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Sample records for primate foveal confluence

  1. Disruption of Foveal Space Impairs Discrimination of Peripheral Objects.

    PubMed

    Weldon, Kimberly B; Rich, Anina N; Woolgar, Alexandra; Williams, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Visual space is retinotopically mapped such that peripheral objects are processed in a cortical region outside the region that represents central vision. Despite this well-known fact, neuroimaging studies have found information about peripheral objects in the foveal confluence, the cortical region representing the fovea. Further, this information is behaviorally relevant: disrupting the foveal confluence using transcranial magnetic stimulation impairs discrimination of peripheral objects at time-points consistent with a disruption of feedback. If the foveal confluence receives feedback of information about peripheral objects to boost vision, there should be behavioral consequences of this phenomenon. Here, we tested the effect of foveal distractors at different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs) on discrimination of peripheral targets. Participants performed a discrimination task on target objects presented in the periphery while fixating centrally. A visual distractor presented at the fovea ~100 ms after presentation of the targets disrupted performance more than a central distractor presented at other SOAs. This was specific to a central distractor; a peripheral distractor at the same time point did not have the same effect. These results are consistent with the claim that foveal retinotopic cortex is recruited for extra-foveal perception. This study describes a new paradigm for investigating the nature of the foveal feedback phenomenon and demonstrates the importance of this feedback in peripheral vision.

  2. Foveal and extra-foveal orientation discrimination.

    PubMed

    Sally, Sharon L; Gurnsey, Rick

    2007-11-01

    Performance can often be made equal across the visual field by scaling peripherally presented stimuli according to F = 1 + E/E (2) where E (2) is the eccentricity at which stimulus size must double to maintain foveal performance levels. Sally and Gurnsey (Vision Res 43:1375-1385, 2003 and Vision Res 44:2719-2727, 2004) have previously shown that estimates of E (2) for orientation discrimination are significantly larger (i.e., less spatial scaling is required) at stimulus contrasts near detection threshold than at contrasts well above detection threshold. To examine the nature of this effect parametrically we measured orientation discrimination thresholds at 0 degrees and 10 degrees eccentricity for three levels of Michelson contrast (3, 12 and 48%) and three stimulus length-to-width aspect ratios (36.4, 9.1 and 2.3) for a range of line sizes (0.19 degrees -36 degrees visual angle). On average, E (2) values decreased as stimulus contrast decreased, consistent with the previous results of Sally and Gurnsey (Vision Res 43:1375-1385, 2003 and Vision Res 44:2719-2727, 2004). It is proposed that contrast reductions have a proportionally larger effect on small orientation-selective units than large ones and thus produce a greater rightward shift of acuity functions (orientation threshold vs. size) at the fovea than in the periphery. This explains why less spatial scaling is required to equate foveal and peripheral acuity functions at low contrasts than at high contrasts.

  3. Synthetic Foveal Imaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoenk, Michael; Monacos, Steve; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic Foveal imaging Technology (SyFT) is an emerging discipline of image capture and image-data processing that offers the prospect of greatly increased capabilities for real-time processing of large, high-resolution images (including mosaic images) for such purposes as automated recognition and tracking of moving objects of interest. SyFT offers a solution to the image-data processing problem arising from the proposed development of gigapixel mosaic focal-plane image-detector assemblies for very wide field-of-view imaging with high resolution for detecting and tracking sparse objects or events within narrow subfields of view. In order to identify and track the objects or events without the means of dynamic adaptation to be afforded by SyFT, it would be necessary to post-process data from an image-data space consisting of terabytes of data. Such post-processing would be time-consuming and, as a consequence, could result in missing significant events that could not be observed at all due to the time evolution of such events or could not be observed at required levels of fidelity without such real-time adaptations as adjusting focal-plane operating conditions or aiming of the focal plane in different directions to track such events. The basic concept of foveal imaging is straightforward: In imitation of a natural eye, a foveal-vision image sensor is designed to offer higher resolution in a small region of interest (ROI) within its field of view. Foveal vision reduces the amount of unwanted information that must be transferred from the image sensor to external image-data-processing circuitry. The aforementioned basic concept is not new in itself: indeed, image sensors based on these concepts have been described in several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. Active-pixel integrated-circuit image sensors that can be programmed in real time to effect foveal artificial vision on demand are one such example. What is new in SyFT is a synergistic combination of recent

  4. Synthetic Foveal Imaging Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monacos, Steve P. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Apparatuses and methods are disclosed that create a synthetic fovea in order to identify and highlight interesting portions of an image for further processing and rapid response. Synthetic foveal imaging implements a parallel processing architecture that uses reprogrammable logic to implement embedded, distributed, real-time foveal image processing from different sensor types while simultaneously allowing for lossless storage and retrieval of raw image data. Real-time, distributed, adaptive processing of multi-tap image sensors with coordinated processing hardware used for each output tap is enabled. In mosaic focal planes, a parallel-processing network can be implemented that treats the mosaic focal plane as a single ensemble rather than a set of isolated sensors. Various applications are enabled for imaging and robotic vision where processing and responding to enormous amounts of data quickly and efficiently is important.

  5. Foveal Avascular Zone and Its Relationship to Foveal Pit Shape

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Toco Y. P.; Zhong, Zhangyi; Song, Hongxin; Burns, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the retinal microvasculature at the fovea and peripheral retina in humans using the adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). To examine the association of foveal avascular zone (FAZ) and foveal pit morphology. Methods Retinal imaging of the foveal capillary network was performed on 11 subjects (15 eyes; age range 20–54) with an AOSLO. Standard deviation maps of the AOSLO images were generated from ~10–30 frames, producing high resolution maps delineating the complete capillary distribution of the retina. Foveal pit morphology was investigated in the same subjects by using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). In an additional subject, only a relatively large retinal vasculature map was obtained using AOSLO. Results A well demarcated FAZ was seen in 11 subjects tested with foveal capillary imaging. There was considerable individual variation in the size and shape of the FAZ. The mean FAZ area and mean FAZ effective diameter were 0.33mm2 and 622μm, respectively. Foveal thickness was found to be negatively correlated with the FAZ effective diameter. Conclusions The structure of the capillary network could be evaluated in the fovea and parafovea using our approach. We find that a smaller FAZ is associated with a narrower foveal pit opening and a thicker fovea. PMID:22426172

  6. CMOS foveal image sensor chip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandera, Cesar (Inventor); Scott, Peter (Inventor); Sridhar, Ramalingam (Inventor); Xia, Shu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A foveal image sensor integrated circuit comprising a plurality of CMOS active pixel sensors arranged both within and about a central fovea region of the chip. The pixels in the central fovea region have a smaller size than the pixels arranged in peripheral rings about the central region. A new photocharge normalization scheme and associated circuitry normalizes the output signals from the different size pixels in the array. The pixels are assembled into a multi-resolution rectilinear foveal image sensor chip using a novel access scheme to reduce the number of analog RAM cells needed. Localized spatial resolution declines monotonically with offset from the imager's optical axis, analogous to biological foveal vision.

  7. Study of foveal tritanopia.

    PubMed

    Cobb, S R; McCrossan, M A

    1978-06-01

    This paper discusses the possibility there is a difference between men and women in foveal tritanopia. The discussion is based on a study carried out by Cobb and McCrossan in 1973 in which they measured the luminosity curves of the fovea in five women and five men. The instrument used was a Wright colorimeter which measured the luminosity curves with a 2 degree 12' field and a 0 degree 12.5' field. Comparison shows a loss of sensitivity to blue for the curve obtained with the 0 degrees 12.5 relative to the curve obtained with the 2 degree 12' field. Male subjects obtained two maxima with the 0 degree 12.5' field, usually at 555 nm and 595 nm, whereas for females on maximum, usually at 555 nm and from 555 nm to the long wavelength end of the spectrum, curves followed loosely the curve obtained with the 2 degree 12' field. Thus, a significant difference was found between the males and the females in their response to the longer wave-lengths when the 0 degree 12.5' (0 degree 12.5') field was used. In addition to this there were also large individual differences in the matching points obtained by the males while the differences among the females were much smaller.

  8. Foveal photoreceptor explanation of short-term visual acuity recovery associated with laser-induced foveal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langus, Amir; Zwick, Harry; Stuck, Bruce E.; Belkin, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Both human laser accident cases and non-human primate behavioral studies demonstrate the possibility of full visual acuity recovery following foveal laser injury. Current explanations of such recovery require suppositions of complex retinal reorganization dynamics or neural reorganization at higher order visual brain systems. However, recent investigation based on data of retinal photoreceptor and ganglion cell topography and connectivity, suggest that the amount of static inherent plasticity, already exists at the retinal level, may also explain visual acuity recovery in the presence of laser-induced foveal damage. Modeling the off-axis visual acuity while utilizing this data, produces a more gradual fall-off in visual acuity, and supports the notion that visual acuity recovery may reside in the topographical organization of the cones. Moreover, considering the filling-in phenomena, which can conceal the presence of retinal damage from being recognized, together with eye movements, could nullify scotoma, as long as the retinal damage is not too extensive.

  9. Foveal photocoagulation from laser iridotomy.

    PubMed

    Berger, B B

    1984-09-01

    Acute and permanent loss of vision has resulted from foveal photocoagulation during argon laser iridotomy. This complication can occur when the laser beam passes through the iridotomy nearly parallel to the visual axis. This is most likely to happen during enlargement of the iridotomy. A retinal burn of the macular region through a peripheral iridotomy was produced experimentally, and the mechanism of this complication is explained.

  10. Clinical Insights Into Foveal Morphology in Albinism

    PubMed Central

    McCafferty, Brandon K.; Wilk, Melissa A.; McAllister, John T.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Dubis, Adam M.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Anderson, Jennifer L; Carroll, Joseph; Summers, C. Gail

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A hallmark of albinism is foveal hypoplasia. However, literature suggests variable foveal development. This study evaluates the association between ocular phenotype and foveal morphology to demonstrate the broad structural and functional spectrum. Methods Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), nystagmus, angle kappa, stereoacuity, iris transillumination, macular melanin presence, foveal avascular zone, and annular reflex were recorded in 14 patients with albinism. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography provided macular images. Results The clinical phenotype was broad, with BCVA varying from 20/20 to 20/100. Better BCVA was associated with a preserved foveal avascular zone, annular macular reflex, stereoacuity, and macular melanin. Imaging demonstrated a continuum of foveal development correlating with BCVA. Individuals with a rudimentary pit had normal inner and outer segment lengthening and better BCVA. Conclusions The spectrum of ocular structure and visual function in albinism is broad, suggesting a possible diagnosis of albinism in a patient with an even more normal clinical presentation. PMID:26053207

  11. Clinical Insights Into Foveal Morphology in Albinism.

    PubMed

    McCafferty, Brandon K; Wilk, Melissa A; McAllister, John T; Stepien, Kimberly E; Dubis, Adam M; Brilliant, Murray H; Anderson, Jennifer L; Carroll, Joseph; Summers, C Gail

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark of albinism is foveal hypoplasia. However, literature suggests variable foveal development. This study evaluates the association between ocular phenotype and foveal morphology to demonstrate the broad structural and functional spectrum. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), nystagmus, angle kappa, stereoacuity, iris transillumination, macular melanin presence, foveal avascular zone, and annular reflex were recorded in 14 patients with albinism. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography provided macular images. The clinical phenotype was broad, with BCVA varying from 20/20 to 20/100. Better BCVA was associated with a preserved foveal avascular zone, annular macular reflex, stereoacuity, and macular melanin. Imaging demonstrated a continuum of foveal development correlating with BCVA. Individuals with a rudimentary pit had normal inner and outer segment lengthening and better BCVA. The spectrum of ocular structure and visual function in albinism is broad, suggesting a possible diagnosis of albinism in a patient with an even more normal clinical presentation. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Megascours: the morphodynamics of large river confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Simon; Sambrook Smith, Greg; Nicholas, Andrew; Best, Jim; Bull, Jon; Vardy, Mark; Goodbred, Steve; Haque Sarker, Maminul

    2015-04-01

    River confluences are wildly acknowledged as crucial controlling influences upon upstream and downstream morphology and thus landscape evolution. Despite their importance very little is known about their evolution and morphodynamics, and there is a consensus in the literature that confluences represent fixed, nodal points in the fluvial network. Confluences have been shown to generate substantial bed scours around five times greater than mean depth. Previous research on the Ganges-Jamuna junction has shown large river confluences can be highly mobile, potentially 'combing' bed scours across a large area, although the extent to which this is representative of large confluences in general is unknown. Understanding the migration of confluences and associated scours is important for multiple applications including: designing civil engineering infrastructure (e.g. bridges, laying cable, pipelines, etc.), sequence stratigraphic interpretation for reconstruction of past environmental and sea level change, and in the hydrocarbon industry where it is crucial to discriminate autocyclic confluence scours from widespread allocyclic surfaces. Here we present a wide-ranging global review of large river confluence planforms based on analysis of Landsat imagery from 1972 through to 2014. This demonstrates there is an array of confluence morphodynamic types: from freely migrating confluences such as the Ganges-Jamuna, through confluences migrating on decadal timescales and fixed confluences. Along with data from recent geophysical field studies in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna basin we propose a conceptual model of large river confluence types and hypothesise how these influence morphodynamics and preservation of 'megascours' in the rock record. This conceptual model has implications for sequence stratigraphic models and the correct identification of surfaces related to past sea level change. We quantify the abundance of mobile confluence types by classifying all large confluences

  13. Clinical characteristics of high grade foveal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2013-02-01

    To report clinical characteristics of high grade foveal hypoplasia. Patients with foveal hypoplasia of grade 3 or 4 on spectral domain optical coherence tomography according to a previously published scheme were enrolled. All patients underwent a full ophthalmologic assessment including visual acuity testing, slit lamp biomicroscopy, fundus examination, and evaluation of ocular alignment. The underlying causes of foveal hypoplasia were identified as albinism in five patients and aniridia in six patients. The mean logMAR visual acuity was 0.57 ± 0.24 (range 0.22-1.00) in the right eyes and 0.58 ± 0.21 (range 0.30-1.00) in the left eyes. On fundus examination in patients with albinism, two patients showed marked transparency, one patient showed moderate transparency, and two patients showed minimal transparency. Among six patients with aniridia, five patients showed normal macular pigmentation without macular reflex and one patient showed decreased macular pigmentation with no macular reflex. Patients with high grade macular hypoplasia tended to have poor visual acuities; however, the range of visual acuity was quite variable. Other factors associated with underlying disease could be the reason of this variability. Therefore, careful consideration should be given when assessing visual prognosis in foveal hypoplasia using optical coherence tomography.

  14. Foveal spot: a report of thirteen patients.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Raymond S; Duncan, Jacque; Brucker, Allison; Prenner, Jonathan L; Brucker, Alexander J

    2003-06-01

    To describe the natural history of a series of patients with a small foveal or juxtafoveal red lesion. Retrospective chart review of 13 patients with a small foveal or juxtafoveal red spot. Long-term follow-up examination was obtained in seven patients. Thirteen patients with a mean age of 34.6 years are reported. Initial visual complaints ranged from no complaints to mild blurring and central distortion of vision. None of the patients had a history of sun gazing or known macular disease. Eleven of the 13 patients had best-corrected visual acuities in the involved eye that were better than 20/30. The lesions were bilateral in five patients and unilateral in eight. When performed, optical coherence tomography and fluorescein angiography were unremarkable. Follow-up was obtained in seven patients (mean, 58 months), and visual acuity remained stable in all affected eyes. In all patients, the lesions remained stable without expansion or alteration of the foveal appearance over the course of follow-up. This report identifies a foveal or juxtafoveal, irregular, apparently intraretinal, red lesion of unclear cause. Long-term follow-up of these patients has demonstrated stable visual acuity and lesion appearance.

  15. Foveal hemorrhage in an eye with foveal hypoplasia associated with albinism

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Naonori; Hasegawa, Taiji; Yamashita, Mariko; Ogata, Nahoko

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism is a group of congenital disorders caused by alterations of melanin biosynthesis. We report our findings in a patient with oculocutaneous albinism who presented with foveal hypoplasia and a foveal hemorrhage. A 48-year-old man noted a dark spot in the middle of the visual field of his right eye. He had depigmented skin, white hair, white eyebrows, and white cilia. He also had horizontal nystagmus and depigmented irides. His best-corrected visual acuity was 2/100 with −14.0 diopters in the right eye and 3/100 with −5.0 diopters in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopy showed diffuse depigmentation in both eyes and a foveal hemorrhage in the right eye. Optical coherence tomography showed the absence of a foveal pit in both eyes and a subretinal hyperreflective lesion corresponding to the foveal hemorrhage in the right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed that the retinal and choroidal vessels were relatively hypofluorescent because of the lack of a blocking effect of the pigments in the retinal pigment epithelium. Fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography did not show any evidence of choroidal neovascularization in either eye. The foveal hemorrhage in the right eye spontaneously regressed and finally resolved at 3 months after onset. At the final examination, the patient reported that his vision had recovered. A foveal hemorrhage is a rare condition in an eye with foveal hypoplasia associated with albinism. The hemorrhage may be related to high myopia and also to the hypoplasia of the fovea associated with albinism. PMID:25228790

  16. Size of the foveal blue scotoma related to the shape of the foveal pit but not to macular pigment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Lan, Weizhong; Schaeffel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    When the eye is covered with a filter that transmits light below 480 nm and a blue field is observed on a computer screen that is modulated in brightness at about 1 Hz, the fovea is perceived as small irregular dark spot. It was proposed that the "foveal blue scotoma" results from the lack of S-cones in the foveal center. The foveal blue scotoma is highly variable among subjects. Possible factors responsible for the variability include differences in S-cone distribution, in foveal shape, and in macular pigment distribution. Nine young adult subjects were instructed to draw their foveal blue scotomas on a clear foil that was attached in front of the computer screen. The geometry of their foveal pit was measured in OCT images in two dimensions. Macular pigment distribution was measured in fundus camera images. Finally, blue scotomas were compared with Maxwell's spot which was visualized with a dichroic filter and is commonly assumed to reflect the macular pigment distribution. The diameters of the foveal blue scotomas varied from 15.8 to 76.4 arcmin in the right eyes and 15.5 to 84.7 arcmin in the left and were highly correlated in both eyes. It was found that the steeper the foveal slopes and the narrower the foveal pit, the larger the foveal blue scotoma. There was no correlation between foveal blue scotoma and macular pigment distribution or Maxwell's spot. The results are therefore in line with the assumption that the foveal blue scotoma is a consequence of the lack of S-cones in the foveal center. Unlike the foveal blue scotoma, Maxwell's spot is based on macular pigment as previously proposed.

  17. Effect of surrounding blur on foveal visibility.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroyuki; Kannon, Takayuki; Usui, Shiro

    2007-11-07

    Visibility of a simple stimulus is known to be determined not only by its physical contrast, but also by the configuration of surrounding stimuli. In this study, we investigated the surrounding modulation of foveal visibility of a blurred target. Subjects were instructed to respond to the gap orientation of a Gaussian-blurred Landolt ring presented at a fixation point with a surrounding stimulus. The correct response rate was measured as a metric of the foveal visibility. Results were subsequently compared among different surrounding stimulus conditions. Results showed an improvement in the subjects' performance when low-pass white noise filtered with the same Gaussian function used for the target was presented in the surrounding area, although no effect was observed using high-contrast white noise. A performance improvement was observed when the surround stimulus had an intermediate contrast in the spatial frequency band necessary for identifying the target orientation.

  18. Accidental foveal photocoagulation secondary to alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Anaya-Alaminos, Roberto; Muñoz-Ávila, José I; González-Gallardo, María C; Mora-Horna, Eduardo R; García-Serrano, José L; Ramírez-Garrido, María V

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, we have seen an increase in the use of laser systems in the field of aesthetics (mainly depigmentation and hair removal). Alexandrite laser is the most widely used.Case report. Case report. We describe a case of retinal injury (foveal photocoagulation) directly related to an alexandrite laser hair removal procedure. Hair removal by laser systems is a fast and efficient method. The use of lasers without adequate protective measures or by unqualified personnel increases the risk of ocular adverse effects.

  19. Photo-induced foveal injury after viewing a solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Källmark, Fredrik P; Ygge, Jan

    2005-10-01

    To study the injury to and possible recovery of the visual function and foveal morphology in patients with photo-induced foveal injury due to watching the solar eclipse of August 11th, 1999 in Stockholm, Sweden. Fifteen patients, all of whom viewed the solar eclipse, were followed for 1 year, during which their visual symptoms were recorded and visual acuity (VA) was tested, and ophthalmoscopy and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy were performed. Photo-induced foveal injury gave rise to subjective visual disturbances, reduced VA and morphological changes in the fovea. Central scotomas could still be seen in all patients 1 year after the foveal injury. Photo-induced foveal injury gave rise to subjective visual disturbances, reduced VA and morphological changes in the fovea. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy offers the possibility of detailed examination of small retinal lesions, which can sometimes be difficult to localize with ophthalmoscopy.

  20. Effects of Foveal Ablation on Emmetropization and Form-Deprivation Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Earl L.; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Hung, Li-Fang; Huang, Juan; Kee, Chea-su; Coats, David; Paysse, Evelyn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Because of the prominence of central vision in primates, it has generally been assumed that signals from the fovea dominate refractive development. To test this assumption, the authors determined whether an intact fovea was essential for either normal emmetropization or the vision-induced myopic errors produced by form deprivation. Methods In 13 rhesus monkeys at 3 weeks of age, the fovea and most of the perifovea in one eye were ablated by laser photocoagulation. Five of these animals were subsequently allowed unrestricted vision. For the other eight monkeys with foveal ablations, a diffuser lens was secured in front of the treated eyes to produce form deprivation. Refractive development was assessed along the pupillary axis by retinoscopy, keratometry, and A-scan ultrasonography. Control data were obtained from 21 normal monkeys and three infants reared with plano lenses in front of both eyes. Results Foveal ablations had no apparent effect on emmetropization. Refractive errors for both eyes of the treated infants allowed unrestricted vision were within the control range throughout the observation period, and there were no systematic interocular differences in refractive error or axial length. In addition, foveal ablation did not prevent form deprivation myopia; six of the eight infants that experienced monocular form deprivation developed myopic axial anisometropias outside the control range. Conclusions Visual signals from the fovea are not essential for normal refractive development or the vision-induced alterations in ocular growth produced by form deprivation. Conversely, the peripheral retina, in isolation, can regulate emmetropizing responses and produce anomalous refractive errors in response to abnormal visual experience. These results indicate that peripheral vision should be considered when assessing the effects of visual experience on refractive development. PMID:17724167

  1. THE NATURE OF FOVEAL DARK ADAPTATION

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Selig

    1921-01-01

    1. After a discussion of the sources of error involved in the study of dark adaptation, an apparatus and a procedure are described which avoid these errors. The method includes a control of the initial light adaptation, a record of the exact beginning of dark adaptation, and an accurate means of measuring the threshold of the fovea after different intervals in the dark. 2. The results show that dark adaptation of the eye as measured by foveal vision proceeds at a very precipitous rate during the first few seconds, that most of the adaptation takes place during the first 30 seconds, and that the process practically ceases after 10 minutes. These findings explain much of the irregularity of the older data. 3. The changes which correspond to those in the fovea alone are secured by correcting the above results in terms of the movements of the pupil during dark adaptation. 4. On the assumption that the photochemical effect of the light is a linear function of the intensity, it is shown that the dark adaptation of the fovea itself follows the course of a bimolecular reaction. This is interpreted to mean that there are two photolytic products in the fovea; that they are disappearing because they are recombining to form anew the photosensitive substance of the fovea; and that the concentration of these products of photolysis in the sense cell must be increased by a definite fraction in order to produce a visual effect. 5. It is then suggested that the basis of the initial event in foveal light perception is some mechanism that involves a reversible photochemical reaction of which the "dark" reaction is bimolecular. Dark adaptation follows the "dark" reaction; sensory equilibrium is represented by the stationary state; and light adaptation by the shifting of the stationary state to a fresh point of equilibrium toward the "dark" side of the reaction. PMID:19871919

  2. THE NATURE OF FOVEAL DARK ADAPTATION.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S

    1921-11-20

    1. After a discussion of the sources of error involved in the study of dark adaptation, an apparatus and a procedure are described which avoid these errors. The method includes a control of the initial light adaptation, a record of the exact beginning of dark adaptation, and an accurate means of measuring the threshold of the fovea after different intervals in the dark. 2. The results show that dark adaptation of the eye as measured by foveal vision proceeds at a very precipitous rate during the first few seconds, that most of the adaptation takes place during the first 30 seconds, and that the process practically ceases after 10 minutes. These findings explain much of the irregularity of the older data. 3. The changes which correspond to those in the fovea alone are secured by correcting the above results in terms of the movements of the pupil during dark adaptation. 4. On the assumption that the photochemical effect of the light is a linear function of the intensity, it is shown that the dark adaptation of the fovea itself follows the course of a bimolecular reaction. This is interpreted to mean that there are two photolytic products in the fovea; that they are disappearing because they are recombining to form anew the photosensitive substance of the fovea; and that the concentration of these products of photolysis in the sense cell must be increased by a definite fraction in order to produce a visual effect. 5. It is then suggested that the basis of the initial event in foveal light perception is some mechanism that involves a reversible photochemical reaction of which the "dark" reaction is bimolecular. Dark adaptation follows the "dark" reaction; sensory equilibrium is represented by the stationary state; and light adaptation by the shifting of the stationary state to a fresh point of equilibrium toward the "dark" side of the reaction.

  3. Similarity issues of confluence of fuzzy relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Tomas; Vychodil, Vilem

    2012-04-01

    We study similarity issues of confluence and related properties of fuzzy relations. The ordinary notions of divergence, convergence, convertibility, and confluence are essential properties of relations which appear in abstract rewriting systems. In a graded setting, we can introduce analogous notions related to the idea of approximate rewriting. This paper is a continuation of our previous paper (Belohlavek et al. 2010), where we have introduced such notions using residuated structures of truth degrees, leaving the ordinary notions a particular case when the underlying structure of truth degrees is the two-valued Boolean algebra. In this paper, we focus on similarity issues of confluence and present formulas which provide approximations of degrees of confluence and related properties based on similarity of the original fuzzy relations.

  4. Dynamics of human foveal development after premature birth.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Ramiro S; O'Connell, Rachelle V; Sarin, Neeru; Freedman, Sharon F; Wallace, David K; Cotten, C Michael; Winter, Katrina P; Stinnett, Sandra; Chiu, Stephanie J; Izatt, Joseph A; Farsiu, Sina; Toth, Cynthia A

    2011-12-01

    To determine the dynamic morphologic development of the human fovea in vivo using portable spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Prospective, observational case series. Thirty-one prematurely born neonates, 9 children, and 9 adults. Sixty-two neonates were enrolled in this study. After examination for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), SD-OCT imaging was performed at the bedside in nonsedated infants aged 31 to 41 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) (= gestational age in weeks + chronologic age) and at outpatient follow-up ophthalmic examinations. Thirty-one neonates met eligibility criteria. Nine children and nine adults without ocular pathology served as control groups. Semiautomatic retinal layer segmentation was performed. Central foveal thickness, foveal to parafoveal (FP) ratio (central foveal thickness divided by thickness 1000 μm from the foveal center), and 3-dimensional thickness maps were analyzed. In vivo determination of foveal morphology, layer segmentation, analysis of subcellular changes, and spatiotemporal layer shifting. In contrast with the adult fovea, several signs of immaturity were observed in the neonates: a shallow foveal pit, persistence of inner retinal layers (IRLs), and a thin photoreceptor layer (PRL) that was thinnest at the foveal center. Three-dimensional mapping showed displacement of retinal layers out of the foveal center as the fovea matured and the progressive formation of the inner/outer segment band in the opposite direction. The FP-IRL ratios decreased as IRL migrated before term and minimally after that, whereas FP-PRL ratios increased as PRL subcellular elements formed closer to term and into childhood. A surprising finding was the presence of cystoid macular edema in 58% of premature neonates that appeared to affect inner foveal maturation. This study provides the first view into the development of living cellular layers of the human retina and of subcellular specialization at the fovea in premature infant eyes

  5. Independence of Foveal Retinal Locus and Visual Detection Paradigm.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-09

    F O-AO.. 17 ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN HUMAN ATTENTION RES -ETC F/A 5/10 INDEPENDENCE OF FOVEAL RETINAL LOCUS AND VISUAL DETECTION PARAD -ETC...variably mapped, and frame time of 100 or 200 msec for the consistent or variably mapped conditions, respectively. The main effects of experimental paradigm...Foveal Retinal Locus and Visual Detection Paradigm Walter Schneider and Arthur D. Fisk Report 8001 Human Attention Research Laboratory University of

  6. Dynamics of Human Foveal Development after Premature Birth

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Ramiro S.; O’Connell, Rachelle V.; Sarin, Neeru; Freedman, Sharon F.; Wallace, David K.; Cotten, C. Michael; Winter, Katrina P.; Stinnett, Sandra; Chiu, Stephanie J.; Izatt, Joseph A.; Farsiu, Sina; Toth, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the dynamic morphological development of the human fovea in-vivo utilizing portable spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Design Prospective, observational case series. Paticipants 31 prematurely born neonates, nine children and nine adults. Methods Sixty-two neonates were enrolled in this study. SDOCT imaging was performed after examination for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) at the bedside in non-sedated infants ages 31-41 weeks post-menstrual-age PMA (PMA=gestational age in weeks + chronological age) and at outpatient follow-up ophthalmic examinations. Thirty-one neonates met eligibility criteria. Nine children and nine adults without ocular pathology served as control groups. Semi-automatic retinal layer segmentation was performed. Central foveal thickness (CFT), foveal to parafoveal (FP) ratio (CFT divided by thickness 1000 μm from the foveal center), and 3D thickness maps were analyzed. Main Outcomes Measures In-vivo determination of foveal morphology, layer segmentation, analysis of sub-cellular changes, spatio-temporal layer shifting. Results In contrast to the adult fovea, we observed several signs of immaturity in the neonates: a shallow foveal pit, persistence of inner retinal layers (IRL), and a thin photoreceptor layer (PRL) that was thinnest at the foveal center. Three-dimensional mapping showed displacement of retinal layers out of the foveal center as the fovea matured and the progressive formation of the inner/outer segment band in the opposite direction. The FP-IRL ratios decreased as IRL migrated prior to term and minimally after that, while FP-PRL ratios increased as PRL subcellular elements formed closer to term and into childhood. A surprising finding was the presence of cystoid macular edema in 58% of premature neonates which appeared to affect inner foveal maturation. Conclusions This study provides the first view into development of living cellular layers of the human retina and of subcellular

  7. Primate cognition.

    PubMed

    Seed, Amanda; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-07-01

    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed by other primates. There may be differences between humans and other primates, however, in more complex cognitive skills, such as reasoning about relations, causality, time, and other minds. Of special importance, the human primate seems to possess a species-unique set of adaptations for "cultural intelligence," which are broad reaching in their effects on human cognition.

