by accretion of nanoparticles, in a process called nonclassical crystallization. The theoretical framework of such processes has only started to be described, partly due to the lack of kinetic or thermodynamic data. Here, we study the growth of magnetite nanoparticles from primary particles—nanometer-sized amorphous iron-rich precursors—in aqueous solution at different temperatures. We propose a theoretical framework to describe the growth of the nanoparticles and model both a diffusion-limited and a reaction-limited pathway to determine which of these best describes the rate-limiting step of the process. We show that, based on the measured iron concentration and the related calculated concentration of primary particles at the steady state, magnetite growth is likely a reaction-limited process, and within the framework of our model, we propose a phase diagram to summarize the observations.

  13. Experimental study on the behavior of primary human osteoblasts on laser-cused pure titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Jutta; Friedrichs, Jens; Werner, Carsten; Davids, Andreas; Weise, Hartmut; Lesche, Raoul; Weber, Anke; Range, Ursula; Meißner, Heike; Lauer, Günther; Reitemeier, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Mandibular tumor resection can lead to a mandibular segmental defect. LaserCUSING® is used to produce a mandibular implant, designed to be identical to the shape of the mandibular defect. Novel microrough surfaces result from this generative technology. In the current study, the behavior of human osteoblasts on untreated laser-cused titanium specimens or on specimens conditioned with different blasting agents was analyzed. The conditioning of these specimens resulted in surfaces with graded roughness. White light confocal microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface of the specimens and to quantify the initial adhesion of primary human osteoblasts to the specimens, respectively. Furthermore, cell growth, viability, apoptosis as well as mineralization of the specimens were analyzed over a time-period of 2 months. Compared to specimens that were treated with blasting agents, untreated specimens had the highest surface roughness. Quantitative SCFS measurements demonstrated that the adhesion of human primary osteoblasts was the highest on these specimens. Additionally, the untreated specimens allowed the highest number of osteoblasts to colonize. Mineralization studies showed increasing calcium and phosphor elemental composition for all specimen series. It can be concluded that untreated laser-cused titanium specimens are superior to promote the initial adhesion and subsequent colonization by osteoblast cells.

  14. Presynaptic inhibition and antidromic spikes in primary afferents of the crayfish: a computational and experimental analysis.

    PubMed

    Cattaert, D; Libersat, F; El Manira A, A

    2001-02-01

    Primary afferent depolarizations (PADs) are associated with presynaptic inhibition and antidromic discharges in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, we have elaborated a realistic compartment model of a primary afferent from the coxobasipodite chordotonal organ of the crayfish based on anatomical and electrophysiological data. The model was used to test the validity of shunting and sodium channel inactivation hypotheses to account for presynaptic inhibition. Previous studies had demonstrated that GABA activates chloride channels located on the main branch close to the first branching point. We therefore focused the analysis on the effect of GABA synapses on the propagation of action potentials in the first axonal branch. Given the large diameters of the sensory axons in the region in which PADs were likely to be produced and recorded, the model indicates that a relatively large increase in chloride conductance (up to 300 nS) is needed to significantly reduce the amplitude of sensory spikes. The role of the spatial organization of GABA synapses in the sensory arborization was analyzed, demonstrating that the most effective location for GABA synapses is in the area of transition from active to passive conduction. This transition is likely to occur on the main branch a few hundred micrometers distal to the first branching point. As a result of this spatial organization, antidromic spikes generated by large-amplitude PADs are prevented from propagating distally.

  15. Laminar burning velocities at high pressure for primary reference fuels and gasoline: Experimental and numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzembeck, S.; Peters, N.; Pepiot-Desjardins, P.; Pitsch, H.

    2009-02-15

    Spherical flames of n-heptane, iso-octane, PRF 87 and gasoline/air mixtures are experimentally investigated to determine laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths under engine-relevant conditions by using the constant volume bomb method. Data are obtained for an initial temperature of 373 K, equivalence ratios varying from {phi}=0.7 to {phi}=1.2, and initial pressures from 10 to 25 bar. To track the flame front in the vessel a dark field He-Ne laser Schlieren measurement technique and digital image processing were used. The propagating speed with respect to the burned gases and the stretch rate are determined from the rate of change of the flame radius. The laminar burning velocities are obtained through a linear extrapolation to zero stretch. The experimentally determined Markstein numbers are compared to theoretical predictions. A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for n-heptane and iso-octane was derived from the Lawrence Livermore comprehensive mechanisms. This mechanism was validated for ignition delay times and flame propagation at low and high pressures. In summary an overall good agreement with the various experimental data sets used in the validation was obtained. (author)

  16. Experimental observation of rainbow scattering by a coated cylinder: twin primary rainbows and thin-film interference.

    PubMed

    Adler, C L; Lock, J A; Nash, J K; Saunders, K W

    2001-03-20

    We experimentally examine the primary rainbow created by the illumination of a coated cylinder. We present a simple technique for varying the coating thickness over a wide range of values, and we see evidence for two different scattering regimes. In one, where the coating thickness is large, twin rainbows are produced. In the second, where the coating is thin enough to act as a thin film, a single rainbow is produced whose intensity varies periodically as the coating thickness varies. We find good agreement with previous theoretical predictions.

  17. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J.

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  18. Understanding flocculation mechanism of graphene oxide for organic dyes from water: Experimental and molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Li, Peng; Xiao, Hang; Zhang, Yayun; Shi, Xiaoyang; Lü, Xiaomeng; Chen, Xi

    2015-11-01

    Flocculation treatment processes play an important role in water and wastewater pretreatment. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the possibility of using graphene oxide (GO) as a flocculant to remove methylene blue (MB) from water. Experimental results show that GO can remove almost all MB from aqueous solutions at its optimal dosages and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that MB cations quickly congregate around GO in water. Furthermore, PIXEL energy contribution analysis reveals that most of the strong interactions between GO and MB are of a van der Waals (London dispersion) character. These results offer new insights for shedding light on the molecular mechanism of interaction between GO and organic pollutants.

  19. Effects of experimental water table and temperature manipulations on ecosystem CO2 fluxes in an Alaskan rich fen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chivers, M.R.; Turetsky, M.R.; Waddington, J.M.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    Peatlands store 30% of the world's terrestrial soil carbon (C) and those located at northern latitudes are expected to experience rapid climate warming. We monitored growing season carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes across a factorial design of in situ water table (control, drought, and flooded plots) and soil warming (control vs. warming via open top chambers) treatments for 2 years in a rich fen located just outside the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest in interior Alaska. The drought (lowered water table position) treatment was a weak sink or small source of atmospheric CO2 compared to the moderate atmospheric CO2 sink at our control. This change in net ecosystem exchange was due to lower gross primary production and light-saturated photosynthesis rather than increased ecosystem respiration. The flooded (raised water table position) treatment was a greater CO2 sink in 2006 due largely to increased early season gross primary production and higher light-saturated photosynthesis. Although flooding did not have substantial effects on rates of ecosystem respiration, this water table treatment had lower maximum respiration rates and a higher temperature sensitivity of ecosystem respiration than the control plot. Surface soil warming increased both ecosystem respiration and gross primary production by approximately 16% compared to control (ambient temperature) plots, with no net effect on net ecosystem exchange. Results from this rich fen manipulation suggest that fast responses to drought will include reduced ecosystem C storage driven by plant stress, whereas inundation will increase ecosystem C storage by stimulating plant growth. ?? 2009 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  20. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2012-07-16

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and

  1. Experimentally probing the libration of interfacial water: the rotational potential of water is stiffer at the air/water interface than in bulk liquid.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yujin; Kampfrath, Tobias; Campen, R Kramer

    2016-07-21

    Most properties of liquid water are determined by its hydrogen-bond network. Because forming an aqueous interface requires termination of this network, one might expect the molecular level properties of interfacial water to markedly differ from water in bulk. Intriguingly, much prior experimental and theoretical work has found that, from the perspective of their time-averaged structure and picosecond structural dynamics, hydrogen-bonded OH groups at an air/water interface behave the same as hydrogen-bonded OH groups in bulk liquid water. Here we report the first experimental observation of interfacial water's libration (i.e. frustrated rotation) using the laser-based technique vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. We find this mode has a frequency of 834 cm(-1), ≈165 cm(-1) higher than in bulk liquid water at the same temperature and similar to bulk ice. Because libration frequency is proportional to the stiffness of water's rotational potential, this increase suggests that one effect of terminating bulk water's hydrogen bonding network at the air/water interface is retarding rotation of water around intact hydrogen bonds. Because in bulk liquid water the libration plays a key role in stabilizing reaction intermediates and dissipating excess vibrational energy, we expect the ability to probe this mode in interfacial water to open new perspectives on the kinetics of heterogeneous reactions at aqueous interfaces.

  2. Water weakening in experimentally deformed milky quartz single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunitz, H.; Thust, A.; Kilian, R.; Heilbronner, R.; Behrens, H.; Tarantola, A.; Fitz Gerald, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural single crystals of quartz have been experimentally deformed in two orientations: (1) normal to one prism-plane, (2) In O+ orientation at temperatures of 900 and 1000°C, pressures of 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, and strain rates of ~1 x 10-6s-1. The starting material is milky quartz, consisting of dry quartz (H2O contents of <150 H/106Si) with fluid inclusions (FI). During pressurization many FI´s decrepitate. Cracks heal and small neonate FI´s form, increasing the number of FI´s drastically. During subsequent deformation, the size of FI´s is further reduced (down to ~10 nm). Sample deformation occurs by dominant dislocation glide on selected slip systems, accompanied by some dynamic recovery. Strongly deformed regions show FTIR spectra with a pointed broad absorption band in the ~3400 cm-1 region as a superposition of molecular H2O bands and three discrete absorption bands (at 3367, 3400, and 3434 cm-1). In addition, there is a discrete absorption band at 3585 cm-1, which only occurs in deformed regions. The 3585 cm-1 band is reduced or even disappears after annealing. This band is polarized and represents structurally bound H, its H-content is estimated to be 1-3% of the total H2O-content and appears to be associated with dislocations. The H2O weakening effect in our FI-bearing natural quartz crystals is assigned to the processes of dislocation generation and multiplication at small FI´s. The deformation processes in these crystals represent a recycling of H2O between FI´s, dislocation generation at very small fluid inclusions, incorporation of structurally bound H into dislocation cores, and release of H2O from dislocations back into FI´s during recovery. Cracking and crack healing play an important role in the recycling process and imply a close interrelationship between brittle and crystal plastic deformation. The H2O weakening by this process is of a disequilibrium nature and thus depends on the amount of H2O available.

  3. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Circulation model for water circulation and purification in a water Cerenkov detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hao-Qi; Yang, Chang-Gen; Wang, Ling-Yu; Xu, Ji-Lei; Wang, Rui-Guang; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Yi-Fang

    2009-07-01

    Owing to its low cost and good transparency, highly purified water is widely used as a medium in large water Cerenkov detector experiments. The water circulation and purification system is usually needed to keep the water in good quality. In this work, a practical circulation model is built to describe the variation of the water resistivity in the circulation process and compared with the data obtained from a prototype experiment. The successful test of the model makes it useful in the future design and optimization of the circulation/purification system.

  4. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors J Appendix J to Part 50 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Pt. 50, App. J Appendix J to Part 50—Primary Reactor...

  5. Hydrocode modeling and an experimental study of explosively driven water jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Philip; Dickson, Peter; Novak, Alan; Parker, Gary

    2007-06-01

    There is currently interest in water based penetrators. The research to be presented is on the experimental and computer model optimization of designs to produce coherent high velocity (4-7 km s-1) jets of water from a shaped charge like device. High-speed and Schlieren photography techniques have been used to record the jets produced by various design iterations and the experimental images compared to models run in the CTH hydrocode. The computer code was used to reduce the number of experiments required and to solve some initial problems with non-uniform initial jet shapes. The CTH code has been successful in modeling the observed jets, but only after careful attention was paid to the equation-of-state used for the water. Initially the jet diameter produced by the code was considerably thinner than experimentally observed. A much better match occurred when the most modern SESAME EOS table for water was used.

  6. Design-development and operation of the Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) facility, 1955--1967

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Wimunc, E.A.; Whittington, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    The Experimental Boiling-Water Reactor (EBWR) was designed, built, and operated to provide experience and engineering data that would demonstrate the feasibility of the direct-cycle, boiling-water reactor and be applicable to improved, larger nuclear power stations; and was based on information obtained in the first test boiling-water reactors, the BORAX series. EBWR initially produced 20 MW(t), 5 MW(e); later modified and upgraded, as described and illustrated, it was operated at up to 100 MW(t). The facility fulfilled its primary mission -- demonstrating the practicality of the direct-boiling concept -- and, in fact, was the prototype of some of the first commercial plants and of reactor programs in some other countries. After successful completion of the Water-Cooled Reactor Program, EBWR was utilized in the joint Argonne-Hanford Plutonium Recycle Program to develop data for the utilization of plutonium as a fuel in light- water thermal systems. Final shutdown of the EBWR facility followed the termination of the latter program. 13 refs., 12 figs.

  7. A cytological and experimental study of the neuropil and primary olfactory afferences to the piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Barroso, Víctor; Larriva-Sahd, Jorge

    2013-09-01

    The microscopic organization of the piriform cortex (PC) was studied in normal and experimental material from adult albino rats. In rapid-Golgi specimens a set of collaterals from the lateral olfactory tract (i.e., sublayer Ia) to the neuropil of the Layer II (LII) was identified. Specimens from experimental animals that received electrolytic lesion of the main olfactory bulb three days before sacrificing, were further processed for pre-embedding immunocytochemistry to the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD 67). This novel approach permitted a simultaneous visualization at electron microscopy of both synaptic degeneration and GAD67-immunoreactive (GAD-I) sites. Degenerating and GAD-I synapses were separately found in the neuropil of Layers I and II of the PC. Previously overlooked patches of neuropil were featured in sublayer Ia. These areas consisted of dendritic and axonal processes including four synaptic types. Tridimensional reconstructions from serial thin sections from LI revealed the external appearance of the varicose and tubular dendrites as well as the synaptic terminals therein. The putative source(s) of processes to the neuropil of sublayer Ia is discussed in the context of the internal circuitry of the PC and an alternative model is introduced.

  8. Incorporating Social and Human Capital into an Experimental Approach to Urban Water Resources Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    To test the benefits of decentralized Green Infrastructure (GI) in an urban setting, we aimed to install GI in the Shepherd Creek Watershed of Cincinnati. The primary stressor in Shepherd Creek is stormwater runoff. An assessment of the total impervious surface area in the waters...

  9. Small-scale experimental study of vaporization flux of liquid nitrogen released on water.

    PubMed

    Gopalaswami, Nirupama; Olewski, Tomasz; Véchot, Luc N; Mannan, M Sam

    2015-10-30

    A small-scale experimental study was conducted using liquid nitrogen to investigate the convective heat transfer behavior of cryogenic liquids released on water. The experiment was performed by spilling five different amounts of liquid nitrogen at different release rates and initial water temperatures. The vaporization mass fluxes of liquid nitrogen were determined directly from the mass loss measured during the experiment. A variation of initial vaporization fluxes and a subsequent shift in heat transfer mechanism were observed with changes in initial water temperature. The initial vaporization fluxes were directly dependent on the liquid nitrogen spill rate. The heat flux from water to liquid nitrogen determined from experimental data was validated with two theoretical correlations for convective boiling. It was also observed from validation with correlations that liquid nitrogen was found to be predominantly in the film boiling regime. The substantial results provide a suitable procedure for predicting the heat flux from water to cryogenic liquids that is required for source term modeling.

  10. Experimental Analysis of Desalination Unit Coupled with Solar Water Lens Concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaithanya, K. K.; Rajesh, V. R.; Suresh, Rahul

    2016-09-01

    The main problem that the world faces in this scenario is shortage of potable water. Hence this research work rivets to increase the yield of desalination system in an economical way. The integration of solar concentrator and desalination unit can project the desired yield, but the commercially available concentrated solar power technologies (CSP) are not economically viable. So this study proposes a novel method to concentrate ample amount of solar radiation in a cost effective way. Water acting as lens is a highlighted technology initiated in this work, which can be a substitute for CSP systems. And water lens can accelerate the desalination process so as to increase the yield economically. The solar irradiance passing through the water will be concentrated at a focal point, and the concentration depends on curvature of water lens. The experimental analysis of water lens makes use of transparent thin sheet, supported on a metallic structure. The Plano convex shape of water lens is developed by varying the volume of water that is being poured on the transparent thin sheet. From the experimental analysis it is inferred that, as the curvature of water lens increases, solar irradiance can be focused more accurately on to the focus and a higher water temperature is obtained inside the solar still.

  11. Performance of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry based estimates of primary productivity in coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C.; Suggett, D. J.; Cherukuru, N.; Ralph, P. J.; Doblin, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    Capturing the variability of primary productivity in highly dynamic coastal ecosystems remains a major challenge to marine scientists. To test the suitability of Fast Repetition Rate fluorometry (FRRf) for rapid assessment of primary productivity in estuarine and coastal locations, we conducted a series of paired analyses estimating 14C carbon fixation and primary productivity from electron transport rates with a Fast Repetition Rate fluorometer MkII, from waters on the Australian east coast. Samples were collected from two locations with contrasting optical properties and we compared the relative magnitude of photosynthetic traits, such as the maximum rate of photosynthesis (Pmax), light utilisation efficiency (α) and minimum saturating irradiance (EK) estimated using both methods. In the case of FRRf, we applied recent algorithm developments that enabled electron transport rates to be determined free from the need for assumed constants, as in most previous studies. Differences in the concentration and relative proportion of optically active substances at the two locations were evident in the contrasting attenuation of PAR (400-700 nm), blue (431 nm), green (531 nm) and red (669 nm) wavelengths. FRRF-derived estimates of photosynthetic parameters were positively correlated with independent estimates of 14C carbon fixation (Pmax: n = 19, R2 = 0.66; α: n = 21, R2 = 0.77; EK: n = 19, R2 = 0.45; all p < 0.05), however primary productivity was frequently underestimated by the FRRf method. Up to 81% of the variation in the relationship between FRRf and 14C estimates was explained by the presence of pico-cyanobacteria and chlorophyll-a biomass, and the proportion of photoprotective pigments, that appeared to be linked to turbidity. We discuss the potential importance of cyanobacteria in influencing the underestimations of FRRf productivity and steps to overcome this potential limitation.

  12. FEM Analysis and Experimental Verification of the Integral Forging Process for AP1000 Primary Coolant Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shenglong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun

    2016-10-01

    AP1000 primary coolant pipes must be manufactured by integral forging technology according to the designer—Westinghouse Electric Co. The characteristics of these large, special-shaped pipes create nonuniform temperatures, effective stress, and effective strain during shaping of the pipes. This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element simulation (3D FEM) of the integral forging process, and qualitatively evaluates the likelihood of forging defects. By analyzing the evolution histories of the three field variables, we concluded that the initial forging temperature should be strictly controlled within the interval 1123 K to 1423 K (850 °C to 1150 °C) to avoid second-phase precipitation. In the hard deformation zones, small strains do not contribute to recrystallization resulting in coarse grains. Conversely, in the free deformation zone, the large strains can contribute to the dynamic recrystallization, favoring grain refinement and closure of voids. Cracks are likely to appear, however, on the workpiece surface when forging leads to large deformations. Based on the simulation results, an eligible workpiece with good mechanical properties, few macroscopic defects, and favorable grain size has been successfully forged by experiments at an industrial scale, which validates the FEM simulation.

  13. Experimental Study of Water Cluster Molecules with Relevance to Mesospheric Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Scott; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Horanyi, Mihaly

    2000-10-01

    We have begun an experimental investigation of the properties of the water cluster molecules responsible for clouds occurring in the polar mesopause. These clusters disturb the charge balance in the ionosphere by attaching electrons which then creates localized reductions in the electron density. A supersonic nozzle sprays a mixture of water vapor and argon into vacuum and the expansion leads to condensation of clusters with 4 to 11 water molecules. Initial measurements are of the collision cross section of these molecules with neutral gas. The cross sections have a minimum at six waters consistent with the tighter molecular arrangement predicted for this cluster number. Additional measurements are underway for charging processes.

  14. Experimental study of iron and multivitamin drops on enamel microhardness of primary tooth

    PubMed Central

    Pasdar, Nilgoon; Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Mottaghi, Fattane; Tavassoli, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Iron and multivitamin drops are being frequently prescribed in children less than 2 years of age. Due to their low pH levels, these drops may lead to the softening of enamel and accelerate the destructive process. The aim of the present study was to investigate the enamel microhardness of primary teeth after exposing them to iron and multivitamin drops. Materials and Methods: Forty healthy anterior teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 10 samples each. Samples were exposed to two iron drops of Kharazmi (Iran) and Ironorm (UK) and two multivitamin drops of Shahdarou (Iran) and Eurovit (Germany) for 5 min. The surface microhardness was measured before and after exposure and data processing was done using statistical paired t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. The surface structure of the teeth was examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Results: In all groups, microhardness was decreased, but it was not significant in Eurovit multivitamin group (P = 0.088). The reduction rate in Kharazmi iron group was significant compared to that in other groups (P < 0.005). Hardness reduction percent for Kharazmi iron drop was 28/12 ± 47/43. In SEM analysis, irregular granular appearance was observed in the enamel exposed to Kharazmi iron drop. Conclusion: The results showed that all the studied drugs have the potential to cause erosion; this potential is the most in Kharazmi iron drop and the least in Eurovit multivitamin drops. Therefore, after using these kinds of drops, preventive measures should be used in children. PMID:26759808

  15. Addressing the sexual problems of Iranian women in a primary health care setting: A quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Rostamkhani, Fatemeh; Jafari, Fatemeh; Ozgoli, Giti; Shakeri, Masomeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The World Health Organization emphasizes on integration of sexual health into primary health care services, educating people and health care workers about sexuality, and promoting optimal sexual health. Despite the high prevalence of sexual problems, these problems are poorly managed in primary health care services. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of the first two steps of PLISSIT (Permission, Limited Information, Specific Suggestions, Intensive Treatment) model for handling of women sexual problems in a primary health care setting. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study that was carried out in Zanjan, northwest of Iran. Eighty women who had got married in the past 5 years and had sexual problem were randomly assigned to control and intervention groups. The intervention group received consultation based on PLISSIT model by a trained midwife and the control group received routine services. Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire was used for assessing and tracking any changes in sexual function. Data were collected at three points: Before consultation and 2 and 4 weeks after consultation. Paired t-test and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) test were used for comparison of scores within groups. Results: Significant improvement was found in FSFI sub-domain scores, including sexual desire (P < 0.0001), arousal (P < 0.0001), lubrication (P < 0.0001), orgasm (P = 0.005), satisfaction (P = 0.005), pain (P < 0.0001), and FSFI total score (P < 0.0001) in the intervention group compared to the control group. Conclusions: This study showed that PLISSIT model can meet the sexual health needs of clients in a primary health care setting and it can be used easily by health workers in this setting for addressing sexual complaints and dysfunctions. PMID:25709703

  16. Swashplateless Helicopter Experimental Investigation: Primary Control with Trailing Edge Flaps Actuated with Piezobenders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copp, Peter

    Helicopter rotor primary control is conventionally carried out using a swashplate with pitch links. Eliminating the swashplate promises to reduce the helicopter's parasitic power in high speed forward flight, as well as may lead to a hydraulic-less vehicle. A Mach-scale swashplateless rotor is designed with integrated piezobender-actuated trailing edge flaps and systematically tested on the benchtop, in the vacuum chamber and on the hoverstand. The blade is nominally based on the UH-60 rotor with a hover tip Mach number of 0.64. The blade diameter is 66 inches requiring 2400 RPM for Mach scale simulation. The rotor hub is modified to reduce the blade fundamental torsional frequency to less than 2.0/rev by replacing the rigid pitch links with linear springs, which results in an increase of the blade pitching response to the trailing edge flaps. Piezoelectric multilayer benders provide the necessary bandwidth, stroke and stiffness to drive the flaps for primary control while fitting inside the blade profile and withstanding the high centrifugal forces. This work focuses on several key issues. A piezobender designed from a soft piezoelectric material, PZT-5K4, is constructed. The new material is used to construct multi-layer benders with increased stroke for the same stiffness relative to hard materials such as PZT-5H2. Each layer has a thickness of 10 mils. The soft material with gold electrodes requires a different bonding method than hard material with nickel electrodes. With this new bonding method, the measured stiffness matches precisely the predicted stiffness for a 12 layer bender with 1.26 inch length and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 1.04 lb/mil. The final in-blade bender has a length of 1.38 inches and 1.0 inch width with a stiffness of 0.325 lb/mil and stroke of 20.2 mils for an energy output of 66.3 lb-mil. The behavior of piezobenders under very high electric fields is investigated. High field means +18.9 kV/cm (limited by arcing in air) and -3.54k

  17. Parameterizing ecosystem light use efficiency and water use efficiency to estimate maize gross primary production and evapotranspiration using MODIS EVI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying global carbon and water balances requires accurate estimation of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET), respectively, across space and time. Models that are based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE) and water use efficiency (WUE) have emerged as efficient met...

  18. Carbon and oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf: role of water column primary production and respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a multi-year study of the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) to better understand the linkages between water column net metabolism and the formation of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen <2 ml O2 L-1) in the region. Rates of water column community respiration (R) and primary p...

  19. Isotope fractionation of sandy-soil water during evaporation - an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Rao, Wen-Bo; Han, Liang-Feng; Tan, Hong-Bing; Wang, Shuai

    2016-12-05

    Soil samples containing water with known stable isotopic compositions were prepared. The soil water was recovered by using vacuum/heat distillation. The experiments were held under different conditions to control rates of water evaporation and water recovery. Recoveries, δ(18)O and δ(2)H values of the soil water were determined. Analyses of the data using a Rayleigh distillation model indicate that under the experimental conditions only loosely bound water is extractable in cases where the recovery is smaller than 100 %. Due to isotopic exchange between vapour and remaining water in the micro channels or capillaries of the soil matrix, isotopic fractionation may take place under near-equilibrium conditions. This causes the observed relationship between δ(2)H and δ(18)O of the extracted water samples to have a slope close to 8. The results of this study may indicate that, in arid zones when soil that initially contains water dries out, the slope of the relationship between δ(2)H and δ(18)O values should be close to 8. Thus, a smaller slope, as observed by some groundwater and soil water samples in arid zones, may be caused by evaporation of water before the water has entered the unsaturated zone.

  20. Consumers mediate the effects of experimental ocean acidification and warming on primary producers

    PubMed Central

    Alsterberg, Christian; Eklöf, Johan S.; Gamfeldt, Lars; Havenhand, Jonathan N.; Sundbäck, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that ocean acidification can have profound impacts on marine organisms. However, we know little about the direct and indirect effects of ocean acidification and also how these effects interact with other features of environmental change such as warming and declining consumer pressure. In this study, we tested whether the presence of consumers (invertebrate mesograzers) influenced the interactive effects of ocean acidification and warming on benthic microalgae in a seagrass community mesocosm experiment. Net effects of acidification and warming on benthic microalgal biomass and production, as assessed by analysis of variance, were relatively weak regardless of grazer presence. However, partitioning these net effects into direct and indirect effects using structural equation modeling revealed several strong relationships. In the absence of grazers, benthic microalgae were negatively and indirectly affected by sediment-associated microalgal grazers and macroalgal shading, but directly and positively affected by acidification and warming. Combining indirect and direct effects yielded no or weak net effects. In the presence of grazers, almost all direct and indirect climate effects were nonsignificant. Our analyses highlight that (i) indirect effects of climate change may be at least as strong as direct effects, (ii) grazers are crucial in mediating these effects, and (iii) effects of ocean acidification may be apparent only through indirect effects and in combination with other variables (e.g., warming). These findings highlight the importance of experimental designs and statistical analyses that allow us to separate and quantify the direct and indirect effects of multiple climate variables on natural communities. PMID:23630263

  1. Consumers mediate the effects of experimental ocean acidification and warming on primary producers.

    PubMed

    Alsterberg, Christian; Eklöf, Johan S; Gamfeldt, Lars; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Sundbäck, Kristina

    2013-05-21

    It is well known that ocean acidification can have profound impacts on marine organisms. However, we know little about the direct and indirect effects of ocean acidification and also how these effects interact with other features of environmental change such as warming and declining consumer pressure. In this study, we tested whether the presence of consumers (invertebrate mesograzers) influenced the interactive effects of ocean acidification and warming on benthic microalgae in a seagrass community mesocosm experiment. Net effects of acidification and warming on benthic microalgal biomass and production, as assessed by analysis of variance, were relatively weak regardless of grazer presence. However, partitioning these net effects into direct and indirect effects using structural equation modeling revealed several strong relationships. In the absence of grazers, benthic microalgae were negatively and indirectly affected by sediment-associated microalgal grazers and macroalgal shading, but directly and positively affected by acidification and warming. Combining indirect and direct effects yielded no or weak net effects. In the presence of grazers, almost all direct and indirect climate effects were nonsignificant. Our analyses highlight that (i) indirect effects of climate change may be at least as strong as direct effects, (ii) grazers are crucial in mediating these effects, and (iii) effects of ocean acidification may be apparent only through indirect effects and in combination with other variables (e.g., warming). These findings highlight the importance of experimental designs and statistical analyses that allow us to separate and quantify the direct and indirect effects of multiple climate variables on natural communities.

  2. Generation of Hydrogen and Methane during Experimental Low-Temperature Reaction of Ultramafic Rocks with Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Donaldson, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks is widely recognized as a source of molecular hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) to support microbial activity, but the extent and rates of formation of these compounds in low-temperature, near-surface environments are poorly understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature reaction of water with ultramafic rocks and minerals. Experiments were performed by heating olivine or harzburgite with aqueous solutions at 90°C for up to 213 days in glass bottles sealed with butyl rubber stoppers. Although H2 and CH4 increased steadily throughout the experiments, the levels were very similar to those found in mineral-free controls, indicating that the rubber stoppers were the predominant source of these compounds. Levels of H2 above background were observed only during the first few days of reaction of harzburgite when CO2 was added to the headspace, with no detectable production of H2 or CH4 above background during further heating of the harzburgite or in experiments with other mineral reactants. Consequently, our results indicate that production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature alteration of ultramafic rocks may be much more limited than some recent experimental studies have suggested. We also found no evidence to support a recent report suggesting that spinels in ultramafic rocks may stimulate H2 production. While secondary silicates were observed to precipitate during the experiments, formation of these deposits was dominated by Si released by dissolution of the glass bottles, and reaction of the primary silicate minerals appeared to be very limited. While use of glass bottles and rubber stoppers has become commonplace in experiments intended to study processes that occur during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks at low temperatures, the high levels of H2, CH4, and SiO2 released during heating indicate that these reactor materials are unsuitable for this purpose.

  3. Drinking water is a significant predictor of Blastocystis infection among rural Malaysian primary schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Abdulsalam, Awatif M; Ithoi, Init; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Ahmed, Abdulhamid; Surin, Johari; Mak, Joon-Wah

    2012-07-01

    Blastocystis infection has a worldwide distribution especially among the disadvantaged population and immunocompromised subjects. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence and the association of Blastocystis infection with the socio-economic characteristics among 300 primary schoolchildren, living in rural communities in Lipis and Raub districts of Pahang state, Malaysia. Stool samples were collected and examined for the presence of Blastocystis using direct smear microscopy after in vitro cultivation in Jones' medium. The overall prevalence of Blastocystis infection was found to be as high as 25.7%. The prevalence was significantly higher among children with gastrointestinal symptoms as compared to asymptomatic children (x2 =4.246; P=0.039). Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that absence of a piped water supply (OR=3.13; 95% CI=1.78, 5.46; P<0.001) and low levels of mothers' education (OR=3.41; 95% CI=1.62, 7.18; P<0.01) were the significant predictors of Blastocystis infection. In conclusion, Blastocystis is prevalent among rural children and the important factors that determine the infection were the sources of drinking water and mothers' educational level. Interventions with provision of clean water supply and health education especially to mothers are required.

  4. Development of water quality thresholds during dredging for the protection of benthic primary producer habitats.

    PubMed

    Sofonia, Jeremy J; Unsworth, Richard K F

    2010-01-01

    Given the potential for adverse effects of ocean dredging on marine organisms, particularly benthic primary producer communities, the management and monitoring of those activities which cause elevated turbidity and sediment loading is critical. In practice, however, this has proven challenging as the development of water quality threshold values, upon which management responses are based, are subject to a large number of physical and biological parameters that are spatially and temporally specific. As a consequence, monitoring programs to date have taken a wide range of different approaches, most focusing on measures of turbidity reported as nephelometric turbidity units (NTU). This paper presents a potential approach in the determination of water quality thresholds which utilises data gathered through the long-term deployment of in situ water instruments, but suggests a focus on photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) rather than NTU as it is more relevant biologically and inclusive of other site conditions. A simple mathematical approach to data interpretation is also presented which facilitates threshold value development, not individual values of concentrations over specific intervals, but as an equation which may be utilized in numerical modelling.

  5. The Fricke dosimeter as an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    El Gamal, Islam; Cojocaru, Claudiu; Mainegra-Hing, Ernesto; McEwen, Malcolm

    2015-06-07

    The aim of this project was to develop an absorbed dose to water primary standard for Ir-192 brachytherapy based on the Fricke dosimeter. To achieve this within the framework of the existing TG-43 protocol, a determination of the absorbed dose to water at the reference position, D(r0,θ0), was undertaken. Prior to this investigation, the radiation chemical yield of the ferric ions (G-value) at the Ir-192 equivalent photon energy (0.380 MeV) was established by interpolating between G-values obtained for Co-60 and 250 kV x-rays.An irradiation geometry was developed with a cylindrical holder to contain the Fricke solution and allow irradiations in a water phantom to be conducted using a standard Nucletron microSelectron V2 HDR Ir-192 afterloader. Once the geometry and holder were optimized, the dose obtained with the Fricke system was compared to the standard method used in North America, based on air-kerma strength.Initial investigations focused on reproducible positioning of the ring-shaped holder for the Fricke solution with respect to the Ir-192 source and obtaining an acceptable type A uncertainty in the optical density measurements required to yield the absorbed dose. Source positioning was found to be reproducible to better than 0.3 mm, and a careful cleaning and control procedure reduced the variation in optical density reading due to contamination of the Fricke solution by the PMMA holder. It was found that fewer than 10 irradiations were required to yield a type A standard uncertainty of less than 0.5%.Correction factors to take account of the non-water components of the geometry and the volume averaging effect of the Fricke solution volume were obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. A sensitivity analysis showed that the dependence on the input data used (e.g. interaction cross-sections) was small with a type B uncertainty for these corrections estimated to be 0.2%.The combined standard uncertainty in the determination of absorbed dose to water at

  6. Materials Reliability Program: Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MRP-137)

    SciTech Connect

    R.Kilian

    2004-12-01

    Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In recent comprehensive review of laboratory, component and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program, flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not considered in laboratory studies but applicable in plant operating environments. Available data for carbon/low-alloy steel piping components suggest that high flow is beneficial regarding the effects of a reactor water environment. Similar information is lacking for stainless steel piping materials. This report documents progress made to date in an extensive testing program underway to evaluate the effects of flow rate on the corrosion fatigue of 304L stainless steel under simulated PWR primary water environmental conditions.

  7. Experimental Confirmation of Water Column Natural Resonance Migration in a BBDB Device

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Diana L.; Gunawan, Budi; Holmes, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Experiments were conducted with a Backward Bent Duct Buoy (BBDB) oscillating water column wave energy conversion device with a scaling factor of 50 at HMRC at University College Cork, Ireland. Results were compared to numerical performance models. This work experimentally verified the migration of the natural resonance location of the water column due to hydrodynamic coupling for a floating non- axisymmetric device without a power conversion chain PCC present. In addition, the experimental results verified the performance model with a PCC of the same non- axisymmetric device when both floating and grounded.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of the Cooling Performance of Water Spraying Systems during a Fire

    PubMed Central

    Chen, YaoHan; Su, ChungHwei; Tseng, JoMing; Li, WunJie

    2015-01-01

    The water spray systems are effective protection systems in the confined or unconfined spaces to avoid the damage to building structures since the high temperature when fires occur. NFPA 15 and 502 have suggested respectively that the factories or vehicle tunnels install water spray systems to protect the machinery and structures. This study discussed the cooling effect of water spray systems in experimental and numerical analyses. The actual combustion of woods were compared with the numerical simulations. The results showed that although the flame continued, the cooling effects by water spraying process within 120 seconds were obvious. The results also indicated that the simulation results of the fifth version Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) overestimated the space temperature before water spraying in the case of the same water spray system. PMID:25723519

  9. Experimental and numerical analysis of the cooling performance of water spraying systems during a fire.

    PubMed

    Chen, YaoHan; Su, ChungHwei; Tseng, JoMing; Li, WunJie

    2015-01-01

    The water spray systems are effective protection systems in the confined or unconfined spaces to avoid the damage to building structures since the high temperature when fires occur. NFPA 15 and 502 have suggested respectively that the factories or vehicle tunnels install water spray systems to protect the machinery and structures. This study discussed the cooling effect of water spray systems in experimental and numerical analyses. The actual combustion of woods were compared with the numerical simulations. The results showed that although the flame continued, the cooling effects by water spraying process within 120 seconds were obvious. The results also indicated that the simulation results of the fifth version Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) overestimated the space temperature before water spraying in the case of the same water spray system.

  10. Experimental investigation of picosecond dynamics following interactions between laser accelerated protons and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senje, L.; Coughlan, M.; Jung, D.; Taylor, M.; Nersisyan, G.; Riley, D.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Lundh, O.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Zepf, M.; Dromey, B.

    2017-03-01

    We report direct experimental measurements with picosecond time resolution of how high energy protons interact with water at extreme dose levels (kGy), delivered in a single pulse with the duration of less than 80 ps. The unique synchronisation possibilities of laser accelerated protons with an optical probe pulse were utilized to investigate the energy deposition of fast protons in water on a time scale down to only a few picoseconds. This was measured using absorbance changes in the water, induced by a population of solvated electrons created in the tracks of the high energy protons. Our results indicate that for sufficiently high doses delivered in short pulses, intertrack effects will affect the yield of solvated electrons. The experimental scheme allows for investigation of the ultrafast mechanisms occurring in proton water radiolysis, an area of physics especially important due to its relevance in biology and for proton therapy.

  11. Experimental Investigation on Oil Enhancement Mechanism of Hot Water Injection in tight reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yongmao, Hao; Mingjing, Lu; Chengshun, Dong; Jianpeng, Jia; Yuliang, Su; Guanglong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at enhancing the oil recovery of tight reservoirs, the mechanism of hot water flooding was studied in this paper. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of hot water injection on oil properties, and the interaction between rock and fluid, petrophysical property of the reservoirs. Results show that with the injected water temperature increasing, the oil/water viscosity ratio falls slightly in a tight reservoir which has little effect on oil recovery. Further it shows that the volume factor of oil increases significantly which can increase the formation energy and thus raise the formation pressure. At the same time, oil/water interfacial tension decreases slightly which has a positive effect on production though the reduction is not obvious. Meanwhile, the irreducible water saturation and the residual oil saturation are both reduced, the common percolation area of two phases is widened and the general shape of the curve improves. The threshold pressure gradient that crude oil starts to flow also decreases. It relates the power function to the temperature, which means it will be easier for oil production and water injection. Further the pore characteristics of reservoir rocks improves which leads to better water displacement. Based on the experimental results and influence of temperature on different aspects of hot water injection, the flow velocity expression of two-phase of oil and water after hot water injection in tight reservoirs is obtained.

  12. Probing the interactions between ionic liquids and water: experimental and quantum chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Kurnia, Kiki A; Mutelet, Fabrice; Pinho, Simão P; Coutinho, João A P

    2014-02-20

    For an adequate choice or design of ionic liquids, the knowledge of their interaction with other solutes and solvents is an essential feature for predicting the reactivity and selectivity of systems involving these compounds. In this work, the activity coefficient of water in several imidazolium-based ionic liquids with the common cation 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium was measured at 298.2 K. To contribute to a deeper insight into the interaction between ionic liquids and water, COSMO-RS was used to predict the activity coefficient of water in the studied ionic liquids along with the excess enthalpies. The results showed good agreement between experimental and predicted activity coefficient of water in ionic liquids and that the interaction of water and ionic liquids was strongly influenced by the hydrogen bonding of the anion with water. Accordingly, the intensity of interaction of the anions with water can be ranked as the following: [CF3SO3](-) < [SCN](-) < [TFA](-) < Br(-) < [TOS](-) < Cl(-) < [CH3SO3](-) [DMP](-) < [Ac](-). In addition, fluorination and aromatization of anions are shown to reduce their interaction with water. The effect of temperature on the activity coefficient of water at infinite dilution was measured by inverse gas chromatography and predicted by COSMO-RS. Further analysis based on COSMO-RS provided information on the nature of hydrogen bonding between water and anion as well as the possibility of anion-water complex formation.

  13. Experimental Study on Behavior of Bow-tie Tree Generation by Using Heavy Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumazawa, Takao; Nakagawa, Wataru; Tsurumaru, Hidekazu

    Bow-tie tree (BTT) generated from contaminant, e.g., metal, carbon, amber(over cured resin) or void in insulator is a significant deterioration factor of XLPE power cable. However, essential role of water in generation and progress of BTT is not yet sufficiently cleared. In order to investigate the role of water we paid attention to difference in chemical properties of light water (H2O) and heavy water (D2O), moreover we evaluated influence of isotopic effect due to hydrogen and deuterium on behavior of BTT generation. In accelerated aging test the number of BTT in XLPE sample, in which copper powder of 500ppm was contaminated as BTT cores, dipped in heavy water (D2O:100wt%) decreased to one third compared with light water(D2O:0wt%). Furthermore, the maximum length of BTT decreased with increase in concentration of heavy water. The experimental results show that heavy water exerted a depression effect on generation and progress of BTT. We considered that the depression effect due to hydrogen isotope appeared by inhibiting ionization and elution of BTT cores, because salt-solubility and ionic mobility of heavy water are about 15 to 20% smaller than those of light water. Therefore, the essential role of water seemed to be production and transport of ions in XLPE.

  14. Experimental Investigation of Thermal Performance of Miniature Heat Pipe Using SiO2-Water Nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yan-Fang; Zhao, Wei-Lin; Gong, Yu-Ying

    2015-04-01

    The four miniature heat pipes filled with DI water and SiO2-water nanofluids containing different volume concentrations (0.2%, 0.6% and 1.0%) are experimentally measured on the condition of air and water cooling. The wall temperature and the thermal resistance are investigated for three inclination angles. At the same of inlet heat water temperature in the heat system, it is observed that the total wall temperatures on the evaporator section are almost retaining constant by air cooling and the wall temperatures at the front end of the evaporator section are slightly reduced by water cooling. However, the wall temperatures at the condenser section using SiO2-water nanofluids are all higher than that for DI water on the two cooling conditions. As compared with the heat pipe using DI water, the decreasing of the thermal resistance in heat pipe using nanofluids is about 43.10%-74.46% by air cooling and 51.43%-72.22% by water cooling. These indicate that the utilization of SiO2-water nanofluids as working fluids enhances the performance of the miniature heat pipe. When the four miniature heat pipes are cut to examine at the end of the experiment, a thin coating on the surface of the screen mesh of the heat pipe using SiO2-water nanofluids is found. This may be one reason for reinforcing the heat transfer performance of the miniature heat pipe.

  15. An experimental test of voluntary strategies to promote urban water demand management.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Kelly S; Spinks, Anneliese; Russell, Sally; McCrea, Rod; Stewart, Rodney; Gardner, John

    2013-01-15

    In light of the current and future threats to global water security the current research focuses on trialing interventions to promote urban water conservation. We report an experimental study designed to test the long-term impact of three different interventions on household water consumption in South East Queensland. Participants from 221 households were recruited and completed an initial survey, and their houses were fitted with smart water meters which measured total water usage at 5 s intervals. Households were allocated into one of four conditions: a control group and three interventions groups (water saving information alone, information plus a descriptive norm manipulation, and information plus tailored end-user feedback). The study is the first to use smart water metering technology as a tool for behaviour change as well as a way to test the effectiveness of demand management interventions. Growth curve modelling revealed that compared to the control, the three intervention groups all showed reduced levels of household consumption (an average reduction of 11.3 L per person per day) over the course of the interventions, and for some months afterwards. All interventions led to significant water savings, but long-term household usage data showed that in all cases, the reduction in water use resulting from the interventions eventually dissipated, with water consumption returning to pre-intervention levels after approximately 12 months. Implications for water demand management programs are discussed.

