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Sample records for primate cerebellar granule

  1. Primate cerebellar granule cells exhibit a tonic GABAAR conductance that is not affected by alcohol: a possible cellular substrate of the low level of response phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Claudia; Kolotushkina, Olena; Kaplan, Joshua S.; Welsh, John; Daunais, James B.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Rossi, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In many rodent brain regions, alcohol increases vesicular release of GABA, resulting in an increase in the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) and the magnitude of tonic GABAA receptor (GABAAR) currents. A neglected issue in translating the rodent literature to humans is the possibility that phylogenetic differences alter the actions of alcohol. To address this issue we made voltage-clamp recordings from granule cells (GCs) in cerebellar slices from the non-human primate (NHP), Macaca fascicularis. We found that similar to Sprague Dawley rats (SDRs), NHP GCs exhibit a tonic conductance generated by α6δ subunit containing GABAARs, as evidenced by its blockade by the broad spectrum GABAAR antagonist, GABAzine (10 μM), inhibition by α6 selective antagonist, furosemide (100 μM), and enhancement by THDOC (10–20 nM) and THIP (500 nM). In contrast to SDR GCs, in most NHP GCs (~60%), application of EtOH (25–105 mM) did not increase sIPSC frequency or the tonic GABAAR current. In a minority of cells (~40%), EtOH did increase sIPSC frequency and the tonic current. The relative lack of response to EtOH was associated with reduced expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), which we recently reported mediates EtOH-induced enhancement of vesicular GABA release in rats. The EtOH-induced increase in tonic GABAAR current was significantly smaller in NHPs than in SDRs, presumably due to less GABA release, because there were no obvious differences in the density of GABAARs or GABA transporters between SDR and NHP GCs. Thus, EtOH does not directly modulate α6δ subunit GABAARs in NHPs. Instead, EtOH enhanced GABAergic transmission is mediated by enhanced GABA release. Further, SDR GC responses to alcohol are only representative of a subpopulation of NHP GCs. This suggests that the impact of EtOH on NHP cerebellar physiology will be reduced compared to SDRs, and will likely have different computational and behavioral consequences. PMID

  2. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L.; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C.; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A.; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D.; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R.; Reep, Roger L.; Hof, Patrick R.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Manger, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  3. Comparative neuronal morphology of the cerebellar cortex in afrotherians, carnivores, cetartiodactyls, and primates.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bob; Johnson, Nicholas L; Wahl, Devin; Schall, Matthew; Maseko, Busisiwe C; Lewandowski, Albert; Raghanti, Mary A; Wicinski, Bridget; Butti, Camilla; Hopkins, William D; Bertelsen, Mads F; Walsh, Timothy; Roberts, John R; Reep, Roger L; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C; Manger, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    Although the basic morphological characteristics of neurons in the cerebellar cortex have been documented in several species, virtually nothing is known about the quantitative morphological characteristics of these neurons across different taxa. To that end, the present study investigated cerebellar neuronal morphology among eight different, large-brained mammalian species comprising a broad phylogenetic range: afrotherians (African elephant, Florida manatee), carnivores (Siberian tiger, clouded leopard), cetartiodactyls (humpback whale, giraffe) and primates (human, common chimpanzee). Specifically, several neuron types (e.g., stellate, basket, Lugaro, Golgi, and granule neurons; N = 317) of the cerebellar cortex were stained with a modified rapid Golgi technique and quantified on a computer-assisted microscopy system. There was a 64-fold variation in brain mass across species in our sample (from clouded leopard to the elephant) and a 103-fold variation in cerebellar volume. Most dendritic measures tended to increase with cerebellar volume. The cerebellar cortex in these species exhibited the trilaminate pattern common to all mammals. Morphologically, neuron types in the cerebellar cortex were generally consistent with those described in primates (Fox et al., 1967) and rodents (Palay and Chan-Palay, 1974), although there was substantial quantitative variation across species. In particular, Lugaro neurons in the elephant appeared to be disproportionately larger than those in other species. To explore potential quantitative differences in dendritic measures across species, MARSplines analyses were used to evaluate whether species could be differentiated from each other based on dendritic characteristics alone. Results of these analyses indicated that there were significant differences among all species in dendritic measures. PMID:24795574

  4. Synaptic representation of locomotion in single cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Kate; Mathy, Alexandre; Duguid, Ian; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in the regulation of locomotion, but how movement is represented at the synaptic level is not known. Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells. The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement. Surprisingly, the entire step sequence can be predicted from input EPSCs and output spikes of a single granule cell, suggesting that a robust gait code is present already at the cerebellar input layer and transmitted via the granule cell pathway to downstream Purkinje cells. Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.001 PMID:26083712

  5. L1 modulates PKD1 phosphorylation in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang-xi; Hu, Cheng-liang; Liao, Yong-hong; Zhao, Wei-jiang

    2015-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 (L1CAM) is crucial for the development of the nervous system, with an essential role in regulating multiple cellular activities. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) serves as a key kinase given its diverse array of functions within the cell. Here, we investigated various aspects of the functional relationship between L1 and phosphorylated PKD1 (pPKD1) in cerebellar granule neurons. To study the relationship between L1 and PKD1 phosphorylation, human cerebellar tissue microarrays were subject to immunofluorescence staining. We observed a positive correlation between L1 protein levels and PKD1 phosphorylation. In addition, L1 also co-localized with pPKD1. To analyze the regulatory role of L1 on PKD1 phosphorylation, primary mouse cerebellar granule neurons were treated with various concentrations of rL1 for 48 h. Using Western blot, we revealed that L1 significantly increased PKD1 phosphorylation compared with vehicle control, with the maximal effect observed at 5 nM. ERK1/2 phosphorylation was significantly increased by 2.5 nM and 10nM L1, with no apparent change in SRC phosphorylation. However, SRC expression was markedly reduced by 10nM rL1. AKT1 expression and phosphorylation levels were significantly increased by rL1, with the maximal effect observed at 2.5 and 5 nM, respectively. Our combined data revealed a positive relationship between L1 and pPKD1 in both cultured cerebellar neurons and human cerebellar tissue, suggesting that L1 functions in the modulation of PKD1 phosphorylation. PMID:25445362

  6. Cerebellar granule cell migration and the effects of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yulan; Kumada, Tatsuro; Cameron, D Bryant; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    In the developing brain the majority of neurons migrate from their birthplace to their final destination. This active movement is essential for the formation of cortical layers and nuclei. The impairment of migration does not affect the viability of neurons but often results in abnormal differentiation. The proper migration of neurons requires the orchestrated activities of multiple cellular and molecular events, such as pathway selection, the activation of specific receptors and channels, and the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeletal components. The migration of neurons is very vulnerable to exposure to environmental toxins, such as alcohol. In this article, we will focus on recent developments in the migration of cerebellar granule cells. First, we will describe when, where and how granule cells migrate through different cortical layers to reach their final destination. Second, we will present how internal programs control the sequential changes in granule cell migration. Third, we will review the roles of external guidance cues and transmembrane signals in granule cell migration. Finally, we will reveal mechanisms by which alcohol exposure impairs granule cell migration. PMID:18075250

  7. AMPA receptors in cerebellar granule cells during development in culture.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Sluiter, A A; Balázs, R

    1995-06-27

    The survival and maturation of differentiating cerebellar granule cells in culture are known to be promoted by excitatory amino acids (EAAs) which, however, compromise the survival of mature cells. In contrast to the trophic effect, the toxic effect of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasolepropiate (AMPA) could only be elicited when the desensitisation of AMPA receptors was blocked, cyclothiazide being used in this study. Nevertheless, even under these conditions, toxicity induced by AMPA in contrast to kainate was, at 9 DIV, only half of the maximal toxicity attained by 13-16 DIV. Since cellular responses to AMPA depend so dramatically on the maturational stage of granule cells, we examined here whether this characteristic is related to developmental changes in AMPA receptor properties, which may result from changes in the subunit composition of the receptor. In contrast to toxicity, AMPA-induced 45Ca2+ influx (determined in the presence of cyclothiazide and the NMDA receptor blocker MK-801) reached a maximum already at 9 DIV. This also applied to a fraction of the 45Ca2+ uptake which persisted either after Cd2+ application or under Na(+)-free conditions and therefore presumably was mediated directly through AMPA receptor channels. Quantitative analysis of Western blots showed that the amounts of GluR4 and to a lesser extent GluR2/3/4c are substantial already at 2 DIV, remaining fairly constant until 9 DIV, followed by an increase by 16 DIV. However GluR1, which is hardly detectable in granule cells in vivo and is also low early in vitro, increased almost linearly with cultivation time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. LKB1 Regulates Cerebellar Development by Controlling Sonic Hedgehog-mediated Granule Cell Precursor Proliferation and Granule Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yuqin; Zhang, Aizhen; Li, Haixiang; Jin, Yecheng; Sun, Xiaoyang; Li, Huashun; Gao, Jiangang

    2015-01-01

    The Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) gene plays crucial roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and the establishment of cell polarity. We created LKB1 conditional knockout mice (LKB1Atoh1 CKO) to investigate the function of LKB1 in cerebellar development. The LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice displayed motor dysfunction. In the LKB1Atoh1 CKO cerebellum, the overall structure had a larger volume and morelobules. LKB1 inactivationled to an increased proliferation of granule cell precursors (GCPs), aberrant granule cell migration and overproduction of unipolar brush cells. To investigate the mechanism underlying the abnormal foliation, we examined sonic hedgehog signalling (Shh) by testing its transcriptional mediators, the Gli proteins, which regulate the GCPs proliferation and cerebellar foliation during cerebellar development. The expression levels of Gli genes were significantly increased in the mutant cerebellum. In vitro assays showed that the proliferation of cultured GCPs from mutant cerebellum significantly increased, whereas the proliferation of mutant GCPs significantly decreased in the presence of a Shh inhibitor GDC-0049. Thus, LKB1 deficiency in the LKB1Atoh1 CKO mice enhanced Shh signalling, leading to the excessive GCP proliferation and the formation of extra lobules. We proposed that LKB1 regulates cerebellar development by controlling GCPs proliferation through Shh signalling during cerebellar development. PMID:26549569

  9. Neuroligin-2 accelerates GABAergic synapse maturation in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhanyan; Vicini, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Neuroligins (NLGs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are thought to function in synaptogenesis. To investigate the role of NLGs on synaptic transmission once the synapse is formed, we transfected neuroligin-2 (NLG-2) in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), and recorded GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptor mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). NLG-2 transfected cells had mIPSCs with faster decay than matching GFP expressing controls at young culture ages (days in vitro, DIV7-8). Down-regulation of NLG-2 by the isoform specific shRNA-NLG-2 resulted in an opposite effect. We and others have shown that the switch of alpha subunits of GABA(A)Rs from alpha2/3 to alpha1 underlies developmental speeding of the IPSC decay in various CNS regions, including the cerebellum. To assess whether the reduced decay time of mIPSCs by NLG-2 is due to the recruitment of more alpha1 containing GABA(A)Rs at the synapses, we examined the prolongation of current decay by the Zolpidem, which has been shown to preferentially enhance the activity of alpha1 subunit-containing GABA channel. The application of Zolpidem resulted in a significantly greater prolongation kinetics of synaptic currents in NLG-2 over-expressing cells than control cells, suggesting that NLG-2 over-expression accelerates synapse maturation by promoting incorporation of the alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs at postsynaptic sites in immature cells. In addition, the effect of NLG-2 on the speeding of decay time course of synaptic currents was abolished when we used CGC cultures from alpha1-/- mice. Lastly, to exclude the possibility that the fast decay of mIPSCs induced by NLG-2 could be also due to the impacts of NLG-2 on the GABA transient in synaptic cleft, we measured the sensitivity of mIPSCs to the fast-off competitive antagonists TPMPA. We found that TPMPA similarly inhibits mIPSCs in control and NLG-2 over-expressing CGCs both at young age (DIV8) and old age (DIV14) of

  10. Neuroligin-2 accelerates GABAergic synapse maturation in cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Zhanyan; Vicini, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLGs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are thought to function in synaptogenesis. To investigate the role of NLGs on synaptic transmission once the synapse is formed, we transfected neuroligin-2(NLG2) in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), and recorded GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid) receptor mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (mISPCs). NLG2 transfected cells had mIPSCs with faster decay than matching GFP expressing controls at young culture ages (days in vitro, DIV 7-8). Down-regulation of NLG2 by the isoform specific shRNA-NLG2 resulted in an opposite effect. We and others have shown that the switch of α subunits of GABAA Rs from α2/3 to α1 underlies developmental speeding of the IPSC decay in various CNS regions, including the cerebellum. To assess whether the reduced decay time of mIPSCs by NLG2 is due to the recruitment of more α1 containing GABAARs at the synapses, we examined the prolongation of current decay by the zolpidem, which has been shown to preferentially enhance the activity of α1 subunit containing GABA channel. The application of zolpidem resulted in a significantly greater prolongation kinetics of synaptic currents in NLG2 over-expressing cells than control cells, suggesting that NLG2 over-expression accelerates synapse maturation by promoting incorporation of the α1 subunit-containing GABAARs at postsynaptic sites in immature cells. In addition, the effect of NLG2 on the speeding of decay time course of synaptic currents was abolished when we used CGC cultures from α1-/- mice. Lastly, to exclude the possibility that the fast decay of mIPSCs induced by NLG2 could be also due to the impacts of NLG2 on the GABA transient in synaptic cleft, we measured the sensitivity of mIPSCs to the fast-off competitive antagonists TPMPA. We found that TPMPA similarly inhibits mIPSCs in control and NLG2 over-expressing CGCs both at young age (DIV8) and old age (DIV14) of cultures. However, we confirm our previous

  11. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression and activity in cerebellar granule neuroblasts: implications for development and dioxin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Mary A; Gasiewicz, Thomas A; Opanashuk, Lisa A

    2005-02-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a potent teratogen that produces neurobehavioral abnormalities associated with both cognitive and locomotor systems, yet the precise regional and cellular targets of developmental neurotoxicity remain largely unknown. Most, if not all, TCDD-induced pathology is mediated via binding to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that belongs to the basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH/PAS) superfamily. Upon ligand binding, AhR translocates to the nucleus, dimerizes with the AhR nuclear translocator protein (Arnt), and regulates transcription by interaction with dioxin-response elements (DREs) in target genes, most notably specific cytochrome P450 (CYP) family members. To assess whether developing cerebellar granule neuroblasts are potential direct targets for TCDD toxicity, AhR expression and transcriptional activity were examined. AhR and Arnt proteins were present in mouse cerebellum from birth throughout postnatal development. AhR protein levels peaked between postnatal day (PND) 3-10, a critical period for granule neuroblast growth and maturation. Transcriptionally active AhR was detected in immature cerebellar granule cells in a transgenic dioxin-responsive lacZ mouse model after acute TCDD exposure. AhR and Arnt were also expressed in cerebellar granule neuroblast cultures. AhR localized to the nucleus in granule cells 15 min after TCDD treatment. TCCD elicited time-dependent and concentration-dependent increases in CYP1A1 and 1B1 mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, TCDD treatment reduced both thymidine incorporation and granule neuroblast survival in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that (1) granule neuroblasts are direct targets for developmental AhR-mediated TCDD neurotoxicity and (2) TCDD exposure may disrupt granule cell neurogenesis.

  12. LXR agonist rescued the deficit in the proliferation of the cerebellar granule cells induced by dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xuting; Zhong, Hongyu; Li, Fen; Cai, Yulong; Li, Xin; Wang, Lian; Fan, Xiaotang

    2016-09-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) exposure during early postnatal life produces permanent neuromotor and intellectual deficits and stunts cerebellar growth. The liver X receptor (LXR) plays important roles in CNS development. However, the effects of LXR on the DEX-mediated impairment of cerebellar development remain undetermined. Thus, mice were pretreated with LXR agonist TO901317 (TO) and were later exposed to DEX to evaluate its protective effects on DEX-mediated deficit during cerebellar development. The results showed that an acute exposure of DEX on postnatal day 7 resulted in a significant impairment in cerebellar development and decreased the proliferation of granule neuron precursors in the external granule layer of cerebellum. This effect was attenuated by pretreatment with TO. We further found that the decrease in the proliferation caused by DEX occurred via up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor and p27kip1, which could be partially prevented by LXR agonist pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that LXR agonist pretreatment could protect against DEX-induced deficits in cerebellar development in postnatal mice and may thus be perspective recruited to counteract such GC side effects. PMID:27369072

  13. Mitotic Events in Cerebellar Granule Progenitor Cells that Expand Cerebellar Surface Area Are Critical for Normal Cerebellar Cortical Lamination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Joshua C.; Leung, Mark; Gokozan, Hamza Numan; Gygli, Patrick Edwin; Catacutan, Fay Patsy; Czeisler, Catherine; Otero, José Javier

    2015-01-01

    Late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar folial surface area expansion promotes cerebellar cortical cytoarchitectural lamination. We developed a streamlined sampling scheme to generate unbiased estimates of murine cerebellar surface area and volume using stereological principles. We demonstrate that during the proliferative phase of the external granule layer (EGL) and folial surface area expansion, EGL thickness does not change and thus is a topological proxy for progenitor self-renewal. The topological constraints indicate that during proliferative phases, migration out of the EGL is balanced by self-renewal. Progenitor self-renewal must, therefore, include mitotic events yielding either 2 cells in the same layer to increase surface area (β-events) and mitotic events yielding 2 cells, with 1 cell in a superficial layer and 1 cell in a deeper layer (α-events). As the cerebellum grows, therefore, β-events lie upstream of α-events. Using a mathematical model constrained by the measurements of volume and surface area, we could quantify inter-mitotic times for β-events on a per-cell basis in post-natal mouse cerebellum. Furthermore, we found that loss of CCNA2, which decreases EGL proliferation and secondarily induces cerebellar cortical dyslamination, shows preserved α-type events. Thus, CCNA2-null cerebellar granule progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal of the EGL stem cell niche; this is concordant with prior findings of extensive apoptosis in CCNA2-null mice. Similar methodologies may provide another layer of depth to the interpretation of results from stereological studies. PMID:25668568

  14. Nuclear factor I and cerebellar granule neuron development: an intrinsic-extrinsic interplay.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Daniel L; Wang, Wei; Gronostajski, Richard; Litwack, E David

    2012-03-01

    Granule neurons have a central role in cerebellar function via their synaptic interactions with other neuronal cell types both within and outside this structure. Establishment of these synaptic connections and its control is therefore essential to their function. Both intrinsic as well as environmental mechanisms are required for neuronal development and formation of neuronal circuits, and a key but poorly understood question is how these various events are coordinated and integrated in maturing neurons. In this review, we summarize recent work on the role of the Nuclear Factor I family in the transcriptional programming of cerebellar granule neuron maturation and synapse formation. In particular, we describe (1) the involvement of this family of factors in key developmental steps occurring throughout postmitotic granule neuron development, including dendrite and synapse formation and synaptic receptor expression, and (2) the mediation of these actions by critical downstream gene targets that control cell-cell interactions. These findings illustrate how Nuclear Factor I proteins and their regulons function as a “bridge” between cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic interactions to control multiple phases of granule neuron development.

  15. Synaptic action of ethanol on cerebellar auditory granule cells reveals acute tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Liu, G.; Huang, R.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The cerebellum is very sensitive to acute intoxication by ethanol. The authors have recorded electrophysiological responses of granule cells to auditory stimulation from the posterior cerebellar vermis of cats before and after a relatively low dose of ethanol. Auditory responses of granule cells were severely inhibited by ethanol at a transient, peak ethanol concentration of 15-18 mM in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thereafter, the clearance of ethanol from CSF followed an exponential time course, with 50% of the CSF ethanol being cleared with every passing hour. Auditory responses of granule cells returned to control levels within 60-90 minutes, despite the presence of a DSF ethanol concentration at 8-10mM, indicating acute tolerance. Moreover, a second, identical dose of ethanol, delivered two hours after the first dose produced an attenuated inhibition in the auditory response of cerebellar granule cells. The inhibition took a longer time to be evident but a shorter time to recover than that followed by the first dose of ethanol.

  16. Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A interferes with the development of cerebellar granule neurons in mice and chicken.

    PubMed

    Mathisen, Gro H; Yazdani, Mazyar; Rakkestad, Kirsten E; Aden, Petra K; Bodin, Johanna; Samuelsen, Mari; Nygaard, Unni C; Goverud, Ingeborg L; Gaarder, Mona; Løberg, Else Marit; Bølling, Anette K; Becher, Rune; Paulsen, Ragnhild E

    2013-12-01

    In mice, prenatal exposure to low doses of bisphenol A has been shown to affect neurogenesis and neuronal migration in cortex, resulting in disturbance of both neuronal positioning and the network formation between thalamus and cortex in the offspring brain. In the present study we investigated whether prenatal exposure to bisphenol A disturbs the neurodevelopment of the cerebellum. Two different model systems were used; offspring from two strains of mice from mothers receiving bisphenol A in the drinking water before mating, during gestation and lactation, and chicken embryos exposed to bisphenol A (in the egg) on embryonic day 16 for 24h before preparation of cerebellar granule cell cultures. In the cerebellum, tight regulation of the level of transcription factor Pax6 is critical for correct development of granule neurons. During the development, the Pax6 level in granule neurons is high when these cells are located in the external granule layer and during their migration to the internal granule layer, and it is then reduced. We report that bisphenol A induced an increase in the thickness of the external granule layer and also an increase in the total cerebellar Pax6 level in 11 days old mice offspring. In cultured chicken cerebellar granule neurons from bisphenol A injected eggs the Pax6 level was increased day 6 in vitro. Together, these findings indicate that bisphenol A may affect the granule neurons in the developing cerebellum and thereby may disturb the correct development of the cerebellum.

  17. Properties of AMPA receptors expressed in rat cerebellar granule cell cultures: Ca2+ influx studies.

    PubMed

    Hack, N; Balázs, R

    1995-09-01

    Cultured cerebellar granule cells become vulnerable to excitatory amino acids, especially to NMDA and kainate, by 9 days in vitro. In the same time, the sensitivity of cells to (RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionate (AMPA), in terms of AMPA-induced toxicity or 45Ca2+ uptake, was very low. The low AMPA responsiveness was due to receptor desensitization, because agents known to block desensitization, cyclothiazide and the lectins concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, rendered granule cells vulnerable to AMPA and produced a pronounced stimulation of 45Ca2+ accumulation. 45Ca2+ influx was induced specifically by AMPA-receptor stimulation, because it was blocked virtually completely by 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzoquinoxaline (NBQX) and the benzodiazepine GYKI 52466 (selective non-NMDA receptor antagonists). Nevertheless, indirect routes activated by cellular responses to AMPA-receptor stimulation contributed significantly to the overall 45Ca2+ influx. These included Ca2+ uptake through NMDA-receptor channels, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, and via Na+/Ca2+ exchange. However, nearly one-fifth of the total 45Ca2+ influx remained unaccounted for and this estimate was similar to 45Ca2+ influx observed under Na(+)-free conditions. This observation suggested that a significant proportion of the Ca2+ flux passes through the AMPA-receptor channel proper, a view supported by Co2+ uptake into nearly all granule cells on exposure to AMPA in the presence of cyclothiazide. Results are discussed in light of the reported AMPA receptor-subunit composition of cerebellar granule cells in vitro.

  18. Glutamate-induced protein phosphorylation in cerebellar granule cells: role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Eboli, M L; Mercanti, D; Ciotti, M T; Aquino, A; Castellani, L

    1994-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation in response to toxic doses of glutamate has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells. 32P-labelled cells have been stimulated with 100 microM glutamate for up to 20 min and analysed by one and two dimensional gel electrophoresis. A progressive incorporation of label is observed in two molecular species of about 80 and 43 kDa (PP80 and PP43) and acidic isoelectric point. Glutamate-stimulated phosphorylation is greatly reduced by antagonists of NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. The effect of glutamate is mimicked by phorbol esters and is markedly reduced by inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC) such as staurosporine and calphostin C. PP80 has been identified by Western blot analysis as the PKC substrate MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate), while antibody to GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43), the nervous tissue-specific substrate of PKC, failed to recognize PP43. Our results suggest that PKC is responsible for the early phosphorylative events induced by toxic doses of glutamate in cerebellar granule cells. PMID:7891841

  19. Procaspase-activating compound 1 induces a caspase-3-dependent cell death in cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Gulzeb; Akselsen, Oyvind W.; Hansen, Trond V.; Paulsen, Ragnhild E.

    2010-09-15

    Procaspase-activating compound 1, PAC-1, has been introduced as a direct activator of procaspase-3 and has been suggested as a therapeutic agent against cancer. Its activation of procaspase-3 is dependent on the chelation of zinc. We have tested PAC-1 and an analogue of PAC-1 as zinc chelators in vitro as well as their ability to activate caspase-3 and induce cell death in chicken cerebellar granule neuron cultures. These neurons are non-dividing, primary cells with normal caspase-3. The results reported herein show that PAC-1 chelates zinc, activates procaspase-3, and leads to caspase-3-dependent cell death in neurons, as the specific caspase-3-inhibitor Ac-DEVD-cmk inhibited both the caspase-3 activity and cell death. Thus, chicken cerebellar granule neurons is a suitable model to study mechanisms of interference with apoptosis of PAC-1 and similar compounds. Furthermore, the present study also raises concern about potential neurotoxicity of PAC-1 if used in cancer therapy.

  20. NMDA receptor-dependent CREB activation in survival of cerebellar granule cells during in vivo and in vitro development.

    PubMed

    Monti, Barbara; Marri, Lucia; Contestabile, Antonio

    2002-10-01

    During both in vivo and in vitro development, cerebellar granule cells depend on the activity of the NMDA glutamate receptor subtype for survival and full differentiation. With the present results, we demonstrate that CREB activation, downstream of the NMDA receptor, is a necessary step to ensure survival of these neurons. The levels of CREB expression and activity increase progressively during the second week of postnatal cerebellar development and the phosphorylated form of CREB is localized selectively to cerebellar granule cells during the critical developmental stages examined. Chronically blocking the NMDA receptor through systemic administration of the competitive antagonist, CGP 39551, during the in vivo critical developmental period, between 7-11 postnatal days, results in increased apoptotic elimination of differentiating granule neurons in the cerebellum [Monti & Contestabile, Eur. J. Neurosci., 12, 3117-3123 (2000)]. We report here that this event is accompanied by a significant decrease of CREB phosphorylation in the cerebellum of treated rat pups. When cerebellar granule neurons are explanted and maintained in dissociated cultures, the levels of CREB phosphorylation increase with differentiation, similar to that which happens during in vivo development. When granule cells are kept in non-trophic conditions, their viability is affected and both CREB phosphorylation and transcriptional activity are decreased significantly. The neuronal viability and the deficiency of CREB activity, are both rescued by the pharmacological activation of the NMDA receptor. These results provide good circumstantial evidence for a functional link between the NMDA receptor and CREB activity in promoting neuronal survival during development.

  1. Model cerebellar granule cells can faithfully transmit modulated firing rate signals

    PubMed Central

    Rössert, Christian; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio; Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2014-01-01

    A crucial assumption of many high-level system models of the cerebellum is that information in the granular layer is encoded in a linear manner. However, granule cells are known for their non-linear and resonant synaptic and intrinsic properties that could potentially impede linear signal transmission. In this modeling study we analyse how electrophysiological granule cell properties and spike sampling influence information coded by firing rate modulation, assuming no signal-related, i.e., uncorrelated inhibitory feedback (open-loop mode). A detailed one-compartment granule cell model was excited in simulation by either direct current or mossy-fiber synaptic inputs. Vestibular signals were represented as tonic inputs to the flocculus modulated at frequencies up to 20 Hz (approximate upper frequency limit of vestibular-ocular reflex, VOR). Model outputs were assessed using estimates of both the transfer function, and the fidelity of input-signal reconstruction measured as variance-accounted-for. The detailed granule cell model with realistic mossy-fiber synaptic inputs could transmit information faithfully and linearly in the frequency range of the vestibular-ocular reflex. This was achieved most simply if the model neurons had a firing rate at least twice the highest required frequency of modulation, but lower rates were also adequate provided a population of neurons was utilized, especially in combination with push-pull coding. The exact number of neurons required for faithful transmission depended on the precise values of firing rate and noise. The model neurons were also able to combine excitatory and inhibitory signals linearly, and could be replaced by a simpler (modified) integrate-and-fire neuron in the case of high tonic firing rates. These findings suggest that granule cells can in principle code modulated firing-rate inputs in a linear manner, and are thus consistent with the high-level adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit. PMID:25352777

  2. Conditional induction of Math1 specifies embryonic stem cells to cerebellar granule neuron lineage and promotes differentiation into mature granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rupali; Kumar, Manoj; Peineau, Stéphane; Csaba, Zsolt; Mani, Shyamala; Gressens, Pierre; El Ghouzzi, Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Directing differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to specific neuronal subtype is critical for modeling disease pathology in vitro. An attractive means of action would be to combine regulatory differentiation factors and extrinsic inductive signals added to the culture medium. In this study, we have generated mature cerebellar granule neurons by combining a temporally controlled transient expression of Math1, a master gene in granule neuron differentiation, with inductive extrinsic factors involved in cerebellar development. Using a Tetracyclin-On transactivation system, we overexpressed Math1 at various stages of ESCs differentiation and found that the yield of progenitors was considerably increased when Math1 was induced during embryonic body stage. Math1 triggered expression of Mbh1 and Mbh2, two target genes directly involved in granule neuron precursor formation and strong expression of early cerebellar territory markers En1 and NeuroD1. Three weeks after induction, we observed a decrease in the number of glial cells and an increase in that of neurons albeit still immature. Combining Math1 induction with extrinsic factors specifically increased the number of neurons that expressed Pde1c, Zic1, and GABAα6R characteristic of mature granule neurons, formed "T-shaped" axons typical of granule neurons, and generated synaptic contacts and action potentials in vitro. Finally, in vivo implantation of Math1-induced progenitors into young adult mice resulted in cell migration and settling of newly generated neurons in the cerebellum. These results show that conditional induction of Math1 drives ESCs toward the cerebellar fate and indicate that acting on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors is a powerful means to modulate ESCs differentiation and maturation into a specific neuronal lineage.

  3. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells: pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, O S; Cotman, C W

    1989-07-01

    The survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by chronic exposure to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The effect is due to the stimulation of 'conventional' NMDA receptor-ionophore complex: it is concentration dependent, voltage dependent and blocked by the selective antagonists D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, D-2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate, dextromethorphan and (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclohepten-5,10-imin emaleate (MK 801). The most potent antagonist tested was MK-801. In contrast, non-selective antagonists, including kynurenate, were much less effective. Further, the trophic effect of NMDA is not reproduced by ibotenate or quinolinate at the concentration range tested. It could also be shown that glutamate released into the culture medium is responsible for limited cell survival in the absence of NMDA.

  4. FHF-independent conduction of action potentials along the leak-resistant cerebellar granule cell axon

    PubMed Central

    Dover, Katarzyna; Marra, Christopher; Solinas, Sergio; Popovic, Marko; Subramaniyam, Sathyaa; Zecevic, Dejan; D'Angelo, Egidio; Goldfarb, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in vertebrate central nervous systems initiate and conduct sodium action potentials in distinct subcellular compartments that differ architecturally and electrically. Here, we report several unanticipated passive and active properties of the cerebellar granule cell's unmyelinated axon. Whereas spike initiation at the axon initial segment relies on sodium channel (Nav)-associated fibroblast growth factor homologous factor (FHF) proteins to delay Nav inactivation, distal axonal Navs show little FHF association or FHF requirement for high-frequency transmission, velocity and waveforms of conducting action potentials. In addition, leak conductance density along the distal axon is estimated as <1% that of somatodendritic membrane. The faster inactivation rate of FHF-free Navs together with very low axonal leak conductance serves to minimize ionic fluxes and energetic demand during repetitive spike conduction and at rest. The absence of FHFs from Navs at nodes of Ranvier in the central nervous system suggests a similar mechanism of current flux minimization along myelinated axons. PMID:27666389

  5. Igf1 and Pacap rescue cerebellar granule neurons from apoptosis via a common transcriptional program

    PubMed Central

    Maino, B; D’Agata, V; Severini, C; Ciotti, MT; Calissano, P; Copani, A; Chang, Y-C; DeLisi, C; Cavallaro, S

    2015-01-01

    A shift of the delicate balance between apoptosis and survival-inducing signals determines the fate of neurons during the development of the central nervous system and its homeostasis throughout adulthood. Both pathways, promoting or protecting from apoptosis, trigger a transcriptional program. We conducted whole-genome expression profiling to decipher the transcriptional regulatory elements controlling the apoptotic/survival switch in cerebellar granule neurons following the induction of apoptosis by serum and potassium deprivation or their rescue by either insulin-like growth factor-1 (Igf1) or pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (Pacap). Although depending on different upstream signaling pathways, the survival effects of Igf1 and Pacap converged into common transcriptional cascades, thus suggesting the existence of a general transcriptional program underlying neuronal survival. PMID:26941962

  6. Generation and Characterization of an Nse-CreERT2 Transgenic Line Suitable for Inducible Gene Manipulation in Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Steller, Laura; May, Petra; Günther, Thomas; Schüle, Roland; Frotscher, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We created an Nse-CreERT2 mouse line expressing the tamoxifen-inducible CreERT2 recombinase under the control of the neuron-specific enolase (Nse) promoter. By using Cre reporter lines we could show that this Nse-CreERT2 line has recombination activity in the granule cells of all cerebellar lobules as well as in postmitotic granule cell precursors in the external granular layer of the developing cerebellum. A few hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells showed Cre-mediated recombination as well. Cre activity could be induced in both the developing and adult mouse brain. The established mouse line constitutes a valuable tool to study the function of genes expressed by cerebellar granule cells in the developing and adult brain. In combination with reporter lines it is a useful model to analyze the development and maintenance of the cerebellar architecture including granule cell distribution, migration, and the extension of granule cell fibers in vivo. PMID:24950299

  7. Talpid3-binding centrosomal protein Cep120 is required for centriole duplication and proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuanqing; Yang, Mei; Li, Juan; Wang, Chengbing; Cao, Ting; Tao, Kaixiong; Wang, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    Granule neuron progenitors (GNPs) are the most abundant neuronal type in the cerebellum. GNP proliferation and thus cerebellar development require Sonic hedgehog (Shh) secreted from Purkinje cells. Shh signaling occurs in primary cilia originating from the mother centriole. Centrioles replicate only once during a typical cell cycle and are responsible for mitotic spindle assembly and organization. Recent studies have linked cilia function to cerebellar morphogenesis, but the role of centriole duplication in cerebellar development is not known. Here we show that centrosomal protein Cep120 is asymmetrically localized to the daughter centriole through its interaction with Talpid3 (Ta3), another centrosomal protein. Cep120 null mutant mice die in early gestation with abnormal heart looping. Inactivation of Cep120 in the central nervous system leads to both hydrocephalus, due to the loss of cilia on ependymal cells, and severe cerebellar hypoplasia, due to the failed proliferation of GNPs. The mutant GNPs lack Hedgehog pathway activity. Cell biological studies show that the loss of Cep120 results in failed centriole duplication and consequently ciliogenesis, which together underlie Cep120 mutant cerebellar hypoplasia. Thus, our study for the first time links a centrosomal protein necessary for centriole duplication to cerebellar morphogenesis.

  8. The survival of cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells is not dependent on elevated potassium-ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, H S; Hack, N; Balázs, R; Jørgensen, O S

    1994-08-01

    The effects of K(+)-induced membrane depolarization were studied on the survival and biochemical parameters in mouse and rat cerebellar granule cells grown in micro-well cultures. Cell numbers were determined by estimating DNA content using the Hoechst 33258 fluorochrome binding assay. DNA from degenerated cells was removed by prior DNAase treatment. These DNA estimates of cell numbers were comparable with values obtained by direct counting of fluorescein diacetate-stained viable cells. In agreement with previous studies, the survival of rat granule cells was promoted by increasing the concentration of K+ in the medium from 5 to 25 mM throughout a 7-day culture period. In contrast, mouse granule cells survived in culture containing 'low' K+ (5 or 10 mM), as well as in the presence of 'high' K+ (25 mM). On the other hand, several biochemical parameters in mouse granule cells were markedly increased by cultivation in 'high' as compared with 'low' K(+)-containing media, demonstrated by increased fluorescein diacetate esterase activity, enhanced rate of NADPH-dependent tetrazolium reduction, augmented 2-deoxy-D-glucose accumulation and increased N-methyl-D-aspartate-evoked 45Ca2+ influx. It was concluded that although cultivation in 'high' K+ promotes biochemical differentiation in mouse cerebellar granule cells, these cells differ from their rat counterparts in that they do not develop a survival requirement for K(+)-induced membrane depolarization.

  9. Development of voltage-activated potassium currents in cultured cerebellar granule neurons under different growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Gorter, J A; Aronica, E; Hack, N J; Balázs, R; Wadman, W J

    1995-07-01

    1. The functional expression of two potassium currents in cultured cerebellar granule cells was investigated with the whole cell patch-clamp technique in relation to development and growth condition. Cells were grown in medium containing different concentrations of potassium: 25 mM (K25) and 40 mM (K40), together referred to as "high K+"; 10 mM (K10) or "low K+"; and K10 with 100 microM N-methyl-D-aspartate (KNMDA). All conditions are known to influence maturation and survival of granule cells in culture. 2. At 2 days in vitro (DIV) the membrane capacitance, taken as index of membrane surface area, was the same for cells grown in each growth condition. At 7-9 DIV it had increased in each condition, but to a substantially larger extent in cells grown in KNMDA, K25, and K40 than in cells grown in K10. During development the input resistance only decreased in cells grown in KNMDA and high K+. 3. A delayed potassium current (IK) and a fast transient potassium current (IA) could both be recorded at 2 DIV in each growth condition, although a few neurons only expressed the IK. The IK was partially suppressed by tetraethylammonium (5 mM), whereas IA was predominantly sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (5 mM). 4. Normalized for cell capacitance, the specific IA conductance hardly changed during development in cells grown in high K+ and KNMDA. Cells in K10, however, displayed an IA with totally different properties in 23 of 24 cells; the specific IA conductance in these cells was considerably smaller at 7-9 DIV, suggesting a deletion of these channels during development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Protective effect of fangchinoline on cyanide-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Soon Ok; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2002-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effect of fangchinoline, a bis- benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which exhibits the characteristics of a Ca2+ channel blocker, on cyanide-induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. NaCN produced a concentration-dependent reduction of cell viability, which was blocked by MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, verapamil, L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, and L-NAME, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Pretreatment with fangchinoline over a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 microM significantly decreased the NaCN-induced neuronal cell death, glutamate release into medium, and elevation of [Ca2+]i and oxidants generation. These results suggest that fangchinoline may mitigate the harmful effects of cyanide-induced neuronal cell death by interfering with [Ca2+]i influx, due to its function as a Ca2+ channel blocker, and then by inhibiting glutamate release and oxidants generation. PMID:12135109

  11. Thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system involvement in cerebellar granule cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bobba, A; Casalino, E; Petragallo, V A; Atlante, A

    2014-10-01

    The involvement of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system has been investigated in cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), a cellular system in which neurons are induced in apoptosis by the physiological stimulus of lowering extracellular potassium. Clarifying the sequence of events that occur during apoptosis is a critical issue as it can lead to the identification of those key events that, if blocked, can slow down or reverse the death process. The results reported in this work show that TrxR is involved in the early phase of CGC apoptosis with an increase in activity that coincides with the increased expression of the TrxR1 isoform and guarantees the maintenance of adequate level of Trx in its reduced, active form. However, in late apoptosis, when about 50 % of cells are dead, partial proteolysis of TrxR1 by calpain occurs and the reduction of TrxR1 mRNA, together with the overall decrease in TrxR activity, contribute to increase the levels of the oxidized form of Trx. When the reduced form of Trx is externally added to apoptotic cultures, a significant reduction in cell death is achieved confirming that a well-functioning thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase system is required for survival of CGCs. PMID:25055978

  12. Selective Depletion of Microglia from Cerebellar Granule Cell Cultures Using L-leucine Methyl Ester.

    PubMed

    Jebelli, Joseph; Piers, Thomas; Pocock, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Microglia, the resident immunocompetent cells of the CNS, play multifaceted roles in modulating and controlling neuronal function, as well as mediating innate immunity. Primary rodent cell culture models have greatly advanced our understanding of neuronal-glial interactions, but only recently have methods to specifically eliminate microglia from mixed cultures been utilized. One such technique - described here - is the use of L-leucine methyl ester, a lysomotropic agent that is internalized by macrophages and microglia, wherein it causes lysosomal disruption and subsequent apoptosis(13,14). Experiments using L-leucine methyl ester have the power to identify the contribution of microglia to the surrounding cellular environment under diverse culture conditions. Using a protocol optimized in our laboratory, we describe how to eliminate microglia from P5 rodent cerebellar granule cell culture. This approach allows one to assess the relative impact of microglia on experimental data, as well as determine whether microglia are playing a neuroprotective or neurotoxic role in culture models of neurological conditions, such as stroke, Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease.

  13. Tactile responses in the granule cell layer of cerebellar folium crus IIa of freely behaving rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, M. J.; Bower, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    We recorded activity from the granule cell layer (GCL) of cerebellar folium Crus IIa as freely moving rats engaged in a variety of natural behaviors, including grooming, eating, and free tactile exploration. Multiunit responses in the 1000-4500 Hz range were found to be strongly correlated with tactile stimulation of lip and whisker (perioral) regions. These responses occurred regardless of whether the stimulus was externally or self-generated and during both active and passive touch. In contrast, perioral movements that did not tactually stimulate this region of the face (e.g., chewing) produced no detectable increases in GCL activity. In addition, GCL responses were not correlated with movement extremes. When rats used their lips actively for palpation and exploration, the tactile responses in the GCL were not detectably modulated by ongoing jaw movements. However, active palpation and exploratory behaviors did result in the largest and most continuous bursts of GCL activity: responses were on average 10% larger and 50% longer during palpation and exploration than during grooming or passive stimulation. Although activity levels differed between behaviors, the position and spatial extent of the peripheral receptive field was similar over all behaviors that resulted in tactile input. Overall, our data suggest that the 1000-4500 Hz multiunit responses in the Crus IIa GCL of awake rats are correlated with tactile input rather than with movement or any movement parameter and that these responses are likely to be of particular importance during the acquisition of sensory information by perioral structures.

  14. Substrate specificity and kinetic parameters of GLUT3 in rat cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Maher, F; Davies-Hill, T M; Simpson, I A

    1996-01-01

    This study examines the apparent affinity, catalytic-centre activity ("turnover number') and stereospecificity of the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 in primary cultured cerebellar granule neurons. Using a novel variation of the 3-O-[14C]methylglucose transport assay, by measuring zero-trans kinetics at 25 degrees C, GLUT3 was determined to be a high-apparent-affinity, high-activity, glucose transporter with a K(m) of 2.87 +/- 0.23 mM (mean +/- S.E.M.) for 3-O-methylglucose, a Vmax of 18.7 +/- 0.48 nmol/min per 10(6) cells, and cells, and a corresponding catalytic-centre activity of 853 s-1. Transport of 3-O-methylglucose was competed by glucose, mannose, 2-deoxyglucose and galactose, but not by fructose. This methodology is compared with the more common 2-[3H]deoxyglucose methodology and the [U-14C]-glucose transport method. The high affinity and transport activity of the neuronal glucose transporter GLUT3 appears to be an appropriate adaptation to meet the demands of neuronal metabolism at prevailing interstitial brain glucose concentrations (1-2 mM). PMID:8645164

  15. N-methyl-D-aspartate promotes the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Jørgensen, O S; Hack, N

    1988-11-01

    Our previous studies on the survival-promoting influence of elevated concentrations of extracellular K+ ([K+]e) on cultured cerebellar granule cells led to the proposal that depolarization in vitro mimics the effect of the earliest afferent inputs received by the granule cells in vivo. This, in turn, might be mediated through the stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate-preferring subtype gating ion channels which are also permeable to Ca2+. Here we report that N-methyl-D-aspartate indeed has a dramatic effect on the survival in culture of cells derived from dissociated cerebella of 7-8-day-old rats and cultured in media containing 'low' [K+]e (5-15 mM). In addition to the visual inspection of the cultures, the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was quantitatively evaluated, using estimates related to the number of viable cells (determination of DNA and of reduction rate of a tetrazolium salt). Furthermore, proteins which are relatively enriched in either nerve cells (neuronal cell adhesion molecule, D3-protein and synaptin) or in glia (glutamine synthetase) were also measured. The findings showed that the rescue of cells by N-methyl-D-aspartate involved primarily nerve cells and that the survival requirement for N-methyl-D-aspartate, as for high K+, developed between 2 and 4 days in vitro. The effect depended on both the concentration of N-methyl-D-aspartate and the degree of depolarization of the cells: both the potency and the efficacy of N-methyl-D-aspartate were increased as [K+]e was raised from 5 to 15 mM, at which range K+ on its own has little if any influence on granule cell survival. These characteristics are consistent with the voltage-dependence of ion conductance through the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-linked channel. The most pronounced effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was obtained in the presence of 15 mM K+, when cell survival approached that obtained in 'control' cultures (grown in 25 mM K

  16. Growth conditions differentially modulate the vulnerability of developing cerebellar granule cells to excitatory amino acids.

    PubMed

    Resink, A; Hack, N; Boer, G J; Balázs, R

    1994-08-29

    The survival of immature nerve cells in a cerebellar culture, predominantly excitatory granule cells, is known to be promoted by chronic exposure to high K+ (> 20 mM) or glutamate (Glu) receptor agonists. These treatments are believed to mimic the in vivo effect of the incoming glutamatergic afferents, the mossy fibres. Here we report that with maturation the cells become vulnerable to excitatory amino acids (EAAs) and that the characteristics of EAA sensitivity are dependent on the environmental influences being either "trophic" (25 mM K+ or 140 microM NMDA, K25 or K10 + NMDA) or "non-trophic" (10 mM K+, K10). Toxicity was assayed routinely at 9 days in vitro (DIV) after 24 h exposure to EAAs. Under all the tested conditions, the effect of Glu was mediated exclusively through NMDA receptors. However, the efficacy and potency of Glu were high in K25- and K10 + NMDA-grown cells compared with K10-grown cells. Growth conditions had the same influence on NMDA as on Glu-induced toxicity, but with the following special features: (1) in comparison with K25 cells, the potency of NMDA was significantly lower in K10 + NMDA cells. The K10 + NMDA cultures behaved as if they were completely insensitive to the NMDA which is present in their growth medium. (2) The K10-grown cells were not vulnerable to NMDA, unless the cell membrane was depolarised by shifting the cells into K25 medium. The efficacy of NMDA became then similar to that in K25 cultures, although the potency was about 7-fold less. Thus NMDA receptors can be activated by the depolarisation of K10 cells, implying the operation of Mg2+ blockade of the channel at normal resting membrane potential. Although non-NMDA receptors did not seem to be involved in Glu toxicity, cells were vulnerable to kainate, which killed significantly more cells than Glu (about 80% vs 70%). This was partly due to the resistance of GABAergic interneurons present in the cultures to Glu- or NMDA-induced toxicity. In contrast to the effects of

  17. Weaver mutant mouse cerebellar granule cells respond normally to chronic depolarization.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard, A; Mogensen, H S; Hack, N; Balázs, R; Jørgensen, O S

    1997-04-01

    We studied the effects of chronic K(+)-induced membrane depolarization and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) from weaver mutant mice and non-weaver litter-mates. The weaver mutation is a Gly-to-Ser substitution in a conserved region of the Girk2 G protein-coupled inward rectifying potassium channel [Patil N., Cox D. R., Bhat D., Faham M., Myers R. M. and Peterson A. S. (1995) Nature Genet. 11, 126-129] which induces early death of CGCs. The biochemical differentiation of CGCs was estimated as the rate of 2-deoxy-D-glucose accumulation and the expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). High (25 mM) K+ ion concentration or treatment with NMDA greatly promoted the biochemical differentiation of both weaver mutant and non-weaver litter-mate mouse CGCs. In contrast to the marked effect on biochemical differentiation in both weaver and non-weaver mice CGSs, chronic high K+ treatment only had limited effect on survival. The survival of weaver mutant mouse CGCs in medium containing 5 mM K+ ions was very low, only 20% of the plated cells surviving at 7 days after plating, as opposed to the 50% for non-weaver CGCs. Chronic high K+ treatment improved the relative survival of weaver mutant mouse CGCs 1.6 2.2-fold and that of non-weaver CGCs 1.2-1.4-fold; the same number of CGCs (about 20% of the plated cells) were rescued by high K+ in both types of culture. The findings indicate that, in culture weaver mutant mouse, CGCs have a normal response to membrane depolarization and that the normal function of the Girk2 potassium channel is not critical for the survival of differentiated CGCs.

  18. PSD-95 regulates NMDA receptors in developing cerebellar granule neurons of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Losi, Gabriele; Prybylowski, Kate; Fu, Zhanyan; Luo, Jianhong; Wenthold, Robert J; Vicini, Stefano

    2003-01-01

    We transfected a green fluorescent protein-tagged PSD-95 (PSD-95gfp) into cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) to investigate the role of PSD-95 in excitatory synapse maturation. Cells were grown in low potassium to favour functional synapse formation in vitro. Transfected cells displayed clear clusters of PSD-95gfp, often at the extremities of the short dendritic trees. We recorded NMDA and AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (NMDA- and AMPA-mESPCs) in the presence of TTX and bicuculline. At days in vitro (DIV) 7–8 PSD-95gfp-transfected cells had NMDA-mEPSCs with faster decay and smaller amplitudes than matching controls. In contrast, AMPA-mEPSC frequencies and amplitudes were increased. Whole-cell current density and ifenprodil sensitivity were reduced in PSD-95gfp cells, indicating a reduction of NR2B subunits containing NMDA receptors. No changes were observed compared to control when cells were transfected with cDNA for PSD-95gfp with palmitoylation site mutations that prevent targeting to the synapse. Overexpression of the NMDA receptor NR2A subunit, but not the NR2B subunit, prevented NMDA-mEPSC amplitude reduction when cotransfected with PSD-95gfp. PSD-95gfp overexpression produced faster NMDA-mEPSC decay when transfected alone or with either NR2 subunit. Surface staining of the epitope-tagged NR2 subunits revealed that colocalization with PSD-95gfp was higher for flag-tagged NR2A subunit clusters than for flag-tagged NR2B subunit clusters. These data suggest that PSD-95 overexpression in CGCs favours synaptic maturation by allowing synaptic insertion of NR2A and depressing expression of NR2B subunits. PMID:12576494

  19. Glucose starvation stimulates Zn2+ toxicity in cultures of cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Isaev, Nickolay K; Lozier, Ekaterina R; Novikova, Svetlana V; Silachev, Denis N; Zorov, Dmitry B; Stelmashook, Elena V

    2012-01-01

    Zinc chloride (0.02 mM, 3h) did not have any influence on the survival of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) incubated in balanced salt solution (BSS). However, in the absence of glucose ZnCl(2) caused severe neuronal damage, decreasing cell survival to 12±2%. Either the blockade of ionotropic glutamate NMDA-receptors with MK-801 or APV or supplementation the medium with ruthenium red (mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter blocker) almost entirely protected CGNs from the toxic effect of ZnCl(2) during glucose deprivation (GD). However, NBQX (AMPA/kainate glutamate receptor blocker) did not show protective effect. Measurements of intracellular calcium ions concentration using fluorescent probe (Fluo-4 AM) and zinc ions (FluoZin-3AM) demonstrated that 1.5h-exposure to GD induced intensive increase of Fluo-4 fluorescence and small increase of FluoZin-3 fluorescence in neurons. The supplementation of medium with ZnCl(2) caused equal increase of FluoZin-3 fluorescence at both GD and normoglycemia, whereas the potentiation of Fluo-4 fluorescence by zinc was observed only under GD and could be prevented by MK-801. However, neither MK-801 nor NBQX could influence [Zn(2+)](i) increase caused by zinc addition under GD, while ruthenium red did cause significant increase of [Zn(2+)](i). This data implies that zinc ions during GD induce an additional overload of CGNs with calcium ions that get transported through activated NMDA-channel. Zinc and calcium ions accumulate in mitochondria and amplify individual destructive action on these organelles leading to neuronal death.

  20. Proneurotrophin-3 promotes cell cycle withdrawal of developing cerebellar granule cell progenitors via the p75 neurotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Juan Pablo; Abercrombie, Elizabeth; Friedman, Wilma J

    2016-07-19

    Cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCP) proliferate extensively in the external granule layer (EGL) of the developing cerebellum prior to differentiating and migrating. Mechanisms that regulate the appropriate timing of cell cycle withdrawal of these neuronal progenitors during brain development are not well defined. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)) is highly expressed in the proliferating GCPs, but is downregulated once the cells leave the cell cycle. This receptor has primarily been characterized as a death receptor for its ability to induce neuronal apoptosis following injury. Here we demonstrate a novel function for p75(NTR) in regulating proper cell cycle exit of neuronal progenitors in the developing rat and mouse EGL, which is stimulated by proNT3. In the absence of p75(NTR), GCPs continue to proliferate beyond their normal period, resulting in a larger cerebellum that persists into adulthood, with consequent motor deficits.

  1. The role of calcium and cyclic nucleotide signaling in cerebellar granule cell migration under normal and pathological conditions.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Yutaro; Galas, Ludovic; Lebon, Alexis; Raoult, Emilie; Fahrion, Jennifer K; Tilot, Amanda; Kumada, Tasturo; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Vaudry, David; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2015-04-01

    In the developing brain, immature neurons migrate from their sites of origin to their final destination, where they reside for the rest of their lives. This active movement of immature neurons is essential for the formation of normal neuronal cytoarchitecture and proper differentiation. Deficits in migration result in the abnormal development of the brain, leading to a variety of neurological disorders. A myriad of extracellular guidance molecules and intracellular effector molecules is involved in controlling the migration of immature neurons in a cell type, cortical layer and birth-date-specific manner. To date, little is known about how extracellular guidance molecules transfer their information to the intracellular effector molecules, which regulate the migration of immature neurons. In this article, to fill the gap between extracellular guidance molecules and intracellular effector molecules, using the migration of cerebellar granule cells as a model system of neuronal cell migration, we explore the role of second messenger signaling (specifically Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signaling) in the regulation of neuronal cell migration. We will, first, describe the cortical layer-specific changes in granule cell migration. Second, we will discuss the roles of Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signaling in controlling granule cell migration. Third, we will present recent studies showing the roles of Ca(2+) and cyclic nucleotide signaling in the deficits in granule cell migration in mouse models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders and fetal Minamata disease.

  2. Reactive oxygen species are related to ionic fluxes and volume decrease in apoptotic cerebellar granule neurons: role of NOX enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Enríquez, Berenice; Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Morán, Julio

    2011-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced early during apoptosis of cerebellar granule neurons induced by low potassium (K5) and staurosporine (Sts). In addition, K5 and Sts activate NADPH oxidases (NOX). Recently, we described that K5 and Sts induce apoptotic volume decrease (AVD) at a time when ROS generation and NOX activity occur. In the present study, we evaluated the relationship between ROS generation and ionic fluxes during AVD. Here, we showed that K5- and Sts-induced AVD was inhibited by antioxidants and that direct ROS production induced AVD. Moreover, NOX inhibitors eliminated AVD induced by both K5 and Sts. Sts, but not K5, failed to induce AVD in cerebellar granule neurons from NOX2 knockout mice. These findings suggest that K5- and Sts-induced AVD is largely mediated by ROS produced by NOX. On the other hand, we also found that the blockage of ionic fluxes involved in AVD inhibited both ROS generation and NOX activity. These findings suggest that ROS generation and NOX activity are involved in ionic fluxes activation, which in turn could maintain ROS generation by activating NOX, leading to a self-amplifying cycle.

  3. Cell Division Mode Change Mediates the Regulation of Cerebellar Granule Neurogenesis Controlled by the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rong; Wang, Minglei; Wang, Jia; Huang, Xingxu; Yang, Ru; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Summary Symmetric and asymmetric divisions are important for self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells during neurogenesis. Although cerebellar granule neurogenesis is controlled by sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, whether and how this process is mediated by regulation of cell division modes have not been determined. Here, using time-lapse imaging and cell culture from neuronal progenitor-specific and differentiated neuron-specific reporter mouse lines (Math1-GFP and Dcx-DsRed) and Patched+/− mice in which SHH signaling is activated, we find evidence for the existence of symmetric and asymmetric divisions that are closely associated with progenitor proliferation and differentiation. While activation of the SHH pathway enhances symmetric progenitor cell divisions, blockade of the SHH pathway reverses the cell division mode change in Math1-GFP;Dcx-DsRed;Patched+/− mice by promoting asymmetric divisions or terminal neuronal symmetric divisions. Thus, cell division mode change mediates the regulation of cerebellar granule neurogenesis controlled by SHH signaling. PMID:26527387

  4. Tenascin promotes cerebellar granule cell migration and neurite outgrowth by different domains in the fibronectin type III repeats

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The extracellular matrix molecule tenascin has been implicated in neuron-glia recognition in the developing central and peripheral nervous system and in regeneration. In this study, its role in Bergmann glial process-mediated neuronal migration was assayed in vitro using tissue explants of the early postnatal mouse cerebellar cortex. Of the five mAbs reacting with nonoverlapping epitopes on tenascin, mAbs J1/tn1, J1/tn4, and J1/tn5, but not mAbs J1/tn2 and J1/tn3 inhibited granule cell migration. Localization of the immunoreactive domains by EM of rotary shadowed tenascin molecules revealed that the mAbs J1/tn4 and J1/tn5, like the previously described J1/tn1 antibody, bound between the third and fifth fibronectin type III homologous repeats and mAb J1/tn3 bound between the third and fifth EGF-like repeats. mAb J1/tn2 had previously been found to react between fibronectin type III homologous repeats 10 and 11 of the mouse molecule (Lochter, A., L. Vaughan, A. Kaplony, A. Prochiantz, M. Schachner, and A. Faissner. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 113:1159-1171). When postnatal granule cell neurons were cultured on tenascin adsorbed to polyornithine, both the percentage of neurite-bearing cells and the length of outgrowing neurites were increased when compared to neurons growing on polyornithine alone. This neurite outgrowth promoting effect of tenascin was abolished only by mAb J1/tn2 or tenascin added to the culture medium in soluble form. The other antibodies did not modify the stimulatory or inhibitory effects of the molecule. These observations indicate that tenascin influences neurite outgrowth and migration of cerebellar granule cells by different domains in the fibronectin type III homologous repeats. PMID:1371773

  5. The effects of neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on cerebellar granule cell movement and neurite extension in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Sekino, Y; Shirao, T

    2000-01-01

    Migration of the granule cells is a major stage of cerebellar maturation. Granule cells express neurotrophins and their receptors; however, their role in cell migration has not been defined. In this study we investigated the effects of exogenous neurotrophins on the movement and neurite extension of granule cells from glial-free cerebellar cell reaggregates in vitro. Our results provide direct evidence that neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor differentially affect the granule cells. Neurotrophin-3 significantly affected granule cell movements by decreasing the migration index (the ratio of the number of cells that moved further than half the neurite length) and the speed of cell soma movement, but did not affect neurite length or growth cone migration. In contrast, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-4 acted on growing neurites and growth cones by significantly increasing neurite length and the speed of growth cone migration, but had no effect either on the migration index or on the speed of the cell soma movement. The results suggest that neurotrophins differentially affect neurite extension and the movements of cerebellar granule cells. PMID:10842017

  6. Endogenous XIAP, but not other members of the inhibitory apoptosis protein family modulates cerebellar granule neurons survival.

    PubMed

    Blancas, Sugela; Fadó, Rut; Rodriguez-Alvarez, José; Morán, Julio

    2014-10-01

    Programmed cell death plays a critical role during cerebellar development. In particular, it has been shown in vivo and in vitro that developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) die apoptotically. Apoptosis involves a series of morphological changes and the activation of caspases. Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) is implicated in negative regulation of caspase activation and apoptotic cell death. Although apoptotic death of CGN has been extensively studied, there is no information about the role of IAPs in the developing cerebellum. Here, we studied the participation of some members of IAPs in the survival of the developing rat CGN in culture and under physiological conditions. Under these conditions, we found a differential expression pattern of cIAP-1, cIAP-2, XIAP and survivin during cerebellar development in an age-dependent manner, highlighting the significant increase of XIAP levels. We also detected an interaction between XIAP and caspase 3 at postnatal day (P) 12 and 16. On the other hand, we found a significant decrease of XIAP levels in cultured CGN maintained in chronic potassium deprivation, an apoptotic condition, suggesting a possible relationship between XIAP levels and neuronal viability. Under these conditions, we also detected the interaction of XIAP with active caspase-3. The down-regulation of XIAP in CGN cultured under survival conditions (chronic potassium depolarization) induced a reduction of cell viability and an increment of apoptotic cells. These findings support the idea that IAPs could be involved in the survival of CGN and that XIAP might be critical for neuronal survival in cerebellar development and during chronic depolarization in cultured CGN through a mechanism involving caspase inhibition.

  7. Differential effects of methylmercury on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor currents in rat cerebellar granule and cerebral cortical neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Herden, Christina J; Pardo, Nicole E; Hajela, Ravindra K; Yuan, Yukun; Atchison, William D

    2008-02-01

    Cerebellar granule cells are particularly sensitive to inhibition by methylmercury (MeHg) on GABA(A) receptor function. This is manifested as a more rapid block of inhibitory postsynaptic currents/inhibitory postsynaptic potentials than for Purkinje cells. The underlying mechanism(s) for differential sensitivity of GABAergic transmission to MeHg in cerebellar neurons is unknown. Differential expression of alpha(6) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar granule and Purkinje neurons could partially explain this. GABA-evoked currents (I(GABA)) were recorded in response to MeHg in alpha(6) subunit-containing cerebellar granule cells and alpha(6) subunit-deficient cerebral cortical cells in culture. Cortical cells were substituted for Purkinje cells, which do not express alpha(6) subunits. They express the same alpha(1)-containing GABA(A) receptor as Purkinje cells but lack characteristics that enhance Purkinje cell resistance to MeHg. I(GABA) were obtained using whole-cell recording and symmetrical [Cl(-)]. MeHg reduced I(GABA) to complete block in both cell types in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. This effect was faster in granule cells than cortical cells. Effects of MeHg on I(GABA) were recorded in granule cells at various developmental stages (days in vitro 4, 6, and 8) to alter the expression level of alpha(6) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors. Effects of MeHg on I(GABA) were similar in cells at all days. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing either alpha(6) or alpha(1) subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors, time to block of I(GABA) by MeHg was comparable. Thus, the presence of the alpha(6) subunit alone may not underlie the differential effects of MeHg on I(GABA) observed in cerebellar granule and cortical neurons; other factors are likely to be involved as well. PMID:17977981

  8. Differentiation and developmental origin of cerebellar granule neuron ectopia in protein O-mannose UDP-N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase 1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhang, P; Yang, Y; Xiong, Y; Qi, Y; Hu, H

    2008-03-18

    The cerebellar cortex of protein O-mannose UDP-N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase 1 (POMGnT1) knockout mice contains discrete clusters of granule neurons that fail to migrate from the external germinal layer (EGL) to the internal granule cell layer (IGL). To test the hypothesis that the breaches in the pial basement membrane and glia limitans contribute to the formation of such heterotopias, POMGnT1 deficient mice were used to examine the mechanisms underlying these migration defects. The basement membrane, glia limitans, and granule neuron development were assessed with protein markers and immunofluorescent microscopy. Further, the integrity of the pial basement membrane, and granule neuron differentiation state were assessed by electron microscopy. Localized breaches in pial basement membrane and disruptions in the glia limitans were strongly associated with ectopia of EGL cells. In such ectopias, Bergmann glia fibers were retracted and disorganized with very few protruded into the ectopic area. Thus, migration failure was correlated with a compromised Bergmann glia scaffold. Nevertheless, the ectopic EGL cells showed characteristics of differentiated granule neurons and formed synapses with mossy fibers. Altogether, these results suggest that pial basement membrane breaches and glia limitans disruptions are the underlying causes of cerebellar granule neuron ectopia in POMGnT1 knockout mice. Moreover, migration into the IGL is not required for granule cell acquisition of certain differentiated characteristics.

  9. Bax inactivation in lurcher mutants rescues cerebellar granule cells but not purkinje cells or inferior olivary neurons.

    PubMed

    Selimi, F; Vogel, M W; Mariani, J

    2000-07-15

    Lurcher is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor gene (Grid2) that turns the receptor into a leaky ion channel. The expression of the Lurcher gene in heterozygous (Grid2(Lc/+)) mutants induces the death of almost all Purkinje cells starting from the second postnatal week. Ninety percent of the granule cells and 60-75% of the inferior olivary neurons die because of the loss of their target neurons, the Purkinje cells. The apoptotic nature of the neurodegeneration has been demonstrated previously by the presence of activated caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family, has been shown to be involved in developmental neuronal death. To study the role of Bax in Grid2(Lc/+) neurodegeneration, double mutants with Grid2(Lc/)+ mice and Bax knock-out mice (Bax-/-) were generated. Bax deletion had no effect on the death of Purkinje cells and inferior olivary neurons, although a temporary rescue of some Purkinje cells could be detected in P15 Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/- animals. From postnatal day 15 (P15) to P60, the number of granule cells in Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/-mice did not significantly change and was significantly increased compared with the number found in Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax+/+ mice. Granule cell number in P60 Grid2(Lc/)+;Bax-/- mice corresponded to 70% of the number found in wild-type mice. Our results show that Bax inactivation in Grid2(Lc/+) mice does not rescue intrinsic Purkinje cell death or the target-related cell death of olivary neurons, but Bax inactivation does inhibit persistently target-related cell death in cerebellar granule cells.

  10. Stimulation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor has a trophic effect on differentiating cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, O S

    1988-04-22

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) supplementation of cerebellar cultures enriched in granule neurones (about 90%) prevented the extensive cell loss which occurs when cultivation takes place, in serum containing media, in the presence of 'low' K+ (5-15 mM). Estimation of tetanus toxin receptors and N-CAM contents indicated that NMDA rescued primarily nerve cells. The influence of NMDA in promoting cell survival was blocked by the receptor antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate. The effect depended both on the concentration of NMDA and on the degree of depolarization of cells, the affinity in the presence of 15 mM K+ being similar to that of NMDA receptor binding. The results attest a new role for excitatory amino acid transmitters by showing that they can exert a stage-dependent trophic action on developing nerve cells.