  8. Foveal crowding differs in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Norgett, Yvonne; Siderov, John

    2014-10-23

    We used custom-designed acuity tests to compare the magnitude and extent of crowded letter recognition in children and adults. Visual acuity (logMAR) was measured monocularly in children and adults using five custom-designed letter tests with varying degrees of crowding: single letter, single letter surrounded by four flanking bars, single letter surrounded by four flanking letters, line of five letters surrounded by flanking bars, and line of five letters surrounded by flanking letters. The tests were constructed using Sloan letters and presented on an iPad (Apple Incorporated, Cupertino, CA) at 4 m using a standardized endpoint and instructions. Crowded logMAR was normalized to unflanked logMAR and results were analyzed in three groups: younger children aged 4-6 (n = 32), older children, aged 7-9 (n = 30), and adults (n = 27). Both groups of children showed a greater extent of crowding than the adults. The adult participants showed no difference in performance between single or linear presentation and letter or bar flankers. Letter flankers and linear presentation individually resulted in poorer performance in the younger children p < 0.001 and p = 0.003, respectively (mean normalized logMAR 0.17 in each case) and together had an additive effect (mean 0.24), p < 0.001. Crowding in the older children was adult-like except in the linear presentation with letter flankers, p < 0.001. These results indicate that both target-flanker similarity and linear presentation contribute more to foveal crowding in young children than in adults. © 2014 ARVO.

  9. The Planform Mobility of Large River Channel Confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambrook Smith, Greg; Dixon, Simon; Nicholas, Andrew; Bull, Jon; Vardy, Mark; Best, James; Goodbred, Steven; Sarker, Maminul

    2017-04-01

    Large river confluences are widely acknowledged as exerting a controlling influence upon both upstream and downstream morphology and thus channel planform evolution. Despite their importance, little is known concerning their longer-term evolution and planform morphodynamics, with much of the literature focusing on confluences as representing fixed, nodal points in the fluvial network. In contrast, some studies of large sand bed rivers in India and Bangladesh have shown large river confluences can be highly mobile, although the extent to which this is representative of large confluences around the world is unknown. Confluences have also been shown to generate substantial bed scours, and if the confluence location is mobile these scours could 'comb' across wide areas. This paper presents field data of large confluences morphologies in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna river basin, illustrating the spatial extent of large river bed scours and showing scour depth can extend below base level, enhancing long term preservation potential. Based on a global review of the planform of large river confluences using Landsat imagery from 1972 to 2014 this study demonstrates such scour features can be highly mobile and there is an array of confluence morphodynamic types: from freely migrating confluences, through confluences migrating on decadal timescales to fixed confluences. Based on this analysis, a conceptual model of large river confluence types is proposed, which shows large river confluences can be sites of extensive bank erosion and avulsion, creating substantial management challenges. We quantify the abundance of mobile confluence types by classifying all large confluences in both the Amazon and Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna basins, showing these two large rivers have contrasting confluence morphodynamics. We show large river confluences have multiple scales of planform adjustment with important implications for river management, infrastructure and interpretation of the rock

  10. Interocular Asymmetry of Foveal Thickness in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shrier, Eric M.; Adam, Christopher R.; Spund, Brian; Glazman, Sofya; Bodis-Wollner, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify interocular asymmetry (IA) of foveal thickness in Parkinson disease (PD) versus that of controls. Design. Prospective case-control series. Methods. In vivo assessment of foveal thickness of 46 eyes of 23 PD patients and 36 eyes of 18 control subjects was studied using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Inner versus outer layer retinal segmentation and macular volumes were quantified using the manufacturer's software, while foveal thickness was measured using the raw data from each eye in a grid covering a 6 by 6 mm area centered on the foveola in 0.25 mm steps. Thickness data were entered into MATLAB software. Results. Macular volumes differed significantly at the largest (Zone 3) diameter centered on the foveola (ETDRS protocol). By segmenting inner from outer layers, we found that the IA in PD is mostly due to changes on the slope of the foveal pit at the radial distances of 0.5 and 0.75 mm (1.5 mm and 1 mm diameter). Conclusions. About half of the PD patients had IA of the slope of the foveal pit. IA is a potentially useful marker of PD and is expected to be comparable across different SD-OCT equipment. Data of larger groups may be developed in future multicenter studies. PMID:22900149

  11. Combining segmentation and attention: a new foveal attention model

    PubMed Central

    Marfil, Rebeca; Palomino, Antonio J.; Bandera, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Artificial vision systems cannot process all the information that they receive from the world in real time because it is highly expensive and inefficient in terms of computational cost. Inspired by biological perception systems, artificial attention models pursuit to select only the relevant part of the scene. On human vision, it is also well established that these units of attention are not merely spatial but closely related to perceptual objects (proto-objects). This implies a strong bidirectional relationship between segmentation and attention processes. While the segmentation process is the responsible to extract the proto-objects from the scene, attention can guide segmentation, arising the concept of foveal attention. When the focus of attention is deployed from one visual unit to another, the rest of the scene is perceived but at a lower resolution that the focused object. The result is a multi-resolution visual perception in which the fovea, a dimple on the central retina, provides the highest resolution vision. In this paper, a bottom-up foveal attention model is presented. In this model the input image is a foveal image represented using a Cartesian Foveal Geometry (CFG), which encodes the field of view of the sensor as a fovea (placed in the focus of attention) surrounded by a set of concentric rings with decreasing resolution. Then multi-resolution perceptual segmentation is performed by building a foveal polygon using the Bounded Irregular Pyramid (BIP). Bottom-up attention is enclosed in the same structure, allowing to set the fovea over the most salient image proto-object. Saliency is computed as a linear combination of multiple low level features such as color and intensity contrast, symmetry, orientation and roundness. Obtained results from natural images show that the performance of the combination of hierarchical foveal segmentation and saliency estimation is good in terms of accuracy and speed. PMID:25177289

  12. Combining segmentation and attention: a new foveal attention model.

    PubMed

    Marfil, Rebeca; Palomino, Antonio J; Bandera, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Artificial vision systems cannot process all the information that they receive from the world in real time because it is highly expensive and inefficient in terms of computational cost. Inspired by biological perception systems, artificial attention models pursuit to select only the relevant part of the scene. On human vision, it is also well established that these units of attention are not merely spatial but closely related to perceptual objects (proto-objects). This implies a strong bidirectional relationship between segmentation and attention processes. While the segmentation process is the responsible to extract the proto-objects from the scene, attention can guide segmentation, arising the concept of foveal attention. When the focus of attention is deployed from one visual unit to another, the rest of the scene is perceived but at a lower resolution that the focused object. The result is a multi-resolution visual perception in which the fovea, a dimple on the central retina, provides the highest resolution vision. In this paper, a bottom-up foveal attention model is presented. In this model the input image is a foveal image represented using a Cartesian Foveal Geometry (CFG), which encodes the field of view of the sensor as a fovea (placed in the focus of attention) surrounded by a set of concentric rings with decreasing resolution. Then multi-resolution perceptual segmentation is performed by building a foveal polygon using the Bounded Irregular Pyramid (BIP). Bottom-up attention is enclosed in the same structure, allowing to set the fovea over the most salient image proto-object. Saliency is computed as a linear combination of multiple low level features such as color and intensity contrast, symmetry, orientation and roundness. Obtained results from natural images show that the performance of the combination of hierarchical foveal segmentation and saliency estimation is good in terms of accuracy and speed.

  13. Relationship Between Foveal Cone Specialization and Pit Morphology in Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Melissa A.; McAllister, John T.; Cooper, Robert F.; Dubis, Adam M.; Patitucci, Teresa N.; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Costakos, Deborah M.; Connor, Thomas B.; Wirostko, William J.; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Dubra, Alfredo; Curcio, Christine A.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Summers, C. Gail; Carroll, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Albinism is associated with disrupted foveal development, though intersubject variability is becoming appreciated. We sought to quantify this variability, and examine the relationship between foveal cone specialization and pit morphology in patients with a clinical diagnosis of albinism. Methods. We recruited 32 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of albinism. DNA was obtained from 25 subjects, and known albinism genes were analyzed for mutations. Relative inner and outer segment (IS and OS) lengthening (fovea-to-perifovea ratio) was determined from manually segmented spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) B-scans. Foveal pit morphology was quantified for eight subjects from macular SD-OCT volumes. Ten subjects underwent imaging with adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), and cone density was measured. Results. We found mutations in 22 of 25 subjects, including five novel mutations. All subjects lacked complete excavation of inner retinal layers at the fovea, though four subjects had foveal pits with normal diameter and/or volume. Peak cone density and OS lengthening were variable and overlapped with that observed in normal controls. A fifth hyper-reflective band was observed in the outer retina on SD-OCT in the majority of the subjects with albinism. Conclusions. Foveal cone specialization and pit morphology vary greatly in albinism. Normal cone packing was observed in the absence of a foveal pit, suggesting a pit is not required for packing to occur. The degree to which retinal anatomy correlates with genotype or visual function remains unclear, and future examination of larger patient groups will provide important insight on this issue. PMID:24845642

  14. Relationship between foveal cone specialization and pit morphology in albinism.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Melissa A; McAllister, John T; Cooper, Robert F; Dubis, Adam M; Patitucci, Teresa N; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Anderson, Jennifer L; Stepien, Kimberly E; Costakos, Deborah M; Connor, Thomas B; Wirostko, William J; Chiang, Pei-Wen; Dubra, Alfredo; Curcio, Christine A; Brilliant, Murray H; Summers, C Gail; Carroll, Joseph

    2014-05-20

    Albinism is associated with disrupted foveal development, though intersubject variability is becoming appreciated. We sought to quantify this variability, and examine the relationship between foveal cone specialization and pit morphology in patients with a clinical diagnosis of albinism. We recruited 32 subjects with a clinical diagnosis of albinism. DNA was obtained from 25 subjects, and known albinism genes were analyzed for mutations. Relative inner and outer segment (IS and OS) lengthening (fovea-to-perifovea ratio) was determined from manually segmented spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) B-scans. Foveal pit morphology was quantified for eight subjects from macular SD-OCT volumes. Ten subjects underwent imaging with adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), and cone density was measured. We found mutations in 22 of 25 subjects, including five novel mutations. All subjects lacked complete excavation of inner retinal layers at the fovea, though four subjects had foveal pits with normal diameter and/or volume. Peak cone density and OS lengthening were variable and overlapped with that observed in normal controls. A fifth hyper-reflective band was observed in the outer retina on SD-OCT in the majority of the subjects with albinism. Foveal cone specialization and pit morphology vary greatly in albinism. Normal cone packing was observed in the absence of a foveal pit, suggesting a pit is not required for packing to occur. The degree to which retinal anatomy correlates with genotype or visual function remains unclear, and future examination of larger patient groups will provide important insight on this issue. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  15. Arthroscopic foveal repair of the triangular fibrocartilage complex.

    PubMed

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-02-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei-European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications.

  16. Arthroscopic Foveal Repair of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex

    PubMed Central

    Atzei, Andrea; Luchetti, Riccardo; Braidotti, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Background Foveal disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is associated with distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. TFCC fixation onto the fovea is the suitable treatment, which is not achieved by conventional arthroscopic techniques. We describe an all-inside arthroscopic technique that uses a suture anchor through distal DRUJ arthroscopy for foveal repair of the TFCC. Materials and Methods Forty-eight patients with TFCC foveal tear and DRUJ instability were selected according to the Atzei–European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) algorithm of treatment. Retrospective evaluation included pain, DRUJ instability, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, Modified Mayo Wrist Score (MMWS), and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Score. Description of Technique DRUJ arthroscopy was performed to débride the TFCC and the foveal area. Under arthroscopic guidance, a suture anchor was inserted via the distal foveal portal to repair the TFCC onto the fovea. Sutures were tied on the radiocarpal surface of the TFCC. Postoperative immobilization of forearm rotation was maintained for 4 weeks. Heavy tasks were allowed after 3 months. Results After a mean follow-up of 33 months, pain improved significantly but remained moderate in four patients, severe in one. DRUJ instability resolved in 44 patients. Wrist ROM increased. Grip strength, MMWS, and DASH score improved significantly. Excellent and good MMWS equaled 83.3%. Forty-one patients (85.5%) resumed previous work and sport activities. As a postoperative complication, five patients experienced neuroapraxia of the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve (DSBUN) with full spontaneous recovery. Conclusions With appropriate indications and patient selection, arthroscopic foveal repair of the TFCC may restore DRUJ stability and provide satisfactory results without significant complications. PMID:25709875

  17. Optical coherence tomography findings of bilateral foveal leukemic infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Le, John Q; Braich, Puneet S; Brar, Vikram S

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 59-year-old man with a history of atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia who presented with a several-week history of decreased vision in both eyes. His clinical examination revealed bilateral foveal infiltration, which was also demonstrated on optical coherence tomography. After a failed induction with imatinib (Gleevec®), he was treated with omacetaxine (Synribo®) with an appropriate hematologic response. As his leukemia improved with chemotherapy, his retinal lesions regressed as demonstrated by serial optical coherence tomography and fundus photographs, with near complete restoration of foveal architecture. PMID:27540313

  18. 1. WATER ENTERING CONFLUENCE POOL FROM BEAR CREEK AT LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WATER ENTERING CONFLUENCE POOL FROM BEAR CREEK AT LEFT, AND FROM SANTA ANA RIVER THROUGH TUNNEL #0 AT RIGHT. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Bear Creek Diversion Dam & Confluence Pool, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  19. Parafoveal-Foveal Overlap Can Facilitate Ongoing Word Identification during Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angele, Bernhard; Tran, Randy; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Readers continuously receive parafoveal information about the upcoming word in addition to the foveal information about the currently fixated word. Previous research (Inhoff, Radach, Starr, & Greenberg, 2000) showed that the presence of a parafoveal word that was similar to the foveal word facilitated processing of the foveal word. We used the…

  20. Parafoveal-Foveal Overlap Can Facilitate Ongoing Word Identification during Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angele, Bernhard; Tran, Randy; Rayner, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Readers continuously receive parafoveal information about the upcoming word in addition to the foveal information about the currently fixated word. Previous research (Inhoff, Radach, Starr, & Greenberg, 2000) showed that the presence of a parafoveal word that was similar to the foveal word facilitated processing of the foveal word. We used the…

  1. Visual Memory for Objects Following Foveal Vision Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringswald, Franziska; Herbik, Anne; Hofmüller, Wolfram; Hoffmann, Michael B.; Pollmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Allocation of visual attention is crucial for encoding items into visual long-term memory. In free vision, attention is closely linked to the center of gaze, raising the question whether foveal vision loss entails suboptimal deployment of attention and subsequent impairment of object encoding. To investigate this question, we examined visual…

  2. Visual Memory for Objects Following Foveal Vision Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringswald, Franziska; Herbik, Anne; Hofmüller, Wolfram; Hoffmann, Michael B.; Pollmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Allocation of visual attention is crucial for encoding items into visual long-term memory. In free vision, attention is closely linked to the center of gaze, raising the question whether foveal vision loss entails suboptimal deployment of attention and subsequent impairment of object encoding. To investigate this question, we examined visual…

  3. Foveal shape and structure in a normal population.

    PubMed

    Tick, Sarah; Rossant, Florence; Ghorbel, Itebeddine; Gaudric, Alain; Sahel, José-Alain; Chaumet-Riffaud, Philippe; Paques, Michel

    2011-07-29

    The shape of the human fovea presents important but still poorly characterized variations. In this study, the variability of the shape and structure of normal foveae were examined. In a group of 110 eyes of 57 healthy adults, the shape and structure of the fovea were analyzed by automated segmentation of retinal layer on high-resolution optical coherence tomography scans. In an additional group of 10 normal eyes of 10 patients undergoing fluorescein angiography, the size of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) was correlated to foveal shape. From the thickest to the thinnest fovea, there was a structural continuum ranging from a shallow pit with continuity of the inner nuclear layer (INL) over the center (seven eyes; 6.7%), to a complete separation of inner layers overlying a flat and thinner central outer nuclear layer (ONL; eight eyes; 7.3%). Central foveal thickness correlated inversely to the degree of inner layer separation and to the surface of the FAZ. Foveal structure strongly correlates with its neurovascular organization. The findings support a developmental model in which the size of the FAZ determines the extent of centrifugal migration of inner retinal layers, which counteracts in some way the centripetal packing of cone photoreceptors.

  4. Foveal relocation by redistribution of the neurosensory retina

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D.; Lois, N.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To describe a new surgical technique for foveal relocation, and to report the outcome in nine patients treated with this procedure.
METHODS—Nine consecutive patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascular membranes (CNVMs) secondary to age related macular degeneration underwent foveal relocation surgery by redistribution of the neurosensory retina (RNR). The technique involved induction of a retinal detachment via a single retinotomy, relocation of the fovea by "sweeping" the retinal tissue with a retinal brush, and stabilisation of the retina in its new location using perfluorocarbon liquid peroperatively and silicone oil postoperatively.
RESULTS—In eight of nine eyes successful relocation of the fovea was achieved; in one eye the CNVM remained in a subfoveal location postoperatively. Visual acuity improved in two eyes, remained unchanged in three, and decreased in four eyes after a median follow up of 4 months (range 2.5-6 months). Complications included rupture of a foveal cyst with the development of a macular hole in one eye and epimacular membrane formation in another eye. In two eyes, macular retinal vessel closure occurred at the time of laser photocoagulation; one of these eyes later developed cystoid macular oedema and the other an epiretinal membrane. Recurrence of the CNVM was observed in one eye, but was controlled with further laser treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—Foveal relocation by RNR appears to be feasible, obviating the need for extensive retinotomies or scleral shortening.

 PMID:10729290

  5. Iliocaval Confluence Stenting for Chronic Venous Obstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, Rick de; Wolf, Mark de; Sailer, Anna M.; Laanen, Jorinde van Wittens, Cees; Jalaie, Houman

    2015-10-15

    PurposeDifferent techniques have been described for stenting of venous obstructions. We report our experience with two different confluence stenting techniques to treat chronic bi-iliocaval obstructions.Materials and MethodsBetween 11/2009 and 08/2014 we treated 40 patients for chronic total bi-iliocaval obstructions. Pre-operative magnetic resonance venography showed bilateral extensive post-thrombotic scarring in common and external iliac veins as well as obstruction of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Stenting of the IVC was performed with large self-expandable stents down to the level of the iliocaval confluence. To bridge the confluence, either self-expandable stents were placed inside the IVC stent (24 patients, SECS group) or high radial force balloon-expandable stents were placed at the same level (16 patients, BECS group). In both cases, bilateral iliac extensions were performed using nitinol stents.ResultsRecanalization was achieved for all patients. In 15 (38 %) patients, a hybrid procedure with endophlebectomy and arteriovenous fistula creation needed to be performed because of significant involvement of inflow vessels below the inguinal ligament. Mean follow-up was 443 ± 438 days (range 7–1683 days). For all patients, primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency rate at 36 months were 70, 73, and 78 %, respectively. Twelve-month patency rates in the SECS group were 85, 85, and 95 % for primary, assisted-primary, and secondary patency. In the BECS group, primary patency was 100 % during a mean follow-up period of 134 ± 118 (range 29–337) days.ConclusionStenting of chronic bi-iliocaval obstruction shows relatively high patency rates at medium follow-up. Short-term patency seems to favor confluence stenting with balloon-expandable stents.

  6. The Association Between the Foveal Avascular Zone and Retinal Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Chui, Toco Y. P.; VanNasdale, Dean A.; Elsner, Ann E.; Burns, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the association between the size and shape of the foveal avascular zone and retinal thickness in healthy subjects. Methods. In vivo imaging of the foveal microvasculature was performed on 32 subjects by using an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO). Motion contrast maps of the AOSLO images were used to generate a montage revealing the foveal capillary network. Foveal avascular zone (FAZ) diameters along the horizontal (FAZH) and vertical (FAZV) meridians were measured on the montages. An asymmetry index (AI) of the FAZ was then computed as the ratio of the FAZH to FAZV. Retinal thickness was investigated by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT). Inner retinal layer (INLFAZ) thickness and outer nuclear layer (ONLFAZ) thickness were measured at the edges of the FAZ on the horizontal and vertical SDOCT scans on the same eye. Results. The foveal capillary network was readily visualized in all subjects. As expected there was individual variation in the size and shape of the FAZ. Along the horizontal and vertical meridians, the mean ± SD (μm) of the FAZ diameter was 607 ± 217 and 574 ± 155, respectively. The INLFAZ thickness was 68 ± 9 and 66 ± 9, and the ONLFAZ thickness was 103 ± 13 and 105 ± 11, respectively. The mean ± SD of the AI was 1.03 ± 0.27. The difference between FAZH and FAZV decreases with increasing FAZ area (P = 0.004). Mean ONLFAZ was negatively correlated with FAZ effective diameter (P < 0.0001). No significant correlation was found between mean INLFAZ and FAZ effective diameter (P = 0.16). Conclusions. Despite large individual variations in size and shape of the FAZ, the INLFAZ has a relatively constant thickness at the margins of the FAZ, suggesting the presence of retinal capillaries is needed to sustain an INLFAZ thickness greater than 60 μm. A smaller FAZ area is associated with a vertically elongated FAZ. PMID:25270194

  7. Mixing zone hydrodynamics in a large confluence: a case study of the Snake and Clearwater Rivers confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, M. M.; Petrie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Confluences are a basic component in all fluvial systems, which are often characterized by complex flow and sediment transport patterns. Addressing confluences, however, started only recently in parallel with new advances of flow measurement tools and computational techniques. A limited number of field studies exist investigating flow hydrodynamics through confluences, particularly for large confluences with central zone widths of 100 m or greater. Previous studies have indicated that the size of the confluent rivers and the post-confluence zone may impact flow and sediment transport processes in the confluence zone, which consequently could impact the biodiversity within the river network. This study presents the results of a field study conducted at the confluence of the Snake and the Clearwater rivers near the towns of Clarkston, WA and Lewiston, ID (average width of 700 m at the confluence center). This confluence supports many different and, sometimes, conflicting purposes including commercial navigation, recreation, and fish and wildlife conservation. The confluence properties are affected by dredging operations carried out periodically to maintain the minimum water depth required for safe flow conveyance and navigation purposes. Also, a levee system was constructed on the confluence banks as an extra flood control measure. In the recent field work, an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler was used to measure water velocity profiles at cross sections in the confluence region. Fixed and moving vessel measurements were taken at selected locations to evaluate both the spatial and temporal variation in velocity throughout the confluence. The confluence bathymetry was surveyed with a multi-beam sonar to investigate existent bed morphological elements. The results identify the velocity pattern in the mixing zone between the two rivers. The present findings are compared to previous studies on small confluences to demonstrate the influence of scale on flow processes.

  8. Data-Driven Multiresolution Camera Using the Foveal Adaptive Pyramid

    PubMed Central

    González, Martin; Sánchez-Pedraza, Antonio; Marfil, Rebeca; Rodríguez, Juan A.; Bandera, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    There exist image processing applications, such as tracking or pattern recognition, that are not necessarily precise enough to maintain the same resolution across the whole image sensor. In fact, they must only keep it as high as possible in a relatively small region, but covering a wide field of view. This is the aim of foveal vision systems. Briefly, they propose to sense a large field of view at a spatially-variant resolution: one relatively small region, the fovea, is mapped at a high resolution, while the rest of the image is captured at a lower resolution. In these systems, this fovea must be moved, from one region of interest to another one, to scan a visual scene. It is interesting that the part of the scene that is covered by the fovea should not be merely spatial, but closely related to perceptual objects. Segmentation and attention are then intimately tied together: while the segmentation process is responsible for extracting perceptively-coherent entities from the scene (proto-objects), attention can guide segmentation. From this loop, the concept of foveal attention arises. This work proposes a hardware system for mapping a uniformly-sampled sensor to a space-variant one. Furthermore, this mapping is tied with a software-based, foveal attention mechanism that takes as input the stream of generated foveal images. The whole hardware/software architecture has been designed to be embedded within an all programmable system on chip (AP SoC). Our results show the flexibility of the data port for exchanging information between the mapping and attention parts of the architecture and the good performance rates of the mapping procedure. Experimental evaluation also demonstrates that the segmentation method and the attention model provide results comparable to other more computationally-expensive algorithms. PMID:27898029

  9. Contour interaction for foveal acuity targets at different luminances.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Harold E; Siderov, John; Waugh, Sarah J; Zemanová, Romana; Pluháček, František; Musilová, Lenka

    2013-08-30

    Single-letter visual acuity is impaired by nearby flanking stimuli, a phenomenon known as contour interaction. We showed previously that when foveal acuity is degraded by a reduction of letter contrast, both the magnitude and angular spatial extent of foveal contour interaction remain unchanged. In this study, we asked whether contour interaction also remains unchanged when foveal visual acuity is degraded by a reduction of the target's background luminance. Percent correct letter identification was measured for isolated, near-threshold black Sloan letters and for letters surrounded by 4 flanking bars in 10 normal observers, 5 at Anglia Ruskin University, UK (ARU) and 5 at Palacky University, Czech Republic (PU). A stepwise reduction in the background luminance over 3 log units resulted in an approximately threefold increase in the near-threshold letter size. At each background luminance, black flanking bars with a width equal to 1 letter stroke were presented at separations between approximately 0.45 and 4.5 min arc (ARU) or 0.32 and 3.2 min arc (PU). The results indicate that the angular extent of contour interaction remains unchanged at approximately 4 min arc at all background luminances. On the other hand, the magnitude of contour interaction decreases systematically as luminance is reduced, from approximately a 50% reduction to a 30% reduction in percent correct. The constant angular extent and decreasing magnitude of contour interaction with a reduction of background luminance suggest foveal contour interaction is mediated by luminance-dependent lateral inhibition within a fixed angular region.

  10. Data-Driven Multiresolution Camera Using the Foveal Adaptive Pyramid.

    PubMed

    González, Martin; Sánchez-Pedraza, Antonio; Marfil, Rebeca; Rodríguez, Juan A; Bandera, Antonio

    2016-11-26

    There exist image processing applications, such as tracking or pattern recognition, that are not necessarily precise enough to maintain the same resolution across the whole image sensor. In fact, they must only keep it as high as possible in a relatively small region, but covering a wide field of view. This is the aim of foveal vision systems. Briefly, they propose to sense a large field of view at a spatially-variant resolution: one relatively small region, the fovea, is mapped at a high resolution, while the rest of the image is captured at a lower resolution. In these systems, this fovea must be moved, from one region of interest to another one, to scan a visual scene. It is interesting that the part of the scene that is covered by the fovea should not be merely spatial, but closely related to perceptual objects. Segmentation and attention are then intimately tied together: while the segmentation process is responsible for extracting perceptively-coherent entities from the scene (proto-objects), attention can guide segmentation. From this loop, the concept of foveal attention arises. This work proposes a hardware system for mapping a uniformly-sampled sensor to a space-variant one. Furthermore, this mapping is tied with a software-based, foveal attention mechanism that takes as input the stream of generated foveal images. The whole hardware/software architecture has been designed to be embedded within an all programmable system on chip (AP SoC). Our results show the flexibility of the data port for exchanging information between the mapping and attention parts of the architecture and the good performance rates of the mapping procedure. Experimental evaluation also demonstrates that the segmentation method and the attention model provide results comparable to other more computationally-expensive algorithms.

  11. Residual Foveal Cone Structure in CNGB3-Associated Achromatopsia

    PubMed Central

    Langlo, Christopher S.; Patterson, Emily J.; Higgins, Brian P.; Summerfelt, Phyllis; Razeen, Moataz M.; Erker, Laura R.; Parker, Maria; Collison, Frederick T.; Fishman, Gerald A.; Kay, Christine N.; Zhang, Jing; Weleber, Richard G.; Yang, Paul; Wilson, David J.; Pennesi, Mark E.; Lam, Byron L.; Chiang, John; Chulay, Jeffrey D.; Dubra, Alfredo; Hauswirth, William W.; Carroll, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Congenital achromatopsia (ACHM) is an autosomal recessive disorder in which cone function is absent or severely reduced. Gene therapy in animal models of ACHM have shown restoration of cone function, though translation of these results to humans relies, in part, on the presence of viable cone photoreceptors at the time of treatment. Here, we characterized residual cone structure in subjects with CNGB3-associated ACHM. Methods High-resolution imaging (optical coherence tomography [OCT] and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy [AOSLO]) was performed in 51 subjects with CNGB3-associated ACHM. Peak cone density and inter-cone spacing at the fovea was measured using split-detection AOSLO. Foveal outer nuclear layer thickness was measured in OCT images, and the integrity of the photoreceptor layer was assessed using a previously published OCT grading scheme. Results Analyzable images of the foveal cones were obtained in 26 of 51 subjects, with nystagmus representing the major obstacle to obtaining high-quality images. Peak foveal cone density ranged from 7,273 to 53,554 cones/mm2, significantly lower than normal (range, 84,733–234,391 cones/mm2), with the remnant cones being either contiguously or sparsely arranged. Peak cone density was correlated with OCT integrity grade; however, there was overlap of the density ranges between OCT grades. Conclusions The degree of residual foveal cone structure varies greatly among subjects with CNGB3-associated ACHM. Such measurements may be useful in estimating the therapeutic potential of a given retina, providing affected individuals and physicians with valuable information to more accurately assess the risk-benefit ratio as they consider enrolling in experimental gene therapy trials. (www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01846052.) PMID:27479814

  12. Bedload transport in a river confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-Vide, J. P.; Plana-Casado, A.; Sambola, A.; Capapé, S.