  16. Experimental research of fluorescence spectra of watercress stressed by lack or excess of watering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullo, O. A.; Fedotov, Yu. V.; Belov, M. L.; Gorodnichev, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental laboratory investigations of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra of watercress were conducted. The fluorescence spectra were excited by a YAG:Nd laser emitting at 532 nm. The laboratory setup was described and fluorescence spectra of watercress in stressed states caused by lack and excess of water were presented. It was established that the influence of stress caused by lack and excess of watering is manifested in changes of fluorescence spectra.

  17. Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Coolant Leak Events Caused by Thermal Fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Corwin Lee; Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Galyean, William Jospeh

    1999-09-01

    We present statistical analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary coolant leak events caused by thermal fatigue, and discuss their safety significance. Our worldwide data contain 13 leak events (through-wall cracking) in 3509 reactor-years, all in stainless steel piping with diameter less than 25 cm. Several types of data analysis show that the frequency of leak events (events per reactor-year) is increasing with plant age, and the increase is statistically significant. When an exponential trend model is assumed, the leak frequency is estimated to double every 8 years of reactor age, although this result should not be extrapolated to plants much older than 25 years. Difficulties in arresting this increase include lack of quantitative understanding of the phenomena causing thermal fatigue, lack of understanding of crack growth, and difficulty in detecting existing cracks.

  18. Experimental study on the effect of the electric filed on the freezing of the supercooled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Seiji; Saito, Akio; Harada, Tadahide

    Effect of the electric field on freezing of supercooled water was investigated, experimentally. The experiment was carried out by charging the electrode whose tip was inserted into supercooled water. It was found that supercooled water freeze instantly by applying the electric charge. There were many papers in the past which dealt with the effect of electrical field on freezing of supercooled water, but with a high voltage, order of a few kV. However, through this experimental study, it was found that the supercooled water can freeze at the voltage less than 100V, if D.C. voltage is applied directly to supercooled water. There was no deformation of water droplet or spark discharge as some papers suggest as a reason for the effect. It was also found that the probability of freezing depends upon the degree of supercooling, value of D.C. voltage applied, size of electrode and the distance between two electrods. The mechanism of this effect was discussed and suggested as follows: High electric field is formed locally due to the existence of surface edge or small projections on the surface. Water molecule which has a polarity is drawn near to the cluster on the surface whose motion is restricted by the existence of electric field. Therefore, embryo can transform to nucleus, instantly.

  19. Cattle-derived microbial input to source water catchments: An experimental assessment of stream crossing modification.

    PubMed

    Smolders, Andrew; Rolls, Robert J; Ryder, Darren; Watkinson, Andrew; Mackenzie, Mark

    2015-06-01

    The provision of safe drinking water is a global issue, and animal production is recognized as a significant potential origin of human infectious pathogenic microorganisms within source water catchments. On-farm management can be used to mitigate livestock-derived microbial pollution in source water catchments to reduce the risk of contamination to potable water supplies. We applied a modified Before-After Control Impact (BACI) design to test if restricting the access of livestock to direct contact with streams prevented longitudinal increases in the concentrations of faecal indicator bacteria and suspended solids. Significant longitudinal increases in pollutant concentrations were detected between upstream and downstream reaches of the control crossing, whereas such increases were not detected at the treatment crossing. Therefore, while the crossing upgrade was effective in preventing cattle-derived point source pollution by between 112 and 158%, diffuse source pollution to water supplies from livestock is not ameliorated by this intervention alone. Our findings indicate that stream crossings that prevent direct contact between livestock and waterways provide a simple method for reducing pollutant loads in source water catchments, which ultimately minimises the likelihood of pathogenic microorganisms passing through source water catchments and the drinking water supply system. The efficacy of the catchment as a primary barrier to pathogenic risks to drinking water supplies would be improved with the integration of management interventions that minimise direct contact between livestock and waterways, combined with the mitigation of diffuse sources of livestock-derived faecal matter from farmland runoff to the aquatic environment.

  20. Water-hyacinth production primary and advanced treatment of wastewater. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, B.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A prototype water hyacinth wastewater treatment system has been in operation for two years at Walt Disney World, near Orlando, Florida. Typically, the hyacinth system removes 80-90% total suspended solids and B.O.D. from the influent stream. Major impacts on water quality exiting the system are: seasonal variations in solar radiation, air and water temperature; operational problems, particularly harvesting equipment breakdown, and retention time in the ponds. Phosphorus and nitrogen removal show a strong seasonal dependence, with removal rates varying from 0.08 to 1.11 g/m/sup 2//day for N and from 0.05 to 0.29 g/m/sup 2//day for P. Nitrogen removal rates show a strong dependence on retention times, with a retention time of 5 days appearing to be a critical limit for the establishment of an active population of denitrifying bacteria. Hyacinth biomass productivity of the system was approximately 66.7 dry metric tons per hectare year (30 dry tons/acre year) during the second year of operation. An Experimental Test Unit (ETU) for anaerobic digestion of hyacinths to methane will be installed by late 1983.

  1. Experimental Evaluation the Effectiveness of Water Mist Fire Extinguishing Systems at Oil and Gas Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyashina, G. S.; Medvedev, V. V.; Shevyrev, S. A.; Vysokomornaya, O. V.

    2016-02-01

    Currently mist water is one of the most promising areas of fire protection. We performed an experimental study of phase transformations drops of water mist (range 50 - 500 microns) in motion in a high-temperature (500 - 2000 K) typical products of combustion of petroleum products (gasoline, kerosene, acetone, alcohol). We used high speed (the speed of shooting at least 105 frames per second) and optical methods of recording streams of liquid and gas medium. We determined the effect of the parameters of the test process (the initial temperature and the initial droplet size) at the rate of evaporation of atomized water under these conditions.

  2. Uncertainty analysis of primary water pollutant control in China's pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zong-guo; Di, Jing-han; Zhang, Xue-ying

    2016-03-15

    The total emission control target of water pollutants (e.g., COD and NH4-N) for a certain industrial sector can be predicted and analysed using the popular technology-based bottom-up modelling. However, this methodology has obvious uncertainty regarding the attainment of mitigation targets. The primary uncertainty comes from macro-production, pollutant reduction roadmap, and technical parameters. This research takes the paper and pulp industry in China as an example, and builds 5 mitigation scenarios via different combinations of raw material structure, scale structure, procedure mitigation technology, and end-of-pipe treatment technology. Using the methodology of uncertainty analysis via Monte Carlo, random sampling was conducted over a hundred thousand times. According to key parameters, sensitive parameters that impact total emission control targets such as industrial output, technique structure, cleaner production technology, and end-of-pipe treatment technology are discussed in this article. It appears that scenario uncertainty has a larger influence on COD emission than NH4-N, hence it is recommended that a looser total emission control target for COD is necessary to increase its feasibility and availability while maintaining the status quo of NH4-N. Consequently, from uncertainty analysis, this research recognizes the sensitive products, techniques, and technologies affecting industrial water pollution.

  3. Factors associated with use of improved water sources and sanitation among rural primary schoolchildren in Pursat Province, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    En, Wee Liang; Gan, Goh Lee

    2011-07-01

    Access to improved water supplies and sanitation generally reduces childhood diarrhea incidence. Using a cross-sectional stratified cluster sampling design, interviews were conducted among grade 4-6 primary schoolchildren from 10 primary schools in highland and lowland districts of Pursat Province, Cambodia, in both June (rainy season) and December (dry season) 2009 to determine the demographics and water sources/sanitation used. Parents also recorded any incidents of diarrhea in their children over those months. We explored the sociodemographic factors associated with use of improved water sources/sanitation, using mixed effect modelling. Participation was 84.7% (1,101/1,300). About half exclusively used improved water sources but less than 25% had access to improved sanitation during both seasons. Adjusting for clustering within households and within individuals over time, exclusive use of improved water sources and sanitation were associated with the following: dry season, more permanent housing type, family size < 8 members, and higher levels of education. Exclusive use of improved sanitation was associated with good hygiene practices and exclusive use of improved water sources was associated with male gender. Access to improved water sources and sanitation among rural Cambodian primary schoolchildren can be improved, particularly in those with lower socio-economic status. Programs to promote use of improved water sources/sanitation need to target less educated parents.

  4. Anticoccidial efficacy of drinking water soluble diclazuril on experimental and field coccidiosis in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    El-Banna, H A; El-Bahy, M M; El-Zorba, H Y; El-Hady, M

    2005-08-01

    Prophylactic and curative capacity of water soluble formulation of Diclazuril (Diclosol 1%) and feed additive form (Clinacox, 0.5%) were tested against Eimeria infection in broiler chickens. Such testing was performed both experimentally and in the field. Toltrazuril (Baycox, 2.5%) was used as reference control drug. Water soluble formulation of Diclazuril induced a marked inhibitory effect on the different stages of the parasite life cycle in experimentally infected treated birds especially when applied on the day when blood first appeared in the faeces [fifth day post-infection (d.p.i.)] as well as on the second day of blood dropping (6 d.p.i.). Both tested dosage levels of Diclazuril water soluble formulation in drinking water (5 and 10 ppm) showed the same effect in controlling coccidial infection and reducing the total oocyst numbers, lesion and faecal scores. Moreover, there was no significant difference in the efficacy of water soluble form of Diclazuril and the reference control drug (Toltrazuril, 25 ppm). In addition, testing the water soluble formulation (5 ppm) in naturally infected poultry farm (20,000 birds), showed the same anticoccidial effect observed when using Toltrazuril, as a treatment for coccidiosis. In conclusion, addition of Diclazuril at the dose of 5 ppm in the drinking water of naturally coccidia infected bird induced the same effect as 25 ppm of Toltrazuril as a treatment for coccidiosis in chickens.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of the Drag Coefficient of Water Rockets by a Simple Free-Fall Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E. Arguelles-Diaz, K.; Fernandez-Oro, J.

    2009-01-01

    The flight trajectory of a water rocket can be reasonably calculated if the magnitude of the drag coefficient is known. The experimental determination of this coefficient with enough precision is usually quite difficult, but in this paper we propose a simple free-fall experiment for undergraduate students to reasonably estimate the drag…

  6. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a representative lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated at various power levels in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to anchor a CFD model. Performance of a water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted by CFD models anchored to test data. The accompanying viewgraph presentation includes the following topics: 1) Testbed Configuration; 2) Core Heater Placement and Instrumentation; 3) Thermocouple Placement; 4) Core Thermocouple Placement; 5) Outer Tank Thermocouple Placement; 6) Integrated Testbed; 7) Methodology; 8) Experimental Results: Core Temperatures; 9) Experimental Results; Outer Tank Temperatures; 10) CFD Modeling; 11) CFD Model: Anchored to Experimental Results (1-g); 12) CFD MOdel: Prediction for 1/6-g; and 13) CFD Model: Comparison of 1-g to 1/6-g.

  7. Cenozoic magmatism of north Victoria Land, Antarctica: an experimental study on the mantle source of a primary basanite from the McMurdo Volcanic Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armienti, P.; Freda, C.; Misiti, V.; Perinelli, C.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanoes of the McMurdo Vocanic Group (MMVG) (Antarctica) dot the eastern shoulder of Ross Sea Rift System giving rise to alkaline transitional volcanic suites which in north Victoria Land are emplaced since Early Cenozoic. Geochemical geological, geophysical and geochronological data on Cenozoic volcanic activity in NVL suggest that the region is a site of passive astenospheric rise, rather than affected by a thermally active mantle plume. Furthermore the comparison of geochemical and isotopical data of basic lavas with those provided by mantle xenoliths they carry to the surface, document the compositional heterogeneity of sublithospheric mantle caused by the coupled action of partial melting and metasomatism. In particular the metasomatic episode is probably linked to the amagmatic extensional event that affected the West Antarctic Rift System in the Late Cretaceous. The astenospheric melts generated during this event, moving through the upper mantle, can have crystallized as veins or may have led to the formation of metasomatic minerals such as amphibole or phlogopite. In this scenario the mineralogical and chemical composition of sources responsible for Cenozoic magmatism, amphibole-bearing spinel-peridotite versus pyroxenite in the garnet stability field, it is still a matter of debate. To shed light on this argument a previous experimental study on a basanite of MMVG, representative of primary magma (Orlando et al., 2000) has been integrated with new experimental investigation on the same basanitic composition. The preliminary experiments were conducted to pressures of 1.0 - 2.0GPa in the presence of 0-1% of added water and indicate olivine on the liquidus at 1.0 GPa that is substitute by clinopyroxene at 2.0GPa. The addition of 1% of water induces a decrease of liquidus temperature of about 40°C shifting its value in the T range (1280-1310°C) the same that was inferred by melt inclusions hosted in the olivine phenocrysts of the studied basanite.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR WATER FORMATION VIA OZONE HYDROGENATION ON DUST GRAINS AT 10 K

    SciTech Connect

    Mokrane, H.; Chaabouni, H.; Accolla, M.; Congiu, E.; Dulieu, F.; Chehrouri, M.; Lemaire, J. L.

    2009-11-10

    The formation of water molecules from the reaction between ozone (O{sub 3}) and D-atoms is studied experimentally for the first time. Ozone is deposited on non-porous amorphous solid water ice (H{sub 2}O), and D-atoms are then sent onto the sample held at 10 K. HDO molecules are detected during the desorption of the whole substrate where isotope mixing takes place, indicating that water synthesis has occurred. The efficiency of water formation via hydrogenation of ozone is of the same order of magnitude as that found for reactions involving O-atoms or O{sub 2} molecules and exhibits no apparent activation barrier. These experiments validate the assumption made by models using ozone as one of the precursors of water formation via solid-state chemistry on interstellar dust grains.

  9. A new experimental design for laser-driven shocks on precompressed and preheated water samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sollier, A.; Auroux, E.; Vauthier, J.-S.; Desbiens, N.; Bourasseau, E.; Maillet, J.-B.; Boustie, M.; He, H.; Resseguier, T. de; Berterretche, P.

    2007-12-12

    Laser driven shock measurements have been performed on precompressed and preheated water samples in order to reach states lying above the standard water Hugoniot in the pressure versus temperature diagram, which are representative of the thermodynamic parameters of water in the detonation products of high condensed explosives. In this experimental system, water is used as both target sample and window medium for VISAR diagnosis. We report the first experiments performed with the LCD's laser system at low shock pressure, on water samples preheated up to 300 deg. C and precompressed up to 300 bar. The results are used to check the predictions of the CARTE thermochemical code, and compared with the Sesame equation of state and with molecular Monte Carlo calculations.

  10. Global gross primary productivity and water use efficiency changes under drought stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhen; Wang, Jingxin; Liu, Shirong; Rentch, James S.; Sun, Pengsen; Lu, Chaoqun

    2017-01-01

    Drought can affect the structure, composition and function of terrestrial ecosystems, yet drought impacts and post-drought recovery potentials of different land cover types have not been extensively studied at a global scale. We evaluated drought impacts on gross primary productivity (GPP), evapotranspiration (ET), and water use efficiency (WUE) of different global terrestrial ecosystems, as well as the drought-resilience of each ecosystem type during the period of 2000 to 2011. Using GPP as biome vitality indicator against drought stress, we developed a model to examine ecosystem resilience represented by the length of recovery days (LRD). LRD presented an evident gradient of high (>60 days) in mid-latitude region and low (<60 days) in low (tropical area) and high (boreal area) latitude regions. As average GPP increased, the LRD showed a significantly decreasing trend, indicating readiness to recover after drought, across various land cover types (R 2 = 0.68, p < 0.0001). Moreover, zonal analysis revealed that the most dramatic reduction of the drought-induced GPP was found in the mid-latitude region of the Northern Hemisphere (48% reduction), followed by the low-latitude region of the Southern Hemisphere (13% reduction). In contrast, a slightly enhanced GPP (10%) was evident in the tropical region under drought impact. Additionally, the highest drought-induced reduction of ET was found in the Mediterranean area, followed by Africa. Water use efficiency, however, showed a pattern of decreasing in the Northern Hemisphere and increasing in the Southern Hemisphere. Drought induced reductions of WUE ranged from 0.96% to 27.67% in most of the land cover types, while the increases of WUE found in Evergreen Broadleaf Forest and savanna were about 7.09% and 9.88%, respectively. These increases of GPP and WUE detected during drought periods could either be due to water-stress induced responses or data uncertainties, which require further investigation.

  11. Factors Leading to Poor Water Sanitation Hygiene Among Primary School Going Children in Chitungwiza

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Blessing

    2012-01-01

    Although the world has progressed in the area of water and sanitation, more than 2.3 billion people still live without access to sanitation facilities and some are unable to practice basic hygiene. Access to water and basic sanitation has deteriorated in Chitungwiza and children are at risk of developing illness and missing school due to the deterioration. We sought to investigate the predisposing, enabling and reinforcing factors that are causally related to water- and sanitation- related hygiene practices among school going children. A random sample of 400 primary school children (196 males, 204 females) in four schools in Chitungwiza town, Zimbabwe was interviewed. Behavioural factors were assessed through cross examination of the PROCEED PRECEDE Model. The respondents had been stratified through the random sampling where strata were classes. A structured observation checklist was also administered to assess hygiene enabling facilities for each school. Children’s knowledge and perceptions were inconsistent with hygienic behaviour. The family institution seemed to play a more important role in life skills training and positive reinforcement compared to the school (50% vs 27.3%). There was no association between a child’s sex, age and parents’ occupation with any of the factors assessed (P=0.646). Schools did not provide a hygiene enabling environment as there were no learning materials, policy and resources on hygiene and health. The challenges lay in the provision of hygiene enabling facilities, particularly, the lack of access to sanitation for the maturing girl child and a school curriculum that provides positive reinforcement and practical life skills training approach. PMID:28299080

  12. Experimental simulation of the water cooling of corium spread over the floor of a BWR containment

    SciTech Connect

    Morage, F.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.; Podowski, M.Z.

    1995-09-01

    This paper is concerned with an experimental investigation of the cooling effect of water collected on the surface of corium released onto the floor of a BWR drywell. In the present experiments, the actual reactor materials were replaced by simulant materials. Specifically, the results are shown for Freon-11 film boiling over liquid Wood`s metal spread above a solid porous surface through which argon gas was injected. An analysis of the obtained experimental data revealed that the actual film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and the water above the pool should be more efficient than predicted by using standard correlations for boiling over solid surfaces. This effect will be further augmented by the gas released due to the ablation of concrete floor beneath the corium and percolating towards its upper surface and into through the water layer above.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Simulation of Water Vapor Adsorption and Diffusion in Shale Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Cihan, A.; Wan, J.; Zheng, L.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in deep horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have lead to large increases in production from unconventional shale gas reservoirs. Despite the success of this technology, uncertainties associated with basic transport processes require understanding in order to improve efficiency and minimize environmental impacts. The hydraulic fracturing process introduces large volumes of water into shale gas reservoirs. Most of the fracturing water remains in reservoirs to interfere with gas production. The quantification of the amount of water retained in shale gas reservoirs is crucial for predicting gas shale formation productivity and for optimizing extraction conditions. In this study, water vapor adsorption isotherms were gravimetrically measured on granular fractions of Woodford formation shales sieved after crushing. The isotherms were obtained at 30℃ and 50℃, for relative humidities from 11.1% to 97.0%. Water adsorption in these shale grains conformed to the typeⅡisotherm, and were nearly identical for the two experimental temperatures. In order to better understand the isotherms, a computational model based on the Maxwell-Stefan Diffusion equations (MSDM) was constructed to analyze the water adsorption and gas diffusion in shale grains. Based on the experimental results, the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer (GAB) isotherm model for gas adsorption was included in the model.

  14. Comparison of GEANT4 very low energy cross section models with experimental data in water

    SciTech Connect

    Incerti, S.; Ivanchenko, A.; Karamitros, M.; Mantero, A.; Moretto, P.; Tran, H. N.; Mascialino, B.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Bernal, M. A.; Francis, Z.; Villagrasa, C.; Baldacchino, G.; Gueye, P.; Capra, R.; Nieminen, P.; Zacharatou, C.

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: The GEANT4 general-purpose Monte Carlo simulation toolkit is able to simulate physical interaction processes of electrons, hydrogen and helium atoms with charge states (H{sup 0}, H{sup +}) and (He{sup 0}, He{sup +}, He{sup 2+}), respectively, in liquid water, the main component of biological systems, down to the electron volt regime and the submicrometer scale, providing GEANT4 users with the so-called ''GEANT4-DNA'' physics models suitable for microdosimetry simulation applications. The corresponding software has been recently re-engineered in order to provide GEANT4 users with a coherent and unique approach to the simulation of electromagnetic interactions within the GEANT4 toolkit framework (since GEANT4 version 9.3 beta). This work presents a quantitative comparison of these physics models with a collection of experimental data in water collected from the literature. Methods: An evaluation of the closeness between the total and differential cross section models available in the GEANT4 toolkit for microdosimetry and experimental reference data is performed using a dedicated statistical toolkit that includes the Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistical test. The authors used experimental data acquired in water vapor as direct measurements in the liquid phase are not yet available in the literature. Comparisons with several recommendations are also presented. Results: The authors have assessed the compatibility of experimental data with GEANT4 microdosimetry models by means of quantitative methods. The results show that microdosimetric measurements in liquid water are necessary to assess quantitatively the validity of the software implementation for the liquid water phase. Nevertheless, a comparison with existing experimental data in water vapor provides a qualitative appreciation of the plausibility of the simulation models. The existing reference data themselves should undergo a critical interpretation and selection, as some of the series exhibit significant

  15. Experimental manipulation of water levels in two French riverine grassland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Oorschot, Mark; van Gaalen, Nils; Maltby, Ed; Mockler, Natalie; Spink, Andrew; Verhoeven, Jos T. A.

    2000-01-01

    In this experimental study, we simulated the effects of different river flooding regimes on soil nutrient availability, decomposition and plant production in floodplain grasslands. This was done to investigate the influences of soil water contents on nutrient cycling. Water levels were manipulated in mesocosms with intact soil turfs from two French floodplain grasslands. Three water levels were established: a `wet' (water level at the soil surface), an `intermediate' (water level at -20 cm) and a `dry' treatment (water level at -120 cm). With increasing soil moisture, soil pH became more neutral, while redox-potential and oxygen concentration decreased. The `dry' treatment showed much lower values for process rates in soil and vegetation than the `intermediate' and `wet' treatments. Regressions showed that soil C-evolution and N-mineralization were positively related to soil moisture content. Not all mineralized N was available for plant uptake in the wet treatment, as a considerable part was denitrified here. Denitrification was especially high as soil water contents increased to levels above field capacity, where redox-potentials sharply dropped. Further, soil P availability was higher under wet conditions. In the `dry' treatment, soil water content was close to the wilting point and plant production was low. In the `intermediate' treatment, plant production was most likely limited by nitrogen. The `wet' treatment did not result in a further increase in plant production. Dam construction and river bed degradation can result in lower river levels and summer drought on floodplains. This experimental study suggests that summer drought on floodplain soils reduces decomposition of soil organic matter, nutrient availability, denitrification, plant production and nutrient uptake. This can affect the capacity of floodplains to remove or retain nutrients from river water in a negative way.

  16. Water-polysaccharide interactions in the primary cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana from polarization transfer solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    White, Paul B; Wang, Tuo; Park, Yong Bum; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2014-07-23

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water (1)H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent (1)H-(1)H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide (13)C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water-pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water-cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water-polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water-pectin spin diffusion precedes water-cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  17. Measuring experimental cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients for the SAMPL5 challenge.

    PubMed

    Rustenburg, Ariën S; Dancer, Justin; Lin, Baiwei; Feng, Jianwen A; Ortwine, Daniel F; Mobley, David L; Chodera, John D

    2016-11-01

    Small molecule distribution coefficients between immiscible nonaqueuous and aqueous phases-such as cyclohexane and water-measure the degree to which small molecules prefer one phase over another at a given pH. As distribution coefficients capture both thermodynamic effects (the free energy of transfer between phases) and chemical effects (protonation state and tautomer effects in aqueous solution), they provide an exacting test of the thermodynamic and chemical accuracy of physical models without the long correlation times inherent to the prediction of more complex properties of relevance to drug discovery, such as protein-ligand binding affinities. For the SAMPL5 challenge, we carried out a blind prediction exercise in which participants were tasked with the prediction of distribution coefficients to assess its potential as a new route for the evaluation and systematic improvement of predictive physical models. These measurements are typically performed for octanol-water, but we opted to utilize cyclohexane for the nonpolar phase. Cyclohexane was suggested to avoid issues with the high water content and persistent heterogeneous structure of water-saturated octanol phases, since it has greatly reduced water content and a homogeneous liquid structure. Using a modified shake-flask LC-MS/MS protocol, we collected cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients for a set of 53 druglike compounds at pH 7.4. These measurements were used as the basis for the SAMPL5 Distribution Coefficient Challenge, where 18 research groups predicted these measurements before the experimental values reported here were released. In this work, we describe the experimental protocol we utilized for measurement of cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients, report the measured data, propose a new bootstrap-based data analysis procedure to incorporate multiple sources of experimental error, and provide insights to help guide future iterations of this valuable exercise in predictive modeling.

  18. Seasonal Shifts in Primary Water Source Type: A Comparison of Largely Pastoral Communities in Uganda and Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Amber L.; Zwickle, Adam; Namanya, Judith; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Mwita, Emiliana

    2016-01-01

    Many water-related illnesses show an increase during the wet season. This is often due to fecal contamination from runoff, yet, it is unknown whether seasonal changes in water availability may also play a role in increased illness via changes in the type of primary water source used by households. Very little is known about the dynamic aspects of access to water and changes in source type across seasons, particularly in semi-arid regions with annual water scarcity. The research questions in this study were: (1) To what degree do households in Uganda (UG) and Tanzania (TZ) change primary water source type between wet and dry seasons?; and (2) How might seasonal changes relate to water quality and health? Using spatial survey data from 92 households each in UG and TZ this study found that, from wet to dry season, 26% (UG) and 9% (TZ) of households switched from a source with higher risk of contamination to a source with lower risk. By comparison, only 20% (UG) and 0% (TZ) of households switched from a source with lower risk of contamination to a source with higher risk of contamination. This research suggests that one pathway through which water-related disease prevalence may differ across seasons is the use of water sources with higher risk contamination, and that households with access to sources with lower risks of contamination sometimes choose to use more contaminated sources. PMID:26828507

  19. Seasonal Shifts in Primary Water Source Type: A Comparison of Largely Pastoral Communities in Uganda and Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Amber L; Zwickle, Adam; Namanya, Judith; Rzotkiewicz, Amanda; Mwita, Emiliana

    2016-01-27

    Many water-related illnesses show an increase during the wet season. This is often due to fecal contamination from runoff, yet, it is unknown whether seasonal changes in water availability may also play a role in increased illness via changes in the type of primary water source used by households. Very little is known about the dynamic aspects of access to water and changes in source type across seasons, particularly in semi-arid regions with annual water scarcity. The research questions in this study were: (1) To what degree do households in Uganda (UG) and Tanzania (TZ) change primary water source type between wet and dry seasons?; and (2) How might seasonal changes relate to water quality and health? Using spatial survey data from 92 households each in UG and TZ this study found that, from wet to dry season, 26% (UG) and 9% (TZ) of households switched from a source with higher risk of contamination to a source with lower risk. By comparison, only 20% (UG) and 0% (TZ) of households switched from a source with lower risk of contamination to a source with higher risk of contamination. This research suggests that one pathway through which water-related disease prevalence may differ across seasons is the use of water sources with higher risk contamination, and that households with access to sources with lower risks of contamination sometimes choose to use more contaminated sources.

  20. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    REID, ROBERT S.; PEARSON, J. BOSIE; STEWART, ERIC T.

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  1. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-30

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  2. Primary portal vein hypoplasia and SLC2A9 mutation associated with urate urolithiasis in a Spanish water dog

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Laura; Hammond, Gawain; Mclauchlan, Gerard

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a Spanish water dog with an ammonium urate urethrolith which was diagnosed with primary portal vein hypoplasia and was found to be homozygous for the mutated SLC2A9 gene. This is the first Spanish water dog described with the SLC2A9 mutation and the first case of concurrent portal vascular abnormalities and SLC2A9 mutation. PMID:26538670

  3. Modeling and experimental examination of water level effects on radon exhalation from fragmented uranium ore.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yong-Jun; Dai, Xin-Tao; Ding, De-Xin; Zhao, Ya-Li

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a one-dimensional steady-state mathematical model of radon transport in fragmented uranium ore was established according to Fick's law and radon transfer theory in an air-water interface. The model was utilized to obtain an analytical solution for radon concentration in the air-water, two-phase system under steady state conditions, as well as a corresponding radon exhalation rate calculation formula. We also designed a one-dimensional experimental apparatus for simulating radon diffusion migration in the uranium ore with various water levels to verify the mathematical model. The predicted results were in close agreement with the measured results, suggesting that the proposed model can be readily used to determine radon concentrations and exhalation rates in fragmented uranium ore with varying water levels.

  4. Experimental study of the water jet induced by underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koita, T.; Zhu, Y.; Sun, M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation on the effects of explosion depth and tube width on the water jet induced by an underwater electrical discharge in a narrow rectangular tube. The water jet formation and bubble structure were evaluated from the images recorded by a high-speed video camera. Two typical patterns of jet formation and four general patterns of bubble implosion were observed, depending on the explosion depth and tube width. The velocity of the water jet was calculated from the recorded images. The jet velocity was observed to depend on not only the explosion depth and energy, but also on the tube width. We proposed an empirical formula defining the water jet velocity in the tube as a function of the tube width and explosion depth and energy.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. B.; Reid, R.; Sadasivan, P.; Stewart, E.

    2007-01-01

    A water based shielding system is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. The use of water may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. A representative lunar surface reactor design is evaluated at various power levels in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The evaluation compares the experimental data from the WST to CFD models. Performance of a water shield on the lunar surface is predicted by CFD models anchored to test data, and by matching relevant dimensionless parameters.

  6. Numerical modeling and experimental measurements of water spray impact and transport over a cylinder.

    SciTech Connect

    Avedisian, C. T.; Presser, Cary; DesJardin, Paul Edward; Hewson, John C.; Yoon, Sam Sukgoo

    2005-03-01

    This study compares experimental measurements and numerical simulations of liquid droplets over heated (to a near surface temperature of 423 K) and unheated cylinders. The numerical model is based on an unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulation using a stochastic separated flow (SSF) approach for the droplets that includes submodels for droplet dispersion, heat and mass transfer, and impact on a solid surface. The details of the droplet impact model are presented and the model is used to simulate water spray impingement on a cylinder. Computational results are compared with experimental measurements using phase Doppler interferometry (PDI).

  7. Measuring experimental cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients for the SAMPL5 challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustenburg, Ariën S.; Dancer, Justin; Lin, Baiwei; Feng, Jianwen A.; Ortwine, Daniel F.; Mobley, David L.; Chodera, John D.

    2016-11-01

    Small molecule distribution coefficients between immiscible nonaqueuous and aqueous phases—such as cyclohexane and water—measure the degree to which small molecules prefer one phase over another at a given pH. As distribution coefficients capture both thermodynamic effects (the free energy of transfer between phases) and chemical effects (protonation state and tautomer effects in aqueous solution), they provide an exacting test of the thermodynamic and chemical accuracy of physical models without the long correlation times inherent to the prediction of more complex properties of relevance to drug discovery, such as protein-ligand binding affinities. For the SAMPL5 challenge, we carried out a blind prediction exercise in which participants were tasked with the prediction of distribution coefficients to assess its potential as a new route for the evaluation and systematic improvement of predictive physical models. These measurements are typically performed for octanol-water, but we opted to utilize cyclohexane for the nonpolar phase. Cyclohexane was suggested to avoid issues with the high water content and persistent heterogeneous structure of water-saturated octanol phases, since it has greatly reduced water content and a homogeneous liquid structure. Using a modified shake-flask LC-MS/MS protocol, we collected cyclohexane/water distribution coefficients for a set of 53 druglike compounds at pH 7.4. These measurements were used as the basis for the SAMPL5 Distribution Coefficient Challenge, where 18 research groups predicted these measurements before the experimental values reported here were released. In this work, we describe the experimental protocol we utilized for measurement of cyclohexane-water distribution coefficients, report the measured data, propose a new bootstrap-based data analysis procedure to incorporate multiple sources of experimental error, and provide insights to help guide future iterations of this valuable exercise in predictive modeling.

  8. Assessing Primary Water Stress Corrosion Crack Morphology and Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Doctor, Steven R.; Schuster, George J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2005-12-01

    A research program on primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In this program, the material degradation problem in Alloys 600, 182 and 82 is being investigated, with objectives that include compiling a knowledge base on all cracking in nickel-base materials at all degradation sites in nuclear power plants, assessing nondestructive evaluation methods using mockups to quantify the detection, sizing, and characterization of tight cracks, determining the role of material parameters, such as welding processes, in the degradation. This work is being conducted as a part of an international cooperative research project that has been set up to leverage efforts in several countries to address a significant and common problem. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is leading this cooperative project to address this generic problem in a systematic manner over the next four years. In this paper, published information on the failure history of Alloys 600, 182, and 82 is compiled and presented. The configurations of the welded assemblies that contain these alloys are shown to be important considerations for NDE reliability measurements. The product forms and the welding processes represented in the degraded components are described. The relevant data on crack morphology parameters such as shape and orientation are presented, and their impact on nondestructive evaluation (NDE) reliability is discussed.

  9. The Life-Cycle Costs of School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan Primary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Kelly T.; Mwaki, Alex; Adhiambo, Dorothy; Cheney-Coker, Malaika; Muga, Richard; Freeman, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programs in schools can increase the health, dignity and comfort of students and teachers. Understanding the costs of WASH facilities and services in schools is one essential piece for policy makers to utilize when budgeting for schools and helping to make WASH programs more sustainable. In this study we collected data from NGO and government offices, local hardware shops and 89 rural primary schools across three Kenyan counties. Current expenditures on WASH, from school and external (NGO, government, parent) sources, averaged 1.83 USD per student per year. After reviewing current expenditures, estimated costs of operations and maintenance for bringing schools up to basic WASH standards, were calculated to be 3.03 USD per student per year. This includes recurrent costs, but not the cost of installing or setting up WASH infrastructure, which was 18,916 USD per school, for a school of 400 students (4.92 USD per student, per year). These findings demonstrate the need for increases in allocations to schools in Kenya, and stricter guidance on how money should be spent on WASH inputs to enable all schools to provide basic WASH for all students. PMID:27355962

  10. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Vikram Naginbhai; Ware, Arthur Gates; Atwood, Corwin Lee; Sattison, Martin Blaine; Hartley, Robert Scott; Hsu, C.

    1999-08-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number of rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs.

  11. Assessment of Field Experience Related to Pressurized Water Reactor Primary System Leaks

    SciTech Connect

    A. G. Ware; C. Hsu; C. L. Atwood; M. B. Sattison; R. S. Hartley; V. N. Shah

    1999-02-01

    This paper presents our assessment of field experience related to pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary system leaks in terms of their number and rates, how aging affects frequency of leak events, the safety significance of such leaks, industry efforts to reduce leaks, and effectiveness of current leak detection systems. We have reviewed the licensee event reports to identify the events that took place during 1985 to the third quarter of 1996, and reviewed related technical literature and visited PWR plants to analyze these events. Our assessment shows that USNRC licensees have taken effective actions to reduce the number of leak events. One main reason for this decreasing trend was the elimination or reportable leakages from valve stem packing after 1991. Our review of leak events related to vibratory fatigue reveals a statistically significant decreasing trend with age (years of operation), but not in calendar time. Our assessment of worldwide data on leakage caused by thermal fatigue cracking is that the fatigue of aging piping is a safety significant issue. Our review of leak events has identified several susceptible sites in piping having high safety significance; but the inspection of some of these sites is not required by the ASME Code. These sites may be included in the risk-informed inspection programs.

  12. The simulation of thermohydraulic phenomena in a pressurized water reactor primary loop

    SciTech Connect

    Popp, M

    1987-01-01

    Several important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena essential to nuclear power reactor safety were investigated. Scaling and modeling laws for pressurized water reactors are reviewed and a new scaling approach focusing on the overall loop behavior is presented. Scaling criteria for one- and two-phase natural circulation are developed, as well as a simplified model describing the first phase of a small break loss of coolant accident. Reactor vessel vent valve effects are included in the analysis of steady one-phase natural circulation flow. Two new dimensionless numbers, which uniquely describe one-phase flow in natural circulation loops, were deduced and are discussed. A scaled model of the primary loop of a typical Babcock and Wilcox reactor was designed, built, and tested. The particular prototype modeled was the TMI unit 2 reactor. The electrically heated, stainless steel model operates at a maximum pressure of 300 psig and has a maximum heat input of 188 kW. The model is about 4 times smaller in height than the prototype reactor, with a nominal volume scale of 1:500. Experiments were conducted establishing subcooled natural circulation in the model loop. Both steady flow and power transients were investigated.

  13. The Life-Cycle Costs of School Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Access in Kenyan Primary Schools.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kelly T; Mwaki, Alex; Adhiambo, Dorothy; Cheney-Coker, Malaika; Muga, Richard; Freeman, Matthew C

    2016-06-27

    Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) programs in schools can increase the health, dignity and comfort of students and teachers. Understanding the costs of WASH facilities and services in schools is one essential piece for policy makers to utilize when budgeting for schools and helping to make WASH programs more sustainable. In this study we collected data from NGO and government offices, local hardware shops and 89 rural primary schools across three Kenyan counties. Current expenditures on WASH, from school and external (NGO, government, parent) sources, averaged 1.83 USD per student per year. After reviewing current expenditures, estimated costs of operations and maintenance for bringing schools up to basic WASH standards, were calculated to be 3.03 USD per student per year. This includes recurrent costs, but not the cost of installing or setting up WASH infrastructure, which was 18,916 USD per school, for a school of 400 students (4.92 USD per student, per year). These findings demonstrate the need for increases in allocations to schools in Kenya, and stricter guidance on how money should be spent on WASH inputs to enable all schools to provide basic WASH for all students.

  14. Impact of animal waste application on runoff water quality in field experimental plots.

    PubMed

    Hill, Dagne D; Owens, William E; Tchoounwou, Paul B

    2005-08-01

    Animal waste from dairy and poultry operations is an economical and commonly used fertilizer in the state of Louisiana. The application of animal waste to pasture lands not only is a source of fertilizer, but also allows for a convenient method of waste disposal. The disposal of animal wastes on land is a potential nonpoint source of water degradation. Water degradation and human health is a major concern when considering the disposal of large quantities of animal waste. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of animal waste application on biological (fecal coliform, Enterobacter spp. and Escherichia coli) and physical/chemical (temperature, pH, nitrate nitrogen, ammonia nitrogen, phosphate, copper, zinc, and sulfate) characteristics of runoff water in experimental plots. The effects of the application of animal waste have been evaluated by utilizing experimental plots and simulated rainfall events. Samples of runoff water were collected and analyzed for fecal coliforms. Fecal coliforms isolated from these samples were identified to the species level. Chemical analysis was performed following standard test protocols. An analysis of temperature, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, iron, copper, phosphate, potassium, sulfate, zinc and bacterial levels was performed following standard test protocols as presented in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater [1]. In the experimental plots, less time was required in the tilled broiler litter plots for the measured chemicals to decrease below the initial pre-treatment levels. A decrease of over 50% was noted between the first and second rainfall events for sulfate levels. This decrease was seen after only four simulated rainfall events in tilled broiler litter plots whereas broiler litter plots required eight simulated rainfall events to show this same type of reduction. A reverse trend was seen in the broiler litter plots and the tilled broiler plots for potassium. Bacteria numbers

  15. Genotoxic and clastogenic effects of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa F; Hoyos-Giraldo, Luz Stella; Londoño-Velasco, Elizabeth; Reyes-Carvajal, Ingrid; Saavedra-Trujillo, Diana; Carvajal-Varona, Silvio; Sánchez-Gómez, Adalberto; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-06-15

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second-most prevalent class of drinking water disinfection by-products formed by chemical disinfectants. Previous studies have determined DNA damage and repair of HAA-induced lesions in mammalian and human cell lines; however, little is known of the genomic DNA and chromosome damage induced by these compounds in primary human cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxic and clastogenic effects of the monoHAA disinfection by-products in primary human lymphocytes. All monoHAAs were genotoxic in primary human lymphocytes, the rank order of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity was IAA > BAA > CAA. After 6 h of repair time, only 50% of the DNA damage (maximum decrease in DNA damage) was repaired compared to the control. This demonstrates that primary human lymphocytes are less efficient in repairing the induced damage by monoHAAs than previous studies with mammalian cell lines. In addition, the monoHAAs induced an increase in the chromosome aberration frequency as a measurement of the clastogenic effect of these compounds. These results coupled with genomic technologies in primary human cells and other mammalian non-cancerous cell lines may lead to the identification of biomarkers that may be employed in feedback loops to aid water chemists and engineers in the overall goal of producing safer drinking water.

  16. Influence of a stationary magnetic field on water relations in lettuce seeds. Part II: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Reina, F G; Pascual, L A; Fundora, I A

    2001-12-01

    An experimental study on water absorption by lettuce seeds previously treated in a stationary magnetic field of 0-10 mT is presented. A significant increase in the rate with which the seeds absorb water is observed in the interval 0-10 mT of magnetic treatment. An increment in the total mass of absorbed water in this interval is also observed. These results are consistent with the reports on the increase of germination rate of the seeds, and the theoretical calculation of the variations induced by magnetic fields in the ionic currents across the cellular membrane. The fields originate in changes in the ionic concentration and thus in the osmotic pressure which regulates the entrance of water to the seeds. The good correlation between the theoretical approach and experimental results provides strong evidence that the magnetic field alters the water relations in seeds, and this effect may be the explanation of the reported alterations in germination rate of seeds by the magnetic field.

  17. Experimental modeling of pressurized subglacial water flow: Implications for tunnel valley formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelandais, Thomas; Mourgues, Régis; Ravier, Édouard; Pochat, Stéphane; Strzerzynski, Pierre; Bourgeois, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    Tunnel valleys are elongated hollows commonly found in formerly glaciated areas and interpreted as resulting from subglacial meltwater erosion beneath ice sheets. Over the past two decades, the number of studies of terrestrial tunnel valleys has continuously increased, and their existence has been hypothesized also on Mars, but their formation mechanisms remain poorly understood. We introduce here an innovative experimental approach to examine erosion by circulation of pressurized meltwater within the substratum and at the ice/substratum interface. We used a permeable substratum (sand) partially covered by a viscous, impermeable, and transparent cap (silicon putty), below which we applied a central injection of pure water. Low water pressures led to groundwater circulation in the substratum only, while water pressures exceeding a threshold that is larger than the sum of the glaciostatic and lithostatic pressures led to additional water circulation and formation of drainage landforms at the cap/substratum interface. The formation of these drainage landforms was monitored through time, and their shapes were analyzed from digital elevation models obtained by stereo-photogrammetry. The experimental landforms include valleys that are similar to natural tunnel valleys in their spatial organization and in a number of diagnostic morphological criteria, such as undulating longitudinal profiles and "tunnel" shapes. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that overpressurized subglacial water circulation controls the formation of tunnel valleys.

  18. Water age and stream solute dynamics at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (US)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botter, Gianluca; Benettin, Paolo; McGuire, Kevin; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The contribution discusses experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA) to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is used to model both conservative and weathering-derived solutes. Based on the available information about the hydrology of the site, an integrated transport model was developed and used to estimate the relevant hydrochemical fluxes. The model was designed to reproduce the deuterium content of streamflow and allowed for the estimate of catchment water storage and dynamic travel time distributions (TTDs). Within this framework, dissolved silicon and sodium concentration in streamflow were simulated by implementing first-order chemical kinetics based explicitly on dynamic TTD, thus upscaling local geochemical processes to catchment scale. Our results highlight the key role of water stored within the subsoil glacial material in both the short-term and long-term solute circulation at Hubbard Brook. The analysis of the results provided by the calibrated model allowed a robust estimate of the emerging concentration-discharge relationship, streamflow age distributions (including the fraction of event water) and storage size, and their evolution in time due to hydrologic variability.

  19. Evaporation of Water from Particles in the Aerodynamic Lens Inlet: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan G.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, Luis A.

    2006-10-01

    The extremely high particle transmission efficiency of aerodynamic lens inlets resulted in their wide use in aerosol mass spectrometers. One of the consequences of a transport of particles from high ambient pressure into the vacuum is that it is accompanied by a rapid drop in relative humidity (RH). Since many atmospheric particles exist in the form of hygroscopic water droplets, a drop in RH may result in a significant loss of water and even a change in phase. To predict how much water will be evaporated is not feasible. Because water loss can effect in addition to particle size, its transmission efficiency, ionization probability and mass spectrum it is imperative to provide definitive experimental data that can serve to guide the field to a reasonable and uniform sampling approach. In this study we present the results of a number of carefully conducted measurements that provide the first experimentally determined benchmark of water evaporation from a range of particles, during their transport through an aerodynamic lens inlet. We conclude that the only sure way to avoid ambiguities during measurements of aerodynamic diameter in instruments that utilize low pressure aerodynamic lens inlets is to dry the particles prior to sampling.