  11. Apoptosis of cerebellar granule cells induced by organotin compounds found in drinking water: involvement of MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Mundy, William R; Freudenrich, Theresa M

    2006-01-01

    Mono- and dialkyl organotin compounds are used primarily as heat stabilizers in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics. Recently, monomethyltin (MMT), dimethyltin (DMT), monobutyltin (MBT), and dibutyltin (DBT) have been detected in water from homes and businesses served by PVC pipes. While trialkyl organotins such as trimethyltin (TMT) and triethyltin (TET) are well known neurotoxicants, the toxicity of the mono- and dialkyl organotins is not well described. The present study compared the cytotoxicity of organotins found in drinking water with the known neurotoxicant TMT in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells, and examined the role of MAP kinase signaling in organotin-induced cell death. Twenty-four hour exposure to TMT resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability with an EC(50) of 3 microM. Exposure to MMT, DMT, and MBT at concentrations up to 10 microM had no effect. DBT, however, was very potent, and decreased cell viability with an EC(50) of 0.3 microM. Staining of organotin-treated cerebellar granule cells with the nuclear dye Syto-13 revealed that TMT and DBT, but not MMT, DMT, or MBT, produced condensation and fragmentation of chromatin characteristic of apoptosis. TMT- and DBT-induced apoptosis was confirmed using TUNEL staining and measurement of PARP cleavage. Activation of MAP kinase pathways was examined after 6 h of exposure to the organotins which induced apoptosis. Both TMT and DBT activated ERK1/2, but only TMT activated the JNK/c-Jun and p38 pathways. Pharmacologic blockade of JNK/c-Jun and p38 activation significantly decreased apoptosis produced by TMT, but not by DBT. These results show that DBT is a potent neurotoxicant in vitro, but unlike TMT, does not induce cell death via activation of MAP kinase signaling.

  12. The effect of gallium nitride on long-term culture induced aging of neuritic function in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Ruei; Young, Tai-Horng

    2008-04-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) has been developed for a variety of microelectronic and optical applications due to its unique electric property and chemical stability. In the present study, n-type and p-type GaN were used as substrates to culture cerebellar granule neurons to examine the effect of GaN on cell response for a long-term culture period. It was found that GaN could rapidly induce cultured neurons to exhibit a high phosphorylated Akt level after 20h of incubation. It was assumed that the anti-apoptotic effect of Akt phosphorylation could be correlated with cell survival, neurite growth and neuronal function for up to 35 days of incubation. Morphological studies showed GaN induced larger neuronal aggregates and neurite fasciculation to exhibit a dense fiber network after 8 days of incubation. Western blot analysis and immunocytochemical characterization showed that GaN still exhibited the expression of neurite growth and function, such as high levels of GAP-43, synapsin I and synaptophysin even after 35 days of incubation. In addition, survival of cerebellar granule neurons on GaN was improved by the analysis of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from damaged cells. These results indicated that neuronal connections were formed on GaN by a gradual process from Akt activation and cell aggregation to develop neurite growth, fasciculation and function. Therefore, GaN offers a good model system to identify a well-characterized pattern of neuronal behavior for a long-term culture period, consistent with the development of a neurochip requiring the integration of biological system and semiconductor material.

  13. Ethanol impairs Rho GTPase signaling and differentiation of cerebellar granule neurons in a rodent model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S; Guleria, R S; Pan, J; Bayless, K J; Davis, G E; Dipette, D; Singh, U S

    2006-12-01

    Developmental exposure to ethanol impairs fetal brain development and causes fetal alcohol syndrome. Although the cerebellum is one of the most alcohol-sensitive brain areas, signaling mechanisms underlying the deleterious effects of ethanol on developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are largely unknown. Here we describe the effects of in vivo ethanol exposure on neurite formation in CGNs and on the activation of Rho GTPases (RhoA and Rac1), regulators of neurite formation. Exposure of 7-day-old rat pups to ethanol for 3 h moderately increased blood alcohol concentration (BAC) ( approximately 40 mM) and inhibited neurite formation and Rac1 activation in CGNs. Longer exposure to ethanol for 5 h resulted in higher BAC ( approximately 80 mM), induced apoptosis, inhibited Rac1, and activated RhoA. Studies demonstrated a regulatory role of Rho GTPases in differentiation of cerebellar neurons, and indicated that ethanol-associated impairment of Rho GTPase signaling might contribute to brain defects observed in fetal alcohol syndrome.

  14. Casein Kinase 1δ Is an APC/CCdh1 Substrate that Regulates Cerebellar Granule Cell Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Penas, Clara; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Fang, Yin; Ramachandran, Vimal; Daniel, Mark; Wang, Weiping; Maloof, Marie E.; Rahaim, Ronald J.; Bibian, Mathieu; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Finkelstein, David; Han, Jeng-Liang; Long, Jun; Li, Bin; Robbins, David J.; Malumbres, Marcos; Roussel, Martine F.; Roush, William R.; Hatten, Mary E.; Ayad, Nagi G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Although casein kinase 1δ (CK1δ) is at the center of multiple signaling pathways, its role in the expansion of central nervous system progenitor cells is unknown. Using mouse cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCPs) as a model for brain neurogenesis, we demonstrate that the loss of CK1δ or treatment of GCPs with a highly selective small molecule inhibits GCP expansion. In contrast, CK1δ overexpression increases GCP proliferation. Thus, CK1δ appears to regulate GCP neurogenesis. CK1δ is targeted for proteolysis via the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/CCdh1) ubiquitin ligase, and conditional deletion of the APC/CCdh1 activator Cdh1 in cerebellar GCPs results in higher levels of CK1δ. APC/CCdh1 also downregulates CK1δ during cell cycle exit. Therefore, we conclude that APC/CCdh1 controls CK1δ levels to balance proliferation and cell cycle exit in the developing central nervous system. Similar studies in medulloblastoma cells showed that CK1δ holds promise as a new therapeutic target. PMID:25843713

  15. Proneurotrophin-3 promotes cell cycle withdrawal of developing cerebellar granule cell progenitors via the p75 neurotrophin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zanin, Juan Pablo; Abercrombie, Elizabeth; Friedman, Wilma J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell progenitors (GCP) proliferate extensively in the external granule layer (EGL) of the developing cerebellum prior to differentiating and migrating. Mechanisms that regulate the appropriate timing of cell cycle withdrawal of these neuronal progenitors during brain development are not well defined. The p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) is highly expressed in the proliferating GCPs, but is downregulated once the cells leave the cell cycle. This receptor has primarily been characterized as a death receptor for its ability to induce neuronal apoptosis following injury. Here we demonstrate a novel function for p75NTR in regulating proper cell cycle exit of neuronal progenitors in the developing rat and mouse EGL, which is stimulated by proNT3. In the absence of p75NTR, GCPs continue to proliferate beyond their normal period, resulting in a larger cerebellum that persists into adulthood, with consequent motor deficits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16654.001 PMID:27434667

  16. The neurotrophic activity of PACAP on rat cerebellar granule cells is associated with activation of the protein kinase A pathway and c-fos gene expression.

    PubMed

    Vaudry, D; Basille, M; Anouar, Y; Fournier, A; Vaudry, H; Gonzalez, B J

    1998-12-11

    In vitro studies have shown that PACAP promotes cell survival and neurite outgrowth in immature cerebellar granule cells. In the present study, we have examined the transduction pathways involved in the neurotrophic activity of PACAP. Incubation of cultured granule cells with graded concentrations of PACAP produced a dose-dependent increase in c-fos mRNA level. The effects of PACAP on c-fos gene expression and granule cell survival were both mimicked by dbcAMP but not by PMA. The maximum effect of PACAP on c-fos gene expression was observed after 1 h of treatment. Similar effects of the peptide on granule cell survival were observed whether the cells were continuously incubated with PACAP for 48 h or only exposed to PACAP during 1 h. The PKA inhibitor H89 significantly reduced the effect of PACAP on c-fos mRNA level, whereas the specific PKC inhibitor chelerytrine had no effect. These data indicate that the action of PACAP on cerebellar granule cell survival and c-fos gene expression are both mediated through the adenylyl cyclase/PKA pathway.

  17. Different ataxin-3 amyloid aggregates induce intracellular Ca(2+) deregulation by different mechanisms in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Pellistri, Francesca; Bucciantini, Monica; Invernizzi, Gaetano; Gatta, Elena; Penco, Amanda; Frana, Anna Maria; Nosi, Daniele; Relini, Annalisa; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Gliozzi, Alessandra; Tortora, Paolo; Robello, Mauro; Stefani, Massimo

    2013-12-01

    This work aims at elucidating the relation between morphological and physicochemical properties of different ataxin-3 (ATX3) aggregates and their cytotoxicity. We investigated a non-pathological ATX3 form (ATX3Q24), a pathological expanded form (ATX3Q55), and an ATX3 variant truncated at residue 291 lacking the polyQ expansion (ATX3/291Δ). Solubility, morphology and hydrophobic exposure of oligomeric aggregates were characterized. Then we monitored the changes in the intracellular Ca(2+) levels and the abnormal Ca(2+) signaling resulting from aggregate interaction with cultured rat cerebellar granule cells. ATX3Q55, ATX3/291Δ and, to a lesser extent, ATX3Q24 oligomers displayed similar morphological and physicochemical features and induced qualitatively comparable time-dependent intracellular Ca(2+) responses. However, only the pre-fibrillar aggregates of expanded ATX3 (the only variant which forms bundles of mature fibrils) triggered a characteristic Ca(2+) response at a later stage that correlated with a larger hydrophobic exposure relative to the two other variants. Cell interaction with early oligomers involved glutamatergic receptors, voltage-gated channels and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1)-rich membrane domains, whereas cell interaction with more aged ATX3Q55 pre-fibrillar aggregates resulted in membrane disassembly by a mechanism involving only GM1-rich areas. Exposure to ATX3Q55 and ATX3/291Δ aggregates resulted in cell apoptosis, while ATX3Q24 was substantially innocuous. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms of ATX3 aggregation, aggregate cytotoxicity and calcium level modifications in exposed cerebellar cells.

  18. Type IV Collagen Controls the Axogenesis of Cerebellar Granule Cells by Regulating Basement Membrane Integrity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Miki; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kakiguchi, Kisa; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the major glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellum, and GC axon formation is an initial step in establishing functional cerebellar circuits. In the zebrafish cerebellum, GCs can be classified into rostromedial and caudolateral groups, according to the locations of their somata in the corresponding cerebellar lobes. The axons of the GCs in the caudolateral lobes terminate on crest cells in the dorsal hindbrain, as well as forming en passant synapses with Purkinje cells in the cerebellum. In the zebrafish mutant shiomaneki, the caudolateral GCs extend aberrant axons. Positional cloning revealed that the shiomaneki (sio) gene locus encodes Col4a6, a subunit of type IV collagen, which, in a complex with Col4a5, is a basement membrane (BM) component. Both col4a5 and col4a6 mutants displayed similar abnormalities in the axogenesis of GCs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Although type IV collagen is reported to control axon targeting by regulating the concentration gradient of an axonal guidance molecule Slit, Slit overexpression did not affect the GC axons. The structure of the BM surrounding the tectum and dorsal hindbrain was disorganized in the col4a5 and col4a6 mutants. Moreover, the abnormal axogenesis of the caudolateral GCs and the RGCs was coupled with aberrant BM structures in the type IV collagen mutants. The regrowth of GC axons after experimental ablation revealed that the original and newly formed axons displayed similar branching and extension abnormalities in the col4a6 mutants. These results collectively suggest that type IV collagen controls GC axon formation by regulating the integrity of the BM, which provides axons with the correct path to their targets. PMID:26451951

  19. Bestrophin1 Channels are Insensitive to Ethanol and Do not Mediate Tonic GABAergic Currents in Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Marvin R.; Wadleigh, Aya; Hughes, Benjamin A.; Woodward, John J.; Valenzuela, C. Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The granule cell layer of the cerebellum functions in spatio-temporal encoding of information. Granule cells (GCs) are tonically inhibited by spillover of GABA released from Golgi cells and this tonic inhibition is facilitated by acute ethanol. Recently, it was demonstrated that a specialized Ca2+-activated anion-channel, bestrophin1 (Best1), found on glial cells, can release GABA that contributes up to 50–75% of the tonic GABAergic current. However, it is unknown if ethanol has any actions on Best1 function. Using whole-cell electrophysiology, we found that recombinant Best1 channels expressed in HEK-293 cells were insensitive to 40 and 80 mM ethanol. We attempted to measure the Best1-mediated component of the tonic current in slices using 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid (NPPB). We confirmed that this agent blocks recombinant Best1 channels. Unexpectedly, we found that NPPB significantly potentiated the tonic current and the area and decay of GABAA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in GCs in rodent slices under two different recording conditions. To better isolate the Best1-dependent tonic current component, we blocked the Golgi cell component of the tonic current with tetrodotoxin and found that NPPB similarly and significantly potentiated the tonic current amplitude and decay time of miniature IPSCs. Two other Cl−-channel blockers were also tested: 4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid disodium salt hydrate (DIDS) showed no effect on GABAergic transmission, while niflumic acid (NFA) significantly suppressed the tonic current noise, as well as the mIPSC frequency, amplitude, and area. These data suggest that acute ethanol exposure does not modulate Best1 channels and these findings serve to challenge recent data indicating that these channels participate in the generation of tonic GABAergic currents in cerebellar GCs. PMID:22275879

  20. Inhibitory effect of fangchinoline on excitatory amino acids-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, S D; Oh, S K; Kim, H S; Seong, Y H

    2001-04-01

    Glutamate receptors-mediated excitotoxicity is believed to play a role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was performed to evaluate the inhibitory effect of fangchinoline, a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid, which has a characteristic as a Ca2+ channel blocker, on excitatory amino acids (EAAs)-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule neuron. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 1 mM) and kainate (100 microM)-induced neuronal cell death which was measured by trypan blue exclusion test. Fangchinoline (1 and 5 microM) inhibited glutamate release into medium induced by NMDA (1 mM) and kainate (100 microM), which was measured by HPLC. And fangchinoline (5 microM) inhibited glutamate (1 mM)-induced elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. These results suggest that inhibition of Ca2+ influx by fangchinoline may contribute to the beneficial effects on neurodegenerative effect of glutamate in pathophysiological conditions. PMID:11339637

  1. CYP2E1 induction leads to oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in glutathione-depleted cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Olvera, Ana Carolina; Morán, Julio; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Prospéro-García, Oscar; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2014-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that brain cytochrome P450 (CYP) can contribute to the in situ metabolism of xenobiotics. In the liver, some xenobiotics can be metabolized by CYPs into more reactive products that can damage hepatocytes and induce cell death. In addition, normal CYP activity may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to cell damage through oxidative mechanisms. CYP2E1 is a CYP isoform that can generate ROS leading to cytotoxicity in multiple tissue types. The aim of this study was to determine whether CYP2E1 induction may lead to significant brain cell impairment. Immunological analysis revealed that exposure of primary cerebellar granule neuronal cultures to the CYP inducer isoniazid, increased CYP2E1 expression. In the presence of buthionine sulfoximine, an agent that reduces glutathione levels, isoniazid treatment also resulted in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, DNA oxidation and cell death. These effects were attenuated by simultaneous exposure to diallyl sulfide, a CYP2E1 inhibitor, or to a mimetic of superoxide dismutase/catalase, (Euka). These results suggest that in cases of reduced antioxidant levels, the induction of brain CYP2E1 could represent a risk of in situ neuronal damage.

  2. Glucose deprivation stimulates Cu(2+) toxicity in cultured cerebellar granule neurons and Cu(2+)-dependent zinc release.

    PubMed

    Isaev, Nickolay K; Genrikhs, Elisaveta E; Aleksandrova, Olga P; Zelenova, Elena A; Stelmashook, Elena V

    2016-05-27

    Copper chloride (0.01mM, 2h) did not have significant influence on the survival of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) incubated in balanced salt solution. However, CuCl2 caused severe neuronal damage by glucose deprivation (GD). The glutamate NMDA-receptors blocker MK-801 partially and antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or Zn(2+) chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN) almost entirely protected CGNs from this toxic effect. Measurements of intracellular calcium ions using Fluo-4 AM, or zinc ions with FluoZin-3 AM demonstrated that 1 h-exposure to GD induced intensive increase of Fluo-4 but not FluoZin-3 fluorescence in neurons. The supplementation of solution with CuCl2 caused an increase of FluoZin-3, Fluo-4 and CellROX Green (reactive oxygen species probe) fluorescence by GD. The stimulation of Fluo-4 but not FluoZin-3 fluorescence by copper could be prevented partially by MK-801 and as well as CellROX Green fluorescence by NAC at GD. This data imply that during GD copper ions induce intense displacement zinc ions from intracellular stores, in addition free radical production, glutamate release and Ca(2+) overload of CGNs, that causes death of neurons as a result. PMID:27063646

  3. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia are motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.

  4. Leading-process actomyosin coordinates organelle positioning and adhesion receptor dynamics in radially migrating cerebellar granule neurons

    DOE PAGES

    Trivedi, Niraj; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Karakaya, Mahmut; Howell, Danielle; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Solecki, David J.

    2014-12-02

    During brain development, neurons migrate from germinal zones to their final positions to assemble neural circuits. A unique saltatory cadence involving cyclical organelle movement (e.g., centrosome motility) and leading-process actomyosin enrichment prior to nucleokinesis organizes neuronal migration. While functional evidence suggests that leading-process actomyosin is essential for centrosome motility, the role of the actin-enriched leading process in globally organizing organelle transport or traction forces remains unexplored. Our results show that myosin ii motors and F-actin dynamics are required for Golgi apparatus positioning before nucleokinesis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) migrating along glial fibers. Moreover, we show that primary cilia aremore » motile organelles, localized to the leading-process F-actin-rich domain and immobilized by pharmacological inhibition of myosin ii and F-actin dynamics. Finally, leading process adhesion dynamics are dependent on myosin ii and F-actin. In conclusion, we propose that actomyosin coordinates the overall polarity of migrating CGNs by controlling asymmetric organelle positioning and cell-cell contacts as these cells move along their glial guides.« less

  5. CYP2E1 induction leads to oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in glutathione-depleted cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Olvera, Ana Carolina; Morán, Julio; Camacho-Carranza, Rafael; Prospéro-García, Oscar; Espinosa-Aguirre, Jesús Javier

    2014-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that brain cytochrome P450 (CYP) can contribute to the in situ metabolism of xenobiotics. In the liver, some xenobiotics can be metabolized by CYPs into more reactive products that can damage hepatocytes and induce cell death. In addition, normal CYP activity may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to cell damage through oxidative mechanisms. CYP2E1 is a CYP isoform that can generate ROS leading to cytotoxicity in multiple tissue types. The aim of this study was to determine whether CYP2E1 induction may lead to significant brain cell impairment. Immunological analysis revealed that exposure of primary cerebellar granule neuronal cultures to the CYP inducer isoniazid, increased CYP2E1 expression. In the presence of buthionine sulfoximine, an agent that reduces glutathione levels, isoniazid treatment also resulted in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, DNA oxidation and cell death. These effects were attenuated by simultaneous exposure to diallyl sulfide, a CYP2E1 inhibitor, or to a mimetic of superoxide dismutase/catalase, (Euka). These results suggest that in cases of reduced antioxidant levels, the induction of brain CYP2E1 could represent a risk of in situ neuronal damage. PMID:24929095

  6. NMDA-Receptors Are Involved in Cu2+/Paraquat-Induced Death of Cultured Cerebellar Granule Neurons.

    PubMed

    Stelmashook, E V; Genrikhs, E E; Aleksandrova, O P; Amelkina, G A; Zelenova, E A; Isaev, N K

    2016-08-01

    Rat cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) were not sensitive to CuCl2 (1-10 µM, 24 h), whereas paraquat (150 µM) decreased neuronal survival to 79 ± 3% of control level. Simultaneous treatment of CGNs with paraquat and CuCl2 (2, 5, or 10 µM Cu2+/paraquat) caused significant copper dose-dependent death, lowering their survival to 56 ± 4, 37 ± 3, or 16 ± 2%, respectively, and stimulating elevated production of free radicals in CGNs. Introduction of vitamin E, a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors (MK-801), and also removal of glutamine from the incubation medium decreased toxicity of Cu2+/paraquat mixture. However, addition of Cu2+ into the incubation medium did not affect CGNs death caused by glutamate. These data emphasize that excessive copper in the brain may trigger oxidative stress, which in turn results in release of glutamate, overstimulation of glutamate receptors, and neuronal death. PMID:27677558

  7. Role of glutamate receptors in tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47) neurotoxicity in mouse cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G; Tagliaferri, Sara; Roqué, Pamela J; Pellacani, Claudia

    2016-01-22

    The polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants are developmental neurotoxicants, as evidenced by numerous in vitro, animal and human studies. PBDEs can alter the homeostasis of thyroid hormone and directly interact with brain cells. Induction of oxidative stress, leading to DNA damage and apoptotic cell death is a prominent mechanism of PBDE neurotoxicity, though other mechanisms have also been suggested. In the present study we investigated the potential role played by glutamate receptors in the in vitro neurotoxicity of the tetrabromodiphenyl ether BDE-47, one of the most abundant PBDE congeners. Toxicity of BDE-47 in mouse cerebellar neurons was diminished by antagonists of glutamate ionotropic receptors, but not by antagonists of glutamate metabotropic receptors. Antagonists of NMDA and AMPA/Kainate receptors also inhibited BDE-47-induced oxidative stress and increases in intracellular calcium. The calcium chelator BAPTA-AM also inhibited BDE-47 cytotoxicity and oxidative stress. BDE-47 caused a rapid increase of extracellular glutamate levels, which was not antagonized by any of the compounds tested. The results suggest that BDE-47, by still unknown mechanisms, increases extracellular glutamate which in turn activates ionotropic glutamate receptors leading to increased calcium levels, oxidative stress, and ultimately cell death. PMID:26640238

  8. Mitochondria and calcium flux as targets of neuroprotection caused by minocycline in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martinez, Eva Maria; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Karachitos, Andonis; Bandez, Manuel J; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J; Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; de Mera, Raquel Maria Melero Fernandez; Jordan, Maria J; Aguirre, Norberto; Galindo, Maria F; Villalobos, Carlos; Navarro, Ana; Kmita, Hanna; Jordán, Joaquín

    2010-01-15

    Minocycline, an antibiotic of the tetracycline family, has attracted considerable interest for its theoretical therapeutic applications in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism of action underlying its effect remains elusive. Here we have studied the effect of minocycline under excitotoxic conditions. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging studies in rat cerebellar granular neuron cultures using fura2/AM and mitochondria-targeted aequorin revealed that minocycline, at concentrations higher than those shown to block inflammation and inflammation-induced neuronal death, inhibited NMDA-induced cytosolic and mitochondrial rises in Ca(2+) concentrations in a reversible manner. Moreover, minocycline added in the course of NMDA stimulation decreased Ca(2+) intracellular levels, but not when induced by depolarization with a high K(+) medium. We also found that minocycline, at the same concentrations, partially depolarized mitochondria by about 5-30 mV, prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake under conditions of environmental stress, and abrogated NMDA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Consistently, minocycline also abrogates the rise in ROS induced by 75 microM Ca(2+) in isolated brain mitochondria. In search for the mechanism of mitochondrial depolarization, we found that minocycline markedly inhibited state 3 respiration of rat brain mitochondria, although distinctly increased oxygen uptake in state 4. Minocycline inhibited NADH-cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome c oxidase activities, whereas the activity of succinate-cytochrome c reductase was not modified, suggesting selective inhibition of complexes I and IV. Finally, minocycline affected activity of voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) as determined in the reconstituted system. Taken together, our results indicate that mitochondria are a critical factor in minocycline-mediated neuroprotection.

  9. Granule cell ascending axon excitatory synapses onto Golgi cells implement a potent feedback circuit in the cerebellar granular layer.

    PubMed

    Cesana, Elisabetta; Pietrajtis, Katarzyna; Bidoret, Céline; Isope, Philippe; D'Angelo, Egidio; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Forti, Lia

    2013-07-24

    The function of inhibitory interneurons within brain microcircuits depends critically on the nature and properties of their excitatory synaptic drive. Golgi cells (GoCs) of the cerebellum inhibit cerebellar granule cells (GrCs) and are driven both by feedforward mossy fiber (mf) and feedback GrC excitation. Here, we have characterized GrC inputs to GoCs in rats and mice. We show that, during sustained mf discharge, synapses from local GrCs contribute equivalent charge to GoCs as mf synapses, arguing for the importance of the feedback inhibition. Previous studies predicted that GrC-GoC synapses occur predominantly between parallel fibers (pfs) and apical GoC dendrites in the molecular layer (ML). By combining EM and Ca(2+) imaging, we now demonstrate the presence of functional synaptic contacts between ascending axons (aa) of GrCs and basolateral dendrites of GoCs in the granular layer (GL). Immunohistochemical quantification estimates these contacts to be ∼400 per GoC. Using Ca(2+) imaging to identify synaptic inputs, we show that EPSCs from aa and mf contacts in basolateral dendrites display similarly fast kinetics, whereas pf inputs in the ML exhibit markedly slower kinetics as they undergo strong filtering by apical dendrites. We estimate that approximately half of the local GrC contacts generate fast EPSCs, indicating their basolateral location in the GL. We conclude that GrCs, through their aa contacts onto proximal GoC dendrites, define a powerful feedback inhibitory circuit in the GL.

  10. Excitotoxicity through NMDA receptors mediates cerebellar granule neuron apoptosis induced by prion protein 90-231 fragment.

    PubMed

    Thellung, Stefano; Gatta, Elena; Pellistri, Francesca; Corsaro, Alessandro; Villa, Valentina; Vassalli, Massimo; Robello, Mauro; Florio, Tullio

    2013-05-01

    Prion diseases recognize, as a unique molecular trait, the misfolding of CNS-enriched prion protein (PrP(C)) into an aberrant isoform (PrP(Sc)). In this work, we characterize the in vitro toxicity of amino-terminally truncated recombinant PrP fragment (amino acids 90-231, PrP90-231), on rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGN), focusing on glutamatergic receptor activation and Ca(2+) homeostasis impairment. This recombinant fragment assumes a toxic conformation (PrP90-231(TOX)) after controlled thermal denaturation (1 h at 53 °C) acquiring structural characteristics identified in PrP(Sc) (enrichment in β-structures, increased hydrophobicity, partial resistance to proteinase K, and aggregation in amyloid fibrils). By annexin-V binding assay, and evaluation of the percentage of fragmented and condensed nuclei, we show that treatment with PrP90-231(TOX), used in pre-fibrillar aggregation state, induces CGN apoptosis. This effect was associated with a delayed, but sustained elevation of [Ca(2+)]i. Both CGN apoptosis and [Ca(2+)]i increase were not observed using PrP90-231 in PrP(C)-like conformation. PrP90-231(TOX) effects were significantly reduced in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. In particular, CGN apoptosis and [Ca(2+)]i increase were largely reduced, although not fully abolished, by pre-treatment with the NMDA antagonists APV and memantine, while the AMPA antagonist CNQX produced a lower, although still significant, effect. In conclusion, we report that CGN apoptosis induced by PrP90-231(TOX) correlates with a sustained elevation of [Ca(2+)]i mediated by the activation of NMDA and AMPA receptors.

  11. GDF-15 enhances intracellular Ca2+ by increasing Cav1.3 expression in rat cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun-Mei; Wang, Chang-Ying; Hu, Changlong; Fang, Yan-Jia; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2016-01-01

    GDF-15 (growth/differentiation factor 15) is a novel member of the TGF (transforming growth factor)-β superfamily that has critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems. We reported previously that GDF-15 increased delayed rectifier outward K+ currents and Kv2.1 α subunit expression through TβRII (TGF-β receptor II) to activate Src kinase and Akt/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signalling in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons). In the present study, we found that treatment of CGNs with GDF-15 for 24 h increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to membrane depolarization, as determined by Ca2+ imaging. Whole-cell current recordings indicated that GDF-15 increased the inward Ca2+ current (ICa) without altering steady-state activation of Ca2+ channels. Treatment with nifedipine, an inhibitor of L-type Ca2+ channels, abrogated GDF-15-induced increases in [Ca2+]i and ICa. The GDF-15-induced increase in ICa was mediated via up-regulation of the Cav1.3 α subunit, which was attenuated by inhibiting Akt/mTOR and ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) pathways and by pharmacological inhibition of Src-mediated TβRII phosphorylation. Given that Cav1.3 is not only a channel for Ca2+ influx, but also a transcriptional regulator, our data confirm that GDF-15 induces protein expression via TβRII and activation of a non-Smad pathway, and provide novel insight into the mechanism of GDF-15 function in neurons. PMID:27114559

  12. Chlorpyrifos Toxicity in Mouse Cultured Cerebellar Granule Neurons at Different Stages of Development: Additive Effect on Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Amani, Nahid; Soodi, Maliheh; Daraei, Bahram; Dashti, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a neurotoxic organophosphorus (OP) insecticide. Its mechanism of action includes oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE). The aim of the present study is to investigate CPF toxicity in mature and immature cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), as well as its effect on glutamate induced excitotoxicity. Materials and Methods This study was an in vitro experimental study performed on mice cultured CGNs. Immature and mature neurons were exposed to different concentrations of CPF (1-1000 µM) and glutamate (10-600 µM) for 48 hours after which we used the MTT assay to measure cytotoxicity. Immature neurons had exposure to CPF for 5 days in order to evaluate the cytotoxic effect on developing neurons. Mature neurons received sub-lethal concentrations of CPF (10, 100 µM) combined with different concentrations of glutamate. AChE activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed after treatments. Results Immature CGNs had increased sensitivity to CPF toxicity compared to mature neurons. We observed significantly greater ROS production in immature compared to mature neurons, however AChE activity was more inhibited in mature neurons. Although CPF toxicity was not well correlated with AChE inhibition, it correlated well with ROS production. Glutamate toxicity was potentiated by sub-lethal concentration of CPF, however glutamate induced ROS production was not affected. The results suggested that CPF potentiated glutamate toxicity by mechanisms other than oxidative stress. Conclusion CPF toxicity differed in mature and immature neurons. Potentiated glutamate toxicity by CPF implied that CPF exposure might be a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27602329

  13. Mefenamic acid bi-directionally modulates the transient outward K{sup +} current in rat cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Man; Shi Wenjie; Fei Xiaowei; Liu Yarong; Zeng Ximin; Mei Yanai

    2008-02-01

    The effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on ion channels has been widely studied in several cell models, but less is known about their modulatory mechanisms. In this report, the effect of mefenamic acid on voltage-activated transient outward K{sup +} current (I{sub A}) in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was investigated. At a concentration of 5 {mu}M to 100 {mu}M, mefenamic acid reversibly inhibited I{sub A} in a dose-dependent manner. However, mefenamic acid at a concentration of 1 {mu}M significantly increased the amplitude of I{sub A} to 113 {+-} 1.5% of the control. At more than 10 {mu}M, mefenamic acid inhibited the amplitude of I{sub A} without any effect on activation or inactivation. In addition, a higher concentration of mefenamic acid induced a significant acceleration of recovery from inactivation with an increase of the peak amplitude elicited by the second test pulse. Intracellular application of mefenamic acid could significantly increase the amplitude of I{sub A}, but had no effect on the inhibition induced by extracellular mefenamic acid, implying that mefenamic acid may exert its effect from both inside and outside the ion channel. Furthermore, the activation of current induced by intracellular application of mefenamic acid was mimicked by other cyclooxygenase inhibitors and arachidonic acid. Our data demonstrate that mefenamic acid is able to bi-directionally modulate I{sub A} channels in neurons at different concentrations and by different methods of application, and two different mechanisms may be involved.

  14. Adverse effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on rat cerebellar granule cell cultures were attenuated by amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, B; Ferri, A; Brusco, A; Rassetto, M; Lopez, L M; Evangelista de Duffard, A M; Duffard, R

    2011-05-01

    2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a worldwide-used herbicide, has been shown to produce a wide range of adverse effects in the health--from embryotoxicity and teratogenicity to neurotoxicity--of animals and humans. In this study, neuronal morphology and biochemical events in rat cerebellar granule cell (CGC) cultures have been analyzed to define some of the possible mechanisms involved in 2,4-D-induced cell death. For that purpose, amphetamine (AMPH) that has been shown to accelerate the recovery of several functions in animals with brain injury has been used as a pharmacologycal tool and was also investigated as a possible protecting agent. Addition of 2,4-D to CGC cultures produced a drastic decrease in cell viability, in association with an increased incidence of necrosis and apoptosis, and an increased level of reactive oxygen species, a decrease in glutathione content, and an abnormal activity of some enzymes with respect to the control group. The adverse effects of 2,4-D were partly attenuated in presence of AMPH. Some deleterious effects on several ultrastructural features of the cells, as well as the enhanced incidence of apoptosis, were partially preserved in AMPH-protected cultures as compared with those which were exposed to 2,4-D alone. The collected evidences (1) confirms the previously observed, deleterious effects of 2.4D on the same or a similar model; (2) suggests that the 2,4-D-induced apoptosis could have been mediated by or associated to an oxidative imbalance in the affected cells, and (3) shows some evidence of a protective effect of AMPH on 2,4-D-induced cell death, which could have been exerted through a reduction in the oxidative stress.

  15. Chlorpyrifos Toxicity in Mouse Cultured Cerebellar Granule Neurons at Different Stages of Development: Additive Effect on Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Amani, Nahid; Soodi, Maliheh; Daraei, Bahram; Dashti, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is a neurotoxic organophosphorus (OP) insecticide. Its mechanism of action includes oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and inhibition of the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE). The aim of the present study is to investigate CPF toxicity in mature and immature cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), as well as its effect on glutamate induced excitotoxicity. Materials and Methods This study was an in vitro experimental study performed on mice cultured CGNs. Immature and mature neurons were exposed to different concentrations of CPF (1-1000 µM) and glutamate (10-600 µM) for 48 hours after which we used the MTT assay to measure cytotoxicity. Immature neurons had exposure to CPF for 5 days in order to evaluate the cytotoxic effect on developing neurons. Mature neurons received sub-lethal concentrations of CPF (10, 100 µM) combined with different concentrations of glutamate. AChE activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were assessed after treatments. Results Immature CGNs had increased sensitivity to CPF toxicity compared to mature neurons. We observed significantly greater ROS production in immature compared to mature neurons, however AChE activity was more inhibited in mature neurons. Although CPF toxicity was not well correlated with AChE inhibition, it correlated well with ROS production. Glutamate toxicity was potentiated by sub-lethal concentration of CPF, however glutamate induced ROS production was not affected. The results suggested that CPF potentiated glutamate toxicity by mechanisms other than oxidative stress. Conclusion CPF toxicity differed in mature and immature neurons. Potentiated glutamate toxicity by CPF implied that CPF exposure might be a risk factor for neurodegenerative disease.

  16. The Time Course of JNK and P38 Activation in Cerebellar Granule Neurons Following Glucose Deprivation and BDNF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vakili Zahir, Niki; Abkhezr, Mousa; Khaje Piri, Zahra; Ostad, Seyyed Nasser; Kebriaezade, Abbass; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Low glucose condition induces neuronal cell-death via intracellular mechanisms including mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways. It has been shown that low glucose medium decreases neuronal survival in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). In this study, we have examined the activation of JNK, p38kinase and ERK1/2 pathways in low glucose medium in CGNs. The CGNs were prepared from new-born (P-2 and P-5) rats and cultured in Dulbecco′s Modified Eagle′s Medium high (DMEM-HIGH) glucose supplemented with Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) 10% for 7 days. The glucose deprivation was induced through replacing the culture medium with the low glucose (5 mM) medium. The MAPK pathways activation was evaluated through phospho specific antibodies using western blot. The viability of cells was measuring using MTT assay. The results indicated that low glucose reduces the cell survival and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) elevates the cell viability in CGNs. The basal c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity was high in CGNs and glucose deprivation for 24 h had increased phospho-JNK level to 2-fold compared to basal. BDNF treatment reduced the basal JNK activity within 30 min but had no effect in longer incubations. BDNF also blocked the low glucose-induced JNK activation. In addition, CGNs exhibited high p38 phosphorylation in low glucose medium in 48 h. These results demonstrated that in sustained low glucose conditions, CGNs had high activity of stress-activated MAPK which could induce cellular damage. Moreover, BDNF can prevent JNK and p38 activation in stress conditions and increase cell viability. Our results suggest that in sustained stress conditions, inhibition of JNK and/or p38 pathways might protect neurons from damage in low glucose conditions. PMID:24250454

  17. Hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls increase reactive oxygen species formation and induce cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiem, Anne Rykken, Sidsel; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Fonnum, Frode

    2009-10-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that bioaccumulate in the body, however, they can be metabolized to more water-soluble products. Although they are more readily excreted than the parent compounds, some of the metabolites are still hydrophobic and may be more available to target tissues, such as the brain. They can also cross the placenta and reach a developing foetus. Much less is known about the toxicity of PCB metabolites than about the parent compounds. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of eight hydroxylated (OH) PCB congeners (2'-OH PCB 3, 4-OH PCB 14, 4-OH PCB 34, 4'-OH PCB 35, 4-OH PCB 36, 4'-OH PCB 36, 4-OH PCB 39, and 4'-OH PCB 68) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and cell viability in rat cerebellar granule cells. We found that, similar to their parent compounds, OH-PCBs are potent ROS inducers with potency 4-OH PCB 14 < 4-OH PCB 36 < 4-OH PCB 34 < 4'-OH PCB 36 < 4'-OH PCB 68 < 4-OH PCB 39 < 4'-OH PCB 35. 4-OH PCB 36 was the most potent cell death inducer, and caused apoptotic or necrotic morphology depending on concentration. Inhibition of ERK1/2 kinase with U0126 reduced both cell death and ROS formation, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is involved in OH-PCB toxicity. The results indicate that the hydroxylation of PCBs may not constitute a detoxification reaction. Since OH-PCBs like their parent compounds are retained in the body and may be more widely distributed to sensitive tissues, it is important that not only the levels of the parent compounds but also the levels of their metabolites are taken into account during risk assessment of PCBs and related compounds.

  18. Inactivating and non-inactivating dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca2+ channels in mouse cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Slesinger, P A; Lansman, J B

    1991-01-01

    1. Granule cells were dissociated from mouse cerebellum and grown in vitro. Currents through single Ca2+ channels were recorded from the cell body with the patch clamp technique. 2. Voltage steps to 0 mV produced brief channel openings with a mean open time of approximately 0.5 ms. The single-channel conductance measured from the amplitude of the single-channel current with 90 mM-Ba2+ in the patch electrode was 22 pS. 3. The probability of Ca2+ channel opening increased with test potentials more positive than -30 mV, with half-activation near 0 mV, and followed the Boltzmann relation for the activation of whole-cell Ca2+ current. 4. Voltage steps to potentials more positive than 0 mV produced more channel activity at the beginning than at the end of the voltage step. The average of the single-channel currents decayed to a non-zero level with a time course similar to that of the whole-cell Ca2+ current. 5. The amplitude as well as the decay of the mean current measured during a test pulse to 0 mV was reduced as the holding potential was made more positive than approximately -90 mV. The change in the open channel probability with holding potential followed the Boltzmann relation which described the inactivation of the whole-cell Ca2+ current. 6. Ca2+ channel activity persisted for over several minutes after excising the patch from the cell body when intracellular cyclic AMP was increased. After patch excision, the number of functional channels decreased to a level where only one channel at a time was active. Ca2+ channel openings appeared as either short bursts at the beginning of the voltage step or long bursts that lasted throughout the pulse. 7. Exposing the cell to the dihydropyridine agonist +(S)-202-791 markedly increased the fraction of sweeps with long openings and produced a non-decaying mean current that was approximately 5 times larger than control. In a fraction of the sweeps, however, long openings occurred more frequently at the beginning than at the

  19. The natural scorpion peptide, BmK NT1 activates voltage-gated sodium channels and produces neurotoxicity in primary cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaohan; He, Yuwei; Qiao, Jinping; Zhang, Chunlei; Cao, Zhengyu

    2016-01-01

    The scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat neuronal diseases such as neuropathic pain, paralysis and epilepsy for thousands of years. Studies have demonstrated that scorpion venom is the primary active component. Although scorpion venom can effectively attenuate pain in the clinic, it also produces neurotoxic response. In this study, toxicity guided purification led to identify a mammalian toxin termed BmK NT1 comprising of 65 amino acid residues and an amidated C-terminus, a mature peptide encoded by the nucleotide sequence (GenBank No. AF464898). In contract to the recombinant product of the same nucleotide sequence, BmK AGAP, which displayed analgesic and anti-tumor effect, intravenous injection (i.v.) of BmK NT1 produced acute toxicity in mice with an LD50 value of 1.36 mg/kg. In primary cultured cerebellar granule cells, BmK NT1 produced a concentration-dependent cell death with an IC50 value of 0.65 μM (0.41-1.03 μM, 95% Confidence Intervals, 95% CI) which was abolished by TTX, a voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) blocker. We also demonstrated that BmK NT1 produced modest sodium influx in cerebellar granule cell cultures with an EC50 value of 2.19 μM (0.76-6.40 μM, 95% CI), an effect similar to VGSC agonist, veratridine. The sodium influx response was abolished by TTX suggesting that BmK NT1-induced sodium influx is solely through activation of VGSC. Considered these data together, we demonstrated that BmK NT1 activated VGSC and produced neurotoxicity in cerebellar granule cell cultures. PMID:26598793

  20. NMDA treatment and K(+)-induced depolarization selectively promote the expression of an NMDA-preferring class of the ionotropic glutamate receptors in cerebellar granule neurones.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Resink, A; Hack, N; Van der Valk, J B; Kumar, K N; Michaelis, E

    1992-03-16

    Growth conditions which promote the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture, such as high K+ or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) treatment, also promote the functional expression of an NMDA-preferring subtype alone of the ionotropic glutamate receptors. The selective regulation of NMDA receptors detected electrophysiologically in individual cells, using the whole cell patch clamp technique, is characteristic of granule cells in general: NMDA-induced 45Ca2+ influx increased several-fold in cultures treated with either high K+ or NMDA. The increase in NMDA receptor activity was correlated with an increase in the expression of an NMDA receptor protein. Since the effect of these 'trophic' conditions is mediated through Ca2+, the induced increase in the density of NMDA receptors (which gate a Ca2+ conductance) provides a positive feedback for strengthening the trophic influences.

  1. Restricted diffusion of calretinin in cerebellar granule cell dendrites implies Ca2+-dependent interactions via its EF-hand 5 domain

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Oliver; Schwaller, Beat; Brown, Edward B; Eilers, Jens; Schmidt, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs) are important regulators of neuronal Ca2+ signalling, acting either as buffers that shape Ca2+ transients and Ca2+ diffusion and/or as Ca2+ sensors. The diffusional mobility represents a crucial functional parameter of CaBPs, describing their range-of-action and possible interactions with binding partners. Calretinin (CR) is a CaBP widely expressed in the nervous system with strong expression in cerebellar granule cells. It is involved in regulating excitability and synaptic transmission of granule cells, and its absence leads to impaired motor control. We quantified the diffusional mobility of dye-labelled CR in mouse granule cells using two-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. We found that movement of macromolecules in granule cell dendrites was not well described by free Brownian diffusion and that CR diffused unexpectedly slow compared to fluorescein dextrans of comparable size. During bursts of action potentials, which were associated with dendritic Ca2+ transients, the mobility of CR was further reduced. Diffusion was significantly accelerated by a peptide embracing EF-hand 5 of CR. Our results suggest long-lasting, Ca2+-dependent interactions of CR with large and/or immobile binding partners. These interactions render CR a poorly mobile Ca2+ buffer and point towards a Ca2+ sensor function of CR. PMID:23732647

  2. Changes in mitogen-activated protein kinase in cerebellar granule neurons by polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Chunyang; Besas, Jonathan

    2010-05-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as additive flame retardants and have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that the effects of PBDEs are similar to the known human developmental neurotoxicants such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) on a molar basis. Previously, we reported that PBDE mixtures and congeners, perturbed calcium homeostasis which is critical for the development and function of the nervous system. In the present study, we tested whether environmentally relevant PBDE/PCB mixtures and congeners affected mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which are down-stream events of calcium signaling in cerebellar granule neuronal cultures. In this study, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK)1/2, a widely studied MAPK cascade and known to be involved in learning and memory, levels were quantitated using western blot technique with phospho-specific antibodies. Glutamate (a positive control) increased pERK1/2 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner reaching maximum activation at 5-30 min of exposure and at doses >= 10 muM. Both Aroclor 1254 (a commercial penta PCB mixture) and DE-71 (a commercial penta PBDE mixture) elevated phospho-ERK1/2, producing maximum stimulation at 30 min and at concentrations >= 3 mug/ml; Aroclor 1254 was more efficacious than DE-71. DE-79 (an octabrominated diphenyl ether mixture) also elevated phospho-ERK1/2, but to a lesser extent than that of DE-71. PBDE congeners 47, 77, 99, and 153 also increased phospo-ERK1/2 in a concentration-dependent manner. The data indicated that PBDE congeners are more potent than the commercial mixtures. PCB 47 also increased phospho-ERK1/2 like its structural analog PBDE 47, but to a lesser extent, suggesting that these chemicals affect similar pathways. Cytotoxicity, measured as %LDH release, data showed that higher concentrations (> 30 muM) and longer exposures (> 30 min) are

  3. Perinatal exposure to low-dose methylmercury induces dysfunction of motor coordination with decreases in synaptophysin expression in the cerebellar granule cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Masatake; Cheng, Jinping; Zhao, Wenchang

    2012-06-29

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental pollutant that is toxic to the developing central nervous system (CNS) in children, even at low exposure levels. Perinatal exposure to MeHg is known to induce neurological symptoms with neuropathological changes in the CNS. However, the relationship between the neurological symptoms and neuropathological changes induced in offspring as a result of exposure to low-dose MeHg is not well defined. In the present study, neurobehavioral analyses revealed that exposure to a low level of MeHg (5 ppm in drinking water) during developmental caused a significant deficit in the motor coordination of rats in the rotating rod test. In contrast, general neuropathological findings, including neuronal cell death and the subsequent nerve inflammation, were not observed in the region of the cerebellum responsible for regulating motor coordination. Surprisingly, the expression of synaptophysin (SPP), a marker protein for synaptic formation, significantly decreased in cerebellar granule cells. These results showed that perinatal exposure to low-dose MeHg causes neurobehavioral impairment without general neuropathological changes in rats. We demonstrated for the first time that exposure to low-dose MeHg during development induces the dysfunction of motor coordination due to changes of synaptic homeostasis in cerebellar granule cells.

  4. Methylmercury disrupts the balance between phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated cofilin in primary cultures of mice cerebellar granule cells A proteomic study

    SciTech Connect

    Vendrell, Iolanda; Carrascal, Montserrat; Abian, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    Methylmercury is an environmental contaminant that is particularly toxic to the developing central nervous system; cerebellar granule neurons are especially vulnerable. Here, primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) were continuously exposed to methylmercury for up to 16 days in vitro (div). LC50 values were 508 +- 199, 345 +- 47, and 243 +- 45 nM after exposure for 6, 11, and 16 div, respectively. Proteins from cultured mouse CGCs were separated by 2DE. Seventy-one protein spots were identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and MALDI-TOF/TOF sequencing. Prolonged exposure to a subcytotoxic concentration of methylmercury significantly increased non-phosphorylated cofilin both in cell protein extracts (1.4-fold; p < 0.01) and in mitochondrial-enriched fractions (1.7-fold; p < 0.01). The decrease in P-cofilin induced by methylmercury was concentration-dependent and occurred after different exposure times. The percentage of P-cofilin relative to total cofilin significantly decreased to 49 +- 13% vs. control cells after exposure to 300 nM methylmercury for 5 div. The balance between the phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated form of cofilin regulates actin dynamics and facilitates actin filament turnover. Filamentous actin dynamics and reorganization are responsible of neuron shape change, migration, polarity formation, regulation of synaptic structures and function, and cell apoptosis. An alteration of the complex regulation of the cofilin phosphorylation/dephosphorylation pathway could be envisaged as an underlying mechanism compatible with reported signs of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Regulation of Tlx3 by Pax6 is required for the restricted expression of Chrnα3 in Cerebellar Granule Neuron progenitors during development

    PubMed Central

    Divya, Thulasi Sheela; Lalitha, Soundararajan; Parvathy, Surendran; Subashini, Chandramohan; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Dhanesh, Sivadasan Bindu; Rasheed, Vazhanthodi Abdul; Divya, Mundackal Sivaraman; Tole, Shubha; James, Jackson

    2016-01-01

    Homeobox gene Tlx3 is known to promote glutamatergic differentiation and is expressed in post-mitotic neurons of CNS. Contrary to this here, we discovered that Tlx3 is expressed in the proliferating progenitors of the external granule layer in the cerebellum, and examined factors that regulate this expression. Using Pax6−/−Sey mouse model and molecular interaction studies we demonstrate Pax6 is a key activator of Tlx3 specifically in cerebellum, and induces its expression starting at embryonic day (E)15. By Postnatal day (PN)7, Tlx3 is expressed in a highly restricted manner in the cerebellar granule neurons of the posterior cerebellar lobes, where it is required for the restricted expression of nicotinic cholinergic receptor-α3 subunit (Chrnα3) and other genes involved in formation of synaptic connections and neuronal migration. These results demonstrate a novel role for Tlx3 and indicate that Pax6-Tlx3 expression and interaction is part of a region specific regulatory network in cerebellum and its deregulation during development could possibly lead to Autistic spectral disorders (ASD). PMID:27452274

  6. Linking oscillations in cerebellar circuits

    PubMed Central

    Courtemanche, Richard; Robinson, Jennifer C.; Aponte, Daniel I.

    2013-01-01

    In many neuroscience fields, the study of local and global rhythmicity has been receiving increasing attention. These network influences could directly impact on how neuronal groups interact together, organizing for different contexts. The cerebellar cortex harbors a variety of such local circuit rhythms, from the rhythms in the cerebellar cortex per se, or those dictated from important afferents. We present here certain cerebellar oscillatory phenomena that have been recorded in rodents and primates. Those take place in a range of frequencies: from the more known oscillations in the 4–25 Hz band, such as the olivocerebellar oscillatory activity and the granule cell layer oscillations, to the more recently reported slow (<1 Hz oscillations), and the fast (>150 Hz) activity in the Purkinje cell layer. Many of these oscillations appear spontaneously in the circuits, and are modulated by behavioral imperatives. We review here how those oscillations are recorded, some of their modulatory mechanisms, and also identify some of the cerebellar nodes where they could interact. A particular emphasis has been placed on how these oscillations could be modulated by movement and certain neuropathological manifestations. Many of those oscillations could have a definite impact on the way information is processed in the cerebellum and how it interacts with other structures in a variety of contexts. PMID:23908606

  7. Cell Signaling and Neurotoxicity: 3H-Arachidonic acid release (Phospholipase A2) in cerebellar granule neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cell signaling is a complex process which controls basic cellular activities and coordinates actions to maintain normal cellular homeostasis. Alterations in signaling processes have been associated with neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's and cerebellar ataxia, as well as, ...

  8. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with bilateral middle cerebellar peduncle lesions confirmed by repeated CSF-JC virus tests and coexistence of JC virus granule cell neuronopathy. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daisuke; Yasui, Keizo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Takahashi, Akira

    2016-07-28

    A 65 year-old woman with small lymphocytic leukemia presented with subacute cerebellar ataxia. Six months after rituximab chemotherapy, a cranial MRI revealed lesions in the bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles. Both cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) JC virus (JCV)-DNA PCR test on three occasions and brain biopsy were negative. CSF tests were repeated. The fourth test performed 6 months after the onset showed positive JCV-DNA, and a definite diagnosis of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) was made. Neuroimaging of cerebellar atrophy was considered to be coexistence of granule cell neuronopathy. Medication with mirtazapine and mefloquine was temporarily effective for several months. Little are known solitary bilateral MRI lesions of the middle cerebellar peduncle in PML. JCV-PCR test of CSF may be negative at an earlier stage of PML. Repeated CSF tests should be essential to confirming the diagnosis in such cases. PMID:27356732

  9. The effect of GABA stimulation on GABAA receptor subunit protein and mRNA expression in rat cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Platt, K. P.; Zwartjes, R. E.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. After 8 days in vitro, rat cerebellar granule cells were exposed to 1 mM gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) for periods of 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days. The effect of the GABA exposure on GABAA receptor alpha 1, alpha 6 and beta 2,3 subunit protein expression and alpha 1 and alpha 6 subunit steady-state mRNA levels, was examined using Western blotting and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. 2. GABA exposure for 2 days decreased alpha 1 (35 +/- 10%, mean +/- s.e.mean), beta 2,3 (21 +/- 9%) and alpha 6 (28 +/- 10%) subunit protein expression compared to control levels. The GABA-mediated reduction in alpha 1 subunit expression after 2 days treatment was abolished in the presence of the GABAA receptor antagonist, Ru 5135 (10 microM). 3. GABA exposure for 8 days increased alpha 1 (26 +/- 10%, mean +/- s.e.mean) and beta 2,3 (56 +/- 23%) subunit protein expression over control levels, whereas alpha 6 subunit protein expression remained below control levels (by 38 +/- 10%). However, after 10 days GABA exposure, alpha 6 subunit protein expression was also increased over control levels by 65 +/- 29% (mean +/- s.e.mean). 4. GABA exposure did not change the alpha 1 or alpha 6 subunit steady-state mRNA levels over and 8 day period, nor did it alter the expression of cyclophilin mRNA over 1-8 days. 5. These results suggest that chronic GABA exposure of rat cerebellar granule cells has a bi-phasic effect on GABAA receptor subunit expression that is independent of changes to mRNA levels. Therefore, the regulation of the GABAA receptor expression by chronic agonist treatment appears to involve post-transcriptional and/or post-translational processes. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8968548

  10. Fluoro-jade identification of cerebellar granule cell and purkinje cell death in the alpha1A calcium ion channel mutant mouse, leaner.

    PubMed

    Frank, T C; Nunley, M C; Sons, H D; Ramon, R; Abbott, L C

    2003-01-01

    Cell death is a critical component of normal nervous system development; too little or too much results in abnormal development and function of the nervous system. The leaner mouse exhibits excessive, abnormal cerebellar granule cell and Purkinje cell death during postnatal development, which is a consequence of a mutated calcium ion channel subunit, alpha(1A). Previous studies have shown that leaner cerebellar Purkinje cells die in a specific pattern that appears to be influenced by functional and anatomical boundaries of the cerebellum. However, the mechanism of Purkinje cell death and the specific timing of the spatial pattern of cell death remain unclear. By double labeling both leaner and wild-type cerebella with Fluoro-Jade and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated, deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling or Fluoro-Jade and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry we demonstrated that the relatively new stain, Fluoro-Jade, will label neurons that are dying secondary to a genetic mutation. Then, by staining leaner and wild-type cerebella between postnatal days 20 and 80 with Fluoro-Jade, we were able to show that Purkinje cell death begins at approximately postnatal day 25, peaks in the vermis about postnatal day 40 and in the hemispheres at postnatal day 50 and persists at a low level at postnatal day 80. In addition, we showed that there is a significant difference in the amount of cerebellar Purkinje cell death between rostral and caudal divisions of the leaner cerebellum, and that there is little to no Purkinje cell death in the wild type cerebellum at the ages we examined. This is the first report of the use of Fluoro-Jade to identify dying neurons in a genetic model for neuronal cell death. By using Fluoro-Jade, we have specifically defined the temporospatial pattern of postnatal Purkinje cell death in the leaner mouse. This information can be used to gain insight into the dynamic mechanisms controlling Purkinje cell death in the leaner

  11. YB-1 is elevated in medulloblastoma and drives proliferation in Sonic hedgehog - dependent cerebellar granule neuron progenitor cells and medulloblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Abhinav; Robitaille, Mélanie; Remke, Marc; Maier, Caroline; Malhotra, Anshu; Gregorieff, Alex; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Taylor, Michael D; Angers, Stéphane; Kenney, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    Post-natal proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs), proposed cells-of-origin for the SHH-associated subgroup of medulloblastoma (MB), is driven by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF) in the developing cerebellum. Shh induces the oncogene Yes-associated protein (YAP), which drives IGF2 expression in CGNPs and mouse Shh-associated medulloblastomas. To determine how IGF2 expression is regulated downstream of YAP, we carried out an unbiased screen for transcriptional regulators bound to IGF2 promoters. We report that Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1), an onco-protein regulating transcription and translation, binds to IGF2 promoter P3. We observed that YB-1 is up-regulated across human medulloblastoma subclasses as well as in other varieties of pediatric brain tumors. Utilizing the cerebellar progenitor model for the Shh-subgroup of MB in mice, we show for the first time that YB-1 is induced by Shh in CGNPs. Its expression is YAP-dependent and it is required for IGF2 expression in CGNPs. Finally, both gain-of function and loss-of-function experiments reveal that YB-1 activity is required for sustaining CGNP and medulloblastoma cell (MBC) proliferation. Collectively, our findings describe a novel role for YB-1 in driving proliferation in the developing cerebellum and medulloblastoma cells and they identify the SHH:YAP:YB1:IGF2 axis as a powerful target for therapeutic intervention in medulloblastomas. PMID:26725322

  12. Developmental expression of GPR3 in rodent cerebellar granule neurons is associated with cell survival and protects neurons from various apoptotic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shigeru; Miyagi, Tatsuhiro; Dohi, Eisuke; Seki, Takahiro; Hide, Izumi; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Antonio Chiocca, E; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Sakai, Norio

    2014-08-01

    G-protein coupled receptor 3 (GPR3), GPR6, and GPR12 belong to a family of constitutively active Gs-coupled receptors that activate 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and are highly expressed in the brain. Among these receptors, the endogenous expression of GPR3 in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) is increased following development. GPR3 is important for neurite outgrowth and neural maturation; however, the physiological functions of GPR3 remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we investigated the survival and antiapoptotic functions of GPR3 under normal and apoptosis-inducing culture conditions. Under normal culture conditions, CGNs from GPR3-knockout mice demonstrated lower survival than did CGNs from wild-type or GPR3-heterozygous mice. Cerebellar sections from GPR3-/- mice at P7, P14, and P21 revealed more caspase-3-positive neurons in the internal granular layer than in cerebellar sections from wild-type mice. Conversely, in a potassium-deprivation model of apoptosis, increased expression of these three receptors promoted neuronal survival. The antiapoptotic effect of GPR3 was also observed under hypoxic (1% O2/5% CO2) and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced apoptotic conditions. We further investigated the signaling pathways involved in the GPR3-mediated antiapoptotic effect. The addition of the PKA inhibitor KT5720, the MAP kinase inhibitor U0126, and the PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abrogated the GPR3-mediated antiapoptotic effect in a potassium-deprivation model of apoptosis, whereas the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 did not affect the antiapoptotic function of GPR3. Furthermore, downregulation of endogenous GPR3 expression in CGNs resulted in a marked reduction in the basal levels of ERK and Akt phosphorylation under normal culture conditions. Finally, we used a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) model in wild-type and GPR3-knockout mice to determine whether GPR3 expression modulates neuronal survival after brain ischemia. After t

  13. Caveolin-rich lipid rafts of the plasma membrane of mature cerebellar granule neurons are microcompartments for calcium/reactive oxygen and nitrogen species cross-talk signaling.

    PubMed

    Marques-da-Silva, D; Gutierrez-Merino, C

    2014-08-01

    In previous works, we have shown that L-type voltage-operated calcium channels, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAr), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and cytochrome b5 reductase (Cb5R) co-localize within the same lipid rafts-associated nanodomains in mature cerebellar granule neurons (CGN). In this work, we show that the calcium transport systems of the plasma membrane extruding calcium from the cytosol, plasma membrane calcium pumps (PMCA) and sodium-calcium exchangers (NCX), are also associated with these nanodomains. All these proteins were found to co-immunoprecipitate with caveolin-1 after treatment with 25mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin, a lipid rafts solubilizing agent. However, the treatment of CGN with methyl-β-cyclodextrin largely attenuated the rise of cytosolic calcium induced by l-glutamate through NMDAr. Fluorescence energy transfer imaging revealed that all of them are present in sub-microdomains of a size smaller than 200nm, with a peripheral distribution of the calcium extrusion systems PMCA and NCX. Fluorescence microscopy images analysis revealed high calcium dynamic sub-microcompartments near the plasma membrane in fura-2-loaded CGN at short times after addition of l-glutamate. In addition, the close proximity between sources of nitric oxide (nNOS) and superoxide anion (Cb5R) suggests that these nanodomains are involved in the fast and efficient cross-talk between calcium and redox signaling in neurons. PMID:24996880

  14. Neuritin activates insulin receptor pathway to up-regulate Kv4.2-mediated transient outward K+ current in rat cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jin-Jing; Gao, Xiao-Fei; Chow, Chi-Wing; Zhan, Xiao-Qin; Hu, Chang-Long; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2012-11-30

    Neuritin is a new neurotrophic factor discovered in a screen to identify genes involved in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Neuritin also plays multiple roles in the process of neural development and synaptic plasticity. The receptors for binding neuritin and its downstream signaling effectors, however, remain unclear. Here, we report that neuritin specifically increases the densities of transient outward K(+) currents (I(A)) in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Neuritin-induced amplification of I(A) is mediated by increased mRNA and protein expression of Kv4.2, the main α-subunit of I(A). Exposure of CGNs to neuritin markedly induces phosphorylation of ERK (pERK), Akt (pAkt), and mammalian target of rapamycin (pmTOR). Neuritin-induced I(A) and increased expression of Kv4.2 are attenuated by ERK, Akt, or mTOR inhibitors. Unexpectedly, pharmacological blockade of insulin receptor, but not the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor, abrogates the effect of neuritin on I(A) amplification and Kv4.2 induction. Indeed, neuritin activates downstream signaling effectors of the insulin receptor in CGNs and HeLa. Our data reveal, for the first time, an unanticipated role of the insulin receptor in previously unrecognized neuritin-mediated signaling. PMID:23066017

  15. Cr (VI) induced oxidative stress and toxicity in cultured cerebellar granule neurons at different stages of development and protective effect of Rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Abolfazl; Soodi, Maliheh; Amani, Nahid

    2016-03-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a widespread metal ion in the workplace, industrial effluent, and water. The toxicity of chromium (VI) on various organs including the liver, kidneys, and lung were studied, but little is known about neurotoxicity. In this study, neurotoxic effects of Cr (VI) have been investigated by cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Immature and mature neurons were exposed to different concentrations of potassium dichromate for 24 h and cytotoxicity was measured by MTT assay. In addition, immature neurons were exposed for 5 days as regards cytotoxic effect in development stages. The reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the protective effect of Rosmarinic acid on mature and immature neurons exposed to potassium dichromate, were measured. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and acetylcholinesterase activity in mature neurons were assessed following exposure to potassium dichromate. The results indicate that toxicity of Cr (VI) dependent on maturation steps. Cr (VI) was less toxic for immature neurons. Also, Cr (VI) induced MMP reduction and ROS production in both immature and mature neurons. In Cr (VI) treated neurons, increased lipid peroxidation and GPx activity but not acetylcholinesterase activity was observed. Interestingly, Rosmarinic acid, as a natural antioxidant, could protect mature but not immature neurons against Cr (VI) induced toxicity. Our findings revealed vulnerability of mature neurons to Cr (VI) induced toxicity and oxidative stress.

  16. Neuroprotection comparison of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites against mechanistically distinct cell death-inducing agents in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Taram, Faten; Winter, Aimee N; Linseman, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    While the number of patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease is increasing, there are currently no effective treatments that significantly limit the neuronal cell death underlying these diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound found in high concentration in coffee, is known to possess antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of CGA and its major metabolites in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons. We show that CGA and caffeic acid displayed a dramatic protective effect against the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. In marked contrast, ferulic acid and quinic acid had no protective effect against this nitrosative stress. While CGA and quinic acid had no protective effect against glutamate-induced cell death, caffeic acid and ferulic acid significantly protected neurons from excitotoxicity. Finally, caffeic acid was the only compound to display significant protective activity against hydrogen peroxide, proteasome inhibition, caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that caffeic acid displays a much broader profile of neuroprotection against a diverse range of stressors than its parent polyphenol, CGA, or the other major metabolites, ferulic acid and quinic acid. We conclude that caffeic acid is a promising candidate for testing in pre-clinical models of neurodegeneration. PMID:27444557

  17. Increased excitability and altered action potential waveform in cerebellar granule neurons of the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Usowicz, Maria M; Garden, Claire L P

    2012-07-17

    Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by intellectual disability and impaired motor control. Lack of coordinated movement, poor balance, and unclear speech imply dysfunction of the cerebellum, which is known to be reduced in volume in DS. The principal cause of the smaller cerebellum is a diminished number of granule cells (GCs). These neurons form the 'input layer' of the cerebellar cortex, where sensorimotor information carried by incoming mossy fibers is transformed before it is conveyed to Purkinje cells and inhibitory interneurons. However, it is not known how processing of this information is affected in the hypogranular cerebellum that characterizes DS. Here we explore the possibility that the electrical properties of the surviving GCs are changed. We find that in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, GCs have a higher input resistance at voltages approaching the threshold for firing, which causes them to be more excitable. In addition, they fire narrower and larger amplitude action potentials. These subtly modified electrical properties may result in atypical transfer of information at the input layer of the cerebellum.