    2015-12-01

    The confluence of the regulated Toltén River and its tributary the unregulated Allipén (south of Chile) has proved dynamic in the last decade. Daily bedload measurements with a Helley-Smith sampler, bed surveys, and grain-size distributions of the two rivers are obtained from a field campaign that lasts 3 months in high-flow season. The goals are to quantify total bedload and to understand the balance between tributary and main river and the bedload distribution in space and texture. The bedload transport varies 200-fold, with a maximum of 5000 t/day. The discharge varies five-fold, with a maximum of 900 m3/s. Two-thirds of the total bedload volume are transported through the deeper area of the cross section and gravel is predominant (64%). Average bedload volumes in the confluence seem unbalanced in favour of the tributary. Main river bedload transport is predominantly at below-capacity conditions, while the tributary bedload transport is at-capacity conditions. This is deemed the main reason of inaccuracy of the bedload predictors. The roles of entrainment into suspension, helical flow, partial transport, and mobile armour are discussed.

  13. Arrested development: high-resolution imaging of foveal morphology in albinism.

    PubMed

    McAllister, John T; Dubis, Adam M; Tait, Diane M; Ostler, Shawn; Rha, Jungtae; Stepien, Kimberly E; Summers, C Gail; Carroll, Joseph

    2010-04-07

    Albinism, an inherited disorder of melanin biosynthesis, disrupts normal retinal development, with foveal hypoplasia as one of the more commonly associated ocular phenotypes. However the cellular integrity of the fovea in albinism is not well understood - there likely exist important anatomical differences that underlie phenotypic variability within the disease and that also may affect responsiveness to therapeutic intervention. Here, using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging, we obtained high-resolution images of the foveal region in six individuals with albinism. We provide a quantitative analysis of cone density and outer segment elongation demonstrating that foveal cone specialization is variable in albinism. In addition, our data reveal a continuum of foveal pit morphology, roughly aligning with schematics of normal foveal development based on post-mortem analyses. Different albinism subtypes, genetic mutations, and constitutional pigment background likely play a role in determining the degree of foveal maturation.

  14. Arrested Development: High-Resolution Imaging of Foveal Morphology in Albinism

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, John T.; Dubis, Adam M.; Tait, Diane M.; Ostler, Shawn; Rha, Jungtae; Stepien, Kimberly E.; Summers, C. Gail; Carroll, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Albinism, an inherited disorder of melanin biosynthesis, disrupts normal retinal development, with foveal hypoplasia as one of the more commonly associated ocular phenotypes. However the cellular integrity of the fovea in albinism is not well understood – there likely exist important anatomical differences that underlie phenotypic variability within the disease and that also may affect responsiveness to therapeutic intervention. Here, using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and adaptive optics (AO) retinal imaging, we obtained high-resolution images of the foveal region in six individuals with albinism. We provide a quantitative analysis of cone density and outer segment elongation demonstrating that foveal cone specialization is variable in albinism. In addition, our data reveal a continuum of foveal pit morphology, roughly aligning with schematics of normal foveal development based on post-mortem analyses. Different albinism subtypes, genetic mutations, and constitutional pigment background likely play a role in determining the degree of foveal maturation. PMID:20149815

  15. Out of the Corner of My Eye: Foveal Semantic Load Modulates Parafoveal Processing in Reading.

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Brennan R.; Stites, Mallory C.; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2016-07-18

    In two experiments, we examined the impact of foveal semantic expectancy and congruity on parafoveal word processing during reading. Experiment 1 utilized an eye-tracking gaze contingent display change paradigm, and Experiment 2 measured event-related brain potentials (ERP) in a modified RSVP paradigm to track the time-course of foveal semantic influences on convert attentional allocation to parafoveal word processing. Furthermore, eye-tracking and ERP data converged to reveal graded effects of semantic foveal load on parafoveal processing.

  16. Out of the Corner of My Eye: Foveal Semantic Load Modulates Parafoveal Processing in Reading.

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Brennan R.; Stites, Mallory C.; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2016-07-18

    In two experiments, we examined the impact of foveal semantic expectancy and congruity on parafoveal word processing during reading. Experiment 1 utilized an eye-tracking gaze contingent display change paradigm, and Experiment 2 measured event-related brain potentials (ERP) in a modified RSVP paradigm to track the time-course of foveal semantic influences on convert attentional allocation to parafoveal word processing. Furthermore, eye-tracking and ERP data converged to reveal graded effects of semantic foveal load on parafoveal processing.

  17. Overview of Climate Confluence Security Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisman, J. P.

    2011-12-01

    Presentation will focus on an overview of the security perspectives based on the confluence considerations including energy, economics and climate change. This will include perspectives from reports generated by the Quadrennial Defense Review, Joint Forces Command, the Center for Strategic International Studies, MIT, the Inter-agency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Center for Naval Analysis, and other relevant reports. The presentation will highlight the connections between resource issues and climate change which can be interpreted into security concerns. General discussion of global issues, contextual review of AR4 WGII may be included and any other report updates as applicable. The purpose of this presentation is to give a rounded view of the general qualitative and quantitative perspectives regarding climate related security considerations.

  18. Anesthesia, antisepsis, microscope: the confluence of neurotology.

    PubMed

    Lustig, Lawrence R

    2007-06-01

    Neurotology and skull base surgery slowly emerged out of a confluence of interrelated disciplines and technologies over the past century to become the field that we know today. Its formation required the marriage of neurosurgery and otology, the introduction of the operating microscope, and advances in surgical technique, anesthesia, and radiology. Along the way, the field also began involving specialists within ophthalmology and craniofacial and plastic and reconstructive surgery. Lastly, and perhaps most importantly, the formation of neurotology and skull base surgery required pioneering surgeons who were willing to push the boundaries of their training, sometimes under the ridicule or scorn of the medical establishment. This historical overview focuses upon the origins of the specialty, from the birth of otology and neurosurgery up through the last quarter century.

  19. The Nature of Creativity: Cognitive and Confluence Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megalakaki, Olga; Craft, Anna; Cremin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    In the present psychology-informed literature review we address some aspects of the nature of creativity from cognitive and confluence perspectives. The authors begin by discussing models of creativity offered by cognitive and confluence approaches, focusing on the transition from univariate to multivariate models. The article explores what these…

  20. The Nature of Creativity: Cognitive and Confluence Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megalakaki, Olga; Craft, Anna; Cremin, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    In the present psychology-informed literature review we address some aspects of the nature of creativity from cognitive and confluence perspectives. The authors begin by discussing models of creativity offered by cognitive and confluence approaches, focusing on the transition from univariate to multivariate models. The article explores what these…

  1. Oculomotor Remapping of Visual Information to Foveal Retinotopic Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Knapen, Tomas; Swisher, Jascha D.; Tong, Frank; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Our eyes continually jump around the visual scene to bring the high-resolution, central part of our vision onto objects of interest. We are oblivious to these abrupt shifts, perceiving the visual world to appear reassuringly stable. A process called remapping has been proposed to mediate this perceptual stability for attended objects by shifting their retinotopic representation to compensate for the effects of the upcoming eye movement. In everyday vision, observers make goal-directed eye movements towards items of interest bringing them to the fovea and, for these items, the remapped activity should impinge on foveal regions of the retinotopic maps in visual cortex. Previous research has focused instead on remapping for targets that were not saccade goals, where activity is remapped to a new peripheral location rather than to the foveal representation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and a phase-encoding design to investigate remapping of spatial patterns of activity towards the fovea/parafovea for saccade targets that were removed prior to completion of the eye movement. We found strong evidence of foveal remapping in retinotopic visual areas, which failed to occur when observers merely attended to the same peripheral target without making eye movements towards it. Significantly, the spatial profile of the remapped response matched the orientation and size of the saccade target, and was appropriately scaled to reflect the retinal extent of the stimulus had it been foveated. We conclude that this remapping of spatially structured information to the fovea may serve as an important mechanism to support our world-centered sense of location across goal-directed eye movements under natural viewing conditions. PMID:27445715

  2. Foveal-Sparing Scotomas in Advanced Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunness, Janet S.; Rubin, Gary S.; Zuckerbrod, Abraham; Applegate, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Foveal-sparing scotomas are common in advanced dry macular degeneration (geographic atrophy). Foveal preservation may be present for a number of years. Despite good visual acuity, these patients have reduced reading rates. Magnification may not be effective if the text becomes too large to "fit" within the central spared area. (Contains 2 tables…

  3. Foveal-Sparing Scotomas in Advanced Dry Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunness, Janet S.; Rubin, Gary S.; Zuckerbrod, Abraham; Applegate, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Foveal-sparing scotomas are common in advanced dry macular degeneration (geographic atrophy). Foveal preservation may be present for a number of years. Despite good visual acuity, these patients have reduced reading rates. Magnification may not be effective if the text becomes too large to "fit" within the central spared area. (Contains 2 tables…

  4. The Mechanisms Underlying the Interhemispheric Integration of Information in Foveal Word Recognition: Evidence for Transcortical Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Haegen, Lise; Brysbaert, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Words are processed as units. This is not as evident as it seems, given the division of the human cerebral cortex in two hemispheres and the partial decussation of the optic tract. In two experiments, we investigated what underlies the unity of foveally presented words: A bilateral projection of visual input in foveal vision, or interhemispheric…

  5. Determination of foveal location using scanning laser polarimetry.

    PubMed

    VanNasdale, Dean A; Elsner, Ann E; Weber, Anke; Miura, Masahiro; Haggerty, Bryan P

    2009-03-25

    The fovea is the retinal location responsible for our most acute vision. There are several methods used to localize the fovea, but the fovea is not always easily identifiable. Landmarks used to determine the foveal location are variable in normal subjects and localization becomes even more difficult in instances of retinal disease. In normal subjects, the photoreceptor axons that make up the Henle fiber layer are cylindrical and the radial orientation of these fibers is centered on the fovea. The Henle fiber layer exhibits form birefringence, which predictably changes polarized light in scanning laser polarimetry imaging. In this study 3 graders were able to repeatably identify the fovea in 35 normal subjects using near infrared image types with differing polarization content. There was little intra-grader, inter-grader, and inter-image variability in the graded foveal position for 5 of the 6 image types examined, with accuracy sufficient for clinical purposes. This study demonstrates that scanning laser polarimetry imaging can localize the fovea by using structural properties inherent in the central macula.

  6. Visual memory for objects following foveal vision loss.

    PubMed

    Geringswald, Franziska; Herbik, Anne; Hofmüller, Wolfram; Hoffmann, Michael B; Pollmann, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Allocation of visual attention is crucial for encoding items into visual long-term memory. In free vision, attention is closely linked to the center of gaze, raising the question whether foveal vision loss entails suboptimal deployment of attention and subsequent impairment of object encoding. To investigate this question, we examined visual long-term memory for objects in patients suffering from foveal vision loss due to age-related macular degeneration. We measured patients' change detection sensitivity after a period of free scene exploration monocularly with their worse eye when possible, and under binocular vision, comparing sensitivity and eye movements to matched normal-sighted controls. A highly salient cue was used to capture attention to a nontarget location before a target change occurred in half of the trials, ensuring that change detection relied on memory. Patients' monocular and binocular sensitivity to object change was comparable to controls, even after more than 4 intervening fixations, and not significantly correlated with visual impairment. We conclude that extrafoveal vision suffices for efficient encoding into visual long-term memory. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Determination of foveal location using scanning laser polarimetry

    PubMed Central

    VanNasdale, Dean A.; Elsner, Ann E.; Weber, Anke; Miura, Masahiro; Haggerty, Bryan P.

    2009-01-01

    The fovea is the retinal location responsible for our most acute vision. There are several methods used to localize the fovea, but the fovea is not always easily identifiable. Landmarks used to determine the foveal location are variable in normal subjects and localization becomes even more difficult in instances of retinal disease. In normal subjects, the photoreceptor axons that make up the Henle fiber layer are cylindrical and the radial orientation of these fibers is centered on the fovea. The Henle fiber layer exhibits form birefringence, which predictably changes polarized light in scanning laser polarimetry imaging. In this study 3 graders were able to repeatably identify the fovea in 35 normal subjects using near infrared image types with differing polarization content. There was little intra-grader, inter-grader, and inter-image variability in the graded foveal position for 5 of the 6 image types examined, with accuracy sufficient for clinical purposes. This study demonstrates that scanning laser polarimetry imaging can localize the fovea by using structural properties inherent in the central macula. PMID:19757960

  8. Cystoid foveal oedema in symptomatic inner lamellar macular holes.

    PubMed

    Ophir, A; Fatum, S

    2009-09-01

    Inner lamellar macular hole (LMH) was considered a relatively risk-free condition that rarely progresses or worsens. Nowadays, at the optical coherence tomography (OCT) era, increasing evidence seems to position it differently. The aim of the study was to describe morphologic abnormalities associated with symptomatic LMH using OCT that may explain reduced visual acuity in these patients. In a retrospective study on consecutive symptomatic patients with LMH, OCT scans were compared with normal controls. Analysis was referred to LMH-associated abnormalities at the residual fovea, mainly cystoid spaces that manifested as cystoid foveal oedema. A total of 22 eyes of 20 patients (mean age, 68 years; range, 22-94) were included in the study. Best-corrected visual acuity ranged from 6/9 to 6/120. Cystoid foveal oedema that contained cystoid spaces of various sizes was found in 21 (95%) of eyes; an intraretinal split was seen in 18 eyes (82%) and epiretinal membrane was detected in 16 eyes (73%). The appearance of cystoid oedema at the residual fovea in symptomatic LMHs may explain in part a reduced visual acuity and/or metamorphopsia. The old notion on the low incidence of LMH progression may probably be related in part to (a) lower diagnostic accuracy before OCT was available and to (b) the already spontaneously peeled inner limiting membrane. Further studies are required to verify these observations, which may merit clinical and surgical considerations.

  9. 1. FIRST SECTION OF PIPELINE BETWEEN CONFLUENCE POOL AND FISH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FIRST SECTION OF PIPELINE BETWEEN CONFLUENCE POOL AND FISH SCREEN. NOTE RETAINING WALL BESIDE PIPE. VIEW TO NORTH-NORTHEAST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Pipeline to Fish Screen, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  10. Foveal input is not required for perception of crowd facial expression

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Benjamin A.; Kosovicheva, Anna A.; Leib, Allison Yamanashi; Wood, Katherine; Whitney, David

    2015-01-01

    The visual system extracts average features from groups of objects (Ariely, 2001; Dakin & Watt, 1997; Watamaniuk & Sekuler, 1992), including high-level stimuli such as faces (Haberman & Whitney, 2007, 2009). This phenomenon, known as ensemble perception, implies a covert process, which would not require fixation of individual stimulus elements. However, some evidence suggests that ensemble perception may instead be a process of averaging foveal input across sequential fixations (Ji, Chen, & Fu, 2013; Jung, Bulthoff, Thornton, Lee, & Armann, 2013). To test directly whether foveating objects is necessary, we measured observers' sensitivity to average facial emotion in the absence of foveal input. Subjects viewed arrays of 24 faces, either in the presence or absence of a gaze-contingent foveal occluder, and adjusted a test face to match the average expression of the array. We found no difference in accuracy between the occluded and non-occluded conditions, demonstrating that foveal input is not required for ensemble perception. Unsurprisingly, without foveal input, subjects spent significantly less time directly fixating faces, but this did not translate into any difference in sensitivity to ensemble expression. Next, we varied the number of faces visible from the set to test whether subjects average multiple faces from the crowd. In both conditions, subjects' performance improved as more faces were presented, indicating that subjects integrated information from multiple faces in the display regardless of whether they had access to foveal information. Our results demonstrate that ensemble perception can be a covert process, not requiring access to direct foveal information. PMID:26360155

  11. Foveal input is not required for perception of crowd facial expression.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Benjamin A; Kosovicheva, Anna A; Leib, Allison Yamanashi; Wood, Katherine; Whitney, David

    2015-01-01

    The visual system extracts average features from groups of objects (Ariely, 2001; Dakin & Watt, 1997; Watamaniuk & Sekuler, 1992), including high-level stimuli such as faces (Haberman & Whitney, 2007, 2009). This phenomenon, known as ensemble perception, implies a covert process, which would not require fixation of individual stimulus elements. However, some evidence suggests that ensemble perception may instead be a process of averaging foveal input across sequential fixations (Ji, Chen, & Fu, 2013; Jung, Bulthoff, Thornton, Lee, & Armann, 2013). To test directly whether foveating objects is necessary, we measured observers' sensitivity to average facial emotion in the absence of foveal input. Subjects viewed arrays of 24 faces, either in the presence or absence of a gaze-contingent foveal occluder, and adjusted a test face to match the average expression of the array. We found no difference in accuracy between the occluded and non-occluded conditions, demonstrating that foveal input is not required for ensemble perception. Unsurprisingly, without foveal input, subjects spent significantly less time directly fixating faces, but this did not translate into any difference in sensitivity to ensemble expression. Next, we varied the number of faces visible from the set to test whether subjects average multiple faces from the crowd. In both conditions, subjects' performance improved as more faces were presented, indicating that subjects integrated information from multiple faces in the display regardless of whether they had access to foveal information. Our results demonstrate that ensemble perception can be a covert process, not requiring access to direct foveal information.

  12. Temporally flexible feedback signal to foveal cortex for peripheral object recognition

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoxu; Wang, Lan; Shao, Hanyu; Kersten, Daniel; He, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that information from peripherally presented images is present in the human foveal retinotopic cortex, presumably because of feedback signals. We investigated this potential feedback signal by presenting noise in fovea at different object–noise stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), whereas subjects performed a discrimination task on peripheral objects. Results revealed a selective impairment of performance when foveal noise was presented at 250-ms SOA, but only for tasks that required comparing objects’ spatial details, suggesting a task- and stimulus-dependent foveal processing mechanism. Critically, the temporal window of foveal processing was shifted when mental rotation was required for the peripheral objects, indicating that the foveal retinotopic processing is not automatically engaged at a fixed time following peripheral stimulation; rather, it occurs at a stage when detailed information is required. Moreover, fMRI measurements using multivoxel pattern analysis showed that both image and object category-relevant information of peripheral objects was represented in the foveal cortex. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis of a temporally flexible feedback signal to the foveal retinotopic cortex when discriminating objects in the visual periphery. PMID:27671651

  13. Temporally flexible feedback signal to foveal cortex for peripheral object recognition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoxu; Wang, Lan; Shao, Hanyu; Kersten, Daniel; He, Sheng

    2016-10-11

    Recent studies have shown that information from peripherally presented images is present in the human foveal retinotopic cortex, presumably because of feedback signals. We investigated this potential feedback signal by presenting noise in fovea at different object-noise stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), whereas subjects performed a discrimination task on peripheral objects. Results revealed a selective impairment of performance when foveal noise was presented at 250-ms SOA, but only for tasks that required comparing objects' spatial details, suggesting a task- and stimulus-dependent foveal processing mechanism. Critically, the temporal window of foveal processing was shifted when mental rotation was required for the peripheral objects, indicating that the foveal retinotopic processing is not automatically engaged at a fixed time following peripheral stimulation; rather, it occurs at a stage when detailed information is required. Moreover, fMRI measurements using multivoxel pattern analysis showed that both image and object category-relevant information of peripheral objects was represented in the foveal cortex. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis of a temporally flexible feedback signal to the foveal retinotopic cortex when discriminating objects in the visual periphery.

  14. Directional eye fixation sensor using birefringence-based foveal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramatikov, Boris I.; Zalloum, Othman H. Y.; Wu, Yi Kai; Hunter, David G.; Guyton, David L.

    2007-04-01

    We recently developed and reported an eye fixation monitor that detects the fovea by its radial orientation of birefringent nerve fibers. The instrument used a four-quadrant photodetector and a normalized difference function to check for a best match between the detector quadrants and the arms of the bow-tie pattern of polarization states surrounding the fovea. This function had a maximum during central fixation but could not tell where the subject was looking relative to the center. We propose a linear transformation to obtain horizontal and vertical eye position coordinates from the four photodetector signals, followed by correction based on a priori calibration information. The method was verified on both a computer model and on human eyes. The major advantage of this new eye-tracking method is that it uses true information coming from the fovea, rather than reflections from other structures, to identify the direction of foveal gaze.

  15. Aniseikonia and Foveal Microstructure after Retinal Detachment Surgery.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Fumiki; Sugiura, Yoshimi; Okamoto, Yoshifumi; Hiraoka, Takahiro; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2014-07-17

    Purpose:To quantify aniseikonia after successful surgical repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RD), and to investigate the relationship between the severity of postoperative aniseikonia and retinal microstructures as well as clinical parameters. Methods:The study included 106 eyes of 106 patients, without any history of ocular disease/surgery and less than 2 diopters of anisometropia, who had undergone successful retinal reattachment surgery. Aniseikonia was measured with New Aniseikonia Test and foveal microstructure was assessed with the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography at 6 months postoperatively. Results:Twenty-eight of 106 patients (26%) had micropsia, 17 patients (16%) had macropsia, and 61 patients (58%) had no aniseikonia. The mean absolute value of aniseikonia was 2.3 ± 2.9% (range; -12.5% - +12.0%). Of 57 eyes with macula-on RD, 3 had micropsia and 12 had macropsia. Of 49 eyes with macula-off RD, 25 had micropsia and 5 had macropsia. Eyes with micropsia mostly exhibited persistent or transient cystoid macular edema, subretinal fluid, hyperreflective or disruption of IS/OS line, while most of the eyes with macropsia presented epiretinal membrane. Stepwise multiple regression analysis revealed that postoperative best-corrected visual acuity and the area of RD were significantly relevant to the mean absolute value of aniseikonia. Conclusions:These results suggested that about half of patients with successful repair of RD had aniseikonia. Eyes with macula-off RD tended to show micropsia, while those with macula-on RD mostly presented macropsia. Micropsia and macropsia were primarily caused by respective specific abnormal structures at the foveal region.

  16. ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF FOVEAL SPARING IN GEOGRAPHIC ATROPHY SECONDARY TO AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION.

    PubMed

    Querques, Giuseppe; Kamami-Levy, Cynthia; Georges, Anouk; Pedinielli, Alexandre; Capuano, Vittorio; Blanco-Garavito, Rocio; Poulon, Fanny; Souied, Eric H

    2016-02-01

    To describe adaptive optics (AO) imaging of foveal sparing in geographic atrophy (GA) secondary to age-related macular degeneration. Flood-illumination AO infrared (IR) fundus images were obtained in four consecutive patients with GA using an AO retinal camera (rtx1; Imagine Eyes). Adaptive optics IR images were overlaid with confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope near-IR autofluorescence images to allow direct correlation of en face AO features with areas of foveal sparing. Adaptive optics appearance of GA and foveal sparing, preservation of functional photoreceptors, and cone densities in areas of foveal sparing were investigated. In 5 eyes of 4 patients (all female; mean age 74.2 ± 11.9 years), a total of 5 images, sized 4° × 4°, of foveal sparing visualized on confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope near-IR autofluorescence were investigated by AO imaging. En face AO images revealed GA as regions of inhomogeneous hyperreflectivity with irregularly dispersed hyporeflective clumps. By direct comparison with adjacent regions of GA, foveal sparing appeared as well-demarcated areas of reduced reflectivity with less hyporeflective clumps (mean 14.2 vs. 3.2; P = 0.03). Of note, in these areas, en face AO IR images revealed cone photoreceptors as hyperreflective dots over the background reflectivity (mean cone density 3,271 ± 1,109 cones per square millimeter). Microperimetry demonstrated residual function in areas of foveal sparing detected by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope near-IR autofluorescence. Adaptive optics allows the appreciation of differences in reflectivity between regions of GA and foveal sparing. Preservation of functional cone photoreceptors was demonstrated on en face AO IR images in areas of foveal sparing detected by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope near-IR autofluorescence.

  17. Flow structure at an ice-covered river confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, Nancy; Biron, Pascale; Buffin-Bélanger, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    River confluences are known to exhibit complex relationships between flow structure, sediment transport and bed-form development. Flow structure at these sites is influenced by the junction angle, the momentum flux ratio (Mr) and bed morphology. In cold regions where an ice cover is present for most of the winter period, the flow structure is also likely affected by the roughness effect of the ice. However, very few studies have examined the impact of an ice cover on the flow structure at a confluence. The aims of this study are (1) to describe the evolution of an ice cover at a river confluence and (2) to characterize and compare the flow structure at a river confluence with and without an ice cover. The field site is a medium-sized confluence (around 40 m wide) between the Mit is and Neigette Rivers in the Bas-Saint-Laurent region, Quebec (Canada). The confluence was selected because a thick ice cover is present for most of the winter allowing for safe field work. Two winter field campaigns were conducted in 2015 and 2016 to obtain ice cover measurements in addition to hydraulic and morphological measurements. Daily monitoring of the evolution of the ice cover was made with a Reconyx camera. Velocity profiles were collected with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to reconstruct the three-dimensional flow structure. Time series of photographs allow the evolution of the ice cover to be mapped, linking the processes leading to the formation of the primary ice cover for each year. The time series suggests that these processes are closely related with both confluence flow zones and hydro-climatic conditions. Results on the thickness of the ice cover from in situ measurements reveal that the ice thickness tends to be thinner at the center of the confluence where high turbulent exchanges take place. Velocity measurements reveal that the ice cover affects velocity profiles by moving the highest velocities towards the center of the profiles. A spatio

  18. An Experimental Study to Control Scour at River Confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuppukondur, A.; Chandra, V.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of present study is finding a method to control sediment erosion at river confluence. The confluences are mixture of two different flows and are common occurrences along the river. River confluences are sites of natural scour phenomenon and also influence reservoir sedimentation. The river confluence is associated with a separation zone, stagnation zone and a mixing layer along which the scour hole is observed. The eroded sediment creates potential problems by depositing at unwanted downstream locations such as barrages, weirs, check dams, reservoirs etc. As per the literature, the storage capacity of major reservoirs in India is going to be reduced nearly half of the storage capacity by 2020. Hence, an experimental study has been conducted on mobile bed (d50=0.28 mm) with a confluence angle of 90o for a discharge ratio (Qr) of 0.5, where, Qr is defined as the ratio between lateral flow discharge (Ql) and main flow discharge (Qm). Circular shape pile models of same diameter are arranged in a systematic manner with constant spacing (5 cm, 10 cm and 15 cm) to change the flow pattern for reducing scour at the confluence. Two types of pile models (8 mm ϕ and 12 mm ϕ) are used to conduct the experiments. The experimental results show that maximum scour depth at confluence is reduced by 60%. In addition, the bed profile modifications are also reported. Keywords: Reservoir sedimentation, River confluence, Mobile bed, Scour, Vanes. References:1. Borghei, S. M., and Sahebari, A. J. (2010). "Local Scour at Open-Channel Junctions", Journal of Hydraulic Research, 48(4), 37 - 41. 2. Kothyari, U. C. (1996). "Methods for Estimation Sediment Yield from Catchments", Proc., Int. Sem. On Civil Engg. Practices in Twenty First Century, Roorkee, India, 1071-1086. 3. Mosley, M. P. (1976) "An Experimental Study of Channel Confluences". The Journal of Geology, 84(55), 532-562. 4. Ouyang, H. T. (2009). "Investigation on the dimensions and shape of a submerged vane for sediment

  19. The morphodynamics and sedimentology of large river confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholas, Andrew; Sambrook Smith, Greg; Best, James; Bull, Jon; Dixon, Simon; Goodbred, Steven; Sarker, Mamin; Vardy, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Confluences are key locations within large river networks, yet surprisingly little is known about how they migrate and evolve through time. Moreover, because confluence sites are associated with scour pools that are typically several times the mean channel depth, the deposits associated with such scours should have a high potential for preservation within the rock record. However, paradoxically, such scours are rarely observed, and the sedimentological characteristics of such deposits are poorly understood. This study reports results from a physically-based morphodynamic model, which is applied to simulate the evolution and resulting alluvial architecture associated with large river junctions. Boundary conditions within the model simulation are defined to approximate the junction of the Ganges and Jamuna rivers, in Bangladesh. Model results are supplemented by geophysical datasets collected during boat-based surveys at this junction. Simulated deposit characteristics and geophysical datasets are compared with three existing and contrasting conceptual models that have been proposed to represent the sedimentary architecture of confluence scours. Results illustrate that existing conceptual models may be overly simplistic, although elements of each of the three conceptual models are evident in the deposits generated by the numerical simulation. The latter are characterised by several distinct styles of sedimentary fill, which can be linked to particular morphodynamic behaviours. However, the preserved characteristics of simulated confluence deposits vary substantial according to the degree of reworking by channel migration. This may go some way towards explaining the confluence scour paradox; while abundant large scours might be expected in the rock record, they are rarely reported.

  20. Foveal cone density shows a rapid postnatal maturation in the marmoset monkey

    PubMed Central

    SPRINGER, ALAN D.; TROILO, DAVID; POSSIN, DANIEL; HENDRICKSON, ANITA E.