  20. [Thiamine metabolism in experimental hepatitis and the intake of Naftusia mineral water].

    PubMed

    Leus, N F

    1986-01-01

    The level and metabolism of vitamin B1 and its coenzymic form were studied in the tissues and subcellular structures of the internal organs of white rats with experimental toxic hepatitis, receiving mineral water naphtusya. It was found that naphtusya given per os stimulated the metabolism of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), enhanced its concentration in the hepatic tissue and intestinal mucosa, producing a stabilizing effect on the TPP activity. It is concluded that the mineral water naphtusya can be used for enteral correction of vitamin balance in hepatitis patients.

  1. Water use efficiency of net primary production in global terrestrial ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lei; Wang, Fei; Mu, Xingmin; Jin, Kai; Sun, Wenyi; Gao, Peng; Zhao, Guangju

    2015-07-01

    The carbon and water cycles of terrestrial ecosystems, which are strongly coupled via water use efficiency (WUE), are influenced by global climate change. To explore the relationship between the carbon and water cycles and predict the effect of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems, it is necessary to study the WUE in global terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, the 13-year WUE (i.e., net primary production (NPP)/evapotranspiration (ET)) of global terrestrial ecosystems was calculated based on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) NPP (MOD17A3) and ET (MOD16A3) products from 2000 to 2012. The results indicate that the annual average WUE decreased but not significantly, and the 13-year mean value was 868.88 mg C m -2 mm -1. The variation trend of WUE value for each pixel differed greatly across the terrestrial ecosystems. A significant variation ( P<0.05) occurred in about 18.50% of the land surface. WUE was spatially distributed from 0 to 2541 mg C m -2 mm -1, and 58.78% of the WUE values were concentrated in the interval of 600-1200 mg C m -2 mm -1. The WUE increased from north to south in Africa and Oceania and from east to west in Europe and South America. Both latitudinal and longitudinal gradients existed in Asia and North America. The following trends in the WUE of different continents and Köppen-Geiger climates were observed: Europe (1129.71 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Oceania (1084.46 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Africa (893.51 mg C m -2 mm -1)> South America (893.07 mg C m -2 mm -1)> North America (870.79 mg C m -2 mm -1)> Asia (738.98 mg C m -2 mm -1) and warm temperate climates (1094 mg C m -2 mm -1)> snowy climates (862 mg C m -2 mm -1)> arid climates (785 mg C m -2 mm -1)> equatorial climates (732 mg C m -2 mm -1)> polar climates (435 mg C m -2 mm -1). Based on the WUE value and the present or future rainfall, the maximum carbon that fixed in one region may be theoretically calculated. Also, under the background of global climatic change, WUE may

  2. Structural properties of geminal dicationic ionic liquid/water mixtures: a theoretical and experimental insight.

    PubMed

    Serva, Alessandra; Migliorati, Valentina; Lapi, Andrea; Aquilanti, Giuliana; Arcovito, Alessandro; D'Angelo, Paola

    2016-06-28

    The structural behavior of geminal dicationic ionic liquid 1,n-bis[3-methylimidazolium-1-yl] alkane bromide ([Cn(mim)2]Br2)/water mixtures has been studied using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The properties of the mixtures are investigated as a function of both water concentration and alkyl-bridge chain length. The very good agreement between the EXAFS experimental data and the theoretical curves calculated from the MD structural results has proven the validity of the theoretical framework used for all of the investigated systems. In all the solutions the water molecules are preferentially coordinated with the Br(-) ion, even if a complex network of interactions among dications, anions and water molecules takes place. The local molecular arrangement around the bromide ion is found to change with increasing water content, as more and more water molecules are accomodated in the Br(-) first coordination shell. Moreover, with the decrease of the alkyl-bridge chain length, the interactions between dications and anions increase, with Br(-) forming a bridge between the two imidazolium rings of the same dication. On the other hand, in [Cn(mim)2]Br2/water mixtures with long alkyl-bridge chains peculiar internal arrangements of the dications are found, leading to different structural features of geminal dicationic ionic liquids as compared to their monocationic counterparts.

  3. Genetic variability of oxalate oxidase activity and elongation in water-stressed primary roots of diverse maize and rice lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous work on maize primary roots under water stress showed that cell elongation is maintained in the apical region of the growth zone but progressively inhibited further from the apex. In association with these responses, several proteins related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, part...

  4. Enhanced Control of PWR Primary Coolant Water Chemistry Using Selective Separation Systems for Recovery and Recycle of Enriched Boric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Ken Czerwinski; Charels Yeamans; Don Olander; Kenneth Raymond; Norman Schroeder; Thomas Robison; Bryan Carlson; Barbara Smit; Pat Robinson

    2006-02-28

    The objective of this project is to develop systems that will allow for increased nuclear energy production through the use of enriched fuels. The developed systems will allow for the efficient and selective recover of selected isotopes that are additives to power water reactors' primary coolant chemistry for suppression of corrosion attack on reactor materials.

  5. 10 CFR Appendix J to Part 50 - Primary Reactor Containment Leakage Testing for Water-Cooled Power Reactors

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... their normal mode, and need not be vented. Systems that are normally filled with water and operating... returning the reactor to an operating mode requiring containment integrity. For primary reactor containment... surfaces of the containment structures and components shall be performed prior to any Type A test...

  6. Water quantity and quality response of a green roof to storm events: Experimental and monitoring observations.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Corey M G; Todorov, Dimitar; Driscoll, Charles T; Montesdeoca, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Syracuse, New York is working under a court-ordered agreement to limit combined sewer overflows (CSO) to local surface waters. Green infrastructure technologies, including green roofs, are being implemented as part of a CSO abatement strategy and to develop co-benefits of diminished stormwater runoff, including decreased loading of contaminants to the wastewater system and surface waters. The objective of this study was to examine the quantity and quality of discharge associated with precipitation events over an annual cycle from a green roof in Syracuse, NY and to compare measurements from this monitoring program with results from a roof irrigation experiment. Wet deposition, roof drainage, and water quality were measured for 87 storm events during an approximately 12 month period over 2011-2012. Water and nutrient (total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and dissolved organic carbon) mass balances were conducted on an event basis to evaluate retention annually and during the growing and non-growing seasons. These results are compared with a hydrological manipulation experiment, which comprised of artificially watering of the roof. Loadings of nutrients were calculated for experimental and actual storms using the concentration of nutrients and the flow data of water discharging the roof. The green roof was effective in retaining precipitation quantity from storm events (mean percent retention 96.8%, SD = 2.7%, n = 87), although the relative fraction of water retained decreased with increases in the size of the event. There was no difference in water retention of the green roof for the growing and non-growing seasons. Drainage waters exhibited high concentration of nutrients during the warm temperature growing season, particularly total nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon. Overall, nutrient losses were low because of the strong retention of water. However, there was marked variation in the retention of nutrients by season due to variations in concentrations in roof

  7. The effect of primary treatment and flow regime on clogging development in horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands: An experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pedescoll, Anna; Corzo, Angélica; Alvarez, Eduardo; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2011-06-01

    The effect of both the type of primary treatment (hydrolitic up-flow sludge blanket (HUSB) reactor and conventional settling) and the flow regime (batch and continuous) on clogging development in subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SSF CWs) was studied. Clogging indicators (such as accumulated solids, hydraulic conductivity and drainable porosity) were determined in an experimental plant with three treatment lines. Correlations were encountered between the solids accumulated and both saturated hydraulic conductivity and drainable porosity reduction over time (74.5% and 89.2% of correlation, respectively). SSF CW implemented with a HUSB reactor accumulated ca. 30% lower sludge (1.9 kg DM/m(2)) than a system with a settler (2.5-2.8 kg DM/m(2)). However, no significant differences were recorded among treatment lines concerning hydraulic parameters (such as hydraulic conductivity or porosity). Root system development contributed to clogging. Accordingly, planted wetlands showed between 30% and 40% and 10% lower hydraulic conductivity and porosity reduction, respectively, than non-planted wetlands.

  8. LBE water interaction in sub-critical reactors: First experimental and modelling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciampichetti, A.; Agostini, P.; Benamati, G.; Bandini, G.; Pellini, D.; Forgione, N.; Oriolo, F.; Ambrosini, W.

    2008-06-01

    This paper concerns the study of the phenomena involved in the interaction between LBE and pressurised water which could occur in some hypothetical accidents in accelerator driven system type reactors. The LIFUS 5 facility was designed and built at ENEA-Brasimone to reproduce this kind of interaction in a wide range of conditions. The first test of the experimental program was carried out injecting water at 70 bar and 235 °C in a reaction vessel containing LBE at 1 bar and 350 °C. A pressurisation up to 80 bar was observed in the test section during the considered transient. The SIMMER III code was used to simulate the performed test. The calculated data agree in a satisfactory way with the experimental results giving confidence in the possibility to use this code for safety analyses of heavy liquid metal cooled reactors.

  9. Wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry: Theory and experimental applications to glucose detection in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelis, Andreas; Guo, Xinxin

    2011-10-01

    A differential photothermal radiometry method, wavelength-modulated differential photothermal radiometry (WM-DPTR), has been developed theoretically and experimentally for noninvasive, noncontact biological analyte detection, such as blood glucose monitoring. WM-DPTR features analyte specificity and sensitivity by combining laser excitation by two out-of-phase modulated beams at wavelengths near the peak and the base line of a prominent and isolated mid-IR analyte absorption band (here the carbon-oxygen-carbon bond in the pyran ring of the glucose molecule). A theoretical photothermal model of WM-DPTR signal generation and detection has been developed. Simulation results on water-glucose phantoms with the human blood range (0-300 mg/dl) glucose concentration demonstrated high sensitivity and resolution to meet wide clinical detection requirements. The model has also been validated by experimental data of the glucose-water system obtained using WM-DPTR.

  10. Experimental and Computational Analysis of Water-Droplet Formation and Ejection Process Using Hollow Microneedle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Norihisa; Oka, Ryotaro; Sakai, Takahiro; Shibata, Takayuki; Kawashima, Takahiro; Nagai, Moeto; Mineta, Takashi; Makino, Eiji

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we present the possibility of liquid delivery using fabricated hollow silicon dioxide microneedles of approximately 2 µm in diameter. As a fundamental study, the water-droplet formation and ejection process was examined via dynamic observations during water ejection tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. The experimental results indicated that fluid flow in a microneedle follows the Hagen-Poiseuille law, i.e., the flow rate is approximately directly proportional to the fourth power of the inner diameter. Moreover, the ejection pressure and maximum droplet curvature obtained using the proposed microfluid ejection model were in good agreement with the experimental results. The resulting ejection pressure is equal to the theoretical pressure difference of a spherical droplet, which is determined using the Young-Laplace equation. The maximum curvature of a droplet formed at the tip of a microneedle can be estimated on the basis of the contact angle theory expressed by the Young equation.

  11. Experimental, Numerical, and Analytical Slosh Dynamics of Water and Liquid Nitrogen in a Spherical Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, Jedediah Morse

    2016-01-01

    Understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid slosh dynamics is critical to safety and improving performance of space missions when a significant percentage of the spacecraft's mass is a liquid. Computational fluid dynamics simulations can be used to predict the dynamics of slosh, but these programs require extensive validation. Many experimental and numerical studies of water slosh have been conducted. However, slosh data for cryogenic liquids is lacking. Water and cryogenic liquid nitrogen are used in various ground-based tests with a spherical tank to characterize damping, slosh mode frequencies, and slosh forces. A single ring baffle is installed in the tank for some of the tests. Analytical models for slosh modes, slosh forces, and baffle damping are constructed based on prior work. Select experiments are simulated using a commercial CFD software, and the numerical results are compared to the analytical and experimental results for the purposes of validation and methodology-improvement.

  12. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Stratmann, G.; Peter, T.

    2014-09-01

    This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200-273 K). Water activity (aw) at low temperatures (T) is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature-dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids) and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for T < 270 K and T < 260 K, respectively. These measurements show that the temperature trend of aw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high-temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice

  13. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Stratmann, G.; Peter, T.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200-273 K). Water activity (aw) at low temperatures (T) is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids) and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for T<270 K and T<260 K, respectively. These measurements show that the temperature trend of aw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice

  14. In-situ tuff water migration/heater experiment: experimental plan

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, J.K.

    1980-08-01

    Tuffs on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are currently under investigation as a potential isolation medium for heat-producing nuclear wastes. The National Academy of Sciences has concurred in our identification of the potentially large water content ({le}40 vol %) of tuffs as one of the important issues affecting their suitability for a repository. This Experimental Plan describes an in-situ experiment intended as an initial assessment of water generation/migration in response to a thermal input. The experiment will be conducted in the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff in Tunnel U12g (G-Tunnel) located in the north-central region of the NTS. While the Grouse Canyon Welded Tuff is not a potential repository medium, it has physical, thermal, and mechanical properties very similar to those tuffs currently under consideration and is accessible at depth (400 m below the surface) in an existing facility. Other goals of the experiment are to support computer-code and instrumentation development, and to measure in-situ thermal properties. The experimental array consists of a central electrical heater, 1.2 m long x 10.2 cm diameter, surrounded by three holes for measuring water-migration behavior, two holes for measuring temperature profiles, one hole for measuring thermally induced stress in the rock, and one hole perpendicular to the heater to measure displacement with a laser. This Experimental Plan describes the experimental objectives, the technical issues, the site, the experimental array, thermal and thermomechanical modeling results, the instrumentation, the data-acquisition system, posttest characterization, and the organizational details.

  15. Modelling and experimental verification of a water alleviation system for the NASP. [National Aerospace Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanfossen, G. James

    1992-01-01

    One possible low speed propulsion system for the National Aerospace Plane is a liquid air cycle engine (LACE). The LACE system uses the heat sink in the liquid hydrogen propellant to liquefy air in a heat exchanger which is then pumped up to high pressure and used as the oxidizer in a hydrogen liquid air rocket. The inlet airstream must be dehumidified or moisture could freeze on the cryogenic heat exchangers and block them. The main objective of this research has been to develop a computer simulation of the cold tube/antifreeze-spray water alleviation system and to verify the model with experimental data. An experimental facility has been built and humid air tests were conducted on a generic heat exchanger to obtain condensing data for code development. The paper describes the experimental setup, outlines the method of calculation used in the code, and presents comparisons of the calculations and measurements. Cause of discrepancies between the model and data are explained.

  16. Simulation and experimental study of rheological properties of CeO2-water nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loya, Adil; Stair, Jacqueline L.; Ren, Guogang

    2015-10-01

    Metal oxide nanoparticles offer great merits over controlling rheological, thermal, chemical and physical properties of solutions. The effectiveness of a nanoparticle to modify the properties of a fluid depends on its diffusive properties with respect to the fluid. In this study, rheological properties of aqueous fluids (i.e. water) were enhanced with the addition of CeO2 nanoparticles. This study was characterized by the outcomes of simulation and experimental results of nanofluids. The movement of nanoparticles in the fluidic media was simulated by a large-scale molecular thermal dynamic program (i.e. LAMMPS). The COMPASS force field was employed with smoothed particle hydrodynamic potential (SPH) and discrete particle dynamics potential (DPD). However, this study develops the understanding of how the rheological properties are affected due to the addition of nanoparticles in a fluid and the way DPD and SPH can be used for accurately estimating the rheological properties with Brownian effect. The rheological results of the simulation were confirmed by the convergence of the stress autocorrelation function, whereas experimental properties were measured using a rheometer. These rheological values of simulation were obtained and agreed within 5 % of the experimental values; they were identified and treated with a number of iterations and experimental tests. The results of the experiment and simulation show that 10 % CeO2 nanoparticles dispersion in water has a viscosity of 2.0-3.3 mPas.

  17. Experimental dehydration of natural obsidian and estimation of DH2O at low water contents.

    PubMed

    Jambon, A; Zhang, Y; Stolper, E M

    1992-01-01

    Water diffusion experiments were carried out by dehydrating rhyolitic obsidian from Valles Caldera (New Mexico, USA) at 510-980 degrees C. The starting glass wafers contained approximately 0.114 wt% total water, lower than any glasses previously investigated for water diffusion. Weight loss due to dehydration was measured as a function of experiment duration, which permits determination of mean bulk water diffusivity, mean Dw. These diffusivities are in the range of 2.6 to 18 X 10(-14) m2/s and can be fit with the following Arrhenius equation: ln mean Dw (m2/s) = -(25.10 +/- 1.29) - (46,480 +/- 11,400) (J/mol) / RT, except for two replicate runs at 510 degrees C which give mean Dw values much lower than that defined by the above equation. When interpreted according to a model of water speciation in which molecular H2O is the diffusing species with concentration-independent diffusivity while OH units do not contribute to the transport but react to provide H2O, the data (except for the 510 degrees C data) are in agreement with extrapolation from previous results and hence extend the previous data base and provide a test of the applicability of the model to very low water contents. Mean bulk water diffusivities are about two orders of magnitude less than molecular H2O diffusivities because the fraction of molecular H2O out of total water is very small at 0.114 wt% total water and less. The 510 degrees C experimental results can be interpreted as due to slow kinetics of OH to H2O interconversion at low temperatures.

  18. Experimental dehydration of natural obsidian and estimation of DH2O at low water contents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jambon, A.; Zhang, Y.; Stolper, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    Water diffusion experiments were carried out by dehydrating rhyolitic obsidian from Valles Caldera (New Mexico, USA) at 510-980 degrees C. The starting glass wafers contained approximately 0.114 wt% total water, lower than any glasses previously investigated for water diffusion. Weight loss due to dehydration was measured as a function of experiment duration, which permits determination of mean bulk water diffusivity, mean Dw. These diffusivities are in the range of 2.6 to 18 X 10(-14) m2/s and can be fit with the following Arrhenius equation: ln mean Dw (m2/s) = -(25.10 +/- 1.29) - (46,480 +/- 11,400) (J/mol) / RT, except for two replicate runs at 510 degrees C which give mean Dw values much lower than that defined by the above equation. When interpreted according to a model of water speciation in which molecular H2O is the diffusing species with concentration-independent diffusivity while OH units do not contribute to the transport but react to provide H2O, the data (except for the 510 degrees C data) are in agreement with extrapolation from previous results and hence extend the previous data base and provide a test of the applicability of the model to very low water contents. Mean bulk water diffusivities are about two orders of magnitude less than molecular H2O diffusivities because the fraction of molecular H2O out of total water is very small at 0.114 wt% total water and less. The 510 degrees C experimental results can be interpreted as due to slow kinetics of OH to H2O interconversion at low temperatures.

  19. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.

    2011-08-22

    Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

  20. The First Association of a Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis Death with Culturable Naegleria fowleri in Tap Water from a U.S. Treated Public Drinking Water System

    PubMed Central

    Cope, Jennifer R.; Ratard, Raoult C.; Hill, Vincent R.; Sokol, Theresa; Causey, Jonathan Jake; Yoder, Jonathan S.; Mirani, Gayatri; Mull, Bonnie; Mukerjee, Kimberly A.; Narayanan, Jothikumar; Doucet, Meggie; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Poole, Charla N.; Akingbola, Olugbenga A.; Ritter, Jana; Xiong, Zhenggang; da Silva, Alexandre; Roellig, Dawn; Van Dyke, Russell; Stern, Harlan; Xiao, Lihua; Beach, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Naegleria fowleri is a climate-sensitive, thermophilic ameba found in warm, freshwater lakes and rivers. Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), which is almost universally fatal, occurs when N. fowleri–containing water enters the nose, typically during swimming, and N. fowleri migrates to the brain via the olfactory nerve. In August 2013, a 4-year-old child died of meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology in a Louisiana hospital. Methods Clinical and environmental testing and a case investigation were initiated to determine the cause of death and to identify potential exposures. Results Based on testing of CSF and brain specimens, the child was diagnosed with PAM. His only reported water exposure was tap water; in particular, tap water that was used to supply water to a lawn water slide on which the child had played extensively prior to becoming ill. Water samples were collected from both the home and the water distribution system that supplied the home and tested; N. fowleri were identified in water samples from both the home and the water distribution system. Conclusions This case is the first reported PAM death associated with culturable N. fowleri in tap water from a U.S. treated drinking water system. This case occurred in the context of an expanding geographic range for PAM beyond southern tier states with recent case reports from Minnesota, Kansas, and Indiana. This case also highlights the role of adequate disinfection throughout drinking water distribution systems and the importance of maintaining vigilance when operating drinking water systems using source waters with elevated temperatures. PMID:25595746

  1. User preferences and willingness to pay for safe drinking water: Experimental evidence from rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Burt, Zachary; Njee, Robert M; Mbatia, Yolanda; Msimbe, Veritas; Brown, Joe; Clasen, Thomas F; Malebo, Hamisi M; Ray, Isha

    2017-01-01

    Almost half of all deaths from drinking microbiologically unsafe water occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. Household water treatment and safe storage (HWTS) systems, when consistently used, can provide safer drinking water and improve health. Social marketing to increase adoption and use of HWTS depends both on the prices of and preferences for these systems. This study included 556 households from rural Tanzania across two low-income districts with low-quality water sources. Over 9 months in 2012 and 2013, we experimentally evaluated consumer preferences for six "low-cost" HWTS options, including boiling, through an ordinal ranking protocol. We estimated consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for these options, using a modified auction. We allowed respondents to pay for the durable HWTS systems with cash, chickens or mobile money; a significant minority chose chickens as payment. Overall, our participants favored boiling, the ceramic pot filter and, where water was turbid, PuR™ (a combined flocculant-disinfectant). The revealed WTP for all products was far below retail prices, indicating that significant scale-up may need significant subsidies. Our work will inform programs and policies aimed at scaling up HWTS to improve the health of resource-constrained communities that must rely on poor-quality, and sometimes turbid, drinking water sources.

  2. Experimental and theoretical investigation of water removal from DMAZ liquid fuel by an adsorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Shahram; Vaferi, Behzad

    2015-07-01

    2-dimethylaminoethylazide (DMAZ) is a new liquid fuel that has made significant progress in bio/mono propellant rocket engines in recent years. Purification of DMAZ fuel by reducing its water content using various adsorbents including zeolites, calcium chloride and nano-particles is experimentally and theoretically investigated. The highest water adsorption of 92.6% from the DMAZ solution is obtained by the CaCl2 adsorbent within 10 min. Four different artificial neural networks (ANN) are examined to correlate an extent of removed water from the DMAZ solution to its affecting parameters. The performed regression analysis indicated that water initial concentration (WIC), adsorbent types, solution temperature, contact time and adsorbent dosage are the most important affecting variables for water sorption from the DMAZ solution. The accomplished statistical analysis demonstrated a multi-layer perceptron neural network (MLPNN) with seven hidden neurons and is the most accurate approach for modeling the considered task. The obtained results showed that the proposed MLPNN model could be successfully employed for accurate prediction of an amount of water removal from the DMAZ fuel solution by the adsorption process.

  3. Analysis of soil water residence times in a monolith lysimeter at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, B.F.; Eckstein, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Estimates of soil water residence times can be made using water budget records. A single average value, referred to as conventional residence time, can be obtained by dividing the mean storage volume by the mean output volume. Using concepts from queuing theory, estimates of residence times can be made by assuming first-in-first-out (FIFO) or last-in-first-out (LIFO) movement of the water. Using such assumption, estimates can be made on the length of time that water remains in the soil, depending on the time of year that water enters the soil. For residence time estimations, monthly water budget data was obtained for the period from 1947 through 1982 for a weighing monolith lysimeter located at the North Appalachian Experimental Watershed near Coshocton, Ohio. The lysimeter encloses an undisturbed block of silt loam soil. The conventional residence time for the record period is 10.2 months. The mean maximum residence time, based on the assumption of all FIFO movement, is 11.1 months with a minimum value of 4 months and a maximum value of 18 months. The assumption of all LIFO movement gives a mean maximum residence time value of 3.8 months with a minimum value of less than one month and a maximum value of 102 months.

  4. Experimental/numerical study of anisotropic water diffusion in glass/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, I. B. C. M.; Raijmaekers, S.; Nijssen, R. P. L.; van der Meer, F. P.; Sluys, L. J.

    2016-07-01

    In this work a glass/epoxy composite commonly used in wind turbine blades is exposed to a humid environment at an elevated temperature. To research the anisotropic diffusion behaviour observed in unidirectional composite specimens, experimental results of slices cut along the three directional planes of the laminate immersed in demineralised water at 50° C are coupled with numerical modelling. The weight of the slices was measured at regular intervals, from which the uptake behaviour could be deduced. The process was modelled using a 3-dimensional RVE of the material, where diffusion is modelled as steady-state and the diffusivity in each direction was measured by applying concentration gradients to the model. The experimental data shows similar water uptake behaviour for samples in both transverse directions, while the water uptake in the fibre direction was significantly faster. A proper fit according to Fick's law was obtained for the transverse direction, while this was not possible for the samples in fibre direction, suggesting a strong dependency of the diffusion behaviour on the fibre orientation. Results from the proposed numerical models show that the geometric effect of fibres acting as barriers for the water movement is indeed responsible for part of the observed anisotropy.

  5. Combustion behavior of single coal-water slurry droplets, Part 1: Experimental techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Levendis, Y.A.; Metghalchi, M.; Wise, D.

    1991-12-31

    Techniques to produce single droplets of coal-water slurries have been developed in order to study the combustion behavior of the slurries. All stages of slurry combustion are of interest to the present study, however, emphasis will be given to the combustion of the solid agglomerate char which remains upon the termination of the water evaporation and the devolatilization periods. An experimental facility is under construction where combustion of coal-water slurries will be monitored in a variety of furnace temperatures and oxidizing atmospheres. The effect of the initial size of the slurry droplet and the solids loading (coal to water ratio) will be investigated. A drop tube, laminar flow furnace coupled to a near-infrared, ratio pyrometer win be used to monitor temperature-time histories of single particles from ignition to extinction. This paper describes the experimental built-up to this date and presents results obtained by numerical analysis that help understanding the convective and radiating environment in the furnace.

  6. Experimental vs. modeled water use in mature Norway spruce (Picea abies) exposed to elevated CO(2).

    PubMed

    Leuzinger, Sebastian; Bader, Martin K-F

    2012-01-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO(2) have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behavior is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO(2) concentration, which form the core of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we provide first results from a free air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) experiment with naturally growing, mature (35 m) Picea abies (L.) (Norway spruce) and compare them to simulations by the DGVM LPJ-GUESS. We monitored sap flow, stem water deficit, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential, and soil moisture in five 35-40 m tall CO(2)-treated (550 ppm) trees over two seasons. Using LPJ-GUESS, we simulated this experiment using climate data from a nearby weather station. While the model predicted a stable reduction of transpiration of between 9% and 18% (at concentrations of 550-700 ppm atmospheric CO(2)), the combined evidence from various methods characterizing water use in our experimental trees suggest no changes in response to future CO(2) concentrations. The discrepancy between the modeled and the experimental results may be a scaling issue: while dynamic vegetation models correctly predict leaf-level responses, they may not sufficiently account for the processes involved at the canopy and ecosystem scale, which could offset the first-order stomatal response.

  7. Experimental Evidence for a Liquid-Liquid Crossover in Deeply Cooled Confined Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupane, Antonio; Fomina, Margarita; Piazza, Irina; Peters, Judith; Schirò, Giorgio

    2014-11-01

    In this work we investigate, by means of elastic neutron scattering, the pressure dependence of mean square displacements (MSD) of hydrogen atoms of deeply cooled water confined in the pores of a three-dimensional disordered SiO2 xerogel; experiments have been performed at 250 and 210 K from atmospheric pressure to 1200 bar. The "pressure anomaly" of supercooled water (i.e., a mean square displacement increase with increasing pressure) is observed in our sample at both temperatures; however, contrary to previous simulation results and to the experimental trend observed in bulk water, the pressure effect is smaller at lower (210 K) than at higher (250 K) temperature. Elastic neutron scattering results are complemented by differential scanning calorimetry data that put in evidence, besides the glass transition at about 170 K, a first-order-like endothermic transition occurring at about 230 K that, in view of the neutron scattering results, can be attributed to a liquid-liquid crossover. Our results give experimental evidence for the presence, in deeply cooled confined water, of a crossover occurring at about 230 K (at ambient pressure) from a liquid phase predominant at 210 K to another liquid phase predominant at 250 K; therefore, they are fully consistent with the liquid-liquid transition hypothesis.

  8. An Experimental Method for Measuring Water Droplet Impingement Efficiency on Two- and Three-dimensional Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Zumwalt, G. W.; Elangonan, R.; Freund, G. A., Jr.; Breer, M.; Whitmer, L.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental method was developed to determine the droplet impingement characteristics on 2-D and 3-D bodies. The experimental results provide the essential droplet impingement data required to validate water droplet trajectory codes, which are used in the analysis of aircraft icing. A body, whose water droplet impingement characteristics are required, is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper, and is exposed to an air stream containing a water dye solution spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips, using an automated reflectometer. Models tested include a 4-inch diameter cylinder, a NACA 652015 airfoil section, a MS(1)-0317 supercritical airfoil section, three simulated ice shapes, an axisymmetric inlet and a Boeing 737-300 inlet model. Detailed descriptions of the dye tracer technique, instrumentation, data reduction method and the results obtained are presented. Analytical predictions of collection efficiency characteristics for most test configurations are included for comparison.

  9. Screening and Quantification of Aliphatic Primary Alkyl Corrosion Inhibitor Amines in Water Samples by Paper Spray Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jjunju, Fred P M; Maher, Simon; Damon, Deidre E; Barrett, Richard M; Syed, S U; Heeren, Ron M A; Taylor, Stephen; Badu-Tawiah, Abraham K

    2016-01-19

    Direct analysis and identification of long chain aliphatic primary diamine Duomeen O (n-oleyl-1,3-diaminopropane), corrosion inhibitor in raw water samples taken from a large medium pressure water tube boiler plant water samples at low LODs (<0.1 pg) has been demonstrated for the first time, without any sample preparation using paper spray mass spectrometry (PS-MS). The presence of Duomeen O in water samples was confirmed via tandem mass spectrometry using collision-induced dissociation and supported by exact mass measurement and reactive paper spray experiments using an LTQ Orbitrap Exactive instrument. Data shown herein indicate that paper spray ambient ionization can be readily used as a rapid and robust method for in situ direct analysis of polymanine corrosion inhibitors in an industrial water boiler plant and other related samples in the water treatment industry. This approach was applied for the analysis of three complex water samples including feedwater, condensate water, and boiler water, all collected from large medium pressure (MP) water tube boiler plants, known to be dosed with varying amounts of polyamine and amine corrosion inhibitor components. Polyamine chemistry is widely used for example in large high pressure (HP) boilers operating in municipal waste and recycling facilities to prevent corrosion of metals. The samples used in this study are from such a facility in Coventry waste treatment facility, U.K., which has 3 × 40 tonne/hour boilers operating at 17.5 bar.

  10. Experimental and numerical simulations of heat transfers between flowing water and a frozen porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Nicolas; Grenier, Christophe; Costard, François

    2015-04-01

    In permafrost-affected regions, hydrological changes due to global warming are still under investigation. But yet, we can already foresee from recent studies that for example, the variability and intensity of surface/subsurface flow are likely to be affected by permafrost degradation. The feedback induced by such changes on permafrost degradation is still not clearly assessed. Of particular interest are lake and river's taliks. A talik is a permanently unfrozen zone that lies below rivers or lakes. They are likely to play a key role in the formerly presented interactions, given that they are the only paths for groundwater flow in permafrost regions. Thus heat transfers on a regional scale are influenced by groundwater circulation. The aim of our study is therefore to investigate the evolution of river's taliks. In addition, they are the only perennial liquid water resources in continuous permafrost environments. The issue associated is to what extent can taliks develop into the future because of climate change and how likely are they to become open taliks, connecting sub-permafrost water with surface water with potentially strong geochemical changes? We developed a multidisciplinary approach coupling field investigation, experimental studies in a cold room and numerical modeling. The field investigation concerns Central Yakutia, Siberia, where we have installed instruments to monitor ground temperatures and water pressure in a small river's talik between two thermokarst lakes. We present here the results corresponding to the cold room experimental work, associating numerical modeling and laboratory experiments in order to look after the main parameters controlling river's talik installation and validate our numerical simulation approach. In a cold room at GEOPS, where a metric scale channel is filled with a porous medium (sand or silty-clay), we are able to control air, water and permafrost initial temperature, but also water flow. At initial time, the "river

  11. Automation of water bacteriological analysis: running test of an experimental prototype.

    PubMed Central

    Trinel, P A; Hanoune, N; Leclerc, H

    1980-01-01

    The experimental apparatus described enables continuous and automatic bacteriological water examination. It ensures the analysis and detection of Escherichia coli by incubation of the water samples and then detection of glutamic acid decarboxylase in coils according to the Technicon principles. The analysis is rapid: it is performed within 13 h with a sensitivity of better than 1 bacterium/100 ml, and 120 samples of 100 ml of water are examined in 24 h. Laboratory experiments and field testing showed that this prototype ensured a specific and sensitive analysis. They also provided information about the frequency of maintenance necessary to retain its efficiency. This device would allow, under the same conditions, the examination of liquid food products. Images PMID:6994648

  12. Abortion and foetal lesions induced by Neospora caninum in experimentally infected water buffalos (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Chryssafidis, Andreas L; Cantón, Germán; Chianini, Francesca; Innes, Elisabeth A; Madureira, Ed H; Soares, Rodrigo M; Gennari, Solange M

    2015-01-01

    The water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) is an important species in several countries for its milk and meat production, as well as for transport and other agricultural activities. It is, in general, considered more resistant than cattle to different parasitic diseases, also less demanding for forage quality. It has been postulated that buffalo may be resistant to abortion caused by neosporosis, because of high serological prevalences found in buffalo herds from different localities, with no description of Neospora caninum-related abortion. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential impact of neosporosis in pregnant water buffalo cows. In this work, three pregnant buffalo cows were experimentally infected with Nc-1 strain of N. caninum, and abortion was detected 35 days post-infection. Molecular and histopathological results found in post-mortem tissues are described and discussed, confirming the susceptibility of water buffalos to abortion caused by N. caninum.

  13. The water balance equations in saline playa lakes: comparison between experimental and recent data from Quero Playa Lake (central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Moral, S.; Ordóñez, S.; Benavente, D.; García del Cura, M. A.

    2002-04-01

    The Quero Playa Lake is an ephemeral saline playa lake located in the La Mancha region of central Spain. In this study, a daily monitoring of the brine physical properties, water activity, brine depth and main climatic parameters was simultaneously carried out together with determining the precipitation sequence of minerals. Field data were compared with the results of simulating the water evaporation in an environmental chamber. In this simulation, a similar hydrochemical composition for the saline lake was used, and the main climatic parameters, temperature and humidity, were controlled. The water balance equation for saline lakes has usually been described using the Wood and Sanford equation [Econ. Geol., 85(1990) 1226-1235]. Our experimental results required us to revise the water balance equation for the brine depth variations (d h/d t), that may be expressed as follows: {dh }/{dt }=p 1+k {A B}/{A L}+S I-S O-ξ-H+D, where p (mm) is the precipitation; k is the drainage coefficient of the lake; AL is the lake surface; AB is the drainage basin surface; SI and SO are the contribution of influent and effluent seepage to the depth of brine in the lake. The term ξ is the evaporation/condensation, defined as ξ= kpW( aW-RH), where k is the mass transfer coefficient (Dalton's equation); pW is the water pressure in equilibrium with the air; aW is the water activity of the brine; RH is the relative humidity. The other terms: H and D, correct the brine depth loss or/and gain a consequence of hydrated saline mineral precipitation and early diagenetic hydration/dehydration reactions. As a consequence of the above, we suggest that the water balance equation for saline lakes can be an important consideration in the interpretation of their evolution. The precipitation of hydrated saline minerals and the early diagenetic dehydration/hydration reactions imply changes in the d h/d t curves. As a result, the interpretation of the sequence of primary saline minerals in older

  14. Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

    2007-04-18

    Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate controlling sub

  15. Experimental determination of solvent-water partition coefficients and Abraham parameters for munition constituents.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuzhen; Kuo, Dave T F; Allen, Herbert E; Di Toro, Dominic M

    2016-10-01

    There is concern about the environmental fate and effects of munition constituents (MCs). Polyparameter linear free energy relationships (pp-LFERs) that employ Abraham solute parameters can aid in evaluating the risk of MCs to the environment. However, poor predictions using pp-LFERs and ABSOLV estimated Abraham solute parameters are found for some key physico-chemical properties. In this work, the Abraham solute parameters are determined using experimental partition coefficients in various solvent-water systems. The compounds investigated include hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazacyclohexane (RDX), octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), hexahydro-1-nitroso-3,5-dinitro-1,3,5-triazine (MNX), hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazine (TNX), hexahydro-1,3-dinitroso-5- nitro-1,3,5-triazine (DNX), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), and 4-nitroanisole. The solvents in the solvent-water systems are hexane, dichloromethane, trichloromethane, octanol, and toluene. The only available reported solvent-water partition coefficients are for octanol-water for some of the investigated compounds and they are in good agreement with the experimental measurements from this study. Solvent-water partition coefficients fitted using experimentally derived solute parameters from this study have significantly smaller root mean square errors (RMSE = 0.38) than predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters (RMSE = 3.56) for the investigated compounds. Additionally, the predictions for various physico-chemical properties using the experimentally derived solute parameters agree with available literature reported values with prediction errors within 0.79 log units except for water solubility of RDX and HMX with errors of 1.48 and 2.16 log units respectively. However, predictions using ABSOLV estimated solute parameters have larger prediction errors of up to 7.68 log units. This large discrepancy is probably due to the missing R2NNO2

  16. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-04-21

    also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were $11.9 million.

  17. Water-waves on linear shear currents. A comparison of experimental and numerical results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Bruno; Seez, William; Touboul, Julien; Rey, Vincent; Abid, Malek; Kharif, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Propagation of water waves can be described for uniformly sheared current conditions. Indeed, some mathematical simplifications remain applicable in the study of waves whether there is no current or a linearly sheared current. However, the widespread use of mathematical wave theories including shear has rarely been backed by experimental studies of such flows. New experimental and numerical methods were both recently developed to study wave current interactions for constant vorticity. On one hand, the numerical code can simulate, in two dimensions, arbitrary non-linear waves. On the other hand, the experimental methods can be used to generate waves with various shear conditions. Taking advantage of the simplicity of the experimental protocol and versatility of the numerical code, comparisons between experimental and numerical data are discussed and compared with linear theory for validation of the methods. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The DGA (Direction Générale de l'Armement, France) is acknowledged for its financial support through the ANR grant N° ANR-13-ASTR-0007.

  18. Computational and experimental platform for understanding and optimizing water flux and salt rejection in nanoporous membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, Susan B.

    2010-09-01

    Affordable clean water is both a global and a national security issue as lack of it can cause death, disease, and international tension. Furthermore, efficient water filtration reduces the demand for energy, another national issue. The best current solution to clean water lies in reverse osmosis (RO) membranes that remove salts from water with applied pressure, but widely used polymeric membrane technology is energy intensive and produces water depleted in useful electrolytes. Furthermore incremental improvements, based on engineering solutions rather than new materials, have yielded only modest gains in performance over the last 25 years. We have pursued a creative and innovative new approach to membrane design and development for cheap desalination membranes by approaching the problem at the molecular level of pore design. Our inspiration comes from natural biological channels, which permit faster water transport than current reverse osmosis membranes and selectively pass healthy ions. Aiming for an order-of-magnitude improvement over mature polymer technology carries significant inherent risks. The success of our fundamental research effort lies in our exploiting, extending, and integrating recent advances by our team in theory, modeling, nano-fabrication and platform development. A combined theoretical and experimental platform has been developed to understand the interplay between water flux and ion rejection in precisely-defined nano-channels. Our innovative functionalization of solid state nanoporous membranes with organic protein-mimetic polymers achieves 3-fold improvement in water flux over commercial RO membranes and has yielded a pending patent and industrial interest. Our success has generated useful contributions to energy storage, nanoscience, and membrane technology research and development important for national health and prosperity.

  19. Experimental and predicted cavitation performance of an 80.6 deg helical inducer in high temperature water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovich, G.

    1972-01-01

    The cavitating performance of a stainless steel 80.6 degree flat-plate helical inducer was investigated in water over a range of liquid temperatures and flow coefficients. A semi-empirical prediction method was used to compare predicted values of required net positive suction head in water with experimental values obtained in water. Good agreement was obtained between predicted and experimental data in water. The required net positive suction head in water decreased with increasing temperature and increased with flow coefficient, similar to that observed for a like inducer in liquid hydrogen.

  20. A cardiovascular educational intervention for primary care professionals in Spain: positive impact in a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Guillén, Vicente; Hermida, Enrique; Pita-Fernandez, Salvador; Palazon-Bru, Antonio; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Pallares-Carratala, Vicente; Orozco-Beltran, Domingo; Carratala-Munuera, Concepcion; Lopez-Pineda, Adriana; Navarro, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine general practice data collection can help identify patients at risk of cardiovascular disease. Aim To determine whether a training programme for primary care professionals improves the recording of cardiovascular disease risk factors in electronic health records. Design and setting A quasi-experimental study without random assignment of professionals. This was an educational intervention study, consisting of an online-classroom 1-year training programme, and carried out in the Valencian community in Spain. Method The prevalence rates of recording of cardiovascular factors (recorded every 6 months over a 4-year period) were compared between intervention and control group. Clinical relevance was calculated by absolute risk reduction (ARR), relative risk reduction (RRR), and number of patients needed-to-attend (NNA), to avoid under-recording, with their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Linear regression models were used for each of the variables. Results Of the 941 professionals initially registered, 78.1% completed the programme. The ARR ranged from 1.87% (95% CI = 1.79 to 1.94) in the diagnosis of diabetes to 15.27% (95% CI = 15.14 to 15.40) in the recording of basal blood glucose. The NNA ranged from 7 in blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose recording to 54 in the diagnosis of diabetes. The RRR ranged from 26.7% in the diagnosis of diabetes to 177.1% in the recording of the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). The rates of change were greater in the intervention group and the differences were significant for recording of cholesterol (P<0.001), basal blood glucose (P<0.001), smoking (P<0.001), alcohol (P<0.001), microalbuminuria (P = 0.001), abdominal circumference (P<0.001), and SCORE (P<0.001). Conclusion The education programme had a beneficial effect at the end of the follow-up that was significant and clinically relevant. PMID:25548314

  1. Assessment of water consumptions in small mediterranean islands' primary schools by means of a long-term online monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Marco; De Gisi, Sabino; Farina, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    A key challenge of our society is improving schools through the sustainable use of resources especially in countries at risk of desertification. The estimation of water consumption is the starting point for the correct dimensioning of water recovery systems. To date, unlike the energy sector, there is a lack of scientific information regarding water consumption in school buildings. Available data refer roughly to indirect estimates by means of utility bills and therefore no information on the role of water leakage in the internal network of the school is provided. In this context, the aim of the work was to define and implement an on-line monitoring system for the assessment of water consumptions in a small Mediterranean island primary school to achieve the following sub-goals: (1) definition of water consumption profile considering teaching activities and secretarial work; (2) direct assessment of water consumptions and leakages and, (3) quantification of the behaviour parameters. The installed monitoring system consisted of 33 water metres (3.24 persons per water metre) equipped with sensors set on 1-L impulse signal and connected to a data logging system. Results showed consumptions in the range 13.6-14.2 L/student/day and leakage equal to 54.8 % of the total water consumptions. Considering the behavioural parameters, the consumptions related to toilet flushing, personal, and building cleaning were, respectively, 54, 43 and 3 % of the total water ones. Finally, the obtained results could be used for dimensioning the most suitable water recovery strategies at school level such as grey water or rainwater recovery systems.

  2. A green roof experimental site in the Mediterranean climate: the storm water quality issue.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, Ilaria; Palla, Anna; Lanza, Luca G; La Barbera, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Since 2007, the University of Genoa has been carrying out a monitoring programme to investigate the hydrologic response of green roofs in the Mediterranean climate by installing a green roof experimental site. In order to assess the influence of green roofs on the storm water runoff quality, water chemistry data have been included in the monitoring programme since 2010, providing rainfall and outflow data. For atmospheric source, the bulk deposition is collected to evaluate the role of the overall atmospheric deposition in storm water runoff quality. For subsurface outflow, a maximum of 24 composite samples are taken on an event basis, thus aiming at a full characterization of the outflow hydrograph. Water chemistry data reveal that the pollutant loads associated with green roof outflow is low; in particular, solids and metal concentrations are lower than values generally observed in storm water runoff from traditional rooftops. The concentration values of chemical oxygen demand, total dissolved solids, Fe, Ca and K measured in the subsurface outflow are significantly higher than those observed in the bulk deposition (p < 0.05). With respect to the atmospheric deposition, the green roof behaviour as a sink/source of pollutants is investigated based on both concentration and mass.