  18. Reciprocal autoregulation by NFI occupancy and ETV1 promotes the developmental expression of dendrite-synapse genes in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Baojin; Cave, John W.; Dobner, Paul R.; Mullikin-Kilpatrick, Debra; Bartzokis, Marina; Zhu, Hong; Chow, Chi-Wing; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Kilpatrick, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Factor One (NFI) transcription factors regulate temporal gene expression required for dendritogenesis and synaptogenesis via delayed occupancy of target promoters in developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Mechanisms that promote NFI temporal occupancy have not been previously defined. We show here that the transcription factor ETV1 directly binds to and is required for expression and NFI occupancy of a cohort of NFI-dependent genes in CGNs maturing in vivo. Expression of ETV1 is low in early postnatal cerebellum and increases with maturation, mirroring NFI temporal occupancy of coregulated target genes. Precocious expression of ETV1 in mouse CGNs accelerated onset of expression and NFI temporal occupancy of late target genes and enhanced Map2(+) neurite outgrowth. ETV1 also activated expression and NFI occupancy of the Etv1 gene itself, and this autoregulatory loop preceded ETV1 binding and activation of other coregulated target genes in vivo. These findings suggest a potential model in which ETV1 activates NFI temporal binding to a subset of late-expressed genes in a stepwise manner by initial positive feedback regulation of the Etv1 gene itself followed by activation of downstream coregulated targets as ETV1 expression increases. Sequential transcription factor autoregulation and subsequent binding to downstream promoters may provide an intrinsic developmental timer for dendrite/synapse gene expression. PMID:26941328

  19. Protection of NMDA-induced neuronal cell damage by methanol extract of zizyphi spinosi semen in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hee; Lee, Hyun Joo; Koh, Sang Bum; Ban, Ju Yeon; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2004-11-01

    Zizypus is one of the herbs widely used in Korea and China due to the CNS calming effect. The present study aims to investigate the effect of the methanol extract of Zizyphi Spinosi Semen (ZSS), the seeds of Zizyphus jujuba Mill var. spinosa, on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cerebellar granule neuron. ZSS, over a concentration range of 0.05-5 microg/ml, inhibited NMDA (1 mM)-induced neuronal cell death, which was measured by a trypan blue exclusion test and a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. ZSS (0.5 microg/ml) inhibited glutamate release into medium induced by NMDA (1mM), which was measured by HPLC. Pretreatment of ZSS (0.5 microg/ml) inhibited NMDA (1mM)-induced elevation of cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)), which was measured by a fluorescent dye, Fura 2-AM, and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that ZSS prevents NMDA-induced neuronal cell damage in vitro. PMID:15374605

  20. Neuroprotective Effect of Total and Sequential Extract of Scrophularia striata Boiss. in Rat Cerebellar Granule Neurons Following Glutamate- Induced Neurotoxicity: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Salavati, Parvin; Ramezani, Mina; Monsef-Esfahani, Hamid R; Hajiagha, Reza; Parsa, Maliheh; Tavajohi, Shoreh; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprotective effect of the extract from aerial parts of Scrophularia striata Boiss (Scrophulariaceae) was investigated against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity on cultured rat pups Cerebellar Granule Neurons (CGNs). CGNs from 8 days old Sprague-Dawley rat were prepared and cultured. The experiments were performed after 8 days in culture. The plant was collected from the northeastern part (Ruin region) of Iran and air-dried at room temperature. The total extract was prepared with maceration of prepared powder in ethanol 80% for three times. Sequential extracts were obtained using dried and powdered aerial parts with increasingly polar solvents: petroleum ether, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol 80% solution. Cultured cells were exposed to 125 μM of glutamate for 12 h following a 24 h of incubation with test fractions at concentration of 10 mcg/mL. Morphological assay was performed using invert light microscope after fixation and staining with haematoxylin. Neuronal viability was measured using MTT assay. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed by Tukey post-hoc test. Values were considered statistically significant when p-value ≤ 0.05. Results of this study showed a significant neuroprotective activity of high polarity methanolic fraction of aerial parts of Scrophularia striata against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in a dosedependent manner. Treatment with 10 mcg/mL of the fractions showed the best result. PMID:24250613

  1. Kruppel-Like Factor 4 Regulates Granule Cell Pax6 Expression and Cell Proliferation in Early Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peter; Ha, Thomas; Larouche, Matt; Swanson, Douglas; Goldowitz, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Kruppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) is a transcription factor that regulates many important cellular processes in stem cell biology, cancer, and development. We used histological and molecular methods to study the expression of Klf4 in embryonic development of the normal and Klf4 knockout cerebellum. We find that Klf4 is expressed strongly in early granule cell progenitor development but tails-off considerably by the end of embryonic development. Klf4 is also co-expressed with Pax6 in these cells. In the Klf4-null mouse, which is perinatal lethal, Klf4 positively regulates Pax6 expression and regulates the proliferation of neuronal progenitors in the rhombic lip, external granular layer and the neuroepithelium. This paper is the first to describe a role for Klf4 in the cerebellum and provides insight into this gene’s function in neuronal development. PMID:26226504

  2. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, O S

    1990-01-01

    Differentiating granule cells develop survival requirements in culture which can be met by treatment with high K+ or N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and, according to our recent findings, also with low concentrations of kainic acid (KA, 50 microM). We have now attempted to elucidate the mechanism(s) underlying the trophic effect of KA. KA rescue of cells was completely suppressed by blockers of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, such as nifedipine in low concentrations (5 x 10(-7) M), indicating that the promotion of cell survival is mediated through the activation of these channels by membrane depolarization. Thus the trophic influences of KA and NMDA share a common mechanism, increased Ca2+ influx (albeit through different routes), a conclusion that is supported by the observation that the effects of these agonists at concentrations causing maximal promotion of cell survival were not additive. Interactive effects involving different classes of excitatory amino acid receptors were revealed by the potentiation of the KA rescue of cells by the NMDA receptor antagonists, 2-amino 5-phosphonovalerate (APV) or (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohept-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801), which on their own failed to promote, but rather reduced cell survival. The potentiation of the KA effect by the competitive NMDA antagonist APV was counteracted by the weak NMDA agonist, quinolinic acid. These observations suggest that KA alone has both trophic and toxic effects, the latter being mediated secondarily through an NMDA-like glutamate receptor, which is distinct from the conventional NMDA, KA and quisqualate preferring subtypes.

  3. Weaker control of the electrical properties of cerebellar granule cells by tonically active GABAA receptors in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Down’s syndrome (DS) is caused by triplication of all or part of human chromosome 21 and is characterized by a decrease in the overall size of the brain. One of the brain regions most affected is the cerebellum, in which the number of granule cells (GCs) is markedly decreased. GCs process sensory information entering the cerebellum via mossy fibres and pass it on to Purkinje cells and inhibitory interneurons. How GCs transform incoming signals depends on their input–output relationship, which is adjusted by tonically active GABAA receptor channels. Results We report that in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, in which cerebellar volume and GC number are decreased as in DS, the tonic GABAA receptor current in GCs is smaller than in wild-type mice and is less effective in moderating input resistance and raising the minimum current required for action potential firing. We also find that tonically active GABAA receptors curb the height and broaden the width of action potentials in wild-type GCs but not in Ts65Dn GCs. Single-cell real-time quantitative PCR reveals that these electrical differences are accompanied by decreased expression of the gene encoding the GABAA receptor β3 subunit but not genes coding for some of the other GABAA receptor subunits expressed in GCs (α1, α6, β2 and δ). Conclusions Weaker moderation of excitability and action potential waveform in GCs of the Ts65Dn mouse by tonically active GABAA receptors is likely to contribute to atypical transfer of information through the cerebellum. Similar changes may occur in DS. PMID:23870245

  4. Selective stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor subtypes and the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture: effect of kainic acid.

    PubMed

    Balázs, R; Hack, N; Jørgensen, O S

    1990-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that the survival of cerebellar granule cells in culture is promoted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate. Here we report on the influence of another glutamate analogue, kainic acid, which, in contrast to N-methyl-D-aspartate, is believed to stimulate transmitter receptors mediating fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials. The kainate effect was complex: increased survival at low concentrations (the maximum, at 25-50 microM, was about 50% promotion), whereas concentrations exceeding 50 microM resulted first in a loss of the effect, and then at concentrations of 2-5 x 10(-4) M cells became vulnerable to kainate. The trophic influence of kainate is mediated through receptors other than the N-methyl-D-aspartate preferring subtype. In contrast to the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate, that of kainate did not depend on the medium K+ level and was potently blocked by dinitroquinoxalinedione, which--at the concentration used here--did not counteract the promotion of cell survival evoked by N-methyl-D-aspartate. Quisqualate was a potent inhibitor of the rescue by kainate. Furthermore, blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors with the selective antagonists MK-801 or aminophosphonovalerate did not inhibit, but rather potentiated the trophic effect of kainate. Possible mechanisms underlying the trophic effect of chronic depolarization or treatment with excitatory amino acids are discussed, and it is proposed that they involve elevated free cytoplasmic calcium activity following increased influx through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (high K+ and kainate) or receptorgated channels (N-methyl-D-aspartate).

  5. GDF15 regulates Kv2.1-mediated outward K+ current through the Akt/mTOR signalling pathway in rat cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chang-Ying; Huang, An-Qi; Zhou, Meng-Hua; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2014-01-01

    GDF15 (growth/differentiation factor 15), a novel member of the TGFβ (transforming growth factor β) superfamily, plays critical roles in the central and peripheral nervous systems, but the signal transduction pathways and receptor subtypes involved are not well understood. In the present paper, we report that GDF15 specifically increases the IK (delayed-rectifier outward K+ current) in rat CGNs (cerebellar granule neurons) in time- and concentration-dependent manners. The GDF15-induced amplification of the IK is mediated by the increased expression and reduced lysosome-dependent degradation of the Kv2.1 protein, the main α-subunit of the IK channel. Exposure of CGNs to GDF15 markedly induced the phosphorylation of ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase), Akt and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), but the GDF15-induced IK densities and increased expression of Kv2.1 were attenuated only by Akt and mTOR, and not ERK, inhibitors. Pharmacological inhibition of the Src-mediated phosphorylation of TGFβR2 (TGFβ receptor 2), not TGFβR1, abrogated the effect of GDF15 on IK amplification and Kv2.1 induction. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that GDF15 increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of TGFβRII in the CGN lysate. The results of the present study reveal a novel regulation of Kv2.1 by GDF15 mediated through the TGFβRII-activated Akt/mTOR pathway, which is a previously uncharacterized Smad-independent mechanism of GDF15 signalling. PMID:24597762

  6. Kainate receptor-mediated apoptosis in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells is attenuated by mitogen-activated protein and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Giardina, Sarah F; Beart, Philip M

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that neuronal apoptosis is the result of an abortive attempt to re-enter the cell cycle, and more recently the cyclin-dependent (CDKs) and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, two superfamilies of kinases that influence and control cell cycle progression, have been implicated in neuronal apoptosis. Here, to examine whether CDK/MAPK related pathways are involved in excitotoxicity, we studied the actions of various kinase inhibitors on apoptosis induced by the ionotropic glutamate (Glu) receptor agonist, kainate (KA), in primary cultures of murine cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). KA-mediated neurotoxicity was concentration-dependent, as determined by a cell viability assay monitoring the reduction of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), and largely apoptotic in nature, as shown by morphological examination and labelling of DNA fragmentation in situ using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick-end labelling (TUNEL). KA-mediated neurotoxicity and apoptosis was completely attenuated by the mixed CDK and MAP kinase inhibitor, olomoucine, in a concentration-dependent manner (50 – 600 μM), and partially by roscovitine (1 – 100 μM), a more selective CDK inihibitor. The p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB203580 (1 – 100 μM), partially attenuated KA receptor-mediated apoptosis, as did the MAP kinase kinase inhibitors PD98509 (1 – 100 μM) and U0126 (1 – 100 μM). These findings provide new evidence for a complex network of interacting pathways involving CDK/MAPK that control apoptosis downstream of KA receptor activation in excitotoxic neuronal cell death. PMID:11934814

  7. NR2A subunit of the N-methyl D-aspartate receptors are required for potentiation at the mossy fiber to granule cell synapse and vestibulo-cerebellar motor learning.

    PubMed

    Andreescu, C E; Prestori, F; Brandalise, F; D'Errico, A; De Jeu, M T G; Rossi, P; Botta, L; Kohr, G; Perin, P; D'Angelo, E; De Zeeuw, C I

    2011-03-10

    Traditionally studies aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying cerebellar motor learning have been focused on plasticity at the parallel fiber to Purkinje cell synapse. In recent years, however, the concept is emerging that formation and storage of memories are both distributed over multiple types of synapses at different sites. Here, we examined the potential role of potentiation at the mossy fiber to granule cell synapse, which occurs upstream to plasticity in Purkinje cells. We show that null-mutants of N-methyl d-aspartate-NR2A receptors (NMDA-NR2A(-/-) mice) have impaired induction of postsynaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) at the mossy fiber terminals and a reduced ability to raise the granule cell synaptic excitation, while the basic excitatory output of the mossy fibers is unaffected. In addition, we demonstrate that these NR2A(-/-) mutants as well as mutants in which the C terminal in the NR2A subunit is selectively truncated (NR2A(ΔC/ΔC) mice) have deficits in phase reversal adaptation of their vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), while their basic eye movement performance is similar to that of wild type littermates. These results indicate that NMDA-NR2A mediated potentiation at the mossy fiber to granule cell synapse is not required for basic motor performance, and they raise the possibility that it may contribute to some forms of vestibulo-cerebellar memory formation. PMID:21185357

  8. Protective effects of fangchinoline and tetrandrine on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative neuronal cell damage in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Sang Bum; Ban, Ju Yeon; Lee, Bo Young; Seong, Yeon Hee

    2003-06-01

    The present study was performed to examine the neuroprotective effects of fangchinoline (FAN) and tetrandrine (TET), bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloids, which exhibit the characteristics of Ca 2+ channel blockers, on H2O2 -induced neurotoxicity using cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. H2O2 produced a concentration-dependent reduction of cell viability, which was blocked by (5 R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[ a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), an N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, verapamil, an L-type Ca 2+ channel blocker, and NG-nitro- L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor. Pretreatment with FAN and TET over a concentration range of 0.1 to 10 microM significantly decreased the H2O2 -induced neuronal cell death as assessed by a trypan blue exclusion test, a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and the number of apoptotic nuclei. In addition, FAN and TET inhibited the H2O2 -induced elevation of glutamate release into the medium, elevation of the cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+] c ), and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that FAN and TET may mitigate the harmful effects of H2O2 -induced neuronal cell death by interfering with the increase of [Ca 2+] c, and then by inhibiting glutamate release and generation of ROS. Abbreviations. AP5:D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid DMSO:dimethyl sulfoxide FAN:fangchinoline H 2 DCF-DA:2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate MK-801:(5 R,10 S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5 H-dibenzo[ a,d]cyclohepten-5,20-imine MTT:3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide L-NAME: NG-Nitro- L-arginine methyl ester NMDA: N-methyl- D-aspartate TET:tetrandrine PMID:12865967

  9. Multisite phosphorylation of c-Jun at threonine 91/93/95 triggers the onset of c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C E; Albanito, L; De Marco, P; Aiello, D; Maggiolini, M; Napoli, A; Musti, A M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell (CGC) apoptosis by trophic/potassium (TK) deprivation is a model of election to study the interplay of pro-apoptotic and pro-survival signaling pathways in neuronal cell death. In this model, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) induces pro-apoptotic genes through the c-Jun/activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor. On the other side, a survival pathway initiated by lithium leads to repression of pro-apoptotic c-Jun/AP-1 target genes without interfering with JNK activity. Yet, the mechanism by which lithium inhibits c-Jun activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we used this model system to study the regulation and function of site-specific c-Jun phosphorylation at the S63 and T91/T93 JNK sites in neuronal cell death. We found that TK-deprivation led to c-Jun multiphosphorylation at all three JNK sites. However, immunofluorescence analysis of c-Jun phosphorylation at single cell level revealed that the S63 site was phosphorylated in all c-Jun-expressing cells, whereas the response of T91/T93 phosphorylation was more sensitive, mirroring the switch-like apoptotic response of CGCs. Conversely, lithium prevented T91T93 phosphorylation and cell death without affecting the S63 site, suggesting that T91T93 phosphorylation triggers c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity. Accordingly, a c-Jun mutant lacking the T95 priming site for T91/93 phosphorylation protected CGCs from apoptosis, whereas it was able to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Vice versa, a c-Jun mutant bearing aspartate substitution of T95 overwhelmed lithium-mediate protection of CGCs from TK-deprivation, validating that inhibition of T91/T93/T95 phosphorylation underlies the effect of lithium on cell death. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed multiphosphorylation of c-Jun at T91/T93/T95 in cells. Moreover, JNK phosphorylated recombinant c-Jun at T91/T93 in a T95-dependent manner. On the basis of our results, we propose that T91/T93/T95 multiphosphorylation of c-Jun functions as a

  10. Molecular mechanisms of benzodiazepine-induced down-regulation of GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M. J.; Bristow, D. R.

    1996-01-01

    1. Chronic benzodiazepine treatment of rat cerebellar granule cells induced a transient down-regulation of the gamma-aminobutyric acidA (GABAA) receptor alpha 1 subunit protein, that was dose-dependent (1 nM-1 microM) and prevented by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil (1 microM). After 2 days of treatment with 1 microM flunitrazepam the alpha 1 subunit protein was reduced by 41% compared to untreated cells, which returned to, and remained at, control cell levels from 4-12 days of treatment. Chronic flunitrazepam treatment did not significantly alter the GABAA receptor alpha 6 subunit protein over the 2-12 day period. 2. GABA treatment for 2 days down-regulates the alpha 1 subunit protein in a dose-dependent (10 microM-1 mM) manner that was prevented by the selective GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (10 microM). At 10 microM and 1 mM GABA the reduction in alpha 1 subunit expression compared to controls was 31% and 66%, respectively. 3. The flunitrazepam-induced decrease in alpha 1 subunit protein is independent of GABA, which suggests that it involves a mechanism distinct from the GABA-dependent action of benzodiazepines on GABAA receptor channel activity. 4. Simultaneous treatment with flunitrazepam and GABA did not produce an additive down-regulation of alpha 1 subunit protein, but produced an effect of the same magnitude as that of flunitrazepam alone. This down-regulation induced by the combination of flunitrazepam and GABA was inhibited by flumazenil (78%), but unaffected by bicuculline. 5. The flunitrazepam-induced down-regulation of alpha 1 subunit protein at 2 days was completely reversed by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine (0.3 microM). 6. This study has shown that both flunitrazepam and GABA treatment, via their respective binding sites, caused a reduction in the expression of the GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit protein; an effect mediated through the same neurochemical mechanism. The results also imply that the benzodiazepine effect

  11. Protection by imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine of glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured cerebellar granule cells through blockade of NMDA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Olmos, Gabriel; DeGregorio-Rocasolano, Nuria; Regalado, M Paz; Gasull, Teresa; Boronat, M Assumpció; Trullas, Ramón; Villarroel, Alvaro; Lerma, Juan; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the potential neuroprotective effect of several imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine on glutamate-induced necrosis and on apoptosis induced by low extracellular K+ in cultured cerebellar granule cells.Exposure (30 min) of energy deprived cells to L-glutamate (1–100 μM) caused a concentration-dependent neurotoxicity, as determined 24 h later by a decrease in the ability of the cells to metabolize 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) into a reduced formazan product. L-glutamate-induced neurotoxicity (EC50=5 μM) was blocked by the specific NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine).Imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine fully prevented neurotoxicity induced by 20 μM (EC100) L-glutamate with the rank order (EC50 in μM): antazoline (13)>cirazoline (44)>LSL 61122 [2-styryl-2-imidazoline] (54)>LSL 60101 [2-(2-benzofuranyl) imidazole] (75)>idazoxan (90)>LSL 60129 [2-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-yl)-4,5-dihydroimidazole] (101)>RX821002 (2-methoxy idazoxan) (106)>agmatine (196). No neuroprotective effect of these drugs was observed in a model of apoptotic neuronal cell death (reduction of extracellular K+) which does not involve stimulation of NMDA receptors.Imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine fully inhibited [3H]-(+)-MK-801 binding to the phencyclidine site of NMDA receptors in rat brain. The profile of drug potency protecting against L-glutamate neurotoxicity correlated well (r=0.90) with the potency of the same compounds competing against [3H]-(+)-MK-801 binding.In HEK-293 cells transfected to express the NR1-1a and NR2C subunits of the NMDA receptor, antazoline and agmatine produced a voltage- and concentration-dependent block of glutamate-induced currents. Analysis of the voltage dependence of the block was consistent with the presence of a binding site for antazoline located within the NMDA channel pore with an IC50 of 10–12 μM at 0 mV.It is concluded that imidazol(ine) drugs and agmatine are

  12. BIT/SHPS-1 promotes antiapoptotic effect of BDNF on low potassium-induced cell death of cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Hisatsugu; Suzuki, Shingo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masashi; Kojima, Masami; Hatanaka, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    Brain immunoglobulin-like molecule with tyrosine-based activation motifs/SHP substrate 1 (BIT/SHPS-1) is a neuronal adhesion molecule that is highly expressed in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs); however its function in CGNs remains unclear. Our previous studies indicated that BIT/SHPS-1 is able to modulate the antiapoptotic effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on CNS neurons by cell type-specific mechanisms. In this article, we have studied the role of BIT/SHPS-1 in the antiapoptotic function of BDNF on low potassium (LK)-induced cell death of cultured CGNs which is an in vitro model system of neuronal apoptosis during brain development. Cultured rat CGNs were transduced with wild-type rat BIT/SHPS-1 (BIT/SHPS-1(WT)), its 4F-mutant (BIT/SHPS-1(4F), in which all cytoplasmic tyrosine residues were substituted with phenylalanine), or nuclear localization signal-attached beta-galactosidase (NLS-LacZ, as control)-expressing adenoviruses. Expression of BIT/SHPS-1(WT) and BIT/SHPS-1(4F) alone did not affect steady-state cell viability. Tyrosine phosphorylation of BIT/SHPS-1 was only detected in BIT/SHPS-1(WT)-expressing cultures in the presence and the absence of BDNF. When subjected to LK in the presence of BDNF, BIT/SHPS-1(WT)- and BIT/SHPS-1(4F)-expressing cultures showed a significant resistance to cell death, while the control virus-transfected culture did not. In addition, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor, LY294002, attenuated the antiapoptotic effect of BDNF on BIT/SHPS-1(WT)-, and BIT/SHPS-1(4F)-expressing cultures. These results demonstrated that in both tyrosine phosphorylation-independent and PI3-K-dependent manners, BIT/SHPS-1 promotes the antiapoptotic effect of BDNF on the LK-induced cell death of CGNs.

  13. Mechanisms underlying developmental changes in the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors in cultured cerebellar granule cells: homologous desensitization and interactive effects involving N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Aronica, E; Dell'Albani, P; Condorelli, D F; Nicoletti, F; Hack, N; Balázs, R

    1993-11-01

    Glutamate receptors coupled to polyphosphoinositide (PPI) hydrolysis (metabotropic glutamate receptors, mGluR), are highly efficient during the early stages of postnatal life and are thought to be involved in developmental plasticity. The dramatic decrease with age in mGluR activity suggests the existence of mechanisms that down-regulate this receptor after a certain stage of neuronal maturation. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons grown under conditions that promote the survival and maturation of cells (serum-containing medium with 25 mM K+), enzymatic depletion of extracellular glutamate prevented the age-dependent decrease in mGluR agonist-stimulated PPI hydrolysis that normally occurs after 4 days of maturation in vitro, suggesting that mGluR activity declines as a result of developmental changes affecting homologous desensitization. This was borne out by the observation that glutamate at low concentrations (1-10 microM) readily desensitized mGluR at 7 days but not at 4 days in culture. Furthermore, the critical period during which the high sensitivity to agonist-induced desensitization of mGluR developed coincided with the period when phorbol ester-activated protein kinase C acquired the ability to suppress mGluR activity. The developmental pattern of mGluR agonist-induced PPI hydrolysis was similar in granule cells grown under "trophic" and "nontrophic" conditions (in cultures in 25 mM K+ and in a medium containing "low" K+, in this study, 10 mM, respectively). However, the developmental decline in the response to mGluR stimulation after 4 days in vitro was not prevented in cells grown in 10 mM K+ by the removal of extracellular glutamate; rather, it could be counteracted by treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (EC50, approximately 4 microM), which blocked the development of mGluR desensitization. The effect was NMDA receptor mediated and required DNA transcription and protein synthesis. However, NMDA exerted a different effect in cells grown in 25 m

  14. Repeated intermittent alcohol exposure during the third trimester-equivalent increases expression of the GABA(A) receptor δ subunit in cerebellar granule neurons and delays motor development in rats.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Marvin R; Vollmer, Cyndel C; Zamudio-Bulcock, Paula A; Vollmer, William; Blomquist, Samantha L; Morton, Russell A; Everett, Julie C; Zurek, Agnieszka A; Yu, Jieying; Orser, Beverley A; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) during fetal development can lead to long-lasting alterations, including deficits in fine motor skills and motor learning. Studies suggest that these are, in part, a consequence of cerebellar damage. Cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) are the gateway of information into the cerebellar cortex. Functionally, CGNs are heavily regulated by phasic and tonic GABAergic inhibition from Golgi cell interneurons; however, the effect of EtOH exposure on the development of GABAergic transmission in immature CGNs has not been investigated. To model EtOH exposure during the 3rd trimester-equivalent of human pregnancy, neonatal pups were exposed intermittently to high levels of vaporized EtOH from postnatal day (P) 2 to P12. This exposure gradually increased pup serum EtOH concentrations (SECs) to ∼60 mM (∼0.28 g/dl) during the 4 h of exposure. EtOH levels gradually decreased to baseline 8 h after the end of exposure. Surprisingly, basal tonic and phasic GABAergic currents in CGNs were not significantly affected by postnatal alcohol exposure (PAE). However, PAE increased δ subunit expression at P28 as detected by immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Also, electrophysiological studies with an agonist that is highly selective for δ-containing GABA(A) receptors, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP), showed an increase in THIP-induced tonic current. Behavioral studies of PAE rats did not reveal any deficits in motor coordination, except for a delay in the acquisition of the mid-air righting reflex that was apparent at P15 to P18. These findings demonstrate that repeated intermittent exposure to high levels of EtOH during the equivalent of the last trimester of human pregnancy has significant but relatively subtle effects on motor coordination and GABAergic transmission in CGNs in rats.

  15. Gene expression as a sensitive endpoint to evaluate cell differentiation and maturation of the developing central nervous system in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) exposed to pesticides

    SciTech Connect

    Hogberg, Helena T.; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Hartung, Thomas; Coecke, Sandra; Bal-Price, Anna K.

    2009-03-15

    The major advantage of primary neuronal cultures for developmental neurotoxicity (DNT) testing is their ability to replicate the crucial stages of neurodevelopment. In our studies using primary culture of cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) we have evaluated whether the gene expression relevant to the most critical developmental processes such as neuronal differentiation (NF-68 and NF-200) and functional maturation (NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors), proliferation and differentiation of astrocytes (GFAP and S100{beta}) as well as the presence of neural precursor cells (nestin and Sox10) could be used as an endpoint for in vitro DNT. The expression of these genes was assessed after exposure to various pesticides (paraquat parathion, dichlorvos, pentachlorophenol and cycloheximide) that could induce developmental neurotoxicity through different mechanisms. All studied pesticides significantly modified the expression of selected genes, related to the different stages of neuronal and/or glial cell development and maturation. The most significant changes were observed after exposure to paraquat and parathion (i.e. down-regulation of mRNA expression of NF-68 and NF-200, NMDA and GABA{sub A} receptors). Similarly, dichlorvos affected mainly neurons (decreased mRNA expression of NF-68 and GABA{sub A} receptors) whereas cycloheximide had an effect on neurons and astrocytes, as significant decreases in the mRNA expression of both neurofilaments (NF-68 and NF-200) and the astrocyte marker (S100{beta}) were observed. Our results suggest that toxicity induced by pesticides that target multiple pathways of neurodevelopment can be identified by studying expression of genes that are involved in different stages of cell development and maturation, and that gene expression could be used as a sensitive endpoint for initial screening to identify the compounds with the potential to cause developmental neurotoxicity.

  16. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders that begin in early childhood, such as ataxia telangiectasia. In an infant or young child, symptoms of a disorder that features cerebellar hypoplasia might include floppy muscle tone, developmental or ...

  17. Cerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degeneration? Cerebellar degeneration is a process in which neurons in the cerebellum - the area of the brain ... proteins that are necessary for the survival of neurons. Associated diseases: Diseases that are specific to the ...

  18. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hammer, Monia; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-06-28

    A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  19. Incorporation of DPP6a and DPP6K Variants in Ternary Kv4 Channel Complex Reconstitutes Properties of A-type K Current in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jerng, Henry H.; Pfaffinger, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-like protein 6 (DPP6) proteins co-assemble with Kv4 channel α-subunits and Kv channel-interacting proteins (KChIPs) to form channel protein complexes underlying neuronal somatodendritic A-type potassium current (ISA). DPP6 proteins are expressed as N-terminal variants (DPP6a, DPP6K, DPP6S, DPP6L) that result from alternative mRNA initiation and exhibit overlapping expression patterns. Here, we study the role DPP6 variants play in shaping the functional properties of ISA found in cerebellar granule (CG) cells using quantitative RT-PCR and voltage-clamp recordings of whole-cell currents from reconstituted channel complexes and native ISA channels. Differential expression of DPP6 variants was detected in rat CG cells, with DPP6K (41±3%)>DPP6a (33±3%)>>DPP6S (18±2%)>DPP6L (8±3%). To better understand how DPP6 variants shape native neuronal ISA, we focused on studying interactions between the two dominant variants, DPP6K and DPP6a. Although previous studies did not identify unique functional effects of DPP6K, we find that the unique N-terminus of DPP6K modulates the effects of KChIP proteins, slowing recovery and producing a negative shift in the steady-state inactivation curve. By contrast, DPP6a uses its distinct N-terminus to directly confer rapid N-type inactivation independently of KChIP3a. When DPP6a and DPP6K are co-expressed in ratios similar to those found in CG cells, their distinct effects compete in modulating channel function. The more rapid inactivation from DPP6a dominates during strong depolarization; however, DPP6K produces a negative shift in the steady-state inactivation curve and introduces a slow phase of recovery from inactivation. A direct comparison to the native CG cell ISA shows that these mixed effects are present in the native channels. Our results support the hypothesis that the precise expression and co-assembly of different auxiliary subunit variants are important factors in shaping the ISA functional properties

  20. [Cerebellar stroke].

    PubMed

    Paradowski, Michał; Zimny, Anna; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke belongs to a group of rare diseases of vascular origin. Cerebellum, supplied by three pairs of arteries (AICA, PICA, SCA) with many anastomoses between them is less susceptible for a stroke, especially ischemic one. Diagnosis of the stroke in this region is harder due to lower sensibility of commonly used CT of the head in case of stroke suspicion. The authors highlight clinical symptoms distinguishing between vascular territories or topographical locations of the stroke, diagnostic procedures, classical and surgical treatment, the most common misdiagnoses are also mentioned. The authors suggest a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm development, including rtPA treatment criteria for ischemic cerebellar stroke. PMID:26181157

  1. Acute cerebellar ataxia

    MedlinePlus

    Cerebellar ataxia; Ataxia - acute cerebellar; Cerebellitis; Post-varicella acute cerebellar ataxia; PVACA ... virus. Viral infections that may cause this include chickenpox , Coxsackie disease, Epstein-Barr, and echovirus . Other causes ...

  2. Molecular markers of neuronal progenitors in the embryonic cerebellar anlage.

    PubMed

    Morales, Daniver; Hatten, Mary E

    2006-11-22

    The cerebellum, like the cerebrum, includes a nuclear structure and an overlying cortical structure. Experiments in the past decade have expanded knowledge beyond the traditional function of the cerebellum to include critical roles in motor learning and memory and sensory discrimination. The initial steps in cerebellar development depend on inductive signaling involving FGF and Wnt proteins produced at the mesencephalic/metencephalic boundary. To address the issue of how individual cerebellar cell fates within the cerebellar territory are specified, we examined the expression of transcription factors, including mammalian homologues of LIM homeodomain-containing proteins, basic helix-loop-helix proteins, and three amino acid loop-containing proteins. The results of these studies show that combinatorial codes of transcription factors define precursors of the cerebellar nuclei, and both Purkinje cells and granule neurons of the cerebellar cortex. Examination of gene expression patterns in several hundred lines of Egfp-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mice in the GENSAT Project revealed numerous genes with restricted expression in cerebellar progenitor populations, including genes specific for cerebellar nuclear precursors and Purkinje cell precursors. In addition, we identified patterns of gene expression that link granule and Purkinje cells to their precerebellar nuclei. These results identify molecular pathways that offer new insights on the development of the nuclear and cortical structures of the cerebellum, as well as components of the cerebellar circuitry.

  3. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hammer, Monia; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-06-28

    A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans. PMID:27320912

  4. Defects in the CAPN1 gene result in alterations in cerebellar development and in cerebellar ataxia in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hamad, Monia Ben; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous CAPN1 null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knock-out (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1 mediated cleavage of PH domain and Leucine rich repeat Protein Phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis, and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans. PMID:27320912

  5. Ethanol-Induced Cerebellar Ataxia: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dar, M Saeed

    2015-08-01

    The cerebellum is an important target of ethanol toxicity given that cerebellar ataxia is the most consistent physical manifestation of acute ethanol consumption. Despite the significance of the cerebellum in ethanol-induced cerebellar ataxia (EICA), the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying EICA are incompletely understood. However, two important findings have shed greater light on this phenomenon. First, ethanol-induced blockade of cerebellar adenosine uptake in rodent models points to a role for adenosinergic A1 modulation of EICA. Second, the consistent observation that intracerebellar administration of nicotine in mice leads to antagonism of EICA provides evidence for a critical role of cerebellar nitric oxide (NO) in EICA reversal. Based on these two important findings, this review discusses the potential molecular events at two key synaptic sites (mossy fiber-granule cell-Golgi cell (MGG synaptic site) and granule cell parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (GPP synaptic site) that lead to EICA. Specifically, ethanol-induced neuronal NOS inhibition at the MGG synaptic site acts as a critical trigger for Golgi cell activation which leads to granule cell deafferentation. Concurrently, ethanol-induced inhibition of adenosine uptake at the GPP synaptic site produces adenosine accumulation which decreases glutamate release and leads to the profound activation of Purkinje cells (PCs). These molecular events at the MGG and GPP synaptic sites are mutually reinforcing and lead to cerebellar dysfunction, decreased excitatory output of deep cerebellar nuclei, and EICA. The critical importance of PCs as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex suggests normalization of PC function could have important therapeutic implications.

  6. Cerebellar and Brainstem Malformations.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-08-01

    The frequency and importance of the evaluation of the posterior fossa have increased significantly over the past 20 years owing to advances in neuroimaging. Conventional and advanced neuroimaging techniques allow detailed evaluation of the complex anatomic structures within the posterior fossa. A wide spectrum of cerebellar and brainstem malformations has been shown. Familiarity with the spectrum of cerebellar and brainstem malformations and their well-defined diagnostic criteria is crucial for optimal therapy, an accurate prognosis, and correct genetic counseling. This article discusses cerebellar and brainstem malformations, with emphasis on neuroimaging findings (including diagnostic criteria), neurologic presentation, systemic involvement, prognosis, and recurrence. PMID:27423798

  7. Primate archaeology.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Michael; Hernandez-Aguilar, Adriana; Ling, Victoria; Carvalho, Susana; de la Torre, Ignacio; DeStefano, April; Du, Andrew; Hardy, Bruce; Harris, Jack; Marchant, Linda; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro; McGrew, William; Mercader, Julio; Mora, Rafael; Petraglia, Michael; Roche, Hélène; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; Warren, Rebecca

    2009-07-16

    All modern humans use tools to overcome limitations of our anatomy and to make difficult tasks easier. However, if tool use is such an advantage, we may ask why it is not evolved to the same degree in other species. To answer this question, we need to bring a long-term perspective to the material record of other members of our own order, the Primates.

  8. Acetylcholine sensitivity of cerebellar neurones in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, J. M.; Curtis, D. R.; Voorhoeve, P. E.; Wilson, V. J.

    1966-01-01

    1. Cholinomimetics, acetylcholine antagonists and some other compounds of pharmacological interest were administered electrophoretically near neurones within the vermal cerebellar cortex of anaesthetized (pentobarbitone) and unanaesthetized (cerveau isolé) cats. 2. The neurones were identified by position within the cortex, spontaneous activity, and the responses to afferent and antidromic stimulation. 3. Purkinje cells, but neither granule nor basket cells, were excited by cholinomimetics, and the acetylcholine receptors had muscarinic properties. Excitation was often preceded by depression of the spontaneous firing. 4. Intravenously administered atropine and dihydro-β-erythroidine did not depress the synaptic excitation of cerebellar neurones evoked by impulses in mossy, climbing or parallel fibres. 5. Acetylcholine is thus unlikely to be an excitatory transmitter within the feline cerebellum, particularly at mossy fibre-granule cell synapses, despite the presence of relatively high levels of acetylcholinesterase within mossy fibre terminals. PMID:5914249

  9. Excitatory Cerebellar Nucleocortical Circuit Provides Internal Amplification during Associative Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenyu; Proietti-Onori, Martina; Lin, Zhanmin; Ten Brinke, Michiel M; Boele, Henk-Jan; Potters, Jan-Willem; Ruigrok, Tom J H; Hoebeek, Freek E; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2016-02-01

    Closed-loop circuitries between cortical and subcortical regions can facilitate precision of output patterns, but the role of such networks in the cerebellum remains to be elucidated. Here, we characterize the role of internal feedback from the cerebellar nuclei to the cerebellar cortex in classical eyeblink conditioning. We find that excitatory output neurons in the interposed nucleus provide efference-copy signals via mossy fibers to the cerebellar cortical zones that belong to the same module, triggering monosynaptic responses in granule and Golgi cells and indirectly inhibiting Purkinje cells. Upon conditioning, the local density of nucleocortical mossy fiber terminals significantly increases. Optogenetic activation and inhibition of nucleocortical fibers in conditioned animals increases and decreases the amplitude of learned eyeblink responses, respectively. Our data show that the excitatory nucleocortical closed-loop circuitry of the cerebellum relays a corollary discharge of premotor signals and suggests an amplifying role of this circuitry in controlling associative motor learning. PMID:26844836

  10. Cerebellar neurodegeneration in human hereditary DNA repair disorders.

    PubMed

    Kohji, T; Hayashi, M; Shioda, K; Minagawa, M; Morimatsu, Y; Tamagawa, K; Oda, M

    1998-02-27

    Recent findings have focused attention on the role of apoptosis in neurodegenerative diseases, however, the apoptotic process in child-onset brain disorders has been little investigated. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hereditary disorders characterized by impaired DNA repair and neurodegeneration. We investigated apoptotic cell death in the cerebellum of five cases of XP group A (XPA), four cases of CS, and twelve controls, using TdT-mediated DIG-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and immunohistochemical staining for bcl-2, bcl-x, p53, bax, BDNF and Trk B. The TUNEL-positive cells were found in the granule cells of the cerebellar cortex of two patients with XPA and two patients with CS, whereas such cells were not detected in the cerebellar cortex in controls. Upregulation of bcl-2 or BDNF was not observed, and bcl-x expression was not altered. Some patients showed nuclear expression of p53 in the granule cells and/or molecular layer, bax-positive glial cells in the cerebellar white matter, and a few Trk B-positive cells in the granular layer. These findings suggest that apoptotic cell death can be involved in the cerebellar degeneration in patients with hereditary defects in DNA repair mechanisms.

  11. Oligodendrocyte ablation affects the coordinated interaction between granule and Purkinje neurons during cerebellum development

    SciTech Connect

    Collin, Ludovic; Doretto, Sandrine; Malerba, Monica; Ruat, Martial; Borrelli, Emiliana . E-mail: borrelli@uci.edu

    2007-08-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs) are the glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS) classically known to be devoted to the formation of myelin sheaths around most axons of the vertebrate brain. We have addressed the role of these cells during cerebellar development, by ablating OLs in vivo. Previous analyses had indicated that OL ablation during the first six postnatal days results into a striking cerebellar phenotype, whose major features are a strong reduction of granule neurons and aberrant Purkinje cells development. These two cell types are highly interconnected during cerebellar development through the production of molecules that help their proliferation, differentiation and maintenance. In this article, we present data showing that OL ablation has major effects on the physiology of Purkinje (PC) and granule cells (GC). In particular, OL ablation results into a reduction of sonic hedgehog (Shh), Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF), and Reelin (Rln) expression. These results indicate that absence of OLs profoundly alters the normal cerebellar developmental program.

  12. A theory of cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Marr, D

    1969-06-01

    1. A detailed theory of cerebellar cortex is proposed whose consequence is that the cerebellum learns to perform motor skills. Two forms of input-output relation are described, both consistent with the cortical theory. One is suitable for learning movements (actions), and the other for learning to maintain posture and balance (maintenance reflexes).2. It is known that the cells of the inferior olive and the cerebellar Purkinje cells have a special one-to-one relationship induced by the climbing fibre input. For learning actions, it is assumed that:(a) each olivary cell responds to a cerebral instruction for an elemental movement. Any action has a defining representation in terms of elemental movements, and this representation has a neural expression as a sequence of firing patterns in the inferior olive; and(b) in the correct state of the nervous system, a Purkinje cell can initiate the elemental movement to which its corresponding olivary cell responds.3. Whenever an olivary cell fires, it sends an impulse (via the climbing fibre input) to its corresponding Purkinje cell. This Purkinje cell is also exposed (via the mossy fibre input) to information about the context in which its olivary cell fired; and it is shown how, during rehearsal of an action, each Purkinje cell can learn to recognize such contexts. Later, when the action has been learnt, occurrence of the context alone is enough to fire the Purkinje cell, which then causes the next elemental movement. The action thus progresses as it did during rehearsal.4. It is shown that an interpretation of cerebellar cortex as a structure which allows each Purkinje cell to learn a number of contexts is consistent both with the distributions of the various types of cell, and with their known excitatory or inhibitory natures. It is demonstrated that the mossy fibre-granule cell arrangement provides the required pattern discrimination capability.5. The following predictions are made.(a) The synapses from parallel fibres

  13. Cerebellar learning mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying cerebellar learning are reviewed with an emphasis on old arguments and new perspectives on eyeblink conditioning. Eyeblink conditioning has been used for decades a model system for elucidating cerebellar learning mechanisms. The standard model of the mechanisms underlying eyeblink conditioning is that there two synaptic plasticity processes within the cerebellum that are necessary for acquisition of the conditioned response: 1) long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses and 2) long-term potentiation (LTP) at mossy fiber-interpositus nucleus synapses. Additional Purkinje cell plasticity mechanisms may also contribute to eyeblink conditioning including LTP, excitability, and entrainment of deep nucleus activity. Recent analyses of the sensory input pathways necessary for eyeblink conditioning indicate that the cerebellum regulates its inputs to facilitate learning and maintain plasticity. Cerebellar learning during eyeblink conditioning is therefore a dynamic interactive process which maximizes responding to significant stimuli and suppresses responding to irrelevant or redundant stimuli. PMID:25289586

  14. Unilateral cerebellar aplasia.

    PubMed

    Boltshauser, E; Steinlin, M; Martin, E; Deonna, T

    1996-02-01

    We describe three children with unilateral cerebellar aplasia (UCA). Deliveries at term and neonatal periods were uneventful. Pregnancy was normal in one and complicated by mild bleeding (in second and fourth month respectively) in two instances. Presenting signs were delayed motor development with marked contralateral torticollis (n = 1), hemiplegia (n = 1) and unusual head nodding (n = 1). Neuroradiological investigations revealed complete aplasia (n = 1) and subtotal aplasia (n = 2) of one cerebellar hemisphere with only a residual wing-like structure below the tentorium. There was contralateral underdevelopment of the brainstem. The infant with hemiplegic cerebral palsy had an additional supratentorial periventricular parenchymal defect, contralateral to the cerebellar hypoplasia. In view of literature reports, describing similar neuroradiological or neuropathological findings in asymptomatic individuals, it is doubtful whether UCA is responsible for our patient's problems. In our cases UCA has presumably resulted from a prenatal destructive lesion, possibly an infarct, but the timing and exact nature are unknown. PMID:8677027

  15. Ultrastructural pathology of human peritumoural oedematous cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar cortical biopsies of the peritumoural region of seven patients with cerebellar haemangioma, mesencephalic meningioma, cerebellopontine astrocytoma, cerebellopontine meningioma, and medulloblastoma of cerebellar vermis were examined by means of conventional transmission electron microscopy. Granule cells showed oedematous cytoplasm and mitochondria. Swollen Golgi cells exhibited lipofuscin granules and intranuclear inclusions. Both neuron cell types displayed swollen dendritic digits synapsing with afferent mossy fibre endings. Degenerated myelinated axons corresponding to afferent mossy and climbing fibres and efferent Purkinje cell axons were observed at the granular layer. Dense and clear ischaemic Purkinje cells established degenerated synapses with swollen parallel fibre synaptic varicosities. Degenerated Purkinje cell recurrent axonal collaterals were found at the molecular layer. Swollen and clear Bergmann glial cell cytoplasm was observed closely applied to the oedematous clear and dark Purkinje cell body, dendritic trunk, secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Swollen climbing fibre endings featured by numerous microtubules and neurofilaments, and a decreased number of synaptic vesicles were observed making degenerated axo-spinodendritic synapses with clear and swollen dendritic spines from Purkinje, Golgi, basket and stellate cell dendrites. Swollen stellate neurons showed oedematous mitochondria. Lipofuscin-rich astrocytes and reactive phagocytic astrocytes were observed. The latter appeared engulfing haematogenous proteinaceous oedema fluid. All cerebellar neurons showed stress endoplasmic reticulum dysfunction featured by focal dilated cisterns and detachment of associated ribosomes. Myelin sheath degeneration was related with oligodendrocyte degenerating hydropic changes. The peritumoural ischaemic cerebellar nerve and glial cell abnormalities were related with neurobehavioral changes, tremor, nystagmus, dismetry and gait disturbance

  16. Giant secretory granules in the ducts of the parotid and submandibular glands of the slow loris.

    PubMed

    Tandler, B; Pinkstaff, C A; Nagato, T; Phillips, C J

    1996-06-01

    The parotid and submandibular glands of a slow loris, a rare Southeast Asian primate, were obtained after the head had been perfused by fixative for a study of the brain. These tissues were processed by conventional means for electron microscopy. Glands also were obtained at autopsy from 2 other lorises, fixed by immersion in formalin, and subjected to a battery of tests for glycoconjugates. In the parotid gland, a short segment of the proximal striated duct lacks both basal striations and any sign of secretory activity. The major portion of the striated duct consists of tall cells that contain a spectrum of secretory granules, some larger than the nuclei (many granules are > 9 mum in diameter). These granules, which are delimited by a single membrane, are capable of chain exocytosis. Many of the giant granules have bundles of cytofilaments (4.5-6.5 nm) in apparent association with their surface. Occasional cells contain numerous small granules. Duct cells with or without granules lack basal striations. The granules contain neutral glycoconjugates but no acidic glycoconjugates. Some, but not all, interlobular excretory ducts also have secretory granules that run the gamut from tiny to giant. Exactly the same situation occurs in the submandibular gland. Unlike other primates, which may have duct cells that contain only a few tiny granules in their apices, the cells in both the striated and excretory ducts in the slow loris appear to be specialized for secretion rather than for transport. The biofunction of the giant granules is unknown.

  17. Establishment of Gal4 transgenic zebrafish lines for analysis of development of cerebellar neural circuitry.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Miki; Matsuda, Koji; Yamaguchi, Shingo; Asakawa, Kazuhide; Miyasaka, Nobuhiko; Lal, Pradeep; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Koga, Akihiko; Kawakami, Koichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Hibi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in some forms of motor coordination and motor learning. Here we isolated transgenic (Tg) zebrafish lines that express a modified version of Gal4-VP16 (GFF) in the cerebellar neural circuits: granule, Purkinje, or eurydendroid cells, Bergmann glia, or the neurons in the inferior olive nuclei (IO) which send climbing fibers to Purkinje cells, with the transposon Tol2 system. By combining GFF lines with Tg lines carrying a reporter gene located downstream of Gal4 binding sequences (upstream activating sequence: UAS), we investigated the anatomy and developmental processes of the cerebellar neural circuitry. Combining an IO-specific Gal4 line with a UAS reporter line expressing the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede demonstrated the contralateral projections of climbing fibers. Combining a granule cell-specific Gal4 line with a UAS reporter line expressing wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) confirmed direct and/or indirect connections of granule cells with Purkinje cells, eurydendroid cells, and IO neurons in zebrafish. Time-lapse analysis of a granule cell-specific Gal4 line revealed initial random movements and ventral migration of granule cell nuclei. Transgenesis of a reporter gene with another transposon Tol1 system visualized neuronal structure at a single cell resolution. Our findings indicate the usefulness of these zebrafish Gal4 Tg lines for studying the development and function of cerebellar neural circuits.

  18. Granulation of fine powder

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Ching-Fong

    2016-08-09

    A mixture of fine powder including thorium oxide was converted to granulated powder by forming a first-green-body and heat treating the first-green-body at a high temperature to strengthen the first-green-body followed by granulation by crushing or milling the heat-treated first-green-body. The granulated powder was achieved by screening through a combination of sieves to achieve the desired granule size distribution. The granulated powder relies on the thermal bonding to maintain its shape and structure. The granulated powder contains no organic binder and can be stored in a radioactive or other extreme environment. The granulated powder was pressed and sintered to form a dense compact with a higher density and more uniform pore size distribution.

  19. Co-localization of glycine and gaba immunoreactivity in interneurons in Macaca monkey cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Crook, J; Hendrickson, A; Robinson, F R

    2006-09-15

    Previous work demonstrates that the cerebellum uses glycine as a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter [Ottersen OP, Davanger S, Storm-Mathisen J (1987) Glycine-like immunoreactivity in the cerebellum of rat and Senegalese baboon, Papio papio: a comparison with the distribution of GABA-like immunoreactivity and with [3H]glycine and [3H]GABA uptake. Exp Brain Res 66(1):211-221; Ottersen OP, Storm-Mathisen J, Somogyi P (1988) Colocalization of glycine-like and GABA-like immunoreactivities in Golgi cell terminals in the rat cerebellum: a postembedding light and electron microscopic study. Brain Res 450(1-2):342-353; Dieudonne S (1995) Glycinergic synaptic currents in Golgi cells of the rat cerebellum. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 92:1441-1445; Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2001) IPSC kinetics at identified GABAergic and mixed GABAergic and glycinergic synapses onto cerebellar Golgi cells. J Neurosci 21(16):6045-6057; Dugue GP, Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2005) Target-dependent use of coreleased inhibitory transmitters at central synapses. J Neurosci 25(28):6490-6498; Zeilhofer HU, Studler B, Arabadzisz D, Schweizer C, Ahmadi S, Layh B, Bosl MR, Fritschy JM (2005) Glycinergic neurons expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice. J Comp Neurol 482(2):123-141]. In the rat cerebellum glycine is not released by itself but is released together with GABA by Lugaro cells onto Golgi cells [Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2001) IPSC kinetics at identified GABAergic and mixed GABAergic and glycinergic synapses onto cerebellar Golgi cells. J Neurosci 21(16):6045-6057] and by Golgi cells onto unipolar brush and granule cells [Dugue GP, Dumoulin A, Triller A, Dieudonne S (2005) Target-dependent use of coreleased inhibitory transmitters at central synapses. J Neurosci 25(28):6490-6498]. Here we report, from immunolabeling evidence in Macaca cerebellum, that interneurons in the granular cell layer are glycine+ at a density

  20. A novel inhibitory nucleo-cortical circuit controls cerebellar Golgi cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Ankri, Lea; Husson, Zoé; Pietrajtis, Katarzyna; Proville, Rémi; Léna, Clément; Yarom, Yosef; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Uusisaari, Marylka Yoe

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum, a crucial center for motor coordination, is composed of a cortex and several nuclei. The main mode of interaction between these two parts is considered to be formed by the inhibitory control of the nuclei by cortical Purkinje neurons. We now amend this view by showing that inhibitory GABA-glycinergic neurons of the cerebellar nuclei (CN) project profusely into the cerebellar cortex, where they make synaptic contacts on a GABAergic subpopulation of cerebellar Golgi cells. These spontaneously firing Golgi cells are inhibited by optogenetic activation of the inhibitory nucleo-cortical fibers both in vitro and in vivo. Our data suggest that the CN may contribute to the functional recruitment of the cerebellar cortex by decreasing Golgi cell inhibition onto granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06262.001 PMID:25965178

  1. Metronidazole induced cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Aditya; Srikanth, B. Akshaya; Lakshmi, G. Sriranga

    2013-01-01

    Metronidazole is a widely used antimicrobial usually prescribed by many specialist doctors for a short duration of 10-15 days. Prolonged use of metronidazole is rare. The present case is of a patient who used the drug for 4 months and developed peripheral neuropathy, convulsions, and cerebellar ataxia. He was treated with diazepam and levetiracetam. The patient recovered completely following discontinuation of metronidazole. PMID:23833378

  2. Cerebellar function in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Stoodley, Catherine J; Stein, John F

    2013-04-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a genetically based neurobiological syndrome, which is characterized by reading difficulty despite normal or high general intelligence. Even remediated dyslexic readers rarely achieve fast, fluent reading. Some dyslexics also have impairments in attention, short-term memory, sequencing (letters, word sounds, and motor acts), eye movements, poor balance, and general clumsiness. The presence of "cerebellar" motor and fluency symptoms led to the proposal that cerebellar dysfunction contributes to the etiology of dyslexia. Supporting this, functional imaging studies suggest that the cerebellum is part of the neural network supporting reading in typically developing readers, and reading difficulties have been reported in patients with cerebellar damage. Differences in both cerebellar asymmetry and gray matter volume are some of the most consistent structural brain findings in dyslexics compared with good readers. Furthermore, cerebellar functional activation patterns during reading and motor learning can differ in dyslexic readers. Behaviorally, some children and adults with dyslexia show poorer performance on cerebellar motor tasks, including eye movement control, postural stability, and implicit motor learning. However, many dyslexics do not have cerebellar signs, many cerebellar patients do not have reading problems, and differences in dyslexic brains are found throughout the whole reading network, and not isolated to the cerebellum. Therefore, impaired cerebellar function is probably not the primary cause of dyslexia, but rather a more fundamental neurodevelopmental abnormality leads to differences throughout the reading network.

  3. Dissociation of locomotor and cerebellar deficits in a murine Angelman syndrome model

    PubMed Central

    Bruinsma, Caroline F.; Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Aronica, Eleonora M.A.; Judson, Matthew C.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Hoebeek, Freek E.; van Woerden, Geeske M.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurological disorder that is associated with prominent movement and balance impairments that are widely considered to be due to defects of cerebellar origin. Here, using the cerebellar-specific vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) paradigm, we determined that cerebellar function is only mildly impaired in the Ube3am–/p+ mouse model of AS. VOR phase-reversal learning was singularly impaired in these animals and correlated with reduced tonic inhibition between Golgi cells and granule cells. Purkinje cell physiology, in contrast, was normal in AS mice as shown by synaptic plasticity and spontaneous firing properties that resembled those of controls. Accordingly, neither VOR phase-reversal learning nor locomotion was impaired following selective deletion of Ube3a in Purkinje cells. However, genetic normalization of αCaMKII inhibitory phosphorylation fully rescued locomotor deficits despite failing to improve cerebellar learning in AS mice, suggesting extracerebellar circuit involvement in locomotor learning. We confirmed this hypothesis through cerebellum-specific reinstatement of Ube3a, which ameliorated cerebellar learning deficits but did not rescue locomotor deficits. This double dissociation of locomotion and cerebellar phenotypes strongly suggests that the locomotor deficits of AS mice do not arise from impaired cerebellar cortex function. Our results provide important insights into the etiology of the motor deficits associated with AS. PMID:26485287

  4. Self-organization of polarized cerebellar tissue in 3D culture of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muguruma, Keiko; Nishiyama, Ayaka; Kawakami, Hideshi; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Sasai, Yoshiki

    2015-02-01

    During cerebellar development, the main portion of the cerebellar plate neuroepithelium gives birth to Purkinje cells and interneurons, whereas the rhombic lip, the germinal zone at its dorsal edge, generates granule cells and cerebellar nuclei neurons. However, it remains elusive how these components cooperate to form the intricate cerebellar structure. Here, we found that a polarized cerebellar structure self-organizes in 3D human embryonic stem cell (ESC) culture. The self-organized neuroepithelium differentiates into electrophysiologically functional Purkinje cells. The addition of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) promotes spontaneous generation of dorsoventrally polarized neural-tube-like structures at the level of the cerebellum. Furthermore, addition of SDF1 and FGF19 promotes the generation of a continuous cerebellar plate neuroepithelium with rhombic-lip-like structure at one end and a three-layer cytoarchitecture similar to the embryonic cerebellum. Thus, human-ESC-derived cerebellar progenitors exhibit substantial self-organizing potential for generating a polarized structure reminiscent of the early human cerebellum at the first trimester. PMID:25640179

  5. Cadherins in cerebellar development: translation of embryonic patterning into mature functional compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Redies, Christoph; Neudert, Franziska; Lin, Juntang

    2011-09-01

    Cadherins are cell adhesion molecules with multiple morphogenic functions in brain development, for example, in neuroblast migration and aggregation, axon navigation, neural circuit formation, and synaptogenesis. More than 100 members of the cadherin superfamily are expressed in the developing and mature brain. Most of the cadherins investigated, in particular classic cadherins and δ-protocadherins, are expressed in the cerebellum. For several cadherin subtypes, expression begins at early embryonic stages and persists until mature stages of cerebellar development. At intermediate stages, distinct Purkinje cell clusters exhibit unique rostrocaudal and mediolateral expression profiles for each cadherin. In the chicken, mouse, and other species, the Purkinje cell clusters are separated by intervening raphes of migrating granule cells. This pattern of Purkinje cell clusters/raphes is, at least in part, continuous with the parasagittal striping pattern that is apparent in the mature cerebellar cortex, for example, for zebrin II/aldolase C. Moreover, subregions of the deep cerebellar nuclei, vestibular nuclei and the olivary complex also express cadherins differentially. Neuroanatomical evidence suggests that the nuclear subregions and cortical domains that express the same cadherin subtype are connected to each other, to form neural subcircuits of the cerebellar system. Cadherins thus provide a molecular code that specifies not only embryonic structures but also functional cerebellar compartmentalization. By following the implementation of this code, it can be revealed how mature functional architecture emerges from embryonic patterning during cerebellar development. Dysfunction of some cadherins is associated with psychiatric diseases and developmental impairments and may also affect cerebellar function.

  6. Dissociation of locomotor and cerebellar deficits in a murine Angelman syndrome model.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Caroline F; Schonewille, Martijn; Gao, Zhenyu; Aronica, Eleonora M A; Judson, Matthew C; Philpot, Benjamin D; Hoebeek, Freek E; van Woerden, Geeske M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Elgersma, Ype

    2015-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurological disorder that is associated with prominent movement and balance impairments that are widely considered to be due to defects of cerebellar origin. Here, using the cerebellar-specific vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) paradigm, we determined that cerebellar function is only mildly impaired in the Ube3am-/p+ mouse model of AS. VOR phase-reversal learning was singularly impaired in these animals and correlated with reduced tonic inhibition between Golgi cells and granule cells. Purkinje cell physiology, in contrast, was normal in AS mice as shown by synaptic plasticity and spontaneous firing properties that resembled those of controls. Accordingly, neither VOR phase-reversal learning nor locomotion was impaired following selective deletion of Ube3a in Purkinje cells. However, genetic normalization of αCaMKII inhibitory phosphorylation fully rescued locomotor deficits despite failing to improve cerebellar learning in AS mice, suggesting extracerebellar circuit involvement in locomotor learning. We confirmed this hypothesis through cerebellum-specific reinstatement of Ube3a, which ameliorated cerebellar learning deficits but did not rescue locomotor deficits. This double dissociation of locomotion and cerebellar phenotypes strongly suggests that the locomotor deficits of AS mice do not arise from impaired cerebellar cortex function. Our results provide important insights into the etiology of the motor deficits associated with AS. PMID:26485287

  7. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components. PMID:24954915

  8. [Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome secondary to a cerebellar tumour].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carral, J; Carreras-Sáez, I; García-Peñas, J J; Fournier-Del Castillo, C; Villalobos-Reales, J

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome is characterized by disturbances of executive function, impaired spatial cognition, linguistic difficulties, and personality change. The case of an 11 year old boy is presented, with behavior problems, learning difficulties and social interaction problems. In the physical examination he had poor visual contact, immature behavior, reduced expressive language and global motor disability with gait dyspraxia, with no defined cerebellar motor signs. In the neuropsychological evaluation he has a full scale overall intellectual quotient of 84, with signs of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. A tumour affecting inferior cerebellar vermis was observed in the magnetic resonance imaging, which had not significantly grown during 5 years of follow up. The cerebellum participates in controlling cognitive and affective functions. Cerebellar pathology must be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with cognitive or learning disorder with associated behavioral and emotional components.

  9. Treatable causes of cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Zeigler, Warren; Desai, Neeja; Biller, José

    2015-04-15

    The cerebellar ataxia syndromes are a heterogeneous group of disorders clinically characterized by the presence of cerebellar dysfunction. Initial assessment of patients with progressive cerebellar ataxia is complex because of an extensive list of potential diagnoses. A detailed history and comprehensive examination are required for an accurate diagnosis and hierarchical diagnostic investigations. Although no cure exists for most of these conditions, a small group of metabolic, hereditary, inflammatory, and immune-mediated etiologies of cerebellar ataxia are amenable to disease-modifying, targeted therapies. Over the past years, disease-specific treatments have emerged. Thus, clinicians must become familiar with these disorders because maximal therapeutic benefit is only possible when done early. In this article, we review disorders in which cerebellar ataxia is a prominent clinical feature requiring targeted treatments along with specific management recommendations.

  10. GDNF-induced cerebellar toxicity: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Luz, Matthias; Mohr, Erich; Fibiger, H Christian

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant-methionyl human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is known for its neurorestorative and neuroprotective effects in rodent and primate models of Parkinson's disease (PD). When administered locally into the putamen of Parkinsonian subjects, early clinical studies showed its potential promise as a disease-modifying agent. However, the development of GDNF for the treatment of PD has been significantly clouded by findings of cerebellar toxicity after continuous intraputamenal high-dose administration in a 6-month treatment/3-month recovery toxicology study in rhesus monkeys. Specifically, multifocal cerebellar Purkinje cell loss affecting 1-21% of the cerebellar cortex was observed in 4 of 15 (26.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 10.5-52.4%) animals treated at the highest dose level tested (3000μg/month). No cerebellar toxicity was observed at lower doses (450 and 900μg/month) in the same study, or at similar or higher doses (up to 10,000μg/month) in subchronic or chronic toxicology studies testing intermittent intracerebroventricular administration. While seemingly associated with the use of GDNF, the pathogenesis of the cerebellar lesions has not been fully understood to date. This review integrates available information to evaluate potential pathogenic mechanisms and provide a consolidated assessment of the findings. While other explanations are considered, the existing evidence is most consistent with the hypothesis that leakage of GDNF into cerebrospinal fluid during chronic infusions into the putamen down-regulates GDNF receptors on Purkinje cells, and that subsequent acute withdrawal of GDNF generates the observed lesions. The implications of these findings for clinical studies with GDNF are discussed.

  11. High-fidelity transmission of sensory information by single cerebellar mossy fibre boutons.

    PubMed

    Rancz, Ede A; Ishikawa, Taro; Duguid, Ian; Chadderton, Paul; Mahon, Séverine; Häusser, Michael

    2007-12-20

    Understanding the transmission of sensory information at individual synaptic connections requires knowledge of the properties of presynaptic terminals and their patterns of firing evoked by sensory stimuli. Such information has been difficult to obtain because of the small size and inaccessibility of nerve terminals in the central nervous system. Here we show, by making direct patch-clamp recordings in vivo from cerebellar mossy fibre boutons-the primary source of synaptic input to the cerebellar cortex-that sensory stimulation can produce bursts of spikes in single boutons at very high instantaneous firing frequencies (more than 700 Hz). We show that the mossy fibre-granule cell synapse exhibits high-fidelity transmission at these frequencies, indicating that the rapid burst of excitatory postsynaptic currents underlying the sensory-evoked response of granule cells can be driven by such a presynaptic spike burst. We also demonstrate that a single mossy fibre can trigger action potential bursts in granule cells in vitro when driven with in vivo firing patterns. These findings suggest that the relay from mossy fibre to granule cell can act in a 'detonator' fashion, such that a single presynaptic afferent may be sufficient to transmit the sensory message. This endows the cerebellar mossy fibre system with remarkable sensitivity and high fidelity in the transmission of sensory information.

  12. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuguang; Wang, Xiaopeng; Xu, Kai; Hu, Chunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) describes a depression of oxidative metabolism glucose and blood flow in the cerebellum secondary to a supratentorial lesion in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. PET/MR has the potential to become a powerful tool for demonstrating and imaging intracranial lesions .We herein report 3 cases of CCD imaging using a tri-modality PET/CT–MR set-up for investigating the value of adding MRI rather than CT to PET in clinical routine. We describe 3 patients with CCD and neurological symptoms in conjunction with abnormal cerebral fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/CT–MR) manifestations including arterial spin-labeling (ASL) and T2-weighted images. In all, 18FDG-PET/CT detected positive FDG uptake in supratentorial lesions, and hypometabolism with atrophy in the contralateral cerebellum. More than that, hybrid PET/MRI provided a more accurate anatomic localization and ASL indicated disruption of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar pathway. Using pathology or long-term clinical follow-up to confirm the PET and ASL findings, the supratentorial lesions of the 3 patients were respectively diagnosed with cerebral infarction, recurrent glioma, and metastasis. The reports emphasize the significance of multimodality radiological examinations. Multimodality imaging contributes to proper diagnosis, management, and follow-up of supratentorial lesions with CCD. PMID:26765477

  13. Integrated plasticity at inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the cerebellar circuit.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Lisa; Pagani, Martina; Garrido, Jesus A; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The way long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) are integrated within the different synapses of brain neuronal circuits is poorly understood. In order to progress beyond the identification of specific molecular mechanisms, a system in which multiple forms of plasticity can be correlated with large-scale neural processing is required. In this paper we take as an example the cerebellar network, in which extensive investigations have revealed LTP and LTD at several excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Cerebellar LTP and LTD occur in all three main cerebellar subcircuits (granular layer, molecular layer, deep cerebellar nuclei) and correspondingly regulate the function of their three main neurons: granule cells (GrCs), Purkinje cells (PCs) and deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) cells. All these neurons, in addition to be excited, are reached by feed-forward and feed-back inhibitory connections, in which LTP and LTD may either operate synergistically or homeostatically in order to control information flow through the circuit. Although the investigation of individual synaptic plasticities in vitro is essential to prove their existence and mechanisms, it is insufficient to generate a coherent view of their impact on network functioning in vivo. Recent computational models and cell-specific genetic mutations in mice are shedding light on how plasticity at multiple excitatory and inhibitory synapses might regulate neuronal activities in the cerebellar circuit and contribute to learning and memory and behavioral control.

  14. Integrated plasticity at inhibitory and excitatory synapses in the cerebellar circuit

    PubMed Central

    Mapelli, Lisa; Pagani, Martina; Garrido, Jesus A.; D’Angelo, Egidio

    2015-01-01

    The way long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) are integrated within the different synapses of brain neuronal circuits is poorly understood. In order to progress beyond the identification of specific molecular mechanisms, a system in which multiple forms of plasticity can be correlated with large-scale neural processing is required. In this paper we take as an example the cerebellar network, in which extensive investigations have revealed LTP and LTD at several excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Cerebellar LTP and LTD occur in all three main cerebellar subcircuits (granular layer, molecular layer, deep cerebellar nuclei) and correspondingly regulate the function of their three main neurons: granule cells (GrCs), Purkinje cells (PCs) and deep cerebellar nuclear (DCN) cells. All these neurons, in addition to be excited, are reached by feed-forward and feed-back inhibitory connections, in which LTP and LTD may either operate synergistically or homeostatically in order to control information flow through the circuit. Although the investigation of individual synaptic plasticities in vitro is essential to prove their existence and mechanisms, it is insufficient to generate a coherent view of their impact on network functioning in vivo. Recent computational models and cell-specific genetic mutations in mice are shedding light on how plasticity at multiple excitatory and inhibitory synapses might regulate neuronal activities in the cerebellar circuit and contribute to learning and memory and behavioral control. PMID:25999817

  15. Automated cerebellar lobule segmentation with application to cerebellar structural analysis in cerebellar disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen; Ye, Chuyang; Bogovic, John A; Carass, Aaron; Jedynak, Bruno M; Ying, Sarah H; Prince, Jerry L

    2016-02-15

    The cerebellum plays an important role in both motor control and cognitive function. Cerebellar function is topographically organized and diseases that affect specific parts of the cerebellum are associated with specific patterns of symptoms. Accordingly, delineation and quantification of cerebellar sub-regions from magnetic resonance images are important in the study of cerebellar atrophy and associated functional losses. This paper describes an automated cerebellar lobule segmentation method based on a graph cut segmentation framework. Results from multi-atlas labeling and tissue classification contribute to the region terms in the graph cut energy function and boundary classification contributes to the boundary term in the energy function. A cerebellar parcellation is achieved by minimizing the energy function using the α-expansion technique. The proposed method was evaluated using a leave-one-out cross-validation on 15 subjects including both healthy controls and patients with cerebellar diseases. Based on reported Dice coefficients, the proposed method outperforms two state-of-the-art methods. The proposed method was then applied to 77 subjects to study the region-specific cerebellar structural differences in three spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) genetic subtypes. Quantitative analysis of the lobule volumes shows distinct patterns of volume changes associated with different SCA subtypes consistent with known patterns of atrophy in these genetic subtypes. PMID:26408861

  16. A comparison of artificial solar granules with real solar granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woehl, H.; Nordlund, A.