    2015-01-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of cone packing during marmoset foveal development was explored to understand the variables involved in creating a high acuity area. Retinal ages were between fetal day (Fd) 125 and 6 years. Cone density was determined in wholemounts using a new hexagonal quantification method. Wholemounts were labeled immunocytochemically with rod markers to identify reliably the foveal center. Cones were counted in small windows and density was expressed as cones × 103/mm2 (K). Two weeks before birth (Fd 125–130), cone density had a flat distribution of 20–30 K across the central retina encompassing the fovea. Density began to rise at postnatal day 1 (Pd 1) around, but not in, the foveal center and reached a parafoveal peak of 45–55 K by Pd 10. Between Pd 10 and 33, there was an inversion such that cone density at the foveal center rose rapidly, reaching 283 K by 3 months and 600 K by 5.4 months. Peak foveal density then diminished to 440 K at 6 months and older. Counts done in sections showed the same pattern of low foveal density up to Pd 1, a rapid rise from Pd 30 to 90, followed by a small decrease into adulthood. Increasing foveal cone density was accompanied by 1) a reduction in the amount of Müller cell cytoplasm surrounding each cone, 2) increased stacking of foveal cone nuclei into a mound 6–10 deep, and 3) a progressive narrowing of the rod-free zone surrounding the fovea. Retaining foveal cones in a monolayer precludes final foveal cone densities above 60 K. However, high foveal adult cone density (300 K) can be achieved by having cone nuclei stack into columns and without reducing their nuclear diameter. Marmosets reach adult peak cone density by 3–6 months postnatal, while macaques and humans take much longer. Early weaning and an arboreal environment may require rapid postnatal maturation of the marmoset fovea. PMID:22192504

  1. Arrested Foveal Development in Preterm Eyes: Thickening of the Outer Nuclear Layer and Structural Redistribution Within the Fovea.

    PubMed

    Sjöstrand, Johan; Rosén, Rebecka; Nilsson, Maria; Popovic, Zoran

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to define landmarks to better characterize foveal microstructure in normal subjects and in preterms with or without signs of immaturity, and to report on thickness changes of outer foveal layers following analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) B-scan images. Selected eyes from eight young adults with a history of prematurity (24-33 weeks of gestation) and five controls were imaged using conventional and directional OCT. Retinal layer thickness analysis was performed at selected temporal eccentricities defined by the individual distance between two landmarks for each case, the foveal center and the foveal rim. The use of a foveal center and foveal rim landmark transformation enabled comparisons of interindividual B-scans at corresponding landmark positions in both controls and preterms. We found a 20% shorter foveal center to foveal rim distance in preterms with an immature fovea than in controls. Reflectometric and manual segmentation measurements showed increased thickness of inner retinal layers and photoreceptor cell body and outer plexiform layers centrally, but no observable change of photoreceptor inner and outer segment thickness. Our landmark-based analysis of OCT images using reflectometry and manual segmentation provides complementary findings in comparisons of normal and immature foveal structures. We show a central thickness increase in the outer nuclear layer, outer plexiform layer, and postreceptor layers in preterms with signs of arrested foveal development. We found no indication of abnormal photoreceptor inner or outer segment development in preterms.

  2. Passive scalar mixing efficiency in open-channel confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignot, Emmanuel; Pouchoulin, Sebastien; Riviere, Nicolas; Lipeme-Kouyi, Gislain

    2017-04-01

    The work deals with the efficiency of passive scalar mixing within and downstream open-channel confluences. Mixing in confluences is imposed by the local 3D hydrodynamics including: i) the slow recirculation zone, ii) the contraction zone with flow acceleration on its side, iii) downstream secondary currents and iv) a mixing-layer at the interface between the two incoming flows. The mixing efficiency thus strongly depends on the characteristics of these large structures that exchange fluid from one flow region to another and that are, themselves, strongly impacted by the characteristics of the confluence geometry (angle, roughness, bed forms…) and of the inflows (momentum and density ratio, density...). The present work aims at investigating the influence of i) the confluence geometry and ii) inflow characteristics on the mixing efficiency at the confluence. In the literature, this efficiency is for example related to the evolution, along the streamwise axis of the downstream branch, of parameter E, accounting for the variability of scalar concentration ci measured in cell i (normalized by the upstream concentration cu of the polluted incoming flow) within a section of mean concentration cm, as: ┌ -------- ││ ∑n ( )2 E = ° 1- ci- cm- n i=1 cu where n is the number of measurements in each section. These results then permit to estimate the so-called "length for perfect mixing" Lm, defined as the distance from the confluence to the section where the differences of local concentrations from a uniform one become lower than a given threshold value (typically 5%). The selected approach combines an experimental and a numerical approach. In a first step, the experiments aim at measuring for a selected configuration, the 3D spatial distribution of passive scalar in a simplified subcritical 90˚ angle confluence in order to better understand the mixing processes and to validate the selected numerical calculation methods. A novel laboratory technique able to measure

  3. Segmentation of the foveal microvasculature using deep learning networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prentašić, Pavle; Heisler, Morgan; Mammo, Zaid; Lee, Sieun; Merkur, Andrew; Navajas, Eduardo; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Šarunić, Marinko; Lončarić, Sven

    2016-07-01

    Accurate segmentation of the retinal microvasculature is a critical step in the quantitative analysis of the retinal circulation, which can be an important marker in evaluating the severity of retinal diseases. As manual segmentation remains the gold standard for segmentation of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) images, we present a method for automating the segmentation of OCT-A images using deep neural networks (DNNs). Eighty OCT-A images of the foveal region in 12 eyes from 6 healthy volunteers were acquired using a prototype OCT-A system and subsequently manually segmented. The automated segmentation of the blood vessels in the OCT-A images was then performed by classifying each pixel into vessel or nonvessel class using deep convolutional neural networks. When the automated results were compared against the manual segmentation results, a maximum mean accuracy of 0.83 was obtained. When the automated results were compared with inter and intrarater accuracies, the automated results were shown to be comparable to the human raters suggesting that segmentation using DNNs is comparable to a second manual rater. As manually segmenting the retinal microvasculature is a tedious task, having a reliable automated output such as automated segmentation by DNNs, is an important step in creating an automated output.

  4. Confluence of the Amazon and Topajos Rivers, Brazil, South America

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-08-11

    This view shows the confluence of the Amazon and the Topajos Rivers at Santarem, Brazil (2.0S, 55.0W). The Am,azon flows from lower left to upper right of the photo. Below the river juncture of the Amazon and Tapajos, there is considerable deforestation activity along the Trans-Amazon Highway.

  5. Confluence of the Amazon and Topajos Rivers, Brazil, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This view shows the confluence of the Amazon and the Topajos Rivers at Santarem, Brazil (2.0S, 55.0W). The Am,azon flows from lower left to upper right of the photo. Below the river juncture of the Amazon and Tapajos, there is considerable deforestation activity along the Trans-Amazon Highway.

  6. Henry Hudson Bridge over Harlem River Shipping Canal at confluence ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Henry Hudson Bridge over Harlem River Shipping Canal at confluence with Hudson River, from Isham Park, view northeast. Inwood Hill Park on left, Spuyten Duyvil Shorefront Park on right, Palisades Interstate Park in background. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  7. Flow mixing at the World's largest river confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, Jim; Ianniruberto, Marco; Gualtieri, Carlo; Paes de Almeida, Renato; Freitas, Bernardo; Nogueira, Pedro; Cisneros, Julia

    2017-04-01

    River confluences form key nodes within all fluvial networks and points of significant, and non-linear, changes in flow discharge, sediment grain size and bed morphology. It is generally acknowledged that the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics within the confluence zone are influenced by the junction planform, the momentum flux ratio between the merging streams, and the level of concordance between channel beds at the confluence entrance. Recent work has also identified the role of density differences between the confluent flows as potentially exerting a significant influence on fluid mixing. Perhaps the most well-known example, which has attracted considerable recent study, is at the world's largest river confluence - the Rio Solimões and Rio Negro (the Encontro das Águas), near Manaus, in the Amazonian basin. This paper sheds new light on the patterns of mixing at the Encontro das Águas as revealed by combined multibeam echo sounder (MBES) and acoustic Doppler current profiling (aDcp) surveys. The MBES survey reveals that the scour and bed morphology at this confluence, that can be up to c. 80m deep, is dominated by the presence of Cretaceous bedrock and that the mobile bedload sediment from the Rio Solimões is confined to a narrow zone of transport. The suspended sediment plume from the Rio Solimões interacts with the bedrock, which can comprise subaqueous roughness up to 20m in height, and is consequently diverted both laterally and vertically by this topography. The aDcp surveys reveal the nature of this topographic interaction and suggest that the routing of sediment-laden fluid within the junction, and the patterns of upwelling on the flow surface, are significantly influenced by these flow-bedrock interactions. Details of the topography and these fluid dynamic interactions will be presented, together with an analysis of satellite imagery that links the longevity of the location of some of the upwellings to the presence of bedrock roughness.

  8. Trans-saccadic integration of peripheral and foveal feature information is close to optimal.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Christian; Schütz, Alexander C

    2015-01-01

    Due to the inhomogenous visual representation across the visual field, humans use peripheral vision to select objects of interest and foveate them by saccadic eye movements for further scrutiny. Thus, there is usually peripheral information available before and foveal information after a saccade. In this study we investigated the integration of information across saccades. We measured reliabilities--i.e., the inverse of variance-separately in a presaccadic peripheral and a postsaccadic foveal orientation--discrimination task. From this, we predicted trans-saccadic performance and compared it to observed values. We show that the integration of incongruent peripheral and foveal information is biased according to their relative reliabilities and that the reliability of the trans-saccadic information equals the sum of the peripheral and foveal reliabilities. Both results are consistent with and indistinguishable from statistically optimal integration according to the maximum-likelihood principle. Additionally, we tracked the gathering of information around the time of the saccade with high temporal precision by using a reverse correlation method. Information gathering starts to decline between 100 and 50 ms before saccade onset and recovers immediately after saccade offset. Altogether, these findings show that the human visual system can effectively use peripheral and foveal information about object features and that visual perception does not simply correspond to disconnected snapshots during each fixation.

  9. Control of fixation duration during scene viewing by interaction of foveal and peripheral processing.

    PubMed

    Laubrock, Jochen; Cajar, Anke; Engbert, Ralf

    2013-10-16

    Processing in our visual system is functionally segregated, with the fovea specialized in processing fine detail (high spatial frequencies) for object identification, and the periphery in processing coarse information (low frequencies) for spatial orienting and saccade target selection. Here we investigate the consequences of this functional segregation for the control of fixation durations during scene viewing. Using gaze-contingent displays, we applied high-pass or low-pass filters to either the central or the peripheral visual field and compared eye-movement patterns with an unfiltered control condition. In contrast with predictions from functional segregation, fixation durations were unaffected when the critical information for vision was strongly attenuated (foveal low-pass and peripheral high-pass filtering); fixation durations increased, however, when useful information was left mostly intact by the filter (foveal high-pass and peripheral low-pass filtering). These patterns of results are difficult to explain under the assumption that fixation durations are controlled by foveal processing difficulty. As an alternative explanation, we developed the hypothesis that the interaction of foveal and peripheral processing controls fixation duration. To investigate the viability of this explanation, we implemented a computational model with two compartments, approximating spatial aspects of processing by foveal and peripheral activations that change according to a small set of dynamical rules. The model reproduced distributions of fixation durations from all experimental conditions by variation of few parameters that were affected by specific filtering conditions.

  10. Foveal processing difficulty does not affect parafoveal preprocessing in young readers

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Christina; Hawelka, Stefan; Schuster, Sarah; Hutzler, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested that parafoveal preprocessing develops early during reading acquisition, that is, young readers profit from valid parafoveal information and exhibit a resultant preview benefit. For young readers, however, it is unknown whether the processing demands of the currently fixated word modulate the extent to which the upcoming word is parafoveally preprocessed – as it has been postulated (for adult readers) by the foveal load hypothesis. The present study used the novel incremental boundary technique to assess whether 4th and 6th Graders exhibit an effect of foveal load. Furthermore, we attempted to distinguish the foveal load effect from the spillover effect. These effects are hard to differentiate with respect to the expected pattern of results, but are conceptually different. The foveal load effect is supposed to reflect modulations of the extent of parafoveal preprocessing, whereas the spillover effect reflects the ongoing processing of the previous word whilst the reader’s fixation is already on the next word. The findings revealed that the young readers did not exhibit an effect of foveal load, but a substantial spillover effect. The implications for previous studies with adult readers and for models of eye movement control in reading are discussed. PMID:28139718

  11. FOVEA: a new program to standardize the measurement of foveal pit morphology

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Bret A.; Yoo, Innfarn; Tyrrell, Luke P.; Benes, Bedrich

    2016-01-01

    The fovea is one of the most studied retinal specializations in vertebrates, which consists of an invagination of the retinal tissue with high packing of cone photoreceptors, leading to high visual resolution. Between species, foveae differ morphologically in the depth and width of the foveal pit and the steepness of the foveal walls, which could influence visual perception. However, there is no standardized methodology to measure the contour of the foveal pit across species. We present here FOVEA, a program for the quantification of foveal parameters (width, depth, slope of foveal pit) using images from histological cross-sections or optical coherence tomography (OCT). FOVEA is based on a new algorithm to detect the inner retina contour based on the color variation of the image. We evaluated FOVEA by comparing the fovea morphology of two Passerine birds based on histological cross-sections and its performance with data from previously published OCT images. FOVEA detected differences between species and its output was not significantly different from previous estimates using OCT software. FOVEA can be used for comparative studies to better understand the evolution of the fovea morphology in vertebrates as well as for diagnostic purposes in veterinary pathology. FOVEA is freely available for academic use and can be downloaded at: http://estebanfj.bio.purdue.edu/fovea. PMID:27076997

  12. Race- and Sex-Related Differences in Retinal Thickness and Foveal Pit Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Wagner-Schuman, Melissa; Dubis, Adam M.; Nordgren, Rick N.; Lei, Yuming; Odell, Daniel; Chiao, Hellen; Weh, Eric; Fischer, William; Sulai, Yusufu; Dubra, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine sex- and race-associated differences in macular thickness and foveal pit morphology by using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. One hundred eighty eyes of 90 healthy patients (43 women, 47 men) underwent retinal imaging with spectral-domain OCT. The lateral scale of each macular volume scan was corrected for individual differences in axial length by ocular biometry. From these corrected volumes, Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) grids of retinal thickness were generated and compared between the groups. Foveal morphology was measured with previously described algorithms. Results. Compared with the Caucasians, the Africans and African Americans had reduced central subfield thickness. Central subfield thickness was also reduced in the women compared with the men, although the women also showed significant thinning in parafoveal regions. There was no difference between the sexes in foveal pit morphology; however, the Africans/African Americans had significantly deeper and broader foveal pits than the Caucasians. Conclusions. Previous studies have reported race- and sex-associated differences in macular thickness, and the inference has been that these differences represent similar anatomic features. However, the data on pit morphology collected in the present study reveal an important and significant variation. Between the sexes, the differences are due to global variability in retinal thickness, whereas the variation in thickness observed between the races appears to be driven by differences in foveal pit morphology. These differences have important implications for the use of SD-OCT in detecting and diagnosing retinal disease. PMID:20861480

  13. Foveal dysplasia evident by optical coherence tomography in patients with a history of retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Franco M; Recchia, Cynthia C

    2007-01-01

    To describe the optical coherence tomography (OCT) findings for patients with a history of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Clinical records, fundus photographs, and OCT findings for consecutive patients aged 8 years and older who had a history of ROP were reviewed. The main outcome measures were best-corrected visual acuity, central foveal thickness (CFT), macular anatomy, and foveal contour by OCT. Twenty eyes of 12 patients (median age, 15 years) were studied. Median gestational age at birth was 25 weeks. Six eyes had received peripheral retinal ablation for threshold ROP. Median best-corrected visual acuity was 20/40 (range, 20/20 to counting fingers). CFT was >220 microm in 70% of eyes and >240 microm in 35% of eyes. In all eyes, foveal contour was abnormal, with foveal depression either absent (n = 7 [35%]) or shallow (n = 13 [65%]). Preservation of multiple inner retinal layers within the fovea was seen in 14 eyes (70%). Vitreomacular traction or subretinal fluid was not seen in any eye. Anomalies in foveal anatomy by OCT may be a vestige of prematurity, appear to be independent of prior retinopexy, and can still be associated with excellent visual acuity.

  14. Primate photopigments and primate color vision.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, G H

    1996-01-01

    The past 15 years have brought much progress in our understanding of several basic features of primate color vision. There has been particular success in cataloging the spectral properties of the cone photopigments found in retinas of a number of primate species and in elucidating the relationship between cone opsin genes and their photopigment products. Direct studies of color vision show that there are several modal patterns of color vision among groupings of primates: (i) Old World monkeys, apes, and humans all enjoy trichromatic color vision, although the former two groups do not seem prone to the polymorphic variations in color vision that are characteristic of people; (ii) most species of New World monkeys are highly polymorphic, with individual animals having any of several types of dichromatic or trichromatic color vision; (iii) less is known about color vision in prosimians, but evidence suggests that at least some diurnal species have dichromatic color vision; and (iv) some nocturnal primates may lack color vision completely. In many cases the photopigments and photopigment gene arrangements underlying these patterns have been revealed and, as a result, hints are emerging about the evolution of color vision among the primates. PMID:8570598

  15. Bed erosion control at 60 degree river confluence using vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuppukondur, Ananth; Chandra, Venu

    2017-04-01

    Confluences are common occurrences along natural rivers. Hydrodynamics at the confluence is complex due to merging of main and lateral flows with different characteristics. Bed erosion occurs at the confluence due to turbulence and also secondary circulation induced by centrifugal action of the lateral flow. The eroded sediment poses various problems in the river ecosystem including river bank failure. Reservoirs are majorly affected due to sediment deposition which reduces storage capacity. The bed erosion also endangers stability of pipeline crossings and bridge piers. The aim of this experimental study is to check the performance of vanes in controlling bed erosion at the confluence. Experiments are performed in a 600 confluence mobile bed model with a non-uniform sediment of mean particle size d50 = 0.28mm. Discharge ratio (q=ratio of lateral flow discharge to main flow discharge) is maintained as 0.5 and 0.75 with a constant average main flow depth (h) of 5cm. Vanes of width 0.3h (1.5cm) and thickness of 1 mm are placed along the mixing layer at an angle of 150, 300 and 600(with respect to main flow) to perform the experiments. Also, two different spacing of 2h and 3h (10cm and 15cm) between the vanes are used for conducting the experiments. A digital point gauge with an accuracy of ±0.1mm is used to measure bed levels and flow depths at the confluence. An Acoustic Doppler Velocitimeter (ADV) with a frequency of 25Hz and accuracy of ±1mm/s is used to measure flow velocities. Maximum scour depth ratio Rmax, which is ratio between maximum scour depth (Ds) and flow depth (h), is used to present the experimental results.From the experiments without vanes, it is observed that the velocities are increasing along the mixing layer and Rmax=0.82 and 1.06, for q=0.5 and 0.75, respectively. The velocities reduce with vanes since roughness increases along the mixing layer. For q=0.5 and 0.75, Rmax reduces to 0.62 and 0.7 with vanes at 2h spacing, respectively. Similarly

  16. Property in Nonhuman Primates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2011-01-01

    Property is rare in most nonhuman primates, most likely because their lifestyles are not conducive to it. Nonetheless, just because these species do not frequently maintain property does not mean that they lack the propensity to do so. Primates show respect for possession, as well as behaviors related to property, such as irrational decision…

  17. Property in Nonhuman Primates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2011-01-01

    Property is rare in most nonhuman primates, most likely because their lifestyles are not conducive to it. Nonetheless, just because these species do not frequently maintain property does not mean that they lack the propensity to do so. Primates show respect for possession, as well as behaviors related to property, such as irrational decision…

  18. Foveal Localization in Non-exudative AMD Using Scanning Laser Polarimetry

    PubMed Central

    VanNasdale, Dean A.; Elsner, Ann E.; Kohne, Kimberly D.; Peabody, Todd D.; Malinovsky, Victor E.; Haggerty, Bryan P.; Weber, Anke; Clark, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether custom scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) images, differing in polarization content, can be used to accurately localize the fovea in the presence of non-exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To determine whether alterations to the foveal structure in non-exudative AMD significantly disrupts the birefringent Henle fiber layer, responsible for the macular cross pattern in some SLP images. To determine whether phase retardation information, specifically color-coded information representing its magnitude and axis, allow better foveal localization than images including retardation amplitude only. Methods SLP images were acquired in 25 AMD subjects and 25 age-matched controls. Raw data were used to generate 5 custom image types differing in polarization content. The foveal location was marked by 3 graders in each image type for each subject. The difference in variability was compared between the AMD subjects and matched controls. We further determined whether the orientation of Henle fiber layer phase retardation improved localization in 10 subjects with the highest variability in images including only phase retardation amplitude. Results Images that differed in polarization content led to strikingly different visualizations of AMD pathology. The Henle fiber layer remained sufficiently intact to assist in fovea localization in all subjects, but with more variability in the AMD group. For both the AMD and matched control group, images containing birefringence amplitude and orientation information reduced the amount of intra-grader, inter-grader, and inter-image variability for estimating foveal location. Conclusions The disruption in Henle fiber birefringence was evident in the eyes with AMD, but nevertheless was sufficient to help in foveal localization despite macular pathology. Phase retardation amplitude and axis of orientation can be a useful tool in foveal localization in patients with AMD. PMID:22466102

  19. Foveal localization in non-exudative AMD using scanning laser polarimetry.

    PubMed

    VanNasdale, Dean A; Elsner, Ann E; Kohne, Kimberly D; Peabody, Todd D; Malinovsky, Victor E; Haggerty, Bryan P; Weber, Anke; Clark, Christopher A

    2012-05-01

    To determine whether custom scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) images, differing in polarization content, can be used to accurately localize the fovea in the presence of non-exudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To determine whether alterations to the foveal structure in non-exudative AMD significantly disrupts the birefringent Henle fiber layer, responsible for the macular cross pattern in some SLP images. To determine whether phase retardation information, specifically color-coded information representing its magnitude and axis, allow better foveal localization than images including retardation amplitude only. SLP images were acquired in 25 AMD subjects and 25 age-matched controls. Raw data were used to generate five custom image types differing in polarization content. The foveal location was marked by three graders in each image type for each subject. The difference in variability was compared between the AMD subjects and matched controls. We further determined whether the orientation of Henle fiber layer phase retardation improved localization in 10 subjects with the highest variability in images including only phase retardation amplitude. Images that differed in polarization content led to strikingly different visualizations of AMD pathology. The Henle fiber layer remained sufficiently intact to assist in fovea localization in all subjects but with more variability in the AMD group. For both the AMD and matched control group, images containing birefringence amplitude and orientation information reduced the amount of intragrader, intergrader, and interimage variability for estimating foveal location. The disruption in Henle fiber birefringence was evident in the eyes with AMD but nevertheless was sufficient to help in foveal localization despite macular pathology. Phase retardation amplitude and axis of orientation can be a useful tool in foveal localization in patients with AMD.

  20. SUPERFICIAL FOVEAL AVASCULAR ZONE DETERMINED BY OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY BEFORE AND AFTER MACULAR HOLE SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Baba, Takayuki; Kakisu, Masato; Nizawa, Tomohiro; Oshitari, Toshiyuki; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2017-03-01

    To determine the size of the superficial foveal avascular zone (FAZ) by optical coherence tomography angiography before and after surgery for an idiopathic macular hole. A retrospective, observational case series, in which 16 eyes of 16 patients with an idiopathic macular hole were studied. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed with internal limiting membrane peeling. The foveal retinal vasculature was examined by optical coherence tomography angiography, and the area of the superficial FAZ was determined before, and at 1 and 3 months after the surgery. The area of the macular hole was also measured in the en face optical coherence tomography images. The central foveal thickness was measured to determine the relationship between the size of the superficial FAZ and foveal shape. The unaffected fellow eyes were used as controls. The mean age of the patients was 68.9 years. The average preoperative superficial FAZ area was 0.45 ± 0.14 mm, which was significantly reduced to 0.23 ± 0.08 mm at 1 month (P < 0.001) and 0.25 ± 0.08 mm at 3 months postoperatively (P < 0.001). The size was smaller than that of the control eyes (0.36 ± 0.12 mm, P = 0.003). There was a significant inverse correlation between the area of the postoperative superficial FAZ and the central foveal thickness (r = -0.589, P = 0.016). The correlations between the visual acuity and the area of the superficial FAZ at 1 and 3 months postoperatively were not significant (P = 0.369 and 0.285). The significant decrease in the superficial FAZ after the macular hole surgery indicates that there was a centripetal movement of the foveal tissue postoperatively.

  1. Raptors and primate evolution.

    PubMed

    McGraw, W Scott; Berger, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Most scholars agree that avoiding predators is a central concern of lemurs, monkeys, and apes. However, given uncertainties about the frequency with which primates actually become prey, the selective importance of predation in primate evolution continues to be debated. Some argue that primates are often killed by predators, while others maintain that such events are relatively rare. Some authors have contended that predation's influence on primate sociality has been trivial; others counter that predation need not occur often to be a powerful selective force. Given the challenges of documenting events that can be ephemeral and irregular, we are unlikely ever to amass the volume of systematic, comparative data we have on such topics as feeding, social dynamics, or locomotor behavior. Nevertheless, a steady accumulation of field observations, insight gained from natural experiments, and novel taphonomic analyses have enhanced understanding of how primates interact with several predators, especially raptors, the subject of this review.

  2. 10. WHITNEY'S FLUME AND VIEW OF THE CONFLUENCE OF TONTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. WHITNEY'S FLUME AND VIEW OF THE CONFLUENCE OF TONTO CREEK AND THE SALT RIVER. AREA SHOWN IS PRESENTLY UNDER WATER. TONTO CREEK FLOWS FROM BACKGROUND CENTER TO LEFT, AND THE SALT RIVER FLOWS FROM RIGHT TO LEFT IN THE PHOTO. DAM IS LOCATED OFF THE PHOTO TO THE LEFT Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, March 3, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  3. Propagation and deposition of stony debris flows at channel confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancanelli, L. M.; Lanzoni, S.; Foti, E.

    2015-07-01

    The fluid dynamics of stony debris flows generated in two small tributaries adjacent to each other and flowing into a main receiving channel was analyzed experimentally at a laboratory scale. The analysis on the propagation along the tributaries and deposition in the main channel provide information about sediment-water mobility, dangerous damming, and potential hazard. Debris flows were generated by releasing a preset water discharge over an erodible layer of saturated gravels material. As a consequence, the debris flow sediment concentration varied accordingly to the entrainment rate which, in turn, was strongly controlled by the tributary slope. The data collected by acoustic level sensors, pore fluid pressure transducers, and a load cell were used to characterize the evolution of bulk density and solid concentration of the sediment-water mixture. These two parameters were relevant to assess the stony debris flow mobility which contributes to determine the shape of sediment deposits in the main channel. The detailed bed topography surveys carried out in the main channel at the end of each experiment provided information on the morphology of these deposits and on the interplay of adjacent confluences. The influences of confluence angle, tributary slopes, and triggering conditions have been investigated, for a total of 18 different configurations. Within the investigated range of parameters, the slope angle was the parameter that mainly influences the stony debris flow mobility while, for adjacent confluences, the degree of obstruction within the receiving channel was strongly influenced by the triggering scenario.

  4. A new method of SC image processing for confluence estimation.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Sajjad; Mirzaei, Mohsen; Toncu, Dana-Cristina

    2017-10-01

    Stem cells images are a strong instrument in the estimation of confluency during their culturing for therapeutic processes. Various laboratory conditions, such as lighting, cell container support and image acquisition equipment, effect on the image quality, subsequently on the estimation efficiency. This paper describes an efficient image processing method for cell pattern recognition and morphological analysis of images that were affected by uneven background. The proposed algorithm for enhancing the image is based on coupling a novel image denoising method through BM3D filter with an adaptive thresholding technique for improving the uneven background. This algorithm works well to provide a faster, easier, and more reliable method than manual measurement for the confluency assessment of stem cell cultures. The present scheme proves to be valid for the prediction of the confluency and growth of stem cells at early stages for tissue engineering in reparatory clinical surgery. The method used in this paper is capable of processing the image of the cells, which have already contained various defects due to either personnel mishandling or microscope limitations. Therefore, it provides proper information even out of the worst original images available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fabrication of anatomically tapered foveal pits for retinal phantoms for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gary C. F.; Smith, Gennifer T.; Agrawal, Monica; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2015-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has become a standard tool for diagnosing retinal disease in many ophthalmology clinics. Nonetheless, the technical and clinical research communities still lack a standardized phantom that could aid in evaluating and normalizing the various scan protocols and OCT machines employed at different institutions. Existing retinal phantoms designed for OCT imaging mimic some important features of the retina, such as the thickness and scattering properties of its many layers. However, the morphology of the foveal pit and the visible tapering of the retinal layers underlying the surface surrounding the pit remains a challenge to replicate in current phantoms. Recent attempts at creating a realistic foveal pit include molding, ablation and laser etching but have not proved sufficient to replicate this particular anatomical feature. In this work, we demonstrate a new fabrication procedure that is capable of replicating the tapered appearance of the retinal layers near the foveal pit using a combination of spin-coating and replica molding. The ability to create an anatomically correct foveal pit will allow for a new phantom better suited for intra- and inter-system evaluation and for improved testing of retinal segmentation algorithms.

  6. Visual Speech Perception in Foveal and Extrafoveal Vision: Further Implications for Divisions in Hemispheric Projections

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Timothy R.; Sheen, Mercedes; Abedipour, Lily; Paterson, Kevin B.