  3. Controls on water drop volume at speleothem drip sites: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, Christopher; Mattey, David

    2008-09-01

    SummaryThe growth of speleothem under cave drip sites is closely related to local climate events and provides an increasingly important means of deciphering past climate change. Since calcite precipitation rates depend on the water discharge at the drip site, the drip rate and mass of water drops detaching from stalactites are fundamental controls on speleothem growth and we have investigated factors that control the volume of water drops in this environment. The classical investigations on the volume of falling water drops are reviewed but there have been no measurements of the volume of drops detaching from curved surfaces equivalent to tips of stalactites. In this study we have used an acoustic drop counting method to measure the variation of the mass of water drops detaching from tubes (representing 'soda straw' stalactites) and artificial stalactites with spherical terminations (representing massive stalactites) as a function of tube radius or surface curvature and the drip rate. The experimental method corroborates classical measurements of drop mass detaching from tubes and, for massive stalactites, we derive a simple empirical relationship between drop mass and radius of curvature of a spherical surface, based on 100,000 drop counts from artificial stalactites with 19 different radii ranging from 3.6 mm to 500 mm. The results of this study allow discharge to be calculated from drip interval measurements and provide a quantitative basis for theoretical modelling of speleothem growth from drip sites.

  4. Spectral changes in conifers subjected to air pollution and water stress: Experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1988-01-01

    The roles of leaf anatomy, moisture and pigment content, and number of leaf layers on spectral reflectance in healthy, pollution-stressed, and water-stressed conifer needles were examined experimentally. Jeffrey pine (Pinus jeffreyi) and giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron gigantea) were exposed to ozone and acid mist treatments in fumigation chambers; red pine (Pinus resinosa) needles were artificially dried. Infrared reflectance from stacked needles rose with free water loss. In an air-drying experiment, cell volume reductions induced by loss of turgor caused near-infrared reflectance (TM band 4) to drop after most free water was lost. Under acid mist fumigation, stunting of tissue development similarly reduced band 4 reflectance. Both artificial drying and pollutant fumigation caused a blue shift of the red edge of spectral reflectance curves in conifers, attributable to chlorophyll denaturation. Thematic mapper band ratio 4/3 fell and 5/4 rose with increasing pollution stress on artificial drying. Loss of water by air-drying, freeze-drying, or oven-drying enhanced spectral features, due in part to greater scattering and reduced water absorption. Grinding of the leaf tissue further enhanced the spectral features by increasing reflecting surfaces and path length. In a leaf-stacking experiment, an asymptote in visible and infrared reflectance was reached at 7-8 needle layers of red pine.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Reid, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the Vision for Space Exploration the end of the next decade will bring man back to the surface of the moon. One of the most critical issues for the establishment of human presence on the moon will be the availability of compact power sources. The establishment of man on the moon will require power from greater than 10's of kWt's in follow on years. Nuclear reactors are extremely we11 suited to meet the needs for power generation on the lunar or Martian surface. reactor system. Several competing concepts exist for lightweight, safe, robust shielding systems such as a water shield, lithium hydride (LiH), Boron Carbide, and others. Water offers several potential advantages, including reduced cost, reduced technical risk, and reduced mass. Water has not typically been considered for space reactor applications because of the need for gravity to remove the potential for radiation streaming paths. The water shield concept relies on predictions of passive circulation of the shield water by natural convection to adequately cool the shield. This prediction needs to be experimentally evaluated, especially for shields with complex geometries. MSFC has developed the experience and fac necessary to do this evaluation in the Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF).

  6. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Bull, R.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increase in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. The authors suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Numerical and experimental study of dissociation in an air-water single-bubble sonoluminescence system.

    PubMed

    Puente, Gabriela F; Urteaga, Raúl; Bonetto, Fabián J

    2005-10-01

    We performed a comprehensive numerical and experimental analysis of dissociation effects in an air bubble in water acoustically levitated in a spherical resonator. Our numerical approach is based on suitable models for the different effects considered. We compared model predictions with experimental results obtained in our laboratory in the whole phase parameter space, for acoustic pressures from the bubble dissolution limit up to bubble extinction. The effects were taken into account simultaneously to consider the transition from nonsonoluminescence to sonoluminescence bubbles. The model includes (1) inside the bubble, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, dissociation of O2 and N2, and mass diffusion of vapor in the noncondensable gases; (2) at the bubble interface, nonequilibrium evaporation and condensation of water and a temperature jump due to the accommodation coefficient; (3) in the liquid, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, and mass diffusion of the gas in the liquid. The model is completed with a Rayleigh-Plesset equation with liquid compressible terms and vapor mass transfer. We computed the boundary for the shape instability based on the temporal evolution of the computed radius. The model is valid for an arbitrary number of dissociable gases dissolved in the liquid. We also obtained absolute measurements for R(t) using two photodetectors and Mie scattering calculations. The robust technique used allows the estimation of experimental results of absolute R0 and P(a). The technique is based on identifying the bubble dissolution limit coincident with the parametric instability in (P(a),R0) parameter space. We take advantage of the fact that this point can be determined experimentally with high precision and replicability. We computed the equilibrium concentration of the different gaseous species and water vapor during collapse as a function of P(a) and R0. The

  8. Numerical and experimental study of dissociation in an air-water single-bubble sonoluminescence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puente, Gabriela F.; Urteaga, Raúl; Bonetto, Fabián J.

    2005-10-01

    We performed a comprehensive numerical and experimental analysis of dissociation effects in an air bubble in water acoustically levitated in a spherical resonator. Our numerical approach is based on suitable models for the different effects considered. We compared model predictions with experimental results obtained in our laboratory in the whole phase parameter space, for acoustic pressures from the bubble dissolution limit up to bubble extinction. The effects were taken into account simultaneously to consider the transition from nonsonoluminescence to sonoluminescence bubbles. The model includes (1) inside the bubble, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, dissociation of O2 and N2 , and mass diffusion of vapor in the noncondensable gases; (2) at the bubble interface, nonequilibrium evaporation and condensation of water and a temperature jump due to the accommodation coefficient; (3) in the liquid, transient and spatially nonuniform heat transfer using a collocation points method, and mass diffusion of the gas in the liquid. The model is completed with a Rayleigh-Plesset equation with liquid compressible terms and vapor mass transfer. We computed the boundary for the shape instability based on the temporal evolution of the computed radius. The model is valid for an arbitrary number of dissociable gases dissolved in the liquid. We also obtained absolute measurements for R(t) using two photodetectors and Mie scattering calculations. The robust technique used allows the estimation of experimental results of absolute R0 and Pa . The technique is based on identifying the bubble dissolution limit coincident with the parametric instability in (Pa,R0) parameter space. We take advantage of the fact that this point can be determined experimentally with high precision and replicability. We computed the equilibrium concentration of the different gaseous species and water vapor during collapse as a function of Pa and R0 . The model

  9. Hot Water Distribution System Program Documentation and Comparison to Experimental Data

    SciTech Connect

    Baskin, Evelyn; Craddick, William G; Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Wendt, Robert L; Woodbury, Professor Keith A.

    2007-09-01

    In 2003, the California Energy Commission s (CEC s) Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) program funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to create a computer program to analyze hot water distribution systems for single family residences, and to perform such analyses for a selection of houses. This effort and its results were documented in a report provided to CEC in March, 2004 [1]. The principal objective of effort was to compare the water and energy wasted between various possible hot water distribution systems for various different house designs. It was presumed that water being provided to a user would be considered suitably warm when it reached 105 F. Therefore, what was needed was a tool which could compute the time it takes for water reaching the draw point to reach 105 F, and the energy wasted during this wait. The computer program used to perform the analyses was a combination of a calculational core, produced by Dr. Keith A. Woodbury, Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director, Alabama Industrial Assessment Center, University of Alabama, and a user interface based on LabVIEW, created by Dr. Roberto Lenarduzzi of ORNL. At that time, the computer program was in a relatively rough and undocumented form adequate to perform the contracted work but not in a condition where it could be readily used by those not involved in its generation. Subsequently, the CEC provided funding through Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to improve the program s documentation and user interface to facilitate use by others, and to compare the program s results to experimental data generated by Dr. Carl Hiller. This report describes the program and provides user guidance. It also summarizes the comparisons made to experimental data, along with options built into the program specifically to allow these comparisons. These options were necessitated by the fact that some of the experimental data required options and features not originally included in the program

  10. Experimental oxygen isotope fractionation between siderite-water and phosphoric acid liberated CO2-siderite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carothers, W.W.; Adami, L.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The equilibrium fractionation of O isotopes between synthetic siderite and water has been measured at temperatures ranging from 33?? to 197??C. The fractionation between siderite and water over this temperature range can be represented by the equation: 103 ln ?? = 3.13 ?? 106T-2 - 3.50. Comparison between the experimental and theoretical fractionations is favorable only at approximately 200??C; at lower temperatures, they generally differ by up to 2 permil. Siderite was prepared by the slow addition of ferrous chloride solutions to sodium bicarbonate solutions at the experimental temperatures. It was also used to determine the O isotope fractionation factors between phosphoric acid liberated CO2 and siderite. The fractionation factors for this pair at 25?? and 50??C are 1.01175 and 1.01075, respectively. Preliminary results of the measured C isotope fractionation between siderite and Co2 also indicate C isotopic equilibrium during precipitation of siderite. The measured distribution of 13C between siderite and CO2 coincides with the theoretical values only at about 120??C. Experimental and theoretical C fractionations differ up to 3 permil at higher and lower temperatures. ?? 1988.

  11. Safe drinking water and clean air: an experimental study evaluating the concept of combining household water treatment and indoor air improvement using the Water Disinfection Stove (WADIS).

    PubMed

    Christen, Andri; Navarro, Carlos Morante; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Indoor air pollution and unsafe water remain two of the most important environmental risk factors for the global burden of infectious diseases. Improved stoves and household water treatment (HWT) methods represent two of the most effective interventions to fight respiratory and diarrhoeal illnesses at household level. Since new improved stoves are highly accepted and HWT methods have their drawbacks regarding sustained use, combining the two interventions in one technical solution could result in notable positive convenience and health benefits. A WAter DIsinfection Stove (WADIS) based on a Lorena-stove design with a simple flow-through boiling water-treatment system was developed and tested by a pilot experimental study in rural Bolivia. The results of a post-implementation evaluation of two WADIS and 27 Lorena-stoves indicate high social acceptance rather due to convenience gains of the stove than to perceived health improvements. The high efficacy of the WADIS-water treatment system, with a reduction of microbiological contamination load in the treated water from 87600 thermotolerant coliform colony forming units per 100mL (CFU/100mL) to zero is indicative. The WADIS concept unifies two interventions addressing two important global burdens of disease. WADIS' simple design, relying on locally available materials and low manufacturing costs (approx. 6 US) indicates potential for spontaneous diffusion and scaling up.

  12. The Water Retention Curves in THF Hydrate-Bearing Sediments - Experimental Measurement and Pore Scale Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabadi, N.; Zheng, X.; Dai, S.; Seol, Y.; Zapata, C.; Yun, T.; Jang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The water retention curve (WRC) of hydrate-bearing sediments is critically important to understand the behaviour of hydrate dissociation for gas production. Most gas hydrates in marine environment have been formed from an aqueous phase (gas-dissolved water). However, the gas hydrate formation from an aqueous phase in a laboratory requires long period due to low gas solubility in water and is also associated with many experimental difficulties such as hydrate dissolution, difficult hydrate saturation control, and dynamic hydrate dissolution and formation. In this study, tetrahydrofuran (THF) is chosen to form THF hydrate because the formation process is faster than gas hydrate formation and hydrate saturation is easy to control. THF hydrate is formed at water-excess condition. Therefore, there is only water in the pore space after a target THF hydrate saturation is obtained. The pore habit of THF hydrate is investigated by visual observation in a transparent micromodel and X-ray computed tomography images; and the water retention curves are obtained under different THF hydrate saturation conditions. Targeted THF hydrate saturations are Sh=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8. Results shown that at a given water saturation the capillary pressure increases as THF hydrate saturation increases. And the gas entry pressure increases with increasing hydrate saturation. The WRC obtained by experiments is also compared with the results of a pore-network model simulation and Lattice Boltzmann Method. The fitting parameters of van Genuchten equation for different hydrate saturation conditions are suggested for the use as input parameters of reservoir simulators.

  13. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during Water Year 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Graziano, D. J.; Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.

    2016-11-01

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year (WY) 2015. It is the seventh report in a series examining the financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined WYs 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011); a report released in August 2011 examined WYs 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011); a report released June 2012 examined WY 2011 (Poch et al. 2012); a report released April 2013 examined WY 2012 (Poch et al. 2013); a report released June 2014 examined WY 2013 (Graziano et al. 2014); and a report released September 2015 examined WY 2014 (Graziano et al. 2015). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. Only one experimental release was conducted at GCD in WY 2015; specifically, a high flow experimental (HFE) release conducted in November 2014. For this experimental release, financial costs of approximately $2.1 million were incurred because the HFE required sustained water releases that exceeded the powerplant’s maximum flow rate. In addition, during the month of the experiment, operators were not allowed to shape GCD power production to either follow firm power customer loads or to respond to market prices. This study identifies the main factors that contribute to HFE costs and examines the interdependencies among these factors. It applies an integrated set of tools to estimate financial impacts by simulating the GCD operations under two scenarios: (1) a baseline scenario that mimics both HFE operations during the experiment and during the rest of the year when it complies with the 1996 ROD operating criteria, and (2) a “without experiments” scenario that is identical to the baseline except it assumes that the HFE did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the

  14. Experimental and numerical modelling of surface water-groundwater flow and pollution interactions under tidal forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanoudaki, Katerina; Bockelmann-Evans, Bettina; Schaefer, Florian; Kampanis, Nikolaos; Nanou-Giannarou, Aikaterini; Stamou, Anastasios; Falconer, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Surface water and groundwater are integral components of the hydrologic continuum and the interaction between them affects both their quantity and quality. However, surface water and groundwater are often considered as two separate systems and are analysed independently. This separation is partly due to the different time scales, which apply in surface water and groundwater flows and partly due to the difficulties in measuring and modelling their interactions (Winter et al., 1998). Coastal areas in particular are a difficult hydrologic environment to represent with a mathematical model due to the large number of contributing hydrologic processes. Accurate prediction of interactions between coastal waters, groundwater and neighbouring wetlands, for example, requires the use of integrated surface water-groundwater models. In the past few decades a large number of mathematical models and field methods have been developed in order to quantify the interaction between groundwater and hydraulically connected surface water bodies. Field studies may provide the best data (Hughes, 1995) but are usually expensive and involve too many parameters. In addition, the interpretation of field measurements and linking with modelling tools often proves to be difficult. In contrast, experimental studies are less expensive and provide controlled data. However, experimental studies of surface water-groundwater interaction are less frequently encountered in the literature than filed studies (e.g. Ebrahimi et al., 2007; Kuan et al., 2012; Sparks et al., 2013). To this end, an experimental model has been constructed at the Hyder Hydraulics Laboratory at Cardiff University to enable measurements to be made of groundwater transport through a sand embankment between a tidal water body such as an estuary and a non-tidal water body such as a wetland. The transport behaviour of a conservative tracer was studied for a constant water level on the wetland side of the embankment, while running a

  15. COMPARISON OF FILTRATION METHODS FOR PRIMARY RECOVERY OF CRYPTOSPORIIDUM PARVUM FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waterborne disease outbreaks from contaminated drinking water have been linked to the protozoan parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum. To improve monitoring for this agent, the USEPA developed Method 1622 for isolation and detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water. Method 1622 i...

  16. Science in an Integrated Primary School Project on Water: Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Describes water-related activities in an elementary school science project. These activities focus on electric generators, rainfall, erosion, floating, water conservation, and other areas. Brief comments on developing such a project are included. (JN)

  17. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks and increases survivability against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Nam, Kyoung-Woo; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that drinking oxygenated water may improve oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improving immune activity. The present study evaluated the immune enhancing effects of oxygenated drinking water in broiler chicks and demonstrated the protective efficacy of oxygenated drinking water against Salmonella Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased serum lysozyme activity, peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation and the CD4(+)/CD8(+) splenocyte ratio in broiler chicks. In the chicks experimentally infected with S. Gallinarum, oxygenated drinking water alleviated symptoms and increased survival. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in broiler chicks, and increases survivability against S. Gallinarum in experimentally infected broiler chicks.

  18. Regulatory impact analysis: Benefits and costs of proposed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for inorganic chemicals. Phase 2, March 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-31

    National Primary Drinking Water Regulations are proposed for 30 synthetic organic chemicals, termed the SOCs. The document presents an analysis of the projected national costs and benefits associated with the proposed regulations in compliance with Executive Order 12291. It also includes an analysis of cost impacts on small water systems in compliance with the Regulatory Flexibility Act. The 30 SOCs fall into three groups. For a group of three 'miscellaneous' contaminants (acrylamide, epichlorohydrin, and PCBs), it is simply not possible to estimate occurrence due to a lack of data. Total national costs and benefits for all three are not anticipated to be very significant.

  19. Experimental study of steam condensation on water in countercurrent flow in presence of inert gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Althof, J.

    1984-08-01

    Experimental results of investigating steam condensation on water in the presence of (noncondensable) inert gases at low temperatures and pressures relevant to open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems are reported. Seven different condenser configurations were tested. The experimental data are correlated using a liquid flow fraction and a vent fraction to yield simple relationships of condenser performance over a wide range of test conditions. Performance maps and envelopes are provided for evaluating the relative merits of tested configurations. The height of transfer unit (HTU) for condensation ranges from 0.2 to 0.3 m among the various condenser geometries. Also reported are the pressure-loss coefficients for all the tested geometries.

  20. Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Redalje, Donald G.; Lohrenz, Stevern E.

    2001-02-12

    In this project we determined primary production and optical variability in the shelf and slope waters off of Cape Hatteras, N.C. These processes were addressed in conjunction with other Ocean Margins Program investigators, during the Spring Transition period and during Summer. We found that there were significant differences in measured parameters between Spring and Summer, enabling us to develop seasonally specific carbon production and ecosystem models as well as seasonal and regional algorithm improvements for use in remote sensing applications.

  1. Experimental study on stimulated scattering of ZnO nanospheres dispersed in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jiulin; Wu, Haopeng; Yan, Feng; Yang, Junjie; He, Xingdao

    2016-01-01

    The backward stimulated scattering (BSS) from ZnO nanospheres dispersed in water has been investigated experimentally by employing a Nd:YAG pulse laser with 532 nm wavelength and 8 ns pulse width as the pump laser source. The present results show that the BSS effect is uniquely and unequivocally different compared to other known stimulated scattering, such as stimulated Rayleigh scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and stimulated Raman scattering, and it displays the characteristics of no frequency shift and threshold dependence on initial spontaneous Mie scattering seed source. These can be understood by means of the Mie scattering theory and a laser-induced stationary Bragg grating model.

  2. Toxicity persistence in runoff water and soil in experimental soybean plots following chlorpyrifos application.

    PubMed

    Mugni, Hernán; Demetrio, Pablo; Paracampo, Ariel; Pardi, Martín; Bulus, Gustavo; Bonetto, Carlos

    2012-07-01

    Toxicity persistence in runoff water and soil was studied in experimental soybean plots in successive runoff events produced by an irrigation system. Three chlorpyrifos applications throughout the growing period were assayed. Runoff and soil toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella curvispina and the fish Cnesterodon decemmaculatus was assessed. Toxicity persistence to H. curvispina was shorter in the early and midseason applications (23-28 and 21-69 days in runoff and soil, respectively) and longer in the late application (more than 140 days). The same trend was observed for C. decemmaculatus: 13 days for early and 56 for the late application.

  3. A combined experimental and numerical study of pore water pressure variations in sub-permafrost groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, A.; Anne, J.; Goncalves, J.

    2013-12-01

    The past few decades have seen a rapid development and progress in research on past and current hydrologic impacts of permafrost evolution. In permafrost area, groundwater is subdivided into two zones: supra-permafrost and sub-permafrost which are separated by permafrost. Knowledge of the sub-permafrost aquifers is often lacking due to the difficulty to access those systems. The few available data show that this aquifers are generally artesian below the continuous permafrost. In the literature, there are two plausible explanations for the relatively high pore pressures in the sub-permafrost aquifer; the recharge related to the ice sheet melting and the expulsion of water related to the ice expansion. In this study, we investigated areas where ice sheets have never developed like in the Paris basin region. The ice expansion induces also soil surface uplift. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure in the sub-permafrost aquifer and the soil surface motion during the permafrost development (freezing front deepening). To fill in the gaps to the field data availability, we developed an experimental approach. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Université de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted in a 2 m2 box insulated at all sides except on the top where a surface temperature was prescribed. The box is filled with silty sand of which hydraulics and thermal parameters are known. Soil temperatures, pore water pressure and soil motion are continuously recorded at different elevations in the sand-box. We developed a two-dimensional transient fully coupled heat and water transport model to simulate thawing and freezing processes taking into account the phase change (Latent heat effects). The balance equations are solved using of a finite difference numerical scheme. Experimental results are used to verify the implementation of the hydro-mechanical processes in our numerical simulations. Experimental and numerical

  4. Experimental limits on the proton life-time from the neutrino experiments with heavy water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretyak, V. I.; Zdesenko, Y. G.

    2001-04-01

    Experimental data on the number of neutrons born in the heavy water targets of the large neutrino detectors are used to set the limit on the proton life-time independently on decay mode through the reaction d-->n+?. The best up-to-date limit τp>4×1023 yr with 95% C.L. is derived from the measurements with D2O target (mass 267 kg) installed near the Bugey reactor. This value can be improved by six orders of magnitude with future data accumulated with the SNO detector containing 1000 t of D2O.

  5. Structural Insights into Bound Water in Crystalline Amino Acids: Experimental and Theoretical (17)O NMR.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Vladimir K; Keeler, Eric G; Ong, Ta-Chung; Craigen, Kimberley N; Penzel, Susanne; Wren, John E C; Kroeker, Scott; Griffin, Robert G

    2015-06-25

    We demonstrate here that the (17)O NMR properties of bound water in a series of amino acids and dipeptides can be determined with a combination of nonspinning and magic-angle spinning experiments using a range of magnetic field strengths from 9.4 to 21.1 T. Furthermore, we propose a (17)O chemical shift fingerprint region for bound water molecules in biological solids that is well outside the previously determined ranges for carbonyl, carboxylic, and hydroxyl oxygens, thereby offering the ability to resolve multiple (17)O environments using rapid one-dimensional NMR techniques. Finally, we compare our experimental data against quantum chemical calculations using GIPAW and hybrid-DFT, finding intriguing discrepancies between the electric field gradients calculated from structures determined by X-ray and neutron diffraction.

  6. Summary of experimental data for critical arrays of water moderated Fast Test Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.; Mincey, J.F.; Primm, R.T. III

    1981-05-01

    A research program, funded by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was initiated at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to acquire experimental data on heterogeneous water moderated arrays of Fast Test Reactor (FTR) fuel pins. The objective of this program is to provide critical experiment data for validating calculational techniques used in criticality assessments of reprocessing equipment containing FTR-type fuels. Consequently, the experiments were designed to permit accurate definition in Monte Carlo computer codes currently used in these assessments. Square and triangular pitched lattices of fuel have been constructed under a variety of conditions covering the range from undermoderated to overmoderated arrays. Experiments were conducted composed of arrays which were water reflected, partially concrete reflected, and arrays with interspersed solid neutron absorbers. The absorbers utilized were Boral, and cadmium plates and gadolinium cylindrical rods. Data from non-CFRP sponsored subcritical experiments (previously performed at Hanford) also are included.

  7. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  8. Condensation of water vapor: Experimental determination of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, P. M.; Vrtala, A.; Rudolf, R.; Wagner, P. E.; Riipinen, I.; Vesala, T.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Viisanen, Y.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Experimental determinations of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients αm and αt for condensation of water vapor in air have been conducted covering a temperature range from about 250 to 290 K. For the first time, both coefficients have been determined directly and simultaneously. To this end, growth of water droplets in air has been observed at different total gas pressures ranging from about 1000 down to 100 hPa. Monodispersed seed particles have been used as condensation nuclei. After addition of water vapor with well-defined partial vapor pressure, supersaturation was achieved by adiabatic expansion in an expansion chamber. Most experiments reported in the present paper were performed at vapor saturation ratios ranging from 1.30 to 1.50. Monodispersed Ag particles with a diameter of 9 nm have been used as condensation nuclei, and for humidification a diffusion humidifier was applied. One experiment was performed at the saturation ratio of 1.02, which resembles conditions observed in the Earth's lower atmosphere. In this experiment, monodispersed DEHS particles with a diameter of 80 nm were used as condensation nuclei, and water vapor was generated by quantitative evaporation of a liquid jet. Droplet growth was monitored using the CAMS method. For determination of the accommodation coefficients, experimental droplet growth curves were compared to corresponding theoretical curves. Quantitative comparison was performed by varying the respective accommodation coefficient and the starting time of droplet growth in a two-parameter best fit procedure. Considering the uncertainty with respect to the starting time of droplet growth and the uncertainties of the experimental water vapor supersaturation, corresponding maximum errors have been determined. From the results obtained it can be stated that αt is larger than 0.85 over the whole considered temperature range. For 250-270 K, values of αm below 0.8 are excluded, and for higher temperatures up to 290 K we can

  9. Experimental evidence for the formation of liquid saline water on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Erik; Martínez, Germán M; Elliott, Harvey M; Rennó, Nilton O

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for deliquescence of perchlorate salts has been discovered in the Martian polar region while possible brine flows have been observed in the equatorial region. This appears to contradict the idea that bulk deliquescence is too slow to occur during the short periods of the Martian diurnal cycle during which conditions are favorable for it. We conduct laboratory experiments to study the formation of liquid brines at Mars environmental conditions. We find that when water vapor is the only source of water, bulk deliquescence of perchlorates is not rapid enough to occur during the short periods of the day during which the temperature is above the salts' eutectic value, and the humidity is above the salts' deliquescence value. However, when the salts are in contact with water ice, liquid brine forms in minutes, indicating that aqueous solutions could form temporarily where salts and ice coexist on the Martian surface and in the shallow subsurface. Key Points The formation of brines at Martian conditions was studied experimentally Bulk deliquescence from water vapor is too slow to occur diurnally on Mars Brines form in minutes when salts are placed in direct contact with ice PMID:25821267

  10. Experimental evaluation of sorptive removal of fluoride from drinking water using iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebede, Beekam; Beyene, Abebe; Fufa, Fekadu; Megersa, Moa; Behm, Michael

    2016-03-01

    High concentrations of fluoride in drinking water is a public health concern globally and of critical importance in the Rift Valley region. As a low-cost water treatment option, the defluoridation capacity of locally available iron ore was investigated. Residence time, pH, agitation rate, particle size of the adsorbent, sorbent dose, initial fluoride concentration and the effect of co-existing anions were assessed. The sorption kinetics was found to follow pseudo-first-order rate and the experimental equilibrium sorption data fitted reasonably well to the Freundlich model. The sorption capacity of iron ore for fluoride was 1.72 mg/g and the equilibrium was attained after 120 min at the optimum pH of 6. The sorption study was also carried out at natural pH conditions using natural ground water samples and the fluoride level was reduced from 14.22 to 1.17 mg/L (below the WHO maximum permissible limit). Overall, we concluded that iron ore can be used in water treatment for fluoride removal in the Rift Valley region and beyond.

  11. Experimental investigate of heat transfer for graphene/water nanofluid in micro heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd Elhafez, S. E.; Abo-Zahhad, E. M.; El-Shazly, A. H.; El-Kady, M. F.

    2017-02-01

    In this investigation, the heat transfer characteristics of graphene nano platelets (GNPs)/water nanofluid were studied in a micro heat exchanger (MHE). The micro heat exchanger performance was also examined. The test setup was worked out in the laminar regime with Reynold numbers varying between 100 and 400GNPs/water nanofluid was prepared three different concentrations (0.025 wt. %, 0.05 wt. % and 0.1 wt. %) using ultrasonic wave. The influence of mass flow rate, inlet temperatures and weight fraction on the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) and logarithmic mean temperature (LMTD) were examined. The results showed considerable enhancement on the overall heat transfer coefficient of graphene/water nanofluid and the MHE effectiveness. A maximum enhancement on overall heat transfer coefficient was reached to 150% at Re=100 by 0.1wt% nanofluid. The effectiveness of micro heat exchanger was enhanced by increase weight fraction of graphene nanoparticle. Moreover, the experimental results showed that 0.1 wt. % GNPs/water nanofluid, flowing through MHE, has had high pressure drop, and pumping power, when it has been compared with 0.5 wt. % and 0.025 wt.%.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Study of Water-Filled Vessel Impacted by Flat Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Ren, Peng; Huang, Wei; Gao, Yubo

    2013-06-01

    To understand the failure patterns and impact resistance of watertight vessel, a flat-nosed projectile was accelerated by a two-stage light gas gun against a vessel filled with water which was placed in an air-filled tank. The targets were the 5A06 aluminum which were installed on two opposite sides of the vessel. The penetration process was recorded by a digital high-speed camera. In order to compare, numerical simulations for the vessel with and without water impacted by projectiles were conducted by AUTODYN-3D. The material parameters of targets and projectiles used in the simulation were obtained from several previous studies. The result indicated that experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. Numerical simulations were capable to capture the main physical behavior. It was also found that the impact resistance of targets in the water-filled vessel was lager than that of the empty vessel. Tearing was the main failure models of the water-filled vessel targets which was different from that of the empty vessel where the shear plugging was in dominate. National Natural Science Foundation of China (NO.:11072072).

  13. Experimental and Numerical Study of Water-Filled Vessel Impacted by Flat Projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Peng; Zhang, Wei; Guo, Zitao; Wei, Gang

    2011-06-01

    To understand the failure patterns and impact resistance of watertight vessel, a flat-nosed projectile was accelerated by a two-stage light gas gun against a vessel filled with water which was placed in an air-filled tank. The targets were the 5A06 aluminum which were installed on two opposite sides of the vessel. The penetration process was recorded by a digital high-speed camera. In order to compare, numerical simulations for the vessel with and without water impacted by projectiles were conducted by AUTODYN-3D. The material parameters of targets and projectiles used in the simulation were obtained from several previous studies. The result indicated that experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. Numerical simulations were capable to capture the main physical behavior. It was also found that the impact resistance of targets in the water-filled vessel was lager than that of the empty vessel. Tearing was the main failure models of the water-filled vessel targets which was different from that of the empty vessel where the shear plugging was in dominate.

  14. Responses of amphibian populations to water and soil factors in experimentally-treated aquatic macrocosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparling, D.W.; Lowe, T.P.; Day, D.; Dolan, K.

    1995-01-01

    Survival of anuran embryos and tadpoles is reduced in acidic (pH < 5.0) waters under laboratory conditions. However, field data on the presence-absence of amphibian species and acidity are equivocal. This study attempts to reconcile some of this discrepancy by using macrocosms to examine the interaction of soil type and water acidification on free-ranging tadpole populations. Tadpoles were caught with activity traps in 24 aquatic macrocosms experimentally treated with H2SO4 and Al2(SO4)3 and lined with either comparatively high metal, Iow organic matter clay soils or lower metal, higher organic matter loams. Northern cricket frog (Acris crepitans) tadpole abundance was less in acidified macrocosms than in circumneutral ones (p < 0.05) and less in those with loam soils than in macrocosms with clay soils (p < 0.04). Gray treefrog (Hyla versicolor) abundance was affected by an interaction between soil and acidification (p < 0.07) in that treatment effects were only observed in macrocosms with clay soils (p < 0.01). No differences were observed among treatments for green frog (Rana clamitans) or southern leopard frog (R. utricularia) tadpoles. The study shows that soil type may interact with water conditions to affect amphibian populations in acidified waters

  15. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between molten aluminum and water

    SciTech Connect

    Farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    The possibility of rapid physical and chemical aluminum/water interactions during a core melt accident in a noncommercial reactor (e.g., HFIR, ATR) has resulted in extensive research to determine the mechanism by which these interactions occur and propagate on an explosive time scale. These events have been reported in nuclear testing facilities, i.e., during SPERT 1D experiment, and also in aluminum casting industries. Although rapid chemical reactions between molten aluminum and water have been subject of many studies, very few reliable measurements of the extent of the chemical reactions have thus far been made. We have modified an existing 1-D shock tube facility to perform experiments in order to determine the extent of the explosive thermal/chemical interactions between molton aluminum and water by measuring important physical quantities such as the maximum dynamic pressure and the amount of the generated hydrogen. Experimental results show that transient pressures greater than 69 MPa with a rise time of less than 125 {mu}sec can occur as the result of the chemical reaction of 4.2 grams of molton aluminum (approximately 15% of the total mass of the fuel of 28 grams) at 980 C with room temperature water.

  16. Primary viraemia responses of herons to experimental infection with Murray Valley encephalitis, Kunjin and Japanese encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Boyle, D B; Dickerman, R W; Marshall, I D

    1983-12-01

    Rufous night herons, Pacific herons, little egrets and intermediate egrets were experimentally infected with Murray Valley encephalitis, Kunjin or Japanese encephalitis viruses. Viraemias of at least one day's duration were detected in all birds except two intermediate egrets inoculated with a very low dose of Kunjin virus and one rufous night heron inoculated with Japanese encephalitis virus. there was usually a viraemia of 3 to 5 days' duration commencing on the first or second day and continuing until day 5 or 6 and rarely until day 7. Maximum titres tended to be higher in young birds, up to 2-5 months of age (10(4)-10(5) mouse LD50/ml), than in older birds more than 8 months of age (10(3)-10(4) mouse LD50/ml). Significant differences in maximum viraemia titres were not observed in the different species or between Murray Valley encephalitis and Kunjin viruses. Japanese encephalitis viraemias were significantly lower, but this was probably due to the high mouse brain passage level of the strain used. The onset of viraemia was earlier in intermediate egrets than in rufous night herons inoculated with similar doses of Murray Valley encephalitis virus, but no difference in the susceptibility to infection was observed. With Kunjin virus there was a significant difference in the susceptibility of intermediate egrets and rufous night herons, with rufous night herons being more susceptible to infection with low doses of virus. This difference in threshold of infection, if it extends to other species with both Kunjin and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses, may, in part, be an explanation for the greater incidence of natural infections observed in rufous night herons compared with other species and orders of water birds.

  17. Modelling and experimental investigation on the application of water super adsorbents in waste air biofilters.

    PubMed

    Danaee, Soroosh; Fazaelipoor, Mohammad Hassan; Gholami, Abdollah; Ataei, Seyed Ahmad; Afzali, Daryoush

    2015-01-01

    In this research work, a synthetic water super absorbent polymer was included in the bed of a perlite-based biofilter for the removal of ethanol from air. The performance of this biofilter was compared with the performance of a control perlite-based biofilter lacking the water super absorbent. With the empty bed residence time of 2 min, both biofilters were able to remove more than 90% of the entering pollutant with the concentration of 1 g /m3, when regular moistening was applied. After last irrigation on day 23, the performance of the control biofilter was unchanged until day 35. From day 36 onwards, the control biofilter lost its activity gradually and became totally inactive on day 45. The performance of the super absorbent containing biofilter, however, was unchanged until day 58 before starting to lose its activity. A mechanistic model was developed to describe the performance of a biofilter under drying effects. The model could predict the trends of experimental results reasonably well. The model was also applied to predict the trends of experimental data from a published paper on the removal of hexane in a perlite/super absorbent containing biofilter.

  18. Experimental testing of a liquid bipropellant rocket engine using nitrous oxide and ethanol diluted with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillip, Jeff; Morales, Rudy; Youngblood, Stewart; Saul, W. Venner; Grubelich, Mark; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A research scale liquid bipropellant rocket engine testing facility was constructed at New Mexico Tech to perform research with various propellants. The facility uses a modular engine design that allows for variation of nozzle geometry and injector configurations. Initial testing focused on pure nitrous oxide and ethanol propellants, operating in the range of 5.5-6.9 MPa (800-1000 psi) chamber pressure with approximately 667 N (150 lbf) thrust. The system is instrumented with sensors for temperature, pressure, and thrust. Experimentally found values for specific impulse are in the range of 250-260 s which match computational predictions. Exhaust flow visualization is performed using high speed schlieren imaging. The engine startup and steady state exhaust flow features are studied through these videos. Computational and experimental data are presented for a study of dilution of the ethanol-nitrous oxide propellants with water. The study has shown a significant drop in chamber temperature compared to a small drop in specific impulse with increasing water dilution.

  19. Jarosite-water oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionations: preliminary experimental data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rye, R.O.; Stoffregen, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    Stable isotope studies of alunite have added a powerful tool for understanding geochemical processes in the surficial environment. Jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6], like alunite, is a common mineral in the weathered portions of many sulfide-bearing ore deposits and mine drainages where its formation reflects acidic conditions produced by the oxidation of sulfides. This paper describes oxygen and hydrogen isotope fractionations in jarosite-water experiments over a temperature range of 100?? to 250??C and the extrapolation of the results to surface conditions. It also includes some general observations on the exchange reaction mechanism that are important for evaluating how well natural samples of jarosite retain primary isotopic compositions. -from Authors

  20. Iron-rich drinking water and ascorbic acid supplementation improved hemolytic anemia in experimental Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Richa; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Banerjee, Saumen; Bhattacharjee, Chira R; Raul, Prasanta; Borah, Kusum; Singh, Lokendra; Veer, Vijay

    2014-11-01

    Anemia is a frequent problem in both the primary and secondary health care programs. In contrast, most areas of northeast India are vulnerable to iron toxicity. In the present study, we documented the effect of administration of iron rich water on hemolytic anemia in a Wistar rats' animal model. Hemolytic anemia was induced by phenyl hydrazine through intraperitoneal route and diagnosed by the lowering of blood hemoglobin. After inducing the hemolytic anemia, 24 Wistar rats (n = 6 in four groups) were randomly assigned to 1 mg/l, 5 mg/l, and 10 mg/l ferric oxide iron along with 1 mg/ml ascorbic acid administered through drinking water; a control group was treated with iron-free water. The hematological and biochemical parameters, iron levels in liver, spleen, and kidney were estimated after 30 d of treatment. In the group treated with 5 mg/l iron and ascorbic acid, a significant increase of serum iron and ferritin, and a decrease of TIBC (total iron binding capacity) were observed without changes in other biochemical parameters and histopathological findings. However, in the group treated with 10 mg/l iron and ascorbic acid, hematological changes with significantly higher values for white blood cell count, serum glutamic phospho transaminase, serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, glucose, splenic, and liver iron content, indicate potential toxicity at this supplementation level. Data suggest that the optimum concentration of iron (5 mg/l) and ascorbic acid solution may improve anemic conditions and may be therapeutically beneficial in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia without any negative impact, while 10 mg/l in drinking water seems to be the threshold for the initiation of toxicity.

  1. Extraction tools for identification of chemical contaminants in estuarine and coastal waters to determine toxic pressure on primary producers.

    PubMed

    Booij, Petra; Sjollema, Sascha B; Leonards, Pim E G; de Voogt, Pim; Stroomberg, Gerard J; Vethaak, A Dick; Lamoree, Marja H

    2013-09-01

    The extent to which chemical stressors affect primary producers in estuarine and coastal waters is largely unknown. However, given the large number of legacy pollutants and chemicals of emerging concern present in the environment, this is an important and relevant issue that requires further study. The purpose of our study was to extract and identify compounds which are inhibitors of photosystem II activity in microalgae from estuarine and coastal waters. Field sampling was conducted in the Western Scheldt estuary (Hansweert, The Netherlands). We compared four different commonly used extraction methods: passive sampling with silicone rubber sheets, polar organic integrative samplers (POCIS) and spot water sampling using two different solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridges. Toxic effects of extracts prepared from spot water samples and passive samplers were determined in the Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry bioassay. With target chemical analysis using LC-MS and GC-MS, a set of PAHs, PCBs and pesticides was determined in field samples. These compound classes are listed as priority substances for the marine environment by the OSPAR convention. In addition, recovery experiments with both SPE cartridges were performed to evaluate the extraction suitability of these methods. Passive sampling using silicone rubber sheets and POCIS can be applied to determine compounds with different structures and polarities for further identification and determination of toxic pressure on primary producers. The added value of SPE lies in its suitability for quantitative analysis; calibration of passive samplers still needs further investigation for quantification of field concentrations of contaminants.

  2. Experimental setup for precise investigation of raindrop impacted thin water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Kinnell, Peter I. A.; Greenwood, Philip; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2015-04-01

    Experimental setups with rainfall simulators over soil flumes are a widely-used method to study laboratory-based erosion processes. Small scale processes, such as splash, sheet, and interrill erosion mechanisms, can be studied with a very high degree of precision and accuracy. However, a major problem when performing investigations on raindrop impacted thin water flows is that accurate measurements of key erosion variables are difficult to obtain. In many investigations, important values are, therefore, not directly measured, but inferred from easier to determine parameters. For example rainfall intensity, plot dimension, and flow discharge are recorded during an experiment to rather crudely estimate velocity and depth of flow. Since water depth and flow velocity vary spatially and temporally during experiments with non-controlled flow conditions, this lack of measurement accuracy clearly reduces the explanatory power of the experimental data. Another example for this imprecision is the use of pressure nozzles for this kind of high accuracy experiments. The main problem associated with spray-type nozzles is that they produce a wide spectrum of drop sizes. In order to characterise simulated rainfall from nozzles, certain parameters, such as mean volumetric drop diameter (d50), are generally used. Knowing that different drop sizes have different effects on particle detachment when impacting on thin water layers of certain depth, it is apparent that this parameter of average drop size is not suitable for the detection of precise relations of, for instance, drop size, flow depth, and particle detachment. Although simulated rainfall from nozzles has a more natural drop size distribution, this use of roughly calculated metadata, instead of accurately measured parameters, is one of the main reasons why it is still not possible to deduce exact physical formulas to precisely model soil erosion mechanisms. In order to be able to control and manipulate the key factors of the

  3. Growth of volcanic ash aggregates in the presence of liquid water and ice: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Muirhead, James D.; Wilson, Colin J. N.; Cimarelli, Corrado

    2012-11-01

    Key processes influencing the aggregation of volcanic ash and hydrometeors are examined with an experimental method employing vibratory pan aggregation. Mechanisms of aggregation in the presence of hail and ice pellets, liquid water (≤30 wt%), and mixed water phases are investigated at temperatures of 18 and -20 °C. The experimentally generated aggregates, examined in hand sample, impregnated thin sections, SEM imagery, and X-ray microtomography, closely match natural examples from phreatomagmatic phases of the 27 ka Oruanui and 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruptions. Laser diffraction particle size analysis of parent ash and aggregates is also used to calculate the first experimentally derived aggregation coefficients that account for changing liquid water contents and subzero temperatures. These indicate that dry conditions (<5-10 wt% liquid) promote strongly size selective collection of sub-63 μm particles into aggregates (given by aggregation coefficients >1). In contrast, liquid-saturated conditions (>15-20 wt% liquid) promote less size selective processes. Crystalline ice was also capable of preferentially selecting volcanic ash <31 μm under liquid-free conditions in a two-stage process of electrostatic attraction followed by ice sintering. However, this did not accumulate more than a monolayer of ash at the ice surface. These quantitative relationships may be used to predict the timescales and characteristics of aggregation, such as aggregate size spectra, densities, and constituent particle size characteristics, when the initial size distribution and water content of a volcanic cloud are known. The presence of an irregularly shaped, millimeter-scale vacuole at the center of natural aggregates was also replicated during interaction of ash and melting ice pellets, followed by sublimation. Fine-grained rims were formed by adding moist aggregates to a dry mixture of sub-31 μm ash, which adhered by electrostatic forces and sparse liquid bridges. From this, we

  4. [Experimental research of turbidity influence on water quality monitoring of COD in UV-visible spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Wei, Biao; Wu, De-Cao; Mi, De-Ling; Zhao, Jing-Xiao; Feng, Peng; Jiang, Shang-Hai; Mao, Ben-Jiang

    2014-11-01

    Eliminating turbidity is a direct effect spectroscopy detection of COD key technical problems. This stems from the UV-visible spectroscopy detected key quality parameters depend on an accurate and effective analysis of water quality parameters analytical model, and turbidity is an important parameter that affects the modeling. In this paper, we selected formazine turbidity solution and standard solution of potassium hydrogen phthalate to study the turbidity affect of UV--visible absorption spectroscopy detection of COD, at the characteristics wavelength of 245, 300, 360 and 560 nm wavelength point several characteristics with the turbidity change in absorbance method of least squares curve fitting, thus analyzes the variation of absorbance with turbidity. The results show, In the ultraviolet range of 240 to 380 nm, as the turbidity caused by particle produces compounds to the organics, it is relatively complicated to test the turbidity affections on the water Ultraviolet spectra; in the visible region of 380 to 780 nm, the turbidity of the spectrum weakens with wavelength increases. Based on this, this paper we study the multiplicative scatter correction method affected by the turbidity of the water sample spectra calibration test, this method can correct water samples spectral affected by turbidity. After treatment, by comparing the spectra before, the results showed that the turbidity caused by wavelength baseline shift points have been effectively corrected, and features in the ultraviolet region has not diminished. Then we make multiplicative scatter correction for the three selected UV liquid-visible absorption spectroscopy, experimental results shows that on the premise of saving the characteristic of the Ultraviolet-Visible absorption spectrum of water samples, which not only improve the quality of COD spectroscopy detection SNR, but also for providing an efficient data conditioning regimen for establishing an accurate of the chemical measurement methods.