    1985-06-01

    The properties of computer-generated images of solar granules were compared with data from the literature and with observations of granules from 1975 and 1979. The lifetimes, shapes, and dimensions of the granules were estimated, and the results are discussed. No significant differences were found between the artificial images and the observed granules. The ratios of width to length among the artificial granules are given in a table.

  17. Primate photopigments and primate color vision.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, G H

    1996-01-23

    The past 15 years have brought much progress in our understanding of several basic features of primate color vision. There has been particular success in cataloging the spectral properties of the cone photopigments found in retinas of a number of primate species and in elucidating the relationship between cone opsin genes and their photopigment products. Direct studies of color vision show that there are several modal patterns of color vision among groupings of primates: (i) Old World monkeys, apes, and humans all enjoy trichromatic color vision, although the former two groups do not seem prone to the polymorphic variations in color vision that are characteristic of people; (ii) most species of New World monkeys are highly polymorphic, with individual animals having any of several types of dichromatic or trichromatic color vision; (iii) less is known about color vision in prosimians, but evidence suggests that at least some diurnal species have dichromatic color vision; and (iv) some nocturnal primates may lack color vision completely. In many cases the photopigments and photopigment gene arrangements underlying these patterns have been revealed and, as a result, hints are emerging about the evolution of color vision among the primates. PMID:8570598

  18. Primate photopigments and primate color vision.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, G H

    1996-01-01

    The past 15 years have brought much progress in our understanding of several basic features of primate color vision. There has been particular success in cataloging the spectral properties of the cone photopigments found in retinas of a number of primate species and in elucidating the relationship between cone opsin genes and their photopigment products. Direct studies of color vision show that there are several modal patterns of color vision among groupings of primates: (i) Old World monkeys, apes, and humans all enjoy trichromatic color vision, although the former two groups do not seem prone to the polymorphic variations in color vision that are characteristic of people; (ii) most species of New World monkeys are highly polymorphic, with individual animals having any of several types of dichromatic or trichromatic color vision; (iii) less is known about color vision in prosimians, but evidence suggests that at least some diurnal species have dichromatic color vision; and (iv) some nocturnal primates may lack color vision completely. In many cases the photopigments and photopigment gene arrangements underlying these patterns have been revealed and, as a result, hints are emerging about the evolution of color vision among the primates. PMID:8570598

  19. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, Maureen

    The present study sought an acoustic signature for the speech disturbance recognized in cerebellar degeneration. Magnetic resonance imaging was used for a radiological rating of cerebellar involvement in six cerebellar ataxic dysarthric speakers. Acoustic measures of the [pap] syllables in contrastive prosodic conditions and of normal vs. brain-damaged patients were used to further our understanding both of the speech degeneration that accompanies cerebellar pathology and of speech motor control and movement in general. Pair-wise comparisons of the prosodic conditions within the normal group showed statistically significant differences for four prosodic contrasts. For three of the four contrasts analyzed, the normal speakers showed both longer durations and higher formant and fundamental frequency values in the more prominent first condition of the contrast. The acoustic measures of the normal prosodic contrast values were then used as a model to measure the degree of speech deterioration for individual cerebellar subjects. This estimate of speech deterioration as determined by individual differences between cerebellar and normal subjects' acoustic values of the four prosodic contrasts was used in correlation analyses with MRI ratings. Moderate correlations between speech deterioration and cerebellar atrophy were found in the measures of syllable duration and f0. A strong negative correlation was found for F1. Moreover, the normal model presented by these acoustic data allows for a description of the flexibility of task- oriented behavior in normal speech motor control. These data challenge spatio-temporal theory which explains movement as an artifact of time wherein longer durations predict more extreme movements and give further evidence for gestural internal dynamics of movement in which time emerges from articulatory events rather than dictating those events. This model provides a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic

  20. Hedgehog regulates cerebellar progenitor cell and medulloblastoma apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Kevin Kiyoshi; Cabrera, Omar Hoseá; Swiney, Brant S; Salinas-Contreras, Patricia; Smith, Julie Kathryn; Farber, Nuri B

    2015-11-01

    The external granule layer (EGL) is a proliferative region that produces over 90% of the neurons in the cerebellum but can also malignantly transform into a cerebellar tumor called the medulloblastoma (the most common malignant brain tumor in children). Current dogma considers Hedgehog stimulation a potent proliferative signal for EGL neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and medulloblastomas. However, the Hedgehog pathway also acts as a survival signal in the neural tube where it regulates dorsoventral patterning by controlling NPC apoptosis. Here we show that Hedgehog stimulation is also a potent survival signal in the EGL and medulloblastomas that produces a massive apoptotic response within hours of signal loss in mice. This toxicity can be produced by numerous Hedgehog antagonists (vismodegib, cyclopamine, and jervine) and is Bax/Bak dependent but p53 independent. Finally, since glucocorticoids can also induce EGL and medulloblastoma apoptosis, we show that Hedgehog's effects on apoptosis can occur independent of glucocorticoid stimulation. This effect may play a major role in cerebellar development by directing where EGL proliferation occurs thereby morphologically sculpting growth. It may also be a previously unknown major therapeutic effect of Hedgehog antagonists during medulloblastoma therapy. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for both cerebellar development and medulloblastoma treatment. PMID:26319366

  1. Property in Nonhuman Primates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2011-01-01

    Property is rare in most nonhuman primates, most likely because their lifestyles are not conducive to it. Nonetheless, just because these species do not frequently maintain property does not mean that they lack the propensity to do so. Primates show respect for possession, as well as behaviors related to property, such as irrational decision…

  2. The mysterious microcircuitry of the cerebellar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Uusisaari, Marylka; De Schutter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The microcircuitry of cerebellar cortex and, in particular, the physiology of its main element, the Purkinje neuron, has been extensively investigated and described. However, activity in Purkinje neurons, either as single cells or populations, does not directly mediate the cerebellar effects on the motor effector systems. Rather, the result of the entire cerebellar cortical computation is passed to the relatively small cerebellar nuclei that act as the final, integrative processing unit in the cerebellar circuitry. The nuclei ultimately control the temporal and spatial features of the cerebellar output. Given this key role, it is striking that the internal organization and the connectivity with afferent and efferent pathways in the cerebellar nuclei are rather poorly known. In the present review, we discuss some of the many critical shortcomings in the understanding of cerebellar nuclei microcircuitry: the extent of convergence and divergence of the cerebellar cortical pathway to the various cerebellar nuclei neurons and subareas, the possible (lack of) conservation of the finely-divided topographical organization in the cerebellar cortex at the level of the nuclei, as well as the absence of knowledge of the synaptic circuitry within the cerebellar nuclei. All these issues are important for predicting the pattern-extraction and encoding capabilities of the cerebellar nuclei and, until resolved, theories and models of cerebellar motor control and learning may err considerably. PMID:21521761

  3. Raptors and primate evolution.

    PubMed

    McGraw, W Scott; Berger, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Most scholars agree that avoiding predators is a central concern of lemurs, monkeys, and apes. However, given uncertainties about the frequency with which primates actually become prey, the selective importance of predation in primate evolution continues to be debated. Some argue that primates are often killed by predators, while others maintain that such events are relatively rare. Some authors have contended that predation's influence on primate sociality has been trivial; others counter that predation need not occur often to be a powerful selective force. Given the challenges of documenting events that can be ephemeral and irregular, we are unlikely ever to amass the volume of systematic, comparative data we have on such topics as feeding, social dynamics, or locomotor behavior. Nevertheless, a steady accumulation of field observations, insight gained from natural experiments, and novel taphonomic analyses have enhanced understanding of how primates interact with several predators, especially raptors, the subject of this review. PMID:24347501

  4. Forebrain-Cerebellar Interactions During Learning

    PubMed Central

    Weible, Aldis P.; Galvez, Roberto; Disterhoft, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebral cortex and cerebellum are high level neural centers that must interact cooperatively to generate coordinated and efficient goal directed movements, including those necessary for a well-timed conditioned response. In this review we describe the progress made in utilizing the forebrain-dependent trace eyeblink conditioning paradigm to understand the neural substrates mediating cerebro-cerebellar interactions during learning and consolidation of conditioned responses. This review expands upon our previous hypothesis that the interaction occurs at sites that project to the pontine nuclei (Weiss & Disterhoft, 1996), by offering more details on the function of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex during acquisition and the circuitry involved in facilitating pontine input to the cerebellum as a necessary requisite for trace eyeblink conditioning. Our discussion describes the role of the hippocampus, caudal anterior cingulate gyrus, basal ganglia, thalamus, and sensory cortex, including the benefit of utilizing the whisker barrel cortical system. We propose that permanent changes in the sensory cortex, along with input from the caudate and claustrum, and a homologue of the primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, serve to bridge the stimulus free trace interval and allow the cerebellum to generate a well-timed conditioned response. PMID:26617664

  5. Expression of classical cadherins in the cerebellar anlage: quantitative and functional aspects.

    PubMed

    Gliem, Michael; Weisheit, Gunnar; Mertz, Kirsten D; Endl, Elmar; Oberdick, John; Schilling, Karl

    2006-12-01

    During central nervous system (CNS) development, cell migration precedes and is key to the integration of diverse sets of cells. Mechanistically, CNS histogenesis is realized through a balanced interplay of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules. Here, we summarize experiments that probe the developmental expression and potential significance of a set of cadherins, including M-, N- and R-cadherin, for patterning of the cerebellar cortex. We established a transgenic marker that allows cerebellar granule cells to be followed from the neuroblast stage to their final, postmitotic settlement. In conjunction with flow cytometry, this allowed us to derive a quantitative view of cadherin expression in differentiating granule cells and relate it to the expression of the same cadherins in cerebellar inhibitory interneuronal precursors. In vitro reaggregation analysis supports a role for cadherins in cell sorting and migration within the nascent cerebellar cortex that may be rationalized within the context of the differential adhesion hypothesis (Foty, R.A. and Steinberg, M.S., 2005. The differential adhesion hypothesis: a direct evaluation. Dev. Biol. 278, 255-263.).

  6. Voltage-dependent calcium signaling in rat cerebellar unipolar brush cells.

    PubMed

    Birnstiel, S; Slater, N T; McCrimmon, D R; Mugnaini, E; Hartell, N A

    2009-09-01

    Unipolar brush cells (UBCs) are a class of excitatory interneuron found in the granule cell layer of the vestibulocerebellum. Mossy fibers form excitatory inputs on to the paint brush shaped dendrioles in the form of giant, glutamatergic synapses, activation of which results in prolonged bursts of action potentials in the postsynaptic UBC. The axons of UBCs themselves form mossy fiber contacts with other UBCs and granule cells, forming an excitatory, intrinsic cerebellar network that has the capacity to synchronize and amplify mossy fiber inputs to potentially large populations of granule cells. In this paper, we demonstrate that UBCs in rat cerebellar slices express low voltage activated (LVA) fast-inactivating and high voltage activated (HVA) slowly inactivating calcium channels. LVA calcium currents are mediated by T-type calcium channels and they are associated with calcium increases in the dendrites and to a lesser extent the cell soma. HVA currents, mediated by L-type calcium channels, are slowly inactivating and they produce larger overall increases in intracellular calcium but with a similar distribution pattern. We review these observations alongside several recent papers that examine how intrinsic membrane properties influence UBCs firing patterns and we discuss how UBC signaling may affect downstream cerebellar processing. PMID:19409228

  7. [Cerebellar infarctions and their mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Amarenco, P

    1993-01-01

    Cerebellar infarcts have been neglected for a long time and are now shown well by CT and especially MRI. Some infarcts involve the full territory supplied by a cerebellar artery. They are frequently complicated by edema with brain stem compression and supratentorial hydrocephalus, requiring at times emergency surgery, and are often accompanied by other medullary, medial pontine, mesencephalic, thalamic and occipital infarcts. On the other hand, partial territory infarcts are usually confined to the cerebellum and have a benign outcome with total recovery or minimal disability. They are more common than full territory infarcts. However, clinical presentations are similar to those full territory infarcts, differing mainly by the lack of drowsiness or unconsciousness. The main symptoms are vertigo, headache, vomiting, unsteadiness of gait and dysarthria. Signs include ipsilateral limb dysmetria, ipsilateral axial lateropulsion, ataxia and dysarthria. Vertigo is more severe and rotary in posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory infarcts, whereas dysarthria and ataxia are prominent in superior cerebellar artery territory infarcts. A few brain stem signs are sometimes added. In these territorial cerebellar infarcts, cardioembolism is the most common cause. Atherosclerotic occlusion comes next, involving the intracranial part of the vertebral artery and, less frequently, the lower basilar artery, both locations inaccessible to surgery. Other causes are artery to artery embolism from a vertebral artery origin stenosis, or the aortic arch, in situ intracranial branch atherosclerotic occlusion, and vertebral artery dissection. Border zone cerebellar infarcts occur in one third of the cases. They are small cortical or deep infarcts. They have the same symptoms and signs as territorial infarcts except for more frequent postural symptoms occurring over days, weeks or months after the ischemic event. The infarcts mainly have a thromboembolic mechanism, and sometimes have a

  8. α6 integrin subunit regulates cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Giovanni; De Arcangelis, Adèle; Pfister, Véronique; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding several basal lamina components as well as their cellular receptors disrupt normal deposition and remodeling of the cortical basement membrane resulting in a disorganized cerebral and cerebellar cortex. The α6 integrin was the first α subunit associated with cortical lamination defects and formation of neural ectopias. In order to understand the precise role of α6 integrin in the central nervous system (CNS), we have generated mutant mice carrying specific deletion of α6 integrin in neuronal and glia precursors by crossing α6 conditional knockout mice with Nestin-Cre line. Cerebral cortex development occurred properly in the resulting α6fl/fl;nestin-Cre mutant animals. Interestingly, however, cerebellum displayed foliation pattern defects although granule cell (GC) proliferation and migration were not affected. Intriguingly, analysis of Bergmann glial (BG) scaffold revealed abnormalities in fibers morphology associated with reduced processes outgrowth and altered actin cytoskeleton. Overall, these data show that α6 integrin receptors are required in BG cells to provide a proper fissure formation during cerebellum morphogenesis. PMID:23722246

  9. Ataxia, dysmetria, tremor. Cerebellar diseases.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, J N

    1991-09-01

    Diseases affecting the cerebellum typically cause ataxia, coupled with dysmetria and tremor. Dysmetria is a condition in which there is improper measuring of distance in muscular acts; hypermetria is overreaching (overstepping) and hypometria is underreaching (understepping). Tremor refers to an involuntary, rhythmic, oscillatory movement of a body part. The tremor of cerebellar disease typically is exaggerated by goal-oriented movements (intention tremor). Cerebellar lesions also often cause loss of the menace response, despite the presence of normal vision. The anatomic basis for this phenomenon is obscure. The principal disease affecting the cerebellum in cats is cerebellar hypoplasia due to in utero infection with the panleukopenia virus. This disease will be discussed here. Neurologic signs of cerebellar involvement also may be seen in association with those diseases that affect the CNS multifocally. In these cats, there may be additional signs indicating involvement of other anatomic areas or the cerebellar deficits may occur alone (see discussion of multifocal diseases in Multiple Neurologic Deficits: Inflammatory Diseases [page 426] and Multiple Neurologic Deficits: Noninfectious Diseases [page 440]). PMID:1802262

  10. Speech prosody in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Casper, Maureen A; Raphael, Lawrence J; Harris, Katherine S; Geibel, Jennifer M

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy speakers and six with ataxia. The speaking task was designed to elicit six different prosodic conditions and four contrastive prosodic events. Distinct prosodic patterns were elicited by the examiner for cerebellar patients and healthy speakers. These utterances were digitally recorded and analysed acoustically and statistically. The healthy speakers showed statistically significant differences among all four prosodic contrasts. The normal model described by the prosodic contrasts provided a sensitive index of cerebellar pathology with quantitative acoustic analyses. A significant interaction between subject groups and prosodic conditions revealed a compromised prosody in cerebellar patients. Significant differences were found for durational parameters, F0 and formant frequencies. The cerebellar speakers demonstrated different patterns of syllable lengthening and syllable reduction from that of the healthy speakers. PMID:17613097

  11. Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration Information Page Synonym(s): ... Publications and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Ataxias and Cerebellar or Spinocerebellar Degeneration? Ataxia often occurs ...

  12. mRNP granules

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    Messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) granules are dynamic, self-assembling structures that harbor non-translating mRNAs bound by various proteins that regulate mRNA translation, localization, and turnover. Their importance in gene expression regulation is far reaching, ranging from precise spatial-temporal control of mRNAs that drive developmental programs in oocytes and embryos, to similarly exquisite control of mRNAs in neurons that underpin synaptic plasticity, and thus, memory formation. Analysis of mRNP granules in their various contexts has revealed common themes of assembly, disassembly, and modes of mRNA regulation, yet new studies continue to reveal unexpected and important findings, such as links between aberrant mRNP granule assembly and neurodegenerative disease. Continued study of these enigmatic structures thus promises fascinating new insights into cellular function, and may also suggest novel therapeutic strategies in various disease states. PMID:25531407

  13. Ethanol exposure during development reduces GABAergic/glycinergic neuron numbers and lobule volumes in the mouse cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    Nirgudkar, Pranita; Taylor, Devin H; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Cerebellar alterations are a hallmark of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and are thought to be responsible for deficits in fine motor control, motor learning, balance, and higher cognitive functions. These deficits are, in part, a consequence of dysfunction of cerebellar circuits. Although the effect of developmental ethanol exposure on Purkinje and granule cells has been previously characterized, its actions on other cerebellar neuronal populations are not fully understood. Here, we assessed the impact of repeated ethanol exposure on the number of inhibitory neurons in the cerebellar vermis. We exposed pregnant mice to ethanol in vapor inhalation chambers during gestational days 12-19 and offspring during postnatal days 2-9. We used transgenic mice expressing the fluorescent protein, Venus, in GABAergic/glycinergic neurons. Using unbiased stereology techniques, we detected a reduction in Venus positive neurons in the molecular and granule cell layers of lobule II in the ethanol exposed group at postnatal day 16. In contrast, ethanol produced a more widespread reduction in Purkinje cell numbers that involved lobules II, IV-V and IX. We also found a reduction in the volume of lobules II, IV-V, VI-VII, IX and X in ethanol-exposed pups. These findings indicate that second and third trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure has a greater impact on Purkinje cells than interneurons in the developing cerebellar vermis. The decrease in the volume of most lobules could be a consequence of a reduction in cell numbers, dendritic arborizations, or axonal projections.

  14. Ethanol exposure during development reduces GABAergic/glycinergic neuron numbers and lobule volumes in the mouse cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    Nirgudkar, Pranita; Taylor, Devin H; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Cerebellar alterations are a hallmark of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders and are thought to be responsible for deficits in fine motor control, motor learning, balance, and higher cognitive functions. These deficits are, in part, a consequence of dysfunction of cerebellar circuits. Although the effect of developmental ethanol exposure on Purkinje and granule cells has been previously characterized, its actions on other cerebellar neuronal populations are not fully understood. Here, we assessed the impact of repeated ethanol exposure on the number of inhibitory neurons in the cerebellar vermis. We exposed pregnant mice to ethanol in vapor inhalation chambers during gestational days 12-19 and offspring during postnatal days 2-9. We used transgenic mice expressing the fluorescent protein, Venus, in GABAergic/glycinergic neurons. Using unbiased stereology techniques, we detected a reduction in Venus positive neurons in the molecular and granule cell layers of lobule II in the ethanol exposed group at postnatal day 16. In contrast, ethanol produced a more widespread reduction in Purkinje cell numbers that involved lobules II, IV-V and IX. We also found a reduction in the volume of lobules II, IV-V, VI-VII, IX and X in ethanol-exposed pups. These findings indicate that second and third trimester-equivalent ethanol exposure has a greater impact on Purkinje cells than interneurons in the developing cerebellar vermis. The decrease in the volume of most lobules could be a consequence of a reduction in cell numbers, dendritic arborizations, or axonal projections. PMID:27565053

  15. Early Disruption of Extracellular Pleiotrophin Distribution Alters Cerebellar Neuronal Circuit Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M M; Rey, S A; Hilber, P; Arabo, A; Collin, T; Vaudry, D; Burel, D

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellum is a structure of the central nervous system involved in balance, motor coordination, and voluntary movements. The elementary circuit implicated in the control of locomotion involves Purkinje cells, which receive excitatory inputs from parallel and climbing fibers, and are regulated by cerebellar interneurons. In mice as in human, the cerebellar cortex completes its development mainly after birth with the migration, differentiation, and synaptogenesis of granule cells. These cellular events are under the control of numerous extracellular matrix molecules including pleiotrophin (PTN). This cytokine has been shown to regulate the morphogenesis of Purkinje cells ex vivo and in vivo via its receptor PTPζ. Since Purkinje cells are the unique output of the cerebellar cortex, we explored the consequences of their PTN-induced atrophy on the function of the cerebellar neuronal circuit in mice. Behavioral experiments revealed that, despite a normal overall development, PTN-treated mice present a delay in the maturation of their flexion reflex. Moreover, patch clamp recording of Purkinje cells revealed a significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in PTN-treated mice, associated with a decrease of climbing fiber innervations and an abnormal perisomatic localization of the parallel fiber contacts. At adulthood, PTN-treated mice exhibit coordination impairment on the rotarod test associated with an alteration of the synchronization gait. Altogether these histological, electrophysiological, and behavior data reveal that an early ECM disruption of PTN composition induces short- and long-term defaults in the establishment of proper functional cerebellar circuit.

  16. Early Disruption of Extracellular Pleiotrophin Distribution Alters Cerebellar Neuronal Circuit Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Hamza, M M; Rey, S A; Hilber, P; Arabo, A; Collin, T; Vaudry, D; Burel, D

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellum is a structure of the central nervous system involved in balance, motor coordination, and voluntary movements. The elementary circuit implicated in the control of locomotion involves Purkinje cells, which receive excitatory inputs from parallel and climbing fibers, and are regulated by cerebellar interneurons. In mice as in human, the cerebellar cortex completes its development mainly after birth with the migration, differentiation, and synaptogenesis of granule cells. These cellular events are under the control of numerous extracellular matrix molecules including pleiotrophin (PTN). This cytokine has been shown to regulate the morphogenesis of Purkinje cells ex vivo and in vivo via its receptor PTPζ. Since Purkinje cells are the unique output of the cerebellar cortex, we explored the consequences of their PTN-induced atrophy on the function of the cerebellar neuronal circuit in mice. Behavioral experiments revealed that, despite a normal overall development, PTN-treated mice present a delay in the maturation of their flexion reflex. Moreover, patch clamp recording of Purkinje cells revealed a significant increase in the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in PTN-treated mice, associated with a decrease of climbing fiber innervations and an abnormal perisomatic localization of the parallel fiber contacts. At adulthood, PTN-treated mice exhibit coordination impairment on the rotarod test associated with an alteration of the synchronization gait. Altogether these histological, electrophysiological, and behavior data reveal that an early ECM disruption of PTN composition induces short- and long-term defaults in the establishment of proper functional cerebellar circuit. PMID:26399645

  17. The genetics of cerebellar malformations.

    PubMed

    Aldinger, Kimberly A; Doherty, Dan

    2016-10-01

    The cerebellum has long been recognized for its role in motor co-ordination, but it is also increasingly appreciated for its role in complex cognitive behavior. Historically, the cerebellum has been overwhelmingly understudied compared to the neocortex in both humans and model organisms. However, this tide is changing as advances in neuroimaging, neuropathology, and neurogenetics have led to clinical classification and gene identification for numerous developmental disorders that impact cerebellar structure and function associated with significant overall neurodevelopmental dysfunction. Given the broad range in prognosis and associated medical and neurodevelopmental concerns accompanying cerebellar malformations, a working knowledge of these disorders and their causes is critical for obstetricians, perinatologists, and neonatologists. Here we present an update on the genetic causes for cerebellar malformations that can be recognized by neuroimaging and clinical characteristics during the prenatal and postnatal periods. PMID:27160001

  18. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  19. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  20. Migration behavior of rodent granule neurons in the presence of antibody to the 4C5 antigen.

    PubMed

    Yfanti, E; Nagata, I; Patsavoudi, E

    1998-10-01

    We have reported the production of monoclonal antibody 4C5, which recognizes a cell surface antigen, the 4C5 antigen, involved in granule cell migration processes. In the present study, we investigated in a more precise manner the role of the 4C5 antigen in the different types of granule cell migrations that take place during cerebellar development. When cerebellar explant cultures derived from 10-day-old rats were performed for 2 days in the presence of monoclonal antibody 4C5, vertical granule cell migration, occurring in the presence of glia, was not significantly inhibited. In contrast, when monoclonal antibody 4C5 was included in the medium of microexplant cultures derived from 4-day-old mice and maintained for 4 days in vitro, granule cell migrations that occurred both parallel and perpendicular to the neurite bundles that were free of glia were inhibited. Moreover, a stronger inhibitory effect of the antibody was observed on migration perpendicular to the neurite bundles compared with the parallel type of migration. Our results indicate that the 4C5 antigen differentially affects the different developmental stages and types of granule cell migration during rodent cerebellar development. PMID:9751168

  1. Human Quadrupeds, Primate Quadrupedalism, and Uner Tan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Liza J.; Cole, Whitney G.; Young, Jesse W.; Raichlen, David A.; Robinson, Scott R.; Adolph, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    Since 2005, an extensive literature documents individuals from several families afflicted with “Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS),” a condition that in its most extreme form is characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia, loss of balance and coordination, impaired cognitive abilities, and habitual quadrupedal gait on hands and feet. Some researchers have interpreted habitual use of quadrupedalism by these individuals from an evolutionary perspective, suggesting that it represents an atavistic expression of our quadrupedal primate ancestry or “devolution.” In support of this idea, individuals with “UTS” are said to use diagonal sequence quadrupedalism, a type of quadrupedal gait that distinguishes primates from most other mammals. Although the use of primate-like quadrupedal gait in humans would not be sufficient to support the conclusion of evolutionary “reversal,” no quantitative gait analyses were presented to support this claim. Using standard gait analysis of 518 quadrupedal strides from video sequences of individuals with “UTS”, we found that these humans almost exclusively used lateral sequence–not diagonal sequence–quadrupedal gaits. The quadrupedal gait of these individuals has therefore been erroneously described as primate-like, further weakening the “devolution” hypothesis. In fact, the quadrupedalism exhibited by individuals with UTS resembles that of healthy adult humans asked to walk quadrupedally in an experimental setting. We conclude that quadrupedalism in healthy adults or those with a physical disability can be explained using biomechanical principles rather than evolutionary assumptions. PMID:25029457

  2. Human quadrupeds, primate quadrupedalism, and Uner Tan Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Liza J; Cole, Whitney G; Young, Jesse W; Raichlen, David A; Robinson, Scott R; Adolph, Karen E

    2014-01-01

    Since 2005, an extensive literature documents individuals from several families afflicted with "Uner Tan Syndrome (UTS)," a condition that in its most extreme form is characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia, loss of balance and coordination, impaired cognitive abilities, and habitual quadrupedal gait on hands and feet. Some researchers have interpreted habitual use of quadrupedalism by these individuals from an evolutionary perspective, suggesting that it represents an atavistic expression of our quadrupedal primate ancestry or "devolution." In support of this idea, individuals with "UTS" are said to use diagonal sequence quadrupedalism, a type of quadrupedal gait that distinguishes primates from most other mammals. Although the use of primate-like quadrupedal gait in humans would not be sufficient to support the conclusion of evolutionary "reversal," no quantitative gait analyses were presented to support this claim. Using standard gait analysis of 518 quadrupedal strides from video sequences of individuals with "UTS", we found that these humans almost exclusively used lateral sequence-not diagonal sequence-quadrupedal gaits. The quadrupedal gait of these individuals has therefore been erroneously described as primate-like, further weakening the "devolution" hypothesis. In fact, the quadrupedalism exhibited by individuals with UTS resembles that of healthy adult humans asked to walk quadrupedally in an experimental setting. We conclude that quadrupedalism in healthy adults or those with a physical disability can be explained using biomechanical principles rather than evolutionary assumptions.

  3. Orthostatic tremor: a cerebellar pathology?

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Traian; García-Lorenzo, Daniel; Valabregue, Romain; Legrand, André-Pierre; Apartis, Emmanuelle; Marais, Lea; Degos, Bertrand; Hubsch, Cecile; Fernández-Vidal, Sara; Bardinet, Eric; Roze, Emmanuel; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Meunier, Sabine; Vidailhet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    See Muthuraman et al. (doi:10.1093/aww164) for a scientific commentary on this article. Primary orthostatic tremor is characterized by high frequency tremor affecting the legs and trunk during the standing position. Cerebellar defects were suggested in orthostatic tremor without direct evidence. We aimed to characterize the anatomo-functional defects of the cerebellar motor pathways in orthostatic tremor. We used multimodal neuroimaging to compare 17 patients with orthostatic tremor and 17 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. Nine of the patients with orthostatic tremor underwent repetitive transcranial stimulation applied over the cerebellum during five consecutive days. We quantified the duration of standing position and tremor severity through electromyographic recordings. Compared to healthy volunteers, grey matter volume in patients with orthostatic tremor was (i) increased in the cerebellar vermis and correlated positively with the duration of the standing position; and (ii) increased in the supplementary motor area and decreased in the lateral cerebellum, which both correlated with the disease duration. Functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area was abnormally increased in patients with orthostatic tremor, and correlated positively with tremor severity. After repetitive transcranial stimulation, tremor severity and functional connectivity between the lateral cerebellum and the supplementary motor area were reduced. We provide an explanation for orthostatic tremor pathophysiology, and demonstrate the functional relevance of cerebello-thalamo-cortical connections in tremor related to cerebellar defects. PMID:27329770

  4. Speech Prosody in Cerebellar Ataxia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Maureen A.; Raphael, Lawrence J.; Harris, Katherine S.; Geibel, Jennifer M.

    2007-01-01

    Persons with cerebellar ataxia exhibit changes in physical coordination and speech and voice production. Previously, these alterations of speech and voice production were described primarily via perceptual coordinates. In this study, the spatial-temporal properties of syllable production were examined in 12 speakers, six of whom were healthy…

  5. Amygdala Modulation of Cerebellar Learning

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Sean J.; Radley, Jason J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that amygdala lesions or inactivation slow the acquisition rate of cerebellum-dependent eyeblink conditioning, a type of associative motor learning. The current study was designed to determine the behavioral nature of amygdala–cerebellum interactions, to identify the neural pathways underlying amygdala–cerebellum interactions, and to examine how the amygdala influences cerebellar learning mechanisms in rats. Pharmacological inactivation of the central amygdala (CeA) severely impaired acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning, indicating that the amygdala continues to interact with the cerebellum after conditioning is consolidated (Experiment 1). CeA inactivation also substantially reduced stimulus-evoked and learning-related neuronal activity in the cerebellar anterior interpositus nucleus during acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning (Experiment 2). A very small proportion of cerebellar neurons responded to the conditioned stimulus (CS) during CeA inactivation. Finally, retrograde and anterograde tracing experiments identified the basilar pontine nucleus at the confluence of outputs from CeA that may support amygdala modulation of CS input to the cerebellum (Experiment 3). Together, these results highlight a role for the CeA in the gating of CS-related input to the cerebellum during motor learning that is maintained even after the conditioned response is well learned. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current study is the first to demonstrate that the amygdala modulates sensory-evoked and learning-related neuronal activity within the cerebellum during acquisition and retention of associative learning. The findings suggest a model of amygdala–cerebellum interactions in which the amygdala gates conditioned stimulus inputs to the cerebellum through a direct projection from the medial central nucleus to the basilar pontine nucleus. Amygdala gating of sensory input to the cerebellum may be an attention-like mechanism that

  6. Mice lacking the transcription factor SHOX2 display impaired cerebellar development and deficits in motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Jessica M; McAllister, Brendan B; Dyck, Richard H; Percival, Christopher J; Kurrasch, Deborah M; Cobb, John

    2015-03-01

    Purkinje cells of the developing cerebellum secrete the morphogen sonic hedgehog (SHH), which is required to maintain the proliferative state of granule cell precursors (GCPs) prior to their differentiation and migration to form the internal granule layer (IGL). Despite a wealth of knowledge regarding the function of SHH during cerebellar development, the upstream regulators of Shh expression during this process remain largely unknown. Here we report that the murine short stature homeobox 2 (Shox2) gene is required for normal Shh expression in dorsal-residing Purkinje cells. Using two different Cre drivers, we show that elimination of Shox2 in the brain results in developmental defects in the inferior colliculus and cerebellum. Specifically, loss of Shox2 in the cerebellum results in precocious differentiation and migration of GCPs from the external granule layer (EGL) to the IGL. This correlates with premature bone morphogenetic protein 4 (Bmp4) expression in granule cells of the dorsal cerebellum. The size of the neonatal cerebellum is reduced in Shox2-mutant animals, which is consistent with a reduction in the number of GCPs present in the EGL, and could account for the smaller vermis and thinner IGL present in adult Shox2mutants. Shox2-mutant mice also display reduced exploratory activity, altered gait and impaired motor coordination. Our findings are the first to show a role for Shox2 in brain development. We provide evidence that Shox2 plays an important role during cerebellar development, perhaps to maintain the proper balance of Shh and Bmp expression levels in the dorsal vermis, and demonstrate that in the absence of Shox2, mice display both cerebellar impairments and deficits in motor coordination, ultimately highlighting the importance of Shox2 in the cerebellum.

  7. Review: granulation and fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Kono, H.

    1981-01-01

    The history of granulation techniques is very long; however, the systematic study of the granulation phenomenon began only after 1950. The first, distinguished paper treating the fundamental binding mechanism of granules was published by Rumpf in 1958. Although there are several binding forces, the discussion in this paper is confined to granulation involving the capillary energy of a liquid-particle system. This technique has been applied widely and successfully to various fields of powder technology because of its advantages of simplicity and economy (ref. 2). Granules with diameters larger than 5 mm can be prepared efficiently by rotating-type granulators, such as a pan or a trommel (ref. 3, 4, 5). On the other hand, the purpose of fluidized-bed granulators (hereafter abbreviated as FBG) is to produce small granules with diameters from 0.3 to 3 mm (ref. 6). Because it contains a small amount of liquid, a fluidized-bed granulator has a fluidization state differing significantly from that of an ordinary fluidized bed. The dispersion of liquid and powder in the bed plays an important role in the granulation mechanism. This mechanism is compared to that of pan granulators, and the differences in characteristics are discussed.

  8. Developmental regulation of glucose transporters GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8 in the mouse cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Olga; Ballester-Lurbe, Begoña; Poch, Enric; Mesonero, José E; Terrado, José

    2010-01-01

    Glucose uptake into the mammalian nervous system is mediated by the family of facilitative glucose transporter proteins (GLUT). In this work we investigate how the expression of the main neuronal glucose transporters (GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8) is modified during cerebellar cortex maturation. Our results reveal that the levels of the three transporters increase during the postnatal development of the cerebellum. GLUT3 localizes in the growing molecular layer and in the internal granule cell layer. However, the external granule cell layer, Purkinje cell cytoplasm and cytoplasm of the other cerebellar cells lack GLUT3 expression. GLUT4 and GLUT8 have partially overlapping patterns, which are detected in the cytoplasm and dendrites of Purkinje cells, and also in the internal granule cell layer where GLUT8 displays a more diffuse pattern. The differential localization of the transporters suggests that they play different roles in the cerebellum, although GLUT4 and GLUT8 could also perform some compensatory or redundant functions. In addition, the increase in the levels and the area expressing the three transporters suggests that these roles become more important as development advances. Interestingly, the external granule cells, which have been shown to express the monocarboxylate transporter MCT2, express none of the three main neuronal GLUTs. However, when these cells migrate inwardly to differentiate in the internal granule cells, they begin to produce GLUT3, GLUT4 and GLUT8, suggesting that the maturation of the cerebellar granule cells involves a switch in their metabolism in such a way that they start using glucose as they mature. PMID:20819112

  9. Presynaptic Calcium Signalling in Cerebellar Mossy Fibres

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Louiza B.; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive fast Na+ spike faithfully followed repetitive depolarizing pulses with little change in spike duration or amplitude, while a strong outward rectification dominated responses to long-lasting depolarizations. High-threshold calcium spikes were uncovered following addition of potassium channel blockers. Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be modulated locally, suggesting that cerebellar glomeruli may be dynamically sub-compartmentalized due to ongoing inhibition mediated by Golgi cells. This could provide a fine-grained control of mossy fibre-granule cell information transfer and synaptic plasticity within a mossy fibre rosette. PMID:20162034

  10. Isolation of neuromelanin granules.

    PubMed

    Tribl, Florian

    2008-12-01

    Neuromelanin granules are pigmented organelles in the human midbrain that give name to a brain area, substantia nigra pars compacta, which macroscopically appears as a dark brown region in the midbrain due to the insoluble pigment neuromelanin. The substantia nigra pars compacta massively degenerates in Parkinson's disease and gives rise to severely disabling movement symptoms. It has been suggested that neuromelanin granules play an important role in the neurodegenerative events in Parkinson's disease: redox-active iron is bound to neuromelanin and thereby retained within this compartment, but in Parkinson's disease it is thought to be increasingly released into the cytosol, promoting oxidative stress. This unit includes a methodological workflow for the isolation of neuromelanin granules from the human midbrain. This top-down approach (describes an approach that reduces the complexity of the sample stepwise from the level of tissue to cell, and from cell to organelle) encompasses the organelle isolation by sequential density gradient centrifugation and the assessment of the isolation efficacy by western blotting. PMID:19085988

  11. Inhibition promotes long-term potentiation at cerebellar excitatory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Binda, F.; Dorgans, K.; Reibel, S.; Sakimura, K.; Kano, M.; Poulain, B.; Isope, P.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the cerebellar cortex to learn from experience ensures the accuracy of movements and reflex adaptation, processes which require long-term plasticity at granule cell (GC) to Purkinje neuron (PN) excitatory synapses. PNs also receive GABAergic inhibitory inputs via GCs activation of interneurons; despite the involvement of inhibition in motor learning, its role in long-term plasticity is poorly characterized. Here we reveal a functional coupling between ionotropic GABAA receptors and low threshold CaV3 calcium channels in PNs that sustains calcium influx and promotes long-term potentiation (LTP) at GC to PN synapses. High frequency stimulation induces LTP at GC to PN synapses and CaV3-mediated calcium influx provided that inhibition is intact; LTP is mGluR1, intracellular calcium store and CaV3 dependent. LTP is impaired in CaV3.1 knockout mice but it is nevertheless recovered by strengthening inhibitory transmission onto PNs; promoting a stronger hyperpolarization via GABAA receptor activation leads to an enhanced availability of an alternative Purkinje-expressed CaV3 isoform compensating for the lack of CaV3.1 and restoring LTP. Accordingly, a stronger hyperpolarization also restores CaV3-mediated calcium influx in PNs from CaV3.1 knockout mice. We conclude that by favoring CaV3 channels availability inhibition promotes LTP at cerebellar excitatory synapses. PMID:27641070

  12. Inhibition promotes long-term potentiation at cerebellar excitatory synapses.

    PubMed

    Binda, F; Dorgans, K; Reibel, S; Sakimura, K; Kano, M; Poulain, B; Isope, P

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the cerebellar cortex to learn from experience ensures the accuracy of movements and reflex adaptation, processes which require long-term plasticity at granule cell (GC) to Purkinje neuron (PN) excitatory synapses. PNs also receive GABAergic inhibitory inputs via GCs activation of interneurons; despite the involvement of inhibition in motor learning, its role in long-term plasticity is poorly characterized. Here we reveal a functional coupling between ionotropic GABAA receptors and low threshold CaV3 calcium channels in PNs that sustains calcium influx and promotes long-term potentiation (LTP) at GC to PN synapses. High frequency stimulation induces LTP at GC to PN synapses and CaV3-mediated calcium influx provided that inhibition is intact; LTP is mGluR1, intracellular calcium store and CaV3 dependent. LTP is impaired in CaV3.1 knockout mice but it is nevertheless recovered by strengthening inhibitory transmission onto PNs; promoting a stronger hyperpolarization via GABAA receptor activation leads to an enhanced availability of an alternative Purkinje-expressed CaV3 isoform compensating for the lack of CaV3.1 and restoring LTP. Accordingly, a stronger hyperpolarization also restores CaV3-mediated calcium influx in PNs from CaV3.1 knockout mice. We conclude that by favoring CaV3 channels availability inhibition promotes LTP at cerebellar excitatory synapses. PMID:27641070

  13. Inhibition promotes long-term potentiation at cerebellar excitatory synapses.

    PubMed

    Binda, F; Dorgans, K; Reibel, S; Sakimura, K; Kano, M; Poulain, B; Isope, P

    2016-09-19

    The ability of the cerebellar cortex to learn from experience ensures the accuracy of movements and reflex adaptation, processes which require long-term plasticity at granule cell (GC) to Purkinje neuron (PN) excitatory synapses. PNs also receive GABAergic inhibitory inputs via GCs activation of interneurons; despite the involvement of inhibition in motor learning, its role in long-term plasticity is poorly characterized. Here we reveal a functional coupling between ionotropic GABAA receptors and low threshold CaV3 calcium channels in PNs that sustains calcium influx and promotes long-term potentiation (LTP) at GC to PN synapses. High frequency stimulation induces LTP at GC to PN synapses and CaV3-mediated calcium influx provided that inhibition is intact; LTP is mGluR1, intracellular calcium store and CaV3 dependent. LTP is impaired in CaV3.1 knockout mice but it is nevertheless recovered by strengthening inhibitory transmission onto PNs; promoting a stronger hyperpolarization via GABAA receptor activation leads to an enhanced availability of an alternative Purkinje-expressed CaV3 isoform compensating for the lack of CaV3.1 and restoring LTP. Accordingly, a stronger hyperpolarization also restores CaV3-mediated calcium influx in PNs from CaV3.1 knockout mice. We conclude that by favoring CaV3 channels availability inhibition promotes LTP at cerebellar excitatory synapses.

  14. Hippocampal and cerebellar mossy fibre boutons – same name, different function

    PubMed Central

    Delvendahl, Igor; Weyhersmüller, Annika; Ritzau-Jost, Andreas; Hallermann, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Over a century ago, the Spanish anatomist Ramón y Cajal described ‘mossy fibres’ in the hippocampus and the cerebellum, which contain several presynaptic boutons. Technical improvements in recent decades have allowed direct patch-clamp recordings from both hippocampal and cerebellar mossy fibre boutons (hMFBs and cMFBs, respectively), making them ideal models to study fundamental properties of synaptic transmission. hMFBs and cMFBs have similar size and shape, but each hMFB contacts one postsynaptic hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neuron, while each cMFB contacts ∼50 cerebellar granule cells. Furthermore, hMFBs and cMFBs differ in terms of their functional specialization. At hMFBs, a large number of release-ready vesicles and low release probability (<0.1) contribute to marked synaptic facilitation. At cMFBs, a small number of release-ready vesicles, high release probability (∼0.5) and rapid vesicle reloading result in moderate frequency-dependent synaptic depression. These presynaptic mechanisms, in combination with faster postsynaptic currents of cerebellar granule cells compared with hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons, enable much higher transmission frequencies at cMFB compared with hMFB synapses. Analysing the underling mechanisms of synaptic transmission and information processing represents a fascinating challenge and may reveal insights into the structure–function relationship of the human brain. PMID:23297303

  15. Neurotrophin receptor proteins immunoreactivity in the rat cerebellar cortex as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Torres, J M; Javier Naves, F; Esteban, I; Del Valle, M E; Vega, J A

    1995-08-31

    The influence of age on immunohistochemically demonstrable neurotrophin receptor proteins (p75, trkA-, trkB-, and trkC-proteins) was studied in the cerebellar cortex of Wistar male rats aged 3 (young), 12 (adult) and 24 (old) months. The number of Purkinje neurons displaying p75, trkA- and trkC-like proteins immunoreactivity (IR), as well as the intensity of p75 and trkA-like protein IR, were significantly reduced in aged rats in comparison with 3 and 12-month-old rats. The intensity of trkC-like protein in the cytoplasm of Purkinje neurons remained unchanged for all the period studied. Moreover, no significant age-dependent changes were observed in the density of p75 or trkC-like proteins IR in the granule neurons layer. The molecular layer showed faint p75 IR which decreased as a function of age. No immunolabelling for neuronal trkB-like proteins was observed, but trkB- and trkC-like proteins IR was found in non-neuronal cells. These results suggest that cerebellar cortex neurons are responsive to and/or dependent upon different neurotrophins. Moreover, the age-dependent impairment in the expression of some neurotrophin receptors in Purkinje neurons, but not in the granule neurons, lends support to a role for neurotrophins in cerebellar aging.

  16. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements. PMID:25124058

  17. Acute hydrocephalus following cerebellar infarct

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Elliot; Naqvi, Huma

    2010-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was admitted with a diagnosis of acute cerebellar infarct. The next day his level of consciousness deteriorated (Glasgow Coma Score 5) and repeat computed tomography (CT) brain scan showed subtle signs of hydrocephalus. Following neurosurgical intervention, he recovered and is now walking with a frame and assistance. The CT changes of hydrocephalus were subtle and difficult to spot. Recognition of these signs of hydrocephalus and prompt neurosurgical intervention were lifesaving. PMID:22355298

  18. Visuomotor learning in cerebellar patients.

    PubMed

    Timmann, D; Shimansky, Y; Larson, P S; Wunderlich, D A; Stelmach, G E; Bloedel, J R

    1996-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that patients with pathology affecting substantial regions of the cerebellum can improve their performance in a series of two-dimensional tracing tasks, thus supporting the view that this type of motor behavior can be acquired even when the integrity of this structure is compromised. Eight patients with chronic, isolated cerebellar lesions and eight age- and sex-matched healthy controls were tested. Three patients had mild, five had moderate upper limb ataxia. The experiment was divided into two parts. In the first, subjects traced an irregularly shaped outline over 20 consecutive trials ('Trace 1' task). Next, subjects were asked to redraw the object without any underlying template as a guide ('Memory 1' task). In the second part of the study, subjects were asked to trace a different, irregularly shaped outline over 20 consecutive trials ('Trace 2' task). Next, they were required to redraw it by memory with its axis rotated 90 degrees ('Memory 2' task). In each of the memory tasks the template was placed over the drawn image after each trial and shown to the subjects. The error of performance was determined by calculating three different measurements, each focused on different aspects of the task. Based on these measurements, the cerebellar patients showed improvement in both memory tasks. In the 'Memory 1' task the calculated error decreased significantly for the patients with mild ataxia. In the 'Memory 2' task all cerebellar patients improved their performance substantially enough to reduce significantly the magnitude of all three error measurements. The experiments demonstrate that patients with cerebellar lesions are capable of improving substantially their performance of a complex motor task involving the recall of memorized shapes and the visuomotor control of a tracing movement.

  19. What Is a Primate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Describes a series of hands-on experiments that engage students in hypothesis testing and promotes active learning of the concepts of evolution and adaptation. Laboratory exercises demonstrate how features of the hands and eyes distinguish primates from other mammals. (SOE)

  20. Modulation of p53 and met expression by Krüppel-like factor 8 regulates zebrafish cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Yuan; Lu, Yu-Fen; Liu, Yu-Hsiu; Lien, Huang-Wei; Huang, Chang-Jen; Wu, Jen-Leih; Hwang, Sheng-Ping L

    2015-09-01

    Krüppel-like factor 8 (Klf8) is a zinc-finger transcription factor implicated in cell proliferation, and cancer cell survival and invasion; however, little is known about its role in normal embryonic development. Here, we show that Klf8 is required for normal cerebellar development in zebrafish embryos. Morpholino knockdown of klf8 resulted in abnormal cerebellar primordium morphology and the induction of p53 in the brain region at 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf). Both p53-dependent reduction of cell proliferation and augmentation of apoptosis were observed in the cerebellar anlage of 24 hpf-klf8 morphants. In klf8 morphants, expression of ptf1a in the ventricular zone was decreased from 48 to 72 hpf; on the other hand, expression of atohla in the upper rhombic lip was unaffected. Consistent with this finding, Purkinje cell development was perturbed and granule cell number was reduced in 72 hpf-klf8 morphants; co-injection of p53 MO(sp) or klf8 mRNA substantially rescued development of cerebellar Purkinje cells in klf8 morphants. Hepatocyte growth factor/Met signaling is known to regulate cerebellar development in zebrafish and mouse. We observed decreased met expression in the tectum and rhombomere 1 of 24 hpf-klf8 morphants, which was largely rescued by co-injection with klf8 mRNA. Moreover, co-injection of met mRNA substantially rescued formation of Purkinje cells in klf8 morphants at 72 hpf. Together, these results demonstrate that Klf8 modulates expression of p53 and met to maintain ptf1a-expressing neuronal progenitors, which are required for the appropriate development of cerebellar Purkinje and granule cells in zebrafish embryos.

  1. Low in situ expression of antioxidative enzymes in rat cerebellar granular cells susceptible to methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, M; Usuki, F

    2014-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg), an environmental neurotoxicant, induces site-specific toxicity in the brain. Although oxidative stress has been demonstrated with MeHg toxicity, the site-specific toxicity is not completely understood. Among the cerebellar neurons, cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) appear vulnerable to MeHg, whereas Purkinje cells and molecular layer neurons are resistant. Here, we use a MeHg-intoxicated rat model to investigate these cerebellar neurons for the different causes of susceptibility to MeHg. Rats were exposed to 20 ppm MeHg for 4 weeks and subsequently exhibited neuropathological changes in the cerebellum that were similar to those observed in humans. We first isolated the three cerebellar neuron types using a microdissection system and then performed real-time PCR analyses for antioxidative enzymes. We observed that expression of manganese-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1), and thioredoxin reductase 1 (TRxR1) was significantly higher in Purkinje cells and molecular layer neurons than in CGCs. Finally, we performed immunohistochemical analyses on the cerebellum. Immunohistochemistry showed increased expression of Mn-SOD, GPx1, and TRxR1 in Purkinje cells and molecular layer neurons, which was coincident with the mRNA expression patterns. Considering Mn-SOD, GPx1, and TRxR1 are critical for protecting cells against MeHg intoxication, the results indicate that low expression of these antioxidative enzymes increases CGCs vulnerability to MeHg toxicity.

  2. Calcium-binding proteins in the cerebellar cortex of the bottlenose dolphin and harbour porpoise.

    PubMed

    Kalinichenko, Sergei G; Pushchin, Igor I

    2008-07-01

    Studying the distribution of Ca2+-binding proteins allows one to discover specific neuron chemotypes involved in the regulation of the activity of various neural elements. While extensive data exist on Ca2+-binding proteins in the nervous system, in particular, in the cerebellar cortex of terrestrial mammals, the localization of these proteins in the cerebellar cortex of marine mammals has not been studied. We studied the localization of calretinin, calbindin, and parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the cerebellar cortex of the bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncates and harbour porpoise Phocoena phocoena. In both species, most Purkinje cells were calbindin-immunoreactive, while calretinin and parvalbumin were expressed in a small portion of Purkinje cells. In addition, calretinin-immunoreactive unipolar brush and granule cells and calbindin- and parvalbumin-immunoreactive basket, stellate, and Golgi cells were observed. Calretinin-immunoreactive corticopetal (mossy and climbing) fibers were found. Based on the length of the primary dendrite, short-, middle-, and long-dendrite unipolar brush cells could be distinguished. The validity of this classification was supported using cluster analysis suggesting the presence of several natural types of these cells. The distribution of Ca2+-binding proteins in the cerebellar cortex of the cetaceans studied was generally similar to that reported for terrestrial mammals, suggesting that this trait is evolutionarily conservative in mammals. PMID:18455363

  3. New supervised learning theory applied to cerebellar modeling for suppression of variability of saccade end points.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masahiko

    2013-06-01

    A new supervised learning theory is proposed for a hierarchical neural network with a single hidden layer of threshold units, which can approximate any continuous transformation, and applied to a cerebellar function to suppress the end-point variability of saccades. In motor systems, feedback control can reduce noise effects if the noise is added in a pathway from a motor center to a peripheral effector; however, it cannot reduce noise effects if the noise is generated in the motor center itself: a new control scheme is necessary for such noise. The cerebellar cortex is well known as a supervised learning system, and a novel theory of cerebellar cortical function developed in this study can explain the capability of the cerebellum to feedforwardly reduce noise effects, such as end-point variability of saccades. This theory assumes that a Golgi-granule cell system can encode the strength of a mossy fiber input as the state of neuronal activity of parallel fibers. By combining these parallel fiber signals with appropriate connection weights to produce a Purkinje cell output, an arbitrary continuous input-output relationship can be obtained. By incorporating such flexible computation and learning ability in a process of saccadic gain adaptation, a new control scheme in which the cerebellar cortex feedforwardly suppresses the end-point variability when it detects a variation in saccadic commands can be devised. Computer simulation confirmed the efficiency of such learning and showed a reduction in the variability of saccadic end points, similar to results obtained from experimental data.

  4. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following supratentorial cerebrovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ross; Kebriaei, Meysam; Gard, Andrew; Thorell, William; Surdell, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Three patients with remote cerebellar hemorrhage following supratentorial cerebrovascular surgery are presented. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage is a rare surgical complication that is most often associated with aneurysm clipping or temporal lobectomies. Bleeding occurs on the superior cerebellar cortex and is believed to be venous in origin. The precise pathogenesis of remote cerebellar hemorrhage has yet to be fully elucidated but is generally considered to be a consequence of intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid loss causing caudal displacement of the cerebellum with resultant stretching of the supracerebellar veins. This case series will hopefully shed further light on the incidence, presentation, workup, and treatment of this particular complication of supratentorial surgery. PMID:24238635

  5. Multiple large and small cerebellar infarcts

    PubMed Central

    Canaple, S.; Bogousslavsky, J.

    1999-01-01

    To assess the clinical, topographical, and aetiological features of multiple cerebellar infarcts,18 patients (16.5% of patients with cerebellar infarction) were collected from a prospective acute stroke registry, using a standard investigation protocol including MRI and magnetic resonance angiography. Infarcts in the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA)+superior cerebellar artery (SCA) territory were most common (9/18; 50%), followed by PICA+anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA)+SCA territory infarcts (6/18; 33%). One patient had bilateral AICA infarcts. No infarct involved the PICA+AICA combined territory. Other infarcts in the posterior circulation were present in half of the patients and the clinical presentation largely depended on them. Large artery disease was the main aetiology. Our findings emphasised the common occurrence of very small multiple cerebellar infarcts (<2 cm diameter).These very small multiple cerebellar infarcts may occur with (13 patients/18; 72%) or without (3/18; 22%) territorial cerebellar infarcts. Unlike previous series, they could not all be considered junctional infarcts (between two main cerebellar artery territories: 51/91), but also small territorial infarcts (40/91). It is suggested that these very small territorial infarcts may be endzone infarcts, due to the involvement of small distal arterial branches. It is possible that some very small territorial infarcts may be due to a microembolic process, but this hypothesis needs pathological confirmation.

 PMID:10329747

  6. RNA Granules in Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Seydoux, Geraldine; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Nagamori, Ippei

    2011-01-01

    “Germ granules” are cytoplasmic, nonmembrane-bound organelles unique to germline. Germ granules share components with the P bodies and stress granules of somatic cells, but also contain proteins and RNAs uniquely required for germ cell development. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of germ granule assembly, dynamics, and function. One hypothesis is that germ granules operate as hubs for the posttranscriptional control of gene expression, a function at the core of the germ cell differentiation program. PMID:21768607

  7. Cerebellar associative sensory learning defects in five mouse autism models

    PubMed Central

    Kloth, Alexander D; Badura, Aleksandra; Li, Amy; Cherskov, Adriana; Connolly, Sara G; Giovannucci, Andrea; Bangash, M Ali; Grasselli, Giorgio; Peñagarikano, Olga; Piochon, Claire; Tsai, Peter T; Geschwind, Daniel H; Hansel, Christian; Sahin, Mustafa; Takumi, Toru; Worley, Paul F; Wang, Samuel S-H

    2015-01-01

    Sensory integration difficulties have been reported in autism, but their underlying brain-circuit mechanisms are underexplored. Using five autism-related mouse models, Shank3+/ΔC, Mecp2R308/Y, Cntnap2−/−, L7-Tsc1 (L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+), and patDp(15q11-13)/+, we report specific perturbations in delay eyeblink conditioning, a form of associative sensory learning requiring cerebellar plasticity. By distinguishing perturbations in the probability and characteristics of learned responses, we found that probability was reduced in Cntnap2−/−, patDp(15q11-13)/+, and L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+, which are associated with Purkinje-cell/deep-nuclear gene expression, along with Shank3+/ΔC. Amplitudes were smaller in L7/Pcp2Cre::Tsc1flox/+ as well as Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y, which are associated with granule cell pathway expression. Shank3+/ΔC and Mecp2R308/Y also showed aberrant response timing and reduced Purkinje-cell dendritic spine density. Overall, our observations are potentially accounted for by defects in instructed learning in the olivocerebellar loop and response representation in the granule cell pathway. Our findings indicate that defects in associative temporal binding of sensory events are widespread in autism mouse models. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06085.001 PMID:26158416

  8. The Cellular State Determines the Effect of Melatonin on the Survival of Mixed Cerebellar Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Daiane Gil; Markus, Regina P.

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key transcription factor involved in neuroinflammation, is essential for the survival of neurons in situ and of cerebellar granule cells in culture. Melatonin is known to inhibit the activation of NF-κB and has a cytoprotective function. In this study, we evaluated whether the cytoprotective effect of melatonin depends on the state of activation of a mixed cerebellar culture that is composed predominantly of granule cells; we tested the effect of melatonin on cultured rat cerebellar cells stimulated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The addition of melatonin (0.1 nM–1 µM) reduced the survival of naïve cells while inhibiting LPS-induced cell death. Melatonin (100 nM) transiently (15 min) inhibited the nuclear translocation of both NF-κB dimers (p50/p50, p50/RelA) and, after 60 min, increased the activation of p50/RelA. Melatonin-induced p50/RelA activity in naïve cells resulted in the transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the production of NO. Otherwise, in cultures treated with LPS, melatonin blocked the LPS-induced activation of p50/RelA and the reduction in p50/p50 levels and inhibited iNOS expression and NO synthesis. Therefore, melatonin in vehicle-treated cells induces cell death, while it protects against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, we confirmed that melatonin is a neuroprotective drug when cerebellar cells are challenged; however, melatonin can also lead to cell death when the normal balance of the NF-κB pathway is disturbed. Our data provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the influence of cell context on the final output response of melatonin. PMID:25184316

  9. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  10. Granulation techniques and technologies: recent progresses

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Granulation, the process of particle enlargement by agglomeration technique, is one of the most significant unit operations in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms, mostly tablets and capsules. Granulation process transforms fine powders into free-flowing, dust-free granules that are easy to compress. Nevertheless, granulation poses numerous challenges due to high quality requirement of the formed granules in terms of content uniformity and physicochemical properties such as granule size, bulk density, porosity, hardness, moisture, compressibility, etc. together with physical and chemical stability of the drug. Granulation process can be divided into two types: wet granulation that utilize a liquid in the process and dry granulation that requires no liquid. The type of process selection requires thorough knowledge of physicochemical properties of the drug, excipients, required flow and release properties, to name a few. Among currently available technologies, spray drying, roller compaction, high shear mixing, and fluid bed granulation are worth of note. Like any other scientific field, pharmaceutical granulation technology also continues to change, and arrival of novel and innovative technologies are inevitable. This review focuses on the recent progress in the granulation techniques and technologies such as pneumatic dry granulation, reverse wet granulation, steam granulation, moisture-activated dry granulation, thermal adhesion granulation, freeze granulation, and foamed binder or foam granulation. This review gives an overview of these with a short description about each development along with its significance and limitations. PMID:25901297

  11. Altered cerebellar feedback projections in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Catani, Marco; Jones, Derek K; Daly, Eileen; Embiricos, Nitzia; Deeley, Quinton; Pugliese, Luca; Curran, Sarah; Robertson, Dene; Murphy, Declan G M

    2008-07-15

    It has been proposed that the biological basis of autism spectrum disorder includes cerebellar 'disconnection'. However, direct in vivo evidence in support of this is lacking. Here, the microstructural integrity of cerebellar white matter in adults with Asperger syndrome was studied using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance tractography. Fifteen adults with Asperger syndrome and 16 age-IQ-gender-matched healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging. For each subject, tract-specific measurements of mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy were made within the inferior, middle, superior cerebellar peduncles and short intracerebellar fibres. No group differences were observed in mean diffusivity. However, people with Asperger syndrome had significantly lower fractional anisotropy in the short intracerebellar fibres (p<0.001) and right superior cerebellar (output) peduncle (p<0.001) compared to controls; but no difference in the input tracts. Severity of social impairment, as measured by the Autistic Diagnostic Interview, was negatively correlated with diffusion anisotropy in the fibres of the left superior cerebellar peduncle. These findings suggest a vulnerability of specific cerebellar neural pathways in people with Asperger syndrome. The localised abnormalities in the main cerebellar outflow pathway may prevent the cerebral cortex from receiving those cerebellar feedback inputs necessary for a successful adaptive social behaviour.

  12. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  13. Crossed Cerebellar Diaschisis in Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Daigo; Fukushima, Kazuhiro; Nakahara, Asa; Kodaira, Minori; Mochizuki, Katsunori; Kaneko, Kikuko; Kaneko, Tomoki; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) is an interesting phenomenon which classically refers to the depressed blood flow and metabolism affecting one cerebellar hemisphere after a contralateral hemispheric infarction. However, CCD can also be caused by a prolonged seizure. We herein report a case of CCD due to status epilepticus in a patient who showed unique magnetic resonance imaging findings.

  14. Learning of Sensory Sequences in Cerebellar Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frings, Markus; Boenisch, Raoul; Gerwig, Marcus; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Timmann, Dagmar

    2004-01-01

    A possible role of the cerebellum in detecting and recognizing event sequences has been proposed. The present study sought to determine whether patients with cerebellar lesions are impaired in the acquisition and discrimination of sequences of sensory stimuli of different modalities. A group of 26 cerebellar patients and 26 controls matched for…

  15. The primate seahorse rhythm.

    PubMed

    Campos, L M G; Cruz-Rizzolo, Roelf J; Pinato, L

    2015-07-10

    The main Zeitgeber, the day-night cycle, synchronizes the central oscillator which determines behaviors rhythms as sleep-wake behavior, body temperature, the regulation of hormone secretion, and the acquisition and processing of memory. Thus, actions such as acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval performed in the hippocampus are modulated by the circadian system and show a varied dependence on light and dark. To investigate changes in the hippocampus' cellular mechanism invoked by the day and night in a diurnal primate, this study analyzed the expression of PER2 and the calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in the hippocampus of Sapajus apella, a diurnal primate, at two different time points, one during the day and one during the dark phase. The PER2 protein expression peaked at night in the antiphase described for the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the same primate, indicating that hippocampal cells can present independent rhythmicity. This hippocampal rhythm was similar to that presented by diurnal but not nocturnal rodents. The CaBPs immunoreactivity also showed day/night variations in the cell number and in the cell morphology. Our findings provide evidence for the claim that the circadian regulation in the hippocampus may involve rhythms of PER2 and CaBPs expression that may contribute to the adaptation of this species in events and activities relevant to the respective periods.

  16. Metronidazole-Induced Cerebellar Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Sabat, Shyam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Metronidazole is a very common antibacterial and antiprotozoal with wide usage across the globe, including the least developed countries. It is generally well-tolerated with a low incidence of serious side-effects. Neurological toxicity is fairly common with this drug, however majority of these are peripheral neuropathy with very few cases of central nervous toxicity reported. We report the imaging findings in two patients with cerebellar dysfunction after Metronidazole usage. Signal changes in the dentate and red nucleus were seen on magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. Most of the cases reported in literature reported similar findings, suggesting high predilection for the dentate nucleus in metronidazole induced encephalopathy. PMID:27127600

  17. Processing of multi-dimensional sensorimotor information in the spinal and cerebellar neuronal circuitry: a new hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Spanne, Anton; Jörntell, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Why are sensory signals and motor command signals combined in the neurons of origin of the spinocerebellar pathways and why are the granule cells that receive this input thresholded with respect to their spike output? In this paper, we synthesize a number of findings into a new hypothesis for how the spinocerebellar systems and the cerebellar cortex can interact to support coordination of our multi-segmented limbs and bodies. A central idea is that recombination of the signals available to the spinocerebellar neurons can be used to approximate a wide array of functions including the spatial and temporal dependencies between limb segments, i.e. information that is necessary in order to achieve coordination. We find that random recombination of sensory and motor signals is not a good strategy since, surprisingly, the number of granule cells severely limits the number of recombinations that can be represented within the cerebellum. Instead, we propose that the spinal circuitry provides useful recombinations, which can be described as linear projections through aspects of the multi-dimensional sensorimotor input space. Granule cells, potentially with the aid of differentiated thresholding from Golgi cells, enhance the utility of these projections by allowing the Purkinje cell to establish piecewise-linear approximations of non-linear functions. Our hypothesis provides a novel view on the function of the spinal circuitry and cerebellar granule layer, illustrating how the coordinating functions of the cerebellum can be crucially supported by the recombinations performed by the neurons of the spinocerebellar systems. PMID:23516353

  18. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania

    PubMed Central

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R.; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-01-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  19. Cerebellar Stroke-manifesting as Mania.

    PubMed

    Jagadesan, Venkatesan; Thiruvengadam, Kannapiran R; Muralidharan, Rengarajalu

    2014-07-01

    Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed. PMID:25035567

  20. Cerebellar hemangioblastoma manifesting as hearing disturbance.

    PubMed

    Amano, Toshiyuki; Tokunaga, So; Shono, Tadahisa; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Kenichi; Yoshida, Fumiaki; Sasaki, Tomio

    2009-09-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with a rare case of cerebellar hemangioblastoma manifesting as only hearing disturbance. He had suffered from hearing difficulty in the right ear for a few months. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic mass lesion with an internal fluid level and surrounding flow voids in the right cerebellopontine (CP) angle. Cerebral angiography disclosed a vascular-rich tumor fed by both the superior cerebellar and anterior inferior cerebellar arteries. En bloc resection of the tumor was planned under a preoperative diagnosis of cerebellar hemangioblastoma. The tumor protruded into the CP cistern and compressed cranial nerve VIII. The feeding arteries were meticulously coagulated and the tumor was successfully removed. The histological diagnosis was hemangioblastoma. After the operation, the patient's hearing acuity improved dramatically. Cerebellar hemangioblastoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of CP angle tumors associated with hearing disturbance.