    2014-01-01

    When observing a talking face, it has often been argued that visual speech to the left and right of fixation may produce differences in performance due to divided projections to the two cerebral hemispheres. However, while it seems likely that such a division in hemispheric projections exists for areas away from fixation, the nature and existence of a functional division in visual speech perception at the foveal midline remains to be determined. We investigated this issue by presenting visual speech in matched hemiface displays to the left and right of a central fixation point, either exactly abutting the foveal midline or else located away from the midline in extrafoveal vision. The location of displays relative to the foveal midline was controlled precisely using an automated, gaze-contingent eye-tracking procedure. Visual speech perception showed a clear right hemifield advantage when presented in extrafoveal locations but no hemifield advantage (left or right) when presented abutting the foveal midline. Thus, while visual speech observed in extrafoveal vision appears to benefit from unilateral projections to left-hemisphere processes, no evidence was obtained to indicate that a functional division exists when visual speech is observed around the point of fixation. Implications of these findings for understanding visual speech perception and the nature of functional divisions in hemispheric projection are discussed. PMID:25032950

  7. Arthroscopic-assisted repair of triangular fibrocartilage complex foveal avulsion in distal radioulnar joint injury

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sung Jong; Jegal, Midum; Park, Min Jong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Disruption of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) foveal insertion can lead to distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability accompanied by ulnar-sided pain, weakness, snapping, and limited forearm rotation. We investigated the clinical outcomes of patients with TFCC foveal tears treated with arthroscopic-assisted repair. Materials and Methods: Twelve patients underwent foveal repair of avulsed TFCC with the assistance of arthroscopy between 2011 and 2013. These patients were followed up for an average of 19 months (range 14–25 months). The avulsed TFCC were reattached to the fovea using a transosseous pull-out suture or a knotless suture anchor. At the final followup, the range of motion, grip strength and DRUJ stability were measured as objective outcomes. Subjective outcomes were assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE), Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH score) and return to work. Results: Based on the DRUJ stress test, 5 patients had normal stability and 7 patients showed mild laxity as compared with the contralateral side. Postoperatively, the mean range of pronation supination increased from 141° to 166°, and the mean VAS score for pain decreased from 5.3 to 1.7 significantly. The PRWE and DASH questionnaires also showed significant functional improvement. All patients were able to return to their jobs. However, two patients complained of persistent pain. Conclusions: Arthroscopically assisted repair of TFCC foveal injury can provide significant pain relief, functional improvement and restoration of DRUJ stability. PMID:27293286

  8. Visual speech perception in foveal and extrafoveal vision: further implications for divisions in hemispheric projections.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Timothy R; Sheen, Mercedes; Abedipour, Lily; Paterson, Kevin B

    2014-01-01

    When observing a talking face, it has often been argued that visual speech to the left and right of fixation may produce differences in performance due to divided projections to the two cerebral hemispheres. However, while it seems likely that such a division in hemispheric projections exists for areas away from fixation, the nature and existence of a functional division in visual speech perception at the foveal midline remains to be determined. We investigated this issue by presenting visual speech in matched hemiface displays to the left and right of a central fixation point, either exactly abutting the foveal midline or else located away from the midline in extrafoveal vision. The location of displays relative to the foveal midline was controlled precisely using an automated, gaze-contingent eye-tracking procedure. Visual speech perception showed a clear right hemifield advantage when presented in extrafoveal locations but no hemifield advantage (left or right) when presented abutting the foveal midline. Thus, while visual speech observed in extrafoveal vision appears to benefit from unilateral projections to left-hemisphere processes, no evidence was obtained to indicate that a functional division exists when visual speech is observed around the point of fixation. Implications of these findings for understanding visual speech perception and the nature of functional divisions in hemispheric projection are discussed.

  9. Evidence for Delayed Parafoveal-on-Foveal Effects from Word n+2 in Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risse, Sarah; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2012-01-01

    During reading information is acquired from word(s) beyond the word that is currently looked at. It is still an open question whether such parafoveal information can influence the current viewing of a word, and if so, whether such parafoveal-on-foveal effects are attributable to distributed processing or to mislocated fixations which occur when…

  10. Parafoveal-foveal Overlap Can Facilitate Ongoing Word Identification During Reading: Evidence from Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Angele, Bernhard; Tran, Randy; Rayner, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Readers continuously receive parafoveal information about the upcoming word in addition to the foveal information about the currently fixated word. Previous research (Inhoff, Radach, Starr, & Greenberg, 2000) showed that the presence of a parafoveal word which was similar to the foveal word facilitated processing of the foveal word. In three experiments, we used the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm (Rayner, 1975) to manipulate the parafoveal information that subjects received before or while fixating a target word (e.g. news) within a sentence. Specifically a reader’s parafovea could contain a repetition of the target (news), a correct preview of the post-target word (once), an unrelated word (warm), random letters (cxmr), a nonword neighbor of the target (niws), a semantically related word (tale), or a nonword neighbor of that word (tule). Target fixation times were significantly lower in the parafoveal repetition condition than in all other conditions, suggesting that foveal processing can be facilitated by parafoveal repetition. We present a simple model framework that can account for these effects. PMID:22866764

  11. Vitreoretinal interface and foveal deformation in asymptomatic fellow eyes of patients with unilateral macular holes.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Hangai, Masanori; Larson, Eric; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2011-08-01

    To compare the vitreoretinal interface of the asymptomatic fellow eyes of patients with unilateral macular holes (MHs) with that of the asymptomatic fellow eyes of patients with other retinal diseases and with that of healthy eyes. Retrospective, observational cross-sectional study. This study included 137 healthy volunteers and 929 eyes of 929 patients with various unilateral retinal diseases. We reviewed medical charts, fundus photographs, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic (SD OCT) images. The incidence of the features of the vitreoretinal interface and foveal structures in the SD OCT images were compared among the asymptomatic fellow eyes of patients with unilateral MHs (n = 242), age-related macular degeneration (n = 129), epiretinal membrane (n = 185), macular pseudohole (n = 48), rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (n = 68), retinal vein occlusion (n = 257), and 1 of the eyes of healthy individuals (n = 137). Findings of slit-lamp biomicroscopy and SD OCT B-scan images. The SD OCT B-scan images showed different types of foveal deformations associated with vitreofoveal adhesions in eyes without a posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) in the macular area. The incidence of the foveal deformations associated with vitreofoveal adhesions was significantly higher (P<0.0001) in the fellow eyes of the unilateral MH group (17%) than that in the other groups (0%-2%), except for the macular pseudohole group (8%). The SD OCT B-scan images also showed residual foveal deformations in eyes with a macular PVD. The incidence of a residual foveal deformation in eyes with a macular PVD was significantly higher (P<0.0001) in the MH group (32%) than that in any other group (0%-9%). The higher incidence of foveal deformations in the fellow eyes of patients with unilateral MHs with and without vitreofoveal adhesions suggests that patients in whom MHs develop have abnormally strong vitreofoveal adhesions sufficient to cause foveal deformation. The author(s) have no

  12. Evaluating outer segment length as a surrogate measure of peak foveal cone density.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Melissa A; Wilk, Brandon M; Langlo, Christopher S; Cooper, Robert F; Carroll, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) imaging tools enable direct visualization of the cone photoreceptor mosaic, which facilitates quantitative measurements such as cone density. However, in many individuals, low image quality or excessive eye movements precludes making such measures. As foveal cone specialization is associated with both increased density and outer segment (OS) elongation, we sought to examine whether OS length could be used as a surrogate measure of foveal cone density. The retinas of 43 subjects (23 normal and 20 albinism; aged 6-67years) were examined. Peak foveal cone density was measured using confocal adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), and OS length was measured using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and longitudinal reflectivity profile-based approach. Peak cone density ranged from 29,200 to 214,000cones/mm(2) (111,700±46,300cones/mm(2)); OS length ranged from 26.3 to 54.5μm (40.5±7.7μm). Density was significantly correlated with OS length in albinism (p<0.0001), but not normals (p=0.99). A cubic model of density as a function of OS length was created based on histology and optimized to fit the albinism data. The model includes triangular cone packing, a cylindrical OS with a fixed volume of 136.6μm(3), and a ratio of OS to inner segment width that increased linearly with increasing OS length (R(2)=0.72). Normal subjects showed no apparent relationship between cone density and OS length. In the absence of adequate AOSLO imagery, OS length may be used to estimate cone density in patients with albinism. Whether this relationship exists in other patient populations with foveal hypoplasia (e.g., premature birth, aniridia, isolated foveal hypoplasia) remains to be seen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Imaging Foveal Microvasculature: Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Versus Adaptive Optics Scanning Light Ophthalmoscope Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Shelley; Krawitz, Brian; Efstathiadis, Eleni; Geyman, Lawrence; Weitz, Rishard; Chui, Toco Y. P.; Carroll, Joseph; Dubra, Alfredo; Rosen, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the use of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope fluorescein angiography (AOSLO FA) for characterizing the foveal microvasculature in healthy and vasculopathic eyes. Methods Four healthy controls and 11 vasculopathic patients (4 diabetic retinopathy, 4 retinal vein occlusion, and 3 sickle cell retinopathy) were imaged with OCTA and AOSLO FA. Foveal perfusion maps were semiautomatically skeletonized for quantitative analysis, which included foveal avascular zone (FAZ) metrics (area, perimeter, acircularity index) and vessel density in three concentric annular regions of interest. On each set of OCTA and AOSLO FA images, matching vessel segments were used for lumen diameter measurement. Qualitative image comparisons were performed by visual identification of microaneurysms, vessel loops, leakage, and vessel segments. Results Adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscope FA and OCTA showed no statistically significant differences in FAZ perimeter, acircularity index, and vessel densities. Foveal avascular zone area, however, showed a small but statistically significant difference of 1.8% (P = 0.004). Lumen diameter was significantly larger on OCTA (mean difference 5.7 μm, P < 0.001). Microaneurysms, fine structure of vessel loops, leakage, and some vessel segments were visible on AOSLO FA but not OCTA, while blood vessels obscured by leakage were visible only on OCTA. Conclusions Optical coherence tomography angiography is comparable to AOSLO FA at imaging the foveal microvasculature except for differences in FAZ area, lumen diameter, and some qualitative features. These results, together with its ease of use, short acquisition time, and avoidance of potentially phototoxic blue light, support OCTA as a tool for monitoring ocular pathology and detecting early disease. PMID:27409463

  14. Iatrogenic bile duct injury with loss of confluence

    PubMed Central

    Mercado, Miguel-Angel; Vilatoba, Mario; Contreras, Alan; Leal-Leyte, Pilar; Cervantes-Alvarez, Eduardo; Arriola, Juan-Carlos; Gonzalez, Bruno-Adonai

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe our experience concerning the surgical treatment of Strasberg E-4 (Bismuth IV) bile duct injuries. METHODS: In an 18-year period, among 603 patients referred to our hospital for surgical treatment of complex bile duct injuries, 53 presented involvement of the hilar confluence classified as Strasberg E4 injuries. Imagenological studies, mainly magnetic resonance imaging showed a loss of confluence. The files of these patients were analyzed and general data were recorded, including type of operation and postoperative outcome with emphasis on postoperative cholangitis, liver function test and quality of life. The mean time of follow-up was of 55.9 ± 52.9 mo (median = 38.5, minimum = 2, maximum = 181.2). All other patients with Strasberg A, B, C, D, E1, E2, E3, or E5 biliary injuries were excluded from this study. RESULTS: Patients were divided in three groups: G1 (n = 21): Construction of neoconfluence + Roux-en-Y hepatojejunostomy. G2 (n = 26): Roux-en-Y portoenterostomy. G3 (n = 6): Double (right and left) Roux-en-Y hepatojejunostomy. Cholangitis was recorded in two patients in group 1, in 14 patients in group 2, and in one patient in group 3. All of them required transhepatic instrumentation of the anastomosis and six patients needed live transplantation. CONCLUSION: Loss of confluence represents a surgical challenge. There are several treatment options at different stages. Roux-en-Y bilioenteric anastomosis (neoconfluence, double-barrel anastomosis, portoenterostomy) is the treatment of choice, and when it is technically possible, building of a neoconfluence has better outcomes. When liver cirrhosis is shown, liver transplantation is the best choice. PMID:26527428

  15. Iatrogenic bile duct injury with loss of confluence.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Miguel-Angel; Vilatoba, Mario; Contreras, Alan; Leal-Leyte, Pilar; Cervantes-Alvarez, Eduardo; Arriola, Juan-Carlos; Gonzalez, Bruno-Adonai

    2015-10-27

    To describe our experience concerning the surgical treatment of Strasberg E-4 (Bismuth IV) bile duct injuries. In an 18-year period, among 603 patients referred to our hospital for surgical treatment of complex bile duct injuries, 53 presented involvement of the hilar confluence classified as Strasberg E4 injuries. Imagenological studies, mainly magnetic resonance imaging showed a loss of confluence. The files of these patients were analyzed and general data were recorded, including type of operation and postoperative outcome with emphasis on postoperative cholangitis, liver function test and quality of life. The mean time of follow-up was of 55.9 ± 52.9 mo (median = 38.5, minimum = 2, maximum = 181.2). All other patients with Strasberg A, B, C, D, E1, E2, E3, or E5 biliary injuries were excluded from this study. Patients were divided in three groups: G1 (n = 21): Construction of neoconfluence + Roux-en-Y hepatojejunostomy. G2 (n = 26): Roux-en-Y portoenterostomy. G3 (n = 6): Double (right and left) Roux-en-Y hepatojejunostomy. Cholangitis was recorded in two patients in group 1, in 14 patients in group 2, and in one patient in group 3. All of them required transhepatic instrumentation of the anastomosis and six patients needed live transplantation. Loss of confluence represents a surgical challenge. There are several treatment options at different stages. Roux-en-Y bilioenteric anastomosis (neoconfluence, double-barrel anastomosis, portoenterostomy) is the treatment of choice, and when it is technically possible, building of a neoconfluence has better outcomes. When liver cirrhosis is shown, liver transplantation is the best choice.

  16. Onyx embolization of anterior condylar confluence dural arteriovenous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Koichiro; Tateshima, Satoshi; Rastogi, Sachin; Gonzalez, Nestor; Jahan, Reza; Duckwiler, Gary; Vinuela, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    The anterior condylar confluence (ACC) is a small complex venous structure located medial to the jugular vein and adjacent to the hypoglossal canal. To our knowledge, this is the first report of transvenous Onyx embolization for ACC dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF). Three patients with ACC DAVF were treated using the Onyx liquid embolic agent with or without detachable coils. Complete angiographic obliteration of the fistulas was achieved in all cases without permanent lower cranial neuropathy. This report suggests that the controlled penetration of Onyx is advantageous in order to obliterate ACC DAVFs with a small amount of embolic material. PMID:23459160

  17. Primate taxonomy: species and conservation.

    PubMed

    Rylands, Anthony B; Mittermeier, Russell A

    2014-01-01

    Primatology as a discrete branch of science involving the study of primate behavior and ecology took off in the 1960s after discovery of the importance of primates as models for biomedical research and the realization that primates provide insights into the evolutionary history of humans. Osman Hill's unfortunately incomplete monograph series on the comparative anatomy and taxonomy of the primates(1) and the Napiers' 1967 A Handbook of Living Primates(2) recorded the world's view of primate diversity at this time. This taxonomy remained the baseline for nearly three decades, with the diversity of each genus being represented by some species, but extensively as subspecies. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Sediment routing through channel confluences: RFID tracer experiments from a gravel-bed river headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imhoff, K.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Tributary confluences may significantly impact large-scale patterns of sediment transport because of their role in connecting individual streams in a network. These unique locations feature complex flow structures and geomorphic features, and may represent ecological hotspots. Sediment transport across confluences is poorly understood, however. We present research on coarse sediment transport and dispersion through confluences using sediment tracers in the East Fork Bitterroot River, Montana, USA. We tagged a range of gravel (>40 mm) and cobble particles with Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and painted smaller (10-40 mm) gravels, and then we traced them through confluences in a montane river's headwaters. We measured the effects of confluences on dispersion, path length, and depositional location and compare properties of sediment routing with a non-confluence control reach. We also measured topographic change through repeat bed surveys and combined topography, hydraulics, and tracer measurements to calculate basal shear and critical Shields stresses for different grain sizes. Field observations suggest that tagged particles in confluences routed along flanks of scour holes in confluences, with sediment depositing further downstream along bank-lateral bars than within the channel thalweg. Travel distances of RFID-tagged particles ranged up to 35 meters from original seeding points, with initial recovery rates of RFID-tagged tracers ranging between 84-89%. In both confluence and control reaches only partial mobility was observed within the entire tracer population, suggesting a hiding effect imposed by the roughness of the bed. Particles seeded in the channel thalweg experienced further travel distances than those seeded towards the banks and on bars. Differences in dispersion between confluence and control reaches are implied by field observation. This study quantified patterns of sediment routing within confluences and provided insight to the importance

  19. Anatomy of simultaneous flood peaks at a lowland confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geertsema, Tjitske; Teuling, Ryan; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Torfs, Paul; Weerts, Albrecht; Hoitink, Ton

    2017-04-01

    Lowlands are vulnerable to flooding due to their mild topography in often densely populated areas with high social and economic value. Moreover, multiple physical processes coincide in lowland areas, such as those involved in river-sea interactions and in merging of rivers. Simultaneous occurrence of such processes can result in amplifying or attenuating effects on water levels. The aim of this study is to understand the mechanisms behind simultaneous occurrence of flood peak events in the main river and tributaries in delta areas, taking the confluence of the Meuse river with the Dommel/Aa tributary as an example. Especially since the January 1995 flood at this confluence is analyzed as result of the simultaneous occurrence of discharge peaks. This study shows that simultaneous occurrence of flood peak events is common in the lowland area of the Meuse with the tributaries Dommel and Aa, because discharge peaks last long; on average 9 days in the Meuse. A typical lag time of about 3 days between tributaries and main river does not prevent simultaneous occurrence. The simultaneous occurrence of the discharge peaks results in a water level gradient increase in the main river and decrease in the tributaries, which show backwater effects of up to 1.5 meters.

  20. Flow structure at low momentum ratio river confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Gelare; Rennie, Colin. D.; Cardot, Romain; Mettra, François; Lane, Stuart. N.

    2017-04-01

    The flow structure at river confluences is a complex pattern of fluid motion and can be characterized by the formation of secondary circulation. As river confluences play an essential role on flow hydrodynamics and control the movement of sediment through river networks, there has been substantial attention given to this subject in recent decades. However, there is still much debate over how momentum ratio and sediment transport can control secondary circulation and mixing processes. In particular, studies have tended to assume that there is some equilibrium between the bed morphology present and the flow structures that form in the junction region. However, this overlooks the fact that tributaries may be associated with highly varying sediment supply regimes, especially for shorter and steeper tributaries, with temporal changes in sediment delivery ratios (between the main stem and the tributary) that do not follow exactly changes in momentum ratio. This may lead to bed morphologies that are a function of rates of historical sediment supply during sediment transporting events and not the momentum ratio associated with the junction during its measurement. It is quite possible that tributaries with low flow momentum ratio have a relatively higher sediment delivery ratio, such that the tributary is still able to influence significantly secondary circulation in the main channel, long after the sediment transport event, and despite its low flow momentum during measurement. The focus of this paper is low momentum ratio junctions where it is possible that the tributary can deliver large amounts of sediment. Secondary circulation at junctions is thought to be dominated by streamwise-oriented vortical cells. These cells are produced by the convergence of surface flow towards the centre of the main channel, with descending motion in the zone of maximum flow convergence. Once flow arrives at the bed, it diverges and completes its rotation by an upwelling motion through the

  1. Use of an Intravitreal Dexamethasone Implant (Ozurdex) in a Case with Accidental Foveal Photocoagulation by Alexandrite Laser.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Muhammed Nurullah; Çallı, Ümit; Göktaş, Eren; Bulut, Kezban; Kandemir, Baran; Özertürk, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Alexandrite laser is one of the most common methods of hair removal. Its utilization is gradually increasing due to easy accessibility and high effectiveness. However, the disuse of protective goggles during the application of this laser is a serious problem. In this case report, we presented a 35-year-old male patient who had foveal injury by alexandrite laser. The inflammatory process secondary to the foveal injury and subsequent macular edema were treated with Ozurdex because of its potent antiedematous effect.

  2. Immunoreactive cytokines within primates.

    PubMed

    Ahne, W; Mayr, A; Wiesner, H

    1996-12-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of primates (man, orang utan, gorilla, baboon), rodents (mouse, rat), carnivores (cat, dog), artiodactyls (cattle, goat, pig) and perissodactyls (horse) were isolated and stimulated with mitogens (5 micrograms/ml LPS, 5 micrograms/ml PHA) at 37 degrees C. Cytokines immunoreactive to monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed to human cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-gamma) could be detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the case of primates only. The mAb used did not recognize cytokines of the other mammalian species investigated. The results demonstrate the close relationship within the primates from the immunophysiological point of view.

  3. Semantic parafoveal-on-foveal effects and preview benefits in reading: Evidence from Fixation Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    López-Peréz, P J; Dampuré, J; Hernández-Cabrera, J A; Barber, H A

    2016-11-01

    During reading parafoveal information can affect the processing of the word currently fixated (parafovea-on-fovea effect) and words perceived parafoveally can facilitate their subsequent processing when they are fixated on (preview effect). We investigated parafoveal processing by simultaneously recording eye movements and EEG measures. Participants read word pairs that could be semantically associated or not. Additionally, the boundary paradigm allowed us to carry out the same manipulation on parafoveal previews that were displayed until reader's gaze moved to the target words. Event Related Potentials time-locked to the prime-preview presentation showed a parafoveal-on-foveal N400 effect. Fixation Related Potentials time locked to the saccade offset showed an N400 effect related to the prime-target relationship. Furthermore, this later effect interacted with the semantic manipulation of the previews, supporting a semantic preview benefit. These results demonstrate that at least under optimal conditions foveal and parafoveal information can be simultaneously processed and integrated.

  4. Newly identified paired box 6 mutation of variant familial aniridia: Congenital iris ectropion with foveal hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Jong Ha; Cho, Nam Chun

    2017-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a kind of eye disease characterized by complete or partial hypoplasia of the iris and is associated with other ocular anomalies including corneal opacity, glaucoma, and foveal hypoplasia. Heterozygous mutation of paired box 6 (PAX6) gene was identified in most cases of aniridia, with iatrogenic mutations accounting for about two-third of the cases and chromosomal rearrangements accounting for the other one-third. We report rare cases of variant aniridia, congenital iris ectropion associated with foveal hypoplasia in both a woman and her son with a mutation of PAX6 gene. To our knowledge, deletion c. 936delC in exon 8 of PAX6 gene has not been reported until now. PMID:28300742

  5. Recessive mutations in SLC38A8 cause foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting without albinism.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Al-Araimi, Musallam; Conte, Ivan; van Genderen, Maria M; Sheridan, Eamonn; Carr, Ian M; Parry, David A; Shires, Mike; Carrella, Sabrina; Bradbury, John; Khan, Kamron; Lakeman, Phillis; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Webster, Andrew R; Moore, Anthony T; Pal, Bishwanath; Mohamed, Moin D; Venkataramana, Anandula; Ramprasad, Vedam; Shetty, Rohit; Saktivel, Murugan; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Tan, Alex; Mackey, David A; Hewitt, Alex W; Banfi, Sandro; Ali, Manir; Inglehearn, Chris F; Toomes, Carmel

    2013-12-05

    Foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting are developmental defects of the visual pathway and only co-occur in connection with albinism; to date, they have only been associated with defects in the melanin-biosynthesis pathway. Here, we report that these defects can occur independently of albinism in people with recessive mutations in the putative glutamine transporter gene SLC38A8. Nine different mutations were identified in seven Asian and European families. Using morpholino-mediated ablation of Slc38a8 in medaka fish, we confirmed that pigmentation is unaffected by loss of SLC38A8. Furthermore, by undertaking an association study with SNPs at the SLC38A8 locus, we showed that common variants within this gene modestly affect foveal thickness in the general population. This study reveals a melanin-independent component underpinning the development of the visual pathway that requires a functional role for SLC38A8.

  6. Recessive Mutations in SLC38A8 Cause Foveal Hypoplasia and Optic Nerve Misrouting without Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, James A.; Al-Araimi, Musallam; Conte, Ivan; van Genderen, Maria M.; Sheridan, Eamonn; Carr, Ian M.; Parry, David A.; Shires, Mike; Carrella, Sabrina; Bradbury, John; Khan, Kamron; Lakeman, Phillis; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Webster, Andrew R.; Moore, Anthony T.; Pal, Bishwanath; Mohamed, Moin D.; Venkataramana, Anandula; Ramprasad, Vedam; Shetty, Rohit; Saktivel, Murugan; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy; Tan, Alex; Mackey, David A.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Banfi, Sandro; Ali, Manir; Inglehearn, Chris F.; Toomes, Carmel

    2013-01-01

    Foveal hypoplasia and optic nerve misrouting are developmental defects of the visual pathway and only co-occur in connection with albinism; to date, they have only been associated with defects in the melanin-biosynthesis pathway. Here, we report that these defects can occur independently of albinism in people with recessive mutations in the putative glutamine transporter gene SLC38A8. Nine different mutations were identified in seven Asian and European families. Using morpholino-mediated ablation of Slc38a8 in medaka fish, we confirmed that pigmentation is unaffected by loss of SLC38A8. Furthermore, by undertaking an association study with SNPs at the SLC38A8 locus, we showed that common variants within this gene modestly affect foveal thickness in the general population. This study reveals a melanin-independent component underpinning the development of the visual pathway that requires a functional role for SLC38A8. PMID:24290379

  7. Hands of early primates.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Doug M; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Chester, Stephen G B; Bloch, Jonathan I; Godinot, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Questions surrounding the origin and early evolution of primates continue to be the subject of debate. Though anatomy of the skull and inferred dietary shifts are often the focus, detailed studies of postcrania and inferred locomotor capabilities can also provide crucial data that advance understanding of transitions in early primate evolution. In particular, the hand skeleton includes characteristics thought to reflect foraging, locomotion, and posture. Here we review what is known about the early evolution of primate hands from a comparative perspective that incorporates data from the fossil record. Additionally, we provide new comparative data and documentation of skeletal morphology for Paleogene plesiadapiforms, notharctines, cercamoniines, adapines, and omomyiforms. Finally, we discuss implications of these data for understanding locomotor transitions during the origin and early evolutionary history of primates. Known plesiadapiform species cannot be differentiated from extant primates based on either intrinsic hand proportions or hand-to-body size proportions. Nonetheless, the presence of claws and a different metacarpophalangeal [corrected] joint form in plesiadapiforms indicate different grasping mechanics. Notharctines and cercamoniines have intrinsic hand proportions with extremely elongated proximal phalanges and digit rays relative to metacarpals, resembling tarsiers and galagos. But their hand-to-body size proportions are typical of many extant primates (unlike those of tarsiers, and possibly Teilhardina, which have extremely large hands). Non-adapine adapiforms and omomyids exhibit additional carpal features suggesting more limited dorsiflexion, greater ulnar deviation, and a more habitually divergent pollex than observed plesiadapiforms. Together, features differentiating adapiforms and omomyiforms from plesiadapiforms indicate increased reliance on vertical prehensile-clinging and grasp-leaping, possibly in combination with predatory behaviors in

  8. Primate wellness exams.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Deborah; Hampshire, Victoria

    2015-09-01

    Non-human primates (NHPs) continue to serve unique animal research needs. Decades of biomedical research have focused on humane restraint and social and environmental enrichment programs necessary to support NHPs, but the housing and care of NHPs remain challenging because of the occupational safety hazards faced by employees who are tasked with the care and use of these valuable animals. Key to obtaining reliable results, providing humane care and ensuring occupational safety when working with NHPs is a sound annual wellness examination. Clinical techniques in veterinary medicine have improved in parallel with efforts to improve psychological well-being, so the timing is opportune to update clinical techniques inside the primate facility.

  9. Functional Foveal Splitting: Evidence from Neuropsychological and Multimodal MRI Investigations in a Chinese Patient with a Splenium Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Benyan; Shan, Chunlei; Zhu, Renjing; Weng, Xuchu; He, Sheng

    2011-01-01

    It remains controversial and hotly debated whether foveal information is double-projected to both hemispheres or split at the midline between the two hemispheres. We investigated this issue in a unique patient with lesions in the splenium of the corpus callosum and the left medial occipitotemporal region, through a series of neuropsychological tests and multimodal MRI scans. Behavioral experiments showed that (1) the patient had difficulties in reading simple and compound Chinese characters when they were presented in the foveal but left to the fixation, (2) he failed to recognize the left component of compound characters when the compound characters were presented in the central foveal field, (3) his judgments of the gender of centrally presented chimeric faces were exclusively based on the left half-face and he was unaware that the faces were chimeric. Functional MRI data showed that Chinese characters, only when presented in the right foveal field but not in the left foveal field, activated a region in the left occipitotemporal sulcus in the mid-fusiform, which is recognized as visual word form area. Together with existing evidence in the literature, results of the current study suggest that the representation of foveal stimuli is functionally split at object processing levels. PMID:21887360

  10. Foveal regions of bird retinas correlate with the aster of the inner nuclear layer.

    PubMed

    Inzunza, O; Bravo, H; Smith, R L

    1989-03-01

    A radiate specialization, the aster, has been found in whole-mount retinas of birds and is associated to each one of the temporal and nasal fovea, with the one related to the convexiclivate nasal fovea more evident. This radial arrangement extends uniformly in all directions from the foveal pit. Transverse sections of the retina show that this structure is formed by bands of cells and bundles of fibers from the inner nuclear layer.

  11. Neural correlates of foveal splitting in reading: evidence from an ERP study of Chinese character recognition.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Janet Hui-wen; Shillcock, Richard; Lee, Chia-ying

    2007-03-25

    Recent research on foveal structure and reading suggests that the two halves of a centrally fixated word seem to be initially projected to, and processed in, different hemispheres. In the current study, we utilize two contrasting structures in Chinese orthography, "SP" (the semantic radical on the left and the phonetic radical on the right) and "PS" characters (the opposite structure), to examine foveal splitting effects in event-related potential (ERP) recordings. We showed that when participants silently named centrally presented characters, there was a significant interaction between character type and hemisphere in N1 amplitude: SP characters elicited larger N1 compared with PS characters in the left hemisphere, whereas the right hemisphere had the opposite pattern. This effect is consistent with the split fovea claim, suggesting that the two halves of a character may be initially projected to and processed in different hemispheres. There was no such interaction observed in an earlier component P1. Also, there was an interaction between character type and sex of the reader in N350 amplitude. This result is consistent with Hsiao and Shillcock's [Hsiao, J. H., & Shillcock, R. (2005b). Foveal splitting causes differential processing of Chinese orthography in the male and female brain. Cognitive Brain Research, 25, 531-536] behavioural study, which showed a similar interaction in naming response time. They argued that this effect was due to a more left-lateralized network for phonological processing in the male brain compared with the female brain. The results hence showed that foveal splitting effects in visual word recognition were observed in N1 the earliest, and could extend far enough to interact with the sex of the reader as revealed in N350.