  5. Influence of Water with Modified Isotope Structure on Development of Radiation Damage in Experimental Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakov, D. V.; Fedorenko, B. S.; Sinyak, Yu. E.

    begin table htbp begin center begin tabular p 442pt hline As the duration of space missions increases the problem of durability of space crews and their resistivity to space flight factors becomes more important The purpose of the present work was to study the radioprotective effects of lowered deuterium content water in experimental animals after repeated exposures to low doses of gamma radiation Both male and female adult mice of NAAoN57Al6 F1 and BALB c lines were exposed to 0 25 0 5 and 1 0 Gy of 60 Co gamma rays by multiple fractions The dose rate was 0 32 Gy min Starting from one month prior to the first irradiation fraction till the end of the experiment the animals were only supplied with lowered deuterium content water ad libitum The control group of mice consumed tap water only The mice were sacrificed by means of cervical dislocation within one month after finishing the last irradiation fraction The following parameters were registered the weight of body thymus and spleen number of leucocytes blood formula number of caryocytes in femur bone marrow cytogenetic lesions in nucleated bone marrow cells The water with lowered deuterium content was produced by means of electrolysis with a special device in the Institute for Biomedical Problems par A long-term consumption of water with lowered deuterium content by irradiated mice was found to result in lower levels of depletion of peripheral blood leucocytes and bone marrow cells in a decrease in the yield of cytogenetic aberrations and in a less intensive reduction of the mass

  6. Experimental research on water management in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li-jun; Chen, Wen-can; Qin, Ming-jun; Ren, Geng-po

    A simulated cathode flow channel experiment system was set up based on the gas flow rate and water flow rate in the PEM fuel cell. With the assistance of the visualization system, high-sensitivity double parallel conductance probes flow regime inspecting technique was adopted successfully in the experiment system to inspect the flow regime of the gas-liquid two-phase flow in the PEM fuel cell. The research results show that the double parallel conductance probes inspecting system and the flow regime image system for the gas-liquid two-phase flow in the PEM fuel cell simulated channel both can judge the slug flow and annular flow in it, and the double parallel conductance probes flow regime inspecting system can divide the annular flow into three subtypes. The main probes inspecting system and the assistant image system validate reciprocally, which enhances the experimental veracity. The typical flow regimes of the PEM fuel cell simulated channel include slug flow, annular flow with big water film wave, annular flow with small water film wave and annular flow without water film wave. With the increase of the liquid superficial velocity, the frequencies of liquid slug and wave of liquid film increase. The flow regime map in the flow channel of the PEM fuel cell was developed. The flow regime of the gas-liquid two-phase flow in a PEM fuel cell in different operating conditions can be forecasted with this map. With the PEM fuel cell operating condition in this study, the flow regimes of gas-liquid two-phase flow for different cases are all annular flow with small water film wave, and the liquid film waves more with bigger current density. With the location closer to the channel outlet, the liquid film waves are more for the same current density.

  7. A modern vs. Permian black shale - the hydrography, primary productivity, and water-column chemistry of deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Perkins, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    The sediment currently accumulating in the Cariaco Basin, on the continental shelf of Venezuela, has an elevated organic-carbon content of approximately 5%; is accumulating under O2-depleted bottom-water conditions (SO42- reduction); is composed dominantly of foraminiferal calcite, diatomaceous silica, clay, and silt; and is dark greenish gray in color. Upon lithification, it will become a black shale. Recent studies have established the hydrography of the basin and the level of primary productivity and bottom-water redox conditions. These properties are used to model accumulation rates of Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn on the seafloor. The model rates agree closely with measured rates for the uppermost surface sediment.The model is applied to the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation, a phosphate deposit of Permian age in the northwest United States. It too has all of the requisite properties of a black shale. Although the deposit is a world-class phosphorite, it is composed mostly of phosphatic mudstone and siltstone, chert, limestone, and dolomite. It has organic-carbon concentrations of up to 15%, is strongly enriched in several trace elements above a terrigenous contribution and is black. The trace-element accumulation defines a mean primary productivity in the photic zone of the Phosphoria Basin as moderate, at 500 g m-2 year-1 organic carbon, comparable to primary productivity in the Cariaco Basin. The source of nutrient-enriched water that was imported into the Phosphoria Basin, upwelled into the photic zone, and supported primary productivity was an O2 minimum zone of the open ocean. The depth range over which the water was imported would have been between approximately 100 and 600 m. The mean residence time of bottom water in the basin was approximately 4 years vs. 100 years in the Cariaco Basin. The bottom water was O2 depleted, but it was denitrifying, or NO3- reducing, rather than SO42- reducing. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Development plan for the External Hazards Experimental Group. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Justin Leigh; Smith, Curtis Lee; Burns, Douglas Edward; Kammerer, Annie

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the development plan for a new multi-partner External Hazards Experimental Group (EHEG) coordinated by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) within the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) technical pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Currently, there is limited data available for development and validation of the tools and methods being developed in the RISMC Toolkit. The EHEG is being developed to obtain high-quality, small- and large-scale experimental data validation of RISMC tools and methods in a timely and cost-effective way. The group of universities and national laboratories that will eventually form the EHEG (which is ultimately expected to include both the initial participants and other universities and national laboratories that have been identified) have the expertise and experimental capabilities needed to both obtain and compile existing data archives and perform additional seismic and flooding experiments. The data developed by EHEG will be stored in databases for use within RISMC. These databases will be used to validate the advanced external hazard tools and methods.

  9. Effect of lithium hydroxide on stability of fuel cladding oxide film in simulated pressurized water reactor primary water environments

    SciTech Connect

    Saario, T.; Taehtinen, S.; Piippo, J.

    1997-09-01

    The trend in pressurized water reactors (PWR) toward higher burnups, increasing lithium concentrations, and higher coolant temperatures imposes a demand for better fuel cladding corrosion and hydriding properties. There is a lack of reliable and fast in-situ techniques to investigate zirconium alloys in high-temperature water environments. The contact electric resistance (CER) technique was used to measure the electric resistance of the oxide growing on a zirconium-based fuel cladding material. Lithium hydroxide (LiOH) decreased electric resistance of the oxide when LiOH was in excess of {approximately} 70 ppm in PWR water at 300 C. Electric resistance of the oxide was dependent upon LiOH concentration and was shown to correlate inversely with the effect of LiOH on weight gain. Kinetics of the decrease of electric resistance indicated the mechanism of degradation was a phase transformation rather than a diffusion-limited process.

  10. Ultrafast solvation dynamics in water: Isotope effects and comparison with experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Nilashis; Roy, Srabani; Bagchi, Biman

    1995-01-01

    A detailed theoretical study of solvation dynamics in water is presented. The motivation of the present study comes from the recent experimental observation that the dynamics of solvation of an ion in water is ultrafast and the solvation time correlation function decays with a time constant of about 55 fs. The slower decay in the long time can be described by a sum of two exponentials with time constants equal to 126 and 880 fs. The molecular theory (developed earlier) predicts a time constant equal to 52 fs for the initial Gaussian decay and time constants equal to 134 and 886 fs for the two exponential components at the long time. This nearly perfect agreement is obtained by using the most detailed dynamical information available in the literature. The present study emphasizes the importance of the intermolecular vibrational band originating from the O...O stretching mode of the O-H...O units in the initial dynamics and raises several interesting questions regarding the nature of the decay of this mode. We have also studied the effects of isotope substitution on solvation dynamics. It is predicted that a significant isotope effect may be observed in the long time. The experimental results have also been compared with the prediction of the dynamic mean spherical approximation (DMSA); the agreement is not satisfactory at the long time. It is further found that the molecular theory and the DMSA lead to virtually identical results if the translational modes of the solvent molecules are neglected in the former. DMSA has also been used to investigate the dynamics of solvation of a dipolar solute in water. It is found that the dynamics of dipolar solvation exhibit features rather different from those of ion solvation.

  11. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  12. Experimental evaluation of the drag coefficient of water rockets by a simple free-fall test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrio-Perotti, R.; Blanco-Marigorta, E.; Argüelles-Díaz, K.; Fernández-Oro, J.

    2009-09-01

    The flight trajectory of a water rocket can be reasonably calculated if the magnitude of the drag coefficient is known. The experimental determination of this coefficient with enough precision is usually quite difficult, but in this paper we propose a simple free-fall experiment for undergraduate students to reasonably estimate the drag coefficient of water rockets made from plastic soft drink bottles. The experiment is performed using relatively small fall distances (only about 14 m) in addition with a simple digital-sound-recording device. The fall time is inferred from the recorded signal with quite good precision, and it is subsequently introduced as an input of a Matlab® program that estimates the magnitude of the drag coefficient. This procedure was tested first with a toy ball, obtaining a result with a deviation from the typical sphere value of only about 3%. For the particular water rocket used in the present investigation, a drag coefficient of 0.345 was estimated.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigations on reliability of air barrier on oil containment in flowing water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinshu; Xu, Zhenfeng; Xu, Song; Xie, Sensen; Wu, Haoxiao; Yang, Zhenbo; Liu, Xueqiang

    2015-06-15

    Air barriers have been recently developed and employed as a new type of oil containment boom. This paper presents systematic investigations on the reliability of air barriers on oil containments with the involvement of flowing water, which represents the commonly-seen shearing current in reality, by using both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Both the numerical and experimental investigations are carried out in a model scale. In the investigations, a submerged pipe with apertures is installed near the bottom of a tank to generate the air bubbles forming the air curtain; and, the shearing water flow is introduced by a narrow inlet near the mean free surface. The effects of the aperture configurations (including the size and the spacing of the aperture) and the location of the pipe on the effectiveness of the air barrier on preventing oil spreading are discussed in details with consideration of different air discharges and velocities of the flowing water. The research outcome provides a foundation for evaluating and/or improve the reliability of a air barrier on preventing spilled oil from further spreading.

  14. Evaluation of tritiated water diffusion through the Toarcian clayey formation of the Tournemire experimental site (France).

    PubMed

    Motellier, S; Devol-Brown, I; Savoye, S; Thoby, D; Alberto, J-C

    2007-10-30

    Through-diffusion experiments with tritiated water were performed on argillaceous samples from various zones of the Tournemire test site. It was intended to evaluate the homogeneity of the transport property of unfracturated samples and the influence of the orientation and the nature of the samples (presence of an opened fracture or a pre-existing tectonic fracture filled with calcite and pyrite). Homogeneous values of the tritiated water (HTO) effective diffusion coefficients were deduced from experiments carried out when diffusion occurred parallel to the stratigraphic bedding, with an apparent sensitivity to experimental conditions. Anisotropy was significant, De(HTO) perpendicular to the bedding being 1/3 lower than that parallel to the bedding. The observed fractures of the samples created by mechanical stress and partial dehydration during sawing and the presence of a pre-existing opened fracture did not affect the effective diffusion coefficients of tritiated water, which is probably due to the healing ability of the clayey medium during the re-saturation phases of the equilibrium steps performed prior to the diffusion experiments. On the contrary, a significant decrease of this transport parameter was induced by the occurrence of a pre-existing tectonic fracture, which was assigned to the dense structure of the filling phases.

  15. An experimental study of hydromagmatic fragmentation through energetic, non-explosive magma-water mixing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, L.G.; Spieler, O.; Downey, W.S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report the first experimental investigation of non-explosive hydromagmatic fragmentation during energetic mixing with water. We mix magma and water by two methods: (1) pouring a basaltic melt between two converging water sprays; and (2) jetting basaltic melt at high pressure (3??MPa) through a nozzle into a tank of stagnant water. These experiments involved shear at relative velocities of ~ 5-16??m/s and vigorous mixing for less than a second, providing sufficient time for glassy rinds to grow but insufficient time for clot interiors to cool. In resulting fragments, we examined the gross morphology, which reflects fluid deformation during mixing, and surface textures, which reflect the growth and disruption of glassy rinds. We find major differences in both fragment morphology and surface texture between experiments. Water-spray experiments produced Pele's hair, thin bubble shards, melt droplets, and angular, fracture-bound droplet pieces. Melt-jet experiments produced mostly coarse (> 1??mm diameter), wavy fluidal fragments with broken ends. Fluidal surfaces of fragments produced by water-spray experiments were generally shiny under reflected light and, in microscopic examination, smooth down to micron scale, implying no disruption of glassy rinds, except for (a) rare flaking on Pele's hair that was bent prior to solidification; or (b) cracking and alligator-skin textures on segments of melt balls that had expanded before complete cooling. In contrast, textures of fluidal surfaces on fragments produced by melt-jet experiments are dull in reflected light and, in scanning electron images, exhibit ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in stripes. Adhering to these surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material microns to tens of microns in diameter. In the water-spray fragments, we interpret the scarcity of disrupted surface rinds to result from lack of bending after surfaces formed. In the

  16. An experimental study of hydromagmatic fragmentation through energetic, non-explosive magma-water mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, L. G.; Spieler, O.; Downey, W. S.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we report the first experimental investigation of non-explosive hydromagmatic fragmentation during energetic mixing with water. We mix magma and water by two methods: (1) pouring a basaltic melt between two converging water sprays; and (2) jetting basaltic melt at high pressure (3 MPa) through a nozzle into a tank of stagnant water. These experiments involved shear at relative velocities of ~ 5-16 m/s and vigorous mixing for less than a second, providing sufficient time for glassy rinds to grow but insufficient time for clot interiors to cool. In resulting fragments, we examined the gross morphology, which reflects fluid deformation during mixing, and surface textures, which reflect the growth and disruption of glassy rinds. We find major differences in both fragment morphology and surface texture between experiments. Water-spray experiments produced Pele's hair, thin bubble shards, melt droplets, and angular, fracture-bound droplet pieces. Melt-jet experiments produced mostly coarse (> 1 mm diameter), wavy fluidal fragments with broken ends. Fluidal surfaces of fragments produced by water-spray experiments were generally shiny under reflected light and, in microscopic examination, smooth down to micron scale, implying no disruption of glassy rinds, except for (a) rare flaking on Pele's hair that was bent prior to solidification; or (b) cracking and alligator-skin textures on segments of melt balls that had expanded before complete cooling. In contrast, textures of fluidal surfaces on fragments produced by melt-jet experiments are dull in reflected light and, in scanning electron images, exhibit ubiquitous discontinuous skins ("rinds") that are flaked, peeled, or smeared away in stripes. Adhering to these surfaces are flakes, blocks, and blobs of detached material microns to tens of microns in diameter. In the water-spray fragments, we interpret the scarcity of disrupted surface rinds to result from lack of bending after surfaces formed. In the melt

  17. Experimental petrology of peridotites, including effects of water and carbon on melting in the Earth's upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, David H.

    2015-02-01

    For over 50 years, the use of high-pressure piston/cylinder apparatus combined with an increasing diversity of microbeam analytical techniques has enabled the study of mantle peridotite compositions and of magmas derived by melting in the upper mantle. The experimental studies have been guided by the petrology and geochemistry of peridotites from diverse settings and by the remarkable range of mantle-derived magma types. Recent experimental study using FTIR spectroscopy to monitor water content of minerals has shown that fertile lherzolite (MORB-source upper mantle) at ~1,000 °C can store ~200 ppm H2O in defect sites in nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxenes, garnet and spinel). Water in excess of 200 ppm stabilizes amphibole (pargasite) at P < 3 GPa up to the lherzolite solidus. However, at P > 3 GPa, water in excess of 200 ppm appears as an aqueous vapour phase and this depresses the temperature of the upper mantle solidus. Provided the uppermost mantle (lithosphere) has H2O < 4,000 ppm, the mantle solidus has a distinctive P, T shape. The temperature of the vapour- undersaturated or dehydration solidus is approximately constant at 1,100 °C at pressures up to ~3 GPa and then decreases sharply to ~1,010 °C. The strongly negative d T/d P of the vapour-undersaturated solidus of fertile lherzolite from 2.8 to 3 GPa provides the basis for understanding the lithosphere/asthenosphere boundary. Through upward migration of near-solidus hydrous silicate melt, the asthenosphere becomes geochemically zoned with the `enriched' intraplate basalt source (>500 ppm H2O) overlying the `depleted' MORB source (~200 ppm H2O). From the study of primitive MOR picrites, the modern mantle potential temperature for MORB petrogenesis is ~1,430 °C. The intersection of the 1,430 °C adiabat with the vapour-saturated lherzolite solidus at ~230 km suggests that upwelling beneath mid-ocean ridges begins around this depth. In intraplate volcanism, diapiric upwelling begins from

  18. Integrated economic and experimental framework for screening of primary recovery technologies for high cell density CHO cultures

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Daria; Stonier, Adam; Pain, David; Titchener‐Hooker, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increases in mammalian cell culture titres and densities have placed significant demands on primary recovery operation performance. This article presents a methodology which aims to screen rapidly and evaluate primary recovery technologies for their scope for technically feasible and cost‐effective operation in the context of high cell density mammalian cell cultures. It was applied to assess the performance of current (centrifugation and depth filtration options) and alternative (tangential flow filtration (TFF)) primary recovery strategies. Cell culture test materials (CCTM) were generated to simulate the most demanding cell culture conditions selected as a screening challenge for the technologies. The performance of these technology options was assessed using lab scale and ultra scale‐down (USD) mimics requiring 25–110mL volumes for centrifugation and depth filtration and TFF screening experiments respectively. A centrifugation and depth filtration combination as well as both of the alternative technologies met the performance selection criteria. A detailed process economics evaluation was carried out at three scales of manufacturing (2,000L, 10,000L, 20,000L), where alternative primary recovery options were shown to potentially provide a more cost‐effective primary recovery process in the future. This assessment process and the study results can aid technology selection to identify the most effective option for a specific scenario. PMID:27067803

  19. [Combined effect of musically-modulated electrical current and mineral drinking water from Khadyzhensky spring in experimental atherosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Zubkova, S M; Varakina, N I; Mikhaĭlik, L V; Bobkova, A S; Chabanenko, S S

    2002-01-01

    Male rats with experimental atherosclerosis drank mineral water (Khadyzhensky spring) and were exposed to music-modulated electric current. This combined treatment showed synergism of physical (current) and balneological (mineral water) factors providing lipolytic, antioxidant, stress-limiting and antiinflammatory intravascular effects and recovery of microcirculatory processes.

  20. Building an understanding of water use innovation adoption processes through farmer-driven experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturdy, Jody D.; Jewitt, Graham P. W.; Lorentz, Simon A.

    Smallholder farmers in Southern Africa are faced with the challenge of securing their livelihoods within the context of a wide variety of biophysical and socio-economic constraints. Agriculture is inherently risky, particularly in regions prone to drought or dry spells, and risk-averse farmers may be viewed by researchers or extension agents as reluctant to invest in agricultural innovations that have potential to improve their livelihoods. However, farmers themselves are more interested in personal livelihood security than any other stakeholder and it is the farmers’ perceptions of needs, investment options and risks that drive their decision-making process. A holistic approach to agricultural innovation development and extension is needed to address both socio-economic and biophysical dynamics that influence adoption and dissemination of innovations. This paper, presents a methodology for involving farmers from the Bergville district of South Africa in the process of innovation development through facilitation of farmer-driven gardening experiments. Facilitating farmer-driven experimentation allows farmers to methodically assess the value of innovations they choose to study while providing researchers with a venue for learning about socio-economic as well as biophysical influences on farmers’ decisions. With this knowledge, researchers can focus on developing innovations that are socially and economically appropriate and therefore, more readily adoptable. The participatory process gave farmers the tools they needed to make informed decisions through critical thinking and analysis and improved their confidence in explaining the function of innovations to others. Researchers were able to use farmers’ manually collected data and observations to supplement laboratory generated and electronically recorded information about soil water dynamics to understand water balances associated with different garden bed designs, and to investigate whether trench beds, drip

  1. Water in quartz? - A comparison of naturally and experimentally deformed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thust, A.; Kilian, R.; Heilbronner, R.; Stunitz, H.; Holyoke, C. W.; Kronenberg, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    In order to study the influence of water on the deformation of quartz, a series of high PT experiments (Pc up to 1500 MPa and T up to 900°C ) were carried out in a solid medium Griggs apparatus using a quartz single crystal containing a large number of fluid inclusions. FTIR spectroscopy was used to determine water contents. In the undeformed material, the H2O rich fluid inclusions show a large range in size (50 μm < d < 700 μm) and an extremely heterogeneous spatial distribution. Adjacent to the fluid inclusions the crystal is essentially dry (< 100 H/10^6 Si). The absorption spectra show no evidence for intra-crystalline H2O. H2O is only detected in the fluid inclusions (broad absorption band indicating molecular water). When samples were being brought up to experimental conditions, P and T remained close to the fluid inclusion isochore. After deformation, the inclusions are homogeneously distributed throughout the sample and dramatically reduced in size (d < 0.1 μm). Areas with high density of very small fluid inclusions (H2O content ≤ 3000 H/10^6 Si) correlate with high deformation (dislocation glide). The absorption spectra display a discrete peak, indicating OH- bonding in the quartz lattice. Naturally deformed quartz grains in the Truzzo granite (Alps, Northern Italy) are dynamically recrystallized during amphibolite facies conditions by subgrain rotation and grain boundary migration (dislocation creep). The recrystallized grain size (200 < d < 750 μm) indicates low differential stresses of 5-30 MPa. Microstructural observations clearly show that fluid inclusion originally contained in magmatic quartz are expelled during grain boundary migration leaving the recrystallized grains essentially dry with water contents comparable to Brazil quartz (< 200 H/10^6Si). In experiments, the release of H2O from fluid inclusions is considered an important process for crystal plastic deformation. Fluid inclusion rupture, micro cracking and the fast crack healing

  2. Can product water footprints indicate the hydrological impact of primary production? - A case study of New Zealand kiwifruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deurer, M.; Green, S. R.; Clothier, B. E.; Mowat, A.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryWater footprints have been discussed as indicators for the influence of primary products on water scarcity and water quality. We assessed the impact of New Zealand kiwifruit on the scarcity and quality of freshwater resources and evaluated how the green-, blue- and grey-water footprints represented this impact. Water scarcity relates to the freshwater stored in soil and groundwater over a yearly timeframe. We found a negligible net change in soil water, as the freshwater in the soil is replenished every year by rain. The dynamics of freshwater in soil is indicated by the green-water footprint. Kiwifruit production has no impact on freshwater scarcity in soils, and we suggest, therefore, discarding the green-water footprint in this and similar studies. The groundwater recharge below kiwifruit orchards showed a large regional variation. A net depletion of groundwater resources occurs only in two kiwifruit growing regions, and only when the orchards are over-irrigated. The blue-water footprint indicates the status of the freshwater resources stored in the groundwater. We compared two different concepts. Our hydrologically based concept (Approach 1) quantifies the net change in the resources, whereas the Water Footprint Network (Approach 2) only accounts for the consumption. The blue-water footprint calculated by Approach 1 could explain 97% and by Approach 2 only 63% of the regional variation of net groundwater recharge below kiwifruit orchards. The values of the blue-water footprints are, on a regional average, about -500 L and 100 L per tray of kiwifruit with Approaches 1 and 2, respectively. According to Approach 1, a tray of kiwifruit delivers a net groundwater recharge of 500 L per tray, whereas according to Approach 2 the production of a tray of kiwifruit consumes 100 L of groundwater. Only Approach 1 contains all the hydrological processes making up the water balance that relates to groundwater. We assessed the impact of regional kiwifruit production on

  3. Experimental measurement of wind and water erosion in Aragón and Andalusia, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, Wolfgang; Iserloh, Thomas; Marzen, Miriam; Ries, Johannes B.; Schmidt, Reinhard-G.

    2010-05-01

    For more than 50 years rainfall simulators and wind tunnels are important tools for soil erosion studies in the field. Laboratory investigations in wind tunnels with the ability of simultaneous rainfall production showed that wind significantly alters drop sizes, drop fall velocities and impact angles of falling raindrops. Leading to higher kinetic energies and increased soil detachment in comparison to falling drops with no wind influence. In most simulators this combined effect of wind and water is either not taken into account or deliberately excluded from the system, because of increasing complexity of processes involved. Within the project Ri 835/3-1, founded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, a portable combined wind an rainfall simulator for in-situ soil erosion studies was developed and used in Spain (Aragón, Andalusia), Morocco (Souss valley), and Germany (Eifel). The main objective of these field experiments was to quantify the susceptibility of different soil surface conditions and soil surface treatments to soil erosion by wind, water, and the combined effect of wind and water. Here, an overview of the results of the experimental measurements in Spain is given. The results show that wind erosion in Aragón is more or less negligible on undisturbed, crusted soil surfaces, but it can reach high amounts of up to 50 g m-² on rolled and grazed fields. Measurements in Andalusia show mean erosion rates of 24 g m-² on crusted soil surfaces. The expected increase of soil detachment, due to the combined force of wind and water in comparison to solely rainfall simulations, is apparent in most of the simulated runs. In total, the results proof that this combined wind and rainfall simulator is a valuable tool for soil erosion studies in the field and that it can be used to investigate various research questions.

  4. Experimental and numerical simulations of heat transfers between flowing water and a horizontal frozen porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, N.; Costard, F.; Grenier, C. F.

    2013-12-01

    In permafrost-affected regions, hydrological changes due to global warming are still under investigation. But yet, we can already foresee from recent studies that for example, the variability and intensity of surface/subsurface flow are likely to be affected by permafrost degradation. And the feedback induced by such changes on permafrost degradation is still not clearly assessed. Of particular interest are lake and river-taliks. A talik is a permanently unfrozen zone that lies below rivers or lake. They should play a key role in these interactions given that they are the only paths for groundwater flow in permafrost regions. Thus heat transfers on a regional scale are potentially influenced by groundwater circulation. The aim of our study is therefore to investigate the evolution of river taliks. We developed a multidisciplinary approach coupling field investigation, experimental studies in a cold room and numerical modeling. In Central Yakutia, Siberia, where permafrost is continuous, we recently installed instruments to monitor ground temperature and water pressure in a river talik between two thermokarst lakes. We present here the coupling of numerical modeling and laboratory experiments in order to look after the main parameters controlling river-talik installation. In a cold room at IDES, where a metric scale channel is filled with sand as a porous medium, we are able to control air, water and permafrost temperature, but also water flow, so that we can test various parameter sets for a miniaturized river. These results are confronted with a numerical model developed at the LSCE with Cast3m (www-cast3m.cea.fr), that couples heat and water transfer. In particular, expressions for river-talik heat exchange terms are investigated. A further step will come in the near future with results from field investigation providing the full complexity of a natural system. Keywords: Talik, River, Numerical Modeling, Cold Room, Permafrost.

  5. Transport behaviour of xenobiotic micropollutants in surface waters - an experimental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwientek, Marc; Kuch, Bertram; Rügner, Hermann; Dobramysl, Lorenz; Grathwohl, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Xenobiotics are substances that do not exist in natural systems but are increasingly produced by industrial processes and introduced into the environment. While many of these compounds are eliminated in waste water treatment plants, some are only barely degraded and are discharged into receiving water bodies. Often little is known about their acute or chronic toxicity and even less about their persistence or transport behaviour in aquatic systems. In the present study, the stability and turnover of selected micropollutants along a 7.5 km long segment of the River Ammer in Southwest Germany was investigated (catchment area 134 km²). This stream carries a proportion of treated wastewater which is clearly above the average in German rivers, mainly supplied by a major waste water treatment plant at the upstream end of the studied stream segment. An experimental mass balance approach was chosen where in- and outflow of water and target compounds into and out of the balanced stream segment was measured during base flow conditions. To cover a complete diurnal cycle of wastewater input, pooled samples were collected every 2 h over a sampling period of 24 h. A comparison of bulk mass fluxes showed that carbamazepine, a pharmaceutical, and phosphorous flame retardants, such as TCPP, behave conservative under the given conditions. Some retention was observed for the disinfectant product Triclosan and some polycyclic musk fragrances (e.g., HHCB). TAED, a bleaching activator used in detergents, was completely eliminated along the stream segment. The outcome of the experiment demonstrates the very different persistence of some widely-used micropollutants in aquatic systems. However, the mechanisms involved in their attenuation as well as the fate of the most persistent compounds still remain subject to further research.

  6. Evidence for dissolved organic matter as the primary source and sink of photochemically produced hydroxyl radical in arctic surface waters.

    PubMed

    Page, Sarah E; Logan, J Robert; Cory, Rose M; McNeill, Kristopher

    2014-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical (˙OH) is an indiscriminate oxidant that reacts at near-diffusion-controlled rates with organic carbon. Thus, while ˙OH is expected to be an important oxidant of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and other recalcitrant compounds, the role of ˙OH in the oxidation of these compounds in aquatic ecosystems is not well known due to the poorly constrained sources and sinks of ˙OH, especially in pristine (unpolluted) natural waters. We measured the rates of ˙OH formation and quenching across a range of surface waters in the Arctic varying in concentrations of expected sources and sinks of ˙OH. Photochemical formation of ˙OH was observed in all waters tested, with rates of formation ranging from 2.6 ± 0.6 to 900 ± 100 × 10(-12) M s(-1). Steady-state concentrations ranged from 2 ± 1 to 290 ± 60 × 10(-17) M, and overlapped with previously reported values in surface waters. While iron-mediated photo-Fenton reactions likely contributed to the observed ˙OH production, several lines of evidence suggest that DOM was the primary source and sink of photochemically produced ˙OH in pristine arctic surface waters. DOM from first-order or headwater streams was more efficient in producing ˙OH than what has previously been reported for DOM, and ˙OH formation decreased with increasing residence time of DOM in sunlit surface waters. Despite the ubiquitous formation of ˙OH in arctic surface waters observed in this study, photochemical ˙OH formation was estimated to contribute ≤4% to the observed photo-oxidation of DOM; however, key uncertainties in this estimate must be addressed before ruling out the role of ˙OH in the oxidation of DOM in these waters.

  7. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  8. Ocular and orbital trauma from water balloon slingshots: a clinical, epidemiological, experimental, and theoretical study.

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, J D; Johnson, D A; Ballal, D R; Bullock, R J

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To report the clinical findings of 17 patients with ocular/orbital injuries produced by launched water balloons; to determine water balloon kinetic energies in experimental and theoretical studies. METHODS: Six case histories are presented, 1 case was retrieved from the medical literature, and 10 cases were reported to the National Injury Information Clearinghouse of the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission. The energies were determined by field trials and calculations. RESULTS: Injuries included orbital contusions and hematomas, facial hypesthesia, eyelid lacerations, subconjunctival hemorrhages, corneal edema and abrasion, hyphemas, traumatic iritis, iris sphincter ruptures, iris atrophy, angle recession, iridodialyses, traumatic cataract, vitreous hemorrhages, retinal hemorrhages, macular hole formation, optic atrophy, and bony orbital wall fractures. Epidemiological analysis revealed that children and young adults, more often males, were injured, most commonly in the warm weather months (May through September). In field trials, maximum water balloon velocities ranged from 38 to 41 m/sec (85 to 92 mph) with kinetic energies from 176 to 245 J; by calculation, maximum velocities ranged from 42 to 54 m/sec (95 to 121 mph) with kinetic energies from 141 to 232 J. In a field demonstration a 300-g water balloon launched horizontally from a distance of 20 ft exploded a 12-kg watermelon. Classic physics calculations are presented to explain the complex bio-mechanical interactions between the water balloon and the eye. CONCLUSION: Kinetic energies of launched water balloons are comparable to or greater than kinetic energies experienced with a variety of common objects, including file bullets, which are well known to cause serious ocular and orbital injuries. In addition, these energies are far in excess of those required to perforate a cornea (0.7 to 1.7 J), rupture a globe (1 to 5.3 J), or fracture the bony orbit (1.8 to 14.7 j). Thus, this study

  9. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Boron Dilution Transients in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hertlein, Roland J.; Umminger, Klaus; Kliem, Soeren; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Hoehne, Thomas; Weiss, Frank-Peter

    2003-01-15

    Within the pressurized water reactor (PWR) safety analyses, attention has increasingly focused in recent years on boron dilution events that could potentially lead to reactivity transients. Mixing of the low-boron water with the ambient coolant of higher boron content provides an important mitigation mechanism before the low-boron water enters the core.Experimental support is needed to validate the computational tools to be applied to analyze the mixing of the low-boron water. Experiments were performed in the three test facilities - the Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF), the Primaerkreislauf (PKL), and the Rossendorf coolant mixing model (ROCOM) - in Germany.The relevant PKL and UPTF tests were focused on small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) scenarios with reflux-condenser mode and restart of natural circulation. The two test facilities represent a typical western-type PWR and are/were operated by Siemens/KWU now Framatome ANP in Germany. While the restart of natural circulation was investigated in the PKL system test facility (volume 1:145, height 1:1), the UPTF experiments dealt with the mixing of water flows with different boron concentration in the cold legs, reactor pressure vessel (RPV) downcomer, and the lower plenum (all these components were full-scale models).The results from the PKL test facility demonstrate that in case of a postulated SBLOCA with reflux condensation phase, natural circulation does not start up simultaneously in all loops. This means that slugs of condensate, which might have accumulated in the pump seal during reflux-condenser mode of operation, would reach the RPV at different points in time. The UPTF tests showed an almost ideal mixing of water flows with different boron concentration in the RPV downcomer.The ROCOM test facility has been built in a linear scale of 1:5 for the investigation of coolant mixing phenomena in a wide range of flow conditions in the RPV of the German KONVOI-type PWR. The test results presented are

  11. Experimental design applied to photo-Fenton treatment of highly methomyl-concentrated water.

    PubMed

    Micó, María M; Bacardit, Jordi; Sans, Carme

    2010-01-01

    This work is focused on the study of the suitability of the photo-Fenton process as a pretreatment for water highly contaminated with a methomyl commercial formulation in Advanced Greenhouses devices. Initial concentrations of reagents and pesticide were evaluated according to a central composite experimental design, with methomyl depletion and biocompatibility of the final effluent as response functions. A triad of optimal operation conditions could be determined, [Met.](0)=50 mg L(-1), [H(2)O(2)](0)=254 mg L(-1) and [Fe(2+)](0)=77 mg L(-1) for the best elimination yield and an acceptable BOD(5)/COD value, and initial concentration of methomyl can be established as the most important parameter for the performance of the treatment due to the limitations that impose on the hydrogen peroxide doses in the presence of the excipients of the commercial formulation.

  12. Experimental investigation of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation designed to evaluate and better define the overall characteristics of freezing blowby in a copper/water heat pipe was conducted. The results from various rates of restart heat addition and channel blockage, indicate that upon breakthrough the depressurization of the evaporator may result in an effective heat transport capacity far in excess of the steady-state transport limit. The resulting transient conditions imposed on the heat pipe by the effective increased heat transport capacity can cause a loss of liquid in the evaporator and potential dryout. Evidence is presented which indicates that in order to prevent either temporary or permanent dryout, sufficient liquid inventory must be present in the evaporator wicking structure to accommodate the increased transient thermal load and allow sufficient time for the capillary wicking structure to reprime.

  13. Experimental results for oscillatory water flow in 10-ppi metal foam at low-frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bağcı, Ö.; Arbak, A.; De Paepe, M.; Dukhan, N.

    2016-09-01

    This experimental study presents results and interpretation of oscillatory water flow in open-cell metal foam. The tested foam had 10 pores per inch and a porosity of 88%. At relatively low frequencies, three flow displacements were employed in the experiment. The influence of frequency and displacement on pressure loss and friction factor is discussed. A correlation of friction factor as a function of the kinetic Reynolds number was determined. Porous media parameters, permeability and drag coefficient, were also found for the same foam via steady-state flow experiments in the Darcy and Forchheimer regimes. The friction factor of oscillating flow was found to be higher than that of steady state. The findings of this study are considered important for oscillating heat transfer in metal foam.

  14. Experimental investigation of the wake behind a model of wind turbine in a water flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okulov, V. L.; Naumov, I. N.; Kabardin, I.; Mikkelsen, R.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The flow behind the model of wind turbine rotor is investigated experimentally in a water flume using Particle Image Velocimetry. The study carried out involves rotors of three bladed wind turbine designed using Glauert's optimization. The transitional regime, generally characterized as in between the regime governed by stable organized vortical structures and the turbulent wake, develops from disturbances of the tip and root vorticies through vortex paring and further complex behaviour towards the fully turbulent wake. Our PIV measurements pay special attention to the onset of the instabilities. The near wake characteristics (development of expansion, tip vortex position, deficit velocity and rotation in the wake) have been measured for different tip speed ratio to compare with main assumptions and conclusions of various rotor theories.

  15. Experimental feature in the primary-proton flux at energies above 10 TeV according to the results of searches for primary particles in nuclear emulsions exposed in the stratosphere (RUNJOB Experiment)

    SciTech Connect

    Zayarnaya, I. S.

    2008-02-15

    In the RUNJOB experiment, a long-term exposure of x-ray emulsion chambers in the stratosphere from 1995 to 1999 with the aim of studying the composition and spectra of primary cosmic particles in the energy range 10-1000 TeV per nucleon revealed about 50% proton tracks. The remaining events of the proton group did not feature any candidate for a track of a singly charged particle within the search region determined from measurements of the coordinates of background nuclei going close to the sought track. Methodological factors that could explain this experimental observation are considered. A possible physical reason associated with the presence of a neutral component in the flux of primary protons in the energy region above 10 TeV is also analyzed.

  16. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction

    PubMed Central

    Aranjuelo, Iker

    2013-01-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N2 fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N2-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N2 fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism. PMID:23440170

  17. Concerted changes in N and C primary metabolism in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) under water restriction.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Molero, Gemma; Gilard, Françoise; Avice, Jean-Christophe; Nogués, Salvador

    2013-02-01

    Although the mechanisms of nodule N(2) fixation in legumes are now well documented, some uncertainty remains on the metabolic consequences of water deficit. In most cases, little consideration is given to other organs and, therefore, the coordinated changes in metabolism in leaves, roots, and nodules are not well known. Here, the effect of water restriction on exclusively N(2)-fixing alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants was investigated, and proteomic, metabolomic, and physiological analyses were carried out. It is shown that the inhibition of nitrogenase activity caused by water restriction was accompanied by concerted alterations in metabolic pathways in nodules, leaves, and roots. The data suggest that nodule metabolism and metabolic exchange between plant organs nearly reached homeostasis in asparagine synthesis and partitioning, as well as the N demand from leaves. Typically, there was (i) a stimulation of the anaplerotic pathway to sustain the provision of C skeletons for amino acid (e.g. glutamate and proline) synthesis; (ii) re-allocation of glycolytic products to alanine and serine/glycine; and (iii) subtle changes in redox metabolites suggesting the implication of a slight oxidative stress. Furthermore, water restriction caused little change in both photosynthetic efficiency and respiratory cost of N(2) fixation by nodules. In other words, the results suggest that under water stress, nodule metabolism follows a compromise between physiological imperatives (N demand, oxidative stress) and the lower input to sustain catabolism.

  18. Experimental research on the characteristics of methane/air explosion affected by ultrafine water mist.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xingyan; Ren, Jingjie; Bi, Mingshu; Zhou, Yihui; Li, Yiming

    2017-02-15

    The inhibition effects of ultrafine water mists on 6.5%, 8%, 9.5%, 11%, and 13.5% methane explosions were experimentally studied in a sealed visual vessel. The mist (10μm) produced by a mist generation system in the vessel was measured by a phase doppler particle analyzer. A high-speed camera was used to record the explosion flame affected by spraying concentration and a high frequency pressure sensor was used to acquire the explosion pressure. Meanwhile, the relationship between flame propagation and pressure rising with time was analyzed. The appearance height of "tulip" flame was increased and appearance moment was delayed obviously with the mist amount increased. The variation trend was illustrated from the viewpoint of the interactions among the flame front, the flame-induced reverse flow and the vortices. Moreover, cellular structure appeared in the burned zone and experienced four developing stages, and its formation indicates that water vapor can cause the intrinsic flame instability and absorb heat on the burned zone further. The pressure underwent two accelerating rises, which was affected by mist amount. The accelerating rise processes were related to the accelerating propagation of combustion wave. Furthermore, methane explosion can be absolutely suppressed by the mist.

  19. Water quality and quantity assessment of pervious pavements performance in experimental car park areas.

    PubMed

    Sañudo-Fontaneda, Luis A; Charlesworth, Susanne M; Castro-Fresno, Daniel; Andres-Valeri, Valerio C A; Rodriguez-Hernandez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Pervious pavements have become one of the most used sustainable urban drainage system (SUDS) techniques in car parks. This research paper presents the results of monitoring water quality from several experimental car park areas designed and constructed in Spain with bays made of interlocking concrete block pavement, porous asphalt, polymer-modified porous concrete and reinforced grass with plastic and concrete cells. Moreover, two different sub-base materials were used (limestone aggregates and basic oxygen furnace slag). This study therefore encompasses the majority of the materials used as permeable surfaces and sub-base layers all over the world. Effluent from the test bays was monitored for dissolved oxygen, pH, electric conductivity, total suspended solids, turbidity and total petroleum hydrocarbons in order to analyze the behaviour shown by each combination of surface and sub-base materials. In addition, permeability tests were undertaken in all car parks using the 'Laboratorio Caminos Santander' permeameter and the Cantabrian Portable Infiltrometer. All results are presented together with the influence of surface and sub-base materials on water quality indicators using bivariate correlation statistical analysis at a confidence level of 95%. The polymer-modified porous concrete surface course in combination with limestone aggregate sub-base presented the best performance.

  20. Properties of experimental titanium cast investment mixing with water reducing agent solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zutai; Ding, Ning; Tamaki, Yukimichi; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Han-Cheol, Cho; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a dental investment for titanium casting. ZrO(2) and Al(2)O(3) were selected as refractory materials to prepare three investments (Codes: A-C) according to the quantity of Zr. Al(2)O(3) cement was used as a binder at a ratio of 15%, they were mixed with special mixing liquid. B1 was used as a control mixed with water. Fundamental examinations were statistically evaluated. A casting test was performed with investment B. Fluidities, setting times, and green strengths showed no remarkable differences; however, they were significantly different from those of B1. Expansion values for A, B, C, and B1 at 850°C were 1.03%±0.08%, 1.96%±0.17%, 4.35%±0.23%, and 1.50%±0.28%, respectively. Castings were covered by only small amounts of mold materials. The hardness test showed no significant differences between castings from B and the ones from commercial investments. The experimental special mixing liquid effectively reduced the water/powder ratio and improved the strength and thermal expansion.

  1. Crossing the boundary: experimental investigation of water entry conditions of V-shaped wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Tingben; Yohann, Daniel; Vincent, Lionel; Jung, Sunghwan; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Seabirds that plunge-dive at high speeds exhibit remarkable abilities to withstand and mitigate impact forces. To minimize these forces, diving birds streamline their shape at impact, entering water with their sharp beak first. Here, we investigate the impact forces on rigid V-shaped wedges crossing the air-water interface at high Weber numbers. We vary the impact velocity V by adjusting the height from which the wedge is dropped. Both a high-speed camera and a force transducer are used to characterize the impact. We found that the splash base and air cavity show little dependence on the impact velocity when rescaling by inertial time d / V , where d is the breadth of the wedge. The peak impact force occurs at time tp smaller than the submersion time ts such that the ratio tp /ts is almost constant for all wedges and impact velocities V. We also found that the maximum impact force, like drag force, scales as AV2 , where A is the cross-sectional area of the wedge. We then propose analytical models of the impact force and splash dynamics. The theoretical predictions agree well with our experimental results. We conclude by commenting on the relevance of these results to understanding the mechanics of diving seabirds. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation.