  1. Cellular and genetic regulation of the development of the cerebellar system.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Constantino

    2004-04-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have drastically changed our vision on the development of the nervous system, the cerebellum in particular. After a classical descriptive period, we are now in a modern mechanistic epoch as we begin to answer crucial questions in our quest to understand the mechanisms underlying the emergence of brain complexity. This review begins with an analysis of the role of the "isthmic organizer" in the induction and specification of the cerebellar territory and progresses through cerebellar development to the formation of cerebellar maps. It gathers information about the control of the proliferation of granule cell precursors by Purkinje cells and the role of Shh/Gli-patched signaling. The migratory routes for cerebellar and precerebellar neurons, together with the long-range and short-range cues guiding gliophilic and, particularly, neurophilic migrations, are also discussed. Because these cues are similar to those involved in axon guidance, both processes are under the same molecular constraints. Finally, using primarily the olivocerebellar projection as a model, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of cerebellar maps are discussed. During embryonic development, Purkinje cells in the cerebellum and neurons in the inferior olive follow a simultaneous, but independent, process of intrinsic parcellation, giving rise to subsets of biochemically different cortical compartments. The occurrence of positional information shared between olivary axons and their postsynaptic targets, the Purkinje cells, provides a molecular code for the formation of coarse-grained maps. Activity-dependent mechanisms are required for the transition from crude to fine-grained maps. This important refinement, which confers ultimate specificity to the maps, is under the regulation of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic activity.

  2. Developmental Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome in Ex-preterm Survivors Following Cerebellar Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brossard-Racine, Marie; du Plessis, Adre J.; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar injury is increasingly recognized as an important complication of very preterm birth. However, the neurodevelopmental consequences of early life cerebellar injury in prematurely born infants have not been well elucidated. We performed a literature search of studies published between 1997 and 2014 describing neurodevelopmental outcomes of preterm infants following direct cerebellar injury or indirect cerebellar injury/underdevelopment. Available data suggests that both direct and indirect mechanisms of cerebellar injury appear to stunt cerebellar growth and adversely affect neurodevelopment. This review also provides important insights into the highly integrated cerebral-cerebellar structural and functional correlates. Finally, this review highlights that early life impairment of cerebellar growth extends far beyond motor impairments and plays a critical, previously underrecognized role in the long-term cognitive, behavioral, and social deficits associated with brain injury among premature infants. These data point to a developmental form of the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome previously described in adults. Longitudinal prospective studies using serial advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques are needed to better delineate the full extent of the role of prematurity-related cerebellar injury and topography in the genesis of cognitive, social-behavioral dysfunction. PMID:25241880

  3. Neurotoxicological effects of nicotine on the embryonic development of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during various stages of incubation.

    PubMed

    El-Beltagy, Abd El-Fattah B M; Abou-El-Naga, Amoura M; Sabry, Dalia M

    2015-10-01

    Long-acting nicotine is known to exert pathological effects on almost all tissues including the cerebellar cortex. The present work was designed to elucidate the effect of nicotine on the development of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during incubation period. The fertilized eggs of hen (Gallus gallus domesticus) were injected into the air space by a single dose of long acting nicotine (1.6 mg/kg/egg) at the 4th day of incubation. The embryos were taken out of the eggs on days 8, 12 and 16 of incubation. The cerebellum of the control and treated embryos at above ages were processed for histopathological examination. The TEM were examined at 16th day of incubation. The results of the present study revealed that, exposure to long-acting nicotine markedly influence the histogenesis of cerebellar cortex of chick embryo during the incubation period. At 8th day of incubation, nicotine delayed the differentiation of the cerebellar analge; especially the external granular layer (EGL) and inner cortical layer (ICL). Furthermore, at 12th day of incubation, the cerebellar foliation was irregular and the Purkinje cells not recognized. By 16th day of incubation, the cerebellar foliations were irregular with interrupted cerebellar cortex and irregular arrangement of Purkinje cells. Immunohistochemical analysis for antibody P53 protein revealed that the cerebellar cortex in all stages of nicotine treated groups possessed a moderate to weak reaction for P53 protein however; this reaction was markedly stronger in the cerebellar cortex of control groups. Moreover, the flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the percentage of apoptosis in control group was significantly higher compared with that of nicotine treated group. At the TEM level, the cerebellar Purkinje cells of 16th day of treated groups showed multiple subcellular alterations in compared with those of the corresponding control group. Such changes represented by appearing of vacuolated mitochondria, cisternal

  4. Pediatric Neurocutaneous Syndromes with Cerebellar Involvement.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes encompasses a broad group of genetic disorders with different clinical, genetic, and pathologic features that share developmental lesions of the skin as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Cerebellar involvement has been shown in numerous types of neurocutaneous syndrome. It may help or be needed for the diagnosis and to explain the cognitive and behavioral phenotype of affected children. This article describes various types of neurocutaneous syndrome with cerebellar involvement. For each neurocutaneous disease or syndrome, clinical features, genetic, neuroimaging findings, and the potential role of the cerebellar involvement is discussed. PMID:27423801

  5. Temporal Evolution of Artificial Solar Granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploner, S. R. O.; Solanki, S. K.; Gadun, A. S.; Hanslmeier, A.

    1998-05-01

    We study the evolution of artificial granulation on the basis of 2-D hydrodynamical simulations. These clearly show that granules die in two different ways. One route to death is the well known bifurcation or fragmentation of a large granule into 2 smaller ones (exploding granules). The other pathway to death is characterized by merging intergranular lanes and the accompanying dissolution of the granule located between them. It is found that the lifetime and maximum brightness is independent of the way in which granules evolve and die. They clearly differ in size, however, with exploding granules being in general significantly larger.

  6. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules and how degranulation of granule subsets is regulated. PMID:27558325

  7. Regional cerebellar volumes predict functional outcome in children with cerebellar malformations.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Marie-Eve; du Plessis, Adre J; Sullivan, Nancy; Guizard, Nicolas; Zhang, Xun; Robertson, Richard L; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2012-06-01

    The cerebellum has recently been recognized for its role in high-order functions, including cognition, language, and behavior. Recent studies have also begun to describe a functional topography of the mature cerebellum that includes organization on a mediolateral axis. However, no study to date has examined the relationship between regional cerebellar volume and developmental disabilities in children with cerebellar malformations. The objective of this study was to estimate the extent to which total and regional cerebellar volumes are associated with developmental disabilities in a cohort of children with cerebellar malformations. Children aged 1 to 6 years with a diagnosis of cerebellar malformation underwent standardized outcome measures and quantitative magnetic resonance scanning. The cerebellum was parcellated into seven mediolateral zones (three for each hemisphere plus the vermis) for regional volume analysis. In children with cerebellar malformations, decreased total cerebellar volume was associated with delays in global development, expressive language, cognition, as well as gross and fine motor function. Decreased volume in the right lateral cerebellar hemisphere was related to impaired cognition, expressive language, and gross motor function. Additionally, reduced vermis volume was associated with impaired global development, cognition, expressive language, and gross and fine motor skills, as well as behavior problems and a higher rate of positive autism spectrum screening test. These results begin to define the structural topography of functional outcome in children with cerebellar malformations and should lead to greater accuracy of prognostication as well as timely early developmental interventions.

  8. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  9. Linking granulation performance with residence time and granulation liquid distributions in twin-screw granulation: An experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Alakarjula, Maija; Vanhoorne, Valérie; Toiviainen, Maunu; De Leersnyder, Fien; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Juuti, Mikko; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Gernaey, Krist V; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-07-30

    Twin-screw granulation is a promising wet granulation technique for the continuous manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms. A twin screw granulator displays a short residence time. Thus, the solid-liquid mixing must be achieved quickly by appropriate arrangement of transport and kneading elements in the granulator screw allowing the production of granules with a size distribution appropriate for tableting. The distribution of residence time and granulation liquid is governed by the field conditions (such as location and length of mixing zones) in the twin-screw granulator, thus contain interesting information on granulation time, mixing and resulting sub-processes such as wetting, aggregation and breakage. In this study, the impact of process (feed rate, screw speed and liquid-to-solid ratio) and equipment parameters (number of kneading discs and stagger angle) on the residence time (distribution), the granulation liquid-powder mixing and the resulting granule size distributions during twin-screw granulation were investigated. Residence time and axial mixing data was extracted from tracer maps and the solid-liquid mixing was quantified from moisture maps, obtained by monitoring the granules at the granulator outlet using near infra-red chemical imaging (NIR-CI). The granule size distribution was measured using the sieving method. An increasing screw speed dominantly reduced the mean residence time. Interaction of material throughput with the screw speed and with the number of kneading discs led to most variation in the studied responses including residence time and mixing capacity. At a high screw speed, granulation yield improved due to high axial mixing. However, increasing material throughput quickly lowers the yield due to insufficient mixing of liquid and powder. Moreover, increasing liquid-to-solid ratio resulted in more oversized granules, and the fraction of oversized granules further increased at higher throughput. Although an increasing number

  10. Stereotyped spatial patterns of functional synaptic connectivity in the cerebellar cortex

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Antoine M; Binda, Francesca; Pawlowski, Sophie A; Dupont, Jean-Luc; Casella, Jean-François; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Poulain, Bernard; Isope, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Motor coordination is supported by an array of highly organized heterogeneous modules in the cerebellum. How incoming sensorimotor information is channeled and communicated between these anatomical modules is still poorly understood. In this study, we used transgenic mice expressing GFP in specific subsets of Purkinje cells that allowed us to target a given set of cerebellar modules. Combining in vitro recordings and photostimulation, we identified stereotyped patterns of functional synaptic organization between the granule cell layer and its main targets, the Purkinje cells, Golgi cells and molecular layer interneurons. Each type of connection displayed position-specific patterns of granule cell synaptic inputs that do not strictly match with anatomical boundaries but connect distant cortical modules. Although these patterns can be adjusted by activity-dependent processes, they were found to be consistent and predictable between animals. Our results highlight the operational rules underlying communication between modules in the cerebellar cortex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09862.001 PMID:26982219

  11. A dynamical system view of cerebellar function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, James D.

    1990-06-01

    First some previous theories of cerebellar function are reviewed, and deficiencies in how they map onto the neurophysiological structure are pointed out. I hypothesize that the cerebellar cortex builds an internal model, or prediction, of the dynamics of the animal. A class of algorithms for doing prediction based on local reconstruction of attractors are described, and it is shown how this class maps very well onto the structure of the cerebellar cortex. I hypothesize that the climbing fibers multiplex between different trajectories corresponding to different modes of operation. Then the vestibulo-ocular reflex is examined, and experiments to test the proposed model are suggested. The purpose of the presentation here is twofold: (1) To enlighten physiologists to the mathematics of a class of prediction algorithms that map well onto cerebellar architecture. (2) To enlighten dynamical system theorists to the physiological and anatomical details of the cerebellum.

  12. Cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2

    PubMed Central

    Işikay, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 is characterised by partial albinism and primary immunodeficiency. We present a case of a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2. Neurological complications may accompany Griscelli syndrome, however, to the best of my knowledge there are only a few case reports of cerebellar involvement of Griscelli syndrome type 2 in the literature. PMID:25315806

  13. Bax-deficiency prolongs cerebellar neurogenesis, accelerates medulloblastoma formation and paradoxically increases both malignancy and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Idoia; Crowther, Andrew J.; Gama, Vivian; Miller, C. Ryan; Deshmukh, Mohanish; Gershon, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Neurogenesis requires negative regulation through differentiation of progenitors or their programmed cell death (PCD). Growth regulation is particularly important in the postnatal cerebellum, where excessive progenitor proliferation promotes medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. We present evidence that PCD operates alongside differentiation to regulate cerebellar granule neuron progenitors (CGNPs) and to prevent medulloblastoma. Here we show that genetic deletion of pro-apoptotic Bax disrupts regulation of cerebellar neurogenesis and promotes medulloblastoma formation. In Bax−/− mice, the period of neurogenesis was extended into the third week of postnatal life, and ectopic neurons and progenitors collected in the molecular layer of the cerebellum and adjacent tectum. Importantly, genetic deletion of Bax in medulloblastoma-prone ND2:SmoA1 transgenic mice greatly accelerated tumorigenesis. Bax-deficient medulloblastomas exhibited strikingly distinct pathology, with reduced apoptosis, increased neural differentiation and tectal migration. Comparing Bax+/+ and Bax−/− medulloblastomas, we were able to identify up-regulation of Bcl-2 and nuclear exclusion of p27 as tumorigenic changes that are required to mitigate the tumor suppressive effect of Bax. Studies on human tumors confirmed the importance of modulating Bax in medulloblastoma pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that Bax-dependent apoptosis regulates postnatal cerebellar neurogenesis, suppresses medulloblastoma formation, and imposes selective pressure on tumors that form. Functional resistance to Bax-mediated apoptosis, required for medulloblastoma tumorigenesis, may be a tumor-specific vulnerability to be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:22710714

  14. Adenosine modulation of [Ca2+]i in cerebellar granular cells: multiple adenosine receptors involved.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Javier; Fernández, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Blanco, Pablo

    2003-12-01

    Elimination of adenosine by addition of adenosine deaminase (ADA) to the media leads to alterations in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in cerebellar granular cells. Adenosine deaminase brings about increases or decreases in [Ca(2+)](i) depending on the previous activation state of the cell. These effects are dependent on the catalytic activity of adenosine deaminase, since its previous catalytic inactivation with Hg(2+) prevents the above-mentioned changes in intracellular calcium. Extracellular calcium is required for the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) promoted by ADA. This rise is insensitive to thapsigargin, but sensitive to micromolar concentrations of Ni(2+). Toxins specific for L, N and P/Q calcium channels do not overtly reduce this effect. N(6)-Cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), an A(1) receptor agonist, produces a partial reversion of ADA effects, while CGS21680, A(2A)/A(2B) receptor agonist, slightly enhances them. Expression of A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) adenosine receptor mRNAs was detected in cerebellar granular cell cultures. These results suggest that adenosine modulate [Ca(2+)](i) in cerebellar granule cells through different adenosine receptor subtypes which, at least in part, seem to act through R-type calcium channels.

  15. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections).

  16. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control.

    PubMed

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections). PMID:25983678

  17. A realistic bi-hemispheric model of the cerebellum uncovers the purpose of the abundant granule cells during motor control

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon-Morales, Ruben-Dario; Hirata, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellar granule cells (GCs) have been proposed to perform lossless, adaptive spatio-temporal coding of incoming sensory/motor information required by downstream cerebellar circuits to support motor learning, motor coordination, and cognition. Here we use a physio-anatomically inspired bi-hemispheric cerebellar neuronal network (biCNN) to selectively enable/disable the output of GCs and evaluate the behavioral and neural consequences during three different control scenarios. The control scenarios are a simple direct current motor (1 degree of freedom: DOF), an unstable two-wheel balancing robot (2 DOFs), and a simulation model of a quadcopter (6 DOFs). Results showed that adequate control was maintained with a relatively small number of GCs (< 200) in all the control scenarios. However, the minimum number of GCs required to successfully govern each control plant increased with their complexity (i.e., DOFs). It was also shown that increasing the number of GCs resulted in higher robustness against changes in the initialization parameters of the biCNN model (i.e., synaptic connections and synaptic weights). Therefore, we suggest that the abundant GCs in the cerebellar cortex provide the computational power during the large repertoire of motor activities and motor plants the cerebellum is involved with, and bring robustness against changes in the cerebellar microcircuit (e.g., neuronal connections). PMID:25983678

  18. Consensus Paper: Radiological Biomarkers of Cerebellar Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Baldarçara, Leonardo; Currie, Stuart; Hadjivassiliou, M.; Hoggard, Nigel; Jack, Allison; Jackowski, Andrea P.; Mascalchi, Mario; Parazzini, Cecilia; Reetz, Kathrin; Righini, Andrea; Schulz, Jörg B.; Vella, Alessandra; Webb, Sara Jane; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic cerebellar ataxias represent a vast and still growing group of diseases whose diagnosis and differentiation cannot only rely on clinical evaluation. Brain imaging including magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine techniques allows for characterization of structural and functional abnormalities underlying symptomatic ataxias. These methods thus constitute a potential source of radiological biomarkers, which could be used to identify these diseases and differentiate subgroups of them, and to assess their severity and their evolution. Such biomarkers mainly comprise qualitative and quantitative data obtained from MR including proton spectroscopy, diffusion imaging, tractography, voxel-based morphometry, functional imaging during task execution or in a resting state, and from SPETC and PET with several radiotracers. In the current article, we aim to illustrate briefly some applications of these neuroimaging tools to evaluation of cerebellar disorders such as inherited cerebellar ataxia, fetal developmental malformations, and immune-mediated cerebellar diseases and of neurodegenerative or early-developing diseases, such as dementia and autism in which cerebellar involvement is an emerging feature. Although these radiological biomarkers appear promising and helpful to better understand ataxia-related anatomical and physiological impairments, to date, very few of them have turned out to be specific for a given ataxia with atrophy of the cerebellar system being the main and the most usual alteration being observed. Consequently, much remains to be done to establish sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of available MR and nuclear medicine features as diagnostic, progression and surrogate biomarkers in clinical routine. PMID:25382714

  19. Characterization of isolated mouse cerebellar cell populations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Schnitzer, J; Schachner, M

    1981-12-01

    Cells from early postnatal mouse cerebellar cortex were isolated by discontinuous BSA gradient centrifugation. Three cellular fractions were obtained and called A (interface at 0-10% BSA), B ( 10-15%) and C (15-25%). These fractions were characterized after maintenance in vitro for 3 days by indirect immunofluorescence labeling with several cell type-specific probes: Tetanus toxin was used as a neuronal marker.Under the described culture conditions Thy-1.2 antibodies served as additional markers for mature neurons and NS-4 antiserum for neurons and oligodendroglial cells. Glial fibrillary acidic (GFA) protein was used as a marker for differentiated astroglia, and fibronectin as a marker for fibroblasts. Monoclonal antibodies to 04 antigen and antiserum to corpus callosum served to distinguish oligodendroglia. Fraction C contains most of the cellular debris and cells with large cell bodies (about 20 micrometers in diameter) which are positive for Thy-1, NS-4, and tetanus toxin. By birthdate labeling with [3H]thymidine these cells can be identified as Purkinje cells and/or Golgi type II cells. Fraction B is relatively heterogeneous. It contains predominantly GFA protien-positive astroglial cells (about 50% of all cells) which can be classified into 3 morphologically distinct cell types, flat epithelioid cells and star-shaped cells with thick or very thin cellular processes. Fraction B is enriched also in 04 antigen-positive oligodendrocytes, fibronectin-positive fibroblasts and Thy-1 negative, but NS-4 and tetanus toxin positive cells with small cell bodies and many fine processes. These small neurons, putative stellate and basket cells, have many fine processes and are morphologically different from th bipolar putative granule cells, some of which are also present in this fraction. Fraction C contains predominantly small neurons, mostly putative granule cell (more than 0% of all cells) which are positive for NS-4 and tetanus toxin, but negative for Thy-1.

  20. Brains, Genes and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Callaway, Edward M.; Churchland, Patricia; Caddick, Sarah J.; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E.; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A.; Miller, Cory T.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R.; Movshon, J. Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H.; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Silva, Afonso C.; Strick, Peter L.; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  1. Ethics of primate use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the ethical issues raised by the use of non-human primates (NHPs) in research involving scientific procedures which may cause pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm. It is not an exhaustive review of the literature and views on this subject, and it does not present any conclusions about the moral acceptability or otherwise of NHP research. Rather the aim has been to identify the ethical issues involved and to provide guidance on how these might be addressed, in particular by carefully examining the scientific rationale for NHP use, implementing fully the 3Rs principle of Russell and Burch (1959) and applying a robust "harm-benefit assessment" to research proposals involving NHPs.

  2. Acquisition of granule neuron precursor identity is a critical determinant of progenitor cell competence to form Hedgehog-induced medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, Ulrich; Heine, Vivi M.; Mao, Junhao; Kho, Alvin T.; Dillon, Allison K.; Han, Young-Goo; Huillard, Emmanuelle; Sun, Tao; Ligon, Azra H.; Qian, Ying; Ma, Qiufu; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; McMahon, Andrew P.; Rowitch, David H.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2008-01-01

    Origins of the brain tumor, medulloblastoma, from stem cells or restricted progenitor cells are unclear. To investigate this, we activated oncogenic Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in multipotent and lineage-restricted CNS progenitors. We observed that normal unipotent cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNP) derive from hGFAP+ and Olig2+ RL progenitors. Hh activation in a spectrum of early and late stage CNS progenitors generated similar medulloblastomas, but not other brain cancers, indicating that acquisition of CGNP identity is essential for tumorigenesis. We show in human and mouse medulloblastoma that cells expressing the glia-associated markers Gfap and Olig2 are neoplastic and that they retain features of embryonic-type granule lineage progenitors. Thus, oncogenic Hh signaling promotes medulloblastoma from lineage-restricted granule cell progenitors. PMID:18691547

  3. Effects of Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 in Cerebellar Development: Role in Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ana P. B.; Diniz, Luan P.; Eller, Cristiane M.; de Matos, Beatriz G.; Martinez, Rodrigo; Gomes, Flávia C. A.

    2016-01-01

    Granule cells (GC) are the most numerous glutamatergic neurons in the cerebellar cortex and represent almost half of the neurons of the central nervous system. Despite recent advances, the mechanisms of how the glutamatergic synapses are formed in the cerebellum remain unclear. Among the TGF-β family, TGF-beta 1 (TGF-β1) has been described as a synaptogenic molecule in invertebrates and in the vertebrate peripheral nervous system. A recent paper from our group demonstrated that TGF-β1 increases the excitatory synapse formation in cortical neurons. Here, we investigated the role of TGF-β1 in glutamatergic cerebellar neurons. We showed that the expression profile of TGF-β1 and its receptor, TβRII, in the cerebellum is consistent with a role in synapse formation in vitro and in vivo. It is low in the early postnatal days (P1–P9), increases after postnatal day 12 (P12), and remains high until adulthood (P30). We also found that granule neurons express the TGF-β receptor mRNA and protein, suggesting that they may be responsive to the synaptogenic effect of TGF-β1. Treatment of granular cell cultures with TGF-β1 increased the number of glutamatergic excitatory synapses by 100%, as shown by immunocytochemistry assays for presynaptic (synaptophysin) and post-synaptic (PSD-95) proteins. This effect was dependent on TβRI activation because addition of a pharmacological inhibitor of TGF-β, SB-431542, impaired the formation of synapses between granular neurons. Together, these findings suggest that TGF-β1 has a specific key function in the cerebellum through regulation of excitatory synapse formation between granule neurons. PMID:27199658

  4. Locomotor patterns in cerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Martino, G; Ivanenko, Y P; Serrao, M; Ranavolo, A; d'Avella, A; Draicchio, F; Conte, C; Casali, C; Lacquaniti, F

    2014-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated how cerebellar ataxia (CA) affects gait, resulting in deficits in multijoint coordination and stability. Nevertheless, how lesions of cerebellum influence the locomotor muscle pattern generation is still unclear. To better understand the effects of CA on locomotor output, here we investigated the idiosyncratic features of the spatiotemporal structure of leg muscle activity and impairments in the biomechanics of CA gait. To this end, we recorded the electromyographic (EMG) activity of 12 unilateral lower limb muscles and analyzed kinematic and kinetic parameters of 19 ataxic patients and 20 age-matched healthy subjects during overground walking. Neuromuscular control of gait in CA was characterized by a considerable widening of EMG bursts and significant temporal shifts in the center of activity due to overall enhanced muscle activation between late swing and mid-stance. Patients also demonstrated significant changes in the intersegmental coordination, an abnormal transient in the vertical ground reaction force and instability of limb loading at heel strike. The observed abnormalities in EMG patterns and foot loading correlated with the severity of pathology [International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), a clinical ataxia scale] and the changes in the biomechanical output. The findings provide new insights into the physiological role of cerebellum in optimizing the duration of muscle activity bursts and the control of appropriate foot loading during locomotion.

  5. Cellular localization of proenkephalin mRNA in rat brain: gene expression in the caudate-putamen and cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Shivers, B D; Harlan, R E; Romano, G J; Howells, R D; Pfaff, D W

    1986-01-01

    The cellular locations of proenkephalin mRNA have been determined for the caudate-putamen and cerebellar cortex of the rat brain by in situ hybridization. In the caudate-putamen, more than half of the neurons express the proenkephalin gene. Morphologically, they are medium-sized cells that may represent projection neurons. In the cerebellar cortex, proenkephalin mRNA is present in a subpopulation of neurons in the granule layer that appear to be Golgi cells--i.e., inhibitory interneurons. The presence of [Met]enkephalin, a pentapeptide derived from proenkephalin, in these two brain areas is consistent with a synthetic role for this mRNA and implicates proenkephalin gene expression in the control of motor function. Images PMID:3461484

  6. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Vangay, Pajau; Huang, Hu; Ward, Tonya; Hillmann, Benjamin M.; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel A.; Travis, Dominic A.; Long, Ha Thang; Tuan, Bui Van; Minh, Vo Van; Cabana, Francis; Nadler, Tilo; Toddes, Barbara; Murphy, Tami; Glander, Kenneth E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Knights, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome. PMID:27573830

  7. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Jonathan B; Vangay, Pajau; Huang, Hu; Ward, Tonya; Hillmann, Benjamin M; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel A; Travis, Dominic A; Long, Ha Thang; Tuan, Bui Van; Minh, Vo Van; Cabana, Francis; Nadler, Tilo; Toddes, Barbara; Murphy, Tami; Glander, Kenneth E; Johnson, Timothy J; Knights, Dan

    2016-09-13

    The primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome. PMID:27573830

  8. Leopard predation and primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Zuberbühler, Klaus; Jenny, David

    2002-12-01

    Although predation is an important driving force of natural selection its effects on primate evolution are still not well understood, mainly because little is known about the hunting behaviour of the primates' various predators. Here, we present data on the hunting behaviour of the leopard (Panthera pardus), a major primate predator in the Tai; forest of Ivory Coast and elsewhere. Radio-tracking data showed that forest leopards primarily hunt for monkeys on the ground during the day. Faecal analyses confirmed that primates accounted for a large proportion of the leopards' diet and revealed in detail the predation pressure exerted on the eight different monkey and one chimpanzee species. We related the species-specific predation rates to various morphological, behavioural and demographic traits that are usually considered adaptations to predation (body size, group size, group composition, reproductive behaviour, and use of forest strata). Leopard predation was most reliably associated with density, suggesting that leopards hunt primates according to abundance. Contrary to predictions, leopard predation rates were not negatively, but positively, related to body size, group size and the number of males per group, suggesting that predation by leopards did not drive the evolution of these traits in the predicted way. We discuss these findings in light of some recent experimental data and suggest that the principal effect of leopard predation has been on primates' cognitive evolution.

  9. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Jonathan B; Vangay, Pajau; Huang, Hu; Ward, Tonya; Hillmann, Benjamin M; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel A; Travis, Dominic A; Long, Ha Thang; Tuan, Bui Van; Minh, Vo Van; Cabana, Francis; Nadler, Tilo; Toddes, Barbara; Murphy, Tami; Glander, Kenneth E; Johnson, Timothy J; Knights, Dan

    2016-09-13

    The primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome.

  10. A theory of cerebellar cortex and adaptive motor control based on two types of universal function approximation capability.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    Lesions of the cerebellum result in large errors in movements. The cerebellum adaptively controls the strength and timing of motor command signals depending on the internal and external environments of movements. The present theory describes how the cerebellar cortex can control signals for accurate and timed movements. A model network of the cerebellar Golgi and granule cells is shown to be equivalent to a multiple-input (from mossy fibers) hierarchical neural network with a single hidden layer of threshold units (granule cells) that receive a common recurrent inhibition (from a Golgi cell). The weighted sum of the hidden unit signals (Purkinje cell output) is theoretically analyzed regarding the capability of the network to perform two types of universal function approximation. The hidden units begin firing as the excitatory inputs exceed the recurrent inhibition. This simple threshold feature leads to the first approximation theory, and the network final output can be any continuous function of the multiple inputs. When the input is constant, this output becomes stationary. However, when the recurrent unit activity is triggered to decrease or the recurrent inhibition is triggered to increase through a certain mechanism (metabotropic modulation or extrasynaptic spillover), the network can generate any continuous signals for a prolonged period of change in the activity of recurrent signals, as the second approximation theory shows. By incorporating the cerebellar capability of two such types of approximations to a motor system, in which learning proceeds through repeated movement trials with accompanying corrections, accurate and timed responses for reaching the target can be adaptively acquired. Simple models of motor control can solve the motor error vs. sensory error problem, as well as the structural aspects of credit (or error) assignment problem. Two physiological experiments are proposed for examining the delay and trace conditioning of eyelid responses, as

  11. A theory of cerebellar cortex and adaptive motor control based on two types of universal function approximation capability.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Masahiko

    2016-03-01

    Lesions of the cerebellum result in large errors in movements. The cerebellum adaptively controls the strength and timing of motor command signals depending on the internal and external environments of movements. The present theory describes how the cerebellar cortex can control signals for accurate and timed movements. A model network of the cerebellar Golgi and granule cells is shown to be equivalent to a multiple-input (from mossy fibers) hierarchical neural network with a single hidden layer of threshold units (granule cells) that receive a common recurrent inhibition (from a Golgi cell). The weighted sum of the hidden unit signals (Purkinje cell output) is theoretically analyzed regarding the capability of the network to perform two types of universal function approximation. The hidden units begin firing as the excitatory inputs exceed the recurrent inhibition. This simple threshold feature leads to the first approximation theory, and the network final output can be any continuous function of the multiple inputs. When the input is constant, this output becomes stationary. However, when the recurrent unit activity is triggered to decrease or the recurrent inhibition is triggered to increase through a certain mechanism (metabotropic modulation or extrasynaptic spillover), the network can generate any continuous signals for a prolonged period of change in the activity of recurrent signals, as the second approximation theory shows. By incorporating the cerebellar capability of two such types of approximations to a motor system, in which learning proceeds through repeated movement trials with accompanying corrections, accurate and timed responses for reaching the target can be adaptively acquired. Simple models of motor control can solve the motor error vs. sensory error problem, as well as the structural aspects of credit (or error) assignment problem. Two physiological experiments are proposed for examining the delay and trace conditioning of eyelid responses, as

  12. Cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haibo; Lin, Zhanmin; Voges, Kai; Ju, Chiheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Bosman, Laurens WJ; Ruigrok, Tom JH; Hoebeek, Freek E

    2014-01-01

    Due to the uniform cyto-architecture of the cerebellar cortex, its overall physiological characteristics have traditionally been considered to be homogeneous. In this study, we show in awake mice at rest that spiking activity of Purkinje cells, the sole output cells of the cerebellar cortex, differs between cerebellar modules and correlates with their expression of the glycolytic enzyme aldolase C or zebrin. Simple spike and complex spike frequencies were significantly higher in Purkinje cells located in zebrin-negative than zebrin-positive modules. The difference in simple spike frequency persisted when the synaptic input to, but not intrinsic activity of, Purkinje cells was manipulated. Blocking TRPC3, the effector channel of a cascade of proteins that have zebrin-like distribution patterns, attenuated the simple spike frequency difference. Our results indicate that zebrin-discriminated cerebellar modules operate at different frequencies, which depend on activation of TRPC3, and that this property is relevant for all cerebellar functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02536.001 PMID:24843004

  13. Metabolic anatomy of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, N.E.; Posner, J.B.; Sidtis, J.J.; Moeller, J.R.; Strother, S.C.; Dhawan, V.; Rottenberg, D.A.

    1988-06-01

    Eleven patients with acquired cerebellar degeneration (10 of whom had paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD)) were evaluated using neuropsychological tests and /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose/positron emission tomography to (1) quantify motor, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities; (2) determine if characteristic alterations in the regional cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (rCMRGlc) are associated with PCD; and (3) correlate behavioral and metabolic measures of disease severity. Eighteen volunteer subjects served as normal controls. Although some PCD neuropsychological test scores were abnormal, these results could not, in general, be dissociated from the effects of dysarthria and ataxia. rCMRGlc was reduced in patients with PCD (versus normal control subjects) in all regions except the brainstem. Analysis of patient and control rCMRGlc data using a mathematical model of regional metabolic interactions revealed two metabolic pattern descriptors, SSF1 and SSF2, which distinguished patients with PCD from normal control subjects; SSF2, which described a metabolic coupling between cerebellum, cuneus, and posterior temporal, lateral frontal, and paracentral cortex, correlated with quantitative indices of cerebellar dysfunction. Our inability to document substantial intellectual impairment in 7 of 10 patients with PCD contrasts with the 50% incidence of dementia in PCD reported by previous investigators. Widespread reductions in PCD rCMRGlc may result from the loss of cerebellar efferents to thalamus and forebrain structures, a reverse cerebellar diaschisis.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions ARCA1 autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Close All Description Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia type 1 ( ARCA1 ) is a condition characterized by progressive problems ...

  15. Neurodevelopmental malformations of the cerebellar vermis in genetically engineered rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    The cerebellar vermis is particularly vulnerable to neurodevelopmental malformations in humans and rodents. Sprague-Dawley, and Long-Evans rats exhibit spontaneous cerebellar malformations consisting of heterotopic neurons and glia in the molecular layer of the vermis. Malformati...

  16. Landmark Based Shape Analysis for Cerebellar Ataxia Classification and Cerebellar Atrophy Pattern Visualization

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules. PMID:27303111

  17. Landmark based shape analysis for cerebellar ataxia classification and cerebellar atrophy pattern visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction can lead to a wide range of movement disorders. Studying the cerebellar atrophy pattern associated with different cerebellar disease types can potentially help in diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment planning. In this paper, we present a landmark based shape analysis pipeline to classify healthy control and different ataxia types and to visualize the characteristic cerebellar atrophy patterns associated with different types. A highly informative feature representation of the cerebellar structure is constructed by extracting dense homologous landmarks on the boundary surfaces of cerebellar sub-structures. A diagnosis group classifier based on this representation is built using partial least square dimension reduction and regularized linear discriminant analysis. The characteristic atrophy pattern for an ataxia type is visualized by sampling along the discriminant direction between healthy controls and the ataxia type. Experimental results show that the proposed method can successfully classify healthy controls and different ataxia types. The visualized cerebellar atrophy patterns were consistent with the regional volume decreases observed in previous studies, but the proposed method provides intuitive and detailed understanding about changes of overall size and shape of the cerebellum, as well as that of individual lobules.

  18. Hepatocyte innervation in primates

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The efferent innervation and some characteristics of nerve fibers of the liver lobule in the tree shrew, a primate, are described. Nerve endings on hepatocytes were encountered regularly and were determined to be efferent adrenergic nerves. Transmission electron microscopy revealed nerve endings and varicosities in close apposition to the hepatocytes adjacent to the connective tissue of the triads as well as within the liver lobule in the space of Disse. Fluorescence microscopy indicated the existence of adrenergic nerves with a similar distribution. Autoradiography of the avid uptake of exogenous [3H]norepinephrine indicated that all intralobular nerves are potentially norepinephrinergic (adrenergic). Chemical sympathectomy with 6-OH-dopamine resulted in the degeneration of all intralobular liver nerve fibers as revealed by fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. Substantial regeneration occurred after 60-90 days but was not completed by that time. Some nerves were also observed in close association with von Kupffer cells and endothelial cells. The functional significance of the efferent liver innervation is discussed. PMID:406265

  19. EFFECTS OF ORGANOTINS ON RACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM IN CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS IN CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of organotins has increased drastically in the past decade, including their use as stabilizers in polyvinylchloride pipes. Monomethyl- (MMT), dimethyl- (DMT), monobutyl- (MBT), and dibutyltin (DBT) have been found in home water samples and in human blood at concentrations up...

  20. Comparative effects of PBDEs and PCBs on intracellular signaling in rat cerebellar granule neurons

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are synthetic chemicals that do not occur in nature and are structurally similar to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs; Figure I) and several chlorinated pesticides. They are comprised of two phenyl rings linked by oxygen and are resistant to p...

  1. CHANGES IN MITOGEN-ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE IN CEREBELLAR GRANULE NEURONAL CULTURES BY POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as additive flame-retardants and have been detected in human blood, adipose tissue, and breast milk; clarifying the nature of the risks posed is important for clean-up and remediation. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have shown t...

  2. STIMULATION OF [3H] ARACHIDONIC ACID RELEASE IN RAT CEREBELLAR GRANULE NEURONS BY POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants in electronic equipment, plastics, textiles, and building materials. While the presence of other persistent organic pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin...

  3. ONTOGENY OF PROTEINS ASSOCIATED WITH NEURITE GROWTH AND SYNAPTOGENESIS IN CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELLS IN VITRO.

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro techniques may be useful in screening for effects of developmental neurotoxicants. Previously, we characterized changes in biochemical markers associated with neuronal development in a PC12 cell model of differentiation and growth. The current research extended these stu...

  4. Mapping cerebellar degeneration in HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Klunder, Andrea D; Chiang, Ming-Chang; Dutton, Rebecca A; Lee, Sharon E; Toga, Arthur W; Lopez, Oscar L; Aizenstein, Howard J; Becker, James T; Thompson, Paul M

    2008-11-19

    Progressive brain atrophy in HIV/AIDS is associated with impaired psychomotor performance, perhaps partly reflecting cerebellar degeneration; yet little is known about how HIV/AIDS affects the cerebellum. We visualized the three-dimensional profile of atrophy in 19 HIV-positive patients (age: 42.9+/-8.3 years) versus 15 healthy controls (age: 38.5+/-12.0 years). We localized consistent patterns of subregional atrophy with an image analysis method that automatically deforms each patient's scan, in three dimensions, to match a reference image. Atrophy was greatest in the posterior cerebellar vermis (14.9% deficit) and correlated with depression severity (P=0.009, corrected), but not with dementia, alcohol/substance abuse, CD4+T-cell counts, or viral load. Profound cerebellar deficits in HIV/AIDS (P=0.007, corrected) were associated with depression, suggesting a surrogate disease marker for antiretroviral trials.

  5. Cerebellar disorders in childhood: cognitive problems.

    PubMed

    Steinlin, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade, increasing evidence of cognitive functions of the cerebellum during development and learning processes could be ascertained. Posterior fossa malformations such as cerebellar hypoplasia or Joubert syndrome are known to be related to developmental problems in a marked to moderate extent. More detailed analyses reveal special deficits in attention, processing speed, visuospatial functions, and language. A study about Dandy Walker syndrome states a relationship of abnormalities in vermis lobulation with developmental problems. Further lobulation or volume abnormalities of the cerebellum and/or vermis can be detected in disorders as fragile X syndrome, Downs's syndrome, William's syndrome, and autism. Neuropsychological studies reveal a relation of dyslexia and attention deficit disorder with cerebellar functions. These functional studies are supported by structural abnormalities in neuroimaging in these disorders. Acquired cerebellar or vermis atrophy was found in groups of children with developmental problems such as prenatal alcohol exposure or extreme prematurity. Also, focal lesions during childhood or adolescence such as cerebellar tumor or stroke are related with neuropsychological abnormalities, which are most pronounced in visuospatial, language, and memory functions. In addition, cerebellar atrophy was shown to be a bad prognostic factor considering cognitive outcome in children after brain trauma and leukemia. In ataxia teleangiectasia, a neurodegenerative disorder affecting primarily the cerebellar cortex, a reduced verbal intelligence quotient and problems of judgment of duration are a hint of the importance of the cerebellum in cognition. In conclusion, the cerebellum seems to play an important role in many higher cognitive functions, especially in learning. There is a suggestion that the earlier the incorrect influence, the more pronounced the problems.

  6. The malignant primate?

    PubMed

    de Grouchy, J

    1991-01-01

    Speciation and carcinogenesis result from genomic instability at the gametic or at the somatic levels. After an infinity of trials they occur, by chromosome rearrangements, in single individuals or in single cells and evolve by similar chromosomal or clonal evolutions. Loss of heterozygosity for the first event is essential in both processes: in evolution, a chromosomal rearrangement, a pericentric inversion or a Robertsonian fusion, must become homozygous to ensure a reproductive barrier for a new species; Knudson's two-event sequence is a similar situation in cancer. Position effect is equally important: we have shown overexpression of the SOD1 gene in the orangutan phylum probably by an intrachromosomal rearrangement; the t(9;22) in CML acts by typical position effect. Parental imprinting underlies the evolution of genome function and the unset of certain cancers. Evolution and malignancy are interweaved by viruses and oncogenes since the dawn of life. Cancer uses its intelligence to expand and to destroy the other tissues, using subtle metabolic pathways and a variety of tricks to metastasize other cells. It always wins but saws the branch on which it sits. Mankind also grows exponentially, killing thousands of other species, poisoning the oceans and soft waters, polluting the atmosphere, all for his egoistic needs. Man also travels and metastasizes other Earths. He modifies his genome or that of other species, and develops new technologies for his reproduction. He can destroy the planet in an eyeblink. To be or not to be the malignant primate, that will be the dilemma for the 21st Century. PMID:1809219

  7. The Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome and Its Relation to Cerebellar Cognitive Function and the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Karin S.; Khademian, Zarir P.; Keating, Robert F.; Packer, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    The postoperative cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS), consisting of diminished speech output, hypotonia, ataxia, and emotional lability, occurs after surgery in up to 25% of patients with medulloblastoma and occasionally after removal of other posterior fossa tumors. Although the mutism is transient, speech rarely normalizes and the syndrome is…

  8. A Molecular Phylogeny of Living Primates

    PubMed Central

    Perelman, Polina; Johnson, Warren E.; Roos, Christian; Seuánez, Hector N.; Horvath, Julie E.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Kessing, Bailey; Pontius, Joan; Roelke, Melody; Rumpler, Yves; Schneider, Maria Paula C.; Silva, Artur; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of primates offer considerable potential to define and understand the processes that mold, shape, and transform the human genome. However, primate taxonomy is both complex and controversial, with marginal unifying consensus of the evolutionary hierarchy of extant primate species. Here we provide new genomic sequence (∼8 Mb) from 186 primates representing 61 (∼90%) of the described genera, and we include outgroup species from Dermoptera, Scandentia, and Lagomorpha. The resultant phylogeny is exceptionally robust and illuminates events in primate evolution from ancient to recent, clarifying numerous taxonomic controversies and providing new data on human evolution. Ongoing speciation, reticulate evolution, ancient relic lineages, unequal rates of evolution, and disparate distributions of insertions/deletions among the reconstructed primate lineages are uncovered. Our resolution of the primate phylogeny provides an essential evolutionary framework with far-reaching applications including: human selection and adaptation, global emergence of zoonotic diseases, mammalian comparative genomics, primate taxonomy, and conservation of endangered species. PMID:21436896

  9. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende; Pedroso, José Luiz; Souza, Paulo Victor Sgobbi de; Albuquerque, Marcus Vinícius Cristino de; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2015-10-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  10. A case of follicular lymphoma associated with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Yayoi; Minakawa, Eiko N; Nishikori, Momoko; Ihara, Masafumi; Hashi, Yuichiro; Matsuyama, Hirofumi; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Yoshida, Sonoyo; Kitano, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2012-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological disorders (PND) are neurological effects of malignancy that are recognized as immune-mediated disorders caused by aberrant expression of a tumor antigen that is normally expressed in the nervous system. We report a case of cerebellar ataxia which turned out to be paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration, a subtype of PND that develops cerebellar symptoms, that was caused by follicular lymphoma. After chemotherapy, the patient attained sufficient improvement of cerebellar symptoms along with complete remission of lymphoma. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration should be recognized as a rare complication of lymphoma as it is important to start proper treatment before the neurological symptoms become irreversible.

  11. Cytoplasmic RNA Granules and Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wei-Chih; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA granules are dynamic cellular structures essential for proper gene expression and homeostasis. The two principle types of cytoplasmic RNA granules are stress granules (SGs), which contain stalled translation initiation complexes, and processing bodies (P-bodies, PBs), which concentrate factors involved in mRNA degradation. RNA granules are associated with gene silencing of transcripts, thus, viruses repress RNA granule functions to favor replication. This review discusses the breadth of viral interactions with cytoplasmic RNA granules, focusing on mechanisms that modulate the functions of RNA granules and that typically promote viral replication. Currently mechanisms for virus manipulation of RNA granules can be loosely grouped into three non-exclusive categories; i) cleavage of key RNA granule factors, ii) regulation of PKR activation and iii) co-opting RNA granule factors for new roles in viral replication. Viral repression of RNA granules supports productive infection by inhibiting their gene silencing functions and counteracting their role in linking stress sensing with innate immune activation. PMID:26958719

  12. Retinal connectivity and primate vision

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Martin, Paul R.; Grünert, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    The general principles of retinal organization are now well known. It may seem surprising that retinal organization in the primate, which has a complex visual behavioral repertoire, appears relatively simple. In this review, we primarily consider retinal structure and function in primate species. Photoreceptor distribution and connectivity are considered as are connectivity in the outer and inner retina. One key issue is the specificity of retinal connections; we suggest that the retina shows connectional specificity but this is seldom complete, and we consider here the functional consequences of imprecise wiring. Finally, we consider how retinal systems can be linked to psychophysical descriptions of different channels, chromatic and luminance, which are proposed to exist in the primate visual system. PMID:20826226

  13. Drying and recovery of aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Zhang, Quanguo; Chen, Yu-You; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    To dehydrate aerobic granules to bone-dry form was proposed as a promising option for long-term storage of aerobic granules. This study cultivated aerobic granules with high proteins/polysaccharide ratio and then dried these granules using seven protocols: drying at 37°C, 60°C, 4°C, under sunlight, in dark, in a flowing air stream or in concentrated acetone solutions. All dried granules experienced volume shrinkage of over 80% without major structural breakdown. After three recovery batches, although with loss of part of the volatile suspended solids, all dried granules were restored most of their original size and organic matter degradation capabilities. The strains that can survive over the drying and storage periods were also identified. Once the granules were dried, they can be stored over long period of time, with minimal impact yielded by the applied drying protocols. PMID:27392096

  14. MicroRNA Biogenesis and Hedgehog-Patched Signaling Cooperate to Regulate an Important Developmental Transition in Granule Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Constantin, Lena; Constantin, Myrna; Wainwright, Brandon J

    2016-03-01

    The Dicer1, Dcr-1 homolog (Drosophila) gene encodes a type III ribonuclease required for the canonical maturation and functioning of microRNAs (miRNAs). Subsets of miRNAs are known to regulate normal cerebellar granule cell development, in addition to the growth and progression of medulloblastoma, a neoplasm that often originates from granule cell precursors. Multiple independent studies have also demonstrated that deregulation of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh)-Patched (Ptch) signaling, through miRNAs, is causative of granule cell pathologies. In the present study, we investigated the genetic interplay between miRNA biogenesis and Shh-Ptch signaling in granule cells of the cerebellum by way of the Cre/lox recombination system in genetically engineered models of Mus musculus (mouse). We demonstrate that, although the miRNA biogenesis and Shh-Ptch-signaling pathways, respectively, regulate the opposing growth processes of cerebellar hypoplasia and hyperplasia leading to medulloblastoma, their concurrent deregulation was nonadditive and did not bring the growth phenotypes toward an expected equilibrium. Instead, mice developed either hypoplasia or medulloblastoma, but of a greater severity. Furthermore, some genotypes were bistable, whereby subsets of mice developed hypoplasia or medulloblastoma. This implies that miRNAs and Shh-Ptch signaling regulate an important developmental transition in granule cells of the cerebellum. We also conclusively show that the Dicer1 gene encodes a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene for Ptch1-induced medulloblastoma, with the monoallielic loss of Dicer1 more severe than biallelic loss. These findings exemplify how genetic interplay between pathways may produce nonadditive effects with a substantial and unpredictable impact on biology. Furthermore, these findings suggest that the functional dosage of Dicer1 may nonadditively influence a wide range of Shh-Ptch-dependent pathologies. PMID:26773048

  15. Cerebellar cortical inhibition and classical eyeblink conditioning.

    PubMed

    Bao, Shaowen; Chen, Lu; Kim, Jeansok J; Thompson, Richard F

    2002-02-01

    The cerebellum is considered a brain structure in which memories for learned motor responses (e.g., conditioned eyeblink responses) are stored. Within the cerebellum, however, the relative importance of the cortex and the deep nuclei in motor learning/memory is not entirely clear. In this study, we show that the cerebellar cortex exerts both basal and stimulus-activated inhibition to the deep nuclei. Sequential application of a gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABA(A)R) agonist and a noncompetitive GABA(A)R antagonist allows selective blockade of stimulus-activated inhibition. By using the same sequential agonist and antagonist methods in behaving animals, we demonstrate that the conditioned response (CR) expression and timing are completely dissociable and involve different inhibitory inputs; although the basal inhibition modulates CR expression, the conditioned stimulus-activated inhibition is required for the proper timing of the CR. In addition, complete blockade of cerebellar deep nuclear GABA(A)Rs prevents CR acquisition. Together, these results suggest that different aspects of the memories for eyeblink CRs are encoded in the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar deep nuclei.

  16. Improving cerebellar segmentation with statistical fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plassard, Andrew J.; Yang, Zhen; Prince, Jerry L.; Claassen, Daniel O.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum is a somatotopically organized central component of the central nervous system well known to be involved with motor coordination and increasingly recognized roles in cognition and planning. Recent work in multiatlas labeling has created methods that offer the potential for fully automated 3-D parcellation of the cerebellar lobules and vermis (which are organizationally equivalent to cortical gray matter areas). This work explores the trade offs of using different statistical fusion techniques and post hoc optimizations in two datasets with distinct imaging protocols. We offer a novel fusion technique by extending the ideas of the Selective and Iterative Method for Performance Level Estimation (SIMPLE) to a patch-based performance model. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm, Non- Local SIMPLE, for segmentation of a mixed population of healthy subjects and patients with severe cerebellar anatomy. Under the first imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold-standard segmentation techniques. In the second imaging protocol, we show that Non-Local SIMPLE outperforms previous gold standard techniques but is outperformed by a non-locally weighted vote with the deeper population of atlases available. This work advances the state of the art in open source cerebellar segmentation algorithms and offers the opportunity for routinely including cerebellar segmentation in magnetic resonance imaging studies that acquire whole brain T1-weighted volumes with approximately 1 mm isotropic resolution.

  17. Cerebellar endocannabinoids: retrograde signaling from purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Marcaggi, Païkan

    2015-06-01

    The cerebellar cortex exhibits a strikingly high expression of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), the cannabinoid binding protein responsible for the psychoactive effects of marijuana. CB1 is primarily found in presynaptic elements in the molecular layer. While the functional importance of cerebellar CB1 is supported by the effect of gene deletion or exogenous cannabinoids on animal behavior, evidence for a role of endocannabinoids in synaptic signaling is provided by in vitro experiments on superfused acute rodent cerebellar slices. These studies have demonstrated that endocannabinoids can be transiently released by Purkinje cells and signal at synapses in a direction opposite to information transfer (retrograde). Here, following a description of the reported expression pattern of the endocannabinoid system in the cerebellum, I review the accumulated in vitro data, which have addressed the mechanism of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling and identified 2-arachidonoylglycerol as the mediator of this signaling. The mechanisms leading to endocannabinoid release, the effects of CB1 activation, and the associated synaptic plasticity mechanisms are discussed and the remaining unknowns are pointed. Notably, it is argued that the spatial specificity of this signaling and the physiological conditions required for its induction need to be determined in order to understand endocannabinoid function in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:25520276

  18. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells.

    PubMed

    Buchin, Anatoly; Rieubland, Sarah; Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S; Roth, Arnd

    2016-08-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  19. Cerebellar Disease in an Adult Cow

    PubMed Central

    Oz, H. H.; Nicholson, S. S.; Al-Bagdadi, F. K.; Zeman, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    This is the report of clinical signs and lesions of a cerebellar disorder in an adult four year old Limousin cow grazing perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne). The most striking histopathological lesion was a marked paucity of Purkinje cells throughout the cerebellum. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:17422607

  20. Vergence Deficits in Patients with Cerebellar Lesions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, T.; Sprenger, A.; Neumann, G.; Machner, B.; Gottschalk, S.; Rambold, H.; Helmchen, C.

    2009-01-01

    The cerebellum is part of the cortico-ponto-cerebellar circuit for conjugate eye movements. Recent animal data suggest an additional role of the cerebellum for the control of binocular alignment and disconjugate, i.e. vergence eye movements. The latter is separated into two different components: fast vergence (to step targets) and slow vergence…

  1. Inverse Stochastic Resonance in Cerebellar Purkinje Cells

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, Michael; Gutkin, Boris S.; Roth, Arnd

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje neurons play an important role in cerebellar computation since their axons are the only projection from the cerebellar cortex to deeper cerebellar structures. They have complex internal dynamics, which allow them to fire spontaneously, display bistability, and also to be involved in network phenomena such as high frequency oscillations and travelling waves. Purkinje cells exhibit type II excitability, which can be revealed by a discontinuity in their f-I curves. We show that this excitability mechanism allows Purkinje cells to be efficiently inhibited by noise of a particular variance, a phenomenon known as inverse stochastic resonance (ISR). While ISR has been described in theoretical models of single neurons, here we provide the first experimental evidence for this effect. We find that an adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model fitted to the basic Purkinje cell characteristics using a modified dynamic IV method displays ISR and bistability between the resting state and a repetitive activity limit cycle. ISR allows the Purkinje cell to operate in different functional regimes: the all-or-none toggle or the linear filter mode, depending on the variance of the synaptic input. We propose that synaptic noise allows Purkinje cells to quickly switch between these functional regimes. Using mutual information analysis, we demonstrate that ISR can lead to a locally optimal information transfer between the input and output spike train of the Purkinje cell. These results provide the first experimental evidence for ISR and suggest a functional role for ISR in cerebellar information processing. PMID:27541958

  2. [Vital reactions in Pacchioni granulations].

    PubMed

    Földes, V; Mojzes, L; Antal, A

    1987-01-01

    By means of histological methods the authors examined the blood and fluid circulatory disturbances associated with cranial and cerebral injuries. The presence of vital reactions was studied by means of the combined histological study of the dura mater, pacchionian granulations and the central nervous system. Samples for histological study were taken from 115 cadavers who had suffered cranial injuries, from 15 individuals who died from destructive cerebral apoplexy caused by a disease and from 30 individuals who died of natural causes. The authors applied a special fixation and sampling technique and, using various histological reactions, the following vital reactions were observed: the appearance of blood-cell elements in the granulation, a moderate fibrin degradation product and hemoglobin phagocytosis, and occasionally lipid phagocytosis. The authors worked out a method that was shown to be highly effective in the more precise determination of the induction time of cerebral apoplexy caused by a disease and that of traumatic injury of the brain.

  3. A proposed aerobic granules size development scheme for aerobic granulation process.

    PubMed

    Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Abdullah, Norhayati; Yuzir, Ali; Olsson, Gustaf; Salmiati; Hamdzah, Myzairah; Din, Mohd Fadhil Mohd; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Khalil, Khalilah Abdul; Anuar, Aznah Nor; Noor, Zainura Zainon; Ujang, Zaini

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic granulation is increasingly used in wastewater treatment due to its unique physical properties and microbial functionalities. Granule size defines the physical properties of granules based on biomass accumulation. This study aims to determine the profile of size development under two physicochemical conditions. Two identical bioreactors namely Rnp and Rp were operated under non-phototrophic and phototrophic conditions, respectively. An illustrative scheme was developed to comprehend the mechanism of size development that delineates the granular size throughout the granulation. Observations on granules' size variation have shown that activated sludge revolutionised into the form of aerobic granules through the increase of biomass concentration in bioreactors which also determined the changes of granule size. Both reactors demonstrated that size transformed in a similar trend when tested with and without illumination. Thus, different types of aerobic granules may increase in size in the same way as recommended in the aerobic granule size development scheme.

  4. The evolution of the vertebrate cerebellum: absence of a proliferative external granule layer in a basal ray-finned fish

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Thomas; Modrell, Melinda S.; Baker, Clare V. H.; Wingate, Richard J. T.

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum represents one of the most morphologically variable structures in the vertebrate brain. To shed light on its evolutionary history, we have examined the molecular anatomy and proliferation of the developing cerebellum of the North American paddlefish, Polyodon spathula. Absence of an external proliferative cerebellar layer and the restriction of Atonal1 expression to the rhombic lip and valvular primordium demonstrate that transit amplification in a cerebellar external germinal layer, a prominent feature of amniote cerebellum development, is absent in paddlefish. Furthermore, expression of Sonic hedgehog, which drives secondary proliferation in the mouse cerebellum, is absent from the paddlefish cerebellum. These data are consistent with what has been observed in zebrafish and suggest that the transit amplification seen in the amniote cerebellum was either lost very early in the ray-finned fish lineage or evolved in the lobe-finned fish lineage. We also suggest that the Atoh1-positive proliferative valvular primordium may represent a synapomorphy (shared derived character) of ray-finned fishes. The topology of valvular primordium development in paddlefish differs significantly from that of zebrafish and correlates with the adult cerebellar form. The distribution of proliferative granule cell precursors in different vertebrate taxa is thus the likely determining factor in cerebellar morphological diversity. PMID:24617988

  5. The actin cytoskeleton differentially regulates platelet alpha-granule and dense-granule secretion.

    PubMed

    Flaumenhaft, Robert; Dilks, James R; Rozenvayn, Nataliya; Monahan-Earley, Rita A; Feng, Dian; Dvorak, Ann M

    2005-05-15

    Stimulation of platelets with strong agonists results in centralization of cytoplasmic organelles and secretion of granules. These observations have led to the supposition that cytoskeletal contraction facilitates granule release by promoting the interaction of granules with one another and with membranes of the open canalicular system. Yet, the influence of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling the membrane fusion events that mediate granule secretion remains largely unknown. To evaluate the role of the actin cytoskeleton in platelet granule secretion, we have assessed the effects of latrunculin A and cytochalasin E on granule secretion. Exposure of platelets to low concentrations of these reagents resulted in acceleration and augmentation of agonist-induced alpha-granule secretion with comparatively modest effects on dense granule secretion. In contrast, exposure of platelets to high concentrations of latrunculin A inhibited agonist-induced alpha-granule secretion but stimulated dense granule secretion. Incubation of permeabilized platelets with low concentrations of latrunculin A primed platelets for Ca(2+)- or guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-gamma-S-induced alpha-granule secretion. Latrunculin A-dependent alpha-granule secretion was inhibited by antibodies directed at vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), demonstrating that latrunculin A supports soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein-dependent membrane fusion. These results indicate that the actin cytoskeleton interferes with platelet exocytosis and differentially regulates alpha-granule and dense granule secretion. PMID:15671445

  6. Developmental features of rat cerebellar neural cells cultured in a chemically defined medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, V.; Ciotti, M.T.; Aloisi, F.; Levi, G.

    1986-01-01

    We studied some aspects of the differentiation of rat cerebellar neural cells obtained from 8-day postnatal animals and cultured in a serum-free, chemically defined medium (CDM). The ability of the cells to take up radioactive transmitter amino acids was analyzed autoradiographically. The L-glutamate analogue /sup 3/H-D-aspartate was taken up by astroglial cells, but not by granule neurons, even in late cultures (20 days in vitro). This is in agreement with the lack of depolarization-induced release of /sup 3/H-D-aspartate previously observed in this type of culture. In contrast, /sup 3/H-(GABA) was scarcely accumulated by glial-fibrillary-acidic-protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes, but taken up by glutamate-decarboxylase-positive inhibitory interneurons and was released in a Ca2+-dependent way upon depolarization: /sup 3/H-GABA evoked release progressively increased with time in culture. Interestingly, the expression of the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I was much reduced in granule cells cultured in CDM as compared to those maintained in the presence of serum. These data would indicate that in CDM the differentiation of granule neurons is not complete, while that of GABAergic neurons is not greatly affected. Whether the diminished differentiation of granule cells must be attributed only to serum deprivation or also to other differences in the composition of the culture medium remains to be established. /sup 3/H-GABA was avidly taken up also by a population of cells which were not recognized by antibodies raised against GFAP, glutamate decarboxylase, and microtubule-associated protein 2. These cells have been characterized as bipotential precursors of oligodendrocytes and of a subpopulation of astrocytes bearing a stellate shape and capable of high-affinity /sup 3/H-GABA uptake.

  7. Posterior fossa syndrome after cerebellar stroke.

    PubMed

    Mariën, Peter; Verslegers, Lieven; Moens, Maarten; Dua, Guido; Herregods, Piet; Verhoeven, Jo

    2013-10-01

    Posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) due to vascular etiology is rare in children and adults. To the best of our knowledge, PFS due to cerebellar stroke has only been reported in patients who also underwent surgical treatment of the underlying vascular cause. We report longitudinal clinical, neurocognitive and neuroradiological findings in a 71-year-old right-handed patient who developed PFS following a right cerebellar haemorrhage that was not surgically evacuated. During follow-up, functional neuroimaging was conducted by means of quantified Tc-99m-ECD SPECT studies. After a 10-day period of akinetic mutism, the clinical picture developed into cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) with reversion to a previously learnt accent, consistent with neurogenic foreign accent syndrome (FAS). No psychometric evidence for dementia was found. Quantified Tc-99m-ECD SPECT studies consistently disclosed perfusional deficits in the anatomoclinically suspected but structurally intact bilateral prefrontal brain regions. Since no surgical treatment of the cerebellar haematoma was performed, this case report is presumably the first description of pure, "non-surgical vascular PFS". In addition, reversion to a previously learnt accent which represents a subtype of FAS has never been reported after cerebellar damage. The combination of this unique constellation of poststroke neurobehavioural changes reflected on SPECT shows that the cerebellum is crucially implicated in the modulation of neurocognitive and affective processes. A decrease of excitatory impulses from the lesioned cerebellum to the structurally intact supratentorial network subserving cognitive, behavioural and affective processes constitutes the likely pathophysiological mechanism underlying PFS and CCAS in this patient. PMID:23575947

  8. Cerebellar circuitry as a neuronal machine.

    PubMed

    Ito, Masao

    2006-01-01

    Shortly after John Eccles completed his studies of synaptic inhibition in the spinal cord, for which he was awarded the 1963 Nobel Prize in physiology/medicine, he opened another chapter of neuroscience with his work on the cerebellum. From 1963 to 1967, Eccles and his colleagues in Canberra successfully dissected the complex neuronal circuitry in the cerebellar cortex. In the 1967 monograph, "The Cerebellum as a Neuronal Machine", he, in collaboration with Masao Ito and Janos Szentágothai, presented blue-print-like wiring diagrams of the cerebellar neuronal circuitry. These stimulated worldwide discussions and experimentation on the potential operational mechanisms of the circuitry and spurred theoreticians to develop relevant network models of the machinelike function of the cerebellum. In following decades, the neuronal machine concept of the cerebellum was strengthened by additional knowledge of the modular organization of its structure and memory mechanism, the latter in the form of synaptic plasticity, in particular, long-term depression. Moreover, several types of motor control were established as model systems representing learning mechanisms of the cerebellum. More recently, both the quantitative preciseness of cerebellar analyses and overall knowledge about the cerebellum have advanced considerably at the cellular and molecular levels of analysis. Cerebellar circuitry now includes Lugaro cells and unipolar brush cells as additional unique elements. Other new revelations include the operation of the complex glomerulus structure, intricate signal transduction for synaptic plasticity, silent synapses, irregularity of spike discharges, temporal fidelity of synaptic activation, rhythm generators, a Golgi cell clock circuit, and sensory or motor representation by mossy fibers and climbing fibers. Furthermore, it has become evident that the cerebellum has cognitive functions, and probably also emotion, as well as better-known motor and autonomic functions

  9. Orthostatic hypotension in acute cerebellar infarction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Hyung

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the frequency and pattern of orthostatic hypotension (OH) associated with acute isolated cerebellar infarction, and to identify the cerebellar structure(s) potentially responsible for OH, 29 patients (mean age 60.0) with acute isolated cerebellar infarction performed a standard battery of autonomic function tests including the head up tilt test using Finapres for recording of the beat-to-beat BP response during the acute period. Cerebellar infarction related OH was defined as fall in BP (>20 mmHg systolic BP) on tilting in patients without any disease(s) that could potentially cause autonomic dysfunction, or in patients who had a potential cause of autonomic dysfunction, but showed the absence of OH during a follow-up test. The severity and distribution of autonomic dysfunction were measured by the composite autonomic severity score (CASS). Nine patients (31 %) had OH (range 24-53 mmHg) on tilting during the acute period. Most patients (7/9) had a remarkable decrement in systolic BP immediately upon tilting, but OH rapidly normalized. Mean of maximal decrease in systolic BP during head up tilt test was 37.0 mmHg. The OH group showed mild autonomic dysfunctions (CASS, 3.7) with adrenergic sympathetic dysfunction appearing as the most common abnormality. Lesion subtraction analyses revealed that damage to the medial part of the superior semilunar lobule (Crus I) and tonsil was more frequent in OH group compared to non-OH group. Cerebellar infarction may cause a brief episode of OH. The medial part of the superior semilunar lobule and tonsil may participate in regulating the early BP response during orthostasis. PMID:26530504

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate cerebellar pathology in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Serina; Shuvaev, Anton N; Iizuka, Akira; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Hirai, Hirokazu

    2014-06-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the ataxin-1 protein. To date, no fundamental treatments for SCA1 have been elucidated. However, some studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are partially effective in other genetic mouse models of cerebellar ataxia. In this study, we tested the efficacy of the intrathecal injection of MSCs in the treatment of SCA1 in transgenic (SCA1-Tg) mice. We found that intrathecal injection of only 3 × 10(3) MSCs greatly mitigated the cerebellar neuronal disorganization observed in SCA1 transgenic mice (SCA1-Tg mice). Although the Purkinje cells (PCs) of 24-week-old nontreated SCA1-Tg mice displayed a multilayer arrangement, SCA1-Tg mice at a similar age injected with MSCs displayed monolayer PCs. Furthermore, intrathecal injection of MSCs suppressed the atrophy of PC dendrites in SCA1-Tg mice. Finally, behavioral tests demonstrated that MSCs normalized deficits in motor coordination in SCA1-Tg mice. Future studies should be performed to develop optimal protocols for intrathecal transplantation of MSCs in SCA1 model primates with the aim of developing applications for SCA1 patients.