  12. Neural correlates of foveal splitting in reading: evidence from an ERP study of Chinese character recognition

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Janet Hui-wen; Shillcock, Richard; Lee, Chia-ying

    2007-01-01

    Recent research on foveal structure and reading suggests that the two halves of a centrally fixated word seem to be initially projected to, and processed in, different hemispheres. In the current study, we utilize two contrasting structures in Chinese orthography, “SP” (the semantic radical on the left and the phonetic radical on the right) and “PS” characters (the opposite structure), to examine foveal splitting effects in Event Related Potential (ERP) recordings. We showed that when participants silently named centrally presented characters, there was a significant interaction between character type and hemisphere in N1 amplitude: SP characters elicited larger N1 compared with PS characters in the left hemisphere, whereas the right hemisphere had the opposite pattern. This effect is consistent with the split fovea claim, suggesting that the two halves of a character may be initially projected to and processed in different hemispheres. There was no such interaction observed in an earlier component P1. Also, there was an interaction between character type and sex of the reader in N350 amplitude. This result is consistent with Hsiao and Shillcock’s (2005b) behavioural study, which showed a similar interaction in naming response time. They argued that this effect was due to a more left-lateralized network for phonological processing in the male brain compared with the female brain. The results hence showed that foveal splitting effects in visual word recognition were observed in N1 the earliest, and could extend far enough to interact with the sex of the reader as revealed in N350. Neural correlates of foveal splitting in reading: evidence from an ERP study of Chinese character pronunciation PMID:17098263

  13. Perceptual learning improves contrast sensitivity, visual acuity, and foveal crowding in amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Barollo, Michele; Contemori, Giulio; Battaglini, Luca; Pavan, Andrea; Casco, Clara

    2017-08-11

    Amblyopic observers present abnormal spatial interactions between a low-contrast sinusoidal target and high-contrast collinear flankers. It has been demonstrated that perceptual learning (PL) can modulate these low-level lateral interactions, resulting in improved visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. We measured the extent and duration of generalization effects to various spatial tasks (i.e., visual acuity, Vernier acuity, and foveal crowding) through PL on the target's contrast detection. Amblyopic observers were trained on a contrast-detection task for a central target (i.e., a Gabor patch) flanked above and below by two high-contrast Gabor patches. The pre- and post-learning tasks included lateral interactions at different target-to-flankers separations (i.e., 2, 3, 4, 8λ) and included a range of spatial frequencies and stimulus durations as well as visual acuity, Vernier acuity, contrast-sensitivity function, and foveal crowding. The results showed that perceptual training reduced the target's contrast-detection thresholds more for the longest target-to-flanker separation (i.e., 8λ). We also found generalization of PL to different stimuli and tasks: contrast sensitivity for both trained and untrained spatial frequencies, visual acuity for Sloan letters, and foveal crowding, and partially for Vernier acuity. Follow-ups after 5-7 months showed not only complete maintenance of PL effects on visual acuity and contrast sensitivity function but also further improvement in these tasks. These results suggest that PL improves facilitatory lateral interactions in amblyopic observers, which usually extend over larger separations than in typical foveal vision. The improvement in these basic visual spatial operations leads to a more efficient capability of performing spatial tasks involving high levels of visual processing, possibly due to the refinement of bottom-up and top-down networks of visual areas.

  14. Decrease of the foveal avascular zone area after internal limiting membrane peeling: single case study

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Uemura, Akinori; Furukawa, Mariko; Suetsugu, Tetsuyuki; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To report a patient whose foveal avascular zone (FAZ) decreased after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling. Methods A 58-year-old woman underwent successful phacovitrectomy with ILM peeling for a thin epiretinal membrane in an eye with a normal foveal contour. Optical coherence tomography angiographic en face images of the 3 mm×3 mm superficial and deep inner retinal vascular plexuses were examined preoperatively, and on days 1, 2, 9, and 37 postoperatively. The changes in the FAZ areas and the thicknesses of the parafoveal retinal layers at 500 μm from the foveal center were assessed in the vertical and horizontal B-scan images. Results The areas of the superficial and deep FAZ decreased after the surgery. The course of the postoperative decrease of the FAZ area in the superficial plexus can be fit by a hyperbolic curve (R2=0.993). An increase in the thicknesses of the retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell–inner plexiform layer, and inner nuclear layer was observed at all times postoperatively. Conclusions We observed one case that the FAZ area decreased and the parafoveal inner retinal thickness increased after the vitrectomy with ILM peeling. The decrease in the FAZ area suggests that a centripetal movement of the inner retinal layer is probably due to the ILM peeling. PMID:28331373

  15. Role of foveal and peripheral visual information in maintenance of postural equilibrium in man.

    PubMed

    Amblard, B; Carblanc, A

    1980-12-01

    In a previous report (Amblard & Crémieux, 1976) we demonstrated that the maintenance of postural equilibrium, measured with the subject in Mann's stance on a foam rubber support, was significantly more difficult under stroboscopic rather than normal lighting conditions. The most plausible cause of the difficulty is the subject's loss of visual perception of movement as a result of the stroboscopic lighting. The present study was designed to look at this factor under normal lighting conditions. Also, the relative contributions of foveal and peripheral vision were assessed. During stance, the subjects (5 women and 6 men, aged from 25 to 55 yr.) viewed either a horizontal or a vertical rectangular grating. With horizontal lines, the visual perception of lateral movement is minimized. Lateral acceleration was measured at three anatomical levels: ankles, hips, and head. The horizontal stripe condition was significantly less effective than the vertical stripe one for maintenance of balance, both for measurements at the head level only and for values averaged from all three levels. Balance was significantly impaired with foveal vision alone compared to full vision or to peripheral vision alone, for measurements from each of the three levels. We conclude that the visual perception of movement is a very important factor in the maintenance of the equilibrium, peripheral vision playing the major role, and foveal vision only a supplementary one.

  16. CuBe: parametric modeling of 3D foveal shape using cubic Bézier

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Sunil Kumar; Motamedi, Seyedamirhosein; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Oertel, Frederike Cosima; Polthier, Konrad; Paul, Friedemann; Kadas, Ella Maria; Brandt, Alexander U.

    2017-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows three-dimensional (3D) imaging of the retina, and is commonly used for assessing pathological changes of fovea and macula in many diseases. Many neuroinflammatory conditions are known to cause modifications to the fovea shape. In this paper, we propose a method for parametric modeling of the foveal shape. Our method exploits invariant features of the macula from OCT data and applies a cubic Bézier polynomial along with a least square optimization to produce a best fit parametric model of the fovea. Additionally, we provide several parameters of the foveal shape based on the proposed 3D parametric modeling. Our quantitative and visual results show that the proposed model is not only able to reconstruct important features from the foveal shape, but also produces less error compared to the state-of-the-art methods. Finally, we apply the model in a comparison of healthy control eyes and eyes from patients with neuroinflammatory central nervous system disorders and optic neuritis, and show that several derived model parameters show significant differences between the two groups. PMID:28966857

  17. Decrease of the foveal avascular zone area after internal limiting membrane peeling: single case study.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kazuyuki; Uemura, Akinori; Furukawa, Mariko; Suetsugu, Tetsuyuki; Ogino, Nobuchika

    2017-01-01

    To report a patient whose foveal avascular zone (FAZ) decreased after vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling. A 58-year-old woman underwent successful phacovitrectomy with ILM peeling for a thin epiretinal membrane in an eye with a normal foveal contour. Optical coherence tomography angiographic en face images of the 3 mm×3 mm superficial and deep inner retinal vascular plexuses were examined preoperatively, and on days 1, 2, 9, and 37 postoperatively. The changes in the FAZ areas and the thicknesses of the parafoveal retinal layers at 500 μm from the foveal center were assessed in the vertical and horizontal B-scan images. The areas of the superficial and deep FAZ decreased after the surgery. The course of the postoperative decrease of the FAZ area in the superficial plexus can be fit by a hyperbolic curve (R(2)=0.993). An increase in the thicknesses of the retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer, and inner nuclear layer was observed at all times postoperatively. We observed one case that the FAZ area decreased and the parafoveal inner retinal thickness increased after the vitrectomy with ILM peeling. The decrease in the FAZ area suggests that a centripetal movement of the inner retinal layer is probably due to the ILM peeling.

  18. Turbulent flow structure at a discordant river confluence: Asymmetric jet dynamics with implications for channel morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhodolov, Alexander N.; Krick, Julian; Sukhodolova, Tatiana A.; Cheng, Zhengyang; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Constantinescu, George S.

    2017-06-01

    Only a handful of field studies have examined turbulent flow structure at discordant confluences; the dynamics of flow at such confluences have mainly been examined in the laboratory. This paper reports results of a field-based investigation of turbulent flow structure at a discordant river confluence. These results support the hypothesis that flow at a discordant alluvial confluence with a velocity ratio greater than 2 exhibits jet-like characteristics. Scaling analysis shows that the dynamics of the jet core are quite similar to those of free jets but that the complex structure of flow at the confluence imposes strong effects that can locally suppress or enhance the spreading rate of the jet. This jet-like behavior of the flow has important implications for morphodynamic processes at these types of confluences. The highly energetic core of the jet at this discordant confluence is displaced away from the riverbed, thereby inhibiting scour; however, helical motion develops adjacent to the jet, particularly at high flows, which may promote scour. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the presence or absence of a depositional wedge at the mouth of the tributary can strongly influence detachment of the jet from the bed and the angle of the jet within the confluence.

  19. Update: nonhuman primate importation.

    PubMed

    1991-10-11

    Beginning in November 1989, a number of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) imported into the United States were found to have been infected with a previously unrecognized Ebola-like filovirus. This report summarizes findings of surveillance and serologic testing of nonhuman primates imported under special permits from June 1990 through September 1991.

  20. Glenohumeral mobility in primates.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2007-01-01

    This study refutes the traditional idea that the glenohumeral joint of hominoids is more mobile than that of other primates, a belief that forms a basis for the two prominent theories of hominoid evolution. According to the brachiation theory, many anatomical features of the hominoid shoulder (including those of the glenohumeral joint) increase shoulder mobility and are interpreted as adaptations for brachiation. The slow climbing theory explains the same set of features as adaptations for slow climbing. The slow-climbing primates should therefore also possess these features, and their glenohumeral mobility should be the same as that of hominoids and be higher than that of other primates. This study presents three-dimensional glenohumeral mobility data, measured using a single video camera method on fresh specimens. The results show that the hominoid glenohumeral joint is actually less mobile than those of non-hominoid primates, including the habitually slow-climbing lorines, but it is characterized by a smooth excursion in the scapulocranial direction. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Nonhuman Primate Ocular Biometry

    PubMed Central

    Augusteyn, Robert C.; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine ocular growth in nonhuman primates (NHPs) from measurements on ex vivo eyes. Methods We obtained NHP eyes from animals that had been killed as part of other studies or because of health-related issues. Digital calipers were used to measure the horizontal, vertical, and anteroposterior globe diameters as well as corneal horizontal and vertical diameters of excised globes from 98 hamadryas baboons, 551 cynomolgus monkeys, and 112 rhesus monkeys, at ages ranging from 23 to 360 months. Isolated lens sagittal thickness and equatorial diameter were measured by shadowphotogrammetry. Wet and fixed dry weights were obtained for lenses. Results Nonhuman primate globe growth continues throughout life, slowing toward an asymptotic maximum. The final globe size scales with negative allometry to adult body size. Corneal growth ceases at around 20 months. Lens diameter increases but thickness decreases with increasing age. Nonhuman primate lens wet and dry weight accumulation is monophasic, continuing throughout life toward asymptotic maxima. The dry/wet weight ratio reaches a maximum of 0.33. Conclusions Nonhuman primate ocular globe and lens growth differ in several respects from those in humans. Although age-related losses of lens power and accommodative amplitude are similar, lens growth and properties are different indicating care should be taken in extrapolating NHP observations to the study of human accommodation. PMID:26780314

  2. What Is a Primate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Describes a series of hands-on experiments that engage students in hypothesis testing and promotes active learning of the concepts of evolution and adaptation. Laboratory exercises demonstrate how features of the hands and eyes distinguish primates from other mammals. (SOE)

  3. What Is a Primate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Describes a series of hands-on experiments that engage students in hypothesis testing and promotes active learning of the concepts of evolution and adaptation. Laboratory exercises demonstrate how features of the hands and eyes distinguish primates from other mammals. (SOE)

  4. The Association between Foveal Morphology and Macular Pigment Spatial Distribution: An Ethnicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Ctori, Irene

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Macular pigment (MP) spatial distribution varies considerably among individuals. We investigated ethnic variations in MP spatial distribution in relation to foveal architecture. Methods We measured MP optical density (MPOD) using heterochromatic flicker photometry (MAP test, City, University of London) in 76 white, 80 South Asian and 70 black volunteers (18 to 39 years). MPOD spatial profiles were classified objectively as exponential, ring-like or central dip, based on deviations away from an exponential fit. Measurements including total retinal thickness (RT), inner retinal layer (IRL), inner and outer plexiform layer (IPL and OPL) thickness, foveal width and foveal pit slope were taken from Spectralis SD-OCT (Heidelberg, Germany) scans. Results Integrated MPOD up to 1.8° (MPODint) was higher in South Asian (0.84±0.26) and black (0.84±0.31) than whites (0.63±0.24, P<0.0005). Ethnicity explained around 10% of the variance while gender played no significant role. MPOD profile phenotypes were associated with ethnicity: 58% with ring profiles were South Asian and 43% with dip profiles were black (χ2(4,226) = 13.4, P = 0.009). MPODint was lower in exponential (0.66±0.21) compared to ring-like (0.96±0.26) and central dip (1.00±0.32, P<0.0005) groups. White subjects had thicker IRL at 0° (130±21μm) than South Asian (123±16μm) and blacks (116±14μm; F(2) = 12.4, P<0.0005), with comparable results for IPL (P<0.0005) and OPL (P = 0.03). There was no significant difference in IRL, IPL or OPL (from 0 to 3.8° retinal eccentricity) or foveal width between MP profile groups (P>0.05). Conclusion We report a significant difference in the amount and distribution of MP between ethnicities that is not explained by variations in foveal morphology. PMID:28068388

  5. Copula-Based Flood Frequency Analysis at Ungauged Basin Confluences: Nashville, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Shih-Chieh; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Many cities are located at or near the confluence of streams where availability of water resources may be enhanced to sustain user needs while also posing an increased flooding risk from multiple tributaries. An accurate flood frequency estimator that models the joint flood potential at a basin confluence is needed. Given that long-term flow observations are often unavailable, estimating flood frequency at ungaged basin confluences proves challenging. Through the use of copulas, this case study demonstrates how an improved flood frequency analysis can be performed for stream confluences at Nashville, TN. The approach involves four major steps including initial data quality control, fitting of marginal distributions of tributary peak flows, construction of a suitable dependence structure, and identification of flood frequency at the confluence point based on synthesized peak flows. This case study may help researchers and practitioners develop a better understanding of joint flood frequency with consideration of upstream dam regulation among several contributing watersheds.

  6. Impending extinction crisis of the world's primates: Why primates matter.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Alejandro; Garber, Paul A; Rylands, Anthony B; Roos, Christian; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Di Fiore, Anthony; Nekaris, K Anne-Isola; Nijman, Vincent; Heymann, Eckhard W; Lambert, Joanna E; Rovero, Francesco; Barelli, Claudia; Setchell, Joanna M; Gillespie, Thomas R; Mittermeier, Russell A; Arregoitia, Luis Verde; de Guinea, Miguel; Gouveia, Sidney; Dobrovolski, Ricardo; Shanee, Sam; Shanee, Noga; Boyle, Sarah A; Fuentes, Agustin; MacKinnon, Katherine C; Amato, Katherine R; Meyer, Andreas L S; Wich, Serge; Sussman, Robert W; Pan, Ruliang; Kone, Inza; Li, Baoguo

    2017-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, our closest biological relatives, play important roles in the livelihoods, cultures, and religions of many societies and offer unique insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and the threat of emerging diseases. They are an essential component of tropical biodiversity, contributing to forest regeneration and ecosystem health. Current information shows the existence of 504 species in 79 genera distributed in the Neotropics, mainland Africa, Madagascar, and Asia. Alarmingly, ~60% of primate species are now threatened with extinction and ~75% have declining populations. This situation is the result of escalating anthropogenic pressures on primates and their habitats-mainly global and local market demands, leading to extensive habitat loss through the expansion of industrial agriculture, large-scale cattle ranching, logging, oil and gas drilling, mining, dam building, and the construction of new road networks in primate range regions. Other important drivers are increased bushmeat hunting and the illegal trade of primates as pets and primate body parts, along with emerging threats, such as climate change and anthroponotic diseases. Often, these pressures act in synergy, exacerbating primate population declines. Given that primate range regions overlap extensively with a large, and rapidly growing, human population characterized by high levels of poverty, global attention is needed immediately to reverse the looming risk of primate extinctions and to attend to local human needs in sustainable ways. Raising global scientific and public awareness of the plight of the world's primates and the costs of their loss to ecosystem health and human society is imperative.

  7. Presence of foveal bulge in optical coherence tomographic images in eyes with macular edema associated with branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Taiji; Ueda, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Masahiro; Ogata, Nahoko

    2014-02-01

    To determine whether a significant correlation exists between the presence of a bulge in the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) line and the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in eyes with resolved macular edema associated with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO). Retrospective, observational case series. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who had a complete resolution of macular edema and had an intact IS/OS line in the central fovea in the spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic (SDOCT) images. Thirty-one eyes with macular edema associated with BRVO (BRVO group) and 31 unaffected fellow eyes (control group) of 31 patients were evaluated. In normal eyes, the intact IS/OS line determined by SDOCT has a bulge at the central fovea, called the foveal bulge. The eyes in the BRVO group were classified by the presence or absence of foveal bulge, and the characteristics of the 2 groups were compared. A foveal bulge was present in 7 of 31 eyes in the BRVO group. The incidence of a foveal bulge was significantly lower in the BRVO group (22.6%) than in the control group (100%; P < .0001). All 7 eyes with foveal bulge had a decimal BCVA of ≥1.0 at the final visit. The incidence of a foveal bulge was significantly higher in eyes with BCVA of ≥1.0 (77.8%) than in the eyes with BCVA of <1.0 (0%; P < .0001). The foveal bulge is a good marker of the functional properties of the fovea in eyes with resolved macular edema associated with BRVO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Birthplace of the Amazon River, the Confluence of the Maranon and Ucayali Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, J. D.; Ortals, C.; Paredes, J.; Vizcarra, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon River starts at the confluence between the Maranon and Ucayali Rivers near Nauta City. The Maranon River is an anabranching channel while the Ucayali River near the confluence is transitioning from purely meandering to anabranching channel. The interaction of water and sediment between these two large rivers is important for the Pacaya-Samiria Peruvian Reserve, a region with one of highest biodiversity in the planet. Past studies related to flow, sediment and morphology at confluences have been performed for single threat channels. Herein a detailed mapping, sediment sampling and hydrodynamics are carried for a confluence between anabranching and meandering channels. Furthermore, remote sensing analysis have been performed to understand that the confluence point has been changing at the geologcal time scale increasing the morphological structures around the Ucamara depression, where the Pacaya-Samiria reserve is located. Results of the field studies indicate complex mixing processes downstream of the confluence, where secondary flows are observed driven the sediment mixing. The dynamic of the confluence point is governed by the evolution of the Ucayali River and the local geology. These findings will help us to relate mixing processes in one of the largest wetlands in the world.

  9. Confluence switch signaling regulates ECM composition and the plasmin proteolytic cascade in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Botta, Adrien; Delteil, Frédéric; Mettouchi, Amel; Vieira, Andhira; Estrach, Soline; Négroni, Luc; Stefani, Caroline; Lemichez, E; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Gagnoux-Palacios, Laurent

    2012-09-15

    In culture, cell confluence generates signals that commit actively growing keratinocytes to exit the cell cycle and differentiate to form a stratified epithelium. Using a comparative proteomic approach, we studied this 'confluence switch' and identified a new pathway triggered by cell confluence that regulates basement membrane (BM) protein composition by suppressing the uPA-uPAR-plasmin pathway. Indeed, confluence triggers adherens junction maturation and enhances TGF-β and activin A activity, resulting in increased deposition of PAI-1 and perlecan in the BM. Extracellular matrix (ECM)-accumulated PAI-1 suppresses the uPA-uPAR-plasmin pathway and further enhances perlecan deposition by inhibiting its plasmin-dependent proteolysis. We show that perlecan deposition in the ECM strengthens cell adhesion, inhibits keratinocyte motility and promotes additional accumulation of PAI-1 in the ECM at confluence. In agreement, during wound-healing, perlecan concentrates at the wound-margin, where BM matures to stabilize keratinocyte adhesion. Our results demonstrate that confluence-dependent signaling orchestrates not only growth inhibition and differentiation, but also controls ECM proteolysis and BM formation. These data suggest that uncontrolled integration of confluence-dependent signaling, might favor skin disorders, including tumorigenesis, not only by promoting cell hyperproliferation, but also by altering protease activity and deposition of ECM components.

  10. Using 3D CFD to reconcile different views of confluence flow structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, S. N.

    2001-05-01

    River channel confluences have seen considerable attention in recent years. The aim of this presentation is to demonstrate how CFD has been used to evaluate and expand some of the results that have emerged from field and laboratory studies. Central to this research has been the use of three-dimensional numerical modelling techniques that are able to represent key hydrodynamic processes in confluences (e.g. water surface super-elevation, topographic forcing of flow, shear-driven turbulence), and to provide predictions of important explanatory variables (e.g. dynamic pressure). The research design is based upon using numerical simulation to explore interactions between amongst governing variables (e.g. tributary momentum ratio, degree of asymmetry, junction angle, tributary bed discordance). On the basis of more than 50 simulations of 'laboratory-style' confluences and a smaller number of field cases, this paper identifies the key controls upon confluence flow structures, and the potential influence of these structures upon geomorphological processes within the confluence. This demonstrates: (i) how divergence of opinion over confluence flow processes has resulted from different methods of instrument rotation in the field; (ii) the importance of both streamline curvature and flow separation as controls upon flow structure development; and (iii) the periodic nature of the flow structures that are seen in confluence environments, and which may be misunderstood when a series of time-averaged measurements are made in the field.

  11. Using confluence hydraulics to quantify relative drag and predict species biogeographical richness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, C.; Filizola, N.; Santos, R. V.; Marco, I.; Endreny, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    Restoring biogeographical richness in river networks requires establishing the analyze biophysical interactions that explain species richness increasing as a nodal pattern about river confluences. This research uses river velocity profiles in the Negro and Solimões Rivers confluence of the Amazon Basin to compute the a set of hydraulic complexity metrics that quantify relative drag forces imposed on aquatic organisms moving between two locations. The metric is computed as the product of the lateral velocity gradient and the ratio of average to minimum velocity, with the set of metrics taken along different vertical domains in the water column. In the Negro and Solimões River confluence the water-column average hydraulic complexity metric was generally largest in the entrance of the confluence, centered at the mixing interface, and decayed laterally toward the banks and longitudinally with downstream distance. The patterns of the hydraulic complexity metric corresponded with the patterns of confluence hydrodynamic zone morphodynamics and the nodal pattern of increased species richness downstream of the confluence, based on a rich dataset for Amazon confluences. The metric's ability to increase about the confluence, in a nodal pattern, is distinct from the river continuum concept type metrics that predict increases in richness with longitudinal distance along the river network. By contrast, this hydraulic complexity metric may capture a physical driver of habitat heterogeneity that ecologists have sought to explain the ecological patterns of diversity increasing at the nodes of the dendritic river networks. The metric is able to quantify drag forces that constrain species movement and is likely important in the management of biophysical interactions about river confluences.

  12. Evolution of the hydromorphodynamics of mountain river confluences for varying discharge ratios and junction angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillén-Ludeña, S.; Franca, M. J.; Cardoso, A. H.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    Mountain river confluences are characterized by narrow and steep tributaries that supply abundant sediment load to a main channel that, in turn, provides the dominant flow discharge. In addition, bed sediments consist of poorly sorted mixtures that promote bed armoring. The knowledge of the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of mountain river confluences is sparse because most of the existent studies on confluence dynamics focus on lowland confluences. This study aims at examining the influence of the junction angle (α) and discharge ratio (Qr = Qt / Qm) on flow dynamics and bed morphology of mountain river confluences. This study presents the results of six laboratory experiments in which three discharge ratios were tested (Qr = Qt / Qm = 0.11, 0.15, 0.23) with two different junction angles (α = 90° and 70°). The experiments were conducted under movable bed conditions and with continuous sediment supply to both flumes. Measurements consisted of systematic bed topography and water surface surveys performed at different instants during the experiments and at equilibrium, i.e., when the outgoing sediment rate coincided with the incoming and bed topography reached a steady state. The results show that the discharge ratio and the junction angle parameters are major controls of the dynamics of mountain river confluences. Also, the evolution of bed morphology and flow dynamics for varying junction angles and discharge ratios present some patterns that contrast with those reported for lowland confluences. Among these patterns are the different flow regimes adopted by the tributary for different junction angles and the decrease of the height of the bank-attached bar for increasing discharge ratios. Moreover, results show that the abundant sediment load of the tributary plays a major role on the dynamics of this type of confluence. This load resulted in a marked bed discordance that, in turn, influenced flow dynamics and bed morphology of the confluence.

  13. On measuring cell confluence in phase contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, K. P.; Richardson, J. B.; Lam, K. P.

    2014-03-01

    A principal focus highlighting recent advances in cell based therapies concerns the development of effective treatments for osteoarthritis. Earlier clinicaltrials have shown that 80% of patients receiving mesenchymal stem cell(MSC) based treatment have improved their quality of life by alleviating pain whilst extending the life of their natural joints. The current challenge facing researchers is to identify the biological differences between the treatments that have worked and those which have shown little improvement. One possible candidate for the difference in treatment prognosis is an examination of the proliferation of the ( type) cells as they grow. To further understanding of the proliferation and differentiation of MSC, non-invasive live cell imaging techniques have been developed which capture important cell events and dynamics in cell divisions over an extended period of time. An automated image analysis procedure capable of tracking cell confluence over time has also been implemented, providing an objective and realistic estimation of cell growth within continuous live cell cultures. The proposed algorithm accounts for the halo artefacts that occur in phase microscopy. In addition to a favourable run-time performance, the method was also validated using continuous live MSC cultures, with consistent and meaningful results.

  14. Cell confluency analysis on microcarriers by micro-flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Christopher J; Cicalese, Stephanie M; Davis, Harrison B; Dogdas, Belma; Shah, Tosha; Culp, Tim; Hoang, Van M

    2016-12-01

    The productivity of cell culture-derived vaccines grown in anchorage-dependent animal cells is limited by bioreactor surface area. One way to increase the available surface area is by growing cells as monolayers on small spheres called microcarriers, which are approximately 100-250 μm in diameter. In order for microcarrier-based cell culture to be a success, it is important to understand the kinetics of cell growth on the microcarriers. Micro-flow imaging (MFI) is a simple and powerful technique that captures images and analyzes samples as they are drawn through a precision flow cell. In addition to providing size distribution and defect frequency data to compare microcarrier lots, MFI was used to generate hundreds of images to determine cell coverage and confluency on microcarriers. Same-day manual classification of these images provided upstream cell culture teams with actionable data that informed in-process decision making (e.g. time of infection). Additionally, an automated cell coverage algorithm was developed to increase the speed and throughput of the analyses.

  15. Autosomal-dominant nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and presenile cataract associated with a novel PAX6 mutation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shery; Thomas, Mervyn G; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Proudlock, Frank A; McLean, Rebecca J; Pradeep, Archana; Engle, Elizabeth C; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal-dominant idiopathic infantile nystagmus has been linked to 6p12 (OMIM 164100), 7p11.2 (OMIM 608345) and 13q31-q33 (OMIM 193003). PAX6 (11p13, OMIM 607108) mutations can also cause autosomal-dominant nystagmus, typically in association with aniridia or iris hypoplasia. We studied a large multigenerational white British family with autosomal-dominant nystagmus, normal irides and presenile cataracts. An SNP-based genome-wide analysis revealed a linkage to a 13.4-MB region on chromosome 11p13 with a maximum lod score of 2.93. A mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the PAX6 gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.227C>G) that segregated with the phenotype and is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution of proline by arginine at codon 76 p.(P76R). The amino-acid variation p.(P76R) within the paired box domain is likely to destabilise the protein due to steric hindrance as a result of the introduction of a polar and larger amino acid. Eye movement recordings showed a significant intrafamilial variability of horizontal, vertical and torsional nystagmus. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed features of foveal hypoplasia, including rudimentary foveal pit, incursion of inner retinal layers, short photoreceptor outer segments and optic nerve hypoplasia. Thus, this study presents a family that segregates a PAX6 mutation with nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in the absence of iris abnormalities. Moreover, it is the first study showing detailed characteristics using eye movement recordings of autosomal-dominant nystagmus in a multigenerational family with a novel PAX6 mutation.