  2. Experimental and kinetic modelling studies on the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the water hyacinth plant to levulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Girisuta, B; Danon, B; Manurung, R; Janssen, L P B M; Heeres, H J

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive experimental and modelling study on the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of the water hyacinth plant (Eichhornia crassipes) to optimise the yield of levulinic acid (LA) is reported (T=150-175 degrees CH2SO4 = 0.1-1M, water hyacinth intake=1-5wt%). At high acid concentrations (>0.5M), LA was the major organic acid whereas at low acid concentrations (<0.1M) and high initial intakes of water hyacinth, the formation of propionic acid instead of LA was favoured. The highest yield of LA was 53mol% (35wt%) based on the amount of C6-sugars in the water hyacinth (T=175 degrees CH2SO4 =1M , water hyacinth intake=1wt%). The LA yield as a function of the process conditions was modelled using a kinetic model originally developed for the acid-catalysed hydrolysis of cellulose and good agreement between the experimental and modelled data was obtained.

  3. Stimulation of fecal bacteria in ambient waters by experimental inputs of organic and inorganic phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Chudoba, Elizabeth A; Mallin, Michael A; Cahoon, Lawrence B; Skrabal, Stephen A

    2013-06-15

    Fecal microbial pollution of recreational and shellfishing waters is a major human health and economic issue. Microbial pollution sourced from stormwater runoff is especially widespread, and strongly associated with urbanization. However, non-point source nutrient pollution is also problematic, and may come from sources different from fecal-derived pollution (i.e. fertilization of farm fields, lawns and gardens, and ornamental urban areas). Fecal bacteria require nutrients; thus the impact of such nutrient loading on survival and abundance of fecal coliform bacteria in ambient waters was experimentally investigated in a constructed wetland in coastal North Carolina, USA. A series of nutrient-addition bioassays testing impacts of inorganic and organic nitrogen and phosphorus demonstrated that additions of neither organic nor inorganic nitrogen stimulated fecal coliform bacteria. However, phosphorus additions provided significant stimulation of fecal coliform growth at times; on other occasions such additions did not. Dilution bioassays combined with nutrient additions were subsequently devised to assess potential impacts of microzooplankton grazing on the target fecal bacteria populations. Results demonstrated grazing to be a significant bacterial reduction factor in 63% of tests, potentially obscuring nutrient effects. Thus, combining dilution experiments with nutrient addition bioassays yielded simultaneous information on microzooplankton grazing rates on fecal bacteria, fecal bacterial growth rates, and nutrient limitation. Overall, when tested against a non-amended control, additions of either organic or inorganic phosphorus significantly stimulated fecal coliform bacterial growth on 50% of occasions tested, with organic phosphorus generally providing greater stimulation. The finding of significant phosphorus stimulation of fecal bacteria indicates that extraneous nutrient loading can, at times, augment the impacts of fecal microbial pollution of shellfishing

  4. A combined experimental and computational study of the molecular interactions between anionic ibuprofen and water

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata-Escobar, Andy; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Guerra, Doris; Hadad, C. Z.; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2014-05-14

    In this work, we report a detailed study of the microsolvation of anionic ibuprofen, Ibu{sup −}. Stochastic explorations of the configurational spaces for the interactions of Ibu{sup −} with up to three water molecules at the DFT level lead to very rich and complex potential energy surfaces. Our results suggest that instead of only one preponderant structure, a collection of isomers with very similar energies would have significant contributions to the properties of the solvated drug. One of these properties is the shift on the vibrational frequencies of the asymmetric stretching band of the carboxylate group in hydrated Ibu{sup −} with respect to the anhydrous drug, whose experimental values are nicely reproduced using the weighted contribution of the structures. We found at least three types of stabilizing interactions, including conventional CO {sub 2}{sup −}⋯H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O⋯H{sub 2}O charge assisted hydrogen bonds (HBs), and less common H{sub 2}O⋯H–C and H{sub 2}O⋯π interactions. Biological water molecules, those in direct contact with Ibu{sup −}, prefer to cluster around the carboxylate oxygen atoms via cyclic or bridged charge assisted hydrogen bonds. Many of those interactions are strongly affected by the formal carboxylate charge, resulting in “enhanced” HBs with increased strengths and degree of covalency. We found striking similarities between this case and the microsolvation of dymethylphosphate, which lead us to hypothesize that since microsolvation of phosphatidylcholine depends mainly on the formal charge of its ionic PO {sub 2}{sup −} group in the polar head, then microsolvation of anionic ibuprofen and interactions of water molecules with eukaryotic cell membranes are governed by the same types of physical interactions.

  5. A combined experimental and computational study of the molecular interactions between anionic ibuprofen and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Escobar, Andy; Manrique-Moreno, Marcela; Guerra, Doris; Hadad, C. Z.; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we report a detailed study of the microsolvation of anionic ibuprofen, Ibu-. Stochastic explorations of the configurational spaces for the interactions of Ibu- with up to three water molecules at the DFT level lead to very rich and complex potential energy surfaces. Our results suggest that instead of only one preponderant structure, a collection of isomers with very similar energies would have significant contributions to the properties of the solvated drug. One of these properties is the shift on the vibrational frequencies of the asymmetric stretching band of the carboxylate group in hydrated Ibu- with respect to the anhydrous drug, whose experimental values are nicely reproduced using the weighted contribution of the structures. We found at least three types of stabilizing interactions, including conventional CO_2^-\\cdotsH2O, H2O⋯H2O charge assisted hydrogen bonds (HBs), and less common H2O⋯H-C and H2O⋯π interactions. Biological water molecules, those in direct contact with Ibu-, prefer to cluster around the carboxylate oxygen atoms via cyclic or bridged charge assisted hydrogen bonds. Many of those interactions are strongly affected by the formal carboxylate charge, resulting in "enhanced" HBs with increased strengths and degree of covalency. We found striking similarities between this case and the microsolvation of dymethylphosphate, which lead us to hypothesize that since microsolvation of phosphatidylcholine depends mainly on the formal charge of its ionic PO_2^- group in the polar head, then microsolvation of anionic ibuprofen and interactions of water molecules with eukaryotic cell membranes are governed by the same types of physical interactions.

  6. Pre-Service Primary Science Teachers' Understandings of the Effect of Temperature and Pressure on Solid-Liquid Phase Transition of Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalcin, Fatma Aggul

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore pre-service primary teachers' understandings of the effect of temperature and pressure on the solid-liquid phase transition of water. In the study a survey approach was used, and the sample consisted of one-hundred and three, third year pre-service primary science teachers. As a tool for data collection, a test…

  7. Photo-active and dynamical properties of hematite (Fe2O3)-water interfaces: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    English, Niall J; Rahman, Mahfujur; Wadnerkar, Nitin; MacElroy, J M D

    2014-07-28

    The dynamical properties of physically and chemically adsorbed water molecules at pristine hematite-(001) surfaces have been studied by means of equilibrium Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) in the NVT ensemble at 298 K. The dissociation of water molecules to form chemically adsorbed species was scrutinised, in addition to 'hopping' or swapping events of protons between water molecules. Particular foci have been dynamical properties of the adsorbed water molecules and OH(-) and H3O(+) ions, the hydrogen bonds between protons in water molecules and the bridging oxygen atoms at the hematite surface, as well as the interactions between oxygen atoms in adsorbed water molecules and iron atoms at the hematite surface. Experimental results for photoelectrical current generation complement simulation findings of water dissociation.

  8. Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Predict the Glass-Water Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.

    2011-10-01

    The use of mineral and glass dissolution rates measured in laboratory experiments to predict the weathering of primary minerals and volcanic and nuclear waste glasses in field studies requires the construction of rate models that accurately describe the weathering process over geologic timescales. Additionally, the need to model the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass for the purpose of estimating radionuclide release rates requires that rate models be validated with long-term experiments. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)], thereby reducing the duration required to evaluate long-term performance. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that mimics the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitors the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. A one-dimensional reactive chemical transport simulation of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year-long PUF experiment was conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct bench scale laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over the length of the experiment. Over the 1.5-year-long test duration, the rate decreased from 0.2 to 0.01 g/(m2 day) based on B release for low-activity waste glass LAWA44. The observed decrease is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the decrease observed under static conditions with the SON68 glass (estimated to be a decrease by four orders of magnitude) and suggests that the gel-layer properties are less protective under these dynamic

  9. Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Predict the Glass-Water Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M; Bacon, Diana

    2011-01-01

    The use of mineral and glass dissolution rates measured in laboratory experiments to predict the weathering of primary minerals and volcanic and nuclear waste glasses in field studies requires the construction of rate models that accurately describe the weathering process over geologic time-scales. Additionally, the need to model the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass for the purpose of estimating radionuclide release rates requires that rate models are validated with long-term experiments. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test-B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)], thereby reducing the duration required to evaluate long-term performance. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that mimics the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitors the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. A one-dimensional reactive chemical transport simulation of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year long PUF experiment was conducted with the subsurface transport over reactive multi-phases code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct bench-scale laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over the length of the experiment. Over the 1.5-year long test duration, the rate decreased from 0.2 to 0.01 g/(m2 d) base on B release. The observed decrease is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the decrease observed under static conditions with the SON68 glass (estimated to be a decrease by 4 orders of magnitude) and suggest the gel-layer properties are less protective under these dynamic conditions.

  10. The Design and Development of a Simulation to Teach Water Conservation to Primary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Information and Communications Technology (ICT) plays a dominant role in enhancing teaching and learning. Similar advances have been made in the use of multimedia in the classroom. These advances are coupled with newer developmental tools and techniques. This paper examines the design and development of a simulation on water conservation. Science…

  11. Embolism spread in the primary xylem of Polystichum munitum: implications for water transport during seasonal drought.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Craig R; Rico, Christopher; Guenni, Orlando; Pittermann, Jarmila

    2016-02-01

    Xylem network structure and function have been characterized for many woody plants, but less is known about fern xylem, particularly in species endemic to climates where water is a limiting resource for months at a time. We characterized seasonal variability in soil moisture and frond water status in a common perennial fern in the redwood understory of a costal California, and then investigated the consequences of drought-induced embolism on vascular function. Seasonal variability in air temperature and soil water content was minimal, and frond water potential declined slowly over the observational period. Our data show that Polystichum munitum was protected from significant drought-induced hydraulic dysfunction during this growing season because of a combination of cavitation resistant conduits (Air-seeding threshold (ASP) = -1.53 MPa; xylem pressure inducing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50 ) = -3.02 MPa) and a soil with low moisture variability. High resolution micro-computed tomography (MicroCT) imaging revealed patterns of embolism formation in vivo for the first time in ferns providing insight into the functional status of the xylem network under drought conditions. Together with stomatal conductance measurements, these data suggest that P. munitum is adapted to tolerate drier conditions than what was observed during the growing season.

  12. Come on in, the Water is Fine: Achieving Mainstream Relevance through Integration with Primary Medical Care

    PubMed Central

    Friman, Patrick C

    2010-01-01

    Behavior analysis is a generic science, and Skinner's vision for it was that it would become a mainstream force, relevant for most if not all human concerns, major and minor. Clearly his vision has not been realized. Determining why this is the case would require a complex multifactorial analysis. One likely factor is that the majority of its basic science findings have been obtained from the study of rats and pigeons. Another likely factor, one directly addressed by this paper, is that the majority of its applied science findings have been obtained from the study of people in only one tail of the normal distribution. Regardless, those outside the field see the relevance of behavior analysis to general human affairs as very limited. Whether the path behavior analysis is on will lead to widespread perception of mainstream relevance anytime soon seems doubtful. An alternative route would involve integrating it with a field that has already made the trip successfully. A premier example involves primary medical care. This paper argues for the integration of behavior analysis with pediatric primary care, sketches a method for its accomplishment, and uses diurnal enuresis to illustrate the requirements of the method. PMID:22479124

  13. [EXPERIMENTAL GROUNDS ON POSSIBILITY TO MAKE AND TO USE PREDICTION MODELS OF PESTICIDES DESIGN STANDARD IN THE WATER OF PONDS USED FOR HOUSEHOLD AND DRINKING WATER SUPPLY].

    PubMed

    Vavrinevych, O P; Omel'chuk, S T

    2015-01-01

    Taking into account the fact that current calculation methods for substantiation of standards in the water of water reservoirs valid in Ukraine are outdated the aim of our research was to scientifically substantiate the possibility to make and to use prediction models of pesticides design standard in the water of ponds used for household and drinking water supply. Array of experimentally substantiated and approved to use in Ukraine maximum allowable concentrations (MAC) of organic pesticides active ingredients in the water was analyzed (n = 201). Analysis of dependence between MAC value of pesticides in the water and its physical and chemical properties, indices of ecotoxicological hazard and persistency in the water was carried out using correlation and regression analysis methods. Twelve regression equations to establish design value of pesticides MAC in the water were proposed on the grounds of performed analysis. The results of reliability testing of proposed procedure on pesticides design tentatively allowable levels (TAL) in the water indicate on needs to apply the least value of TAL obtained in the process of calculations using proposed equations. It was proved that mathematical models proposed for prediction of pesticide design standard in the water are adequate and significant by Fisher's test (P < 0.05). Proposed algorithm allows considerably simplify procedure of obtaining temporary hygienic standard in the water for new pesticides.

  14. Toward Obtaining the Experimental Constraints on the Role of Water on Melting Under the Lower Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amulele, G.; Lee, K. K.; Karato, S.

    2012-12-01

    Water and other volatile components (such as carbon dioxide) are known to have important influence on the melting behavior of silicates. The role of these components on the melting under the upper mantle conditions is now reasonably well understood. Recent experimental studies in our lab as well as some of the previous studies do show that water has an important influence on the melting relationship under the lower mantle conditions. The influence of water is not only to reduce the solidus but also to change the composition of the melt to (Mg,Fe)O rich. Quantifying these observations is essential in the understanding of chemical evolution of Earth and other planets. However, there are several challenges in performing these experimental studies. In this presentation, we discuss the issue of quantifying the water effects with special attention to the capability of preserving water content during the high pressure-temperature experiments. The issue of the preservation of water is important firstly because water could escape from a capsule during an experiment, and secondly because the melt is unquenchable in a commonly used processes under the lower mantle conditions. A commonly used practice is to identify the deficit of EPMA measurement from 100% to the water content, but there is no sound basis for this practice. In this presentation, we will show some preliminary results of our new approach to quantify the water content from the high-pressure run products containing melts.

  15. Primary factors affecting water quality and quantity in four watersheds in Eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Sheila F.; Stallard, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    As part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Water, Energy, and Biogeochemical Budgets (WEBB) program, four small watersheds in eastern Puerto Rico were monitored to identify and evaluate the effects of geology, landcover, atmospheric deposition, and other factors on stream water quality and quantity. Two catchments are located on coarse-grained granitic plutonic rocks, which weather to quartz- and clay-rich, sandy soils, and two are located on fine-grained volcanic rocks and volcaniclastic sediments, which weather to quartz-poor, fine-grained soils. These differing soil materials result in different hydrologic regimes. Soils on the granitic rocks have greater permeability than those developed on the volcaniclastic rocks, allowing more water infiltration and potentially greater landslide erosion rates. For each bedrock type, one catchment was covered with mature rainforest, and the other catchment was affected by agricultural practices typical of eastern Puerto Rico. These practices led to the erosion of much of the original surface soil in the agricultural watersheds, which introduced large quantities of sediment to stream channels. The agricultural watersheds are undergoing natural reforestation, like much of Puerto Rico. Eastern Puerto Rico receives large atmospheric inputs of marine salts, pollutants from the Northern Hemisphere, and Saharan Desert dust. Marine salts contribute over 80 percent of the ionic charge in precipitation, with peak inputs in January. Intense storms, mostly hurricanes, are associated with exceptionally high chloride concentrations in stream waters. Temperate pollution contributes nitrate, ammonia, and sulfate, with maximum inputs during northern cold fronts in January, April, and May. Pollution inputs have increased through time. Desert dust peaks in June and July, during times of maximum dust transport from the Saharan Desert across the Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Hydrogen-enriched water restoration of impaired calcium propagation by arsenic in primary keratinocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei-Tai; Chiu, Yi-Ching; Lee, Chih-Hung; Yoshioka, Tohru; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2013-11-01

    Endemic contamination of artesian water for drinking by arsenic is known to cause several human cancers, including cancers of the skin, bladder, and lungs. In skin, multiple arsenic-induced Bowen's disease (As-BD) can develop into invasive cancers after decades of arsenic exposure. The characteristic histological features of As-BD include full-layer epidermal dysplasia, apoptosis, and abnormal proliferation. Calcium propagation is an essential cellular event contributing to keratinocyte differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, all of which occur in As-BD. This study investigated how arsenic interferes calcium propagation of skin keratinocytes through ROS production and whether hydrogen-enriched water would restore arsenic-impaired calcium propagation. Arsenic was found to induce oxidative stress and inhibit ATP- and thapsigaragin-induced calcium propagation. Pretreatment of arsenic-treated keratinocytes by hydrogen-enriched water or beta-mercaptoethanol with potent anti-oxidative effects partially restored the propagation of calcium by ATP and by thapsigaragin. It was concluded that arsenic may impair calcium propagation, likely through oxidative stress and interactions with thiol groups in membrane proteins.

  17. Direct energy recovery from primary and secondary sludges by supercritical water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Svanström, M; Modell, M; Tester, J

    2004-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) oxidizes organic and biological materials virtually completely to benign products without the need for stack gas scrubbing. Heavy metals are recovered as stabilized solid, along with the sand and clay that is present in the feed. The technology has been under development for twenty years. The major obstacle to commercialization has been developing reactors that are not clogged by inorganic solid deposits. That problem has been solved by using tubular reactors with fluid velocities that are high enough to keep solids in suspension. Recently, system designs have been created that reduce the cost of processing sewage sludges below that of incineration. At 10 wt- % dry solids, sludge can be oxidized with virtually complete recovery of the sludge heating value as hot water or high-pressure steam. Liquid carbon dioxide of high purity can be recovered from the gaseous effluent and excess oxygen can be recovered for recycle. The net effect is to reduce the stack to a harmless vent with minimal flow rate of a clean gas. Complete simulations have been developed using physical property models that accurately simulate the thermodynamic properties of sub- and supercritical water in mixtures with O2, N2, CO2, and organics. Capital and operating cost estimates are given for sewage sludge treatment, which are less costly than incineration. The scenario of direct recovery of energy from sludges has inherent benefits compared to other gasification or liquefaction options.

  18. A Review of the Experimental and Modeling Development of a Water Phase Change Heat Exchanger for Future Exploration Support Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cognata, Thomas; Leimkuehler, Thomas; Ramaswamy, Balasubramaniam; Nayagam, Vedha; Hasan, Mohammad; Stephan, Ryan

    2011-01-01

    Water affords manifold benefits for human space exploration. Its properties make it useful for the storage of thermal energy as a Phase Change Material (PCM) in thermal control systems, in radiation shielding against Solar Particle Events (SPE) for the protection of crew members, and it is indisputably necessary for human life support. This paper envisions a single application for water which addresses these benefits for future exploration support vehicles and it describes recent experimental and modeling work that has been performed in order to arrive at a description of the thermal behavior of such a system. Experimental units have been developed and tested which permit the evaluation of the many parameters of design for such a system with emphasis on the latent energy content, temperature rise, mass, and interstitial material geometry. The experimental results are used to develop a robust and well correlated model which is intended to guide future design efforts toward the multi-purposed water PCM heat exchanger envisioned.

  19. Carbon dioxide flux and net primary production of a boreal treed bog: Responses to warming and water-table-lowering simulations of climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munir, T. M.; Perkins, M.; Kaing, E.; Strack, M.

    2015-02-01

    Midlatitude treed bogs represent significant carbon (C) stocks and are highly sensitive to global climate change. In a dry continental treed bog, we compared three sites: control, recent (1-3 years; experimental) and older drained (10-13 years), with water levels at 38, 74 and 120 cm below the surface, respectively. At each site we measured carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes and estimated tree root respiration (Rr; across hummock-hollow microtopography of the forest floor) and net primary production (NPP) of trees during the growing seasons (May to October) of 2011-2013. The CO2-C balance was calculated by adding the net CO2 exchange of the forest floor (NEff-Rr) to the NPP of the trees. From cooler and wetter 2011 to the driest and the warmest 2013, the control site was a CO2-C sink of 92, 70 and 76 g m-2, the experimental site was a CO2-C source of 14, 57 and 135 g m-2, and the drained site was a progressively smaller source of 26, 23 and 13 g CO2-C m-2. The short-term drainage at the experimental site resulted in small changes in vegetation coverage and large net CO2 emissions at the microforms. In contrast, the longer-term drainage and deeper water level at the drained site resulted in the replacement of mosses with vascular plants (shrubs) on the hummocks and lichen in the hollows leading to the highest CO2 uptake at the drained hummocks and significant losses in the hollows. The tree NPP (including above- and below-ground growth and litter fall) in 2011 and 2012 was significantly higher at the drained site (92 and 83 g C m-2) than at the experimental (58 and 55 g C m-2) and control (52 and 46 g C m-2) sites. We also quantified the impact of climatic warming at all water table treatments by equipping additional plots with open-top chambers (OTCs) that caused a passive warming on average of ~ 1 °C and differential air warming of ~ 6 °C at midday full sun over the study years. Warming significantly enhanced shrub growth and the CO2 sink function of the drained

  20. Analysis and generalization of experimental data on heat transfer to supercritical pressure water flow in annular channels and rod bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deev, V. I.; Kharitonov, V. S.; Churkin, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    Experimental data on heat transfer to supercritical pressure water presented at ISSCWR-5, 6, and 7 international symposiums—which took place in 2011-2015 in Canada, China, and Finland—and data printed in recent periodical scientific publications were analyzed. Results of experiments with annular channels and three- and four-rod bundles of heating elements positioned in square or triangular grids were examined. Methodology used for round pipes was applied at generalization of experimental data and establishing of correlations suitable for engineering analysis of heat exchange coefficient in conditions of strongly changing water properties in the near-critical pressure region. Empiric formulas describing normal heat transfer to supercritical pressure water mowing in annular channels and rod bundles were obtained. As compared to existing recommendations, suggested correlations are distinguished by specified dependency of heat exchange coefficient on density of heat flux and mass flow velocity of water near pseudo-critical temperature. Differences between computed values of heat exchange coefficient and experimental data usually do not exceed ±25%. Detailed statistical analysis of deviations between computed and experimental results at different states of supercritical pressure water flow was carried out. Peculiarities of deteriorated heat exchange were considered and their existence boundaries were defined. Experimental results obtained for these regimes were generalized using criteria by J.D. Jackson that take the influence of thermal acceleration and Archimedes forces on heat exchange processes into account. Satisfactory agreement between experimental data on heat exchange at flowing of water in annular channels and rod bundles and data for round pipes was shown.

  1. An Experimental Investigation Into the Feasibility of Measuring Static and Dynamic Aerodynamic Derivatives in the DSTO Water Tunnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    in the DSTO water tunnel. The current experimental program to determine derivatives, including the method used to reduce data, is based on the...chord (MAC) of a model, (m). d Model fuselage base diameter, (m). f Equivalent constant circular frequency of rotation for oscillatory pitching...tunnel using a Standard Dynamics Model (SDM). The experimental program, including data processing, is based on the recommendations given by Newman

  2. Siliceous sponge spicule dissolution: In field experimental evidences from temperate and tropical waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolino, Marco; Cattaneo-Vietti, Riccardo; Pansini, Maurizio; Santini, Chiara; Bavestrello, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Sponge siliceous spicules are considered a sink in the silica balance of the oceans as their dissolution rate seems to be negligible, but no field data are available about this process. The aim of this study was a first evaluation of the quantitative dissolution rates of some demosponge and hexactinellid spicules (collected in different localities at different latitudes), left at sea for six months in two localities characterised by different water average temperatures: Mediterranean Sea and Celebes Sea. The effects of silica dissolution on the experimented spicules, studied by SEM analysis, produced an enlargement of the axial canal sometimes resulting in empty spicules. While in demosponges the axial canal wall of eroded spicules was perfectly smooth or slightly rough, the hexactinellid Rossella racovitzae showed a cavernous, well recognisable pattern of dissolution. The dissolution rates were determined evaluating the decrease in outer diameter and in the expansion of the axial channel of about 300 spicules for each considered species and locality. The spicules from the Mediterranean Geodia cydonium did not show any detectable dissolution in both localities, while those from Tethya citrina showed a loose of silica of about 23% in the Mediterranean and 47% in the Celebes Sea. Paratetilla bacca from the Red Sea decreased the silica content of about 30% in both the localities. Tetilla leptoderma from Mar del Plata lost about 8% and 42% of silica respectively in Mediterranean and Celebes Sea. Finally, the hexactinellid spicules from the Antarctic Rossella racovitzae showed highest dissolution rates in both experimental sites (37% and 66% in the Mediterranean and Celebes Sea, respectively). The different levels of dissolution can be related to the different taxonomic position in terms of specular structures as well as to the temperatures at which the spicules have been deposited and exposed. In fact, spicules from the same species showed a dissolution rate generally

  3. Testing geochemical models of bentonite pore water evolution against laboratory experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, David; Arthur, Randy; Watson, Claire; Wilson, James; Strömberg, Bo

    The determination of a bentonite pore water composition and understanding its evolution with time underpins many radioactive waste disposal issues, such as buffer erosion, canister corrosion, and radionuclide solubility, sorption, and diffusion, inter alia. Previous modelling approaches have tended to ignore clay dissolution-precipitation reactions, a consequence of which is that montmorillonite is theoretically preserved indefinitely in the repository system. Here, we investigate the applicability of an alternative clay pore fluid evolution model, that incorporates clay dissolution-precipitation reactions as an integral component and test it against well-characterised laboratory experimental data, where key geochemical parameters, Eh and pH, have been measured directly in compacted bentonite. Simulations have been conducted using different computer codes (Geochemist’s Workbench, PHREEQC, and QPAC) to test the applicability of this model. Thermodynamic data for the Gibb’s free energy of formation of MX-80 smectite used in the calculations were estimated using two different methods (‘Polymer’ and ‘Vieillard’ Models). Simulations of ‘end-point’ pH measurements in batch bentonite-water slurry experiments showed different pH values according to the complexity of the system studied. The most complete system investigated revealed pH values were a strong function of partial pressure of carbon dioxide, with pH increasing with decreasing PCO 2 (with log PCO 2 values ranging from -3.5 to -7.5 bars produced pH values ranging from 7.9 to 9.6). A second set of calculations investigated disequilibrium between clay and pore fluid in laboratory squeezing cell tests involving pure water (pH = 9.0) or a 1 M NaOH solution (pH = 12.1). Simulations carried out for 100 days (the same timescale as the experiments) showed that smectite remained far from equilibrium throughout, and that the lowering of pH due to smectite hydrolysis was trivial. However, extending the

  4. Primary ultrafast events preceding the photoinduced proton transfer from pyranine to water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran-Thi, T.-H.; Gustavsson, T.; Prayer, C.; Pommeret, S.; Hynes, James T.

    2000-10-01

    Femtosecond fluorescence and absorption spectroscopies are used to probe the early events of the photoinduced proton transfer (PT) from pyranine to water. The process is found to involve two ultrafast steps (300 fs and 2.5 ps) which precede the relatively slow (87 ps) PT step. From the comparative study of the properties of the excited acid and its conjugate anion in various aqueous and alcoholic media, these ultrafast steps are identified as the solvation dynamics of the locally excited (LE) state of the acid and its subsequent relaxation to an intermediate electronic state, whose nature is discussed.

  5. Primary tuberculosis of urethra presenting as stricture urethra and watering can perineum: A rarity

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Gaurav; Singh, Vishwajeet; Sinha, Rahul Janak; Babu, Suresh; Jhanwar, Ankur; Mehrotra, C. N.

    2016-01-01

    A young man presented with irritative lower urinary tract symptoms and multiple fistulae (watering can) in the perineum since 6 months. Micturating cystourethrogram and retrograde urethrogram was performed after 12 weeks following suprapubic cystostomy which showed bulbar urethral stricture with multiple urethrocutaneous fistulae. He underwent anastomotic urethroplasty and excision of the urethrocutaneous fistulae. Histopathology of the excised fistulous tract showed granulomatous pathology suggestive of tuberculosis. Antitubercular treatment was given for 9 months. The patient is voiding well at 12 months follow-up. PMID:28058001

  6. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Water: Performance and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisowski, Darius D.

    This experimental study investigated the thermal hydraulic behavior and boiling mechanisms present in a scaled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS). The experimental facility reflects a ¼ scale model of one conceptual design for decay heat removal in advanced GenIV nuclear reactors. Radiant heaters supply up to 25 kW/m2 onto a three parallel riser tube and cooling panel test section assembly, representative of a 5° sector model of the full scale concept. Derived similarity relations have preserved the thermal hydraulic flow patterns and integral system response, ensuring relevant data and similarity among scales. Attention will first be given to the characterization of design features, form and heat losses, nominal behavior, repeatability, and data uncertainty. Then, tests performed in single-phase have evaluated the steady-state behavior. Following, the transition to saturation and subsequent boiling allowed investigations onto four parametric effects at two-phase flow and will be the primary focus area of remaining analysis. Baseline conditions at two-phase flow were defined by 15.19 kW of heated power and 80% coolant inventory, and resulted in semi-periodic system oscillations by the mechanism of hydrostatic head fluctuations. Void generation was the result of adiabatic expansion of the fluid due to a reduction in hydrostatic head pressure, a phenomena similar to flashing. At higher powers of 17.84 and 20.49 kW, this effect was augmented, creating large flow excursions that followed a smooth and sinusoidal shaped path. Stabilization can occur if the steam outflow condition incorporates a nominal restriction, as it will serve to buffer the short time scale excursions of the gas space pressure and dampen oscillations. The influences of an inlet restriction, imposed by an orifice plate, introduced subcooling boiling within the heated core and resulted in chaotic interactions among the parallel risers. The penultimate parametric examined effects of boil-off and

  7. Involvement of spleen components of mature fowl in the primary and secondary humoral antibody response following experimental EDS'76 virus infection.

    PubMed

    van Eck, J H

    1986-04-01

    Cellular changes in spleens of mature fowl in relation to both the primary and secondary humoral antibody response following experimental EDS'76 virus infection were studied. The influence of splenectomy on humoral antibody response was also examined. Experimental fowl had been naturally infected with fowl adenovirus (FAV) but did not possess precipitins to these viruses at the time of EDS'76 virus infection. Since EDS'76 infection provokes a recall of the group antibody to FAV, this infection simultaneously induces a primary response against EDS'76 virus and a secondary response due to the recall of the group antibody to FAV. HI and precipitating antibody to EDS'76 virus (primary response) were first detected at 6 and 8 days p.i. respectively. Curves of HI, precipitating and neutralising antibody titres were biphasic; the first peak (IgM peak) occurred at 10-11 days p.i., the second (IgG peak) at 16-28 days p.i. Precipitating antibodies to FAV (secondary response) were demonstrated from 4 days p.i. The curve of these antibody titres was also biphasic, with peaks at the same times as in the primary response. Based on HI and AGP testing of primary and secondary immune response in both splenectomised and non-splenectomised fowl it is concluded that in the primary response the spleen of the adult fowl is involved significantly in only IgM secretion, while in the secondary response it is likely that both IgM and IgG are secreted in considerable amounts. Clusters of lymphoblasts and plasmablasts were observed at 3 days p.i. in the red pulp. It is very likely that antigen-antibody complexes are formed from that time and circulate bound to the surface of lymphocytes. These antigen-loaded lymphocytes are 'picked up' from the blood stream by -red pulp macrophages, leading to enhanced formation of lymphoblasts in the red pulp. Great numbers of these cells (which are very probably IgM secreting cells) were present on days 6 and 7 p.i., but were no longer detectable after day

  8. First international comparison of primary absorbed dose to water standards in the medium-energy X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büermann, Ludwig; Guerra, Antonio Stefano; Pimpinella, Maria; Pinto, Massimo; de Pooter, Jacco; de Prez, Leon; Jansen, Bartel; Denoziere, Marc; Rapp, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the results of the first international comparison of primary measurement standards of absorbed dose to water for the medium-energy X-ray range. Three of the participants (VSL, PTB, LNE-LNHB) used their existing water calorimeter based standards and one participant (ENEA) recently developed a new standard based on a water-graphite calorimeter. The participants calibrated three transfer chambers of the same type in terms of absorbed dose to water (NDw) and in addition in terms of air kerma (NK) using the CCRI radiation qualities in the range 100 kV to 250 kV. The additional NK values were intended to be used for a physical analysis of the ratios NDw/NK. All participants had previously participated in the BIPM.RI(I)-K3 key comparison of air kerma standards. Ratios of pairs of NMI's NK results of the current comparison were found to be consistent with the corresponding key comparison results within the expanded uncertainties of 0.6 % - 1 %. The NDw results were analysed in terms of the degrees of equivalence with the comparison reference values which were calculated for each beam quality as the weighted means of all results. The participant's results were consistent with the reference value within the expanded uncertainties. However, these expanded uncertainties varied significantly and ranged between about 1-1.8 % for the water calorimeter based standards and were estimated at 3.7 % for the water-graphite calorimeter. It was shown previously that the ratios NDw/NK for the type of ionization chamber used as transfer chamber in this comparison were very close (within less than 1 %) to the calculated values of (bar muen/ρ)w,ad, the mean values of the water-to-air ratio of the mass-energy-absorption coefficients at the depth d in water. Some of the participant's results deviated significantly from the expected behavior. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of

  9. An Experimental Study of Water Injection into a Rolls-Royce Model 250-C20B Turboshaft Gas Turbine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-06

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Experimental Study of Water Injection into a Rolls- Royce Model 250-C20B Turboshaft Gas Turbine 6. AUTHOR(S) Golden...ABSTRACT Environmental responsibility is a focus of researchers in many fields. In the field of engine and propulsion research this is manifested in a focus...on minimization of emissions while maximizing efficiency and performance. Water Fog Injection (WFI) has been suggested as a method for the

  10. Methane adsorption on porous nano-silica in the presence of water: An experimental and ab initio study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yu, Qingchun

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of silanol groups and water content on methane adsorption on hydrophilic nano-silica H-380 through experiments and ab initio calculations. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of silanol groups on the solid surface, and the pore size distribution between 0 and 40nm was determined using CO2 and N2 sorption experiments. Ab initio MP2 and complete basis set model (CBS-4) calculations were performed to optimize four different silica surfaces with and without silanol groups using different basis sets. The theoretical calculations and experiments indicated that the adsorption of methane slightly decreased when the water content was low. As the water content increased from 29.03wt% to 40.54wt%, the confined water molecules (water within the pores) promoted the adsorption of CH4 by forming deeper adsorption potential energy wells, thus rendering the system more stable. The experimental isotherms at 308.15-318.15K were obtained over a wide range of water contents up to 75.05wt%. The experimental data are consistent with the theoretical analysis, indicating an increase in the adsorption of CH4 as the water content increased from 39.75wt% to 50.35wt%. Additionally, the adsorption of CH4 sharply decreased when the water content was greater than 63.12wt%. This study contributes essential data on methane-confined H2O interactions on nano-silica surfaces to the scientific literature.

  11. Experimental investigation on effects of acid/base waters on the bottom sediment of Kaita Cove (Hiroshima, Japan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touch, Narong; Hibino, Tadashi; Ueno, Kohei; Fukui, Shogo

    2013-12-01

    The decomposition of organic matter existing in bottom sediment produces reduced substances, and this has an influence on the water environment. Recently, it has been pointed out that the water environment can be improved after covering the bottom sediment with alkaline material. In this study, we experimentally investigate the effects of acid and base waters (hydrogen peroxide and calcium oxide solutions, respectively) on bottom sediment. The bottom sediment of Kaita Cove (Hiroshima, Japan) was mixed and stirred with the acid or base water, and then the dissolved carbon content (DCC), the pH, and the ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N) of the overlying solution were analyzed along with the particle size distribution, particulate carbon content (PCC), and particulate nitrogen content (PNC) of the sediment. It was found that particulate organic matter was decomposed under acid water conditions, leading to large decreases in PCC and PNC, and to large increases in pH, DCC, and NH4-N. Importantly, there were no variations in PCC, PNC, or particle size under base water conditions. However, there were increases in NH4-N, and large amounts of DCC remained in the overlying solution. It is evident from the experimental results that base water conditions enhanced both the elution of nutrient salts and the dissolved organic matter from the sediment, but retarded the decomposition of organic matter. These are considered as important factors associated with the improvement of water environments.

  12. An MMP13-Selective Inhibitor Delays Primary Tumor Growth and the Onset of Tumor-Associated Osteolytic Lesions in Experimental Models of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Manisha; Huang, Dexing; Blick, Tony; Connor, Andrea; Reiter, Lawrence A.; Hardink, Joel R.; Lynch, Conor C.; Waltham, Mark; Thompson, Erik W.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP13)-selective inhibitor, 5-(4-{4-[4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-oxazol-2-yl]phenoxy}phenoxy)-5-(2-methoxyethyl) pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (Cmpd-1), on the primary tumor growth and breast cancer-associated bone remodeling using xenograft and syngeneic mouse models. We used human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated into the mammary fat pad and left ventricle of BALB/c Nu/Nu mice, respectively, and spontaneously metastasizing 4T1.2-Luc mouse mammary cells inoculated into mammary fat pad of BALB/c mice. In a prevention setting, treatment with Cmpd-1 markedly delayed the growth of primary tumors in both models, and reduced the onset and severity of osteolytic lesions in the MDA-MB-231 intracardiac model. Intervention treatment with Cmpd-1 on established MDA-MB-231 primary tumors also significantly inhibited subsequent growth. In contrast, no effects of Cmpd-1 were observed on soft organ metastatic burden following intracardiac or mammary fat pad inoculations of MDA-MB-231 and 4T1.2-Luc cells respectively. MMP13 immunostaining of clinical primary breast tumors and experimental mice tumors revealed intra-tumoral and stromal expression in most tumors, and vasculature expression in all. MMP13 was also detected in osteoblasts in clinical samples of breast-to-bone metastases. The data suggest that MMP13-selective inhibitors, which lack musculoskeletal side effects, may have therapeutic potential both in primary breast cancer and cancer-induced bone osteolysis. PMID:22253746

  13. Impacts of climate and land use change on ecosystem hydrology and net primary productivity: Linking water availability to food security in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangal, S. R. S.; Tian, H.; Pan, S.; Zhang, B.; Yang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The nexus approach to food, water and energy security in Asia is extremely important and relevant as the region has to feed two-third of the world's population and accounts for 59% of the global water consumption. The distribution pattern of food, water and energy resources have been shaped by the legacy effect of both natural and anthropogenic disturbances and therefore are vulnerable to climate change and human activities including land use/cover change (LUCC) and land management (irrigation and nitrogen fertilization). In this study, we used the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM) to examine the effects of climate change, land use/cover change, and land management practices (irrigation and nitrogen fertilization) on the spatiotemporal trends and variability in water availability and its role in limiting net primary productivity (NPP) and food security in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Our specific objectives are to quantify how climate change, LUCC and other environmental changes have interactively affected carbon and water dynamics across the Asian region. In particular, we separated the Asian region into several sub-region based on the primary limiting factor - water, food and energy. We then quantified how changes in environmental factors have altered the water and food resources during the past century. We particularly focused on Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and water cycle (Evapotranspiration, discharge, and runoff) as a measure of available food and water resources, respectively while understanding the linkage between food and water resources in Asia.

  14. Experimental studies of alunite: II. Rates of alunite-water alkali and isotope exchange

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoffregen, R.E.; Rye, R.O.; Wasserman, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    Rates of alkali exchange between alunite and water have been measured in hydrothermal experiments of 1 hour to 259 days duration at 150 to 400??C. Examination of run products by scanning electron microscope indicates that the reaction takes place by dissolution-reprecipitation. This exchange is modeled with an empirical rate equation which assumes a linear decrease in mineral surface area with percent exchange (f) and a linear dependence of the rate on the square root of the affinity for the alkali exchange reaction. This equation provides a good fit of the experimental data for f = 17% to 90% and yields log rate constants which range from -6.25 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 400??C to - 11.7 moles alkali m-2s-1 at 200??C. The variation in these rates with temperature is given by the equation log k* = -8.17(1000/T(K)) + 5.54 (r2 = 0.987) which yields an activation energy of 37.4 ?? 1.5 kcal/mol. For comparison, data from O'Neil and Taylor (1967) and Merigoux (1968) modeled with a pseudo-second-order rate expression give an activation energy of 36.1 ?? 2.9 kcal/mol for alkali-feldspar water Na-K exchange. In the absence of coupled alkali exchange, oxygen isotope exchange between alunite and water also occurs by dissolution-reprecipitation but rates are one to three orders of magnitude lower than those for alkali exchange. In fine-grained alunites, significant D-H exchange occurs by hydrogen diffusion at temperatures as low as 100??C. Computed hydrogen diffusion coefficients range from -15.7 to -17.3 cm2s-1 and suggest that the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion may be as low as 6 kcal/mol. These experiments indicate that rates of alkali exchange in the relatively coarse-grained alunites typical of hydrothermal ore deposits are insignificant, and support the reliability of K-Ar age data from such samples. However, the fine-grained alunites typical of low temperature settings may be susceptible to limited alkali exchange at surficial conditions which could cause

  15. Modeling the underwater light field fluctuations in coastal oceanic waters: Validation with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundarabalan, Balasubramanian; Shanmugam, Palanisamy; Ahn, Yu-Hwan

    2016-03-01

    Modeling of the wave-induced underwater light fluctuations at near-surface depths in coastal oceanic waters is challenging because of the surface roughness and strong anisotropic effects of the light field. In the present work, a simple and computationally efficient radiative transfer model is used for the wind-driven sea surface for simulating underwater light fields such as downwelling irradiance ( E d ), upwelling irradiance ( E u ), and upwelling radiance ( L u ) in a spatial domain. It is an extension of our previous work that essentially combines the air-sea interface of the wind-driven sea surface with transmittance and reflectance along with the diffuse and direct components of the homogenous and inhomogeneous water column. The present model simulates underwater light fields for any possible values of absorption and backscattering coefficients. To assess the performance of the model, the E d , E u , and L u profiles predicted by the model are compared with experimental data from relatively clear and turbid coastal waters. Statistical results show significantly low mean relative differences regardless of the wavelength. Comparison of the simulated and in-situ time series data measured over rough sea surfaces demonstrates that model-observation agreement is good for the present model. The Hydrolight model when implemented with the modified bottom reflectance and phase function provides significantly better results than the original Hydrolight model without consideration of the bottom slope and vertically varying phase function. However, these results are non-spatial and have errors fluctuating at different wavelengths. To further demonstrate the efficiency of the present model, spatial distribution patterns of the underwater light fields are simulated based on the measured data from a coastal station for different solar zenith angles (under sunny condition). Simulated wave-induced fluctuations of the underwater lights fields show a good consistency with in

  16. Modeling the radiolysis of supercritical water by fast neutrons: density dependence of the yields of primary species at 400°c.

    PubMed

    Butarbutar, Sofia Loren; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Guzonas, David A; Stuart, Craig R; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2014-12-01

    A reliable understanding of radiolysis processes in supercritical water (SCW)-cooled reactors is crucial to developing chemistry control strategies that minimize the corrosion and degradation of materials. However, directly measuring the chemistry in reactor cores is difficult due to the extreme conditions of high temperature and pressure and mixed neutron and gamma-radiation fields, which are incompatible with normal chemical instrumentation. Thus, chemical models and computer simulations are an important route of investigation for predicting the detailed radiation chemistry of the coolant in a SCW reactor and the consequences for materials. Surprisingly, information on the fast neutron radiolysis of water at high temperatures is limited, and even more so for fast neutron irradiation of SCW. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the G values for the primary species e(-)aq, H(•), H2, (•)OH and H2O2 formed from the radiolysis of pure, deaerated SCW (H2O) by 2 MeV monoenergetic neutrons at 400°C as a function of water density in the range of ∼0.15-0.6 g/cm(3). The 2 MeV neutron was taken as representative of a fast neutron flux in a reactor. For light water, the moderation of these neutrons after knock-on collisions with water molecules generated mostly recoil protons of 1.264, 0.465, 0.171 and 0.063 MeV. Neglecting oxygen ion recoils and assuming that the most significant contribution to the radiolysis came from these first four recoil protons, the fast neutron yields were estimated as the sum of the G values for these protons after appropriate weightings were applied according to their energy. Calculated yields were compared with available experimental data and with data obtained for low-LET radiation. Most interestingly, the reaction of H(•) atoms with water was found to play a critical role in the formation yields of H2 and (•)OH at 400°C. Recent work has underscored the potential importance of this reaction above 200°C, but its

  17. Inactivation and injury of total coliform bacteria after primary disinfection of drinking water by TiO2 photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Luigi

    2009-06-15

    In this study the potential application of TiO(2) photocatalysis as primary disinfection system of drinking water was investigated in terms of coliform bacteria inactivation and injury. As model water the effluent of biological denitrification unit for nitrate removal from groundwater, which is characterized by high organic matter and bacteria release, was used. The injury of photocatalysis on coliform bacteria was characterized by means of selective (mEndo) and less selective (mT7) culture media. Different catalyst loadings as well as photolysis and adsorption effects were investigated. Photocatalysis was effective in coliform bacteria inactivation (91-99% after 60 min irradiation time, depending on both catalyst loading and initial density of coliform bacteria detected by mEndo), although no total removal was observed after 60 min irradiation time. The contribution of adsorption mechanism was significant (60-98% after 60 min, depending on catalyst loading) compared to previous investigations probably due to the nature of source water rich in particulate organic matter and biofilm. Photocatalysis process did not result in any irreversible injury (98.8% being the higher injury) under investigated conditions, thus a bacteria regrowth may take place under optimum environment conditions if any final disinfection process (e.g., chlorine or chlorine dioxide) is not used.