  11. A marked paucity of granule cells in the developing cerebellum of the Npc1−/− mouse is corrected by a single injection of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin

    PubMed Central

    Nusca, S.; Canterini, S.; Palladino, G.; Bruno, F.; Mangia, F.; Erickson, R.P.; Fiorenza, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we show that postnatal development of cerebellar granule neurons (GNs) is defective in Npc1−/− mice. Compared to age-matched wild-type littermates, there is an accelerated disappearance of the external granule layer (EGL) in these mice. This is due to a premature exit from the cell cycle of GN precursors residing at the level of the EGL. As a consequence, the size of cerebellar lobules of these mice displays a 20%–25% reduction compared to that of age-matched wild-type mice. This size reduction is detectable at post-natal day 28 (PN28), when cerebellar GN development is completed while signs of neuronal atrophy are not yet apparent. Based on the analysis of EGL thickness and the determination of proliferating GN fractions at increasing developmental times (PN8–PN14), we trace the onset of this GN developmental defect during the second postnatal week. We also show that during this developmental time Shh transcripts undergo a significant reduction in Npc1−/− mice compared to age-matched wild-type mice. In light of the mitogenic activity of Shh on GNs, this observation further supports the presence of defective GN proliferation in Npc1−/− mice. A single injection of hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin at PN7 rescues this defect, restoring the normal patterns of granule neuron proliferation and cerebellar lobule size. To our knowledge, these findings identify a novel developmental defect that was underappreciated in previous studies. This defect was probably overlooked because Npc1 loss-of-function does not affect cerebellar foliation and causes the internal granule layer and molecular layer to decrease proportionally, giving rise to a normally appearing, yet harmoniously smaller, cerebellum. PMID:24969023

  12. Assessing anxiety in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Kristine; Pierre, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety can be broadly described as a psychological state in which normally innocuous environmental stimuli trigger negative emotional expectations. Human anxiety disorders are multidimensional and may be organic or acquired, situational or pervasive. The broad ranging nature of the anxiety phenotype speaks to the need for models that identify its various components and root causes to develop effective clinical treatments. The cross-species comparative approach to modeling anxiety disorders in animals aims to understand mechanisms that both contribute to and modulate anxiety. Nonhuman primate models provide an important bridge from nonprimate model systems because of the complexity of nonhuman primates' biobehavioral capacities and their commonalities with human emotion. The broad goal of this review is to provide an overview of various procedures available to study anxiety in the nonhuman primate, with a focus on the behavioral aspects of anxiety. Commonly used methods covered in this review include assessing animals in their home environment or in response to an ethologically relevant threat, associative conditioning and startle response tests, and cognitive bias tests. We also discuss how these procedures can help veterinarians and researchers care for captive nonhuman primates.

  13. Enrichment and aggression in primates.

    PubMed

    Honess, P E; Marin, C M

    2006-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that primates housed under impoverished conditions develop behavioural abnormalities, including, in the most extreme example, self-harming behaviour. This has implications for all contexts in which primates are maintained in captivity from laboratories to zoos since by compromising the animals' psychological well-being and allowing them to develop behavioural abnormalities their value as appropriate educational and research models is diminished. This review examines the extensive body of literature documenting attempts to improve living conditions with a view to correcting behavioural abnormalities and housing primates in such a way that they are encouraged to exhibit a more natural range and proportion of behaviours, including less self-directed and social aggression. The results of housing, feeding, physical, sensory and social enrichment efforts are examined with specific focus on their effect on aggressive behaviour and variation in their use and efficacy. It is concluded that while inappropriate or poorly distributed enrichment may encourage aggressive competition, enrichment that is species, sex, age and background appropriate can dramatically reduce aggression, can eliminate abnormal behaviour and substantially improve the welfare of primates maintained in captivity.

  14. Pathogenesis of Varicelloviruses in primates

    PubMed Central

    Ouwendijk, Werner J.D.; Verjans, Georges M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation. PMID:25255989

  15. Neuroethology of primate social behavior.

    PubMed

    Chang, Steve W C; Brent, Lauren J N; Adams, Geoffrey K; Klein, Jeffrey T; Pearson, John M; Watson, Karli K; Platt, Michael L

    2013-06-18

    A neuroethological approach to human and nonhuman primate behavior and cognition predicts biological specializations for social life. Evidence reviewed here indicates that ancestral mechanisms are often duplicated, repurposed, and differentially regulated to support social behavior. Focusing on recent research from nonhuman primates, we describe how the primate brain might implement social functions by coopting and extending preexisting mechanisms that previously supported nonsocial functions. This approach reveals that highly specialized mechanisms have evolved to decipher the immediate social context, and parallel circuits have evolved to translate social perceptual signals and nonsocial perceptual signals into partially integrated social and nonsocial motivational signals, which together inform general-purpose mechanisms that command behavior. Differences in social behavior between species, as well as between individuals within a species, result in part from neuromodulatory regulation of these neural circuits, which itself appears to be under partial genetic control. Ultimately, intraspecific variation in social behavior has differential fitness consequences, providing fundamental building blocks of natural selection. Our review suggests that the neuroethological approach to primate behavior may provide unique insights into human psychopathology.

  16. Effect of methotrexate on cerebellar development in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Akihiko; Sun, Jing; Ueda, Kota; Furukawa, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Six-day-old rats were treated intraperitoneal injections with methotrexate 1 mg/kg, and the cerebellum was examined. Both the length and width of the vermis decreased in the methotrexate-treated group instead of the control from 4 day after treatment (DAT) onward. A significant reduction in the width of the external granular layer was detected on 2 and 3 DAT in the methotrexate group. By 4 DAT, the width of the external granular layer of the methotrexate group was indistinguishable from the control, and by 8 DAT, it was greater than that of the control. The molecular layer of methotrexate group on 8 and 15 DAT was thinner than that of the control. On 1 DAT, in the methotrexate group, there were many TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3-positive granular cells throughout the external granular layer, and they decreased time-dependently. On 1 DAT, in the methotrexate group, phospho-histone H3-positive cells in the external granular layer were fewer than in the control and tended to increase on 2-4 DAT. The p21-positive-rate of the external granule cells in the MTX group was higher than in the control on 1-4 DAT. These results suggested that methotrexate exposure on postnatal day 6 induces a delay, slowing in the migration of external granular cells to the inner granular layer, attributed to decrease or inhibition in the production of external granular cells that had arisen from apoptosis and the decrease in cell proliferative activity, resulting in cerebellar hypoplasia.

  17. A probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter.

    PubMed

    van Baarsen, K M; Kleinnijenhuis, M; Jbabdi, S; Sotiropoulos, S N; Grotenhuis, J A; van Cappellen van Walsum, A M

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei and their connectivity are gaining attraction, due to the important role the cerebellum plays in cognition and motor control. Atlases of the cerebellar cortex and nuclei are used to locate regions of interest in clinical and neuroscience studies. However, the white matter that connects these relay stations is of at least similar functional importance. Damage to these cerebellar white matter tracts may lead to serious language, cognitive and emotional disturbances, although the pathophysiological mechanism behind it is still debated. Differences in white matter integrity between patients and controls might shed light on structure-function correlations. A probabilistic parcellation atlas of the cerebellar white matter would help these studies by facilitating automatic segmentation of the cerebellar peduncles, the localization of lesions and the comparison of white matter integrity between patients and controls. In this work a digital three-dimensional probabilistic atlas of the cerebellar white matter is presented, based on high quality 3T, 1.25mm resolution diffusion MRI data from 90 subjects participating in the Human Connectome Project. The white matter tracts were estimated using probabilistic tractography. Results over 90 subjects were symmetrical and trajectories of superior, middle and inferior cerebellar peduncles resembled the anatomy as known from anatomical studies. This atlas will contribute to a better understanding of cerebellar white matter architecture. It may eventually aid in defining structure-function correlations in patients with cerebellar disorders.

  18. Neuro-Otological Aspects of Cerebellar Stroke Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cerebellar stroke is a common cause of a vascular vestibular syndrome. Although vertigo ascribed to cerebellar stroke is usually associated with other neurological symptoms or signs, it may mimic acute peripheral vestibulopathy (APV), so called pseudo-APV. The most common pseudo-APV is a cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). Recent studies have shown that a normal head impulse result can differentiate acute medial PICA infarction from APV. Therefore, physicians who evaluate stroke patients should be trained to perform and interpret the results of the head impulse test. Cerebellar infarction in the territory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) can produce a unique stroke syndrome in that it is typically accompanied by unilateral hearing loss, which could easily go unnoticed by patients. The low incidence of vertigo associated with infarction involving the superior cerebellar artery distribution may be a useful way of distinguishing it clinically from PICA or AICA cerebellar infarction in patients with acute vertigo and limb ataxia. For the purpose of prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment, it is imperative to recognize the characteristic patterns of the clinical presentation of each cerebellar stroke syndrome. This paper provides a concise review of the key features of cerebellar stroke syndromes from the neuro-otology viewpoint. PMID:19587812

  19. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique.

  20. Purkinje cell and cerebellar effects following developmental exposure to PCBs and/or MeHg.

    PubMed

    Roegge, Cindy S; Morris, John R; Villareal, Sherilyn; Wang, Victor C; Powers, Brian E; Klintsova, Anna Y; Greenough, William T; Pessah, Isaac N; Schantz, Susan L

    2006-01-01

    We recently reported that rats exposed to PCBs and MeHg during development were impaired on the rotating rod, a test of balance and coordination that is often indicative of cerebellar damage. In addition, developmental PCB exposure is known to dramatically reduce circulating thyroid hormone concentrations, which may have a negative impact on cerebellar development. Therefore, we investigated the effects of combined PCB and MeHg exposure on Purkinje cells and the cerebellum. The serum and brains from littermates of the animals tested on the rotating rod were collected at weaning, and we also collected brains from the adult animals at the end of motor testing. Four groups were studied: 1) vehicle controls, 2) PCBs only (Aroclor 1254, 6 mg/kg/d, oral), 3) MeHg only (0.5 ppm, in dams' drinking water), and 4) PCB+MeHg (at the same doses as in individual toxicant exposures). Female Long-Evans rats were exposed beginning 4 weeks prior to breeding with an unexposed male and continuing until postnatal day (PND) 16. There was a significant reduction in serum T4 and T3 concentrations in the PCB and PCB+MeHg pups on PND21. Golgi-impregnated Purkinje cells were examined in PND21 brains, but there were no significant exposure-related effects on primary dendrite length, branching area, or structural abnormalities. However, all three male exposure groups had a marginally significant increase in Purkinje cell height, which may suggest a subtle thyromimetic effect in the cerebellum. Cresyl-violet stained sections from the adult brains showed no exposure-related effects within paramedian lobule in Purkinje cell number, total lobule volume or layer volumes (molecular, granule cell and white matter layers). Evidence is provided for the dysregulation of expression of cerebellar ryanodine receptor (RyR) isoforms in PCB-exposed brains, and this could contribute to the rotating rod deficit by changing critical aspects of intracellular calcium signaling within the cerebellum.

  1. Changes in the cerebellar cortex of hairless Rhino-J mice (hr-rh-j).

    PubMed

    García-Atares, N; San Jose, I; Cabo, R; Vega, J A; Represa, J

    1998-10-30

    A mutation in the hr gene is responsible for typical epithelium phenotype in hairless mice. As this gene is expressed at high levels not only in the skin but also in the brain, the aim of the study was to clarify its role in the central nervous system. We have analyzed by morphological and immunocytochemical methods (calbindin D-28k, phosphorylated and 200 kDa neurofilament protein) the cerebellum of a mutated mouse strain, the hairless (hr-rh-j) type carrying the homozygous hr gene rhino mutation. The cerebellar cortex was studied in young (3 months) and adult (9 months) wild type and mutated mice. No major structural change was found in any of the groups and neuronal density or neuronal arrangement were similar in mutated animals to their age-matched controls. Nevertheless there were changes in shape and size of the Purkinje neurons in the old mutated animals respect to their normal littermates, while the molecular and the granule cell layers were apparently invariable. Calbindin (CB) immunohistochemistry revealed a significant decrease in the expression of this protein in the Purkinje cells of the aged mutated mice. Immunohistochemistry for a neurofilament protein (NFP) showed a reduction of staining in all the cerebellar cortex layers in the older animals, which was much more evident in the (hr-rh-j) mutated mice. These results suggest that hr gene is involved in the structural maintenance of the mature cerebellar cortex, rather than in the development. Our findings may also be consistent with an accelerated aging of the central nervous system in rh-rh-j mice.

  2. Low resolution scanning electron microscopy of cerebellar neurons and neuroglial cells of the granular layer.

    PubMed

    Castejón, O J

    1984-01-01

    Teleost fishes, Arius Spixii and Salmo trout and adult Swiss albino mice have been processed with the freeze-fracture technique for SEM to explore the inner cytoplasmic and nuclear surface details of neurons and neuroglial cells. The specimens were fixed by vascular perfusion with Karnovsky fixative and 2-3 mm thick cerebellar slices were subsequently fixed by immersion in the same fixative. They were postfixed in osmium tetroxide, dehydrated in ethanol, frozen in Freon 22, cooled by liquid nitrogen and fractured. After thawing in ethanol, they were critically point dried, coated with gold-palladium and viewed by SEM. The surface features of perikaryon were examined at low resolution and magnifications. The image of endoplasmic reticulum, GERL complex and chromatin were described in fractured cerebellar neurons (granule and Golgi cells). The fractured protoplasmic astrocytes displayed a characteristic glass surface appearance of cytoplasmic body and processes, which facilitated their recognition at the neuropile and perivascular region. The oligodendrocytes appeared as fusiform cells depicting a thin rim of perinuclear cytoplasm. The surface view of endoplasmic reticulum was well studied at the nuclear poles. Fine cytoplasmic beaded canaliculi appeared connecting the outer surface of nuclear envelope with the plasma membrane inner surface. The nucleus exhibited well developed peripheral heterochromatin masses forming anastomotic bands separated by vacuolar spaces. The SEM nerve and neuroglial cell fractographs were compared with similar images obtained by conventional transmission electron microscopy and freeze etching technique. PMID:6505621

  3. [EXPRESSION OF DOUBLECORTIN AND NeuN IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLAR NEURONS IN RAT].

    PubMed

    Zimatkin, S M; Karniushko, O A

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed on the offspring of 5 outbred female albino rats to give a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of doublecortin (DCX) and NeuN expression in the neurons of the cerebellar cortex and nucleus interpositus in the early postnatal ontogenesis (postnatal days 2-15). DCX expression was detected in postmitotic neurons of the external granular layer and migrating neurons of the cerebellar cortex. At postnatal days 2 and 7 DCX expression in neocerebellum was higher than in paleocerebellum. NeuN expression was found to appear in migrating granule neurons, and reach the maximum in mature neurons of internal granular layer. DCX expression was not detected in Purkinje cells and in the nucleus interpositus of the cerebellum. In neurons of the nucleus interpositus the expression of NeuN progressively increased from postnatal days 2 to 15. Thus, a comparative immunohistochemical study of the dynamics of the expression of the pair of molecular markers studied proved to be an effective way of the assessment of the development of granular neurons of the cerebellum in early postnatal ontogenesis. PMID:27487661

  4. Pre and Post Synaptic NMDA Effects Targeting Purkinje Cells in the Mouse Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lonchamp, Etienne; Gambino, Frédéric; Dupont, Jean Luc; Doussau, Frédéric; Valera, Antoine; Poulain, Bernard; Bossu, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are associated with many forms of synaptic plasticity. Their expression level and subunit composition undergo developmental changes in several brain regions. In the mouse cerebellum, beside a developmental switch between NR2B and NR2A/C subunits in granule cells, functional postsynaptic NMDA receptors are seen in Purkinje cells of neonate and adult but not juvenile rat and mice. A presynaptic effect of NMDA on GABA release by cerebellar interneurons was identified recently. Nevertheless whereas NMDA receptor subunits are detected on parallel fiber terminals, a presynaptic effect of NMDA on spontaneous release of glutamate has not been demonstrated. Using mouse cerebellar cultures and patch-clamp recordings we show that NMDA facilitates glutamate release onto Purkinje cells in young cultures via a presynaptic mechanism, whereas NMDA activates extrasynaptic receptors in Purkinje cells recorded in old cultures. The presynaptic effect of NMDA on glutamate release is also observed in Purkinje cells recorded in acute slices prepared from juvenile but not from adult mice and requires a specific protocol of NMDA application. PMID:22276158

  5. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  6. [EXPRESSION OF DOUBLECORTIN AND NeuN IN THE DEVELOPING CEREBELLAR NEURONS IN RAT].

    PubMed

    Zimatkin, S M; Karniushko, O A

    2016-01-01

    This work was performed on the offspring of 5 outbred female albino rats to give a comparative immunohistochemical evaluation of doublecortin (DCX) and NeuN expression in the neurons of the cerebellar cortex and nucleus interpositus in the early postnatal ontogenesis (postnatal days 2-15). DCX expression was detected in postmitotic neurons of the external granular layer and migrating neurons of the cerebellar cortex. At postnatal days 2 and 7 DCX expression in neocerebellum was higher than in paleocerebellum. NeuN expression was found to appear in migrating granule neurons, and reach the maximum in mature neurons of internal granular layer. DCX expression was not detected in Purkinje cells and in the nucleus interpositus of the cerebellum. In neurons of the nucleus interpositus the expression of NeuN progressively increased from postnatal days 2 to 15. Thus, a comparative immunohistochemical study of the dynamics of the expression of the pair of molecular markers studied proved to be an effective way of the assessment of the development of granular neurons of the cerebellum in early postnatal ontogenesis.

  7. Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Visavadiya, Nishant P; Springer, Joe E

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar function is critical for coordinating movement and motor learning. However, events occurring in the cerebellum following spinal cord injury (SCI) have not been investigated in detail. We provide evidence of SCI-induced cerebellar synaptic changes involving a loss of granule cell parallel fiber input to distal regions of the Purkinje cell dendritic tree. This is accompanied by an apparent increase in synaptic contacts to Purkinje cell proximal dendrites, presumably from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive. We also observed an early stage injury-induced decrease in the levels of cerebellin-1, a synaptic organizing molecule that is critical for establishing and maintaining parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synaptic integrity. Interestingly, this transsynaptic reorganizational pattern is consistent with that reported during development and in certain transgenic mouse models. To our knowledge, such a reorganizational event has not been described in response to SCI in adult rats. Regardless, the novel results of this study are important for understanding SCI-induced synaptic changes in the cerebellum, which may prove critical for strategies focusing on promoting functional recovery. PMID:27504204

  8. Mechanisms and functional roles of glutamatergic synapse diversity in a cerebellar circuit

    PubMed Central

    Zampini, Valeria; Liu, Jian K; Diana, Marco A; Maldonado, Paloma P; Brunel, Nicolas; Dieudonné, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic currents display a large degree of heterogeneity of their temporal characteristics, but the functional role of such heterogeneities remains unknown. We investigated in rat cerebellar slices synaptic currents in Unipolar Brush Cells (UBCs), which generate intrinsic mossy fibers relaying vestibular inputs to the cerebellar cortex. We show that UBCs respond to sinusoidal modulations of their sensory input with heterogeneous amplitudes and phase shifts. Experiments and modeling indicate that this variability results both from the kinetics of synaptic glutamate transients and from the diversity of postsynaptic receptors. While phase inversion is produced by an mGluR2-activated outward conductance in OFF-UBCs, the phase delay of ON UBCs is caused by a late rebound current resulting from AMPAR recovery from desensitization. Granular layer network modeling indicates that phase dispersion of UBC responses generates diverse phase coding in the granule cell population, allowing climbing-fiber-driven Purkinje cell learning at arbitrary phases of the vestibular input. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15872.001 PMID:27642013

  9. Optogenetic Modulation and Multi-Electrode Analysis of Cerebellar Networks In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Wolfgang; Krause, Martin; Aarse, Janna; Mark, Melanie D.; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise; Herlitze, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The firing patterns of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs), as the sole output of the cerebellar cortex, determine and tune motor behavior. PC firing is modulated by various inputs from different brain regions and by cell-types including granule cells (GCs), climbing fibers and inhibitory interneurons. To understand how signal integration in PCs occurs and how subtle changes in the modulation of PC firing lead to adjustment of motor behaviors, it is important to precisely record PC firing in vivo and to control modulatory pathways in a spatio-temporal manner. Combining optogenetic and multi-electrode approaches, we established a new method to integrate light-guides into a multi-electrode system. With this method we are able to variably position the light-guide in defined regions relative to the recording electrode with micrometer precision. We show that PC firing can be precisely monitored and modulated by light-activation of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) expressed in PCs, GCs and interneurons. Thus, this method is ideally suited to investigate the spatio/temporal modulation of PCs in anesthetized and in behaving mice. PMID:25144735

  10. Ectopic Cerebellar Cell Migration Causes Maldevelopment of Purkinje Cells and Abnormal Motor Behaviour in Cxcr4 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guo-Jen; Edwards, Andrew; Tsai, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Yi-Shin; Peng, Lei; Era, Takumi; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Tsai, Ching-Yen; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Chen, Shu-Jen; Flint, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    SDF-1/CXCR4 signalling plays an important role in neuronal cell migration and brain development. However, the impact of CXCR4 deficiency in the postnatal mouse brain is still poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the importance of CXCR4 on cerebellar development and motor behaviour by conditional inactivation of Cxcr4 in the central nervous system. We found CXCR4 plays a key role in cerebellar development. Its loss leads to defects in Purkinje cell dentritogenesis and axonal projection in vivo but not in cell culture. Transcriptome analysis revealed the most significantly affected pathways in the Cxcr4 deficient developing cerebellum are involved in extra cellular matrix receptor interactions and focal adhesion. Consistent with functional impairment of the cerebellum, Cxcr4 knockout mice have poor coordination and balance performance in skilled motor tests. Together, these results suggest ectopic the migration of granule cells impairs development of Purkinje cells, causes gross cerebellar anatomical disruption and leads to behavioural motor defects in Cxcr4 null mice. PMID:24516532

  11. The spatiotemporal organization of cerebellar network activity resolved by two-photon imaging of multiple single neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Daniela; Pozzi, Paolo; Tognolina, Marialuisa; Chirico, Giuseppe; Mapelli, Jonathan; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the spatiotemporal organization of neuronal activity in local microcircuits, techniques allowing the simultaneous recording from multiple single neurons are required. To this end, we implemented an advanced spatial-light modulator two-photon microscope (SLM-2PM). A critical issue for cerebellar theory is the organization of granular layer activity in the cerebellum, which has been predicted by single-cell recordings and computational models. With SLM-2PM, calcium signals could be recorded from different network elements in acute cerebellar slices including granule cells (GrCs), Purkinje cells (PCs) and molecular layer interneurons. By combining WCRs with SLM-2PM, the spike/calcium relationship in GrCs and PCs could be extrapolated toward the detection of single spikes. The SLM-2PM technique made it possible to monitor activity of over tens to hundreds neurons simultaneously. GrC activity depended on the number of spikes in the input mossy fiber bursts. PC and molecular layer interneuron activity paralleled that in the underlying GrC population revealing the spread of activity through the cerebellar cortical network. Moreover, circuit activity was increased by the GABA-A receptor blocker, gabazine, and reduced by the AMPA and NMDA receptor blockers, NBQX and APV. The SLM-2PM analysis of spatiotemporal patterns lent experimental support to the time-window and center-surround organizing principles of the granular layer. PMID:24782707

  12. Direction of transneuronal transport of herpes simplex virus 1 in the primate motor system is strain-dependent.

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, M C; Strick, P L; Dix, R D

    1991-01-01

    We examined the axonal transport of two strains of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) within the central nervous system of cebus monkeys. Each strain was injected into the "arm area" of the primary motor cortex. One strain, HSV-1(McIntyre-B), was transported transneuronally in the retrograde direction. It infected neurons at sites known to project to the arm area of the primary motor cortex (e.g., ventrolateral thalamus). In addition, "second-order" neurons were labeled in the deep cerebellar nuclei (dentate and interpositus) and in the globus pallidus (internal segment). This result supports the concept that the arm area of the primary motor cortex is a target of both cerebellar and basal ganglia output. In contrast, the other strain, HSV-1(H129), was transported transneuronally in the anterograde direction. It infected neurons at sites known to receive input from the arm area of the primary motor cortex (e.g., putamen, pontine nuclei). In addition, "third-order" neurons were labeled in the cerebellar cortex (granule and Golgi cells) and in the globus pallidus (largely the external segment). Our observations suggest that strain differences have an important impact on the direction of transneuronal transport of HSV-1. Furthermore, it should be possible to examine the organization of cerebellar and basal ganglia loops with cerebral cortex by exploiting transneuronal transport of HSV-1 and virus strain differences. Images PMID:1654557

  13. Regulation of secretory granule size by the precise generation and fusion of unit granules

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Ilan; Lagunoff, David; Galli, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Morphometric evidence derived from studies of mast cells, pancreatic acinar cells and other cell types supports a model in which the post-Golgi processes that generate mature secretory granules can be resolved into three steps: (1) fusion of small, Golgi-derived progranules to produce immature secretory granules which have a highly constrained volume; (2) transformation of such immature granules into mature secretory granules, a process often associated with a reduction in the maturing granule’s volume, as well as changes in the appearance of its content and (3) fusion of secretory granules of the smallest size, termed ‘unit granules’, forming granules whose volumes are multiples of the unit granule’s volume. Mutations which perturb this process can cause significant pathology. For example, Chediak–Higashi syndrome / lysosomal trafficking regulator (CHS)/(Lyst) mutations result in giant secretory granules in a number of cell types in human beings with the Chediak–Higashi syndrome and in ‘beige’ (Lystbg/Lystbg) mice. Analysis of the secretory granules of mast cells and pancreatic acinar cells in Lyst-deficient beige mice suggests that beige mouse secretory granules retain the ability to fuse randomly with other secretory granules no matter what the size of the fusion partners. By contrast, in normal mice, the pattern of granule–granule fusion occurs exclusively by the addition of unit granules, either to each other or to larger granules. The normal pattern of fusion is termed unit addition and the fusion evident in cells with CHS/Lyst mutations is called random addition. The proposed model of secretory granule formation has several implications. For example, in neurosecretory cells, the secretion of small amounts of cargo in granules constrained to a very narrow size increases the precision of the information conveyed by secretion. By contrast, in pancreatic acinar cells and mast cells, large granules composed of multiple unit granules

  14. A toolbox to visually explore cerebellar shape changes in cerebellar disease and dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abulnaga, S. Mazdak; Yang, Zhen; Carass, Aaron; Kansal, Kalyani; Jedynak, Bruno M.; Onyike, Chiadi U.; Ying, Sarah H.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    The cerebellum plays an important role in motor control and is also involved in cognitive processes. Cerebellar function is specialized by location, although the exact topographic functional relationship is not fully understood. The spinocerebellar ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause regional atrophy in the cerebellum, yielding distinct motor and cognitive problems. The ability to study the region-specific atrophy patterns can provide insight into the problem of relating cerebellar function to location. In an effort to study these structural change patterns, we developed a toolbox in MATLAB to provide researchers a unique way to visually explore the correlation between cerebellar lobule shape changes and function loss, with a rich set of visualization and analysis modules. In this paper, we outline the functions and highlight the utility of the toolbox. The toolbox takes as input landmark shape representations of subjects' cerebellar substructures. A principal component analysis is used for dimension reduction. Following this, a linear discriminant analysis and a regression analysis can be performed to find the discriminant direction associated with a specific disease type, or the regression line of a specific functional measure can be generated. The characteristic structural change pattern of a disease type or of a functional score is visualized by sampling points on the discriminant or regression line. The sampled points are used to reconstruct synthetic cerebellar lobule shapes. We showed a few case studies highlighting the utility of the toolbox and we compare the analysis results with the literature.

  15. Carbon granule probe microphone for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, S. P.

    1985-02-01

    A microphone which is not subject to corrosion is provided by employing carbon granules to sense sound waves. The granules are packed into a ceramic tube and no diaphragm is used. A pair of electrodes is located in the tube adjacent the carbon granules and are coupled to a sensing circuit. Sound waves cause pressure changes on the carbon granules which results in a change in resistance in the electrical path between the electrodes. This change in resistance is detected by the sensing circuit. The microphone is suitable for use as a leak detection probe in recovery boilers, where it provides reliable operation without corrosion problems associated with conventional microphones.

  16. Cerebellar ataxia as presenting feature of hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Kotwal, Suman Kumar; Kotwal, Shalija; Gupta, Rohan; Singh, Jang Bhadur; Mahajan, Annil

    2016-04-01

    Symptoms and signs of the hypothyroidism vary in relation to the magnitude and acuteness of the thyroid hormone deficiency. The usual clinical features are constipation, fatigue, cold intolerance and weight gain. Rarely it can present with neurologic problems like reversible cerebellar ataxia, dementia, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis and coma. Hypothyroidism should be suspected in all cases of ataxia, as it is easily treatable. A 40 year-old male presented with the history facial puffiness, hoarseness of voice and gait-ataxia. Investigations revealed frank primary hypothyroidism. Anti-TPO antibody was positive. Thyroxine was started and patient improved completely within eight weeks. Hypothyroidism can present with ataxia as presenting feature. Hypothyroidism should be considered in all cases of cerebellar ataxia as it is a reversible cause of ataxia. PMID:26886095

  17. Cerebellar secretin modulates eyeblink classical conditioning.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Jason R; Robinson, Gain M; Dean, Aaron M; Schoenberg, Heidi E; Williams, Michael R; Morielli, Anthony D; Green, John T

    2014-12-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received intracerebellar infusions of the secretin receptor antagonist 5-27 secretin or vehicle into the lobulus simplex of cerebellar cortex immediately prior to sessions 1-3 of acquisition. Antagonist-infused rats showed a reduction in the percentage of eyeblink CRs compared with vehicle-infused rats. In Experiment 2, rats received intracerebellar infusions of secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1-2 of extinction. Secretin did not significantly affect extinction performance. In Experiment 3, rats received intracerebellar infusions of 5-27 secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1-2 of extinction. The secretin antagonist did not significantly affect extinction performance. Together, our current and previous results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous cerebellar secretin modulate acquisition, but not extinction, of EBC. We have previously shown that (1) secretin reduces surface expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel α-subunit Kv1.2 in cerebellar cortex and (2) intracerebellar infusions of a Kv1.2 blocker enhance EBC acquisition, much like secretin. Kv1.2 is almost exclusively expressed in cerebellar cortex at basket cell-Purkinje cell pinceaus and Purkinje cell dendrites; we propose that EBC-induced secretin release from PCs modulates EBC acquisition by reducing surface expression of Kv1.2 at one or both of these sites.

  18. Cerebellar secretin modulates eyeblink classical conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Jason R.; Robinson, Gain M.; Dean, Aaron M.; Schoenberg, Heidi E.; Williams, Michael R.; Morielli, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that intracerebellar infusion of the neuropeptide secretin enhances the acquisition phase of eyeblink conditioning (EBC). Here, we sought to test whether endogenous secretin also regulates EBC and to test whether the effect of exogenous and endogenous secretin is specific to acquisition. In Experiment 1, rats received intracerebellar infusions of the secretin receptor antagonist 5-27 secretin or vehicle into the lobulus simplex of cerebellar cortex immediately prior to sessions 1–3 of acquisition. Antagonist-infused rats showed a reduction in the percentage of eyeblink CRs compared with vehicle-infused rats. In Experiment 2, rats received intracerebellar infusions of secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. Secretin did not significantly affect extinction performance. In Experiment 3, rats received intracerebellar infusions of 5-27 secretin or vehicle immediately prior to sessions 1–2 of extinction. The secretin antagonist did not significantly affect extinction performance. Together, our current and previous results indicate that both exogenous and endogenous cerebellar secretin modulate acquisition, but not extinction, of EBC. We have previously shown that (1) secretin reduces surface expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel α-subunit Kv1.2 in cerebellar cortex and (2) intracerebellar infusions of a Kv1.2 blocker enhance EBC acquisition, much like secretin. Kv1.2 is almost exclusively expressed in cerebellar cortex at basket cell–Purkinje cell pinceaus and Purkinje cell dendrites; we propose that EBC-induced secretin release from PCs modulates EBC acquisition by reducing surface expression of Kv1.2 at one or both of these sites. PMID:25403455

  19. Granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading: differential sorting of α-granules expressing VAMP-7.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christian G; Michelson, Alan D; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2012-07-01

    There has been recent controversy as to whether platelet α-granules represent a single granule population or are composed of different subpopulations that serve discrete functions. To address this question, we evaluated the localization of vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) in spread platelets to determine whether platelets actively sort a specific subpopulation of α-granules to the periphery during spreading. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that granules expressing VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 localized to the central granulomere of spread platelets along with the granule cargos von Willebrand factor and serotonin. In contrast, α-granules expressing VAMP-7 translocated to the periphery of spread platelets along with the granule cargos TIMP2 and VEFG. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that α-granules expressing VAMP-7 actively moved from the granulomere to the periphery during spreading. Platelets from a patient with gray platelet syndrome lacked α-granules and demonstrated only minimal spreading. Similarly, spreading was impaired in platelets obtained from Unc13d(Jinx) mice, which are deficient in Munc13-4 and have an exocytosis defect. These studies identify a new α-granule subtype expressing VAMP-7 that moves to the periphery during spreading, supporting the premise that α-granules are heterogeneous and demonstrating that granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading.

  20. Granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading: differential sorting of α-granules expressing VAMP-7

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christian G.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    There has been recent controversy as to whether platelet α-granules represent a single granule population or are composed of different subpopulations that serve discrete functions. To address this question, we evaluated the localization of vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) in spread platelets to determine whether platelets actively sort a specific subpopulation of α-granules to the periphery during spreading. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that granules expressing VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 localized to the central granulomere of spread platelets along with the granule cargos von Willebrand factor and serotonin. In contrast, α-granules expressing VAMP-7 translocated to the periphery of spread platelets along with the granule cargos TIMP2 and VEFG. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that α-granules expressing VAMP-7 actively moved from the granulomere to the periphery during spreading. Platelets from a patient with gray platelet syndrome lacked α-granules and demonstrated only minimal spreading. Similarly, spreading was impaired in platelets obtained from Unc13dJinx mice, which are deficient in Munc13-4 and have an exocytosis defect. These studies identify a new α-granule subtype expressing VAMP-7 that moves to the periphery during spreading, supporting the premise that α-granules are heterogeneous and demonstrating that granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading. PMID:22589474

  1. The antecubital organ of the primate slow loris (Nycticebus coucang coucang).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M M; Ling, E A

    1976-01-01

    A study of the 'antecubital organ' of the slow loris (Nycticebus coucang coucang), was undertaken in light and electron microscopes. As distinct from other prosimian primates there is a complete absence of interstitial cells in the gland suggesting its different functional role. The acinar cells in the 'antecubital organ', of slow loris contain large number of smooth ER and electron-dense secretory granules. The granules are seen both in the apical region of the cells as well as in their basal cytoplasmic processes. Some of these processes appear to terminate close to a blood capillary. The structural features of the 'antecubital organs' of slow loris suggest that it is a mixed gland of both exocrine and endocrine nature.

  2. The microvasculature of the human cerebellar meninges.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Hiroko; Akima, Michiko; Hatori, Tsutomu; Nagayama, Tadashi; Zhang, Zean; Ihara, Fumie

    2002-12-01

    The vascular architecture of the human cerebellar meninges was investigated. The surface meninges were poor in vasculature. In the sulci, the meninges were highly vascular but had few capillaries. The venous blood vessels gave long side branches at right angles to the parent vessels in a cruciform pattern, running horizontally along the cerebellar sulci. They were situated at the origin of the secondary or tertiary sulci. Anastomoses between these horizontal branches gave a crosshatched appearance. Short branches often extended to the bases of the sulci, terminating in T-shaped bifurcations with numerous tiny branches, like the roots of a tree. The arteries ran perpendicular to venous branches which were parallel to each other exclusively along the sagittal plane. These arteries bifurcated to straddle the horizontally running veins at the origin of the secondary or tertiary sulci. They gave off many small branches like teeth of a fork from each artery in the secondary or tertiary sulci after they bifurcated to straddle the venous branches and penetrated the cerebellar cortex at the bases of sulci. These fork-like ramifications in the bases of the sulci were most likely responsible for the ready development of pronounced ischemic state. They might also play an important role in the occurrence of ischemic damage at the bases of sulci in cases of severe generalized ischemia.

  3. From cerebellar texture to movement optimization.

    PubMed

    Sultan, Fahad

    2014-10-01

    The cerebellum is a major site for supervised procedural learning and appears to be crucial for optimizing sensorimotor performance. However, the site and origin of the supervising signal are still elusive. Furthermore, its relationship with the prominent neuronal circuitry remains puzzling. In this paper, I will review the relevant information and seek to synthesize a working hypothesis that explains the unique cerebellar structure. The aim of this review was to link the distinctive functions of the cerebellum, as derived from cerebellar lesion studies, with potential elementary computations, as observed by a bottom-up approach from the cerebellar microcircuitry. The parallel fiber geometry is ideal for performing millisecond computations that extract instructive signals. In this scenario, the higher time derivatives of kinematics such as acceleration and/or jerk that occur during motor performance are detected via a tidal wave mechanism and are used (with appropriate gating) as the instructive signal to guide motor smoothing. The advantage of such a mechanism is that movements are optimized by reducing "jerkiness" which, in turn, lowers their energy requirements. PMID:25037239

  4. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    D'Mello, Anila M.; Stoodley, Catherine J.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD. PMID:26594140

  5. Isolated lateropulsion of the trunk in cerebellar infarct.

    PubMed

    Shan, D E; Wang, V; Chen, J T

    1995-05-01

    MRI in a 63-year-old male with isolated lateropulsion of the trunk disclosed an infarct in the inferior portion of the right cerebellar hemisphere, suggesting an end-zone type infarct in the lateral branch of the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (1PICA) or a borderzone infarct between 1PICA and superior cerebellar artery. A close clinico-topographical relationship between isolated lateropulsion of the trunk and lesion in the territory of 1PICA was demonstrated.

  6. Cerebro-cerebellar circuits in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    D'Mello, Anila M; Stoodley, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most consistent sites of abnormality in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and cerebellar damage is associated with an increased risk of ASD symptoms, suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction may play a crucial role in the etiology of ASD. The cerebellum forms multiple closed-loop circuits with cerebral cortical regions that underpin movement, language, and social processing. Through these circuits, cerebellar dysfunction could impact the core ASD symptoms of social and communication deficits and repetitive and stereotyped behaviors. The emerging topography of sensorimotor, cognitive, and affective subregions in the cerebellum provides a new framework for interpreting the significance of regional cerebellar findings in ASD and their relationship to broader cerebro-cerebellar circuits. Further, recent research supports the idea that the integrity of cerebro-cerebellar loops might be important for early cortical development; disruptions in specific cerebro-cerebellar loops in ASD might impede the specialization of cortical regions involved in motor control, language, and social interaction, leading to impairments in these domains. Consistent with this concept, structural, and functional differences in sensorimotor regions of the cerebellum and sensorimotor cerebro-cerebellar circuits are associated with deficits in motor control and increased repetitive and stereotyped behaviors in ASD. Further, communication and social impairments are associated with atypical activation and structure in cerebro-cerebellar loops underpinning language and social cognition. Finally, there is converging evidence from structural, functional, and connectivity neuroimaging studies that cerebellar right Crus I/II abnormalities are related to more severe ASD impairments in all domains. We propose that cerebellar abnormalities may disrupt optimization of both structure and function in specific cerebro-cerebellar circuits in ASD.

  7. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    PubMed

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia. PMID:11532563

  8. Suppression of thyroid hormone receptor-mediated transcription and disruption of thyroid hormone-induced cerebellar morphogenesis by the polybrominated biphenyl mixture, BP-6.

    PubMed

    Ibhazehiebo, Kingsley; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Okano-Uchida, Takayuki; Shimokawa, Noriaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2011-08-01

    Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) are polyhalogenated, bioaccumulative flame retardant chemicals, which have been used in a variety of consumer and household products. They were accidentally introduced into the food chain in Michigan in 1973 and have remained a source of health concern. Studies have shown that exposure to PBB may cause adverse neurotoxic effects. We therefore examined the effects of BP-6, a PBB mixture, on thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-mediated transcription, on TH-induced Purkinje cell dendritogenesis, and on TH-induced cerebellar granule cell neurite extension. Our study shows that BP-6 suppressed TR-mediated transcription in CV-1 cells. Mammalian two-hybrid studies revealed that BP-6 did not inhibit coactivator binding to TR nor did it recruit corepressors to TR. Further examination using the liquid chemiluminescent DNA pull down assay revealed partial dissociation of TR from TH response element (TRE). In primary rat cerebellar culture, BP-6 significantly suppressed TH-induced dendrite arborization of Purkinje cells, and in reaggregate rat granule cell culture, impaired TH-induced neurite extension of granule cells. Taken together, our results indicate that BP-6 may disrupt TH homeostasis and consequently impair normal neuronal development. PMID:21396401

  9. Different responses of rat cerebellar Purkinje cells and Golgi cells evoked by widespread convergent sensory inputs

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Tahl; Rajapaksa, Thimali; Mostofi, Abteen; Edgley, Steve A

    2006-01-01

    While the synaptic properties of Golgi cell-mediated inhibition of granule cells are well studied, less is known of the afferent inputs to Golgi cells so their role in information processing remains unclear. We investigated the responses of cerebellar cortical Golgi cells and Purkinje cells in Crus I and II of the posterior lobe cerebellar hemisphere to activation of peripheral afferents in vivo, using anaesthetized rats. Recordings were made from 70 Golgi cells and 76 Purkinje cells. Purkinje cells were identified by the presence of climbing fibre responses. Golgi cells were identified by both spontaneous firing pattern and response properties, and identification was confirmed using juxtacellular labelling of single neurones (n = 16). Purkinje cells in Crus II showed continuous firing at relatively high rates (25–60 Hz) and stimulation of peripheral afferents rarely evoked substantial responses. The most common response was a modest, long-latency, long-lasting increase in simple spike output. By comparison, the most common response evoked in Golgi cells by the same stimuli was a long-latency, long-lasting depression of firing, found in ∼70% of the Golgi cells tested. The onsets of Golgi cell depressions had shorter latencies than the Purkinje cell excitations. Brief, short-latency excitations and reductions in firing were also evoked in some Golgi cells, and rarely in Purkinje cells, but in most cases long-lasting depressions were the only significant change in spike firing. Golgi cell responses could be evoked using air puff or tactile stimuli and under four different anaesthetic regimens. Long-lasting responses in both neurone types could be evoked from wide receptive fields, in many cases including distal afferents from all four limbs, as well as from trigeminal afferents. These Golgi cell responses are not consistent with the conventional feedback inhibition or ‘gain control’ models of Golgi cell function. They suggest instead that cerebellar cortical

  10. Underground hibernation in a primate.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Marina B; Dausmann, Kathrin H; Ranaivoarisoa, Jean F; Yoder, Anne D

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation in mammals is a remarkable state of heterothermy wherein metabolic rates are reduced, core body temperatures reach ambient levels, and key physiological functions are suspended. Typically, hibernation is observed in cold-adapted mammals, though it has also been documented in tropical species and even primates, such as the dwarf lemurs of Madagascar. Western fat-tailed dwarf lemurs are known to hibernate for seven months per year inside tree holes. Here, we report for the first time the observation that eastern dwarf lemurs also hibernate, though in self-made underground hibernacula. Hence, we show evidence that a clawless primate is able to bury itself below ground. Our findings that dwarf lemurs can hibernate underground in tropical forests draw unforeseen parallels to mammalian temperate hibernation. We expect that this work will illuminate fundamental information about the influence of temperature, resource limitation and use of insulated hibernacula on the evolution of hibernation.

  11. Optogenetics in the nonhuman primate

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    The nonhuman primate brain, the model system closest to the human brain, plays a critical role in our understanding of neural computation, cognition, and behavior. The continued quest to crack the neural codes in the monkey brain would be greatly enhanced with new tools and technologies that can rapidly and reversibly control the activities of desired cells at precise times during specific behavioral states. Recent advances in adapting optogenetic technologies to monkeys have enabled precise control of specific cells or brain regions at the millisecond timescale, allowing for the investigation of the causal role of these neural circuits in this model system. Validation of optogenetic technologies in monkeys also represents a critical preclinical step on the translational path of new generation cell-type-specific neural modulation therapies. Here, I discuss the current state of the application of optogenetics in the nonhuman primate model system, highlighting the available genetic, optical and electrical technologies, and their limitations and potentials. PMID:22341328

  12. Cerebellar ataxia as the presenting manifestation of Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Arav-Boger, Ravit; Crawford, Thomas; Steere, Allen C; Halsey, Neal A

    2002-04-01

    A 7-year-old boy from suburban Baltimore who presented with cerebellar ataxia and headaches was found by magnetic resonance imaging to have multiple cerebellar enhancing lesions. He had no history of tick exposure. He was initially treated with steroids for presumptive postinfectious encephalitis. Lyme disease was diagnosed 10 weeks later after arthritis developed. Testing of the cerebrospinal fluid obtained at the time cerebellar ataxia was diagnosed revealed intrathecal antibody production to Borrelia burgdorferi. Treatment with intravenous antibiotics led to rapid resolution of persistent cerebellar findings.

  13. Immune activation during cerebellar dysfunction following Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    de Silva, H J; Hoang, P; Dalton, H; de Silva, N R; Jewell, D P; Peiris, J B

    1992-01-01

    Evidence for immune activation was investigated in 12 patients with a rare syndrome of self-limiting, delayed onset cerebellar dysfunction following an attack of falciparum malaria which occurred 18-26 d previously. Concentrations of tumour necrosis factor, interleukin 6 and interleukin 2 were all significantly higher in serum samples of patients during cerebellar ataxia than in recovery sera and in the sera of 8 patients who did not develop delayed cerebellar dysfunction following an attack of falciparum malaria. Cytokine concentrations in the cerebrospinal fluid were also significantly higher in ataxic patients than in controls. These findings suggest that immunological mechanisms may play a role in delayed cerebellar dysfunction following falciparum malaria.

  14. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma in two siblings suggests a possible familial predisposition.

    PubMed

    Pikis, Stylianos; Fellig, Yakov; Margolin, Emil

    2016-10-01

    There is limited data on the genetic origin and natural history of cerebellar liponeurocytoma. To the best of our knowledge there has been only one report of a familial presentation of this rare entity. We report a 72-year-old female with a posterior fossa tumor presenting with progressive cerebellar signs and symptoms. The patient underwent total tumor resection via an uncomplicated sub-occipital craniotomy. Histopathologic examination was diagnostic for cerebellar liponeurocytoma. Her sister was previously treated for a similar tumor. Our report provides further evidence for the possible existence of a hereditary abnormality predisposing afflicted families to cerebellar liponeurocytoma development. PMID:27349466

  15. Primate Experiments on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aochi, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments to study how certain body systems are affected by the space environment are described. These experiments are to be conducted on space shuttle flights. How weightlessness affects two body systems of primates are the prime concern. Thermoregulation and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis are the two systems concerned. The thermoregulation project will provide data on how body temperature and circadian rhythms are affected in a weightlessness environment and the homeostasis in fluids and electrolyte levels will address the problem of body fluid shifts.

  16. [Buspirone in the treatment of cerebellar ataxia].

    PubMed

    Svetel, M; Vojvodić, N; Filipović, S R; Dragasević, N; Sternić, N; Kostić, V S

    1999-01-01

    Ataxia is defined as a disturbance which, quite independent of any motor weakness, alters direction and extent of voluntary movement and impairs the sustained voluntary of reflex muscle contraction necessary for maintaining postiue and equilibrium [1]. Since pathophysiological basis of cerebeller ataxia is still not completely clear, the current therapeutic attempts are mainly symptom-oriented [3]. One possible approach could be a modification of potentially involved neurotransmitter systems of the cerebellum, where particularly interesting is the serotonergic system. However, attempts with levorotatory form of tryptophan (5-HT precursors) proved to be ineffective [4, 5]. Since receptors in the cerebellum are mainly of 5-HTIA subtype, the use of specific agonists might be a more reasonable therapy [6]. The study initially involved 11 patients, but only 9 completed the protocol due to unfavorable side effects. Our open label prospective study lasted for 15 weeks. The patients were tested before the beginning of the treatment (initial visit), at 7th (first visit) and 11th week (second visit) of continuous therapy, and eventually at 15th week (final visit). The daily dose was 40 mg at the first and 60 mg at the second visit. We used the evaluation scale gurposed for cerebellar functions testing (speech, gait, coordination and ocular movements). Significant improvement of cerebellar ataxia in patients under buspiron therapy has been noted. We analyzed the results obtained from our 9 patients (4 females and 5 males), of which 6 patients suffered from cerebellar degeneration, one from multiple sclerosis, one from Ramsey-Hunt syndrome, and one from pontine myelinolysis. At the initial visit the patient score was 18.9 (SD = 7.3), subsequently, at the iirst visit the score was 15.4 (SD = 8), while the second visit yielded the score of 12.9 (SD = 8.2), and finally, after a two-weeks lasting wash-out period, it was 17.7 (SD = 7.1) (Table 1). It was found that patients

  17. Soils, time, and primate paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Soils are the skin of the earth. From both poles to the equator, wherever rocks or sediment are exposed at the surface, soils are forming through the physical and chemical action of climate and living organisms. The physical attributes (color, texture, thickness) and chemical makeup of soils vary considerably, depending on the composition of the parent material and other variables: temperature, rainfall and soil moisture, vegetation, soil fauna, and the length of time that soil-forming processes have been at work. United States soil scientists1 have classified modern soils into ten major groups and numerous subgroups, each reflecting the composition and architecture of the soils and, to some extent, the processes that led to their formation. The physical and chemical processes of soil formation have been active throughout geologic time; the organic processes have been active at least since the Ordovician.2 Consequently, nearly all sedimentary rocks that were deposited in nonmarine settings and exposed to the elements contain a record of ancient, buried soils or paleosols. A sequence of these rocks, such as most ancient fluvial (stream) deposits, provides a record of soil paleoenvironments through time. Paleosols are also repositories of the fossils of organisms (body fossils) and the traces of those organisms burrowing, food-seeking, and dwelling activities (ichnofossils). Indeed, most fossil primates are found in paleosols. Careful study of ancient soils gives new, valuable insights into the correct temporal reconstruction of the primate fossil record and the nature of primate paleoenvironments. ?? 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Serendipitous insights involving nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Morton, William R; Swindler, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    Serendipity is discussed as a form of controlled chaos, a phenomenon in a class with synchronicity and other actions affecting research in terms of theory versus observation (e.g., "optional stopping"). Serendipity is a fundamental aspect of basic research, a profitable and normal outcome in the context of "informed observation." The serendipitous finding fits into the following pattern: it is unanticipated, anomalous, and strategic. All observations that have meaning must fit into some context in the observer's mind or suggest a revolutionary new context. It is critically important to maintain access to the resources provided by established primate centers and similar laboratories to capitalize in a timely way on serendipitous findings and to benefit from valuable discoveries made in more directly targeted development investments. Examples are given of serendipitous insights gained in experimentation and observation relative to nonhuman primate research, including both broad and narrow topics. Genomics, which uses comparison-based strategies and capitalizes on the DNA sequences of genetic information, presents what might seem the basis for endless serendipity because nonhuman primates are likely to share most genes present in the human genome. Other topics discussed include infant behavior, birth periodicity, leprosy, cystic fibrosis, environmental enrichment, endocrinology, drug development, and the rapidly expanding study of infectious diseases and pathogen-based bioterrorism. PMID:16179742

  19. Assessing Anxiety in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kristine; Pierre, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety can be broadly described as a psychological state in which normally innocuous environmental stimuli trigger negative emotional expectations. Human anxiety disorders are multidimensional and may be organic or acquired, situational or pervasive. The broad ranging nature of the anxiety phenotype speaks to the need for models that identify its various components and root causes to develop effective clinical treatments. The cross-species comparative approach to modeling anxiety disorders in animals aims to understand mechanisms that both contribute to and modulate anxiety. Nonhuman primate models provide an important bridge from nonprimate model systems because of the complexity of nonhuman primates’ biobehavioral capacities and their commonalities with human emotion. The broad goal of this review is to provide an overview of various procedures available to study anxiety in the nonhuman primate, with a focus on the behavioral aspects of anxiety. Commonly used methods covered in this review include assessing animals in their home environment or in response to an ethologically relevant threat, associative conditioning and startle response tests, and cognitive bias tests. We also discuss how these procedures can help veterinarians and researchers care for captive nonhuman primates. PMID:25225310

  20. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration. PMID:25869451

  1. Electrochemical performance of granulated titania nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, O.; Pratsinis, S. E.; de Chambrier, E.; Crouzet, M.; Exnar, I.

    The electrochemical performance of Li-ion insertion into electrodes made of various sizes of anatase titania nanoparticles embedded in larger granulated entities (1-10 μm) is investigated. The granules are formed by spray drying of a suspension containing titania nanoparticles made by hydrolyzing titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). Depending on the three process steps, i.e. hydrolysis-condensation, hydrothermal processing and spray drying, different properties for the electrode made from these granules can be achieved in terms of phase composition, specific surface area (SSA) and specific charge capacity. Hydrothermally processed (HP) particles are more resistant to calcination than sol-gel precipitated (SGP) ones and have a higher SSA which leads to a better performance with respect to specific charge capacity. Electrodes made from granulated nanoparticles have superior specific charge capacity than from non-granulated ones as the former have more inter-particle contacts.

  2. Ecology and evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Misha

    2004-07-01

    More than one hundred years ago, Grant Allen suggested that colour vision in primates, birds and insects evolved as an adaptation for foraging on colourful advertisements of plants--fruits and flowers. Recent studies have shown that well developed colour vision appeared long before fruits and flowers evolved. Thus, colour vision is generally beneficial for many animals, not only for those eating colourful food. Primates are the only placental mammals that have trichromatic colour vision. This may indicate either that trichromacy is particularly useful for primates or that primates are unique among placental mammals in their ability to utilise the signals of three spectrally distinct types of cones or both. Because fruits are an important component of the primate diet, primate trichromacy could have evolved as a specific adaptation for foraging on fruits. Alternatively, primate trichromacy could have evolved as an adaptation for many visual tasks. Comparative studies of mammalian eyes indicate that primates are the only placental mammals that have in their retina a pre-existing neural machinery capable of utilising the signals of an additional spectral type of cone. Thus, the failure of non-primate placental mammals to evolve trichromacy can be explained by constraints imposed on the wiring of retinal neurones. PMID:15312027

  3. Ecology and evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Misha

    2004-07-01

    More than one hundred years ago, Grant Allen suggested that colour vision in primates, birds and insects evolved as an adaptation for foraging on colourful advertisements of plants--fruits and flowers. Recent studies have shown that well developed colour vision appeared long before fruits and flowers evolved. Thus, colour vision is generally beneficial for many animals, not only for those eating colourful food. Primates are the only placental mammals that have trichromatic colour vision. This may indicate either that trichromacy is particularly useful for primates or that primates are unique among placental mammals in their ability to utilise the signals of three spectrally distinct types of cones or both. Because fruits are an important component of the primate diet, primate trichromacy could have evolved as a specific adaptation for foraging on fruits. Alternatively, primate trichromacy could have evolved as an adaptation for many visual tasks. Comparative studies of mammalian eyes indicate that primates are the only placental mammals that have in their retina a pre-existing neural machinery capable of utilising the signals of an additional spectral type of cone. Thus, the failure of non-primate placental mammals to evolve trichromacy can be explained by constraints imposed on the wiring of retinal neurones.

  4. Influence of metronidazole particle properties on granules prepared in a high-shear mixer-granulator.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Piera; Censi, Roberta; Malaj, Ledjan; Martelli, Sante; Joiris, Etienne; Barthélémy, Christine

    2007-02-01

    Metronidazole is a good example of high-dose drug substance with poor granulating and tableting properties. Tablets are generally produced by liquid granulation; however, the technological process failure is quite frequent. In order to verify how the metronidazole particle characteristics can influence granule properties, three metronidazole batches differing for crystal habit, mean particle size, BET surface area and wettability were selected, primarily designed according to their different elongation ratio: needle-shaped, stick-shaped, and isodimensional. In the presence of lactose monohydrate and pregelatinized maize starch, respectively as diluent and binder, they were included in a formula for wet granulation in a high-shear mixer-granulator. In order to render the process comparable as far as possible, all parameters and experimental conditions were maintained constant. Four granule batches were obtained: granules from placebo (G-placebo), granules from needle-shaped crystals (G-needle-shaped), granules from stick-shaped crystals (G-stick-shaped), and granules from isodimensional crystals (G-isodimensional). Different granule properties were considered, in particular concerning porosity, friability, loss on drying (LOD), and flowability. In order to study their tabletability and compressibility, the different granules obtained were then compressed in a rotary press. The best tabletability was obtained with the isodimensional batch, while the poorest was exhibited by the stick-shaped one. Differences in tabletability are in good accordance with compressibility results: to a better tabletability corresponds an important granule ability to undergo a volume reduction as a result of an applied pressure. In particular, it was proposed that the greatest compressibility of the G-isodimensional must be related to the greatest granule porosity percentage. PMID:17454043

  5. NEDDylation promotes stress granule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Jayabalan, Aravinth Kumar; Sanchez, Anthony; Park, Ra Young; Yoon, Sang Pil; Kang, Gum-Yong; Baek, Je-Hyun; Anderson, Paul; Kee, Younghoon; Ohn, Takbum

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) harbour translationally stalled messenger ribonucleoproteins and play important roles in regulating gene expression and cell fate. Here we show that neddylation promotes SG assembly in response to arsenite-induced oxidative stress. Inhibition or depletion of key components of the neddylation machinery concomitantly inhibits stress-induced polysome disassembly and SG assembly. Affinity purification and subsequent mass-spectrometric analysis of Nedd8-conjugated proteins from translationally stalled ribosomal fractions identified ribosomal proteins, translation factors and RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), including SRSF3, a previously known SG regulator. We show that SRSF3 is selectively neddylated at Lys85 in response to arsenite. A non-neddylatable SRSF3 (K85R) mutant do not prevent arsenite-induced polysome disassembly, but fails to support the SG assembly, suggesting that the neddylation pathway plays an important role in SG assembly. PMID:27381497

  6. Correlative microscopy of detergent granules.

    PubMed

    van Dalen, G; Nootenboom, P; Heussen, P C M

    2011-03-01

    The microstructure of detergent products for textile cleaning determines to a large extent the physical properties of these products. Correlative microscopy was used to reveal the microstructure by reconciling images obtained by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray microtomography and Fourier transform infrared microscopy. These techniques were applied on the same location of a subsample of a spray-dried detergent base powder embedded in polyacrylate. In this way, the three-dimensional internal and external structure of detergent granules could be investigated from milli to nano scale with detailed spatial information about the components present. This will generate knowledge how to design optimal microstructures for laundry products to obtain product properties demanded by the market. This method is also very useful for other powder systems used in a large variety of industries (e.g. for pharmaceutical, food, ceramic and metal industries).

  7. [Cerebellar Control of Ocular Movements: Application to the Topographical Diagnosis of Cerebellar Lesions].

    PubMed

    Hirose, Genjiro

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade, substantial information on cerebellar oculomotor control has been provided by the use of sophisticated neuroanatomical, neurophysiological, and imaging techniques. We now know that an intact cerebellum is a prerequisite for normal oculomotor performance. This review clarifies the current knowledge on structure-function correlations of the cerebellum in relation to ocular movements and allows them to be applied to topographical diagnosis of cerebellar lesions. The cerebellar regions most closely related to oculomotor function are: (1) the flocculus/paraflocculus for VOR suppression, cancellation, smooth pursuit eye movement and gaze-holding, (2) the nodulus/ventral uvula for velocity storage and low frequency prolonged vestibular response, and (3) the dorsal oculomotor vermis (declive VI, folium VII) and the posterior portion of the fastigial nucleus (fastigial oculomotor region) for saccades and smooth pursuit initiation. Symptomatically, defects in the flocculus/parflocculus cause saccadic pursuit, downbeat nystagmus, and impairments to visual suppression of the VOR. Lesions of the nodulus/uvula reveal as periodic alternating nystagmus. Lesions of the oculomotor vermis and the fastigial nucleus can induce saccadic dysmetria, while fastigial nucleus lesions may also cause ocular flutter/opsoclonus. A detailed knowledge of cerebellar anatomy and the physiology of eye movements enables localization of lesions to specific areas of the cerebellum. PMID:27001776

  8. Dystonia and Cerebellar Degeneration in the Leaner Mouse Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Raike, Robert S.; Hess, Ellen J.; Jinnah, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar degeneration is traditionally associated with ataxia. Yet, there are examples of both ataxia and dystonia occurring in individuals with cerebellar degeneration. There is also substantial evidence suggesting that cerebellar dysfunction alone may cause dystonia. The types of cerebellar defects that may cause ataxia, dystonia, or both have not been delineated. In the current study, we explored the relationship between cerebellar degeneration and dystonia using the leaner mouse mutant. Leaner mice have severe dystonia that is associated with dysfunctional and degenerating cerebellar Purkinje cells. Whereas the density of Purkinje cells was not significantly reduced in 4 week-old leaner mice, approximately 50% of the neurons were lost by 34 weeks of age. On the other hand, the dystonia and associated functional disability became significantly less severe during this same interval. In other words, dystonia improved as Purkinje cells were lost, suggesting that dysfunctional Purkinje cells, rather than Purkinje cell loss, contribute to the dystonia. These results provide evidence that distorted cerebellar function may cause dystonia and support the concept that different types of cerebellar defects can have different functional consequences. PMID:25791619

  9. Cerebellar disorders: clinical/radiologic findings and modern imaging tools.

    PubMed

    Manto, Mario; Habas, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar disorders, also called cerebellar ataxias, comprise a large group of sporadic and genetic diseases. Their core clinical features include impaired control of coordination and gait, as well as cognitive/behavioral deficits usually not detectable by a standard neurologic examination and therefore often overlooked. Two forms of cognitive/behavioral syndromes are now well identified: (1) the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, which combines an impairment of executive functions, including planning and working memory, deficits in visuospatial skills, linguistic deficiencies such as agrammatism, and inappropriate behavior; and (2) the posterior fossa syndrome, a very acute form of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome occurring essentially in children. Sporadic ataxias include stroke, toxic causes, immune ataxias, infectious/parainfectious ataxias, traumatic causes, neoplasias and paraneoplastic syndromes, endocrine disorders affecting the cerebellum, and the so-called "degenerative ataxias" (multiple system atrophy, and sporadic adult-onset ataxias). Genetic ataxias include mainly four groups of disorders: autosomal-recessive cerebellar ataxias, autosomal-dominant ataxias (spinocerebellar ataxias and episodic ataxias), mitochondrial disorders, and X-linked ataxias. In addition to biochemical studies and genetic tests, brain imaging techniques are a cornerstone for the diagnosis, clinicoanatomic correlations, and follow-up of cerebellar ataxias. Modern radiologic tools to assess cerebellar ataxias include: functional imaging studies, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, volumetric studies, and tractography. These complementary methods provide a multimodal appreciation of the whole long-range cerebellar network functioning, and allow the extraction of potential biomarkers for prognosis and rating level of recovery after treatment. PMID:27432679

  10. Humor and laughter in patients with cerebellar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Frank, B; Propson, B; Göricke, S; Jacobi, H; Wild, B; Timmann, D

    2012-06-01

    Humor is a complex behavior which includes cognitive, affective and motor responses. Based on observations of affective changes in patients with cerebellar lesions, the cerebellum may support cerebral and brainstem areas involved in understanding and appreciation of humorous stimuli and expression of laughter. The aim of the present study was to examine if humor appreciation, perception of humorous stimuli, and the succeeding facial reaction differ between patients with cerebellar degeneration and healthy controls. Twenty-three adults with pure cerebellar degeneration were compared with 23 age-, gender-, and education-matched healthy control subjects. No significant difference in humor appreciation and perception of humorous stimuli could be found between groups using the 3 Witz-Dimensionen Test, a validated test asking for funniness and aversiveness of jokes and cartoons. Furthermore, while observing jokes, humorous cartoons, and video sketches, facial expressions of subjects were videotaped and afterwards analysed using the Facial Action Coding System. Using depression as a covariate, the number, and to a lesser degree, the duration of facial expressions during laughter were reduced in cerebellar patients compared to healthy controls. In sum, appreciation of humor appears to be largely preserved in patients with chronic cerebellar degeneration. Cerebellar circuits may contribute to the expression of laughter. Findings add to the literature that non-motor disorders in patients with chronic cerebellar disease are generally mild, but do not exclude that more marked disorders may show up in acute cerebellar disease and/or in more specific tests of humor appreciation.

  11. Distinct Critical Cerebellar Subregions for Components of Verbal Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Freya E.; Grube, Manon; Von Kriegstein, Katharina; Kumar, Sukhbinder; English, Philip; Kelly, Thomas P.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Griffiths, Timothy D.

    2012-01-01

    A role for the cerebellum in cognition has been proposed based on studies suggesting a profile of cognitive deficits due to cerebellar stroke. Such studies are limited in the determination of the detailed organisation of cerebellar subregions that are critical for different aspects of cognition. In this study we examined the correlation between…

  12. An integrator circuit in cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Maex, Reinoud; Steuber, Volker

    2013-09-01

    The brain builds dynamic models of the body and the outside world to predict the consequences of actions and stimuli. A well-known example is the oculomotor integrator, which anticipates the position-dependent elasticity forces acting on the eye ball by mathematically integrating over time oculomotor velocity commands. Many models of neural integration have been proposed, based on feedback excitation, lateral inhibition or intrinsic neuronal nonlinearities. We report here that a computational model of the cerebellar cortex, a structure thought to implement dynamic models, reveals a hitherto unrecognized integrator circuit. In this model, comprising Purkinje cells, molecular layer interneurons and parallel fibres, Purkinje cells were able to generate responses lasting more than 10 s, to which both neuronal and network mechanisms contributed. Activation of the somatic fast sodium current by subthreshold voltage fluctuations was able to maintain pulse-evoked graded persistent activity, whereas lateral inhibition among Purkinje cells via recurrent axon collaterals further prolonged the responses to step and sine wave stimulation. The responses of Purkinje cells decayed with a time-constant whose value depended on their baseline spike rate, with integration vanishing at low (< 1 per s) and high rates (> 30 per s). The model predicts that the apparently fast circuit of the cerebellar cortex may control the timing of slow processes without having to rely on sensory feedback. Thus, the cerebellar cortex may contain an adaptive temporal integrator, with the sensitivity of integration to the baseline spike rate offering a potential mechanism of plasticity of the response time-constant.

  13. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. PMID:25562758

  14. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting.