  16. Autosomal-dominant nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and presenile cataract associated with a novel PAX6 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shery; Thomas, Mervyn G; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Proudlock, Frank A; McLean, Rebecca J; Pradeep, Archana; Engle, Elizabeth C; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant idiopathic infantile nystagmus has been linked to 6p12 (OMIM 164100), 7p11.2 (OMIM 608345) and 13q31-q33 (OMIM 193003). PAX6 (11p13, OMIM 607108) mutations can also cause autosomal-dominant nystagmus, typically in association with aniridia or iris hypoplasia. We studied a large multigenerational white British family with autosomal-dominant nystagmus, normal irides and presenile cataracts. An SNP-based genome-wide analysis revealed a linkage to a 13.4-MB region on chromosome 11p13 with a maximum lod score of 2.93. A mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the PAX6 gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.227C>G) that segregated with the phenotype and is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution of proline by arginine at codon 76 p.(P76R). The amino-acid variation p.(P76R) within the paired box domain is likely to destabilise the protein due to steric hindrance as a result of the introduction of a polar and larger amino acid. Eye movement recordings showed a significant intrafamilial variability of horizontal, vertical and torsional nystagmus. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed features of foveal hypoplasia, including rudimentary foveal pit, incursion of inner retinal layers, short photoreceptor outer segments and optic nerve hypoplasia. Thus, this study presents a family that segregates a PAX6 mutation with nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in the absence of iris abnormalities. Moreover, it is the first study showing detailed characteristics using eye movement recordings of autosomal-dominant nystagmus in a multigenerational family with a novel PAX6 mutation. PMID:23942204

  17. Scaling the primate lateral geniculate nucleus: niche and neurodevelopment in the regulation of magnocellular and parvocellular cell number and nucleus volume.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Barbara L; Charvet, Christine J; Bastille, Isle; Cheung, Desmond T; Muniz, José Augusto P C; de Lima Silveira, Luiz Carlos

    2014-06-01

    New stereological assessments of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) neuron numbers and volumes in five New World primates (Cebus apella, Saguinus midas niger, Alouatta caraya, Aotus azarae, and Callicebus moloch) and compiled LGN volumes for an additional 26 mammals were analyzed for a better understanding of visual system evolution. Both the magnocellular (M)- and the parvocellular (P)-cell populations scale allometrically with brain volume in primates, P cells with a significantly higher slope such that, for every increase in M neuron number, P neuron numbers more than double (ln scale; y = 0.89x + 2.42R(2) = 0.664). In diurnal primates, the ratio of P to M cells was slightly but significantly higher than in nocturnal primates. For all mammals, including primates, LGN volume was unrelated to nocturnal or diurnal niche but showed marked differences in slope and intercept depending on taxonomic group. The allometric scaling of M and P cells can be related to the order of neurogenesis, with late-generated P cells increasing with positive allometry compared with the earlier-generated M cells. This developmental regularity links relative foveal representation to relative isocortex enlargement, which is also generated late. The small increase in the P/M cell ratio in diurnal primates may result from increased developmental neuron loss in the M-cell population as it competes for limited termination zones in primary visual cortex.

  18. Modeling the foveal cone mosaic imaged with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Putnam, Nicole M; Hammer, Daniel X; Zhang, Yuhua; Merino, David; Roorda, Austin

    2010-11-22

    To better understand the limitations of high-resolution adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), we describe an imaging model that examines the smallest cone photoreceptors in the fovea of normal human subjects and analyze how different factors contribute to their resolution. The model includes basic optical factors such as wavelength and pupil size, and defines limits caused by source coherence which are specific to the AOSLO imaging modality as well as foveal cone structure. The details of the model, its implications for imaging, and potential techniques to circumvent the limitations are discussed in this paper.

  19. Early-onset foveal involvement in retinitis punctata albescens with mutations in RLBP1.

    PubMed

    Dessalces, Elodie; Bocquet, Béatrice; Bourien, Jérôme; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Verdet, Robert; Meunier, Isabelle; Hamel, Christian P

    2013-10-01

    Retinitis punctata albescens (RPA) is an autosomal recessive form of retinitis pigmentosa characterized by white dotlike deposits in the fundus, in most cases caused by mutations in RLBP1. To study disease progression and visual function in RPA. We performed clinical and molecular investigations in patients with RPA at various ages, from November 5, 2003, through June 20, 2012, with no planned patient follow-up. The National Reference Center for Genetic Sensory Diseases (Montpellier). Eleven patients with RPA (mean age, 24 [range, 3-39] years) from 7 families and 11 control subjects undergoing evaluation. Optical coherence tomography measurements. Screening for mutations by polymerase chain reaction sequencing of the 9 RLBP1 exons. Patients underwent standard ophthalmic examination, fundus imaging, autofluorescence testing, Goldmann visual field measurement, optical coherence tomography, adaptive optics-based infrared fundus ophthalmoscopy, dark adaptometry, and electroretinography. We found 2 novel RLBP1 mutations (p.Tyr111X and p.Arg9Cys), and 8 patients from Morocco were homozygous for the recurrent 7.36-kilobase RLBP1 deletion of exons 7 through 9. All patients had night blindness (before age 6 years in 10). The dotlike deposits were generally dense but could be rare, appearing in adaptive optics as elongated structures with variable orientation and no foveal involvement. We found no specific refractive error, and visual acuity varied widely from normal (1.2) to counting fingers. Variable degrees of visual field impairment were present, and all patients had severely decreased electroretinographic responses with predominant rod impairment. No correlation between visual acuity (P = .27) or visual field and age (P = .08) was present. On optical coherence tomography, the mean (SD) central foveal (122 [23] vs 187 [30] µm in controls) and foveal (147 [19] vs 217 [17] µm) thicknesses were significantly (P < .01) decreased, independently of age, whereas the retinal

  20. Simultaneous measurement of foveal spectral reflectance and cone-photoreceptor directionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagers, Niels P. A.; van de Kraats, Jan; Berendschot, Tos T. J. M.; van Norren, Dirk

    2002-08-01

    An instrument for simultaneous measurement of foveal spectral reflectance and cone-photoreceptor directionality is described. The key element is an imaging spectrograph (spectral range of 420-790 nm) with its entrance slit conjugate to the pupil plane of a human eye. A 1.9-deg spot on the retina is sampled in 1 s. Video observation of the retina and the pupil facilitates proper alignment. Measurements were performed on 21 healthy subjects. Model analysis of the spectra provided densities of photostable ocular absorbers. As an example, macular pigment and melanin are discussed in more detail. Spatial profiles exhibited the optical Stiles-Crawford effect, reflecting cone-photoreceptor directionality.

  1. Use digital subtraction images of blue-light and near-infrared autofluorescence for the assessment of irregular foveal contour.

    PubMed

    Hua, Rui; Gangwani, Rita; Liu, Limin; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study are to generate subtraction images of blue-light autofluorescence (BL-AF) and near-infrared autofluorescence (NIR-AF) from normal eyes, eyes with full thickness macular holes, and eyes with irregular foveal contour, and to compare their autofluorescence patterns. This retrospective study included 44 normal eyes of 22 health individuals, 32 eyes with full thickness macular holes of 32 patients, and 36 eyes with irregular foveal contour of 36 patients. BL-AF and NIR-AF were obtained from all patients and used to generate subtraction images using the Image J software. The decreased signal of central patch was recorded. The central foveal thickness (CFT) and outer nucleus layer (ONL) thickness of fovea were measured to calculate the ONL thickness/CFT ratio. The subtraction images showed regularly increased signal in the central macula of all normal eyes. In contrast, decreased signal of central patch was detected in all full thickness macular holes eyes and 26 out of 36 eyes with irregular foveal contour. No significant difference of the ONL thickness/CFT ratio (F = 2.32, P = 0.113) was observed between normal and irregular foveal contour eyes with or without decreased signal of central patch. Both regularly increased signal and decreased signal of central patch were detected in the eyes with irregular foveal contour. Our results suggest that subtraction images are useful for the assessment of certain macular conditions by providing supplementary information to the green-light autofluorescence and BL-AF.

  2. Relationship Between Foveal Cone Structure and Clinical Measures of Visual Function in Patients With Inherited Retinal Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, Kavitha; Carroll, Joseph; Porco, Travis C.; Duncan, Jacque L.; Roorda, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To study the relationship between cone spacing and density and clinical measures of visual function near the fovea. Methods. High-resolution images of the photoreceptor mosaic were obtained with adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy from 26 patients with inherited retinal degenerations. Cone spacing measures were made close to or at the foveal center (mean [SD] eccentricity, 0.02 [0.03] degree; maximum eccentricity, 0.13 degree) and were converted to Z-scores, fraction of cones, and percentage-of-cones-below-average compared with normal values for each location (based on 37 age-similar visually normal eyes). Z-scores and percentage of cones below average were compared with best-corrected visual acuity (VA) and foveal sensitivity. Results. Visual acuity was significantly correlated with cone spacing (Spearman rank correlation ρ = −0.60, P = 0.003) and was preserved (≥80 letters), despite cone density measures that were 52% below normal. Foveal sensitivity showed significant correlation with cone spacing (ρ = −0.47, P = 0.017) and remained normal (≥35 decibels), despite density measures that were approximately 52% to 62% below normal. Conclusions. Cone density was reduced by up to 62% below normal at or near the fovea in eyes with VA and sensitivity that remained within normal limits. Despite a significant correlation with foveal cone spacing, VA and sensitivity are insensitive indicators of the integrity of the foveal cone mosaic. Direct, objective measures of cone structure may be more sensitive indicators of disease severity than VA or foveal sensitivity in eyes with inherited retinal degenerations. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00254605.) PMID:23908179

  3. The confluence model: birth order as a within-family or between-family dynamic?

    PubMed

    Zajonc, R B; Sulloway, Frank J

    2007-09-01

    The confluence model explains birth-order differences in intellectual performance by quantifying the changing dynamics within the family. Wichman, Rodgers, and MacCallum (2006) claimed that these differences are a between-family phenomenon--and hence are not directly related to birth order itself. The study design and analyses presented by Wichman et al. nevertheless suffer from crucial shortcomings, including their use of unfocused tests, which cause statistically significant trends to be overlooked. In addition, Wichman et al. treated birth-order effects as a linear phenomenon thereby ignoring the confluence model's prediction that these two samples may manifest opposing results based on age. This article cites between- and within-family data that demonstrate systematic birth-order effects as predicted by the confluence model. The corpus of evidence invoked here offers strong support for the assumption of the confluence model that birth-order differences in intellectual performance are primarily a within-family phenomenon.

  4. Axial length variation impacts on retinal vessel density and foveal avascular zone area measurement using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Danuta M.; Gong, Peijun; An, Di; Menghini, Moreno; Hansen, Alex; Mackey, David A.; Sampson, David D.; Chen, Fred K.

    2017-04-01

    We examined the impact of axial length on superficial retinal vessel density (SRVD) and foveal avascular zone area (FAZA) measurement using optical coherence tomography angiography. The SRVD and FAZA were quantified before and after correction for magnification error associated with axial length variation. Although SRVD did not differ before and after correction for magnification error in the parafoveal region, change in foveal SRVD and FAZA were significant. This has implications for clinical trials outcome in diseased eyes where significant capillary dropout may occur in the parafovea.

  5. Use of an Intravitreal Dexamethasone Implant (Ozurdex) in a Case with Accidental Foveal Photocoagulation by Alexandrite Laser

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Muhammed Nurullah; Çallı, Ümit; Göktaş, Eren; Bulut, Kezban; Kandemir, Baran; Özertürk, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Alexandrite laser is one of the most common methods of hair removal. Its utilization is gradually increasing due to easy accessibility and high effectiveness. However, the disuse of protective goggles during the application of this laser is a serious problem. In this case report, we presented a 35-year-old male patient who had foveal injury by alexandrite laser. The inflammatory process secondary to the foveal injury and subsequent macular edema were treated with Ozurdex because of its potent antiedematous effect. PMID:27293415

  6. Hydrodynamics of mountain-river confluences and its relationship to sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillén Ludeña, S.; Cheng, Z.; Constantinescu, G.; Franca, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    Mountain confluences are characterized by narrow and steep tributaries that provide important sediment load to the confluence, whereas the main channel supplies the dominant flow discharge. This results in a marked bed discordance between the tributary and main channel which induces key differences in the hydromorphodynamics of the confluence when compared to concordant bed and some common types of discordant bed confluences. The processes of initiation and maintenance of the morphology of confluences are still unknown, and research linking morphodynamics and hydrodynamics of river confluences is required to understand these phenomena. In this paper, eddy-resolving simulations based on laboratory experiments made in a live-bed model of a mountain-river confluence are used to provide a detailed description of flow hydrodynamics and implications for morphodynamics. The test case study corresponds to a confluence with an angle of 70°. Numerical simulations are performed for two extreme bathymetric conditions: those at the start of the experiment and when equilibrium morphological conditions are reached. Results of the simulations and experimental observations are used to make inferences on erosion mechanisms during the initial and final states of the erosion/deposition process. The relationship between the coherent structures present in the near-bed region in the instantaneous and mean flow fields and sediment entrainment/transport is described. The present paper demonstrates the critical role played by large-scale turbulence generated in the shear layers forming on the side of the tributary flow as it enters the main channel, by the main vortex forming over the discordant bed region surrounding the downstream end of the tributary, as well as by several near-bed vortices induced by the deflection of the tributary flow by the incoming flow in the main channel. The predicted patterns of bed shear stress are linked to pathways of sediment movement documented in the

  7. Foveal Structure in Macula-off Rhegmatogenous Retinal Detachment after Scleral Buckling or Vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Roohipoor, Ramak; Mohammadi, Naseh; Ghassemi, Fariba; Karkhaneh, Reza; Rezaei, Mansour; Nili-Ahmadabadi, Mehdi; Ebrahimiadib, Nazanin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate foveal microstructural changes and to determine its association with visual outcomes after reattachment of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments (RRDs) by scleral buckling (SB) or pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Methods: Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), foveal microstructure in eyes with macula-off RRD were studied 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 months after PPV or SB and correlated with visual outcomes. Results: Forty-two eyes were included in the final analysis. Even with improved microstructural changes and normalization of retinal structures on OCT, final visual acuity was not correlated with microstructural changes in eyes undergoing PPV. In the SB group, final visual acuity was significantly correlated with an intact inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junction (P = 0.013). There was no significant correlation between final visual acuity and presence of subretinal fluid (SRF) in either group. Conclusion: After SB, eyes with an intact IS/OS junction had better final visual acuity. In the PPV group, there was no significant correlation between microstructural changes and visual acuity. The presence of SRF did not influence final visual acuity in both groups. PMID:26425321

  8. Foveal topography in the optic nerve and primary visual centers in Falconiforms.

    PubMed

    Inzunza, O; Bravo, H

    1993-04-01

    The topography of the retinal nasal and temporal foveal projections upon the optic nerve and primary visual centers was studied in diurnal bifoveate birds of prey by means of restricted tritiated proline intraocular injection. According to the degree of retinotopy, this study reveals that a single injection of tracer in the nasal or temporal fovea produces a well-defined and complementary pattern of projections in the following contralateral nuclei: lateral anterior thalamus, lateroventral geniculate nucleus (glv), superficial synencephalic (ss), tectal grey (gt), and optic tectum. In the thalamic nucleus dorsolateral anterior, the nasal foveal projections are seen mainly in the lateral and rostrolateral subdivision, while temporal projections are seen mainly in the magnocellular subdivision. In the external and ectomammillary nuclei there is some evidence of retinotopic innervation. Finally, a discrete field of projection from the nasal or temporal fovea is detected in lateral hypothalamus, ventrolateral thalamus, lateral geniculate intercalated nucleus, and pretectal optic area. The nasotemporal axis of the retina is ventrodorsally oriented in the optic nerve with ganglion cell axons of the temporal fovea more dorsally placed than the nasal ones. In the primary visual centers this retinal axis is mediolaterally represented in the nuclei glv, ss, and gt, and dorsoventrally oriented in the optic tectum.

  9. Retinotopic maps and foveal suppression in the visual cortex of amblyopic adults

    PubMed Central

    Conner, Ian P; Odom, J Vernon; Schwartz, Terry L; Mendola, Janine D

    2007-01-01

    Amblyopia is a developmental visual disorder associated with loss of monocular acuity and sensitivity as well as profound alterations in binocular integration. Abnormal connections in visual cortex are known to underlie this loss, but the extent to which these abnormalities are regionally or retinotopically specific has not been fully determined. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study compared the retinotopic maps in visual cortex produced by each individual eye in 19 adults (7 esotropic strabismics, 6 anisometropes and 6 controls). In our standard viewing condition, the non-tested eye viewed a dichoptic homogeneous mid-level grey stimulus, thereby permitting some degree of binocular interaction. Regions-of-interest analysis was performed for extrafoveal V1, extrafoveal V2 and the foveal representation at the occipital pole. In general, the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal was reduced for the amblyopic eye. At the occipital pole, population receptive fields were shifted to represent more parafoveal locations for the amblyopic eye, compared with the fellow eye, in some subjects. Interestingly, occluding the fellow eye caused an expanded foveal representation for the amblyopic eye in one early–onset strabismic subject with binocular suppression, indicating real-time cortical remapping. In addition, a few subjects actually showed increased activity in parietal and temporal cortex when viewing with the amblyopic eye. We conclude that, even in a heterogeneous population, abnormal early visual experience commonly leads to regionally specific cortical adaptations. PMID:17627994

  10. Association between integrity of foveal photoreceptor layer and visual acuity in branch retinal vein occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Masafumi; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Murakami, Tomoaki; Kita, Mihori; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Yamaike, Noritatsu; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2007-01-01

    Aim To study the correlation between integrity of the photoreceptor layer after resolution of macular oedema (MO) associated with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and final visual acuity (VA), and to determine prognostic factors for visual outcome. Methods We retrospectively studied 46 eyes from 46 patients with resolved MO secondary to BRVO, the foveal thickness of which was less than 250 µm at final observation. We assessed the status of the third high reflectance band (HRB) in the fovea using optical coherence tomography (OCT) at final observation, and studied OCT images taken at the initial visit in the hope of identifying a factor that would be prognostic of visual outcome. Results No differences were found in initial VA or in foveal thickness between eyes with or without complete third HRB at final observation. However, final VA in eyes without a complete HRB was significantly poorer (p<0.002). Additionally, initial status of the third HRB in the parafoveal area of unaffected retina was associated with final VA; lack of visualisation of the third HRB at 500 µm (p = 0.0104) or 1000 µm (p = 0.0167) from the fovea on initial OCT images was associated with poor visual recovery after resolution of the MO. Conclusion Integrity of the photoreceptor layer in the fovea is associated with VA in resolved MO, and status of the third HRB before treatment might be predictive of visual outcome. PMID:17504858

  11. The role of extra-foveal processing in 3D imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckstein, Miguel P.; Lago, Miguel A.; Abbey, Craig K.

    2017-03-01

    The field of medical image quality has relied on the assumption that metrics of image quality for simple visual detection tasks are a reliable proxy for the more clinically realistic visual search tasks. Rank order of signal detectability across conditions often generalizes from detection to search tasks. Here, we argue that search in 3D images represents a paradigm shift in medical imaging: radiologists typically cannot exhaustively scrutinize all regions of interest with the high acuity fovea requiring detection of signals with extra-foveal areas (visual periphery) of the human retina. We hypothesize that extra-foveal processing can alter the detectability of certain types of signals in medical images with important implications for search in 3D medical images. We compare visual search of two different types of signals in 2D vs. 3D images. We show that a small microcalcification-like signal is more highly detectable than a larger mass-like signal in 2D search, but its detectability largely decreases (relative to the larger signal) in the 3D search task. Utilizing measurements of observer detectability as a function retinal eccentricity and observer eye fixations we can predict the pattern of results in the 2D and 3D search studies. Our findings: 1) suggest that observer performance findings with 2D search might not always generalize to 3D search; 2) motivate the development of a new family of model observers that take into account the inhomogeneous visual processing across the retina (foveated model observers).

  12. Effects of ocular transverse chromatic aberration on near foveal letter recognition.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shun-nan; Tai, Yu-chi; Laukkanen, Hannu; Sheedy, James

    2009-11-01

    Transverse chromatic aberration (TCA) smears retinal images of peripheral stimuli. In reading, text information is extracted from both foveal and near fovea, where TCA magnitude is relatively small and variable. The present study investigated whether TCA significantly affects near foveal letter identification. Subjects were briefly presented a string of five letters centered one degree of visual angle to the left or right of fixation. They indicated whether the middle letter was the same as a comparison letter subsequently presented. Letter strings were rendered with a reddish fringe on the left edge of each letter and a bluish fringe on the right edge, consistent with expected left periphery TCA, or with the opposite fringe consistent with expected right periphery TCA. Effect of the color fringing on letter recognition was measured by comparing the response accuracy for fringed and non-fringed stimuli. Effects of lateral interference were examined by manipulating inter-letter spacing and similarity of neighboring letters. Results demonstrated significantly improved response accuracy with the color fringe opposite to the expected TCA, but decreased accuracy when consistent with it. Narrower letter spacing exacerbated the effect of the color fringe, whereas letter similarity did not. Our results suggest that TCA significantly reduces the ability to recognize letters in the near fovea by impeding recognition of individual letters and by enhancing lateral interference between letters.

  13. Foveal and peripheral fields of vision influences perceptual skill in anticipating opponents' attacking position in volleyball.

    PubMed

    Schorer, Jörg; Rienhoff, Rebecca; Fischer, Lennart; Baker, Joseph

    2013-09-01

    The importance of perceptual-cognitive expertise in sport has been repeatedly demonstrated. In this study we examined the role of different sources of visual information (i.e., foveal versus peripheral) in anticipating volleyball attack positions. Expert (n = 11), advanced (n = 13) and novice (n = 16) players completed an anticipation task that involved predicting the location of volleyball attacks. Video clips of volleyball attacks (n = 72) were spatially and temporally occluded to provide varying amounts of information to the participant. In addition, participants viewed the attacks under three visual conditions: full vision, foveal vision only, and peripheral vision only. Analysis of variance revealed significant between group differences in prediction accuracy with higher skilled players performing better than lower skilled players. Additionally, we found significant differences between temporal and spatial occlusion conditions. Both of those factors interacted separately, but not combined with expertise. Importantly, for experts the sum of both fields of vision was superior to either source in isolation. Our results suggest different sources of visual information work collectively to facilitate expert anticipation in time-constrained sports and reinforce the complexity of expert perception.

  14. Associating peripheral and foveal visual input across saccades: a default mode of the human visual system?

    PubMed

    Weiß, Katharina; Schneider, Werner X; Herwig, Arvid

    2014-09-09

    Spatial processing resolution of a particular object in the visual field can differ considerably due to eye movements. The same object will be represented with high acuity in the fovea but only coarsely in periphery. Herwig and Schneider (in press) proposed that the visual system counteracts such resolution differences by predicting, based on previous experience, how foveal objects will look in the periphery and vice versa. They demonstrated that previously learned transsaccadic associations between peripheral and foveal object information facilitate performance in visual search, irrespective of the correctness of these associations. False associations were learned by replacing the presaccadic object with a slightly different object during the saccade. Importantly, participants usually did not notice this object change. This raises the question of whether perception of object continuity is a critical factor in building transsaccadic associations. We disturbed object continuity during learning with a postsaccadic blank or a task-irrelevant shape change. Interestingly, visual search performance revealed that neither disruption of temporal object continuity (blank) nor disruption of spatial object continuity (shape change) impaired transsaccadic learning. Thus, transsaccadic learning seems to be a very robust default mechanism of the visual system that is probably related to the more general concept of action-effect learning.

  15. Morphological Evolution and Sediment Partitioning Through a Large Confluence-Diffluence Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, C. R.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Leyland, J.; Best, J.; Aalto, R. E.; Nicholas, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Confluence-diffluence units are key nodes in fluvial systems, controlling local bed morphology, the routing of sediment and water and ultimately defining channel stability and the larger-scale, planform dynamics. The Chaktomuk Junction on the Mekong River is the site of the confluence of the Tonlé Sap and Mekong rivers, as well as the diffluence of the Mekong and Bassac rivers. This junction defines the upstream apex of the Mekong delta. As such, the morphological evolution of this confluence-diffluence over single flood events, and larger temporal scales, determines the partitioning of water and sediment as it enters the Mekong delta, as well as to the critically important ecosystem that is the Tonlé Sap Lake. Here, we present data from a series of high spatial resolution topographic (Multibeam Echo Sounder), flow (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) and sub-bottom profiling (Parametric Echo Sounder) surveys undertaken on the Chaktomuk Junction, which reveal the temporal and spatial evolution of this critically important confluence-diffluence unit. We show spatial patterns of morphological change across a range of monsoonal flow stages and at various temporal scales, as well as sub-bottom profiling across the large bars present at the confluence. We also identify the response in the partitioning of the suspended and bedload portions of sediment transport through the confluence-diffluence, and elucidate the implications of this partitioning for the evolution of the downstream channel.

  16. The spatial arrangement of cones in the primate fovea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollon, J. D.; Bowmaker, J. K.

    1992-12-01

    THE retinae of Old World primates contain three classes of light-sensitive cone, which exhibit peak absorption in different spectral regions1-4. But how are the different types of cone arranged in the hexagonal mosaic of the fovea? This question has often been answered with artists' impressions5-7, but never with direct measurements. Staining for antibodies specific to the short-wave photopigment has revealed a sparse, semiregular array of cones8; but nothing is known about the arrangement of the more numerous long- and middle-wave cones. Are they randomly distributed, with chance aggregations of one type, as Hartridge postulated in these columns nearly 50 years ago9,10? Or do they exhibit a regular alternation, recalling the systematic mosaics seen in some non-mammalian species6,11? Or, conversely, is there positive clumping of particular cone types, as might be expected if local patches of cones were descended from a single precursor cell? We have made direct microspectrophotometric measurements of patches of foveal retina from Old World monkeys, and report here that the distribu tion of long- and middle-wave cones is locally random. These two cone types are present in almost equal numbers, and not in the ratio of 2:1 that has been postulated for the human fovea.

  17. BETTER PROGNOSIS FOR EYES WITH PRESERVED FOVEAL DEPRESSION AFTER INTRAVITREAL RANIBIZUMAB INJECTION FOR MACULAR EDEMA SECONDARY TO CENTRAL RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Shuta; Yasuda, Shunsuke; Ito, Yasuki; Ueno, Shinji; Iwase, Takeshi; Terasaki, Hiroko

    2017-05-18

    To determine the prognosis of eyes with central retinal vein occlusion that had a preserved foveal depression at the baseline and were treated by intravitreal ranibizumab injections (IRIs). The authors reviewed the medical records of 23 eyes of 23 consecutive treatment-naive patients who received IRIs to treat the macular edema due to central retinal vein occlusion. Eyes were classified by the pre-IRI presence or absence of a foveal depression. A foveal depression was defined as a central foveal thickness that was <50 μm thinner than the average thickness at 200 μm temporal and nasal to the central fovea. The characteristics of the two groups were compared. Seven of 23 eyes had a preserved foveal depression before the IRI. The mean number of injections within 12 months after the initial IRI was significantly fewer (P < 0.001) in eyes with foveal depression (1.6 ± 0.5) than in eyes without foveal depression (4.3 ± 1.3). The mean best-corrected visual acuity at 12 months after the initial IRI was significantly better (P = 0.003) in eyes with foveal depression (0.10 ± 0.17 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution [logMAR] units; 20/25 Snellen units) than in eyes without foveal depression (0.77 ± 0.54 logMAR units; 20/118 Snellen units). These results indicate that the prognosis is better for eyes with a foveal depression before the IRI treatment for a macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion.

  18. Fluid dynamics, sediment transport and turbulent mixing at large confluences of the Amazon River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevethan, Mark; Gualtieri, Carlo; Filizola, Naziano; Ianniruberto, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The Clim-Amazon Project aims to study temporal sedimentary records to understand the mechanisms involved in climate and geodynamic changes and the processes involved in dissolved and suspended load evolution of the Amazon River basin from the Miocene to present. The knowledge of the present Amazon River sediment discharge and of its variability is fundamental since it can be linked to the on-going climatic and erosion processes at the regional scale. Understanding the relationships between these processes will be helpful to better interpret the observations of the past sedimentation rates. Within this general objective the aim of this study is to investigate the complex fluid dynamics, sediment transport and water quality processes occurring at the large confluences in the Amazon River, through a combination of theoretical, experimental (field) and numerical research. In the last decades a wide body of theoretical, experimental, and field research has emerged on the fluvial dynamics of river confluences, which are integral and ubiquitous features of river networks. Through this research substantial advances have been made into understanding the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of river confluences which will be outlined here. However, to date most experimental studies have focused either on laboratory confluences or on small to medium sized natural confluences, whereas an extremely limited number of investigations about the confluences on large rivers. Presently little is understood about how river confluence hydrodynamics may vary with the size of the river, especially in the largest rivers. The Amazon River is the largest river in the World, with approximately 15,000 sub-branches joining the Amazon River within the Amazon Basin including some of the largest confluences on Earth. A study region containing three of the larger confluences between Manacapuru and Itacoatiara will be used as part of this study, with the primary focus being the confluence of the Rio

  19. Visual influences on primate encephalization.

    PubMed

    Kirk, E Christopher

    2006-07-01

    Primates differ from most other mammals in having relatively large brains. As a result, numerous comparative studies have attempted to identify the selective variables influencing primate encephalization. However, none have examined the effect of the total amount of visual input on relative brain size. According to Jerison's principle of proper mass, functional areas of the brain devoted primarily to processing visual information should exhibit increases in size when the amount of visual input to those areas increases. As a result, the total amount of visual input to the brain could exert a large influence on encephalization because visual areas comprise a large proportion of total brain mass in primates. The goal of this analysis is to test the expectation of a direct relationship between visual input and encephalization using optic foramen size and optic nerve size as proxies for total visual input. Data were collected for a large comparative sample of primates and carnivorans, and three primary analyses were undertaken. First, the relationship between relative proxies for visual input and relative endocranial volume were examined using partial correlations and phylogenetic comparative methods. Second, to examine the generality of the results derived for extant primates, a parallel series of partial correlation and comparative analyses were undertaken using data for carnivorans. Third, data for various Eocene and Oligocene primates were compared with those for living primates in order to determine whether the fossil taxa demonstrate a similar relationship between relative brain size and visual input. All three analyses confirm the expectations of proper mass and favor the conclusion that the amount of visual input has been a major influence on the evolution of relative brain size in both primates and carnivorans. Furthermore, this study suggests that differences in visual input may partly explain (1) the high encephalization of primates relative to the primitive

  20. Fronts and Thermohaline Structure of the Brazil Current Confluence System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severov, Dimitri

    and Thermohaline Structure of the Brazil Current Confluence System (BCCS) are stud-ied from climatic data, "Marathon Exp. Leg.8, 1984"data, and two Sea surface temperature (SST) data bases: "Meteor satellite"(1989-1994) and "ds277-Reynolds" (1981-2000).The South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) is divided in two main types: tropical (TW) and subtropical water (ST). Water masses, fronts, inter-frontal and frontal zones are analysed and classified: a) the water masses: Tropical Low-Salinity Water, Tropical Surface Water, Tropical Tropospheric Water, Subtropical Low-Salinity Water, Subtropical Surface Water, Subtropical Tropospheric Water. T,S characteristics of intermediate, deep and bottom water defined by different authors are confirmed and completed; b) the Inter-frontal Zones: Tropical/Brazil Current Zone, Sub-tropical Zone and Subantarctic Zone; c) the Frontal Zones: Subtropical, Subantarctic and Polar, and d) the Fronts: Subtropical Front of the Brazil Current, Principal Subtropical Front, North Subtropical Front, Subtropical Surface Front, South Subtropical Front, Subantarctic Surface Front, Subantarctic Front and Polar Front. Several stable T-S relationships are found below the friction layer and at the Fronts. The maximum gradient of the oceanographic characteris-tics occurs at the Brazil Current Front, which can be any of the subtropical fronts, depending on season. Minimum mean depth of the pycnocline coincides with the fronts of the BCCS, indicating the paths of low-salinity shelf waters into the open ocean. D. N. Severov (a) , V. Pshennikov (b) and A.V. Remeslo (c) a -Sección Oceanologé Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de la Republica, Igué 4225, 11400 ıa, a Montevideo, Uruguay. Tel. (598-2) 525-8618, Fax (598-2) 525-8617, mail: dima@fcien.edu.uy b -Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la Republica, Igué 4225, 11400 Mon-a tevideo, Uruguay, mail: seva@fisica.edu.uy c -Atlantic Research Inst. For Fisheries Oceanology (Atlant

  1. Axial Length Variation Impacts on Superficial Retinal Vessel Density and Foveal Avascular Zone Area Measurements Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Danuta M; Gong, Peijun; An, Di; Menghini, Moreno; Hansen, Alex; Mackey, David A; Sampson, David D; Chen, Fred K

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of image magnification correction on superficial retinal vessel density (SRVD) and foveal avascular zone area (FAZA) measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Participants with healthy retinas were recruited for ocular biometry, refraction, and RTVue XR Avanti OCTA imaging with the 3 × 3-mm protocol. The foveal and parafoveal SRVD and FAZA were quantified with custom software before and after correction for magnification error using the Littman and the modified Bennett formulae. Relative changes between corrected and uncorrected SRVD and FAZA were calculated. Forty subjects were enrolled and the median (range) age of the participants was 30 (18-74) years. The mean (range) spherical equivalent refractive error was -1.65 (-8.00 to +4.88) diopters and mean (range) axial length was 24.42 mm (21.27-28.85). Images from 13 eyes were excluded due to poor image quality leaving 67 for analysis. Relative changes in foveal and parafoveal SRVD and FAZA after correction ranged from -20% to +10%, -3% to +2%, and -20% to +51%, respectively. Image size correction in measurements of foveal SRVD and FAZA was greater than 5% in 51% and 74% of eyes, respectively. In contrast, 100% of eyes had less than 5% correction in measurements of parafoveal SRVD. Ocular biometry should be performed with OCTA to correct image magnification error induced by axial length variation. We advise caution when interpreting interocular and interindividual comparisons of SRVD and FAZA derived from OCTA without image size correction.