  18. Liquid chromatographic determination of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, p-toluenesulfonamide, in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, V.K.; Davis, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    N-sodium-N-chloro-rho-toluenesulfonamide (chloramine-T) effectively controls bacterial gill disease (BGD) in cultured fishes, BGD, a common disease of hatchery-reared salmonids, causes more fish losses than any other disease among these species, This study describes a liquid chromatographic (LC) method that is capable of direct, simultaneous analysis of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, rho-toluenesulfonamide (rho-TSA), in water. The procedure involves reversed-phase (C-18) LC analysis with ion suppression, using 0.01 M phosphate buffer at pH 3. The mobile phase is phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (60 + 40) at 1 mL/min. Both chemicals can be detected with a UV spectrophotometer at 229 nm; the method is linear up to 40 mg, chloramine-T or rho-TSA/L. Mean recoveries were 96.4 +/- 6.1% for water samples fortified with 0.03 mg chloramine-T/L and 95.3 +/- 4.6% for water samples fortified with 0.005 mg rho-TSA/L. Limits of detection without sample enrichment for chloramine-T and rho-TSA are 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L, respectively.

  19. Liquid chromatographic determination of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, p-toluenesulfonamide, in water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, Verdel K.; Davis, Ruth A.

    1997-01-01

    N-sodium-N-chloro-rho-toluenesulfonamide (chloramine-T) effectively controls bacterial gill disease (BGD) in cultured fishes, BGD, a common disease of hatchery-reared salmonids, causes more fish losses than any other disease among these species. This study describes a liquid chromatographic (LC) method that is capable of direct, simultaneous analysis of chloramine-T and its primary degradation product, rho-toluenesulfonamide (rho-TSA), in water. The procedure involves reversed-phase (C-18) LC analysis with ion suppression, using 0.01 M phosphate buffer at pH 3. The mobile phase is phosphate buffer-acetonitrile (60 + 40) at 1 mL/min. Both chemicals can be detected with a UV spectrophotometer at 229 nm; the method is linear up to 40 mg, chloramine-T or rho-TSA/L. Mean recoveries were 96.4 +/- 6.1% for water samples fortified with 0.03 mg chloramine-T/L and 95.3 +/- 4.6% for water samples fortified with 0.005 mg rho-TSA/L. Limits of detection without sample enrichment for chloramine-T and rho-TSA are 0.01 mg/L and 0.001 mg/L, respectively.

  20. Determination of pharmaceuticals in drinking water by CD-modified MEKC: separation optimization using experimental design.

    PubMed

    Drover, Vincent J; Bottaro, Christina S

    2008-12-01

    A suite of 12 widely used pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, bezafibrate, gemfibrozil, ofloxacin, norfloxacin, carbamazepine, primidone, sulphamethazine, sulphadimethoxine and sulphamethoxazole) commonly found in environmental waters were separated by highly sulphated CD-modified MEKC (CD-MEKC) with UV detection. An experimental design method, face-centred composite design, was employed to minimize run time without sacrificing resolution. Using an optimized BGE composed of 10 mM ammonium hydrogen phosphate, pH 11.5, 69 mM SDS, 6 mg/mL sulphated beta-CD and 8.5% v/v isopropanol, a separation voltage of 30 kV and a 48.5 cm x 50 microm id bare silica capillary at 30 degrees C allowed baseline separation of the 12 analytes in a total analysis time of 6.7 min. Instrument LODs in the low milligram per litre range were obtained, and when combined with offline preconcentration by SPE, LODs were between 4 and 30 microg/L.

  1. Experimental meteoric water-basalt interactions: Characterization and interpretation of alteration products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Veblen, David R.; Livi, Kenneth J. T.

    1993-04-01

    The products from experimental alteration of crystalline and glassy basalt by meteoric water at ~45 and ~70°C have been analyzed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction (SAED), and X-ray analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The principal solid alteration products include quartz, chrysotile, talc, kerolite, calcite, kaolinite, smectite, and amorphous silicate material with spongy, smectite-like morphology. These solids act as sinks for elements that are released during the basalt alteration, and they are important for controlling the chemistry of the altering fluid. Comparison of the reaction quotients for the various solid phases and the fluid composition shows that the approach to equilibrium between altering fluid and basalt depends on both temperature and the ratio of fluid to basalt surface area. The degree of supersaturation with respect to equilibrium values for the precipitated phases can be explained by the enhanced solubility resulting from small crystal size of the alteration products. The results of this study underscore the importance of metastabile phenomena in the low-temperature alteration or weathering of both crystalline and glassy basalt.

  2. Experimental studies of thermal and chemical interactions between oxide and silicide nuclear fuels with water

    SciTech Connect

    farahani, A.A.; Corradini, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    Given some transient power/cooling mismatch is a nuclear reactor and its inability to establish the necessary core cooling, energetic fuel-coolant interactions (FCI`s commonly called `vapor explosions`) could occur as a result of the core melting and coolant contact. Although a large number of studies have been done on energetic FCI`s, very few experiments have been performed with the actual fuel materials postulated to be produced in severe accidents. Because of the scarcity of well-characterized FCI data for uranium allows in noncommercial reactors (cermet and silicide fuels), we have conducted a series of experiments to provide a data base for the foregoing materials. An existing 1-D shock-tube facility was modified to handle depleted radioactive materials (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-Al, and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al). Our objectives have been to determine the effects of the initial fuel composition and temperature and the driving pressure (triggering) on the explosion work output, dynamic pressures, transient temperatures, and the hydrogen production. Experimental results indicate limited energetics, mainly thermal interactions, for these fuel materials as compared to aluminum where more chemical reactions occur between the molten aluminum and water.

  3. The experimental study of Cr6+ contaminated water remediation by zero-valent nano-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. N.; Liu, A. P.; Chen, Q. F.; Wang, X.

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, researchers have developed a number of new types of zero-valent nano-Fe remediation materials applied in the remediation of contaminated soil and water, which has attracted wide attentions. This paper selected soil leaching wastewater severely contaminated by chromium as target of the study and chose zero-valent nano-Fe, Na2SO3 and NaHSO3 for comparison experiments to study the effects on removing Cr6+ under experimental conditions of different pH values, dosages and reaction times. As is shown in the experiments, zero-valent nano-Fe has the highest removal rates for Cr6+, while the reaction of Na2SO3 is the slowest under the same conditions. However, both removal rates are prone to be stable after 10 min. Dosages do not make a distinct difference and the pH value has the least effect on the repair of zero-valent nano-Fe.

  4. Experimental burial inhibits methanogenesis and anaerobic decomposition in water-saturated peats.

    PubMed

    Blodau, Christian; Siems, Melanie; Beer, Julia

    2011-12-01

    A mechanistic understanding of carbon (C) sequestration and methane (CH(4)) production is of great interest due to the importance of these processes for the global C budget. Here we demonstrate experimentally, by means of column experiments, that burial of water saturated, anoxic bog peat leads to inactivation of anaerobic respiration and methanogenesis. This effect can be related to the slowness of diffusive transport of solutes and evolving energetic constraints on anaerobic respiration. Burial lowered decomposition constants in homogenized peat sand mixtures from about 10(-5) to 10(-7) yr(-1), which is considerably slower than previously assumed, and methanogenesis slowed down in a similar manner. The latter effect could be related to acetoclastic methanogenesis approaching a minimum energy quantum of -25 kJ mol(-1) (CH(4)). Given the robustness of hydraulic properties that locate the oxic-anoxic boundary near the peatland surface and constrain solute transport deeper into the peat, this effect has likely been critical for building the peatland C store and will continue supporting long-term C sequestration in northern peatlands even under moderately changing climatic conditions.

  5. Simultaneous flow of water and solutes through geological membranes-I. Experimental investigation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Berry, F.A.P.

    1973-01-01

    The relative retardation by geological membranes of cations and anions generally present in subsurface waters was investigated using a high pressure and high temperature 'filtration cell'. The solutions were forced through different clays and a disaggregated shale subjected to compaction pressures up to 9500 psi and to temperatures from 20 to 70??C. The overall efficiences measured increased with increase of exchange capacity of the material used and with decrease in concentration of the input solution. The efficiency of a given membrane increased with increasing compaction pressure but decreased slightly at higher temperatures for solutions of the same ionic concentration. The results further show that geological membranes are specific for different dissolved species. The retardation sequences varied depending on the material used and on experimental conditions. The sequences for monovalent and divalent cations at laboratory temperatures were generally as follows: Li < Na < NH3 < K < Rb < Cs Mg < Ca < Sr < Ba. The sequences for anions at room temperature were variable, but at 70??C, the sequence was: HCO3 < I < B < SO4 < Cl < Br. Monovalent cations contrary to some field data were generally retarded with respect to divalent cations. The differences in the filtration ratios among the divalent cations were smaller than those between the monovalent cations. The passage rate of B, HCO3, I and NH3 was greatly increased at 70??C. ?? 1973.

  6. Hydrogen-rich water improves neurological functional recovery in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Liu, Ming-Dong; Pu, Ying-Yan; Wang, Dan; Xie, Yu; Xue, Gai-Ci; Jiang, Yong; Yang, Qian-Qian; Sun, Xue-Jun; Cao, Li

    2016-05-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The high costs, inconvenient administration, and side effects of current Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs often lead to poor adherence to the long-term treatment of MS. Molecular hydrogen (H2) has been reported to exhibit anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, we explored the prophylactic and therapeutic effects of hydrogen-rich water (HRW) on the progress of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model for MS. We found that prophylactic administration of both 0.36mM and 0.89mM HRW was able to delay EAE onset and reduce maximum clinical scores. Moreover, 0.89mM HRW also reduced disease severity, CNS infiltration, and demyelination when administered after the onset of disease. Furthermore, HRW treatment prevented infiltration of CD4(+) T lymphocytes into the CNS and inhibited Th17 cell development without affecting Th1 cell populations. Because HRW is non-toxic, inexpensive, easily administered, and can readily cross the blood-brain barrier, our experiments suggest that HRW may have great potential in the treatment of MS.

  7. Theoretical and experimental characterization of novel water-equivalent plastics in clinical high-energy carbon-ion beams.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, A; Wellock, N; Thomas, R; Homer, M; Bouchard, H; Kanai, T; MacDougall, N; Royle, G; Palmans, H

    2016-11-07

    Water-equivalent plastics are frequently used in dosimetry for experimental simplicity. This work evaluates the water-equivalence of novel water-equivalent plastics specifically designed for light-ion beams, as well as commercially available plastics in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. A plastic- to-water conversion factor [Formula: see text] was established to derive absorbed dose to water in a water phantom from ionization chamber readings performed in a plastic phantom. Three trial plastic materials with varying atomic compositions were produced and experimentally characterized in a high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed with a Roos ionization chamber, using a broad un-modulated beam of 11  ×  11 cm(2), to measure the plastic-to-water conversion factor for the novel materials. The experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Commercially available plastics were also simulated for comparison with the plastics tested experimentally, with particular attention to the influence of nuclear interaction cross sections. The measured [Formula: see text] correction increased gradually from 0% at the surface to 0.7% at a depth near the Bragg peak for one of the plastics prepared in this work, while for the other two plastics a maximum correction of 0.8%-1.3% was found. Average differences between experimental and numerical simulations were 0.2%. Monte Carlo results showed that for polyethylene, polystyrene, Rando phantom soft tissue and A-150, the correction increased from 0% to 2.5%-4.0% with depth, while for PMMA it increased to 2%. Water-equivalent plastics such as, Plastic Water, RMI-457, Gammex 457-CTG, WT1 and Virtual Water, gave similar results where maximum corrections were of the order of 2%. Considering the results from Monte Carlo simulations, one of the novel plastics was found to be superior in comparison with the plastic materials currently used in dosimetry, demonstrating that it is feasible to tailor

  8. Theoretical and experimental characterization of novel water-equivalent plastics in clinical high-energy carbon-ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, A.; Wellock, N.; Thomas, R.; Homer, M.; Bouchard, H.; Kanai, T.; MacDougall, N.; Royle, G.; Palmans, H.

    2016-11-01

    Water-equivalent plastics are frequently used in dosimetry for experimental simplicity. This work evaluates the water-equivalence of novel water-equivalent plastics specifically designed for light-ion beams, as well as commercially available plastics in a clinical high-energy carbon-ion beam. A plastic- to-water conversion factor {{H}\\text{pl,w}} was established to derive absorbed dose to water in a water phantom from ionization chamber readings performed in a plastic phantom. Three trial plastic materials with varying atomic compositions were produced and experimentally characterized in a high-energy carbon-ion beam. Measurements were performed with a Roos ionization chamber, using a broad un-modulated beam of 11  ×  11 cm2, to measure the plastic-to-water conversion factor for the novel materials. The experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Commercially available plastics were also simulated for comparison with the plastics tested experimentally, with particular attention to the influence of nuclear interaction cross sections. The measured H\\text{pl,w}\\exp correction increased gradually from 0% at the surface to 0.7% at a depth near the Bragg peak for one of the plastics prepared in this work, while for the other two plastics a maximum correction of 0.8%-1.3% was found. Average differences between experimental and numerical simulations were 0.2%. Monte Carlo results showed that for polyethylene, polystyrene, Rando phantom soft tissue and A-150, the correction increased from 0% to 2.5%-4.0% with depth, while for PMMA it increased to 2%. Water-equivalent plastics such as, Plastic Water, RMI-457, Gammex 457-CTG, WT1 and Virtual Water, gave similar results where maximum corrections were of the order of 2%. Considering the results from Monte Carlo simulations, one of the novel plastics was found to be superior in comparison with the plastic materials currently used in dosimetry, demonstrating that it is feasible to tailor plastic

  9. The Effects of Metallurgical Factors on PWSCC Crack Growth Rates in TT Alloy 690 in Simulated PWR Primary Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Watanabe, Masashi; Hashimoto, Atsushi

    2015-06-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking growth rates (PWSCCGRs) in highly cold-worked thermally treated (TT) Alloy 690 have been recently reported as exhibiting significant heat-to-heat variability. Authors hypothesized that these significant differences could be due to the metallurgical characteristics of each heat. In order to confirm this hypothesis, the effect of fundamental metallurgical characteristics on PWSCCGR measurements in cold-worked TT Alloy 690 has been investigated. The following new observations were made in this study: (1) Microcracks and voids were observed in or near eutectic crystals of grain boundary (GB) M23C6 carbides (primary carbides) after cold rolling, but were not observed before cold rolling. These primary carbides with microcracks and voids were observed in both lightly forged and as-cast and cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 (heat A) as well as in a cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 (heat Y) that simulated the chemical composition and carbide banded structure of the material previously tested by Paraventi and Moshier. However, this was not observed in precipitated (secondary) M23C6 GB carbides in heavily forged and cold-rolled TT Alloy 690 heat A and a cold-rolled commercial TT Alloy 690. (2) From microstructural analyses carried out on the various TT Alloy 690 test materials before and after cold rolling, the amount of eutectic crystals (primary carbides and nitrides) M23C6 and TiN depended on the chemical composition. In particular, the amount of M23C6 depended on the fabrication process. Microcracks and voids in or near the M23C6 and TiN precipitates were generated by the cold rolling process. (3) The PWSCCGRs observed in TT Alloy 690 were different for each heat and fabrication process. The PWSCCGR decreased with increasing Vickers hardness of each heat. However, for the same heats and fabrication processes, the PWSCCGR increased with increasing Vickers hardness due to cold work. Thus, the PWSCCGR must be affected not only by hardness (or

  10. Permanence of suppression of the primary immune response in rainbow trout, Salmo gairdneri, sublethally exposed to tritiated water during embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strand, J.A.; Fujihara, M.P.; Poston, T.M.; Abernethy, C.S.

    1982-09-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that antibody synthesis in response to a challenge from the bacterium, Flexibacter columnaris, was significantly suppresssed in juvenile (5 months) rainbow trout following exposure to tritium at doses as low as 4.0 rad when administered during the first 20 days of embryogenesis. In continuing studies, a secondary challenge to columnaris cells delivered to yearling (17 months) trout was used to test the hypothesis that early embryonic exposure to tritium irradiation (0, 0.04, 0.4, 4.0, and 40.0 rad) resulted in permanent injury to the primary immune process.Results indicated that under the prescribed experimental conditions, suppression of the primary immune response was permanent; that is, the degree of injury in yearling fish (17 months) equaled or exceeded that found in juvenile fish (5 months). At levels in the range of the maximum permissible concentration, tritium produced measurable, dose-dependent, and irreversible suppression of immune capacity in affected fish. The threshold-free and exponential nature of the dose-response curve suggests extrapolation of effects to even lower exposures.

  11. Measurement of water column primary production using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical chlorophyll profile, and underwater light intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, A. B.; Gagarin, V. I.; Mosharov, S. A.

    2016-09-01

    A method has been developed to measure water column integrated primary production (PPint) in the water column using photosynthesis-irradiance relations for surface phytoplankton, the vertical profile of chlorophyll a concentration, and the underwater light intensity. Good correlation has been found for the results calculated with this method and light dependences in situ. The advantages of this method are the independence of PPint calculation from CTD profiling and water sampling, and thus optimization (reduction) of the station working time.

  12. [Interactions of DNA bases with individual water molecules. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics computation results vs. experimental data].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, E; Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Herrera, J N F; Poltev, V I

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate details of the DNA-water interactions we performed the calculations and systemaitic search for minima of interaction energy of the systems consisting of one of DNA bases and one or two water molecules. The results of calculations using two force fields of molecular mechanics (MM) and correlated ab initio method MP2/6-31G(d, p) of quantum mechanics (QM) have been compared with one another and with experimental data. The calculations demonstrated a qualitative agreement between geometry characteristics of the most of local energy minima obtained via different methods. The deepest minima revealed by MM and QM methods correspond to water molecule position between two neighbor hydrophilic centers of the base and to the formation by water molecule of hydrogen bonds with them. Nevertheless, the relative depth of some minima and peculiarities of mutual water-base positions in' these minima depend on the method used. The analysis revealed insignificance of some differences in the results of calculations performed via different methods and the importance of other ones for the description of DNA hydration. The calculations via MM methods enable us to reproduce quantitatively all the experimental data on the enthalpies of complex formation of single water molecule with the set of mono-, di-, and trimethylated bases, as well as on water molecule locations near base hydrophilic atoms in the crystals of DNA duplex fragments, while some of these data cannot be rationalized by QM calculations.

  13. Hydrogeologic and water-quality data for the explosive experimental area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site, Dahlgren, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammond, E.C.; Bell, C.F.

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogeologic and water-quality data were collected at the Explosive Experimental Area, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Site at Dahlgren, Virginia, as part of a hydrogeologic assessment of the shallow aquifer system begun in 1993. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted this study to provide the U.S. Navy with hydrogeologic data to aid in the evaluation of the effects from remediation of contaminated sites and to protect against additional contamination. This report describes the ground-water observation- well network, hydrogeologic, and water-quality data collected between October 1993 and April 1995. The report includes a description of the locations and construction of 28 observation wells on the Explosive Experimental Area. Hydrogeologic data include lithologic logs, geophysical logs, and vertical hydraulic conductivity measurements of selected core intervals. Hydrologic data include synoptic and hourly measurements of ground-water levels, and observation-well slug tests to determine horizontal hydraulic conductivity. Water-quality data include analyses of major dissolved constituents in ground water and surface water.

  14. The effects of nutrient additions on particulate and dissolved primary production in surface waters of three Mediterranean eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagaria, A.; Psarra, S.; Lefèvre, D.; van Wambeke, F.; Courties, C.; Pujo-Pay, M.; Oriol, L.; Tanaka, T.; Christaki, U.

    2010-12-01

    The effects of additions of nitrogen (+N), phosphorus (+P), alone and in combination, were assessed during three microcosm experiments performed with surface waters of three anticyclonic eddies, located in the Western, Central and Eastern Mediterranean. We examined the effects of nutrient additions on rates of dissolved and particulate primary production and on metabolic rates of the osmotrophic community (phytoplankton and heterotrophic prokaryotes). The experiments were performed in June/July 2008 during the BOUM (Biogeochemistry from the Oligotrophic to the Ultra-oligotrophic Mediterranean) cruise. In all three experiments, particulate primary production was significantly stimulated by the additions of nitrogen (+N, +NP) while no effect was observed with the addition of phosphorus alone. Percent extracellular release (PER) showed an inverse relation with total primary production (PPtotal), displaying the lowest values (4-8%) in the +NP treatment. Among the three treatments, the +NP had the strongest effect on the community metabolic rates leading to positive net community production values (NCP>0). These changes of NCP were mainly due to enhanced gross community production (GCP) rather than lower respiration rates (CR). In +NP treatments autotrophic production (whether expressed as GCP or PPtotal) was high enough to fulfil the carbon requirements of the heterotrophic prokaryotes, with phytoplankton and heterotrophic prokaryote production positively correlated. Addition of nitrogen alone (+N) had a smaller effect on community production, resulting in metabolically balanced systems (NCP≍0). Finally, heterotrophic conditions persisted in the +P treatment at the central and eastern stations, and gross production was not sufficient to supply bacterial carbon demand, evidence of a decoupling of phytoplankton production and consumption by heterotrophic prokaryotes.

  15. Landscape configuration is the primary driver of impacts on water quality associated with agricultural expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Hamel, Perrine; Sharp, Richard; Kowal, Virgina; Wolny, Stacie; Sim, Sarah; Mueller, Carina

    2016-07-01

    Corporations and other multinational institutions are increasingly looking to evaluate their innovation and procurement decisions over a range of environmental criteria, including impacts on ecosystem services according to the spatial configuration of activities on the landscape. We have developed a spatially explicit approach and modeled a hypothetical corporate supply chain decision representing contrasting patterns of land-use change in four regions of the globe. This illustrates the effect of introducing spatial considerations in the analysis of ecosystem services, specifically sediment retention. We explored a wide variety of contexts (Iowa, USA; Mato Grosso, Brazil; and Jiangxi and Heilongjiang in China) and these show that per-area representation of impacts based on the physical characterization of a region can be misleading. We found two- to five-fold differences in sediment export for the same amount of habitat conversion within regions characterized by similar physical traits. These differences were mainly determined by the distance between land use changes and streams. The influence of landscape configuration is so dramatic that it can override wide variation in erosion potential driven by physical factors like soil type, slope, and climate. To minimize damage to spatially-dependent ecosystem services like water purification, sustainable sourcing strategies should not assume a direct correlation between impact and area but rather allow for possible nonlinearity in impacts, especially in regions with little remaining habitat and highly variable hydrological connectivity.

  16. Primary disassembly of Light Water Breeder Reactor modules for core evaluation (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberger, R.J.; Miller, E.L.

    1987-10-01

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to disassemble LWBR fuel modules for subsequent proof-of-breeding (POB) and core examination operations. Included are discussions of module handling fixtures and equipment, the underwater milling machine and bandsaw assemblies, and the associated design and operation of this equipment for LWBR fuel module disassembly.

  17. Primary description of surface water phytoplankton pigment patterns in the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, R. K.; Anil, A. C.; Narale, D. D.; Chitari, R. R.; Kulkarni, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in surface water phytoplankton pigment distribution in the Bay of Bengal were studied during the spring intermonsoon (SpIM, February-April) and the commencement of the summer monsoon (CSM, May-June), using pigment and diagnostic indices. The Prokaryotic pigment index (Prok DP) was dominant at all the oceanic stations whereas the Flagellate pigment index (Flag DP) was dominant at the near coastal stations. However, during the commencement of summer monsoon, an oscillation in the dominance of Prok DP and Flag DP was observed in the central oceanic bay, whereas flagellates and diatoms were dominant at the near coastal stations. This change in pigment pattern is possibly related to the influence of rainfall. Comparison of pigment data with microscopic cell counts indicated a significant relationship between the diatom pigment index (Diat DP) and diatom abundance. However, the relationship between the dinoflagellate pigment index (Dino DP) and dinoflagellate abundance was not significant. Studies coupling pigment composition analysis with microscopic analysis of phytoplankton in natural conditions should thus be a prerequisite in establishing valid biogeochemical and ecosystem models.

  18. Nonlinear low frequency water waves in a cylindrical shell subjected to high frequency excitations - Part I: Experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dajun, Wang; Chunyan, Zhou; Li, Junbao; Shen, Song; Li, Min; Liu, Xijun

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation on nonlinear low frequency gravity water waves in a partially filled cylindrical shell subjected to high frequency horizontal excitations. The characteristics of natural frequencies and mode shapes of the water-shell coupled system are discussed. The boundaries for onset of gravity waves are measured and plotted by curves of critical excitation force magnitude with respect to excitation frequency. For nonlinear water waves, the time history signals and their spectrums of motion on both water surface and shell are recorded. The shapes of water surface are also measured using scanning laser vibrometer. In particular, the phenomenon of transitions between different gravity wave patterns is observed and expressed by the waterfall graphs. These results exhibit pronounced nonlinear properties of shell-fluid coupled system.

  19. Effects of elevated CO2 on predator avoidance behaviour by reef fishes is not altered by experimental test water.

    PubMed

    Munday, Philip L; Welch, Megan J; Allan, Bridie J M; Watson, Sue-Ann; McMahon, Shannon J; McCormick, Mark I

    2016-01-01

    Pioneering studies into the effects of elevated CO2 on the behaviour of reef fishes often tested high-CO2 reared fish using control water in the test arena. While subsequent studies using rearing treatment water (control or high CO2) in the test arena have confirmed the effects of high CO2 on a range of reef fish behaviours, a further investigation into the use of different test water in the experimental arena is warranted. Here, we used a fully factorial design to test the effect of rearing treatment water (control or high CO2) and experimental test water (control or high CO2) on antipredator responses of larval reef fishes. We tested antipredator behaviour in larval clownfish Amphiprion percula and ambon damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis, two species that have been used in previous high CO2 experiments. Specifically, we tested if: (1) using control or high CO2 water in a two channel flume influenced the response of larval clownfish to predator odour; and (2) using control or high CO2 water in the test arena influenced the escape response of larval damselfish to a startle stimulus. Finally, (3) because the effects of high CO2 on fish behaviour appear to be caused by altered function of the GABA-A neurotransmitter we tested if antipredator behaviours were restored in clownfish treated with a GABA antagonist (gabazine) in high CO2 water. Larval clownfish reared from hatching in control water (496 µatm) strongly avoided predator cue whereas larval clownfish reared from hatching in high CO2 (1,022 µatm) were attracted to the predator cue, as has been reported in previous studies. There was no effect on fish responses of using either control or high CO2 water in the flume. Larval damselfish reared for four days in high CO2 (1,051 µatm) exhibited a slower response to a startle stimulus and slower escape speed compared with fish reared in control conditions (464 µatm). There was no effect of test water on escape responses. Treatment of high-CO2 reared clownfish with

  20. Effects of elevated CO2 on predator avoidance behaviour by reef fishes is not altered by experimental test water

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Megan J.; Allan, Bridie J.M.; Watson, Sue-Ann; McMahon, Shannon J.; McCormick, Mark I.

    2016-01-01

    Pioneering studies into the effects of elevated CO2 on the behaviour of reef fishes often tested high-CO2 reared fish using control water in the test arena. While subsequent studies using rearing treatment water (control or high CO2) in the test arena have confirmed the effects of high CO2 on a range of reef fish behaviours, a further investigation into the use of different test water in the experimental arena is warranted. Here, we used a fully factorial design to test the effect of rearing treatment water (control or high CO2) and experimental test water (control or high CO2) on antipredator responses of larval reef fishes. We tested antipredator behaviour in larval clownfish Amphiprion percula and ambon damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis, two species that have been used in previous high CO2 experiments. Specifically, we tested if: (1) using control or high CO2 water in a two channel flume influenced the response of larval clownfish to predator odour; and (2) using control or high CO2 water in the test arena influenced the escape response of larval damselfish to a startle stimulus. Finally, (3) because the effects of high CO2 on fish behaviour appear to be caused by altered function of the GABA-A neurotransmitter we tested if antipredator behaviours were restored in clownfish treated with a GABA antagonist (gabazine) in high CO2 water. Larval clownfish reared from hatching in control water (496 µatm) strongly avoided predator cue whereas larval clownfish reared from hatching in high CO2 (1,022 µatm) were attracted to the predator cue, as has been reported in previous studies. There was no effect on fish responses of using either control or high CO2 water in the flume. Larval damselfish reared for four days in high CO2 (1,051 µatm) exhibited a slower response to a startle stimulus and slower escape speed compared with fish reared in control conditions (464 µatm). There was no effect of test water on escape responses. Treatment of high-CO2 reared clownfish with

  1. Efficacious Treatment of Experimental Leishmaniasis with Amphotericin B-Arabinogalactan Water-Soluble Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Golenser, Jacob; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Ehrenfreund, Tirtsa; Domb, Abraham J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we tested the efficacy of amphotericin B (AmB)-arabinogalactan (AmB-AG) conjugates for the treatment of experimental leishmaniasis. Chemical conjugation of AmB to a water-soluble, biodegradable, and biocompatible polymer could present many advantages over presently available AmB formulations. Two conjugates were tested, a reduced (rAmB-AG) form and an unreduced (uAmB-AG) form. In vitro, the drug concentrations which lower the values of parasites (for promastigotes) or infected macrophages (for amastigotes) to 50% of the untreated values (ED50s) of uAmB-AG and rAmB-AG were 0.19 and 0.34 μg/ml, respectively, for Leishmania major promastigotes and 0.17 and 0.31 μg/ml, respectively, for amastigotes. The effect on Leishmania infantum-infected macrophages was more marked, with ED50s of 0.035 μg/ml for rAmB-AG and 0.027 μg/ml for uAmB-AG. In in vivo experiments, BALB/c mice injected with L. major were treated from day 2 onwards on alternate days for 2 weeks. Both conjugates, as well as liposomal AmB (all at 6 mg/kg of body weight) and Fungizone (1 mg/kg), significantly delayed the appearance of lesions compared to that in untreated mice. In addition, both conjugates, but not liposomal AmB, were significantly more effective than Fungizone. Subcutaneous injection of the conjugates (6 mg/kg) was significantly more effective than liposomal AmB in delaying the appearance of lesions. Higher AmB concentrations of up to 12 mg/kg could be administered by this route. When an established infection was treated, uAmB-AG was somewhat more effective than liposomal AmB. In summary, water-soluble polymeric AmB derivatives were found effective and safe for the treatment of leishmanial infections. The conjugates, which are stable and can be produced relatively cheaply (compared to lipid formulations), can be used in the future for the treatment of leishmaniasis infections. PMID:10471566

  2. Changing forest water yields in response to climate warming: results from long-term experimental watershed sites across North America.

    PubMed

    Creed, Irena F; Spargo, Adam T; Jones, Julia A; Buttle, Jim M; Adams, Mary B; Beall, Fred D; Booth, Eric G; Campbell, John L; Clow, Dave; Elder, Kelly; Green, Mark B; Grimm, Nancy B; Miniat, Chelcy; Ramlal, Patricia; Saha, Amartya; Sebestyen, Stephen; Spittlehouse, Dave; Sterling, Shannon; Williams, Mark W; Winkler, Rita; Yao, Huaxia

    2014-10-01

    Climate warming is projected to affect forest water yields but the effects are expected to vary. We investigated how forest type and age affect water yield resilience to climate warming. To answer this question, we examined the variability in historical water yields at long-term experimental catchments across Canada and the United States over 5-year cool and warm periods. Using the theoretical framework of the Budyko curve, we calculated the effects of climate warming on the annual partitioning of precipitation (P) into evapotranspiration (ET) and water yield. Deviation (d) was defined as a catchment's change in actual ET divided by P [AET/P; evaporative index (EI)] coincident with a shift from a cool to a warm period - a positive d indicates an upward shift in EI and smaller than expected water yields, and a negative d indicates a downward shift in EI and larger than expected water yields. Elasticity was defined as the ratio of interannual variation in potential ET divided by P (PET/P; dryness index) to interannual variation in the EI - high elasticity indicates low d despite large range in drying index (i.e., resilient water yields), low elasticity indicates high d despite small range in drying index (i.e., nonresilient water yields). Although the data needed to fully evaluate ecosystems based on these metrics are limited, we were able to identify some characteristics of response among forest types. Alpine sites showed the greatest sensitivity to climate warming with any warming leading to increased water yields. Conifer forests included catchments with lowest elasticity and stable to larger water yields. Deciduous forests included catchments with intermediate elasticity and stable to smaller water yields. Mixed coniferous/deciduous forests included catchments with highest elasticity and stable water yields. Forest type appeared to influence the resilience of catchment water yields to climate warming, with conifer and deciduous catchments more susceptible to

  3. Changing forest water yields in response to climate warming: results from long-term experimental watershed sites across North America

    PubMed Central

    Creed, Irena F; Spargo, Adam T; Jones, Julia A; Buttle, Jim M; Adams, Mary B; Beall, Fred D; Booth, Eric G; Campbell, John L; Clow, Dave; Elder, Kelly; Green, Mark B; Grimm, Nancy B; Miniat, Chelcy; Ramlal, Patricia; Saha, Amartya; Sebestyen, Stephen; Spittlehouse, Dave; Sterling, Shannon; Williams, Mark W; Winkler, Rita; Yao, Huaxia

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming is projected to affect forest water yields but the effects are expected to vary. We investigated how forest type and age affect water yield resilience to climate warming. To answer this question, we examined the variability in historical water yields at long-term experimental catchments across Canada and the United States over 5-year cool and warm periods. Using the theoretical framework of the Budyko curve, we calculated the effects of climate warming on the annual partitioning of precipitation (P) into evapotranspiration (ET) and water yield. Deviation (d) was defined as a catchment's change in actual ET divided by P [AET/P; evaporative index (EI)] coincident with a shift from a cool to a warm period – a positive d indicates an upward shift in EI and smaller than expected water yields, and a negative d indicates a downward shift in EI and larger than expected water yields. Elasticity was defined as the ratio of interannual variation in potential ET divided by P (PET/P; dryness index) to interannual variation in the EI – high elasticity indicates low d despite large range in drying index (i.e., resilient water yields), low elasticity indicates high d despite small range in drying index (i.e., nonresilient water yields). Although the data needed to fully evaluate ecosystems based on these metrics are limited, we were able to identify some characteristics of response among forest types. Alpine sites showed the greatest sensitivity to climate warming with any warming leading to increased water yields. Conifer forests included catchments with lowest elasticity and stable to larger water yields. Deciduous forests included catchments with intermediate elasticity and stable to smaller water yields. Mixed coniferous/deciduous forests included catchments with highest elasticity and stable water yields. Forest type appeared to influence the resilience of catchment water yields to climate warming, with conifer and deciduous catchments more susceptible to

  4. An experimental investigation on the surface water transport process over an airfoil by using a digital image projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wei, Tian; Hu, Hui

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, an experimental investigation was conducted to characterize the transient behavior of the surface water film and rivulet flows driven by boundary layer airflows over a NACA0012 airfoil in order to elucidate underlying physics of the important micro-physical processes pertinent to aircraft icing phenomena. A digital image projection (DIP) technique was developed to quantitatively measure the film thickness distribution of the surface water film/rivulet flows over the airfoil at different test conditions. The time-resolved DIP measurements reveal that micro-sized water droplets carried by the oncoming airflow impinged onto the airfoil surface, mainly in the region near the airfoil leading edge. After impingement, the water droplets formed thin water film that runs back over the airfoil surface, driven by the boundary layer airflow. As the water film advanced downstream, the contact line was found to bugle locally and developed into isolated water rivulets further downstream. The front lobes of the rivulets quickly advanced along the airfoil and then shed from the airfoil trailing edge, resulting in isolated water transport channels over the airfoil surface. The water channels were responsible for transporting the water mass impinging at the airfoil leading edge. Additionally, the transition location of the surface water transport process from film flows to rivulet flows was found to occur further upstream with increasing velocity of the oncoming airflow. The thickness of the water film/rivulet flows was found to increase monotonically with the increasing distance away from the airfoil leading edge. The runback velocity of the water rivulets was found to increase rapidly with the increasing airflow velocity, while the rivulet width and the gap between the neighboring rivulets decreased as the airflow velocity increased.

  5. Coupling gross primary production and transpiration for a consistent estimate of canopy water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yebra, Marta; van Dijk, Albert

    2015-04-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of transpiration or evapotranspiration per unit gross (GPP) or net CO2 uptake) is key in all areas of plant production and forest management applications. Therefore, mutually consistent estimates of GPP and transpiration are needed to analysed WUE without introducing any artefacts that might arise by combining independently derived GPP and ET estimates. GPP and transpiration are physiologically linked at ecosystem level by the canopy conductance (Gc). Estimates of Gc can be obtained by scaling stomatal conductance (Kelliher et al. 1995) or inferred from ecosystem level measurements of gas exchange (Baldocchi et al., 2008). To derive large-scale or indeed global estimates of Gc, satellite remote sensing based methods are needed. In a previous study, we used water vapour flux estimates derived from eddy covariance flux tower measurements at 16 Fluxnet sites world-wide to develop a method to estimate Gc using MODIS reflectance observations (Yebra et al. 2013). We combined those estimates with the Penman-Monteith combination equation to derive transpiration (T). The resulting T estimates compared favourably with flux tower estimates (R2=0.82, RMSE=29.8 W m-2). Moreover, the method allowed a single parameterisation for all land cover types, which avoids artefacts resulting from land cover classification. In subsequent research (Yebra et al, in preparation) we used the same satellite-derived Gc values within a process-based but simple canopy GPP model to constrain GPP predictions. The developed model uses a 'big-leaf' description of the plant canopy to estimate the mean GPP flux as the lesser of a conductance-limited and radiation-limited GPP rate. The conductance-limited rate was derived assuming that transport of CO2 from the bulk air to the intercellular leaf space is limited by molecular diffusion through the stomata. The radiation-limited rate was estimated assuming that it is proportional to the absorbed photosynthetically

  6. Comparative experimental investigation on the actuation mechanisms of ionic polymer–metal composites with different backbones and water contents

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Zicai; Chang, Longfei; Wang, Yanjie; Chen, Hualing; Asaka, Kinji; Zhao, Hongxia; Li, Dichen

    2014-03-28

    Water-based ionic polymer–metal composites (IPMCs) exhibit complex deformation properties, especially when the water content changes. To explore the general actuation mechanisms, both Nafion and Flemion membranes are used as the polymer backbones. IPMC deformation includes three stages: fast anode deformation, relaxation deformation, and slow anode deformation, which is mainly dependent on the water content and the backbone. When the water content decreases from 21 to 14 wt. %, Nafion–IPMC exhibits a large negative relaxation deformation, zero deformation, a positive relaxation deformation, and a positive steady deformation without relaxation in sequence. Despite the slow anode deformation, Flemion–IPMC also shows a slight relaxation deformation, which disappears when the water content is less than 13 wt. %. The different water states are investigated at different water contents using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The free water, which decreases rapidly at the beginning through evaporation, is proven to be critical for relaxation deformation. For the backbone, indirect evidence from the steady current response is correlated with the slow anode deformation of Flemion-IPMC. The latter is explained by the secondary dissociation of the weak acid group –COOH. Finally, we thoroughly explain not only the three deformations by swelling but also their evolvement with decreasing water content. A fitting model is also presented based on a multi-diffusion equation to reveal the deformation processes more clearly, the results from which are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Experimentally studying TV3-117 gas-turbine unit characteristics at superheated water injection into a compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favorskii, O. N.; Alekseev, V. B.; Zalkind, V. I.; Zeigarnik, Yu. A.; Ivanov, P. P.; Marinichev, D. V.; Nizovskii, V. L.; Nizovskii, L. V.

    2014-05-01

    The results from experimentally studying TV3-117 gas-turbine unit (GTU) characteristics at injection of cold and superheated (metastable) water to the inlet of the GTU compressor are presented. In the latter case, the finer water atomization is obtained. The water injection makes it possible to considerably increase the unit power. At a constant temperature of the working fluid downstream of the turbine combustion chamber, water injection in an amount of 1% of the air flow rate provides an increase in the turbine power by approximately 12% and expands GTU controlling potentialities. The use of the metastable superheated water atomization enables one to more reliably implement the technology of water injection into a compressor, especially into intermediate compressor stages. However, it requires accounting for operational conditions of particular installation. Due to small water droplet residence time in the compressor flow path, even with fine water atomization, in aircraft engine derivative power turbines, about 15-20% of moisture injected have no time to completely evaporate within the compressor. When injecting cold water, this figure is from 5 to 10% larger.

  8. Experimental, water droplet impingement data on two-dimensional airfoils, axisymmetric inlet and Boeing 737-300 engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Elangovan, E.; Freund, G. A., Jr.; Breer, M. D.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional bodies. The experimental results provide the essential droplet impingement data required to validate particle trajectory codes, used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. A body whose water droplet impingement characteristics are required is covered at strategic locations by thin strips of moisture absorbing (blotter) paper, and then exposed to an air stream containing a dyed-water spray cloud. Water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter strips, by measuring the optical reflectance of the dye deposit on the strips, using an automated reflectometer. Impingement efficiency data obtained for a NACA 65(2)015 airfoil section, a supercritical airfoil section, and Being 737-300 and axisymmetric inlet models are presented in this paper.

  9. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-01-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa∙s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa. PMID:27270403

  10. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-06-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa•s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa.

  11. Calculation of the yields for the primary species formed from the radiolysis of liquid water by fast neutrons at temperatures between 25-350°C.

    PubMed

    Butarbutar, Sofia Loren; Sanguanmith, Sunuchakan; Meesungnoen, Jintana; Sunaryo, Geni Rina; Jay-Gerin, Jean-Paul

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the yields for the primary species (e(-)aq, H(•), H2, (•)OH and H2O2) formed from the radiolysis of neutral liquid water by mono-energetic 2 MeV neutrons at temperatures between 25-350°C. The 2 MeV neutron was taken as representative of a fast neutron flux in a reactor. For light water, the moderation of these neutrons generated elastically scattered recoil protons of ∼1.264, 0.465, 0.171 and 0.063 MeV, which at 25°C, had linear energy transfers (LETs) of ∼22, 43, 69 and 76 keV/μm, respectively. Neglecting the radiation effects due to oxygen ion recoils and assuming that the most significant contribution to the radiolysis came from these first four recoil protons, the fast neutron yields could be estimated as the sum of the yields for these protons after allowance was made for the appropriate weightings according to their energy. Yields were calculated at 10(-7), 10(-6) and 10(-5) s after the ionization event at all temperatures, in accordance with the time range associated with the scavenging capacities generally used for fast neutron radiolysis experiments. The results of the simulations agreed reasonably well with the experimental data, taking into account the relatively large uncertainties in the experimental measurements, the relatively small number of reported radiolysis yields, and the simplifications included in the model. Compared with data obtained for low-LET radiation ((60)Co γ rays or fast electrons), our computed yields for fast neutron radiation showed essentially similar temperature dependences over the range of temperatures studied, but with lower values for yields of free radicals and higher values for molecular yields. This general trend is a reflection of the high-LET character of fast neutrons. Although the results of the simulations were consistent with the experiment, more experimental data are required to better describe the dependence of radiolytic yields on temperature and to test

  12. Experimental Simulations of Methane Gas Migration through Water-Saturated Sediment Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Seol, Y.; Rosenbaum, E. J.