  15. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) Granules Have no Phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Bresan, Stephanie; Sznajder, Anna; Hauf, Waldemar; Forchhammer, Karl; Pfeiffer, Daniel; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) granules, also designated as carbonosomes, are supra-molecular complexes in prokaryotes consisting of a PHB polymer core and a surface layer of structural and functional proteins. The presence of suspected phospholipids in the surface layer is based on in vitro data of isolated PHB granules and is often shown in cartoons of the PHB granule structure in reviews on PHB metabolism. However, the in vivo presence of a phospholipid layer has never been demonstrated. We addressed this topic by the expression of fusion proteins of DsRed2EC and other fluorescent proteins with the phospholipid-binding domain (LactC2) of lactadherin in three model organisms. The fusion proteins specifically localized at the cell membrane of Ralstonia eutropha but did not co-localize with PHB granules. The same result was obtained for Pseudomonas putida, a species that accumulates another type of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules related to PHB. Notably, DsRed2EC-LactC2 expressed in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense was detected at the position of membrane-enclosed magnetosome chains and at the cytoplasmic membrane but not at PHB granules. In conclusion, the carbonosomes of representatives of α-proteobacteria, β-proteobacteria and γ-proteobacteria have no phospholipids in vivo and we postulate that the PHB/PHA granule surface layers in natural producers generally are free of phospholipids and consist of proteins only. PMID:27222167

  16. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of ‘restorable stage’. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  17. Cerebellar vermis plays a causal role in visual motion discrimination.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Renzi, Chiara; Casali, Stefano; Silvanto, Juha; Vecchi, Tomaso; Papagno, Costanza; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-09-01

    Cerebellar patients have been found to show deficits in visual motion discrimination, suggesting that the cerebellum may play a role in visual sensory processing beyond mediating motor control. Here we show that triple-pulse online transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over cerebellar vermis but not over the cerebellar hemispheres significantly impaired motion discrimination. Critically, the interference caused by vermis TMS on motion discrimination did not depend on an indirect effect of TMS over nearby visual areas, as demonstrated by a control experiment in which TMS over V1 but not over cerebellar vermis significantly impaired orientation discrimination. These findings demonstrate the causal role of the cerebellar vermis in visual motion processing in neurologically normal participants.

  18. The physiological basis of therapies for cerebellar ataxias.

    PubMed

    Mitoma, Hiroshi; Manto, Mario

    2016-09-01

    Cerebellar ataxias represent a group of heterogeneous disorders impacting on activities of daily living and quality of life. Various therapies have been proposed to improve symptoms in cerebellar ataxias. This review examines the physiological background of the various treatments currently administered worldwide. We analyze the mechanisms of action of drugs with a focus on aminopyridines and other antiataxic medications, of noninvasive cerebellar stimulation, and of motor rehabilitation. Considering the cerebellum as a controller, we propose the novel concept of 'restorable stage'. Because of its unique anatomical architecture and its diffuse connectivity in particular with the cerebral cortex, keeping in mind the anatomophysiology of the cerebellar circuitry is a necessary step to understand the rationale of therapies of cerebellar ataxias and develop novel therapeutic tools. PMID:27582895

  19. New evidence for the cerebellar involvement in personality traits

    PubMed Central

    Picerni, Eleonora; Petrosini, Laura; Piras, Fabrizio; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cutuli, Debora; Chiapponi, Chiara; Fagioli, Sabrina; Girardi, Paolo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Following the recognition of its role in sensory-motor coordination and learning, the cerebellum has been involved in cognitive, emotional, and even personality domains. This study investigated the relationships between cerebellar macro- and micro-structural variations and temperamental traits measured by Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). High resolution T1-weighted, and Diffusion Tensor Images of 100 healthy subjects aged 18–59 years were acquired by 3 Tesla Magnetic Resonance scanner. In multiple regression analyses, cerebellar Gray Matter (GM) or White Matter (WM) volumes, GM Mean Diffusivity (MD), and WM Fractional Anisotropy (FA) were used as dependent variables, TCI scores as regressors, gender, age, and education years as covariates. Novelty Seeking scores were associated positively with the cerebellar GM volumes and FA, and negatively with MD. No significant association between Harm Avoidance, Reward Dependence or Persistence scores and cerebellar structural measures was found. The present data put toward a cerebellar involvement in the management of novelty. PMID:24106465

  20. Bion 11 mission: primate experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilyin, E. A.; Korolkov, V. I.; Skidmore, M. G.; Viso, M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Grindeland, R. E.; Lapin, B. A.; Gordeev, Y. V.; Krotov, V. P.; Fanton, J. W.; Bielitzki, J. T.; Golov, V. K.; Magedov, V. S.; Hines, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    A summary is provided of the major operations required to conduct the wide range of primate experiments on the Bion 11 mission, which flew for 14 days beginning December 24, 1996. Information is given on preflight preparations, including flight candidate selection and training; attachment and implantation of bioinstrumentation; flight and ground experiment designs; onboard life support and test systems; ground and flight health monitoring; flight monkey selection and transport to the launch site; inflight procedures and data collection; postflight examinations and experiments; and assessment of results.

  1. Bion 11 mission: primate experiments.

    PubMed

    Ilyin, E A; Korolkov, V I; Skidmore, M G; Viso, M; Kozlovskaya, I B; Grindeland, R E; Lapin, B A; Gordeev, Y V; Krotov, V P; Fanton, J W; Bielitzki, J T; Golov, V K; Magedov, V S; Hines, J W

    2000-01-01

    A summary is provided of the major operations required to conduct the wide range of primate experiments on the Bion 11 mission, which flew for 14 days beginning December 24, 1996. Information is given on preflight preparations, including flight candidate selection and training; attachment and implantation of bioinstrumentation; flight and ground experiment designs; onboard life support and test systems; ground and flight health monitoring; flight monkey selection and transport to the launch site; inflight procedures and data collection; postflight examinations and experiments; and assessment of results.

  2. Impairment of granulation tissue formation after menopause.

    PubMed

    Gniadecki, R; Wyrwas, B; Kabala, A; Matecka, J

    1996-04-01

    Formation of connective tissue is an essential step in the process of wound healing. After menopause an atrophy of connective tissues in skin, bone, and reproductive organs takes place. Using a dead-space wound healing model we measured collagen synthesis and deposition, and cell replication in the granulation tissue of 18 premenopausal and 23 peri- and postmenopausal women not receiving any hormonal therapy. In the postmenopausal group collagen synthesis and deposition and cell number in the granulation tissue were diminished. These results document the impairment of the granulation tissue formation after menopause.

  3. Noninvasive Test for Tuberculosis Detection among Primates

    PubMed Central

    Mugisha, Lawrence; Shoyama, Fernanda Miyagaki; O’Malley, Melanie J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Asiimwe, Benon; Travis, Dominic A.; Singer, Randall S.; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Traditional testing methods have limited epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis among free-living primates. PCR amplification of insertion element IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from fecal samples was evaluated as a noninvasive screening test for tuberculosis in primates. Active tuberculosis was detected among inoculated macaques and naturally exposed chimpanzees, demonstrating the utility of this test. PMID:25695329

  4. Distribution of binder in granules produced by means of twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Fonteyne, Margot; Fussell, Andrew Luke; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; Strachan, Clare; Rades, Thomas; De Beer, Thomas

    2014-02-28

    According to the quality by design principle processes may not remain black-boxes and full process understanding is required. The granule size distribution of granules produced via twin screw granulation is often found to be bimodal. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of binder distribution within granules produced via twin screw granulation in order to investigate if an inhomogeneous spread of binder is causing this bimodal size distribution. Theophylline-lactose-polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 (PVP) (30-67.5-2.5%, w/w) was used as a model formulation. The intra-granular distribution of PVP was evaluated by means of hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. For the evaluated formulation, no PVP rich zones were detected when applying a lateral spatial resolution of 0.5 μm, indicating that PVP is homogenously distributed within the granules. PMID:24361911

  5. Cerebellar ependymal cyst in a dog.

    PubMed

    Wyss-Fluehmann, G; Konar, M; Jaggy, A; Vandevelde, M; Oevermann, A

    2008-11-01

    An 11-week-old, male, Staffordshire Bull Terrier had a history of generalized ataxia and falling since birth. The neurologic findings suggested a localization in the cerebellum. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was performed. In all sequences the area of the cerebellum was almost replaced by fluid isointense to cerebrospinal fluid. A complete necropsy was performed after euthanasia. Histologically, the lesion was characterized by extensive loss of cerebellar tissue in both hemispheres and vermis. Toward the surface of the cerebellar defect, the cavity was confined by ruptured and folded membranes consisting of a layer of glial fibrillary acidic (GFAP)-positive glial cells covered multifocally by epithelial cells. Some of these cells bore apical cilia and were cytokeratin and GFAP negative, supporting their ependymal origin. The histopathologic features of our case are consistent with the diagnosis of an ependymal cyst. Its glial and ependymal nature as demonstrated by histopathologic and immunohistochemical examination differs from arachnoid cysts, which have also been reported in dogs. The origin of these cysts remains controversial, but it has been suggested that they develop during embryogenesis subsequent to sequestration of developing neuroectoderm. We speculate that the cyst could have been the result of a pre- or perinatal, possibly traumatic, insult because hemorrhage, and tissue destruction had occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ependymal cyst in the veterinary literature.

  6. [Surgical decompression for massive cerebellar infarction].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, K; Koshu, K; Nagamine, Y; Fujiwara, S; Mizoi, K; Yoshimoto, T

    1995-01-01

    The authors report 10 patients with progressive neurological deterioration due to massive cerebellar infarctions. Computerized tomography scans confirmed obstructive hydrocephalus and brain stem compression. All 10 patients (seven men, three women; mean age, 59 years) were treated by external ventricular drainage and decompressive suboccipital craniectomy. After discharge from the hospital, they were followed up (23-101 months) and their functional independence was evaluated by the Barthel Index. The condition of three patients with brain-stem infarction had deteriorated despite decompressive surgery. Two of these died during the acute stage and one because severely disabled. The remaining seven patients showed neurological improvement during the postoperative period. Four patients with preoperative Japan Coma Scale of 100 returned to their previous jobs within the follow-up period and three patients with preoperative Japan Coma Scale of 200 required some assistance in daily activities. It is suggested that decompressive surgery may be beneficial for massive cerebellar infarction. The postoperative prognosis depends mainly on the presence or absence of coexisting brain-stem infarction. It is possible that, without brain-stem infarction, patients who remained in a "dependent" state may have recovered better if they had been operated on earlier.

  7. Insights into cerebellar development and medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bihannic, Laure; Ayrault, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar development is an extensive process that begins during early embryonic stages and persists more than one year after birth in human. Therefore, the cerebellum is susceptible to acquire various developmental abnormalities leading to numerous diseases such as medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric malignant brain tumor. One third of the patients with medulloblastoma are incurable and survivors have a poor quality of life due to the aggressiveness of the broad-spectrum treatments. Within the past few years, it has been highlighted that medulloblastoma is a heterogeneous disease that is divided in four molecular subgroups. This recent advance in the field, combined with the development of associated preclinical models for each subgroup, should enable, in the future, the discovery and use of targeted therapy in clinical treatments for each subtype of medulloblastoma. In this review, we first aim to show how deregulation of cerebellar development can lead to medulloblastoma formation and then to present the advances in the molecular subgrouping of medulloblastoma and the associated preclinical models.

  8. Survival of interneurons and parallel fiber synapses in a cerebellar cortex deprived of Purkinje cells: studies in the double mutant mouse Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-).

    PubMed

    Zanjani, S Hadi; Selimi, Fekrije; Vogel, Michael W; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Boeuf, Julien; Mariani, Jean; Bailly, Yannick J

    2006-08-01

    The Lurcher mutation in the Grid2 gene causes the cell autonomous death of virtually all cerebellar Purkinje cells and the target-related death of 90% of the granule cells and 60-75% of the olivary neurons. Inactivation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic gene of the Bcl-2 family, in heterozygous Lurcher mutants (Grid2Lc/+) rescues approximately 60% of the granule cells, but does not rescue Purkinje or olivary neurons. Given the larger size of the cerebellar molecular layer in Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) double mutants compared to Grid2Lc/+ mutants, we analyzed the survival of the stellate and basket interneurons as well as the synaptic connectivity of parallel fibers originating from the surviving granule cells in the absence of their Purkinje cell targets in the Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) cerebellum. Quantification showed a significantly higher density of interneurons ( approximately 60%) in the molecular layer of the Grid2Lc/+;Bax(-/-) mice compared to Grid2Lc/+, suggesting that interneurons are subject to a BAX-dependent target-related death in the Lurcher mutants. Furthermore, electron microscopy showed the normal ultrastructural aspect of a number of parallel fibers in the molecular layer of the Grid2Lc/+; Bax(-/-) double mutant mice and preserved their numerous synaptic contacts on interneurons, suggesting that interneurons could play a trophic role for axon terminals of surviving granule cells. Finally, parallel fibers varicosities in the double mutant established "pseudo-synapses" on glia as well as displayed autophagic profiles, suggesting that the connections established by the parallel fibers in the absence of their Purkinje cell targets were subject to a high turnover involving autophagy.

  9. Gastroretentive extended-release floating granules prepared using a novel fluidized hot melt granulation (FHMG) technique.

    PubMed

    Zhai, H; Jones, D S; McCoy, C P; Madi, A M; Tian, Y; Andrews, G P

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of using a novel granulation technique, namely, fluidized hot melt granulation (FHMG), to prepare gastroretentive extended-release floating granules. In this study we have utilized FHMG, a solvent free process in which granulation is achieved with the aid of low melting point materials, using Compritol 888 ATO and Gelucire 50/13 as meltable binders, in place of conventional liquid binders. The physicochemical properties, morphology, floating properties, and drug release of the manufactured granules were investigated. Granules prepared by this method were spherical in shape and showed good flowability. The floating granules exhibited sustained release exceeding 10 h. Granule buoyancy (floating time and strength) and drug release properties were significantly influenced by formulation variables such as excipient type and concentration, and the physical characteristics (particle size, hydrophilicity) of the excipients. Drug release rate was increased by increasing the concentration of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) and Gelucire 50/13, or by decreasing the particle size of HPC. Floating strength was improved through the incorporation of sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Furthermore, floating strength was influenced by the concentration of HPC within the formulation. Granules prepared in this way show good physical characteristics, floating ability, and drug release properties when placed in simulated gastric fluid. Moreover, the drug release and floating properties can be controlled by modification of the ratio or physical characteristics of the excipients used in the formulation. PMID:25105340

  10. The variability in nutrient composition of Anaerobic Digestate granules produced from high shear granulation.

    PubMed

    Mangwandi, Chirangano; JiangTao, Liu; Albadarin, Ahmad B; Allen, Stephen J; Walker, Gavin M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the production of organic fertilizer using Anaerobic Digestate (as a nutrient source) and limestone powder as the raw materials. A two-level factorial experimental design was used to determine the influence of process variables on the nutrient homogeneity within the granules. Increasing the liquid-to-solid ratio during granulation resulted in increased granule nutrient homogeneity. Increasing the processing time and the impeller speed were also found to increase the nutrient homogeneity. In terms of nutrients release into deionized water, the granules effectively released both potassium and phosphate into solution.

  11. Helioseismic evidence of two solar granulation timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez Ramió, H.; Régulo, C.; Roca Cortés, T.

    2005-11-01

    The signature of two different scales of solar granulation in the power spectrum of disk integrated irradiance time series is presented. The fitted timescales for granulation (τGR1≈ 237~s and τGR2≈ 62~s) are in good agreement with the characteristic lifetimes derived from recent image time series of the Sun's surface (Del Moro 2004); and probably linked to magnetic chromospheric structures such as bright points (Harvey et al. 1993).

  12. Prenatal Cerebellar Disruptions: Neuroimaging Spectrum of Findings in Correlation with Likely Mechanisms and Etiologies of Injury.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that the cerebellum is susceptible to prenatal infections and hemorrhages and that congenital morphologic anomalies of the cerebellum may be caused by disruptive (acquired) causes. Starting from the neuroimaging pattern, this report describes a spectrum of prenatal cerebellar disruptions including cerebellar agenesis, unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia, cerebellar cleft, global cerebellar hypoplasia, and vanishing cerebellum in Chiari type II malformation. The neuroimaging findings, possible causative disruptive events, and clinical features of each disruption are discussed. Recognition of cerebellar disruptions and their differentiation from cerebellar malformations is important in terms of diagnosis, prognosis, and genetic counselling. PMID:27423799

  13. An Internal Model Architecture for Novelty Detection: Implications for Cerebellar and Collicular Roles in Sensory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sean R.; Porrill, John; Pearson, Martin J.; Pipe, Anthony G.; Prescott, Tony J.; Dean, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum is thought to implement internal models for sensory prediction, but details of the underlying circuitry are currently obscure. We therefore investigated a specific example of internal-model based sensory prediction, namely detection of whisker contacts during whisking. Inputs from the vibrissae in rats can be affected by signals generated by whisker movement, a phenomenon also observable in whisking robots. Robot novelty-detection can be improved by adaptive noise-cancellation, in which an adaptive filter learns a forward model of the whisker plant that allows the sensory effects of whisking to be predicted and thus subtracted from the noisy sensory input. However, the forward model only uses information from an efference copy of the whisking commands. Here we show that the addition of sensory information from the whiskers allows the adaptive filter to learn a more complex internal model that performs more robustly than the forward model, particularly when the whisking-induced interference has a periodic structure. We then propose a neural equivalent of the circuitry required for adaptive novelty-detection in the robot, in which the role of the adaptive filter is carried out by the cerebellum, with the comparison of its output (an estimate of the self-induced interference) and the original vibrissal signal occurring in the superior colliculus, a structure noted for its central role in novelty detection. This proposal makes a specific prediction concerning the whisker-related functions of a region in cerebellar cortical zone A2 that in rats receives climbing fibre input from the superior colliculus (via the inferior olive). This region has not been observed in non-whisking animals such as cats and primates, and its functional role in vibrissal processing has hitherto remained mysterious. Further investigation of this system may throw light on how cerebellar-based internal models could be used in broader sensory, motor and cognitive contexts. PMID

  14. Properties of cerebellar fastigial neurons during translation, rotation, and eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaikh, Aasef G.; Ghasia, Fatema F.; Dickman, J. David; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2005-01-01

    The most medial of the deep cerebellar nuclei, the fastigial nucleus (FN), receives sensory vestibular information and direct inhibition from the cerebellar vermis. We investigated the signal processing in the primate FN by recording single-unit activities during translational motion, rotational motion, and eye movements. Firing rate modulation during horizontal plane translation in the absence of eye movements was observed in all non-eye-movement-sensitive cells and 26% of the pursuit eye-movement-sensitive neurons in the caudal FN. Many non-eye-movement-sensitive cells recorded in the rostral FN of three fascicularis monkeys exhibited convergence of signals from both the otolith organs and the semicircular canals. At low frequencies of translation, the majority of these rostral FN cells changed their firing rates in phase with head velocity rather than linear acceleration. As frequency increased, FN vestibular neurons exhibited a wide range of response dynamics with most cells being characterized by increasing phase leads as a function of frequency. Unlike cells in the vestibular nuclei, none of the rostral FN cells responded to rotational motion alone, without simultaneously exhibiting sensitivity to translational motion. Modulation during earth-horizontal axis rotation was observed in more than half (77%) of the neurons, although with smaller gains than during translation. In contrast, only 47% of the cells changed their firing rates during earth-vertical axis rotations in the absence of a dynamic linear acceleration stimulus. These response properties suggest that the rostral FN represents a main processing center of otolith-driven information for inertial motion detection and spatial orientation.

  15. Abnormal cerebellar morphometry in abstinent adolescent marijuana users

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Krista Lisdahl; Nagel, Bonnie J.; Tapert, Susan F.

    2010-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging data from adults have, in general, found frontocerebellar dysfunction associated with acute and chronic marijuana (MJ) use (Loeber & Yurgelun-Todd, 1999). One structural neuroimaging study found reduced cerebellar vermis volume in young adult MJ users with a history of heavy polysubstance use (Aasly et al., 1993). The goal of this study was to characterize cerebellar volume in adolescent chronic MJ users following one month of monitored abstinence. Method Participants were MJ users (n=16) and controls (n=16) aged 16-18 years. Extensive exclusionary criteria included history of psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Drug use history, neuropsychological data, and structural brain scans were collected after 28 days of monitored abstinence. Trained research staff defined cerebellar volumes (including three cerebellar vermis lobes and both cerebellar hemispheres) on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images. Results Adolescent MJ users demonstrated significantly larger inferior posterior (lobules VIII-X) vermis volume (p<.009) than controls, above and beyond effects of lifetime alcohol and other drug use, gender, and intracranial volume. Larger vermis volumes were associated with poorer executive functioning (p’s<.05). Conclusions Following one month of abstinence, adolescent MJ users had significantly larger posterior cerebellar vermis volumes than non-using controls. These greater volumes are suggested to be pathological based on linkage to poorer executive functioning. Longitudinal studies are needed to examine typical cerebellar development during adolescence and the influence of marijuana use. PMID:20413277

  16. Neural correlates of impaired emotional face recognition in cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Adamaszek, Michael; Kirkby, Kenneth C; D'Agata, Fedrico; Olbrich, Sebastian; Langner, Sönke; Steele, Christopher; Sehm, Bernhard; Busse, Stefan; Kessler, Christof; Hamm, Alfons

    2015-07-10

    Clinical and neuroimaging data indicate a cerebellar contribution to emotional processing, which may account for affective-behavioral disturbances in patients with cerebellar lesions. We studied the neurophysiology of cerebellar involvement in recognition of emotional facial expression. Participants comprised eight patients with discrete ischemic cerebellar lesions and eight control patients without any cerebrovascular stroke. Event-related potentials (ERP) were used to measure responses to faces from the Karolinska Directed Emotional Faces Database (KDEF), interspersed in a stream of images with salient contents. Images of faces augmented N170 in both groups, but increased late positive potential (LPP) only in control patients without brain lesions. Dipole analysis revealed altered activation patterns for negative emotions in patients with cerebellar lesions, including activation of the left inferior prefrontal area to images of faces showing fear, contralateral to controls. Correlation analysis indicated that lesions of cerebellar area Crus I contribute to ERP deviations. Overall, our results implicate the cerebellum in integrating emotional information at different higher order stages, suggesting distinct cerebellar contributions to the proposed large-scale cerebral network of emotional face recognition. PMID:25912431

  17. Developmental dyslexia and widespread activation across the cerebellar hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Baillieux, Hanne; Vandervliet, Everhard J M; Manto, Mario; Parizel, Paul M; De Deyn, Peter P; Mariën, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Developmental dyslexia is the most common learning disability in school-aged children with an estimated incidence of five to ten percent. The cause and pathophysiological substrate of this developmental disorder is unclear. Recently, a possible involvement of the cerebellum in the pathogenesis of dyslexia has been postulated. In this study, 15 dyslexic children and 7 age-matched control subjects were investigated by means of functional neuroimaging (fMRI) using a noun-verb association paradigm. Comparison of activation patterns between dyslexic and control subjects revealed distinct and significant differences in cerebral and cerebellar activation. Control subjects showed bilaterally well-defined and focal activation patterns in the frontal and parietal lobes and the posterior regions of the cerebellar hemispheres. The dyslexic children, however, presented widespread and diffuse activations on the cerebral and cerebellar level. Cerebral activations were found in frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital regions. Activations in the cerebellum were found predominantly in the cerebellar cortex, including Crus I, Crus II, hemispheric lobule VI, VII and vermal lobules I, II, III, IV and VII. This preliminary study is the first to reveal a significant difference in cerebellar functioning between dyslexic children and controls during a semantic association task. As a result, we propose a new hypothesis regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms of developmental dyslexia. Given the sites of activation in the cerebellum in the dyslexic group, a defect of the intra-cerebellar distribution of activity is suspected, suggesting a disorder of the processing or transfer of information within the cerebellar cortex. PMID:18986695

  18. Contribution of Cerebellar Sensorimotor Adaptation to Hippocampal Spatial Memory

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Jean-Baptiste; Sheynikhovich, Denis; Duvelle, Éléonore; Arleo, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Complementing its primary role in motor control, cerebellar learning has also a bottom-up influence on cognitive functions, where high-level representations build up from elementary sensorimotor memories. In this paper we examine the cerebellar contribution to both procedural and declarative components of spatial cognition. To do so, we model a functional interplay between the cerebellum and the hippocampal formation during goal-oriented navigation. We reinterpret and complete existing genetic behavioural observations by means of quantitative accounts that cross-link synaptic plasticity mechanisms, single cell and population coding properties, and behavioural responses. In contrast to earlier hypotheses positing only a purely procedural impact of cerebellar adaptation deficits, our results suggest a cerebellar involvement in high-level aspects of behaviour. In particular, we propose that cerebellar learning mechanisms may influence hippocampal place fields, by contributing to the path integration process. Our simulations predict differences in place-cell discharge properties between normal mice and L7-PKCI mutant mice lacking long-term depression at cerebellar parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. On the behavioural level, these results suggest that, by influencing the accuracy of hippocampal spatial codes, cerebellar deficits may impact the exploration-exploitation balance during spatial navigation. PMID:22485133

  19. Cerebellar Processing of Sensory Inputs Primes Motor Cortex Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, B.; Hubsch, C.; Pradeep, S.; Roze, E.; Vidailhet, M.; Meunier, S.; Kishore, A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasticity of the human primary motor cortex (M1) has a critical role in motor control and learning. The cerebellum facilitates these functions using sensory feedback. We investigated whether cerebellar processing of sensory afferent information influences the plasticity of the primary motor cortex (M1). Theta-burst stimulation protocols (TBS), both excitatory and inhibitory, were used to modulate the excitability of the posterior cerebellar cortex and to condition an ongoing M1 plasticity. M1 plasticity was subsequently induced in 2 different ways: by paired associative stimulation (PAS) involving sensory processing and TBS that exclusively involves intracortical circuits of M1. Cerebellar excitation attenuated the PAS-induced M1 plasticity, whereas cerebellar inhibition enhanced and prolonged it. Furthermore, cerebellar inhibition abolished the topography-specific response of PAS-induced M1 plasticity, with the effects spreading to adjacent motor maps. Conversely, cerebellar excitation had no effect on the TBS-induced M1 plasticity. This demonstrates the key role of the cerebellum in priming M1 plasticity, and we propose that it is likely to occur at the thalamic or olivo-dentate nuclear level by influencing the sensory processing. We suggest that such a cerebellar priming of M1 plasticity could shape the impending motor command by favoring or inhibiting the recruitment of several muscle representations. PMID:22351647

  20. Neural correlates of impaired emotional face recognition in cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Adamaszek, Michael; Kirkby, Kenneth C; D'Agata, Fedrico; Olbrich, Sebastian; Langner, Sönke; Steele, Christopher; Sehm, Bernhard; Busse, Stefan; Kessler, Christof; Hamm, Alfons

    2015-07-10

    Clinical and neuroimaging data indicate a cerebellar contribution to emotional processing, which may account for affective-behavioral disturbances in patients with cerebellar lesions. We studied the neurophysiology of cerebellar involvement in recognition of emotional facial expression. Participants comprised eight patients with discrete ischemic cerebellar lesions and eight control patients without any cerebrovascular stroke. Event-related potentials (ERP) were used to measure responses to faces from the Karolinska Directed Emotional Faces Database (KDEF), interspersed in a stream of images with salient contents. Images of faces augmented N170 in both groups, but increased late positive potential (LPP) only in control patients without brain lesions. Dipole analysis revealed altered activation patterns for negative emotions in patients with cerebellar lesions, including activation of the left inferior prefrontal area to images of faces showing fear, contralateral to controls. Correlation analysis indicated that lesions of cerebellar area Crus I contribute to ERP deviations. Overall, our results implicate the cerebellum in integrating emotional information at different higher order stages, suggesting distinct cerebellar contributions to the proposed large-scale cerebral network of emotional face recognition.

  1. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique. PMID:25402966

  2. [Modeling formation of aerobic granule and influence of hydrodynamic shear forces on granule diameter].

    PubMed

    Dong, Feng; Zhang, Han-Min; Yang, Feng-Lin

    2012-01-01

    A one-dimension aerobic granule mathematical model was established, basing on mathematical biofilm model and activated sludge model. The model was used to simulate simple aerobic granule process such as nutrients removal, granule diameter evolution, cycle performance as well as depth profiles of DO and biomass. The effluent NH4(+) -N concentration decreased as the modeling processed. The simulation effluent NO3(-)-N concentration decreased to 3 mg x L(-1) as the granules grew. While the granule diameter increased from 1.1 mm on day 30 to 2.5 mm on day 100, the TN removal efficiency increased from less than 10% to 91%. The denitrification capacity was believed to enhance because the anoxic zone would be enlarged with the increasing granule diameter. The simultaneous nitrification and denitrification occurred inside the big aerobic granules. The oxygen permeating depth increased with the consumption of substrate. It was about 100-200 microm at the beginning of the aeration phase, and it turned to near 800 microm at the end of reaction. The autotrophs (AOB and NOB) were mostly located at the out layer where the DO concentration was high. The heterotrophic bacteria were distributed through the whole granule. As hydrodynamic shear coefficient k(de) increased from 0.25 (m x d)(-1) to 5 (m x d)(-1), the granule diameter under steady state decreased form 3.5 mm to 1.8 mm. The granule size under the dynamic steady-state decreased with the increasing hydrodynamic shear force. The granule size could be controlled by adjusting aeration intensity. PMID:22452208

  3. Distal myopathy with rimmed vacuoles and cerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed

    Merkli, Hajnalka; Pál, Endre; Gáti, István; Czopf, József

    2006-01-01

    Distal myopathies constitute a clinically and pathologically heterogeneous group of genetically determined neuromuscular disorders, where the distal muscles of the upper or lower limbs are affected. The disease of a 41-year-old male patient started with gait disturbances, when he was 25. The progression was slow, but after 16 years he became seriously disabled. Neurological examination showed moderate to severe weakness in distal muscles of all extremities, marked cerebellar sign and steppage gait. Muscle biopsy resulted in myopathic changes with rimmed vacuoles. Brain MRI scan showed cerebellar atrophy. This case demonstrates a rare association of distal myopathy and cerebellar atrophy.

  4. Cerebellar morphological alterations in rats induced by prenatal ozone exposure.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Manzano, P; Paz, C

    1999-11-26

    The present study analyzes the morphological aspects of the cerebellum of rats with prenatal exposure to ozone. A double blind histological and planimetric analysis was performed studying sagittal sections of the anterior cerebellar lobe at postnatal days 0, 12 and 60. Ozone exposed rats showed cerebellar necrotic signs at age 0, diminished area of the molecular layer with Purkinje cells with pale nucleoli and perinucleolar bodies at age 12, and Purkinje cells showing nuclei with unusual clumps of chromatin in the periphery at age 60. We conclude that exposure to high concentrations of ozone during gestation induces permanent cerebellar damage in rats.

  5. [A case of cerebral gigantism with cerebellar atrophy].

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, K; Ikeda, M; Tsukagoshi, H

    1990-05-01

    A 37-year-old housewife, who had physical characteristics of cerebral gigantism, such as the tall stature, acromegaly, macrocephalia, high arched palate and antimongoloid slant, developed cerebellar ataxia and dysarthria. Her mother, uncle and grandmother were also reported to have slowly progressive gait disturbance. Her mother was also tall. Endocrinological studies failed to show any definite abnormality. CT and MRI revealed remarkable cerebellar atrophy. Though cerebral gigantism is often associated with clumsiness and incoordination, the etiology of the ataxia is poorly understood. This case indicates that the ataxia in cerebral gigantism may be, at least partly, caused by cerebellar atrophy. PMID:2401112

  6. Consensus Paper: Revisiting the Symptoms and Signs of Cerebellar Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bodranghien, Florian; Bastian, Amy; Casali, Carlo; Hallett, Mark; Louis, Elan D; Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter; Nowak, Dennis A; Schmahmann, Jeremy D; Serrao, Mariano; Steiner, Katharina Marie; Strupp, Michael; Tilikete, Caroline; Timmann, Dagmar; van Dun, Kim

    2016-06-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensorimotor operations, cognitive tasks and affective processes. Here, we revisit the concept of the cerebellar syndrome in the light of recent advances in our understanding of cerebellar operations. The key symptoms and signs of cerebellar dysfunction, often grouped under the generic term of ataxia, are discussed. Vertigo, dizziness, and imbalance are associated with lesions of the vestibulo-cerebellar, vestibulo-spinal, or cerebellar ocular motor systems. The cerebellum plays a major role in the online to long-term control of eye movements (control of calibration, reduction of eye instability, maintenance of ocular alignment). Ocular instability, nystagmus, saccadic intrusions, impaired smooth pursuit, impaired vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), and ocular misalignment are at the core of oculomotor cerebellar deficits. As a motor speech disorder, ataxic dysarthria is highly suggestive of cerebellar pathology. Regarding motor control of limbs, hypotonia, a- or dysdiadochokinesia, dysmetria, grasping deficits and various tremor phenomenologies are observed in cerebellar disorders to varying degrees. There is clear evidence that the cerebellum participates in force perception and proprioceptive sense during active movements. Gait is staggering with a wide base, and tandem gait is very often impaired in cerebellar disorders. In terms of cognitive and affective operations, impairments are found in executive functions, visual-spatial processing, linguistic function, and affective regulation (Schmahmann's syndrome). Nonmotor linguistic deficits including disruption of articulatory and graphomotor planning, language dynamics, verbal fluency, phonological, and semantic word retrieval, expressive and receptive syntax, and various aspects of reading and writing may be impaired after cerebellar damage. The cerebellum is organized into (a) a primary sensorimotor region in the anterior lobe and adjacent part of lobule VI, (b) a second sensorimotor

  7. Two forms of cerebellar glial cells interact differently with neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Specific interactions between neurons and glia dissociated from early postnatal mouse cerebellar tissue were studied in vitro by indirect immunocytochemical staining with antisera raised against purified glial filament protein, galactocerebroside, and the NILE glycoprotein. Two forms of cells were stained with antisera raised against purified glial filament protein. The first, characterized by a cell body 9 microns diam and processes 130-150 microns long, usually had two to three neurons associated with them and resembled Bergmann glia. The second had a slightly larger cell body with markedly shorter arms among which were nestled several dozen neuronal cells, and resembled astrocytes of the granular layer. Staining with monoclonal antisera raised against purified galactocerebroside revealed the presence of immature oligodendroglia in the cultures. These glial cells constituted approximately 2% of the total cell population in the cultures and, in contrast to astroglia, did not form specific contacts with neurons. Staining with two neuronal markers, antisera raised against purified NILE glycoprotein and tetanus toxin, revealed that most cells associated with presumed astroglia were small neurons (5-8 microns). After 1-2 d in culture, some stained neurons had very fine, short processes. Nearly all of the processes greater than 10-20 micron long were glial in origin. Electron microscopy also demonstrated the presence of two forms of astroglia in the cultures, each with a different organizing influence on cerebellar neurons. Most neurons associated with astroglia were granule neurons, although a few larger neurons sometimes associated with them. Time-lapse video microscopy revealed extensive cell migration (approximately 10 microns/h) along the arms of Bergmann-like astroglia. In contrast, cells did not migrate along the arms of astrocyte-like astroglia, but remained stationary at or near branch points. Growth cone activity, pulsating movements of cell perikarya, and

  8. A New Mouse Allele of Glutamate Receptor Delta 2 with Cerebellar Atrophy and Progressive Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Suzuki, Kinuko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Koura, Minako; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kajimura, Naoko; Monobe, Yoko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayasaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar degenerations (SCDs) are a large class of sporadic or hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motion defects and degenerative changes in the cerebellum and other parts of the CNS. Here we report the identification and establishment from a C57BL/6J mouse colony of a novel mouse line developing spontaneous progressive ataxia, which we refer to as ts3. Frequency of the phenotypic expression was consistent with an autosomal recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance, suggesting that a single gene mutation is responsible for the ataxic phenotype of this line. The onset of ataxia was observed at about three weeks of age, which slowly progressed until the hind limbs became entirely paralyzed in many cases. Micro-MRI study revealed significant cerebellar atrophy in all the ataxic mice, although individual variations were observed. Detailed histological analyses demonstrated significant atrophy of the anterior folia with reduced granule cells (GC) and abnormal morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). Study by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) further indicated aberrant morphology of PC dendrites and their spines, suggesting both morphological and functional abnormalities of the PC in the mutants. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed defects in parallel fiber (PF)–PC synapse formation and abnormal distal extension of climbing fibers (CF). Based on the phenotypic similarities of the ts3 mutant with other known ataxic mutants, we performed immunohistological analyses and found that expression levels of two genes and their products, glutamate receptor delta2 (grid2) and its ligand, cerebellin1 (Cbln1), are significantly reduced or undetectable. Finally, we sequenced the candidate genes and detected a large deletion in the coding region of the grid2 gene. Our present study suggests that ts3 is a new allele of the grid2 gene, which causes similar but different phenotypes as compared to other grid2 mutants. PMID

  9. A new mouse allele of glutamate receptor delta 2 with cerebellar atrophy and progressive ataxia.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Suzuki, Kinuko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Koura, Minako; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kajimura, Naoko; Monobe, Yoko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayasaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar degenerations (SCDs) are a large class of sporadic or hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motion defects and degenerative changes in the cerebellum and other parts of the CNS. Here we report the identification and establishment from a C57BL/6J mouse colony of a novel mouse line developing spontaneous progressive ataxia, which we refer to as ts3. Frequency of the phenotypic expression was consistent with an autosomal recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance, suggesting that a single gene mutation is responsible for the ataxic phenotype of this line. The onset of ataxia was observed at about three weeks of age, which slowly progressed until the hind limbs became entirely paralyzed in many cases. Micro-MRI study revealed significant cerebellar atrophy in all the ataxic mice, although individual variations were observed. Detailed histological analyses demonstrated significant atrophy of the anterior folia with reduced granule cells (GC) and abnormal morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). Study by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) further indicated aberrant morphology of PC dendrites and their spines, suggesting both morphological and functional abnormalities of the PC in the mutants. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed defects in parallel fiber (PF)-PC synapse formation and abnormal distal extension of climbing fibers (CF). Based on the phenotypic similarities of the ts3 mutant with other known ataxic mutants, we performed immunohistological analyses and found that expression levels of two genes and their products, glutamate receptor delta2 (grid2) and its ligand, cerebellin1 (Cbln1), are significantly reduced or undetectable. Finally, we sequenced the candidate genes and detected a large deletion in the coding region of the grid2 gene. Our present study suggests that ts3 is a new allele of the grid2 gene, which causes similar but different phenotypes as compared to other grid2 mutants.

  10. Oligocene primates from China reveal divergence between African and Asian primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xijun; Li, Qiang; Li, Lüzhou; Beard, K Christopher

    2016-05-01

    Profound environmental and faunal changes are associated with climatic deterioration during the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT) roughly 34 million years ago. Reconstructing how Asian primates responded to the EOT has been hindered by a sparse record of Oligocene primates on that continent. Here, we report the discovery of a diverse primate fauna from the early Oligocene of southern China. In marked contrast to Afro-Arabian Oligocene primate faunas, this Asian fauna is dominated by strepsirhines. There appears to be a strong break between Paleogene and Neogene Asian anthropoid assemblages. Asian and Afro-Arabian primate faunas responded differently to EOT climatic deterioration, indicating that the EOT functioned as a critical evolutionary filter constraining the subsequent course of primate evolution across the Old World. PMID:27151861

  11. The Automated Primate Research Laboratory (APRL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a self-contained automated primate research laboratory to study the effects of weightlessness on subhuman primates. Physiological parameters such as hemodynamics, respiration, blood constituents, waste, and diet and nutrition are analyzed for abnormalities in the simulated space environment. The Southeast Asian pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemistrina) was selected for the experiments owing to its relative intelligence and learning capacity. The objective of the program is to demonstrate the feasibility of a man-tended primate space flight experiment.

  12. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sun; Cho, Jin Whan

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes. PMID:26090078

  13. Septo-temporal distribution and lineage progression of hippocampal neurogenesis in a primate (Callithrix jacchus) in comparison to mice

    PubMed Central

    Amrein, Irmgard; Nosswitz, Michael; Slomianka, Lutz; van Dijk, R. Maarten; Engler, Stefanie; Klaus, Fabienne; Raineteau, Olivier; Azim, Kasum

    2015-01-01

    Adult born neurons in the hippocampus show species-specific differences in their numbers, the pace of their maturation and their spatial distribution. Here, we present quantitative data on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in a New World primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) that demonstrate parts of the lineage progression and age-related changes. Proliferation was largely (∼70%) restricted to stem cells or early progenitor cells, whilst the remainder of the cycling pool could be assigned almost exclusively to Tbr2+ intermediate precursor cells in both neonate and adult animals (20–122 months). Proliferating DCX+ neuroblasts were virtually absent in adults, although rare MCM2+/DCX+ co-expression revealed a small, persisting proliferative potential. Co-expression of DCX with calretinin was very limited in marmosets, suggesting that these markers label distinct maturational stages. In adult marmosets, numbers of MCM2+, Ki67+, and significantly Tbr2+, DCX+, and CR+ cells declined with age. The distributions of granule cells, proliferating cells and DCX+ young neurons along the hippocampal longitudinal axis were equal in marmosets and mice. In both species, a gradient along the hippocampal septo-temporal axis was apparent for DCX+ and resident granule cells. Both cell numbers are higher septally than temporally, whilst proliferating cells were evenly distributed along this axis. Relative to resident granule cells, however, the ratio of proliferating cells and DCX+ neurons remained constant in the septal, middle, and temporal hippocampus. In marmosets, the extended phase of the maturation of young neurons that characterizes primate hippocampal neurogenesis was due to the extension in a large CR+/DCX- cell population. This clear dissociation between DCX+ and CR+ young neurons has not been reported for other species and may therefore represent a key primate-specific feature of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:26175670

  14. Mathematical modelling of the citric acid cycle for the analysis of glutamine isotopomers from cerebellar astrocytes incubated with [1(-13)C]glucose.

    PubMed

    Merle, M; Martin, M; Villégier, A; Canioni, P

    1996-08-01

    A mathematical model of the citric acid cycle devoted to the analysis of 13C-NMR data was developed for determining the relative flux of molecules through the anaplerotic versus oxidative pathways and the relative pyruvate carboxylase versus pyruvate dehydrogenase activities. Different variants of the model were considered depending on the reversibility of the conversion of fumarate into malate and oxaloacetate. The model also included the possibility of orientation-conserved transfer of the four-carbon citric acid cycle intermediates, leading to conversion of succinyl-CoA C1 into either malate C1 or C4. It was used to analyse NMR data from glutamine isotopomers produced by cerebellar astrocytes incubated with [1-13C]glucose. Partial cycling (39%) between oxaloacetate and fumarate was evident from the analysis. Application of the model to glutamate isotopomers from granule cells incubated with [1-13C]glucose [Martin, M.. Portais, J.C.. Labouesse. J., Canioni. P, & Merle, M. (1993) Eur. J. Biochem. 217, 617-625] indicated that total cycling of oxaloacetate into fumarate was, in this case, required to get the best fit. The results emphasized some important differences in carbon metabolism between cerebellar astrocytes and granule cells concerning the sources of carbon fuelling the citric acid cycle and the carbon fluxes on different pathways.

  15. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation in neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrucci, Roberta; Bocci, Tommaso; Cortese, Francesca; Ruggiero, Fabiana; Priori, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with neurological diseases, including dementia, epilepsy, post-stroke dysfunctions, movement disorders, and other pathological conditions. Because of this technique's ability to modify cerebellar excitability without significant side effects, cerebellar tDCS is a new, interesting, and powerful tool to induce plastic modifications in the cerebellum. In this report, we review a number of interesting studies on the application of cerebellar tDCS for various neurological conditions (ataxia, Parkinson's disease, dystonia, essential tremor) and the possible mechanism by which the stimulation acts on the cerebellum. Study findings indicate that cerebellar tDCS is a promising therapeutic tool in treating several neurological disorders; however, this method's efficacy appears to be limited, given the current data. PMID:27595007

  16. Novel Approaches to Studying the Genetic Basis of Cerebellar Development

    PubMed Central

    Sajan, Samin A.; Waimey, Kathryn E.

    2010-01-01

    The list of genes that when mutated cause disruptions in cerebellar development is rapidly increasing. The study of both spontaneous and engineered mouse mutants has been essential to this progress, as it has revealed much of our current understanding of the developmental processes required to construct the mature cerebellum. Improvements in brain imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the emergence of better classification schemes for human cerebellar malformations, have recently led to the identification of a number of genes which cause human cerebellar disorders. In this review we argue that synergistic approaches combining classical molecular techniques, genomics, and mouse models of human malformations will be essential to fuel additional discoveries of cerebellar developmental genes and mechanisms. PMID:20387026

  17. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  18. Anomalous Cerebellar Anatomy in Chinese Children with Dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Hui; Yang, Yang; Chen, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Bi, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellar deficit hypothesis for developmental dyslexia claims that cerebellar dysfunction causes the failures in the acquisition of visuomotor skills and automatic reading and writing skills. In people with dyslexia in the alphabetic languages, the abnormal activation and structure of the right or bilateral cerebellar lobes have been identified. Using a typical implicit motor learning task, however, one neuroimaging study demonstrated the left cerebellar dysfunction in Chinese children with dyslexia. In the present study, using voxel-based morphometry, we found decreased gray matter volume in the left cerebellum in Chinese children with dyslexia relative to age-matched controls. The positive correlation between reading performance and regional gray matter volume suggests that the abnormal structure in the left cerebellum is responsible for reading disability in Chinese children with dyslexia. PMID:27047403

  19. Past, Present and Future Therapeutics for Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Marmolino, D; Manto, M

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are a group of disabling neurological disorders. Patients exhibit a cerebellar syndrome and can also present with extra-cerebellar deficits, namely pigmentary retinopathy, extrapyramidal movement disorders, pyramidal signs, cortical symptoms (seizures, cognitive impairment/behavioural symptoms), and peripheral neuropathy. Recently, deficits in cognitive operations have been unraveled. Cerebellar ataxias are heterogeneous both at the phenotypic and genotypic point of view. Therapeutical trials performed during these last 4 decades have failed in most cases, in particular because drugs were not targeting a deleterious pathway, but were given to counteract putative defects in neurotransmission. The identification of the causative mutations of many hereditary ataxias, the development of relevant animal models and the recent identifications of the molecular mechanisms underlying ataxias are impacting on the development of new drugs. We provide an overview of the pharmacological treatments currently used in the clinical practice and we discuss the drugs under development. PMID:20808545

  20. Developmental delay in motor skill acquisition in Niemann-Pick C1 mice reveals abnormal cerebellar morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caporali, Paola; Bruno, Francesco; Palladino, Giampiero; Dragotto, Jessica; Petrosini, Laura; Mangia, Franco; Erickson, Robert P; Canterini, Sonia; Fiorenza, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by defective intracellular trafficking of exogenous cholesterol. Purkinje cell (PC) degeneration is the main sign of cerebellar dysfunction in both NPC1 patients and animal models. It has been recently shown that a significant decrease in Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression reduces the proliferative potential of granule neuron precursors in the developing cerebellum of Npc1 (-/-) mice. Pursuing the hypothesis that this developmental defect translates into functional impairments, we have assayed Npc1-deficient pups belonging to the milder mutant mouse strain Npc1 (nmf164) for sensorimotor development from postnatal day (PN) 3 to PN21. Npc1 (nmf164) / Npc1 (nmf164) pups displayed a 2.5-day delay in the acquisition of complex motor abilities compared to wild-type (wt) littermates, in agreement with the significant disorganization of cerebellar cortex cytoarchitecture observed between PN11 and PN15. Compared to wt, Npc1 (nmf164) homozygous mice exhibited a poorer morphological differentiation of Bergmann glia (BG), as indicated by thicker radial shafts and less elaborate reticular pattern of lateral processes. Also BG functional development was defective, as indicated by the significant reduction in GLAST and Glutamine synthetase expression. A reduced VGluT2 and GAD65 expression also indicated an overall derangement of the glutamatergic/GABAergic stimulation that PCs receive by climbing/parallel fibers and basket/stellate cells, respectively. Lastly, Npc1-deficiency also affected oligodendrocyte differentiation as indicated by the strong reduction of myelin basic protein. Two sequential 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin administrations at PN4 and PN7 counteract these defects, partially preventing functional impairment of BG and fully restoring the normal patterns of glutamatergic/GABAergic stimulation to PCs.These findings indicate that in Npc1 (nmf164) homozygous mice the derangement of synaptic

  1. Biokinetics of Plutonium in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Deepesh; Guilmette, Raymond A; Gesell, Thomas F; Harris, Jason T; Brey, Richard R

    2016-10-01

    A major source of data on metabolism, excretion and retention of plutonium comes from experimental animal studies. Although old world monkeys are one of the closest living relatives to humans, certain physiological differences do exist between these nonhuman primates and humans. The objective of this paper was to describe the metabolism of plutonium in nonhuman primates using the bioassay and retention data obtained from macaque monkeys injected with plutonium citrate. A biokinetic model for nonhuman primates was developed by adapting the basic model structure and adapting the transfer rates described for metabolism of plutonium in adult humans. Significant changes to the parameters were necessary to explain the shorter retention of plutonium in liver and skeleton of the nonhuman primates, differences in liver to bone partitioning ratio, and significantly higher excretion of plutonium in feces compared to that in humans. PMID:27575347

  2. Polyomaviruses of Nonhuman Primates: Implications for Research

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Meredith A

    2008-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of small nonenveloped DNA viruses that infect birds and mammals. At least 7 nonhuman primate polyomaviruses that occur in macaques, African green monkeys, marmosets baboons, and chimpanzees have been described, as well as 4 polyomaviruses that occur in humans. Simian virus 40 (SV40), which infects macaques, was the first nonhuman primate polyomavirus identified as a contaminant of early polio vaccines. Primate polyomaviruses cause inapparent primary infections but persist in the host and can cause severe disease in situations of immunocompromise. This review describes the primate polyomaviruses, and the diseases associated with the viruses of macaques. In macaques, the greatest current concerns are the potential confounding of study results by polyomavirus infections and the zoonotic potential of SV40. PMID:19793457

  3. Exposure to Nonhuman Primates in Rural Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, A. Tassy; Carr, Jean K.; Tamoufe, Ubald; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Torimiro, J. Ndongo; LeBreton, Matthew; McCutchan, Francine E.; Birx, Deborah L.; Burke, Donald S.

    2004-01-01

    Exposure to nonhuman primates has led to the emergence of important diseases, including Ebola hemorrhagic fever, AIDS, and adult T-cell leukemia. To determine the extent of exposure to nonhuman primates, persons were examined in 17 remote villages in Cameroon that represented three habitats (savanna, gallery forest, and lowland forest). Questionnaire data were collected to assess whether persons kept wild animal pets; hunted and butchered wild game; had experienced bites, scratches, or injuries from live animals; or had been injured during hunting or butchering. While all villages had substantial exposure to nonhuman primates, higher rates of exposure were seen in lowland forest sites. The study demonstrates that exposure is not limited to small groups of hunters. A high percentage of rural villagers report exposure to nonhuman primate blood and body fluids and risk acquiring infectious diseases. PMID:15663844

  4. Biokinetics of Plutonium in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Deepesh; Guilmette, Raymond A; Gesell, Thomas F; Harris, Jason T; Brey, Richard R

    2016-10-01

    A major source of data on metabolism, excretion and retention of plutonium comes from experimental animal studies. Although old world monkeys are one of the closest living relatives to humans, certain physiological differences do exist between these nonhuman primates and humans. The objective of this paper was to describe the metabolism of plutonium in nonhuman primates using the bioassay and retention data obtained from macaque monkeys injected with plutonium citrate. A biokinetic model for nonhuman primates was developed by adapting the basic model structure and adapting the transfer rates described for metabolism of plutonium in adult humans. Significant changes to the parameters were necessary to explain the shorter retention of plutonium in liver and skeleton of the nonhuman primates, differences in liver to bone partitioning ratio, and significantly higher excretion of plutonium in feces compared to that in humans.

  5. The use of nonhuman primates in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, R. C. (Editor); Bourne, G. H. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Space related biomedical research involving nonhuman primates is reviewed. The scientific assets of various species and the instruments used for monitoring physiological processes during long duration experimentations are described.

  6. The evolution of granule fracture strength as a function of impeller tip speed and granule size for a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process.

    PubMed

    Wade, J B; Martin, G P; Long, D F

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of a novel reverse-phase wet granulation process has been established previously and several potential advantages over the conventional process have been highlighted (Wade et al., 2014a,b,b). Due to fundamental differences in the growth mechanism and granule consolidation behaviour between the two processes the reverse-phase approach generally formed granules with a greater mass mean diameter and a lower intragranular porosity than those formed by the conventional granulation process under the same liquid saturation and impeller tip speed conditions. The lower intragranular porosity was hypothesised to result in an increase in the granule strength and subsequent decrease in tablet tensile strength. Consequently, the aim of this study was to compare the effect of impeller tip speed and granule size on the strength and compaction properties of granules prepared using both the reverse-phase and conventional granulation processes. For the conventional granulation process an increase in the impeller tip speed from 1.57 to 4.71 ms(-1) (200-600 RPM) resulted in an increase in the mean granule strength (p<0.05) for all granule size fractions and as the granule size fraction increased from 425-600 to 2000-3350 μm the mean fracture strength decreased (p<0.05). For the reverse-phase process an increase in impeller tip speed had no effect (p>0.05) on mean granule strength whereas, like the conventional process, an increase in granule size fraction from 425-600 to 2000-3350 μm resulted in a decrease (p<0.05) in the mean fracture strength. No correlation was found between mean granule fracture strength and the tablet tensile strength (p>0.05) for either granulation approach. These data support the rejection of the original hypothesis which stated that an increase in granule strength may result in a decrease in the tablet tensile strength. The similar tablet tensile strength observed between the conventional and reverse-phase granulation processes indicated that

  7. Cerebellar contributions to neurological soft signs in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Kubera, Katharina M; Stieltjes, Bram; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-02-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSS) are frequently found in psychiatric disorders of significant neurodevelopmental origin, e.g., in patients with schizophrenia and autism. Yet NSS are also present in healthy individuals suggesting a neurodevelopmental signature of motor function, probably as a continuum between health and disease. So far, little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying these motor phenomena in healthy persons, and it is even less known whether the cerebellum contributes to NSS expression. Thirty-seven healthy young adults (mean age = 23 years) were studied using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and "resting-state" functional MRI at three Tesla. NSS levels were measured using the "Heidelberg Scale." Cerebellar gray matter volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Cerebellar function was assessed using regional homogeneity (ReHo), a measure of local network strength. The relationship between cerebellar structure and function and NSS was analyzed using regression models. There was no significant relationship between cerebellar volume and NSS (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). Positive associations with cerebellar lobule VI activity were found for the "motor coordination" and "hard signs" NSS domains. A negative relationship was found between lobule VI activity and "complex motor task" domain (p < 0.005, uncorrected for height, p < 0.05 corrected for spatial extent). The data indicate that in healthy young adults, distinct NSS domains are related to cerebellar activity, specifically with activity of cerebellar subregions with known cortical somatomotor projections. In contrast, cerebellar volume is not predictive of NSS in healthy persons.

  8. Primary cerebellar agenesis presenting as isolated cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Obaid; Jabeen, Shumyla; Khan, Azhar; Shaheen, Feroze

    2016-01-01

    Primary cerebellar agenesis is a rare entity. To the best of our knowledge, eleven living cases have been reported till date. Most of these were associated with some degree of motor impairment. We present a case of cerebellar agenesis in a child who presented with cognitive abnormalities leading to poor performance at school. No motor impairment was seen. Among the eleven cases reported earlier, only one case showed lack of motor impairment.

  9. Primary cerebellar agenesis presenting as isolated cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Obaid; Jabeen, Shumyla; Khan, Azhar; Shaheen, Feroze

    2016-01-01

    Primary cerebellar agenesis is a rare entity. To the best of our knowledge, eleven living cases have been reported till date. Most of these were associated with some degree of motor impairment. We present a case of cerebellar agenesis in a child who presented with cognitive abnormalities leading to poor performance at school. No motor impairment was seen. Among the eleven cases reported earlier, only one case showed lack of motor impairment. PMID:27606028

  10. Granulation in saturnian rings and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2008-09-01

    The third theorem of the wave planetary tectonics [1-3 & others] states: "Celestial bodies are granular". It means that inertia-gravity waves appearing in bodies due to their movements in non-circular keplerian orbits and propagating in them in four interfering orthogonal and diagonal directions produce tectonic granules. They are of three kinds: uprising (+), subsiding (-) and neutral (0). Their sizes are inversely proportional to bodies orbital frequencies. Higher frequency - smaller granule, lower frequency - larger granule. The inertia-gravity waves warp all spheres of celestial bodies: solid, liquid, gaseous, and act in stars, planets, asteroids, comets and satellites. The Cassini data provide numerous excellent images of saturnian rings and show that wave processes are ordinary also in them - in disperse solid environment. To illustrate dependence between orbital frequencies and granule sizes we provide the following geometrical representation of the planetary row starting from the solar photosphere also having a certain orbital frequency about the center of the Solar system (Fig. 1). This row can be extended in domain of the outer planets by the same algorithm: Jupiter 3πR, Saturn 7.5πR, Uranus 21πR, Neptune 41πR, Pluto 62πR. One cannot directly observe these huge waves in the planets but they are needed for wave modulation procedures very important for satellites and rings having two orbital frequencies: around the star and planets. A recent support for the wave structurization in the Solar system came from Saturn where 22 year long ground-based temperature observations discovered a wave-like oscillation: hotcold pattern switches every Saturn half-year = 15 Earth's years [4]. Like in the radio-wave physics the lower orbiting frequency of the Saturn's system around Sun modulates the higher orbiting frequencies of the system satellites, rings and the planet's upper atmosphere about the Saturn `s system center. . The higher frequency is multiplied and

  11. Formation of volutin granules in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Pallerla, Srinivas Reddy; Knebel, Sandra; Polen, Tino; Klauth, Peter; Hollender, Juliane; Wendisch, Volker F; Schoberth, Siegfried M

    2005-02-01

    Volutin granules are intracellular storages of complexed inorganic polyphosphate (poly P). Histochemical staining procedures differentiate between pathogenic corynebacteria such as Corynebacterum diphtheriae (containing volutin) and non-pathogenic species, such as C. glutamicum. Here we report that strains ATCC13032 and MH20-22B of the non-pathogenic C. glutamicum also formed subcellular entities (18-37% of the total cell volume) that had the typical characteristics of volutin granules: (i) volutin staining, (ii) green UV fluorescence when stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, (iii) electron-dense and rich in phosphorus when determined with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis, and (iv) 31P NMR poly P resonances of isolated granules dissolved in EDTA. MgCl2 addition to the growth medium stimulated granule formation but did not effect expression of genes involved in poly P metabolism. Granular volutin fractions from lysed cells contained polyphosphate glucokinase as detected by SDS-PAGE/MALDI-TOF, indicating that this poly P metabolizing enzyme is present also in intact poly P granules. The results suggest that formation of volutin is a more widespread phenomenon than generally accepted. PMID:15668011

  12. Transient inhibition of the ERK pathway prevents cerebellar developmental defects and improves long-term motor functions in murine models of neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Edward; Wang, Yuan; Kim, Sun-Jung; Bornhorst, Miriam; Jecrois, Emmanuelle S; Anthony, Todd E; Wang, Chenran; Li, Yi E; Guan, Jun-Lin; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Zhu, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) frequently exhibit cognitive and motor impairments and characteristics of autism. The cerebellum plays a critical role in motor control, cognition, and social interaction, suggesting that cerebellar defects likely contribute to NF1-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. Here we show that Nf1 inactivation during early, but not late stages of cerebellar development, disrupts neuronal lamination, which is partially caused by overproduction of glia and subsequent disruption of the Bergmann glia (BG) scaffold. Specific Nf1 inactivation in glutamatergic neuronal precursors causes premature differentiation of granule cell (GC) precursors and ectopic production of unipolar brush cells (UBCs), indirectly disrupting neuronal migration. Transient MEK inhibition during a neonatal window prevents cerebellar developmental defects and improves long-term motor performance of Nf1-deficient mice. This study reveals essential roles of Nf1 in GC/UBC migration by generating correct numbers of glia and controlling GC/UBC fate-specification/differentiation, identifying a therapeutic prevention strategy for multiple NF1-associcated developmental abnormalities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05151.001 PMID:25535838

  13. Oxidative injury in multiple sclerosis cerebellar grey matter.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Kevin; Redondo, Juliana; Hares, Kelly; Rice, Claire; Scolding, Neil; Wilkins, Alastair

    2016-07-01

    Cerebellar dysfunction is a significant contributor to disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). Both white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) injury occurs within MS cerebellum and, within GM, demyelination, inflammatory cell infiltration and neuronal injury contribute to on-going pathology. The precise nature of cerebellar GM injury is, however, unknown. Oxidative stress pathways with ultimate lipid peroxidation and cell membrane injury occur extensively in MS and the purpose of this study was to investigate these processes in MS cerebellar GM. Post-mortem human cerebellar GM from MS and control subjects was analysed immunohistochemically, followed by semi-quantitative analysis of markers of cellular injury, lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant enzyme expression. We have shown evidence for reduction in myelin and neuronal markers in MS GM, coupled to an increase in expression of a microglial marker. We also show that the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal co-localises with myelin and its levels negatively correlate to myelin basic protein levels. Furthermore, superoxide dismutase (SOD1 and 2) enzymes, localised within cerebellar neurons, are up-regulated, yet the activation of subsequent enzymes responsible for the detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, catalase and glutathione peroxidase are relatively deficient. These studies provide evidence for oxidative injury in MS cerebellar GM and further help define disease mechanisms within the MS brain. PMID:27086975

  14. Emotions and their cognitive control in children with cerebellar tumors.

    PubMed

    Hopyan, Talar; Laughlin, Suzanne; Dennis, Maureen

    2010-11-01

    A constellation of deficits, termed the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS), has been reported following acquired cerebellar lesions. We studied emotion identification and the cognitive control of emotion in children treated for acquired tumors of the cerebellum. Participants were 37 children (7-16 years) treated for cerebellar tumors (19 benign astrocytomas (AST), 18 malignant medulloblastomas (MB), and 37 matched controls (CON). The Emotion Identification Task investigated recognition of happy and sad emotions in music. In two cognitive control tasks, we investigated whether children could identify emotion in situations in which the emotion in the music and the emotion in the lyrics was either congruent or incongruent. Children with cerebellar tumors identified emotion as accurately and quickly as controls (p > .05), although there was a significant interaction of emotions and group (p < .01), with the MB group performing less accurately identifying sad emotions, and both cerebellar tumor groups were impaired in the cognitive control of emotions (p < .01). The fact that childhood acquired cerebellar tumors disrupt cognitive control of emotion rather than emotion identification provides some support for a model of the CCAS as a disorder, not so much of emotion as of the regulation of emotion by cognition. PMID:20887648

  15. Correlates of body mass evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Soligo, Christophe

    2006-07-01

    Body mass is undoubtedly central to the overall adaptive profile of any organism. Despite this, very little is known of what forces drive evolutionary changes in body mass and, consequently, shape patterns of body mass distribution exhibited by animal radiations. The search for factors that may influence evolutionary processes in general frequently focuses on environmental parameters such as climate change or interspecific competition. With respect to body mass, there is also the suggestion that evolutionary lineages may follow an inherent trend toward increased body mass, known as Cope's rule. The present paper investigates whether overall directional trends of body mass change, or correlations between patterns of body mass evolution and environmental factors have influenced the evolution of body mass in plesiadapiforms and primates. Analyses of the global fossil record of plesiadapiforms and primates suggest that the former did indeed follow an overall trend toward increased body mass compatible with the predictions of Cope's rule. In contrast, neither primates as a whole, nor a number of individual primate radiations (Adapiformes, Omomyiformes, and Anthropoidea), show any indication of overall directional patterns of body mass change. No correlations of primate body mass change with either the latitudinal distribution of fossil species, or with estimates of global temperature trends, were found. There is evidence, however, that direct competition between omomyiforms and adapiforms (the two main primate radiations known from the Paleogene) influenced processes of body mass evolution in omomyiforms.

  16. Ontogeny of the nasopalatine duct in primates.

    PubMed

    Shimp, Kristin L; Bhatnagar, Kunwar P; Bonar, Christopher J; Smith, Timothy D

    2003-09-01

    Ecological explanations have been put forward to account for the precocious or delayed development of patency in ducts leading to the vomeronasal organ (VNO) in certain mammals. Perinatal function may be related, in part, to the patency or fusion of the vomeronasal and nasopalatine (NPD) ducts. However, few studies have focused on NPD development in primates, which generally have a prolonged period of dependence during infancy. In this study we examined 24 prenatal primates and 13 neonatal primates, and a comparative sample of fetal mice and insectivores. In embryonic and early fetal Microcebus murinus, the NPD was completely fused, whereas in fetuses of later stages the duct was partially fused or completely patent. M. myoxinus of all stages demonstrated some degree of NPD fusion. In all other prenatal primates, the NPD was fused to some extent. Four prenatal insectivores (Tenrec ecaudatus) showed some degree of NPD fusion. In Mus musculus at 19 days gestation, the NPD was patent, although the anatomically separate VNO duct was fused. T. ecaudatus and most of the neonatal primates revealed complete NPD patency. An exception was Saguinus geoffroyi, which exhibited fusion of the NPD near the VNO opening. These observations may relate to differences in perinatal VNO function. The differences noted in our study suggest that M. murinus and M. myoxinus may differ in perinatal VNO functionality and perhaps in related behavior. Observations of neonatal primates suggest that NPD patency may be relatively common at birth and could serve other purposes in addition to being an access route for VNO stimuli.

  17. Forest structure drives global diversity of primates.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Sidney F; Villalobos, Fabricio; Dobrovolski, Ricardo; Beltrão-Mendes, Raone; Ferrari, Stephen F

    2014-11-01

    Geographic gradients in the species richness of non-human primates have traditionally been attributed to the variation in forest productivity (related to precipitation levels), although an all-inclusive, global-scale analysis has never been conducted. We perform a more comprehensive test on the role of precipitation and biomass production and propose an alternative hypothesis - the variation in vertical structure of forest habitats as measured by forest canopy height - in determining primate species richness on a global scale. Considering the potential causal relationships among precipitation, productivity and forest structure, we arranged these variables within a path framework to assess their direct and indirect associations with the pattern of primate species richness using structural equation modelling. The analysis also accounted for the influence of spatial autocorrelation in the relationships and assessed possible historical differences among biogeographical regions. The path coefficients indicate that forest canopy height (used as a proxy for vertical forest structure) is a better predictor of primate species richness than either precipitation or productivity on both global and continental scales. The only exception was Asia, where precipitation prevailed, albeit independently from productivity or forest structure. The influence of spatially structured processes varied markedly among biogeographical regions. Our results challenge the traditional rainfall-based viewpoint in favour of forest distribution and structure as primary drivers of primate species richness, which aggregate potential effects from both climatic factors and habitat complexity. These findings may support predictions of the impact of forest removal on primate species richness.