    2010-12-01

    Previous numerical simulations (Jaines and Juanes, 2009) showed that modes of gas migration would mainly be determined by grain size; capillary invasion preferably occurring in coarse-grained sediments vs. fracturing dominantly in fine-grained sediments. This study was intended to experimentally simulate preferential modes of gas migration in various water-saturated sediment cores. The cores compacted in the laboratory include a silica sand core (mean size of 180 μm), a silica silt core (1.7 μm), and a kaolin clay core (1.0 μm). Methane gas was injected into the core placed within an x-ray-transparent pressure vessel, which was under continuous x-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning with controlled radial (σr), axial (σa), and pore pressures (P). The CT image analysis reveals that, under the radial effective stress (σr') of 0.69 MPa and the axial effective stress (σa') of 1.31 MPa, fracturings by methane gas injection occur in both silt and clay cores. Fracturing initiates at the capillary pressure (Pc) of ~ 0.41 MPa and ~ 2.41 MPa for silt and clay cores, respectively. Fracturing appears as irregular fracture-networks consisting of nearly invisibly-fine multiple fractures, longitudinally-oriented round tube-shape conduits, or fine fractures branching off from the large conduits. However, for the sand core, only capillary invasion was observed at or above 0.034 MPa of capillary pressure under the confining pressure condition of σr' = 1.38 MPa and σa' = 2.62 MPa. Compared to the numerical predictions under similar confining pressure conditions, fracturing occurs with relatively larger grain sizes, which may result from lower grain-contact compression and friction caused by loose compaction and flexible lateral boundary employed in the experiment.

  13. Experimental Measurement of Frozen and Partially Melted Water Droplet Impact Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palacios, Jose; Yan, Sihong; Tan, Jason; Kreeger, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    High-speed video of single frozen water droplets impacting a surface was acquired. The droplets diameter ranged from 0.4 mm to 0.9 mm and impacted at velocities ranging from 140 m/sec to 309 m/sec. The techniques used to freeze the droplets and launch the particles against the surfaces is described in this paper. High-speed video was used to quantify the ice accretion area to the surface for varying impact angles (30 deg, 45 deg, 60 deg), impacting velocities, and break-up angles. An oxygen /acetylene cross-flow flame used to ensure partial melting of the traveling frozen droplets is also discussed. A linear relationship between impact angle and ice accretion is identified for fully frozen particles. The slope of the relationship is affected by impact speed. Perpendicular impacts, i.e. 30 deg, exhibited small differences in ice accretion for varying velocities, while an increase of 60% in velocity from 161 m/sec to 259 m/sec, provided an increase on ice accretion area of 96% at an impact angle of 60 deg. The increase accretion area highlights the importance of impact angle and velocity on the ice accretion process of ice crystals. It was experimentally observed that partial melting was not required for ice accretion at the tested velocities when high impact angles were used (45 and 60 deg). Partially melted droplets doubled the ice accretion areas on the impacting surface when 0.0023 Joules were applied to the particle. The partially melted state of the droplets and a method to quantify the percentage increase in ice accretion area is also described in the paper.

  14. Factors influencing fecundity in experimental crosses of water lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) cultivars

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Breeding programs for the water lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) are hampered by an inability to account for variation in seed set associated with crosses between different cultivars. We studied seed set in two reciprocal crosses between lotus cultivars (‘Guili’ × ‘Aijiangnan’ and ‘Molingqiuse’ × ‘Qinhuaiyanzhi') to obtain insights into factors that govern fecundity in these experimental hybrids. Pollen viability, stigma receptivity and embryo development were compared for each hybrid and reciprocal cross. Results Pollen viability of the individual cultivars ranged from 4.1% to 20.2%, with the highest level (>11.9%) for all cultivars observed from the earliest collected grains (05:00–06:00 a.m.). Stigmatic pollen germination peaked at 4 h after pollination and varied from 4.8 to 60.6 grains per stigma among the crosses. Production of normal embryos ranged from 7.6% to 58.8% at 1 d after pollination and from 0 to 25% by 11 d after pollination. Seed set in crosses (0.2–23.3%) was generally lower than in open-pollinated plants (8.4–26.5%). Similar to the germination results, seed set was substantially reduced in both reciprocal crosses. Conclusions These results suggested that poor pollen fertility, low stigma receptivity, and embryo abortion were responsible for the failure of the crosses ‘Molingqiuse’ × ‘Qinhuaiyanzhi’, ‘Qinhuaiyanzhi’ × ‘Molingqiuse’, and ‘Aijiangnan’ × ‘Guili’. PMID:22676293

  15. Effect of surface state on the oxidation behavior of welded 308L in simulated nominal primary water of PWR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jiazhen; Zhu, Ruolin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Jianqiu; Han, En-Hou; Ke, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The oxidation behavior of 308L weld metal (WM) with different surface state in the simulated nominal primary water of pressurized water reactor (PWR) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyzer and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After 480 h immersion, a duplex oxide film composed of a Fe-rich outer layer (Fe3O4, Fe2O3 and a small amount of NiFe2O4, Ni(OH)2, Cr(OH)3 and (Ni, Fe)Cr2O4) and a Cr-rich inner layer (FeCr2O4 and NiCr2O4) can be formed on the 308L WM samples with different surface state. The surface state has no influence on the phase composition of the oxide films but obviously affects the thickness of the oxide films and the morphology of the oxides (number & size). With increasing the density of dislocations and subgrain boundaries in the cold-worked superficial layer, the thickness of the oxide film, the number and size of the oxides decrease.

  16. Indoor/outdoor of PM10 relationships and its water-soluble ions composition in selected primary schools in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, Noorlin; Latif, Mohd Talib

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of PM10 and water-soluble ions were carried out on indoor and outdoor PM10 (particles > 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter) aerosols sampled at selected primary schools of Kuala Lumpur (S1) and Putrajaya (S2), respectively. Samples were collected using a low volume sampler on Teflon filters. The water-soluble ions chloride (Cl-), nitrate (NO3-), sulfate (SO42-), calcium (Ca2+), magnesium (Mg2+), sodium (Na+), potassium (K+) and ammonium (NH4+) was analyzed using ion chromatography. The results showed that the indoor PM10 mass concentrations in S1 and S2 were 96.6 and 69.5 μg/m3, while the outdoor PM10 mass concentrations were 80.1 and 85.2 μg/m3, respectively. This indicated that NO3- were the most dominant ions, followed by SO42-, Ca2+, K+ and Na+, while Cl-, Mg2+ and Na+ were present at low concentrations. Pearson's correlation test applied to all the data showed high correlation between SO42- and NO3-, indicating a common anthropogenic origin. In addition, the correlations between Na+ and Ca2+ indicated crustal origins that significantly contributed to human exposure.

  17. Influence of hydraulic regimes on bacterial community structure and composition in an experimental drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Douterelo, I; Sharpe, R L; Boxall, J B

    2013-02-01

    Microbial biofilms formed on the inner-pipe surfaces of drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) can alter drinking water quality, particularly if they are mechanically detached from the pipe wall to the bulk water, such as due to changes in hydraulic conditions. Results are presented here from applying 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene to investigate the influence of different hydrological regimes on bacterial community structure and to study the potential mobilisation of material from the pipe walls to the network using a full scale, temperature-controlled experimental pipeline facility accurately representative of live DWDS. Analysis of pyrosequencing and water physico-chemical data showed that habitat type (water vs. biofilm) and hydraulic conditions influenced bacterial community structure and composition in our experimental DWDS. Bacterial community composition clearly differed between biofilms and bulk water samples. Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria were the most abundant phyla in biofilms while Alphaproteobacteria was predominant in bulk water samples. This suggests that bacteria inhabiting biofilms, predominantly species belonging to genera Pseudomonas, Zooglea and Janthinobacterium, have an enhanced ability to express extracellular polymeric substances to adhere to surfaces and to favour co-aggregation between cells than those found in the bulk water. Highest species richness and diversity were detected in 28 days old biofilms with this being accentuated at highly varied flow conditions. Flushing altered the pipe-wall bacterial community structure but did not completely remove bacteria from the pipe walls, particularly under highly varied flow conditions, suggesting that under these conditions more compact biofilms were generated. This research brings new knowledge regarding the influence of different hydraulic regimes on the composition and structure of bacterial communities within DWDS and the implication that this

  18. Tracing spatial variation of canopy water fluxes to the soil: An experimental approach to assessing heterogeneity with high resolution data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Johanna Clara; Dalla Valle, Nicolas; Wutzler, Thomas; Filipzik, Janett; Weckmüller, Josef; Schelhorn, Danny; Grauer, Christoph; Hildebrandt, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Due to the mechanisms of interception, stemflow and canopy throughfall, precipitation reaches a forest soil surface in an altered temporal and spatial distribution. The retention of water by canopies is contrasted by the formation of dynamic hotspots, which channel rain water down to the soil, e.g. canopy dripping points and stemflow. Throughfall patterns are often assumed to be the main driver for soil water content heterogeneity in forests, yet this relation has not been studied extensively and there is no prove to this theory. Because it is impossible to measure net precipitation input and soil water content in the same place at the same time, elaborate sampling is necessary for a data set allowing to address this subject. Within the last two years, in the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre AquaDiva, our group has established a new experimental site to investigate on the relationship of forest precipitation and soil water. We have developed an experimental design combining the measurement of throughfall, stemflow and soil water content on a 1 ha plot in a manner so all measurements are representative for the plot yet do not disturb each other. We adapted a statistical sampling method common for throughfall measurement to soil water content measurement comprising a high number of measurement points (throughfall: 350, soil water content: 210). To gain good insights in soil water dynamics and to capture preferential flow, soil water content was recorded in a high frequency (1* 6-1 min-1) in two soil depths. Stemflow was measured area-based on regular subplots (11% of the total plot area, 65 trees). Stand and soil surveys were made to investigate canopy impacts and identify soil-born patterns in soil water content. The plot is located in a mixed beech forest of the Hainich national park in Thuringia, Germany. Shallow loamy soils cover the lime- and marlstone bedrock. The forest plot is complemented by a smaller neighboring grassland plot acting as a

  19. Removal of TiO2 Nanoparticles During Primary Water Treatment: Role of Coagulant Type, Dose, and Nanoparticle Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Ryan J.; Keene, Valerie; Daniels, Louise; Walker, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Nanomaterials from consumer products (i.e., paints, sunscreens, toothpastes, and food grade titanium dioxide [TiO2]) have the capacity to end up in groundwater and surface water, which is of concern because the effectiveness of removing them via traditional treatment is uncertain. Although aggregation and transport of nanomaterials have been investigated, studies on their removal from suspension are limited. Hence, this study involves the development of scaled-down jar tests to determine the mechanisms involved in the removal of a model metal oxide nanoparticle (NP), TiO2, in artificial groundwater (AGW), and artificial surface water (ASW) at the primary stages of treatment: coagulation, flocculation, and sedimentation. Total removal was quantified at the end of each treatment stage by spectroscopy. Three different coagulants—iron chloride (FeCl3), iron sulfate (FeSO4), and alum [Al2(SO4)3]—destabilized the TiO2 NPs in both source waters. Overall, greater than one-log removal was seen in groundwater for all coagulants at a constant dose of 50 mg/L and across the range of particle concentrations (10, 25, 50, and 100 mg/L). In surface water, greater than 90% removal was seen with FeSO4 and Al2(SO4)3, but less than 60% when using FeCl3. Additionally, removal was most effective at higher NP concentrations (50 and 100 mg/L) in AGW when compared with ASW. Zeta potential was measured and compared between AGW and ASW with the presence of all three coagulants at the same treatment stage times as in the removal studies. These electrokinetic trends confirm that the greatest total removal of NPs occurred when the magnitude of charge was smallest (<10 mV) and conversely, higher zeta potential values (>35 mV) measured were under conditions with poor removal (<90%). These results are anticipated to be of considerable interest to practitioners for the assessment of traditional treatment processes' capacity to remove nanomaterials prior to subsequent

  20. Does Water Temperature Affect the Timing and Duration of Remigial Moult in Sea Ducks? An Experimental Approach.

    PubMed

    Viain, Anouck; Guillemette, Magella

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic birds have high cost of thermoregulation, especially during the moulting period, yet the effect of water temperature on the moulting strategy of aquatic birds has rarely been studied. Our general hypothesis is that energy savings associated with lower thermoregulation costs would be allocated to moulting processes. We predicted that aquatic birds moulting in warm water would have a higher level of body reserves, a faster growth rate of feathers, and an earlier remigial moult onset compared with birds moulting in cold water. We used the common eider (Somateria mollissima dresseri), a large sea duck, as the model species. Captive individuals were experimentally exposed to warm (18°C) and cold (8°C) water treatments during a three year period with individuals swapped between treatments. We found a similar feather growth rate for the two water temperature treatments and in contrast to our predictions, eiders exposed to warm water had a lower body mass and showed a delayed onset of remigial moult of approximately 7 days compared with those exposed to cold water. Our data indicate that body mass variations influence the timing of moult in unexpected ways and we suggest that it likely controls the occurrence of wing moult through a hormonal cascade. This study emphasizes the importance of improving our knowledge of the effects of water temperature on remigial moult of aquatic birds, to better assert the potential effects of global warming on their survival.

  1. Does Water Temperature Affect the Timing and Duration of Remigial Moult in Sea Ducks? An Experimental Approach

    PubMed Central

    Viain, Anouck; Guillemette, Magella

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic birds have high cost of thermoregulation, especially during the moulting period, yet the effect of water temperature on the moulting strategy of aquatic birds has rarely been studied. Our general hypothesis is that energy savings associated with lower thermoregulation costs would be allocated to moulting processes. We predicted that aquatic birds moulting in warm water would have a higher level of body reserves, a faster growth rate of feathers, and an earlier remigial moult onset compared with birds moulting in cold water. We used the common eider (Somateria mollissima dresseri), a large sea duck, as the model species. Captive individuals were experimentally exposed to warm (18°C) and cold (8°C) water treatments during a three year period with individuals swapped between treatments. We found a similar feather growth rate for the two water temperature treatments and in contrast to our predictions, eiders exposed to warm water had a lower body mass and showed a delayed onset of remigial moult of approximately 7 days compared with those exposed to cold water. Our data indicate that body mass variations influence the timing of moult in unexpected ways and we suggest that it likely controls the occurrence of wing moult through a hormonal cascade. This study emphasizes the importance of improving our knowledge of the effects of water temperature on remigial moult of aquatic birds, to better assert the potential effects of global warming on their survival. PMID:27177039

  2. Experimental study on improvement effect of guide wall to water flow in bend of spillway chute.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinghua; Diao, Yanfang; Zhai, Xingtao; Li, Shuning

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve water flow in a bend of a spillway chute using a guide wall, modeling experiments with or without a guide wall under conditions of three different bend axial radii, three chute bottom slopes and three flow rates were carried out in this study. Two indexes were calculated, which are the improved water surface uniformity and the reduced rate of water surface difference in concave and convex banks of the cross-section. The results show that: (1) setting a guide wall in a bend can improve water flow in the bend because it increased the water surface uniformity of the cross-section and reduced the water surface difference in the concave and convex banks; (2) the smaller the bend axial radius, the better the water surface improvement effect will be using a guide wall; (3) the steeper the bottom slope, the more cross-sections with less water surface difference; and (4) flow rates have a great influence on water surface improvement in the bend, and the guide wall can improve water flow obviously when the water depth in the starting section of the bend is lower than the height of the guide wall. This study has important implications in engineering design of guide walls.

  3. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water and glycol-water mixture in multi-port serpentine microchannel slab heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Md Mesbah-ul Ghani

    Microchannels have several advantages over traditional large tubes. Heat transfer using microchannels recently have attracted significant research and industrial design interests. Open literatures leave with question on the applicability of classical macroscale theory in microchannels. Better understanding of heat transfer in various microchannel geometries and building experimental database are continuously urged. The purpose of this study is to contribute the findings and data to this emerging area through carefully designed and well controlled experimental works. The commercially important glycol-water mixture heat transfer fluid and multiport slab serpentine heat exchangers are encountered in heating and cooling areas, e.g. in automotive, aircraft, and HVAC industries. For a given heat duty, the large diameter tubes experience turbulent flow whereas the narrow channels face laminar flow and often developing flow. Study of low Reynolds number developing glycol-water mixture laminar flow in serpentine microchannel heat exchanger with parallel multi-port slab is not available in the open literature. Current research therefore experimentally investigates glycol-water mixture and water in simultaneously developing laminar flows. Three multiport microchannel heat exchangers; straight and serpentine slabs, are used for each fluid. Friction factors of glycol-water mixture and water flows in straight slabs are higher than conventional fully developed laminar flow. If a comprehensive pressure balance is introduced, the results are well compared with conventional Poiseuille theory. Similar results are found in serpentine slab. The pressure drop for the straight core is the highest, manifolds are the intermediate, and serpentine is the least; which are beneficial for heat exchangers. The heat transfer results in serpentine slab for glycol-water mixture and water are higher and could not be compared with conventional fully developed and developing flow correlations. New

  4. Experimental investigation on the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system on water-heating mode

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Guiyin; Hu, Hainan; Liu, Xu

    2010-09-15

    An experimental study on operation performance of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was conducted in this paper. The experimental system of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure, the condensation pressure and the coefficient of performance (COP) of heat pump air-conditioning system, the water temperature and receiving heat capacity in water heater, the photovoltaic (PV) module temperature and the photovoltaic efficiency were investigated. The experimental results show that the mean photovoltaic efficiency of photovoltaic-thermal (PV/T) solar heat pump air-conditioning system reaches 10.4%, and can improve 23.8% in comparison with that of the conventional photovoltaic module, the mean COP of heat pump air-conditioning system may attain 2.88 and the water temperature in water heater can increase to 42 C. These results indicate that the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system has better performances and can stably work. (author)

  5. Experimental test of a hot water storage system including a macro-encapsulated phase change material (PCM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongibello, L.; Atrigna, M.; Bianco, N.; Di Somma, M.; Graditi, G.; Risi, N.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal energy storage systems (TESs) are of fundamental importance for many energetic systems, essentially because they permit a certain degree of decoupling between the heat or cold production and the use of the heat or cold produced. In the last years, many works have analysed the addition of a PCM inside a hot water storage tank, as it can allow a reduction of the size of the storage tank due to the possibility of storing thermal energy as latent heat, and as a consequence its cost and encumbrance. The present work focuses on experimental tests realized by means of an indoor facility in order to analyse the dynamic behaviour of a hot water storage tank including PCM modules during a charging phase. A commercial bio-based PCM has been used for the purpose, with a melting temperature of 58°C. The experimental results relative to the hot water tank including the PCM modules are presented in terms of temporal evolution of the axial temperature profile, heat transfer and stored energy, and are compared with the ones obtained by using only water as energy storage material. Interesting insights, relative to the estimation of the percentage of melted PCM at the end of the experimental test, are presented and discussed.

  6. Modeling of experimental treatment of acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-containing water using corona discharge technique.

    PubMed

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Sano, Noriaki; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2006-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-contaminated water were experimentally treated using corona discharge reactions and gas absorption in a single water-film column. Mathematical modeling of the combined treatment was developed in this work. Efficient removal of the gaseous acetaldehyde was achieved while the corona discharge reactions produced short-lived species such as O and O- as well as ozone. Direct contact of the radicals and ions with water was known to produce aqueous OH radical, which contributes to the decomposition of organic contaminants: phenol, absorbed acetaldehyde, and intermediate byproducts in the water. The influence of initial phenol concentration ranging from 15 to 50 mg L(-1) and that of influent acetaldehyde ranging from 0 to 200 ppm were experimentally investigated and used to build the math model. The maximum energetic efficiency of TOC, phenol, and acetaldehyde were obtained at 25.6 x 10(-9) mol carbon J(-1), 25.0 x 10(-9) mol phenol J(-1), and 2.0 x 10(-9) mol acetaldehyde J(-1), respectively. The predictions for the decomposition of acetaldehyde, phenol, and their intermediates were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Experimental Water Droplet Impingement Data on Airfoils, Simulated Ice Shapes, an Engine Inlet and a Finite Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadakis, M.; Breer, M.; Craig, N.; Liu, X.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental method has been developed to determine the water droplet impingement characteristics on two- and three-dimensional aircraft surfaces. The experimental water droplet impingement data are used to validate particle trajectory analysis codes that are used in aircraft icing analyses and engine inlet particle separator analyses. The aircraft surface is covered with thin strips of blotter paper in areas of interest. The surface is then exposed to an airstream that contains a dyed-water spray cloud. The water droplet impingement data are extracted from the dyed blotter paper strips by measuring the optical reflectance of each strip with an automated reflectometer. Experimental impingement efficiency data represented for a NLF (1)-0414 airfoil, a swept MS (1)-0317 airfoil, a Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model, two simulated ice shapes and a swept NACA 0012 wingtip. Analytical impingement efficiency data are also presented for the NLF (1)-0414 airfoil and the Boeing 737-300 engine inlet model.

  8. Water adsorption on charcoal: New approach in experimental studies and data representation

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.; Walker, R.

    1991-08-01

    The experimental apparatus was built to study the H{sub 2}O adsorption on charcoal at very low concentrations and collect the data in the form of isosteres. Experimental method is discussed and the global three-dimensional fit is constructed to predict the post-regeneration conditions of charcoal absorbers. 11 refs.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON WATER BALANCE IN A NEGATIVE PRESSURE DIFFERENCE IRRIGATION SYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniruzzaman, S. M.; Fukuhara, Teruyuki; Terasaki, Hiroaki

    Negative pressure difference irrigation (NPDI) is considered to be an attractive mode of irrigation because water use efficiency in this case is higher than that in conventional irrigation methods such as basin irrigation, furrow irrigation and sprinkler irrigation. In order to investigate the water balance in a NPDI system, experiments involving the use of a soil column, porous pipe and water reservoir were carried out in a temperature and humidity controlled room. The evaporation (Meva), supplied water (Msup), soil water storage (Msoil), wetted soil surface area and configuration of the wetted soil around the porous pipe were determined for three different negative pressures. Empirical equations were proposed for the calculation of Meva and Msoil. The proposed simple model could well reproduce the temporal variations in Meva and Msoil. With a decrease in the negative pressure, the water use efficiency increased and was in the range of 0.92 to 0.97.

  10. Extraction and Capture of Water from Martian Regolith Experimental Proof-of-Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linne, Diane L.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.; Bauman, Steven W.; Johnson, Kyle A.

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept for extraction of water from the Mars soil in a real-time, open-air process was demonstrated in a Mars environment chamber. The concept breadboard uses radiative heating to bake off water from exposed soil contained in a bin. An enclosure, intended to mimic the bottom of a rover, covers the bin. A fan continuously blows the Mars atmospheric gases through the enclosure to collect the evolved water while a tiller was used to churn up moist subsurface soil. These initial tests verified concept feasibility. The sweep gas generated by commercially available muffin fans at 7 Torr was sufficient to transfer water vapor into a condenser flow loop. The radiative heating, while non-optimized, heated the soil surface to 60 C to generate water vapor. A rototiller working through the soil bin brought sufficient amounts of new moist soil to the heated surface to show an increase in rate of water extraction.

  11. Vegetation Responses to Future Climates: Global Variability in Water Use Efficiency and Primary Productivity in a CMIP5 Multimodel Ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardes, S.; Campbell, P. K. E.; Zhang, Q.; Middleton, E.

    2015-12-01

    Climate projections for the 21st century predict substantial changes in temperature and in the quantity and spatiotemporal distribution of precipitation for large regions on the planet. Reductions in water availability resulting from decreased precipitation and increased water demand by the atmosphere can negatively affect plant metabolism, reduce carbon uptake, and limit services of entire ecosystems. Future increases in temperature and in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations may help offset some of these impacts on vegetation. In particular, plants may adjust their water use efficiency (WUE, plant production per water loss by evapotranspiration) in response to changing environmental conditions. We assessed an ensemble of thirteen models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) and analyzed future changes in climate variables, carbon mass in vegetation, vegetation primary productivity and WUE. The analysis considered two representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) for the period 2006-2099 and compared projections to historical values (1850-2005). Results include differences between historical and projected conditions for global, regional and latitudinal distributions of model outputs, for both RCPs. We observed significant intermodel variability when representing changes in WUE over the century, including high model sensitivity to different greenhouse concentration scenarios. Model agreement varied with RCP (higher agreement for RCP4.5), as well as regionally (higher agreement in Southeast Asia, lower agreement in arid areas, including the Sahara and Western Australia). The majority of models point to an increase in GPP and WUE for most of the planet under both concentration pathways, with changes ranging from zero to 100% of their historical values. These increases were observed to be consistently higher for RCP8.5. In addition, higher increases in GPP and WUE are predicted to occur over higher latitudes in the northern

  12. [Experimental research on combined water and air backwashing reactor technology for biological activated carbon].

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Xue-Min; Zhao, Yan-Ling

    2012-01-01

    To proper control the backwashing process of biological activated carbon (BAC) reactor and improve the overall operation performance, the evaluative indexes such as backwashing wastewater turbidity, organic pollutants removal rate of pre and post-backwashing, and the variation of biomass and biological activity in carbon column are used to compare and analyze the effect of three different combined water and air backwashing methods on the operation of BAC reactor. The result shows that intermittent combined water and air backwashing method is most suitable to BAC reactor. The biological activaty obviously increases by 62.5% after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process. While, the biological activaty using the backwashing method of air plus water and the backwashing method of water and air compounded plus water washing increases by 55.6%, 38.5%, respectively. After backwashing 308h, the reactor recovered to its normal function after intermittent combined water and air backwashing process with the removal rate of UV254 reaching to 60.0%. The fulvic-like fluorescence peak of backwashing water are very weak, and are characterized by low-excitation wavelength tryptophan like (peak S) and high excitation wavelength of tryptophan (peak T), which are caused by the microbial debris washed down. The three-dimensional fluorescence spectra also show that microbial fragments are easy to be washed clean with intermittent combined water and air backwashing.

  13. Isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from Food and Water: Official and Experimental Protocols.

    PubMed

    Azizoglu, Reha O; Gorski, Lisa; Kathariou, Sophia

    2014-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is frequently encountered in foods but often at low concentrations and typically in the presence of other microbiota, including nonpathogenic Listeria spp. The potential of L. monocytogenes to cause severe human disease mandates sensitive, accurate, and rapid detection in foods. Isolation of L. monocytogenes from foods is critical, not only for routine surveillance, but also for epidemiologic investigations. Isolation of the pathogen from water (especially surface water used for irrigation) is similarly important, as produce has been implicated in listeriosis outbreaks and contaminated water can be involved in contamination of produce. This unit provides basic protocols for the isolation of L. monocytogenes from foods and water.

  14. Gravel admix, vegetation, and soil water interactions in protective barriers: Experimental design, construction, and initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, W.J.

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the interactive effects of gravel admix and greater precipitation on soil water storage and plant abundance. The study is one of many tasks in the Protective Barrier Development Program for the disposal of Hanford defense waste. A factorial field-plot experiment was set up at the site selected as the borrow area for barrier topsoil. Gravel admix, vegetation, and enhanced precipitation treatments were randomly assigned to the plots using a split-split plot design structure. Changes in soil water storage and plant cover were monitored using neutron probe and point intercept methods, respectively. The first-year results suggest that water extraction by plants will offset gravel-caused increases in soil water storage. Near-surface soil water contents were much lower in graveled plots with plants than in nongraveled plots without plants. Large inherent variability in deep soil water storage masked any effects gravel may have had on water content below the root zone. In the future, this source of variation will be removed by differencing monthly data series and testing for changes in soil water storage. Tests of the effects of greater precipitation on soil water storage were inconclusive. A telling test will be possible in the spring of 1988, following the first wet season during which normal precipitation is doubled. 26 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  15. Inorganic ground-water chemistry at an experimental New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in situ gasification site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Branam, T.D.; Comer, J.B.; Shaffer, N.R.; Ennis, M.V.; Carpenter, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental in situ gasification of New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) has been conducted in Clark County. Analyses of ground water sampled from a production well and nine nearby monitoring wells 3 months after a brief in situ gasification period revealed changes in water chemistry associated with the gasification procedure. Dissolved iron, calcium and sulphate in ground water from the production well and wells as much as 2 m away were significantly higher than in ground water from wells over 9 m away. Dissolved components in the more distant wells are in the range of those in regional ground water. Thermal decomposition of pyrite during the gasification process generated the elevated levels of iron and sulphate in solution. High concentrations of calcium indicate buffering by dissolution of carbonate minerals. While iron quickly precipitates, calcium and sulphate remain in the ground water. Trends in the concentration of sulphate show that altered ground water migrated mostly in a south-westerly direction from the production well along natural joints in the New Albany Shale. ?? 1991.

  16. An experimental study on isotope fractionation in a mesoporous silica-water system with implications for vadose-zone hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying; Horita, Juske

    2016-07-01

    Soil water dynamics within a thick vadose (unsaturated) zone is a key component in the hydrologic cycle in arid regions. In isotopic studies of soil water, the isotopic composition of adsorbed/pore-condensed water within soils has been assumed to be identical to that of bulk liquid water. To test this critical assumption, we have conducted laboratory experiments on equilibrium isotope fractionation between adsorbed/condensed water in mesoporous silica (average pore diameter 15 nm) and the vapor at relative pressures p/po = 0.3-1.0 along the adsorption-desorption isotherm at 30 °C. The isotope fractionation factors between condensed water in the silica pores and the vapor, α(2H) and α(18O), are smaller than those between liquid and vapor of bulk water (1.074 and 1.0088, respectively, at 30 °C). The α(2H) and α(18O) values progressively decrease from 1.064 and 1.0083 at p/po = 1 to 1.024 and 1.0044 at p/po = 0.27 for hydrogen and oxygen isotopes, respectively, establishing trends very similar to the isotherm curves. Empirical formulas relating α(2H) and α(18O) to the proportions of filled pores (f) are developed. Our experimental results challenge the long-held assumption that the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors for the soil water-vapor are identical to those of liquid water-vapor system with potential implications for arid-zone and global water cycles, including paleoclimate proxies in arid regions.

  17. Leaf water deuterium enrichment shapes leaf wax n-alkane δD values of angiosperm plants I: Experimental evidence and mechanistic insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmen, Ansgar; Schefuß, Enno; Sachse, Dirk

    2013-06-01

    Leaf wax n-alkanes of terrestrial plants are long-chain hydrocarbons that can persist in sedimentary records over geologic timescales. Since meteoric water is the primary source of hydrogen used in leaf wax synthesis, the hydrogen isotope composition (δD value) of these biomarkers contains information on hydrological processes. Consequently, leaf wax n-alkane δD values have been advocated as powerful tools for paleohydrological research. The exact kind of hydrological information that is recorded in leaf wax n-alkanes remains, however, unclear because critical processes that determine their δD values have not yet been resolved. In particular the effects of evaporative deuterium (D)-enrichment of leaf water on the δD values of leaf wax n-alkanes have not yet been directly assessed and quantified. Here we present the results of a study where we experimentally tested if and by what magnitude evaporative D-enrichment of leaf water affects the δD of leaf wax n-alkanes in angiosperm C3 and C4 plants. Our study revealed that n-alkane δD values of all plants that we investigated were affected by evaporative D-enrichment of leaf water. For dicotyledonous plants we found that the full extent of leaf water evaporative D-enrichment is recorded in leaf wax n-alkane δD values. For monocotyledonous plants we found that between 18% and 68% of the D-enrichment in leaf water was recorded in the δD values of their n-alkanes. We hypothesize that the different magnitudes by which evaporative D-enrichment of leaf water affects the δD values of leaf wax n-alkanes in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants is the result of differences in leaf growth and development between these plant groups. Our finding that the evaporative D-enrichment of leaf water affects the δD values of leaf wax n-alkanes in monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants - albeit at different magnitudes - has important implications for the interpretation of leaf wax n-alkane δD values from

  18. Studies of air showers produced by primaries 10(16) eV using a combined scintillation and water-Cerenkov array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooke, G.; Perrett, J. C.; Watson, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    An array of 8 x 1.0 sq m plastic scintillation counters and 13 water-Cerenkov detectors (1 to 13.5 sq m) were operated at the center of the Haverah Park array to study some features of air showers produced by 10(16) eV primaries. Measurements of the scintillator lateral distribution function, the water-Cerenkov lateral distribution function, and of the distance dependence of the Cerenkov/scintillator ratio are described.

  19. Thermally activated dislocation creep model for primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M., Jr

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing awareness that awareness that environmentally assisted creep plays an important role in integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of NiCrFe alloys in the primary coolant water environment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The expected creep mechanism is the thermally activated glide of dislocations. This mode of deformation is favored by the relatively low temperature of PWR operation combined with the large residual stresses that are most often identified as responsible for the SCC failure of plant components. Stress corrosion crack growth rate (CGR) equations that properly reflect the influence of this mechanism of crack tip deformation are required for accurate component life predictions. A phenomenological IGSCC-CGR model, which is based on an apriori assumption that the IGSCC-CGR is controlled by a low temperature dislocation creep mechanism, is developed in this report. Obstacles to dislocation creep include solute atoms such as carbon, which increase the lattice friction force, and forest dislocations, which can be introduced by cold prestrain. Dislocation creep also may be environmentally assisted due to hydrogen absorption at the crack tip. The IGSCC-CGR model developed here is based on an assumption that crack growth occurs by repeated fracture events occurring within an advancing crack-tip creep-fracture zone. Thermal activation parameters for stress corrosion cracking are obtained by fitting the CGR model to IGSCC-CGR data obtained on NiCrFe alloys, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 600. These IGSCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to activation parameters obtained from creep and stress relaxation tests. Recently reported CGR data, which exhibit an activation energy that depends on yield stress and the applied stress intensity factor, are used to benchmark the model. Finally, the effects of matrix carbon concentration, grain boundary carbides and absorbed hydrogen concentration are discussed within context of the model.

  20. Modeling of the shrinking process of a bubble induced by laser metal ablation in water and experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabir-Moghaddam, Navid; Liu, Ze; Wu, Benxin

    2017-01-01

    Laser ablation of a solid target immersed in liquid (such as water) has many important applications such as laser synthesis of nanoparticles, laser micromachining in water, and laser shock peening. Laser ablation of a solid target in water involves complicated physical processes. One important process often involved is the generation and evolution of a bubble in water and attached to the target surface, which may have significant effects on the target and the ambient water, and hence may greatly affect the relevant practical applications. Some experimental studies were reported in the literature on bubble evolutions induced by laser ablation of a solid target in water. However, the reported previous relevant physics-based modeling work is not sufficient. A physics-based model may help improve the process fundamental understanding and generate valuable information to related applications. In this paper, physics-based modeling work has been performed on the shrinking process of a bubble induced by laser metal ablation in water, together with time-resolved shadowgraph imaging experiments to verify the model. The model-predicted bubble evolution agrees reasonably well with the experimental measurement shown in the paper. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that near the bubble collapse moment (i.e., the moment when the bubble shrinks to a minimum size): (1) the bubble shrinks very fast, and the peak fluid velocity magnitude occurs inside the bubble and can exceed ˜550 m/s; (2) the temperature inside the bubble increases very quickly and approaches ˜2000 K; and (3) the pressure inside the bubble becomes very high, and can reach a peak magnitude of ˜380 MPa at the collapse moment at the bubble center. During the shrinking process, a high-pressure region outside and near the bubble wall is generated near the collapse moment, but the temperature of the region outside the bubble mostly remains low.

  1. Approximate water and chemical budgets for an experimental in-pond raceway system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing interest in intensive production of Ictalurid catfish in the United States and a better understanding of water quality dynamics in intensive culture is needed. Budgets for water, nitrogen, phosphorus, organic carbon (OC), and dissolved oxygen (DO) were estimated over a productio...

  2. Controlling Disinfection Residual Losses in Drinking Water Distribution Systems: Results from Experimental Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is generally accepted that water quality can deteriorate in a distribution system through reactions in the bulk phase and/or at the pipe wall. These reactions may be physical, chemical and/or microbiological in nature. Perhaps one of the most serious aspects of water quality...

  3. Controlling Disinfection Residual Losses in Drinking Water Distribution Systems: Results from Experimental Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has become generally accepted that water quality can deteriorate in a distribution system through reactions in the bulk phase and/or at the pipe wall. These reactions may be physical, chemical and/or microbiological in nature. Perhaps one of the most serious aspects of water...

  4. Plasticity in leaf-level water relations of tropical rainforest trees in response to experimental drought.

    PubMed

    Binks, Oliver; Meir, Patrick; Rowland, Lucy; da Costa, Antonio Carlos Lola; Vasconcelos, Steel Silva; de Oliveira, Alex Antonio Ribeiro; Ferreira, Leandro; Christoffersen, Bradley; Nardini, Andrea; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The tropics are predicted to become warmer and drier, and understanding the sensitivity of tree species to drought is important for characterizing the risk to forests of climate change. This study makes use of a long-term drought experiment in the Amazon rainforest to evaluate the role of leaf-level water relations, leaf anatomy and their plasticity in response to drought in six tree genera. The variables (osmotic potential at full turgor, turgor loss point, capacitance, elastic modulus, relative water content and saturated water content) were compared between seasons and between plots (control and through-fall exclusion) enabling a comparison between short- and long-term plasticity in traits. Leaf anatomical traits were correlated with water relation parameters to determine whether water relations differed among tissues. The key findings were: osmotic adjustment occurred in response to the long-term drought treatment; species resistant to drought stress showed less osmotic adjustment than drought-sensitive species; and water relation traits were correlated with tissue properties, especially the thickness of the abaxial epidermis and the spongy mesophyll. These findings demonstrate that cell-level water relation traits can acclimate to long-term water stress, and highlight the limitations of extrapolating the results of short-term studies to temporal scales associated with climate change.

  5. Silica-rich lavas in the oceanic crust: experimental evidence for fractional crystallization under low water activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, Martin; Koepke, Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally investigated phase relations and phase compositions as well as the influence of water activity ( aH2O) and redox conditions on the equilibrium crystallization path within an oceanic dacitic potassium-depleted system at shallow pressure (200 MPa). Moreover, we measured the partitioning of trace elements between melt and plagioclase via secondary ion mass spectrometry for a highly evolved experiment (SiO2 = 74.6 wt%). As starting material, we used a dacitic glass dredged at the Pacific-Antarctic Rise. Phase assemblages in natural high-silica systems reported from different locations of fast-spreading oceanic crust could be experimentally reproduced only in a relatively small range of temperature and melt-water content ( T ~950 °C; melt H2O < 1.5 wt%) at redox conditions slightly below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer. The relatively low water content is remarkable, because distinct hydrothermal influence is generally regarded as key for producing silica-rich rocks in an oceanic environment. However, our conclusion is also supported by mineral and melt chemistry of natural evolved rocks; these rocks are only congruent to the composition of those experimental phases that are produced under low aH2O. Low FeO contents under water-saturated conditions and the characteristic enrichment of Al2O3 in high aH2O experiments, in particular, contradict natural observations, while experiments with low aH2O match the natural trend. Moreover, the observation that highly evolved experimental melts remain H2O-poor while they are relatively enriched in chlorine implies a decoupling between these two volatiles during crustal contamination.

  6. The fast-spectrum transmutation experimental facility FASTEF: Main design achievements (Part 1: Core and primary system) within the FP7-CDT collaborative project of the European Commission

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruyn, D.; Fernandez, R.; Mansani, L.; Woaye-Hune, A.; Sarotto, M.; Bubelis, E.

    2012-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is the flexible experimental accelerator-driven system (ADS) in development at SCK CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. SCK CEN in association with 17 European partners from industry, research centres and academia, responded to the FP7 (Seventh Framework Programme) call from the European Commission to establish a Central Design Team (CDT) for the design of a Fast Spectrum Transmutation Experimental Facility (FASTEF) able to demonstrate efficient transmutation and associated technology through a system working in subcritical and/or critical mode. The project has started on April 01, 2009 for a period of three years. In this paper, we present the latest configuration of the reactor core and primary system. The FASTEF facility has evolved quite a lot since the intermediate reporting done at the ICAPP'10 and ICAPP'11 conferences 1 2. If it remains a small-scale facility, the core power amounts now up to 100 MWth in critical mode. In a companion paper 3, we present the concept of the reactor building and the plant layout. (authors)

  7. Thermodynamic and Experimental Study of the Energetic Cost Involved in the Capture of Carbon Dioxide by Aqueous Mixtures of Commonly Used Primary and Tertiary Amines.

    PubMed

    Arcis, Hugues; Coulier, Yohann; Coxam, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-05

    The capture of carbon dioxide with chemical solvents is one solution to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from anthropogenic sources and thus tackle climate change. Recent research has been focused on optimizing new kinds of advanced absorbents including aqueous amine blends, but critical downsides such as the large energetic cost involved with the industrial process remain. To address this issue, a better understanding of the energetic interactions existing in solution is necessary. In this paper, we report direct experimental measurements of the energy cost involved in the solvation of CO2 in two aqueous amine blends at different temperatures. The chemical solvents were designed as aqueous mixtures of commonly used primary and tertiary amines to study the influence of the different chemical properties inferred by the amine class. We have also applied a thermodynamic model to represent the energetic effects that take place in solution during CO2 dissolution in these mixtures, where all parameters were taken from previous studies focused on single amine absorbents. The noteworthy agreement observed with the reported experimental heats of absorption and with literature vapor liquid equilibrium properties confirmed the relevance of the underlying molecular mechanisms considered in our model, and suggest that this model would prove useful to investigate CO2 dissolution in other amine blends.

  8. Water/rock interactions in experimentally simulated dirty snowball and dirty iceball cometary nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Allton, Judith H.

    1991-01-01

    In the dirty snowball model for cometary nuclei, comet-nucleus materials are regarded as mixtures of volatile ices and relatively non-volatile minerals or chemical compounds. Carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are regarded as useful analogs for the rocky component. To help elucidate the possible physical geochemistry of cometary nuclei, preliminary results are reported of calorimetric experiments with two-component systems involving carbonaceous chondrites and water ice. Based on collective knowledge of the physics of water ice, three general types of interactions can be expected between water and minerals at sub-freezing temperatures: (1) heterogeneous nucleation of ice by insoluble minerals; (2) adsorption of water vapor by hygroscopic phases; and (3) freezing- and melting-point depression of liquid water sustained by soluble minerals. The relative and absolute magnitude of all three effects are expected to vary with mineral composition.

  9. Ionized alkaline water: new strategy for management of metabolic acidosis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Abol-Enein, Hassan; Gheith, Osama A; Barakat, Nashwa; Nour, Eman; Sharaf, Abd-Elhameed

    2009-06-01

    Metabolic acidosis can occur as a result of either the accumulation of endogenous acids or loss of bicarbonate from the gastrointestinal tract or the kidney, which represent common causes of metabolic acidosis. The appropriate treatment of acute metabolic acidosis has been very controversial. Ionized alkaline water was not evaluated in such groups of patients in spite of its safety and reported benefits. So, we aimed to assess its efficacy in the management of metabolic acidosis in animal models. Two models of metabolic acidosis were created in dogs and rats. The first model of renal failure was induced by ligation of both ureters; and the second model was induced by urinary diversion to gut (gastrointestinal bicarbonate loss model). Both models were subjected to ionized alkaline water (orally and by hemodialysis). Dogs with renal failure were assigned to two groups according to the type of dialysate utilized during hemodialysis sessions, the first was utilizing alkaline water and the second was utilizing conventional water. Another two groups of animals with urinary diversion were arranged to receive oral alkaline water and tap water. In renal failure animal models, acid-base parameters improved significantly after hemodialysis with ionized alkaline water compared with the conventional water treated with reverse osmosis (RO). Similar results were observed in urinary diversion models as there was significant improvement of both the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and serum bicarbonate (P = 0.007 and 0.001 respectively) after utilizing alkaline water orally. Alkaline ionized water can be considered as a major safe strategy in the management of metabolic acidosis secondary to renal failure or dialysis or urinary diversion. Human studies are indicated in the near future to confirm this issue in humans.

  10. Direct Measurements of Quantum Kinetic Energy Tensor in Stable and Metastable Water near the Triple Point: An Experimental Benchmark.

    PubMed

    Andreani, Carla; Romanelli, Giovanni; Senesi, Roberto

    2016-06-16

    This study presents the first direct and quantitative measurement of the nuclear momentum distribution anisotropy and the quantum kinetic energy tensor in stable and metastable (supercooled) water near its triple point, using deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS). From the experimental spectra, accurate line shapes of the hydrogen momentum distributions are derived using an anisotropic Gaussian and a model-independent framework. The experimental results, benchmarked with those obtained for the solid phase, provide the state of the art directional values of the hydrogen mean kinetic energy in metastable water. The determinations of the direction kinetic energies in the supercooled phase, provide accurate and quantitative measurements of these dynamical observables in metastable and stable phases, that is, key insight in the physical mechanisms of the hydrogen quantum state in both disordered and polycrystalline systems. The remarkable findings of this study establish novel insight into further expand the capacity and accuracy of DINS investigations of the nuclear quantum effects in water and represent reference experimental values for theoretical investigations.

  11. Synthesis of a highly water-soluble acacetin prodrug for treating experimental atrial fibrillation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Ya-Jing; Yang, Lei; Zhou, Mei; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Sun, Hai-Ying; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-05-10