  18. Altered cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients ON and OFF L-DOPA medication.

    PubMed

    Festini, Sara B; Bernard, Jessica A; Kwak, Youngbin; Peltier, Scott; Bohnen, Nicolaas I; Müller, Martijn L T M; Dayalu, Praveen; Seidler, Rachael D

    2015-01-01

    Although nigrostriatal changes are most commonly affiliated with Parkinson's disease, the role of the cerebellum in Parkinson's has become increasingly apparent. The present study used lobule-based cerebellar resting state functional connectivity to (1) compare cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients both ON and OFF L-DOPA medication and controls, and to (2) relate variations in cerebellar connectivity to behavioral performance. Results indicated that, when contrasted to the control group, Parkinson's patients OFF medication had increased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity, whereas Parkinson's patients ON medication had decreased levels of cerebellar-whole brain and cerebellar-cerebellar connectivity. Moreover, analyses relating levels of cerebellar connectivity to behavioral measures demonstrated that, within each group, increased levels of connectivity were most often associated with improved cognitive and motor performance, but there were several instances where increased connectivity was related to poorer performance. Overall, the present study found medication-variant cerebellar connectivity in Parkinson's patients, further demonstrating cerebellar changes associated with Parkinson's disease and the moderating effects of medication. PMID:25954184

  19. The combined effect of wet granulation process parameters and dried granule moisture content on tablet quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Gabbott, Ian P; Al Husban, Farhan; Reynolds, Gavin K

    2016-09-01

    A pharmaceutical compound was used to study the effect of batch wet granulation process parameters in combination with the residual moisture content remaining after drying on granule and tablet quality attributes. The effect of three batch wet granulation process parameters was evaluated using a multivariate experimental design, with a novel constrained design space. Batches were characterised for moisture content, granule density, crushing strength, porosity, disintegration time and dissolution. Mechanisms of the effect of the process parameters on the granule and tablet quality attributes are proposed. Water quantity added during granulation showed a significant effect on granule density and tablet dissolution rate. Mixing time showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength, and mixing speed showed a significant effect on the distribution of tablet crushing strengths obtained. The residual moisture content remaining after granule drying showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength. The effect of moisture on tablet tensile strength has been reported before, but not in combination with granulation parameters and granule properties, and the impact on tablet dissolution was not assessed. Correlations between the energy input during granulation, the density of granules produced, and the quality attributes of the final tablets were also identified. Understanding the impact of the granulation and drying process parameters on granule and tablet properties provides a basis for process optimisation and scaling. PMID:27016211

  20. The combined effect of wet granulation process parameters and dried granule moisture content on tablet quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Gabbott, Ian P; Al Husban, Farhan; Reynolds, Gavin K

    2016-09-01

    A pharmaceutical compound was used to study the effect of batch wet granulation process parameters in combination with the residual moisture content remaining after drying on granule and tablet quality attributes. The effect of three batch wet granulation process parameters was evaluated using a multivariate experimental design, with a novel constrained design space. Batches were characterised for moisture content, granule density, crushing strength, porosity, disintegration time and dissolution. Mechanisms of the effect of the process parameters on the granule and tablet quality attributes are proposed. Water quantity added during granulation showed a significant effect on granule density and tablet dissolution rate. Mixing time showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength, and mixing speed showed a significant effect on the distribution of tablet crushing strengths obtained. The residual moisture content remaining after granule drying showed a significant effect on tablet crushing strength. The effect of moisture on tablet tensile strength has been reported before, but not in combination with granulation parameters and granule properties, and the impact on tablet dissolution was not assessed. Correlations between the energy input during granulation, the density of granules produced, and the quality attributes of the final tablets were also identified. Understanding the impact of the granulation and drying process parameters on granule and tablet properties provides a basis for process optimisation and scaling.

  1. Antimicrobial-Coated Granules for Disinfecting Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.; Kliestik, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Methods of preparing antimicrobialcoated granules for disinfecting flowing potable water have been developed. Like the methods reported in the immediately preceding article, these methods involve chemical preparation of substrate surfaces (in this case, the surfaces of granules) to enable attachment of antimicrobial molecules to the surfaces via covalent bonds. A variety of granular materials have been coated with a variety of antimicrobial agents that include antibiotics, bacteriocins, enzymes, bactericides, and fungicides. When employed in packed beds in flowing water, these antimicrobial-coated granules have been proven effective against gram-positive bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Composite beds, consisting of multiple layers containing different granular antimicrobial media, have proven particularly effective against a broad spectrum of microorganisms. These media have also proven effective in enhancing or potentiating the biocidal effects of in-line iodinated resins and of very low levels of dissolved elemental iodine.

  2. MEMBRANE-COATING GRANULES OF KERATINIZING EPITHELIA.

    PubMed

    MATOLTSY, A G; PARAKKAL, P F

    1965-02-01

    The purpose of this study has been to obtain information on the development of the envelop of horny cells that resists the action of keratinolytic agents. Toward this end the epidermis, oral mucosa, and tongue epithelium of various vertebrates, as well as the isolated envelopes of horny cells, were examined by electron microscopy. It was found that small cytoplasmic granules (1,000 to 5,000 A) that develop within differentiating epithelial cells move toward the cell periphery, and after fusion with the plasma membrane, empty their contents into the intercellular spaces. The content of the granules spreads over the cell surfaces, and subsequently a thickened and coated cell envelope is formed that resists the action of keratinolytic agent. The membrane-coating granule is regarded as a specific differentiation product of the keratinizing epithelium. It contains numerous inner membranes and is assumed to engage in synthetic activities such as, perhaps, the formation of polysaccharides.

  3. Ephrin/Eph receptor expression in brain of adult nonhuman primates: implications for neuroadaptation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Danqing; Miller, Gregory M; Jassen, Amy; Westmoreland, Susan V; Pauley, Douglas; Madras, Bertha K

    2006-01-01

    In developing brain, Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands (Ephs/ephrins) are implicated in facilitating topographic guidance of a number of pathways, including the nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine (DA) pathways. In adult rodent brain, these molecules are implicated in neuronal plasticity associated with learning and memory. Cocaine significantly alters the expression of select members of this family of axonal guidance molecules, implicating Ephs, ephrins in drug-induced neuroadaptation. The potential contribution of Ephs, ephrins to cocaine-induced reorganization of striatal circuitry brain in primates [Saka, E., Goodrich, C., Harlan, P., Madras, B.K., Graybiel, A.M., 2004. Repetitive behaviors in monkeys are linked to specific striatal activation patterns. J. Neurosci. 24, 7557-7565] is unknown because there are no documented reports of Eph/ephrin expression or function in adult primate brain. We now report that brains of adult old and new world monkeys express mRNA encoding EphA4 receptor and ephrin-B2 ligand, implicated in topographic guidance of dopamine and striatal neurons during development. Their encoded proteins distributed highly selectively in regions of adult monkey brain. EphA4 mRNA levels were prominent in the DA-rich caudate/putamen, nucleus accumbens and globus pallidus, as well as the medial and orbitofrontal cortices, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus and cerebellum. Immunocytochemical localization of EphA4 protein revealed discrete expression in caudate/putamen, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, cerebellar Purkinje cells, pyramidal cells of frontal cortices (layers II, III and V) and the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. Evidence for EphA4 expression in dopamine neurons emerged from colocalization with tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive terminals in striatum and substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area cell bodies. The association of axonal guidance molecules with drug-induced reorganization of adult primate brain circuitry warrants

  4. Cerebellar Ataxia and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Helena; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Blanco, Yolanda; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Sabater, Lidia; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Rouco, Idoia; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep O.; Saiz, Albert; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current clinical and immunologic knowledge on cerebellar ataxia (CA) with glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies (GAD65-Abs) is based on case reports and small series with short-term follow-up data. OBJECTIVE To report the symptoms, additional antibodies, prognostic factors, and long-term outcomes in a cohort of patients with CA and GAD65-Abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations at a center for autoimmune neurologic disorders among 34 patients with CA and GAD65-Abs, including 25 with long-term follow-up data (median, 5.4 years; interquartile range, 3.1-10.3 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of clinicoimmunologic features and predictors of response to immunotherapy. Immunochemistry on rat brain, cultured neurons, and human embryonic kidney cells expressing GAD65, GAD67, α1-subunit of the glycine receptor, and a repertoire of known cell surface autoantigens were used to identify additional antibodies. Twenty-eight patients with stiff person syndrome and GAD65-Abs served as controls. RESULTS The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 33-80 years); 28 of 34 patients (82%) were women. Nine patients (26%) reported episodes of brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction or persistent vertigo several months before developing CA. The clinical presentation was subacute during a period of weeks in 13 patients (38%). Nine patients (26%) had coexisting stiff person syndrome symptoms. Systemic organ-specific autoimmunities (type 1 diabetes mellitus and others) were present in 29 patients (85%). Twenty of 25 patients with long-term follow-up data received immunotherapy (intravenous immunoglobulin in 10 and corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin or other immunosuppressors in 10), and 7 of them (35%) improved. Predictors of clinical response included subacute onset of CA (odds ratio [OR], 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99; P = .047) and prompt immunotherapy (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99; P = .01). Similar

  5. Process for producing zirconium based granules

    SciTech Connect

    Jade, S.S.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production f amorphous zirconium based granules. It comprises: adding about 2--15 wt % of a suitable phase stabilizer to an aqueous solutio, based upon the total weight of ZrO{sub 2} in solution, to produce an aqueous solution having a pH in the range of about 4 to 7 comprising a zirconium based complex and phase stabilizer and thereafter; drying the aqueous solution comprising the zirconium based complex and the phase stabilizer at a temperature below about 180{degrees} C. for a time sufficient to evaporate the aqueous solution thereby forming amorphous zirconium based granules containing the phase stabilizer.

  6. Formulation of custom sized LX-15 granules

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, T.W.

    1980-04-01

    LX-15 is a booster explosive formulation consisting of 95% HNS I and 5% Kel F-800 developed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The purpose of this effort was to develop formulation techniques for the production of custom size granules that are amenable for processing in automatic weighing equipment. This report details processes whereby 0.4 and 1.5 kg size batches are produced, meeting those requirements. Efforts to date have found that granule size is dependent on batch/vessel size, water-to-solvent ratio and the degree of vessel agitation.

  7. Continuous melt granulation: Influence of process and formulation parameters upon granule and tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Vancoillie, Jochem; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has a growing interest in alternative manufacturing models allowing automation and continuous production in order to improve process efficiency and reduce costs. Implementing a switch from batch to continuous processing requires fundamental process understanding and the implementation of quality-by-design (QbD) principles. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between formulation-parameters (type binder, binder concentration, drug-binder miscibility), process-parameters (screw speed, powder feed rate and granulation temperature), granule properties (size, size distribution, shape, friability, true density, flowability) and tablet properties (tensile strength, friability, dissolution rate) of four different drug-binder formulations using Design of experiments (DOE). Two binders (polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Soluplus®) with a different solid state, semi-crystalline vs amorphous respectively, were combined with two model-drugs, metoprolol tartrate (MPT) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF), both having a contrasting miscibility with the binders. This research revealed that the granule properties of miscible drug-binder systems depended on the powder feed rate and barrel filling degree of the granulator whereas the granule properties of immiscible systems were mainly influenced by binder concentration. Using an amorphous binder, the tablet tensile strength depended on the granule size. In contrast, granule friability was more important for tablet quality using a brittle binder. However, this was not the case for caffeine-containing blends, since these phenomena were dominated by the enhanced compression properties of caffeine Form I, which was formed during granulation. Hence, it is important to gain knowledge about formulation behavior during processing since this influences the effect of process parameters onto the granule and tablet properties. PMID:27449628

  8. High-shear granulation as a manufacturing method for cocrystal granules.

    PubMed

    Rehder, Sönke; Christensen, Niels Peter Aae; Rantanen, Jukka; Rades, Thomas; Leopold, Claudia S

    2013-11-01

    Cocrystal formation allows the tailoring of physicochemical as well as of mechanical properties of an API. However, there is a lack of large-scale manufacturing methods of cocrystals. Therefore, the objective of this work was to examine the suitability of high-shear wet granulation as a manufacturing method for cocrystal granules on a batch scale. Furthermore, the cocrystal granules were characterized regarding their mechanical properties as well as their dissolution behavior. High-shear wet granulation was found to be a feasible manufacturing method for cocrystal granules. Cocrystal formation depended on the exposure time of the solids to the granulation liquid (water), the amount of liquid, the impeller speed of the granulator, and on the excipients (hydroxyl propylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose, calcium hydrogenphosphate) used in the formulation. Storage stability was strongly influenced by the excipients, since in presence of calcium hydrogenphosphate, the poorly water-soluble salt calcium tartrate monohydrate was formed at high relative humidity. Interestingly, compactability was increased by cocrystal formation compared to that of the reference granules (piracetam and the respective excipients). The drug release was slightly decreased by cocrystal formation, most likely due to the lower solubility of the cocrystal. In the presence of calcium hydrogenphosphate however, no influence of cocrystal formation on either compactability or on drug release were observed, compared with the reference tablets. It was concluded that high-shear wet granulation is a valuable, however complex, manufacturing method for cocrystals. Cocrystal formation may influence compactability and drug release and thus affect drug performance and should be investigated during pre-formulation.

  9. Continuous melt granulation: Influence of process and formulation parameters upon granule and tablet properties.

    PubMed

    Monteyne, Tinne; Vancoillie, Jochem; Remon, Jean-Paul; Vervaet, Chris; De Beer, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has a growing interest in alternative manufacturing models allowing automation and continuous production in order to improve process efficiency and reduce costs. Implementing a switch from batch to continuous processing requires fundamental process understanding and the implementation of quality-by-design (QbD) principles. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between formulation-parameters (type binder, binder concentration, drug-binder miscibility), process-parameters (screw speed, powder feed rate and granulation temperature), granule properties (size, size distribution, shape, friability, true density, flowability) and tablet properties (tensile strength, friability, dissolution rate) of four different drug-binder formulations using Design of experiments (DOE). Two binders (polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Soluplus®) with a different solid state, semi-crystalline vs amorphous respectively, were combined with two model-drugs, metoprolol tartrate (MPT) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF), both having a contrasting miscibility with the binders. This research revealed that the granule properties of miscible drug-binder systems depended on the powder feed rate and barrel filling degree of the granulator whereas the granule properties of immiscible systems were mainly influenced by binder concentration. Using an amorphous binder, the tablet tensile strength depended on the granule size. In contrast, granule friability was more important for tablet quality using a brittle binder. However, this was not the case for caffeine-containing blends, since these phenomena were dominated by the enhanced compression properties of caffeine Form I, which was formed during granulation. Hence, it is important to gain knowledge about formulation behavior during processing since this influences the effect of process parameters onto the granule and tablet properties.

  10. Characteristic diffusion tensor tractography in multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia and cortical cerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Yusuke; Hishikawa, Nozomi; Sato, Kota; Nakano, Yumiko; Morihara, Ryuta; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Toru; Abe, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography analysis is a potential method for differentiating cerebellar ataxia patients with multiple system atrophy with predominant cerebellar ataxia (MSA-C) and cortical cerebellar atrophy (CCA). Forty-one MSA-C patients (62.7 ± 8.1 years old, mean ± SD) and age- and gender-matched 15 CCA patients (63.0 ± 8.6 years old) were examined.Tractography was performed using the DTI track module provided in the MedINRIA version 1.9.4, and regions of interest were drawn manually to reconstruct an efferent fiber tract and two afferent fiber tracts via the cerebellum. Compared with CCA, MSA-C patients showed significant declines of fractional anisotropy (FA) values of afferent 1 and 2 (p<0.01, respectively) and a significant increase of the radial diffusivity (RD) value in afferent 1 (p<0.05). Receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis showed 85.7 % sensitivity and 75.0 % specificity of FA values in afferent 1 (cutoff value 0.476). Linear regressions showed strong correlations between FA value and disease duration in CCA patients (efferent 1, r = -0.466; afferent 2, r = -0.543; both p<0.05), and between the FA value and the ratio of the standardized scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia (SARA)/disease duration in MSA-C patients (afferent 1, r = -0.407; p<0.01). The present DTI tractography newly showed that the FA values of two afferent fiber tracts showed significant declines in MSA-C patients, and afferent 1 showed good diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. When combining the FA values of efferent 1 with disease duration, the present DTI tractography analysis could be useful for differentiating MSA-C and CCA patients.

  11. TrkB (Tropomyosin-Related Kinase B) Controls the Assembly and Maintenance of GABAergic Synapses in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Albert I.; Nguyen, Cindy N.; Copenhagen, David R.; Badurek, Sylvia; Minichiello, Liliana; Ranscht, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons play a critical role in coordinating the activity of neural circuits. To explore the mechanisms that direct the organization of inhibitory circuits, we analyzed the involvement of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in the assembly and maintenance of GABAergic inhibitory synapses between Golgi and granule cells in the mouse cerebellar cortex. We show that TrkB acts directly within each cell-type to regulate synaptic differentiation. TrkB is required not only for assembly, but also maintenance of these synapses and acts, primarily, by regulating the localization of synaptic constituents. Postsynaptically, TrkB controls the localization of a scaffolding protein, gephyrin, but acts at a step subsequent to the localization of a cell adhesion molecule, Neuroligin-2. Importantly, TrkB is required for the localization of an Ig superfamily cell adhesion molecule, Contactin-1, in Golgi and granule cells and the absence of Contactin-1 also results in deficits in inhibitory synaptic development. Thus, our findings demonstrate that TrkB controls the assembly and maintenance of GABAergic synapses and suggest that TrkB functions, in part, through promoting synaptic adhesion. PMID:21414899

  12. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  13. Cerebellar development in the absence of Gbx function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Su, Chen-Ying; Kemp, Hilary A; Moens, Cecilia B

    2014-02-01

    The midbrain-hindbrain boundary (MHB) is a well-known organizing center during vertebrate brain development. The MHB forms at the expression boundary of Otx2 and Gbx2, mutually repressive homeodomain transcription factors expressed in the midbrain/forebrain and anterior hindbrain, respectively. The genetic hierarchy of gene expression at the MHB is complex, involving multiple positive and negative feedback loops that result in the establishment of non-overlapping domains of Wnt1 and Fgf8 on either side of the boundary and the consequent specification of the cerebellum. The cerebellum derives from the dorsal part of the anterior-most hindbrain segment, rhombomere 1 (r1), which undergoes a distinctive morphogenesis to give rise to the cerebellar primordium within which the various cerebellar neuron types are specified. Previous studies in the mouse have shown that Gbx2 is essential for cerebellar development. Using zebrafish mutants we show here that in the zebrafish gbx1 and gbx2 are required redundantly for morphogenesis of the cerebellar primordium and subsequent cerebellar differentiation, but that this requirement is alleviated by knocking down Otx. Expression of fgf8, wnt1 and the entire MHB genetic program is progressively lost in gbx1-;gbx2- double mutants but is rescued by Otx knock-down. This rescue of the MHB genetic program depends on rescued Fgf signaling, however the rescue of cerebellar primordium morphogenesis is independent of both Gbx and Fgf. Based on our findings we propose a revised model for the role of Gbx in cerebellar development.

  14. A Cerebellar Neuroprosthetic System: Computational Architecture and in vivo Test

    PubMed Central

    Herreros, Ivan; Giovannucci, Andrea; Taub, Aryeh H.; Hogri, Roni; Magal, Ari; Bamford, Sim; Prueckl, Robert; Verschure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Emulating the input–output functions performed by a brain structure opens the possibility for developing neuroprosthetic systems that replace damaged neuronal circuits. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by replacing the cerebellar circuit responsible for the acquisition and extinction of motor memories. Specifically, we show that a rat can undergo acquisition, retention, and extinction of the eye-blink reflex even though the biological circuit responsible for this task has been chemically inactivated via anesthesia. This is achieved by first developing a computational model of the cerebellar microcircuit involved in the acquisition of conditioned reflexes and training it with synthetic data generated based on physiological recordings. Secondly, the cerebellar model is interfaced with the brain of an anesthetized rat, connecting the model’s inputs and outputs to afferent and efferent cerebellar structures. As a result, we show that the anesthetized rat, equipped with our neuroprosthetic system, can be classically conditioned to the acquisition of an eye-blink response. However, non-stationarities in the recorded biological signals limit the performance of the cerebellar model. Thus, we introduce an updated cerebellar model and validate it with physiological recordings showing that learning becomes stable and reliable. The resulting system represents an important step toward replacing lost functions of the central nervous system via neuroprosthetics, obtained by integrating a synthetic circuit with the afferent and efferent pathways of a damaged brain region. These results also embody an early example of science-based medicine, where on the one hand the neuroprosthetic system directly validates a theory of cerebellar learning that informed the design of the system, and on the other one it takes a step toward the development of neuro-prostheses that could recover lost learning functions in animals and, in the longer term, humans. PMID:25152887

  15. Abnormal cerebellar volume in acute and remitted major depression.

    PubMed

    Depping, Malte S; Wolf, Nadine D; Vasic, Nenad; Sambataro, Fabio; Hirjak, Dusan; Thomann, Philipp A; Wolf, Robert C

    2016-11-01

    Abnormal cortical volume is well-documented in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), but cerebellar findings have been heterogeneous. It is unclear whether abnormal cerebellar structure relates to disease state or medication. In this study, using structural MRI, we investigated cerebellar volume in clinically acute (with and without psychotropic treatment) and remitted MDD patients. High-resolution structural MRI data at 3T were obtained from acute medicated (n=29), acute unmedicated (n=14) and remitted patients (n=16). Data from 29 healthy controls were used for comparison purposes. Cerebellar volume was investigated using cerebellum-optimized voxel-based analysis methods. Patients with an acute MDD episode showed increased volume of left cerebellar area IX, and this was true for both medicated and unmedicated individuals (p<0.05 cluster-corrected). Remitted patients exhibited bilaterally increased area IX volume. In remitted, but not in acutely ill patients, area IX volume was significantly associated with measures of depression severity, as assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD). In addition, area IX volume in remitted patients was significantly related to the duration of antidepressant treatment. In acutely ill patients, no significant relationships were established using clinical variables, such as HAMD, illness or treatment duration and number of depressive episodes. The data suggest that cerebellar area IX, a non-motor region that belongs to a large-scale brain functional network with known relevance to core depressive symptom expression, exhibits abnormal volume in patients independent of clinical severity or medication. Thus, the data imply a possible trait marker of the disorder. However, given bilaterality and an association with clinical scores at least in remitted patients, the current findings raise the possibility that cerebellar volume may be reflective of successful treatment as well.

  16. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum.

  17. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Schmelzeisen, Steffen; Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  18. Anoctamin Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels May Modulate Inhibitory Transmission in the Cerebellar Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Parthier, Daniel; Frings, Stephan; Möhrlen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels of the anoctamin (alias TMEM16) protein family fulfill critical functions in epithelial fluid transport, smooth muscle contraction and sensory signal processing. Little is known, however, about their contribution to information processing in the central nervous system. Here we examined the recent finding that a calcium-dependent chloride conductance impacts on GABAergic synaptic inhibition in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. We asked whether anoctamin channels may underlie this chloride conductance. We identified two anoctamin channel proteins, ANO1 and ANO2, in the cerebellar cortex. ANO1 was expressed in inhibitory interneurons of the molecular layer and the granule cell layer. Both channels were expressed in Purkinje cells but, while ANO1 appeared to be retained in the cell body, ANO2 was targeted to the dendritic tree. Functional studies confirmed that ANO2 was involved in a calcium-dependent mode of ionic plasticity that reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses. ANO2 channels attenuated GABAergic transmission by increasing the postsynaptic chloride concentration, hence reducing the driving force for chloride influx. Our data suggest that ANO2 channels are involved in a Ca2+-dependent regulation of synaptic weight in GABAergic inhibition. Thus, in balance with the chloride extrusion mechanism via the co-transporter KCC2, ANO2 appears to regulate ionic plasticity in the cerebellum. PMID:26558388

  19. Current source density correlates of cerebellar Golgi and Purkinje cell responses to tactile input

    PubMed Central

    Tahon, Koen; Wijnants, Mike; De Schutter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The overall circuitry of the cerebellar cortex has been known for over a century, but the function of many synaptic connections remains poorly characterized in vivo. We used a one-dimensional multielectrode probe to estimate the current source density (CSD) of Crus IIa in response to perioral tactile stimuli in anesthetized rats and to correlate current sinks and sources to changes in the spike rate of corecorded Golgi and Purkinje cells. The punctate stimuli evoked two distinct early waves of excitation (at <10 and ∼20 ms) associated with current sinks in the granular layer. The second wave was putatively of corticopontine origin, and its associated sink was located higher in the granular layer than the first trigeminal sink. The distinctive patterns of granular-layer sinks correlated with the spike responses of corecorded Golgi cells. In general, Golgi cell spike responses could be linearly reconstructed from the CSD profile. A dip in simple-spike activity of coregistered Purkinje cells correlated with a current source deep in the molecular layer, probably generated by basket cell synapses, interspersed between sparse early sinks presumably generated by synapses from granule cells. The late (>30 ms) enhancement of simple-spike activity in Purkinje cells was characterized by the absence of simultaneous sinks in the granular layer and by the suppression of corecorded Golgi cell activity, pointing at inhibition of Golgi cells by Purkinje axon collaterals as a likely mechanism of late Purkinje cell excitation. PMID:21228303

  20. Aprosencephaly and cerebellar dysgenesis in SIBS

    SciTech Connect

    Florell, S.R.; Townsend, J.J.; Klatt, E.C.

    1996-06-28

    Aprosencephaly is a rare, lethal malformation sequence of the central nervous system that has been attributed to a postneuralation encephaloclastic process. We describe autopsy findings consistent with aprosencephaly in 2 fetuses conceived from a consanguineous mating (first cousins). Both showed anecephalic manifestations; however, the crania were intact, with fused sutures. The neuropathologic findings were essentially identical. Each fetus had complete absence of the telecephalon and pyramidal tracts, rudimentary diencephalic and mesencephalic structures, primitive cerebellar hemispheres, posterolateral clusters of primitive neural cells in the medullas suggesting an abnormality of neural migration, a normally-formed spinal cord, and retinal dysplasia within normally-formed globes. In addition, both fetuses manifested a peculiar perivascular mesenchymal proliferation seen only within the central nervous system. The similarity of these cases, coupled with parental consanguinity, suggests a primary malformation in brain development due to the homozygous representation of a mutant allele. We hypothesize that these patients may represent a defect in a gene important in brain development, the nature of which has yet to be elucidated. 26 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Morphological characteristics of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Dodevski, A; Tosovska Lazarova, D; Zhivadinovik, J; Lazareska, M; Stojovska-Jovanovska, E

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of new techniques in diagnostic and interventional radiology and progress in micro neurosurgery, accurate knowledge of the brain blood vessels is essential for daily clinical work. The aim of this study was to describe the morphological characteristics of the superior cerebellar artery and to emphasize their clinical significance. In this study we examined radiographs of 109 patients who had CT angiography at the University Clinic for Radiology in Skopje, R. Macedonia. This study included 49 females and 60 males, ranging in age from 27 to 83 years; mean age 57.4 ± 11.8 years. In 105 patients SCA arose from the basilar artery on both sides as a single vessel. In two patients SCA arose as a duplicate trunk from the basilar artery. We found unilateral duplication on the right SCA in one patient, and bilateral duplication in one patient. In two patients was noticed origin of the SCA from PCA as a single trunk from adult type of the PCA. Through knowledge of the anatomy and variations of SCA is important for clinicians as well as basic scientists who deal with problems related to intracranial vasculature in daily basis for save performance of diagnostic and interventional procedures. PMID:26076777

  2. Morphological characteristics of the superior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Dodevski, A; Tosovska Lazarova, D; Zhivadinovik, J; Lazareska, M; Stojovska-Jovanovska, E

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of new techniques in diagnostic and interventional radiology and progress in micro neurosurgery, accurate knowledge of the brain blood vessels is essential for daily clinical work. The aim of this study was to describe the morphological characteristics of the superior cerebellar artery and to emphasize their clinical significance. In this study we examined radiographs of 109 patients who had CT angiography at the University Clinic for Radiology in Skopje, R. Macedonia. This study included 49 females and 60 males, ranging in age from 27 to 83 years; mean age 57.4 ± 11.8 years. In 105 patients SCA arose from the basilar artery on both sides as a single vessel. In two patients SCA arose as a duplicate trunk from the basilar artery. We found unilateral duplication on the right SCA in one patient, and bilateral duplication in one patient. In two patients was noticed origin of the SCA from PCA as a single trunk from adult type of the PCA. Through knowledge of the anatomy and variations of SCA is important for clinicians as well as basic scientists who deal with problems related to intracranial vasculature in daily basis for save performance of diagnostic and interventional procedures.

  3. Multiplexed coding by cerebellar Purkinje neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sungho; Negrello, Mario; Junker, Marc; Smilgin, Aleksandra; Thier, Peter; De Schutter, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje cells (PC), the sole output neurons of the cerebellar cortex, encode sensorimotor information, but how they do it remains a matter of debate. Here we show that PCs use a multiplexed spike code. Synchrony/spike time and firing rate encode different information in behaving monkeys during saccadic eye motion tasks. Using the local field potential (LFP) as a probe of local network activity, we found that infrequent pause spikes, which initiated or terminated intermittent pauses in simple spike trains, provide a temporally reliable signal for eye motion onset, with strong phase-coupling to the β/γ band LFP. Concurrently, regularly firing, non-pause spikes were weakly correlated with the LFP, but were crucial to linear encoding of eye movement kinematics by firing rate. Therefore, PC spike trains can simultaneously convey information necessary to achieve precision in both timing and continuous control of motion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13810.001 PMID:27458803

  4. Distributed Cerebellar Motor Learning: A Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity Model

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Niceto R.; Garrido, Jesús A.; Naveros, Francisco; Carrillo, Richard R.; D'Angelo, Egidio; Ros, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebellar nuclei neurons receive both inhibitory (GABAergic) synaptic currents from Purkinje cells (within the cerebellar cortex) and excitatory (glutamatergic) synaptic currents from mossy fibers. Those two deep cerebellar nucleus inputs are thought to be also adaptive, embedding interesting properties in the framework of accurate movements. We show that distributed spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms (STDP) located at different cerebellar sites (parallel fibers to Purkinje cells, mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus cells, and Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nucleus cells) in close-loop simulations provide an explanation for the complex learning properties of the cerebellum in motor learning. Concretely, we propose a new mechanistic cerebellar spiking model. In this new model, deep cerebellar nuclei embed a dual functionality: deep cerebellar nuclei acting as a gain adaptation mechanism and as a facilitator for the slow memory consolidation at mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. Equipping the cerebellum with excitatory (e-STDP) and inhibitory (i-STDP) mechanisms at deep cerebellar nuclei afferents allows the accommodation of synaptic memories that were formed at parallel fibers to Purkinje cells synapses and then transferred to mossy fibers to deep cerebellar nucleus synapses. These adaptive mechanisms also contribute to modulate the deep-cerebellar-nucleus-output firing rate (output gain modulation toward optimizing its working range). PMID:26973504

  5. [Preparation of no-sugar huazhen granules].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Ren, Z; Lin, C

    1997-11-01

    This article introduces the preperation, especially its technologies of spraying, drying and making grain of no-sugar Huazhen Granules (composed of Flos lonicerae, Radix Bupleuri, etc.). Ideal grain can be obtained, the capacity of taking can be reduced greatly. PMID:12572515

  6. Mitochondrial RNA granules: Compartmentalizing mitochondrial gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jourdain, Alexis A.; Boehm, Erik; Maundrell, Kinsey

    2016-01-01

    In mitochondria, DNA replication, gene expression, and RNA degradation machineries coexist within a common nondelimited space, raising the question of how functional compartmentalization of gene expression is achieved. Here, we discuss the recently characterized “mitochondrial RNA granules,” mitochondrial subdomains with an emerging role in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26953349

  7. Eosinophil crystalloid granules: structure, function, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Muniz, Valdirene S.; Weller, Peter F.; Neves, Josiane S.

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophils are granulocytes associated with host defense against parasitic helminths with allergic conditions and more recently, with immunoregulatory responses. Eosinophils are distinguished from leukocytes by their dominant population of cytoplasmic crystalloid (also termed secretory, specific, or secondary) granules that contain robust stores of diverse, preformed cationic proteins. Here, we provide an update on our knowledge about the unique and complex structure of human eosinophil crystalloid granules. We discuss their significance as rich sites of a variety of receptors and review our own recent research findings and those of others that highlight discoveries concerning the function of intracellular receptors and their potential implications in cell signaling. Special focus is provided on how eosinophils might use these intracellular receptors as mechanisms to secrete, selectively and rapidly, cytokines or chemokines and enable cell-free extracellular eosinophil granules to function as independent secretory structures. Potential roles of cell-free eosinophil granules as immune players in the absence of intact eosinophils will also be discussed. PMID:22672875

  8. Importance of genetics in fetal alcohol effects: null mutation of the nNOS gene worsens alcohol-induced cerebellar neuronal losses and behavioral deficits.

    PubMed

    Bonthius, Daniel J; Winters, Zachary; Karacay, Bahri; Bousquet, Samantha Larimer; Bonthius, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is a major target of alcohol-induced damage in the developing brain. However, the cerebella of some children are much more seriously affected than others by prenatal alcohol exposure. As a consequence of in utero alcohol exposure, some children have substantial reductions in cerebellar volume and corresponding neurodevelopmental problems, including microencephaly, ataxia, and balance deficits, while other children who were exposed to similar alcohol quantities are spared. One factor that likely plays a key role in determining the impact of alcohol on the fetal cerebellum is genetics. However, no specific gene variant has yet been identified that worsens cerebellar function as a consequence of developmental alcohol exposure. Previous studies have revealed that mice carrying a homozygous mutation of the gene for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS-/- mice) have more severe acute alcohol-induced neuronal losses from the cerebellum than wild type mice. Therefore, the goals of this study were to determine whether alcohol induces more severe cerebellum-based behavioral deficits in nNOS-/- mice than in wild type mice and to determine whether these worsened behavior deficits are associated with worsened cerebellar neuronal losses. nNOS-/- mice and their wild type controls received alcohol (0.0, 2.2, or 4.4mg/g) daily over postnatal days 4-9. In adulthood, the mice underwent behavioral testing, followed by neuronal quantification. Alcohol caused dose-related deficits in rotarod and balance beam performance in both nNOS-/- and wild type mice. However, the alcohol-induced behavioral deficits were substantially worse in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. Likewise, alcohol exposure led to losses of Purkinje cells and cerebellar granule cells in mice of both genotypes, but the cell losses were more severe in the nNOS-/- mice than in wild type. Behavioral performances were correlated with neuronal number in the nNOS-/- mice, but not in wild type. Thus, homozygous

  9. Insulin granules. Insulin secretory granules control autophagy in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Goginashvili, Alexander; Zhang, Zhirong; Erbs, Eric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Kessler, Pascal; Mihlan, Michael; Pasquier, Adrien; Krupina, Ksenia; Schieber, Nicole; Cinque, Laura; Morvan, Joëlle; Sumara, Izabela; Schwab, Yannick; Settembre, Carmine; Ricci, Romeo

    2015-02-20

    Pancreatic β cells lower insulin release in response to nutrient depletion. The question of whether starved β cells induce macroautophagy, a predominant mechanism maintaining energy homeostasis, remains poorly explored. We found that, in contrast to many mammalian cells, macroautophagy in pancreatic β cells was suppressed upon starvation. Instead, starved β cells induced lysosomal degradation of nascent secretory insulin granules, which was controlled by protein kinase D (PKD), a key player in secretory granule biogenesis. Starvation-induced nascent granule degradation triggered lysosomal recruitment and activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin that suppressed macroautophagy. Switching from macroautophagy to insulin granule degradation was important to keep insulin secretion low upon fasting. Thus, β cells use a PKD-dependent mechanism to adapt to nutrient availability and couple autophagy flux to secretory function.

  10. Sperm Morphology Assessment in Captive Neotropical Primates.

    PubMed

    Swanson, W F; Valle, R R; Carvalho, F M; Arakaki, P R; Rodas-Martínez, A Z; Muniz, Japc; García-Herreros, M

    2016-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate sperm morphology in four neotropical primate species to compare the sperm morphological traits and the sperm morphometric parameters as a basis for establishing normative sperm standards for each species. Data from 80 ejaculates collected from four primate species, Callithrix jacchus, Callimico goeldii, Alouatta caraya and Ateles geoffroyi, were analysed for detection of sperm morphological alterations using subjective World Health Organization (WHO-2010) standards and Sperm Deformity Index (SDI) criteria, objective computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA) and subpopulation sperm determination (SSD) methods. There were multiple differences (p < 0.01) observed among primate species in values obtained from WHO-2010, SDI, CASMA and SSD sperm analysis methods. In addition, multiple significant positive and negative correlations were observed between the sperm morphological traits (SDI, Sperm Deformity Index Head Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Midpiece Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Tail Defects, Normal Sperm, Head Defects, Midpiece Defects and Tail Defects) and the sperm morphometric parameters (SSD, Area (A), Perimeter (P), Length (L), Width (W), Ellipticity, Elongation and Rugosity) (p ≤ 0.046). In conclusion, our findings using different evaluation methods indicate that pronounced sperm morphological variation exists among these four neotropical primate species. Because of the strong relationship observed among morphological and morphometric parameters, these results suggest that application of objective analysis methods could substantially improve the reliability of comparative studies and help to establish valid normative sperm values for neotropical primates. PMID:27260333

  11. Ancient single origin for Malagasy primates.

    PubMed Central

    Yoder, A D; Cartmill, M; Ruvolo, M; Smith, K; Vilgalys, R

    1996-01-01

    We report new evidence that bears decisively on a long-standing controversy in primate systematics. DNA sequence data for the complete cytochrome b gene, combined with an expanded morphological data set, confirm the results of a previous study and again indicate that all extant Malagasy lemurs originated from a single common ancestor. These results, as well as those from other genetic studies, call for a revision of primate classifications in which the dwarf and mouse lemurs are placed within the Afro-Asian lorisiforms. The phylogenetic results, in agreement with paleocontinental data, indicate an African origin for the common ancestor of lemurs and lorises (the Strepsirrhini). The molecular data further suggest the surprising conclusion that lemurs began evolving independently by the early Eocene at the latest. This indicates that the Malagasy primate lineage is more ancient than generally thought and places the split between the two strepsirrhine lineages well before the appearance of known Eocene fossil primates. We conclude that primate origins were marked by rapid speciation and diversification sometime before the late Paleocene. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8643538

  12. Primate energy expenditure and life history

    PubMed Central

    Pontzer, Herman; Raichlen, David A.; Gordon, Adam D.; Schroepfer-Walker, Kara K.; Hare, Brian; O’Neill, Matthew C.; Muldoon, Kathleen M.; Dunsworth, Holly M.; Wood, Brian M.; Isler, Karin; Burkart, Judith; Irwin, Mitchell; Shumaker, Robert W.; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth V.; Ross, Stephen R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans and other primates are distinct among placental mammals in having exceptionally slow rates of growth, reproduction, and aging. Primates’ slow life history schedules are generally thought to reflect an evolved strategy of allocating energy away from growth and reproduction and toward somatic investment, particularly to the development and maintenance of large brains. Here we examine an alternative explanation: that primates’ slow life histories reflect low total energy expenditure (TEE) (kilocalories per day) relative to other placental mammals. We compared doubly labeled water measurements of TEE among 17 primate species with similar measures for other placental mammals. We found that primates use remarkably little energy each day, expending on average only 50% of the energy expected for a placental mammal of similar mass. Such large differences in TEE are not easily explained by differences in physical activity, and instead appear to reflect systemic metabolic adaptation for low energy expenditures in primates. Indeed, comparisons of wild and captive primate populations indicate similar levels of energy expenditure. Broad interspecific comparisons of growth, reproduction, and maximum life span indicate that primates’ slow metabolic rates contribute to their characteristically slow life histories. PMID:24474770

  13. Sperm Morphology Assessment in Captive Neotropical Primates.

    PubMed

    Swanson, W F; Valle, R R; Carvalho, F M; Arakaki, P R; Rodas-Martínez, A Z; Muniz, Japc; García-Herreros, M

    2016-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate sperm morphology in four neotropical primate species to compare the sperm morphological traits and the sperm morphometric parameters as a basis for establishing normative sperm standards for each species. Data from 80 ejaculates collected from four primate species, Callithrix jacchus, Callimico goeldii, Alouatta caraya and Ateles geoffroyi, were analysed for detection of sperm morphological alterations using subjective World Health Organization (WHO-2010) standards and Sperm Deformity Index (SDI) criteria, objective computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA) and subpopulation sperm determination (SSD) methods. There were multiple differences (p < 0.01) observed among primate species in values obtained from WHO-2010, SDI, CASMA and SSD sperm analysis methods. In addition, multiple significant positive and negative correlations were observed between the sperm morphological traits (SDI, Sperm Deformity Index Head Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Midpiece Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Tail Defects, Normal Sperm, Head Defects, Midpiece Defects and Tail Defects) and the sperm morphometric parameters (SSD, Area (A), Perimeter (P), Length (L), Width (W), Ellipticity, Elongation and Rugosity) (p ≤ 0.046). In conclusion, our findings using different evaluation methods indicate that pronounced sperm morphological variation exists among these four neotropical primate species. Because of the strong relationship observed among morphological and morphometric parameters, these results suggest that application of objective analysis methods could substantially improve the reliability of comparative studies and help to establish valid normative sperm values for neotropical primates.

  14. Neocortex size predicts deception rate in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Richard W.; Corp, Nadia

    2004-01-01

    Human brain organization is built upon a more ancient adaptation, the large brain of simian primates: on average, monkeys and apes have brains twice as large as expected for mammals of their size, principally as a result of neocortical enlargement. Testing the adaptive benefit of this evolutionary specialization depends on finding an association between brain size and function in primates. However, most cognitive capacities have been assessed in only a restricted range of species under laboratory conditions. Deception of conspecifics in social circumstances is an exception, because a corpus of field data is available that encompasses all major lines of the primate radiation. We show that the use of deception within the primates is well predicted by the neocortical volume, when observer effort is controlled for; by contrast, neither the size of the rest of the brain nor the group size exert significant effects. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that neocortical expansion has been driven by social challenges among the primates. Complex social manipulations such as deception are thought to be based upon rapid learning and extensive social knowledge; thus, learning in social contexts may be constrained by neocortical size. PMID:15306289

  15. Cerebellar unit responses of the mossy fibre system to passive movements in the decerebrate cat. I. Responses to static parameters.

    PubMed

    Kolb, F P; Rubia, F J; Bauswein, E

    1987-01-01

    1) Experiments were designed to detect how static parameters of natural, passive hand movements are encoded and integrated within the cerebellar cortex. For this purpose unit activity was recorded extracellularly from presumed mossy fibres (MF), presumed granule cells (GrC) and from Purkinje cells (PC) discharging with simple spikes (SS) and complex spikes (CS). With respect to the PC, our interest was focussed primarily on the SS activity. The recordings were performed in the intermediate part of the cerebellar anterior lobe of decerebrate cats. The animal's forepaw was passively moved around the wrist joint by an electronically controlled device. The movements were exactly reproducible so that peristimulus time histograms of the unit activity could be constructed. 2) At the input level (MF) and at the first level of integration within the cerebellar cortex (GrC), patterns with similar discharge characteristics were found. Such patterns could, to a limited extent, also be detected at the cerebellar output (SS of PC). However, in most cases of SS discharge, patterns were found with weak correlation between the tonic activity and static parameters of the movements. 3) Absolute paw position, amplitude, and duration of movements were found to be related over wide ranges to the activities of MF and GrC. Absolute position is directly encoded by tonic discharge during the low or high holding phases. Beside this, units were found without a correlation between the tonic discharge and the position of the nonmoving paw. However, in these units it was sometimes observed that the information about the momentary position or the information about the mean position was sometimes conveyed exclusively during the proceeding upward or downward movement. Thus, information about static parameters was transmitted only at times when a dynamic parameter (such as velocity) occurred. This type of position information encoding is termed "indirect mode of transmission". 4) A specific

  16. Distribution and phenotypes of unipolar brush cells in relation to the granule cell system of the rat cochlear nuclear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Diño, Maria. R.; Mugnaini, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    In most mammals the cochlear nuclear complex (CN) contains a distributed system of granule cells (GCS), whose parallel fiber axons innervate the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN). Like their counterpart in cerebellum, CN granules are innervated by mossy fibers of various origins. The GCS is complemented by unipolar brush (UBCs) and Golgi cells, and by stellate and cartwheel cells of the DCN. This cerebellum-like microcircuit modulates the activity of the DCN’s main projection neurons, the pyramidal, giant and tuberculoventral neurons, and is thought to improve auditory performance by integrating acoustic and proprioceptive information. In this paper, we focus on the UBCs, a chemically heterogeneous neuronal population, using antibodies to calretinin, mGluR1α epidermal growth factor substrate 8 (Eps8) and the transcription factor Tbr2. Eps8 and Tbr2 labeled most of the CN’s UBCs, if not the entire population, while calretinin and mGluR1α distinguished two largely separate subsets with overlapping distributions. By double labeling with antibodies to Tbr2 and the α6 GABAA-receptor subunit, we found that UBCs populate all regions of the GCS and occur at remarkably high densities in the DCN and subpeduncular corner, but rarely in the lamina. Although GCS subregions likely share the same microcircuitry, their dissimilar UBC densities suggest they may be functionally distinct. UBCs and granules are also present in regions previously not included in the GCS, namely the rostrodorsal magnocellular portions of VCN, vestibular nerve root, trapezoid body, spinal tract and sensory and principal nuclei of the trigeminal nerve, and cerebellar peduncles. The UBC’s dendritic brush receives AMPA- and NMDA-mediated input from an individual mossy fiber, favoring singularity of input, and its axon most likely forms several mossy fiber-like endings that target numerous granule cells and other UBCs, as in the cerebellum. The UBCs therefore, may amplify afferent signals temporally and

  17. Comparison of PC12 and Cerebellar Granule Cell Cultures for Evaluating Neurite Outgrowth Using High Content Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of high-throughput assays for chemical screening and hazard identification is a pressing priority worldwide. One approach uses in vitro, cell-based assays which recapitulate biological events observed in vivo. Neurite outgrowth is one such critical cellular process un...

  18. The absence of pleiotrophin modulates gene expression in the hippocampus in vivo and in cerebellar granule cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    González-Castillo, Celia; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Márquez-Aguirre, Ana Laura; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Pallás, Mercé; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E

    2016-09-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted growth factor recently proposed to act as a neuromodulatory peptide in the Central Nervous System. PTN appears to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neural disorders, and it has also been implicated in learning and memory. Specifically, PTN-deficient mice exhibit a lower threshold for LTP induction in the hippocampus, which is attenuated in mice overexpressing PTN. However, there is little information about the signaling systems recruited by PTN to modulate neural activity. To address this issue, the gene expression profile in hippocampus of mice lacking PTN was analyzed using microarrays of 22,000 genes. In addition, we corroborated the effect of the absence of PTN on the expression of these genes by silencing this growth factor in primary neuronal cultures in vitro. The microarray analysis identified 102 genes that are differentially expressed (z-score>3.0) in PTN null mice, and the expression of eight of those modified in the hippocampus of KO mice was also modified in vitro after silencing PTN in cultured neurons with siRNAs. The data obtained indicate that the absence of PTN affects AKT pathway response and modulates the expression of genes related with neuroprotection (Mgst3 and Estrogen receptor 1, Ers 1) and cell differentiation (Caspase 6, Nestin, and Odz4), both in vivo and in vitro.

  19. COMPARISON OF NEUROSCREEN-1 AND CEREBELLAR GRANULE CELL CULTURES FOR EVALUATING NEURITE OUTGROWTH USING THE ARRAYSCAN HIGH CONTENT ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major challenge facing the Environmental Protection Agency is the development of high-throughput screening assays amendable to resource-efficient developmental neurotoxicity for chemical screening and toxicity prioritization. One approach uses in vitro, cell-based assays which...

  20. The absence of pleiotrophin modulates gene expression in the hippocampus in vivo and in cerebellar granule cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    González-Castillo, Celia; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Márquez-Aguirre, Ana Laura; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Pallás, Mercé; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E

    2016-09-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a secreted growth factor recently proposed to act as a neuromodulatory peptide in the Central Nervous System. PTN appears to be involved in neurodegenerative diseases and neural disorders, and it has also been implicated in learning and memory. Specifically, PTN-deficient mice exhibit a lower threshold for LTP induction in the hippocampus, which is attenuated in mice overexpressing PTN. However, there is little information about the signaling systems recruited by PTN to modulate neural activity. To address this issue, the gene expression profile in hippocampus of mice lacking PTN was analyzed using microarrays of 22,000 genes. In addition, we corroborated the effect of the absence of PTN on the expression of these genes by silencing this growth factor in primary neuronal cultures in vitro. The microarray analysis identified 102 genes that are differentially expressed (z-score>3.0) in PTN null mice, and the expression of eight of those modified in the hippocampus of KO mice was also modified in vitro after silencing PTN in cultured neurons with siRNAs. The data obtained indicate that the absence of PTN affects AKT pathway response and modulates the expression of genes related with neuroprotection (Mgst3 and Estrogen receptor 1, Ers 1) and cell differentiation (Caspase 6, Nestin, and Odz4), both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:27468976

  1. Modeling the Generation of Output by the Cerebellar Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Steuber, Volker; Jaeger, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Functional aspects of network integration in the cerebellar cortex have been studied experimentally and modeled in much detail ever since the early work by theoreticians such as Marr, Albus and Braitenberg more than 40 years ago. In contrast, much less is known about cerebellar processing at the output stage, namely in the cerebellar nuclei (CN). Here, input from Purkinje cells converges to control CN neuron spiking via GABAergic inhibition, before the output from the CN reaches cerebellar targets such as the brainstem and the motor thalamus. In this article we review modeling studies that address how the CN may integrate cerebellar cortical inputs, and what kind of signals may be transmitted. Specific hypotheses in the literature contrast rate coding and temporal coding of information in the spiking output from the CN. One popular hypothesis states that postinhibitory rebound spiking may be an important mechanism by which Purkinje cell inhibition is turned into CN output spiking, but this hypothesis remains controversial. Rate coding clearly does take place, but in what way it may be augmented by temporal codes remains to be more clearly established. Several candidate mechanisms distinct from rebound spiking are discussed, such as the significance of spike time correlations between Purkinje cell pools to determine CN spike timing, irregularity of Purkinje cell spiking as a determinant of CN firing rate, and shared brief pauses between Purkinje cell pools that may trigger individual CN spikes precisely. PMID:23200193

  2. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-García, M Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, José Á

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  3. Cerebellar liponeurocytoma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    WANG, KE; NI, MING; WANG, LIANG; JIA, GUIJUN; WU, ZHEN; ZHANG, LIWEI; ZHANG, JUNTING

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar liponeurocytoma is rare, and the clinical characteristics and treatment strategy remain unclear. In the present study, a case of cerebellar liponeurocytoma was retrospectively reported and a literature review was performed. A 45-year-old female presented due to occipital headaches, exhibiting a hoarse voice and a broad-based gait. Pre-operative magnetic resonance images revealed a lesion occupying the right hemisphere of the cerebellum and the inferior vermis, compressing the medulla oblongata from the right side, and extending through the foramen magnum to the C2 level. A total resection was performed, and pathological analysis of the lesion showed positivity for synaptophysin, S-100 and neuronal nuclear antigen, partial positivity for Olig-2, and negativity for glial fibrillary acidic protein and epithelial membrane antigen. In addition, the Ki-67 index was low (<5%). Thus, a diagnosis of cerebellar liponeurocytoma was determined. Total resection was successful and the patient was followed up closely. A review of the literature showed that cerebellar liponeurocytoma is mainly located in the cerebellum, with rare extra-cerebellar cases. Certain studies have suggested that the tumor may be located supratentorially and subtentorially, and should be renamed as solely liponeurocytoma. Total resection of the tumor contributes to an improved prognosis, while a subtotal resection and high Ki-67 index lead to recurrence. The tumor is similar to a tumor of low malignancy, with long-term recurrence. Radiation is recommended when there is residual tumor, recurrence or when the Ki-67 is high. PMID:26893691

  4. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Porras-García, M. Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M.; Armengol, José Á.

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input–output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum. PMID:23630472

  5. Motor learning of mice lacking cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Porras-García, M Elena; Ruiz, Rocío; Pérez-Villegas, Eva M; Armengol, José Á

    2013-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a key role in the acquisition and execution of motor tasks whose physiological foundations were postulated on Purkinje cells' long-term depression (LTD). Numerous research efforts have been focused on understanding the cerebellum as a site of learning and/or memory storage. However, the controversy on which part of the cerebellum participates in motor learning, and how the process takes place, remains unsolved. In fact, it has been suggested that cerebellar cortex, deep cerebellar nuclei, and/or their combination with some brain structures other than the cerebellum are responsible for motor learning. Different experimental approaches have been used to tackle this question (cerebellar lesions, pharmacological agonist and/or antagonist of cerebellar neurotransmitters, virus tract tracings, etc.). One of these approaches is the study of spontaneous mutations affecting the cerebellar cortex and depriving it of its main input-output organizer (i.e., the Purkinje cell). In this review, we discuss the results obtained in our laboratory in motor learning of both Lurcher (Lc/+) and tambaleante (tbl/tbl) mice as models of Purkinje-cell-devoid cerebellum.

  6. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  7. Lateralized cognitive deficits in children following cerebellar lesions.

    PubMed

    Scott, R B; Stoodley, C J; Anslow, P; Paul, C; Stein, J F; Sugden, E M; Mitchell, C D

    2001-10-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to examine the developing cognitive profiles of children with cerebellar tumours in a consecutive series of clinical patients. MRI and longitudinal intellectual profiles were obtained on seven children (two females, five males; mean age 3 years at diagnosis; mean age 7 years at first assessment). Tumours in three of the children were astrocytomas; of the remaining tumours, two were medulloblastomas, one low-grade glioma, and one ependymoma. In right-handed children, we observed an association between greater damage to right cerebellar structures and a plateauing in verbal and/or literacy skills. In contrast, greater damage to left cerebellar structures was associated with delayed or impaired non-verbal/spatial skills. Long-term cognitive development of the children studied tentatively supports a role for the cerebellum in learning/development. These findings suggest that lateralized cerebellar damage may selectively impair the development of cognitive functions subserved by the contralateral cerebral hemisphere and, in addition, that all children with cerebellar lesions in early childhood should routinely undergo long-term monitoring of their intellectual development. PMID:11665825

  8. Experimental investigation of granule size and shape dynamics in twin-screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashish; Vercruysse, Jurgen; Bellandi, Giacomo; Gernaey, Krist V; Vervaet, Chris; Remon, Jean Paul; De Beer, Thomas; Nopens, Ingmar

    2014-11-20

    A twin-screw granulator (TSG), a promising equipment for continuous high shear wet granulation (HSWG), achieves the desired level of mixing by a combination of the appropriate screw configuration and a suitable set of process settings (e.g. feed rate, screw speed, etc.), thus producing a certain granule size and shape distribution (GSSD). However, the primary sizing and shaping mechanism behind the resulting distribution is not well understood due to the opacity of the multiphase system in the granulator. This study experimentally characterised the GSSD dynamics along the TSG barrel length in order to understand the function of individual screw modules and process settings, as well as their interaction. Particle size analysis of granules collected at the outlet of the TSG suggested significant interaction between the process and screw configuration parameters influencing the heterogeneity in the GSSD. By characterising the samples collected along the screw length, a variable influence of the screw modules at different process conditions was observed. At low liquid-to-solid ratio (L/S), the first kneading module seemed to play a significant role in mixing, whereas the second kneading module was found to be more involved in reshaping the granules. At high L/S and high throughput, aggregation mainly took place in the second kneading module changing the GSSD. The results obtained from this study will be further used for the calibration and validation of a mechanistic model and, hence, support future development of a more detailed understanding of the HSWG process in a TSG. PMID:25234863

  9. Amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules affected by granule surface area.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kong, B W; Kim, M J; Lee, S H

    2008-11-01

    Initial stage of hydrolysis of native starch granules with various amylolytic enzymes, alpha-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, glucoamylase I (GA-I) and II (GA-II) from Aspergillus niger, and beta-amylase from sweet potato showed that the reaction was apparently affected by a specific surface area of the starch granules. The ratios of the reciprocal of initial velocity of each amylolytic hydrolysis for native potato and maize starch to that for rice with the amylolytic enzymes were nearly equivalent to the ratio of surface area per mass of the 2 starch granules to that of rice, that is, 6.94 and 2.25, respectively. Thus, the reciprocal of initial velocity of each enzymatic hydrolysis as expressed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot was a linear function of the reciprocal of surface area for each starch granule. As a result, it is concluded that amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules is governed by the specific surface area, not by the mass concentration, of each granule. PMID:19021791

  10. Aerobic granulation of protein-rich granules from nitrogen-lean wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-You; Ju, Sheau-Pyng; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Proteins (PN)-rich granules are stable in structure in long-term reactor operations. This study proposed to cultivate PN-rich granules with PN/polysaccharides (PS) >20 from nitrogen lean wastewater, with ammonia-nitrogen as sole nitrogen source at chemical oxygen demand (COD)/N of 153.8. The yielded granules can sustain their structural stability in sequencing batch reactor mode for sufficient treatment of wastewaters up to 7000mg/L COD and with COD/N<500 and in continuous-flow reactor for successful 216-d treatment of wastewaters up to organic loading rate (OLR) of 39kg/m(3)-d. The produced granules were enriched with Firmicutes and β-proteobacteria as dominating strains. More than 58% of the nitrogen fed in the nitrogen-lean wastewater is converted to the PN in the granules. The replacement of ammonia by nitrate as sole nitrogen source led to granules enriched with γ-proteobacteria which are easily deteriorated at low OLR. PMID:27394992

  11. Amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules affected by granule surface area.

    PubMed

    Kim, J C; Kong, B W; Kim, M J; Lee, S H

    2008-11-01

    Initial stage of hydrolysis of native starch granules with various amylolytic enzymes, alpha-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, glucoamylase I (GA-I) and II (GA-II) from Aspergillus niger, and beta-amylase from sweet potato showed that the reaction was apparently affected by a specific surface area of the starch granules. The ratios of the reciprocal of initial velocity of each amylolytic hydrolysis for native potato and maize starch to that for rice with the amylolytic enzymes were nearly equivalent to the ratio of surface area per mass of the 2 starch granules to that of rice, that is, 6.94 and 2.25, respectively. Thus, the reciprocal of initial velocity of each enzymatic hydrolysis as expressed in a Lineweaver-Burk plot was a linear function of the reciprocal of surface area for each starch granule. As a result, it is concluded that amylolytic hydrolysis of native starch granules is governed by the specific surface area, not by the mass concentration, of each granule.

  12. Wave granulation in the Venus' atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    In unique venusian planetary system the solid body rotates very slowly and the detached massive atmosphere very rapidly. However both together orbit Sun and their characteristic orbital frequency -1/ 0.62 year - places them in the regular row of planets assigning them characteristic only for Venus wave produced granulation with a granule size πR/6 [1& others]. Remind other bodies in the row with their granule sizes inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: solar photosphere πR/60, Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1 (R-a body radius). Three planets have atmospheres with wave granulations having sizes equal to their lithospheric granules. But Venus, unlike Earth and Mars, has the detached atmosphere that can be considered as a separate body with its own orbital frequency around the center of the Venus' system. According to the correlation between an orbital frequency and a wave granule size the venusian wave granule will be πR/338 (a scale can be Earth: orbital frequency 1/ 1year, granule size πR/4 or Sun: frequency 1/1month, granule size πR/60). So, πR/338 = 57 km. This theoretical size is rather close to that observed by Galileo SC through a violet filter "the filamentary dark features. . . are here revealed to be composed of several dark nodules, like beads on a string, each about 60 miles across" (PIA00072). Actually all Venus' disc seen from a distance π1.7mln.miles is peppered with these fine features seen on a limit of resolution. So, the Venus' atmosphere has two main frequencies in the solar system with corresponding wave granulations: around Sun 1/225 days (granule πR/6) and around Venus 1/ 4 days (granule πR/338). As was done for the Moon, Phobos, Titan and other icy satellites of Saturn [2, 3, 4 & others] one can apply the wave modulation technique also for the atmosphere of Venus. The lower frequency modulates the higher one by dividing and multiplying it thus getting two side frequencies and

  13. Wave granulation in the Venus' atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    2007-08-01

    In unique venusian planetary system the solid body rotates very slowly and the detached massive atmosphere very rapidly. However both together orbit Sun and their characteristic orbital frequency -1/ 0.62 year - places them in the regular row of planets assigning them characteristic only for Venus wave produced granulation with a granule size πR/6 [1& others]. Remind other bodies in the row with their granule sizes inversely proportional to their orbital frequencies: solar photosphere πR/60, Mercury πR/16, Venus πR/6, Earth πR/4, Mars πR/2, asteroids πR/1 (R-a body radius). Three planets have atmospheres with wave granulations having sizes equal to their lithospheric granules. But Venus, unlike Earth and Mars, has the detached atmosphere that can be considered as a separate body with its own orbital frequency around the center of the Venus' system. According to the correlation between an orbital frequency and a wave granule size the venusian wave granule will be πR/338 (a scale can be Earth: orbital frequency 1/ 1year, granule size πR/4 or Sun: frequency 1/1month, granule size πR/60). So, πR/338 = 57 km. This theoretical size is rather close to that observed by Galileo SC through a violet filter "the filamentary dark features. . . are here revealed to be composed of several dark nodules, like beads on a string, each about 60 miles across" (PIA00072). Actually all Venus' disc seen from a distance ~1.7mln.miles is peppered with these fine features seen on a limit of resolution. So, the Venus' atmosphere has two main frequencies in the solar system with corresponding wave granulations: around Sun 1/225 days (granule πR/6) and around Venus 1/ 4 days (granule πR/338). As was done for the Moon, Phobos, Titan and other icy satellites of Saturn [2, 3, 4 & others] one can apply the wave modulation technique also for the atmosphere of Venus. The lower frequency modulates the higher one by dividing and multiplying it thus getting two side frequencies and

  14. Convergent evolution in primates and an insectivore

    SciTech Connect

    Boffelli, Dario; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-04-16

    The cardiovascular risk factor apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) has a puzzling distribution among mammals, its presence being limited to a subset of primates and a member of the insectivore lineage, the hedgehog. To explore the evolutionary history of apo(a), we performed extensive genomic sequence comparisons of multiple species with and without an apo(a) gene product, such as human, baboon, hedgehog, lemurand mouse. This analysis indicated that apo(a) arose independently in a subset of primates, including baboon and human, and an insectivore, the hedgehog, and was not simply lost by species lacking it. The similar structural domains shared by the hedgehog and primate apo(a) indicate that they were formed by a unique molecular mechanism involving the convergent evolution of paralogous genes in these distantspecies.

  15. Progress with nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Don P; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Pau, K-Y Francis; Lester, Linda

    2004-12-01

    Embryonic stem cells hold potential in the fields of regenerative medicine, developmental biology, tissue regeneration, disease pathogenicity, and drug discovery. Embryonic stem (ES) cell lines are now available in primates, including man, rhesus, and cynomologous monkeys. Monkey ES cells serve as invaluable clinically relevant models for studies that can't be conducted in humans because of practical or ethical limitations, or in rodents because of differences in physiology and anatomy. Here, we review the current status of nonhuman primate research with ES cells, beginning with a description of their isolation, characterization, and availability. Substantial limitations still plague the use of primate ES cells, such as their required growth on feeder layers, poor cloning efficiency, and restricted availability. The ability to produce homogenous populations of both undifferentiated as well as differentiated phenotypes is an important challenge, and genetic approaches to achieving these objectives are discussed. Finally, safety, efficiency, and feasibility issues relating to the transplantation of ES-derived cells are considered.

  16. Protopithecus: rediscovering the first fossil primate.

    PubMed

    Hartwig, W C

    1995-01-01

    The earliest discoveries of extinct primates and humans profoundly affected the course of evolutionary theory as a scientific model for explaining life and its diversity through time. The absence of such fossils in the early nineteenth century provided important negative evidence to the competing French intellectual schools of Lamarckian evolutionism and Cuvierian catastrophism. Indeed, the first recognition of extinct primates fell serendipitously between the death of Cuvier in 1832 and the revolutionary writings of Darwin in 1859. Largely unknown to history, however, is that four different European scholars, working on three continents, independently discovered and recognized extinct primates within a few months of each other in 1836. The first of these to be formally named, Protopithecus, is ironically the least well known despite being the largest monkey ever discovered in the western hemisphere. The reasons for this forgotten first discovery reflect a general unawareness of South American mammals, and propagation of misinterpretation at a critical time in the history of primatology.

  17. Primate color vision: a comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Gerald H

    2008-01-01

    Thirty years ago virtually everything known about primate color vision derived from psychophysical studies of normal and color-defective humans and from physiological investigations of the visual system of the macaque monkey, the most popular of human surrogates for this purpose. The years since have witnessed much progress toward the goal of understanding this remarkable feature of primate vision. Among many advances, investigations focused on naturally occurring variations in color vision in a wide range of nonhuman primate species have proven to be particularly valuable. Results from such studies have been central to our expanding understanding of the interrelationships between opsin genes, cone photopigments, neural organization, and color vision. This work is also yielding valuable insights into the evolution of color vision.

  18. The ecology of primate material culture.

    PubMed

    Koops, Kathelijne; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; van Schaik, Carel P

    2014-11-01

    Tool use in extant primates may inform our understanding of the conditions that favoured the expansion of hominin technology and material culture. The 'method of exclusion' has, arguably, confirmed the presence of culture in wild animal populations by excluding ecological and genetic explanations for geographical variation in behaviour. However, this method neglects ecological influences on culture, which, ironically, may be critical for understanding technology and thus material culture. We review all the current evidence for the role of ecology in shaping material culture in three habitual tool-using non-human primates: chimpanzees, orangutans and capuchin monkeys. We show that environmental opportunity, rather than necessity, is the main driver. We argue that a better understanding of primate technology requires explicit investigation of the role of ecological conditions. We propose a model in which three sets of factors, namely environment, sociality and cognition, influence invention, transmission and retention of material culture.

  19. Genetic correlates of the evolving primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Vallender, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The tremendous shifts in the size, structure, and function of the brain during primate evolution are ultimately caused by changes at the genetic level. Understanding what these changes are and how they effect the phenotypic changes observed lies at the heart of understanding evolutionary change. This chapter focuses on understanding the genetic basis of primate brain evolution, considering the substrates and mechanisms through which genetic change occurs. It also discusses the implications that our current understandings and tools have for what we have already discovered and where our studies will head in the future. While genetic and genomic studies have identified many regions undergoing positive selection during primate evolution, the findings are certainly not exhaustive and functional relevance remains to be confirmed. Nevertheless, a strong foundation has been built upon which future studies will emerge. PMID:22230621

  20. Lipoprotein(a): nonhuman primate models.

    PubMed

    Makino, K; Scanu, A M

    1991-09-01

    Lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is a low density lipoprotein which has apo(a) disulfide-linked to apoB100. Apo(a) has recently been shown to have a striking homology with plasminogen, a knowledge that has stimulated a lot of interest in the mechanism of atherogenicity and thrombogenicity of this lipoprotein particle. Several studies have documented the presence of Lp(a) in nonhuman primates with particular reference to the rhesus monkeys and baboons. The Lp(a) of rhesus monkey is structurally very similar to that of humans, except for the absence of kringle V and the amino acid composition of the catalytic region. The Lp(a) of nonhuman primates, like their human counterparts, exhibit a wide range of interindividual plasma levels and also a wide size polymorphism of apo(a). Nonhuman primates appear to represent a good model for the study of the structure and biology of Lp(a).