  2. Isolated foveal hypoplasia with secondary nystagmus and low vision is associated with a homozygous SLC38A8 mutation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Yonatan; Gradstein, Libe; Flusser, Hagit; Markus, Barak; Cohen, Idan; Langer, Yshaia; Marcus, Mira; Lifshitz, Tova; Kadir, Rotem; Birk, Ohad S

    2014-05-01

    Foveal hypoplasia, always accompanied by nystagmus, is found as part of the clinical spectrum of various eye disorders such as aniridia, albinism and achromatopsia. However, the molecular basis of isolated autosomal recessive foveal hypoplasia is yet unknown. Individuals of apparently unrelated non consanguineous Israeli families of Jewish Indian (Mumbai) ancestry presented with isolated foveal hypoplasia associated with congenital nystagmus and reduced visual acuity. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping followed by fine mapping defined a 830 Kb disease-associated locus (LOD score 3.5). Whole-exome sequencing identified a single missense mutation in the homozygosity region: c.95T>G, p.(Ile32Ser), in a conserved amino acid within the first predicted transmembrane domain of SLC38A8. The mutation fully segregated with the disease-associated phenotype, demonstrating an ∼10% carrier rate in Mumbai Jews. SLC38A8 encodes a putative sodium-dependent amino-acid/proton antiporter, which we showed to be expressed solely in the eye. Thus, a homozygous SLC38A8 mutation likely underlies isolated foveal hypoplasia.

  3. Enhancing the natural removal of As in a reactive fluvial confluence receiving acid drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarca, M. I.; Arce, G.; Montecinos, M.; Guerra, P. A.; Pasten, P.

    2014-12-01

    Fluvial confluences are natural reactors that can determine the fate of contaminants in watersheds receiving acid drainage. Hydrological, hydrodynamic and chemical factors determine distinct conditions for the formation of suspended particles of iron and aluminum oxyhydroxides. The chemical and physical properties of these particle assemblages (e.g. particle size, chemical composition) can vary according to inflow mixing ratios, hydrodynamic velocity profiles, and chemical composition of the flows mixing at the confluence. Due to their capacity to sorb metals, it is important to identify the optimal conditions for removing metals from the aqueous phase, particularly arsenic, a contaminant frequently found in acid drainage. We studied a river confluence in the Lluta watershed, located in the arid Chilean Altiplano. We performed field measurements and laboratory studies to find optimal mixing ratio for arsenic sorption onto oxyhydroxide particles at the confluence between the Azufre (pH=2, As=2 mg/L) and the Caracarani river (pH=8, As<0.1 mg/L). As the contribution of the acidic stream increased, the concentration of Fe and Al in the solid phase reached a peak at different pHs. Although the optimal pH for As sorption was ~3, the overall maximum removal of As at the confluence, ocurred for pH~4. This is produced because optimal As sorption does not occur necessarily for the highest concentrations of particles being formed. We propose that fluvial confluences could be engineered to enhance the natural attenuation of contaminants. An analogy between confluences and coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation drinking water plants could be used to engineer such intervention.Acknowledgements: Proyecto Fondecyt 1130936 and Proyecto CONICYT FONDAP 15110020

  4. Foveal light exposure is increased at the time of removal of silicone oil with the potential for phototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dogramaci, Mahmut; Williams, Katie; Lee, Ed; Williamson, Tom H

    2013-01-01

    There is sudden and dramatic visual function deterioration in 1-10 % of eyes filled with silicone oil at the time of removal of silicon oil. Transmission of high-energy blue light is increased in eyes filled with silicone oil. We sought to identify if increased foveal light exposure is a potential factor in the pathophysiology of the visual loss at the time of removal of silicone oil. A graphic ray tracing computer program and laboratory models were used to determine the effect of the intraocular silicone oil bubble size on the foveal illuminance at the time of removal of silicone oil under direct microscope light. The graphic ray tracing computer program revealed a range of optical vignetting effects created by different sizes of silicone oil bubble within the vitreous cavity giving rise to an uneven macular illumination. The laboratory model was used to quantify the variation of illuminance at the foveal region with different sizes of silicone oil bubble with in the vitreous cavity at the time of removal of silicon oil under direct microscope light. To substantiate the hypothesis of the light toxicity during removal of silicone oil, The outcome of oil removal procedures performed under direct microscope illumination in compared to those performed under blocked illumination. The computer program showed that the optical vignetting effect at the macula was dependent on the size of the intraocular silicone oil bubble. The laboratory eye model showed that the foveal illuminance followed a bell-shaped curve with 70 % greater illuminance demonstrated at with 50-60 % silicone oil fill. The clinical data identified five eyes with unexplained vision loss out of 114 eyes that had the procedure performed under direct microscope illumination compared to none out of 78 eyes that had the procedure under blocked illumination. Foveal light exposure, and therefore the potential for phototoxicity, is transiently increased at the time of removal of silicone oil. This is due to

  5. Ethics of primate use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the ethical issues raised by the use of non-human primates (NHPs) in research involving scientific procedures which may cause pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm. It is not an exhaustive review of the literature and views on this subject, and it does not present any conclusions about the moral acceptability or otherwise of NHP research. Rather the aim has been to identify the ethical issues involved and to provide guidance on how these might be addressed, in particular by carefully examining the scientific rationale for NHP use, implementing fully the 3Rs principle of Russell and Burch (1959) and applying a robust "harm-benefit assessment" to research proposals involving NHPs.

  6. Brains, Genes and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Callaway, Edward M.; Churchland, Patricia; Caddick, Sarah J.; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E.; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A.; Miller, Cory T.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R.; Movshon, J. Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H.; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Silva, Afonso C.; Strick, Peter L.; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  7. Brains, genes, and primates.

    PubMed

    Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Callaway, Edward M; Caddick, Sarah J; Churchland, Patricia; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A; Miller, Cory T; Mitchell, Jude F; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R; Movshon, J Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Silva, Afonso C; Strick, Peter L; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-05-06

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators, and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive, and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of changes in foveal capillary architecture caused by idiopathic epiretinal membrane using OCT angiography.

    PubMed

    Nelis, P; Alten, F; Clemens, C R; Heiduschka, P; Eter, N

    2017-07-01

    To quantify the extent and depth of distortion of the foveal capillary architecture due to traction of an idiopathic epiretinal membrane (ERM) using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A). Multimodal imaging including OCT-A (Angiovue, Optovue) was performed in 42 eyes with idiopathic ERM (72.4 years ±6.8). Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), OCT-A vessel density of the foveal (VDfo) and parafoveal (VDp) region were assessed. Based on 6 × 6-mm(2) OCT-A images, a macular vessel density ratio (MVR = VDfo/VDp) was calculated for the superficial (s), deep (d) and full-thickness (f) slabs to assess a depth-resolved, non-invasive evaluation of foveal distortion. The acquired data were subdivided in a patient group with mild and significant BCVA reduction due to ERM. Data was compared to age-matched healthy controls. In all three slabs, MVR was significantly smaller in the control group in comparison with the ERM group: MVRs: 0.63 ± 0.1 vs 0.83 ± 0.1 (p > 0.001); MVRd: 0.60 ± 0.1 vs 0.73 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001); MVRf: 0.68 ± 0.1 vs 0.82 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001). Group 1 (BCVA <0.4 LogMar) showed a significantly higher MVR in comparison with the control group in the superficial plexus only: MVRs: 0.64 ± 0.1 vs 0.78 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001); MVRd: 0.60 ± 0.1 vs 0.65 ± 0.2 (p = 0.3); MVRf: 0.68 ± 0.1 vs 0.77 ± 0.1 (p = 0.01). However, group 2 (BCVA > = 0.4 LogMar) showed a significantly higher MVR in all three slabs: MVRs: 0.64 ± 0.1 vs 0.86 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001); MVRd: 0.60 ± 0.1 vs 0.77 ± 0.2 (p < 0.001); MVRf: 0.68 ± 0.1 vs 0.85 ± 0.1 (p < 0.001). Assessing MVR using OCT-A may serve as a tool to quantify the extent and depth of distortion of the foveal capillary architecture due to traction of ERM. BCVA reduction appears to be associated with extent and depth of distortion.

  9. Effect of timolol on sub-foveal choroidal blood flow using laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, Nithiyanantham; Rovati, Luigi; Cellini, Mauro; Gizzi, Corrado; Strobbe, Ernesto; Campos, Emilio; Riva, Charles E.

    2011-03-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a technique used to measure relative average velocity, number and flux (number times velocity) of red blood cells in vessels or capillaries. In this study, the effect of topical timolol on the choroidal circulation was investigated in 12 healthy subjects. Maximum velocity of red blood cells and volumetric blood flow rate in sub-foveal choroids are determined in each eye just before instillation of drops and then every 30 min upto 2 hours. Average intraocular pressure (IOP) decreased significantly in the timolol-treated eyes compared to that of placebo-treated eyes. Nevertheless no significant differences in choroidal blood hemodynamic between timolol and placebo-treated eyes were observed.

  10. Modeling and minimizing interference from corneal birefringence in retinal birefringence scanning for foveal fixation detection

    PubMed Central

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing the measured corneal birefringence from a data set of 150 eyes of 75 human subjects, an algorithm and related computer program, based on Müller-Stokes matrix calculus, were developed in MATLAB for assessing the influence of corneal birefringence on retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) and for converging upon an optical/mechanical design using wave plates (“wave-plate-enhanced RBS”) that allows foveal fixation detection essentially independently of corneal birefringence. The RBS computer model, and in particular the optimization algorithm, were verified with experimental human data using an available monocular RBS-based eye fixation monitor. Fixation detection using wave-plate-enhanced RBS is adaptable to less cooperative subjects, including young children at risk for developing amblyopia. PMID:21750772

  11. Modeling and minimizing interference from corneal birefringence in retinal birefringence scanning for foveal fixation detection.

    PubMed

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David

    2011-07-01

    Utilizing the measured corneal birefringence from a data set of 150 eyes of 75 human subjects, an algorithm and related computer program, based on Müller-Stokes matrix calculus, were developed in MATLAB for assessing the influence of corneal birefringence on retinal birefringence scanning (RBS) and for converging upon an optical/mechanical design using wave plates ("wave-plate-enhanced RBS") that allows foveal fixation detection essentially independently of corneal birefringence. The RBS computer model, and in particular the optimization algorithm, were verified with experimental human data using an available monocular RBS-based eye fixation monitor. Fixation detection using wave-plate-enhanced RBS is adaptable to less cooperative subjects, including young children at risk for developing amblyopia.

  12. Autofluorescence Characteristics of Normal Foveas and Reconstruction of Foveal Autofluorescence from Limited Data Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. Theodore; Koniarek, Jan P.; Chan, Jackie; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Sparrow, Janet R.; Langton, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop mathematical and geometric models of the nonuniform autofluorescence (AF) patterns of foveas of normal subjects and to reconstruct these models from limited subsets of data. Methods Confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO) AF fundus images of normal maculae were obtained from both eyes of 10 middle-aged subjects. They were filtered and contrast enhanced, to obtain elliptical isobars of equal gray levels (GLs) and determine the isobars’ resolutions, eccentricities, and angles of orientation. The original image data were fit with a mathematical model of elliptic quadratic polynomials in two equal zones: the center and the remaining annulus. Results The AF images segmented into nested concentric GL isobars with GLs that increased radially from the least-fluorescent center. The mean isobar resolution was 31 ± 7 μm. The geometric eccentricity of the ellipses increased from 0.42 ± 0.12 centrally to 0.52 ± 0.14 peripherally (P = 0.0005), with mean axes of orientation peripherally 97.12 ± 15.46°. The model fits to the complete image data had mean absolute normalized errors ranging from 3.6% ± 3.7% to 7.3% ± 7.1%. The model fits to small subsets (1% to 2% of total image data) had mean absolute errors ranging from 3.7% ± 3.8% to 7.3% ± 7.2%. Conclusions Normal AF fundus images show finely resolved, concentric, elliptical foveal patterns consistent with the anatomic distribution of fluorescent lipofuscin, light-attenuating macular pigment (MP), cone photopigment, and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) pigment in the fovea. A two-zone, elliptic, quadratic polynomial model can accurately model foveal data. This model may be useful for image analysis and for automated segmentation of pathology. PMID:16043869

  13. Primate Models in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas J.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2013-01-01

    Large animal models have long served as the proving grounds for advances in transplantation, bridging the gap between inbred mouse experimentation and human clinical trials. Although a variety of species have been and continue to be used, the emergence of highly targeted biologic- and antibody-based therapies has required models to have a high degree of homology with humans. Thus, the nonhuman primate has become the model of choice in many settings. This article will provide an overview of nonhuman primate models of transplantation. Issues of primate genetics and care will be introduced, and a brief overview of technical aspects for various transplant models will be discussed. Finally, several prominent immunosuppressive and tolerance strategies used in primates will be reviewed. PMID:24003248

  14. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Vangay, Pajau; Huang, Hu; Ward, Tonya; Hillmann, Benjamin M.; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel A.; Travis, Dominic A.; Long, Ha Thang; Tuan, Bui Van; Minh, Vo Van; Cabana, Francis; Nadler, Tilo; Toddes, Barbara; Murphy, Tami; Glander, Kenneth E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Knights, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome. PMID:27573830

  15. DOES ALCOHOL CONTRIBUTE TO THE CONFLUENCE MODEL OF SEXUAL ASSAULT PERPETRATION?

    PubMed Central

    PARKHILL, MICHELE R.; ABBEY, ANTONIA

    2015-01-01

    The confluence model of sexual assault provides a useful theoretical integration of factors that influence men’s likelihood of committing sexual assault (Malamuth, Sockloskie, Koss, & Tanaka, 1991). This study replicates and extends the confluence model by including alcohol at multiple levels. Participants’ usual alcohol consumption and alcohol consumption in sexual situations were included as predictor variables. The number of sexually aggressive acts that participants committed after consuming alcohol and the number of sexually aggressive acts participants committed when sober were separately calculated so that the predictors of each could be distinguished. Participants were 356 men who completed a survey that included measures that assessed the key components of the confluence model. Results of path analyses indicated that the expanded model fit the data well, with both general and situational measures of alcohol use predicting frequency of sexual assault when drinking alcohol. These findings highlight the importance of developing universal and targeted prevention programs for young men. PMID:26405374

  16. THREE-DIMENSIONAL SIMULATION OF FLOW AT AN OPEN-CHANNEL CONFLUENCE WITH TURBULENCE MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh Thanh, Mung; Kimura, Ichiro; Shimizu, Yasuyuki

    Open-channel confluence flows are common in natural river systems as well as in environmental and hydraulic engineering, such as in river engineering. Often, these flows are three-dimensional and complex,while numerical studies fully describing confluence flow are still few. This paper presents the results of investigation of confluence flow using a three-dimensional numerical model with the linear and nonlinear k-ε models. To treat the dynamic boundary condition at the free surface, non-hydrostatic pressure is included in the present model. The model is validated using the experimental data available. Adequacy of the present model with two turbulence models above is indicated based on the result analysis. The nonlinear model is indicated as the more advantageous one than the linear one.

  17. A joint probability approach for coincidental flood frequency analysis at ungauged basin confluences

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng

    2016-03-12

    A reliable and accurate flood frequency analysis at the confluence of streams is of importance. Given that long-term peak flow observations are often unavailable at tributary confluences, at a practical level, this paper presents a joint probability approach (JPA) to address the coincidental flood frequency analysis at the ungauged confluence of two streams based on the flow rate data from the upstream tributaries. One case study is performed for comparison against several traditional approaches, including the position-plotting formula, the univariate flood frequency analysis, and the National Flood Frequency Program developed by US Geological Survey. It shows that the results generated by the JPA approach agree well with the floods estimated by the plotting position and univariate flood frequency analysis based on the observation data.

  18. Hydrodynamics of 90o concordant beds' confluences of straight-channels with unequal channel widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Đorđević, Dejana

    2017-04-01

    With the exception of confluences of large alluvial rivers, tributary channel is usually narrower that the channel of the main-river. hydrodynamics of confluences of equal width channels has been thoroughly studied using 3D numerical models and to a certain extent it was studied in laboratory confluences. Hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of confluences with unequal channel widths were recently studied experimentally for mountainous rivers, and there are limited experimental data on hydrodynamic characteristics for horizontal bed confluences. This study aims at analysing hydrodynamics of alluvial river confluences with unequal channel widths and concordant beds. They are analysed for the three typical hydrological scenarios at the confluence (defined by the discharge ratio DR = QMR / (QMR + QT)): 1) the dominance of the tributary flow (DR = 0.250), 2) equal contributions of the combining flows (DR = 0.583) and 3) the dominance of the main-river flow (DR = 0.750). A confluence with the 90o junction angle is chosen for the study, since this angle allows for the development of all six subzones within the confluence hydrodynamics zone that were recognised by Best in 1980s. Two values of the channel-width-ratio of the tributary ("T") and main-channels ("MR") (BT / BMR = {0.75, 0.50}) are analysed in addition to the case of equal width channels (BT / BMR = 1.00). As it was expected, the flow deflection on the horizontal plane (defined by the flow angle δ = arc tg (v/ u)) reduced with the narrowing of the tributary channel, due to increase in the value of the momentum-flux ratio. For DR=0.250, the momentum-flux ratio increases by 22 and 73% for BT/BMR = {0.75, 0.50}, respectively, whereas for DR= 0.583 and DR = 0.750, this increase ranges between 10 and 40%. The greatest effect on the reduction of the flow deflection (increase in the average flow angle (δav)) is achieved in the case when the main-river flow dominates. The increase is between 28 and 33% for BT/BMR = {0

  19. Foveal Microstructure Analysis in Eyes with Diabetic Macular Edema Treated with Vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kogo, Jiro; Shiono, Akira; Sasaki, Hiroki; Yomoda, Ryo; Jujo, Tatsuya; Kitaoka, Yasushi; Takagi, Hitoshi

    2017-08-14

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate baseline and postoperative factors affecting outcomes after vitrectomy for diabetic macular edema (DME) using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Vitrectomy combined with inner limiting membrane (ILM) peeling and additional laser photocoagulation therapy was performed on 36 eyes of 30 DME patients. Evaluations included the logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution (logMAR), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and OCT parameters at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Correlations between OCT parameters and BCVA were assessed at each follow-up visit. Correlations among postoperative BCVA and preoperative BCVA, foveal macular thickness (FMT), outer foveal thickness (OFT), and photoreceptor outer segment (PROS) length were evaluated using multiple regression analysis. BCVA significantly improved from 0.50 ± 0.25 to 0.34 ± 0.26 at 12 months postoperatively (P < 0.001). Mean FMT improved significantly from 526.4 ± 120.4 to 384.6 ± 120.5 at 1 month, 325.2 ± 100.3 at 3 months, 304.1 ± 102.5 at 6 months and 274.2 ± 86.6 μm at 12 months postoperatively (P < 0.001, respectively). OFT 1 month after surgery was significantly decreased 46.5 ± 14.7-40.2 ± 14.4 μm (P = 0.017), although at 3, 6, and 12 months it did not differ from the baseline value. PROS length 1 month after surgery significantly decreased from 31.7 ± 6.9-28.8 ± 6.8 μm (P = 0.015) and that at 3 months and 6 months recovered to the baseline value. PROS length 12 months after surgery was significantly increased to 34.3 ± 7.2 μm from baseline (P = 0.023). Mean FMT was not correlated with BCVA at any time point. Mean OFT and PROS length at 3, 6, and 12 months were correlated with BCVA. In multiple regression analysis, PROS length had the greatest effect on VA 12 months postoperatively (P = 0.0262, standard regression coefficient = -0.366). Current surgery helps DME patients to maintain

  20. Canine retina has a primate fovea-like bouquet of cone photoreceptors which is affected by inherited macular degenerations.

    PubMed

    Beltran, William A; Cideciyan, Artur V; Guziewicz, Karina E; Iwabe, Simone; Swider, Malgorzata; Scott, Erin M; Savina, Svetlana V; Ruthel, Gordon; Stefano, Frank; Zhang, Lingli; Zorger, Richard; Sumaroka, Alexander; Jacobson, Samuel G; Aguirre, Gustavo D

    2014-01-01

    Retinal areas of specialization confer vertebrates with the ability to scrutinize corresponding regions of their visual field with greater resolution. A highly specialized area found in haplorhine primates (including humans) is the fovea centralis which is defined by a high density of cone photoreceptors connected individually to interneurons, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that are offset to form a pit lacking retinal capillaries and inner retinal neurons at its center. In dogs, a local increase in RGC density is found in a topographically comparable retinal area defined as the area centralis. While the canine retina is devoid of a foveal pit, no detailed examination of the photoreceptors within the area centralis has been reported. Using both in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we identified a retinal region with a primate fovea-like cone photoreceptor density but without the excavation of the inner retina. Similar anatomical structure observed in rare human subjects has been named fovea-plana. In addition, dogs with mutations in two different genes, that cause macular degeneration in humans, developed earliest disease at the newly-identified canine fovea-like area. Our results challenge the dogma that within the phylogenetic tree of mammals, haplorhine primates with a fovea are the sole lineage in which the retina has a central bouquet of cones. Furthermore, a predilection for naturally-occurring retinal degenerations to alter this cone-enriched area fills the void for a clinically-relevant animal model of human macular degenerations.

  1. Canine Retina Has a Primate Fovea-Like Bouquet of Cone Photoreceptors Which Is Affected by Inherited Macular Degenerations

    PubMed Central

    Guziewicz, Karina E.; Iwabe, Simone; Swider, Malgorzata; Scott, Erin M.; Savina, Svetlana V.; Ruthel, Gordon; Stefano, Frank; Zhang, Lingli; Zorger, Richard; Sumaroka, Alexander; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal areas of specialization confer vertebrates with the ability to scrutinize corresponding regions of their visual field with greater resolution. A highly specialized area found in haplorhine primates (including humans) is the fovea centralis which is defined by a high density of cone photoreceptors connected individually to interneurons, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that are offset to form a pit lacking retinal capillaries and inner retinal neurons at its center. In dogs, a local increase in RGC density is found in a topographically comparable retinal area defined as the area centralis. While the canine retina is devoid of a foveal pit, no detailed examination of the photoreceptors within the area centralis has been reported. Using both in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we identified a retinal region with a primate fovea-like cone photoreceptor density but without the excavation of the inner retina. Similar anatomical structure observed in rare human subjects has been named fovea-plana. In addition, dogs with mutations in two different genes, that cause macular degeneration in humans, developed earliest disease at the newly-identified canine fovea-like area. Our results challenge the dogma that within the phylogenetic tree of mammals, haplorhine primates with a fovea are the sole lineage in which the retina has a central bouquet of cones. Furthermore, a predilection for naturally-occurring retinal degenerations to alter this cone-enriched area fills the void for a clinically-relevant animal model of human macular degenerations. PMID:24599007

  2. Photoreceptor damage and foveal sensitivity in surgically closed macular holes: an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Takayama, Kohei; Ueda-Arakawa, Naoko; Hanebuchi, Masaaki; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2012-07-01

    To assess photoreceptor structure using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO SLO) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD OCT) and to evaluate the relationship between structural abnormalities and foveal sensitivity in eyes with surgically closed macular hole (MH). Prospective, interventional case series. Twenty-one eyes of 19 patients with idiopathic MH underwent a full ophthalmologic examination, including SD OCT at baseline. Imaging with SD OCT, an original prototype AO SLO system, and microperimetry were performed at 6 months after surgery. All patients underwent anatomically successful MH closure. On AO SLO, dark areas (0.004 to 0.754 mm(2)) were seen in all eyes after MH repair. Lower cone density correlated with poorer postoperative visual acuity and lower mean foveal sensitivity (both P < .001). Larger dark areas on AO SLO correlated with poorer postoperative visual acuity (P = .003) and lower mean foveal sensitivity (P = .006). Cone density was significantly lower and dark areas were significantly larger in eyes that had defects of the outer segments in the fluid cuff before surgery (P = .018 and P = .001, respectively) and moderately reflective foveal lesions after surgery (P < .001 and P < .001, respectively). Larger dark areas correlated with longer symptom duration before surgery (P < .001). Structural damage to the photoreceptor layer correlated with greater decreases in visual function in eyes with surgically closed MH. AO SLO imaging is a useful and quantitative tool for detecting photoreceptor abnormalities and their association with visual acuity and retinal sensitivity in eyes with closed MH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The malignant primate?

    PubMed

    de Grouchy, J

    1991-01-01

    Speciation and carcinogenesis result from genomic instability at the gametic or at the somatic levels. After an infinity of trials they occur, by chromosome rearrangements, in single individuals or in single cells and evolve by similar chromosomal or clonal evolutions. Loss of heterozygosity for the first event is essential in both processes: in evolution, a chromosomal rearrangement, a pericentric inversion or a Robertsonian fusion, must become homozygous to ensure a reproductive barrier for a new species; Knudson's two-event sequence is a similar situation in cancer. Position effect is equally important: we have shown overexpression of the SOD1 gene in the orangutan phylum probably by an intrachromosomal rearrangement; the t(9;22) in CML acts by typical position effect. Parental imprinting underlies the evolution of genome function and the unset of certain cancers. Evolution and malignancy are interweaved by viruses and oncogenes since the dawn of life. Cancer uses its intelligence to expand and to destroy the other tissues, using subtle metabolic pathways and a variety of tricks to metastasize other cells. It always wins but saws the branch on which it sits. Mankind also grows exponentially, killing thousands of other species, poisoning the oceans and soft waters, polluting the atmosphere, all for his egoistic needs. Man also travels and metastasizes other Earths. He modifies his genome or that of other species, and develops new technologies for his reproduction. He can destroy the planet in an eyeblink. To be or not to be the malignant primate, that will be the dilemma for the 21st Century.

  4. A modeling study of aeolian erosion enhanced by surface wind confluences over Mexico City

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Using erosion and air quality models, a study on the effect of PM10 episodes in Mexico City is presented. The important contribution of Aeolian erosion on urban air quality, its genesis, morphology, location and regional implications such as the role played by surface confluences, the dry Lake of T...

  5. Hepatic duct confluence injury in blunt abdominal trauma: case report and synopsis on management.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Meena; Gates, Jonathan; Ferzoco, Stephen J

    2003-10-01

    Injuries of the extra hepatic biliary tree following blunt trauma to the abdomen are rare. We present here a case of injury to the confluence of the hepatic ducts and a brief synopsis on diagnosis and management of blunt injury to the extrahepatic biliary system.

  6. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Busschots, Steven; O’Toole, Sharon; O’Leary, John J.; Stordal, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. • Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner. • The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation. • The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines. PMID:26150966

  7. Unconfounding the Confluence Model: A Test of Sibship Size and Birth Order Effects on Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steelman, Lala Carr; Mercy, James A.

    1980-01-01

    Based on a study which controlled for the effects of age, sex, maritial disruption, socioeconomic status, race, and other potentially confounding variables, this article explores the theoretical validity of the confluence model in explaining the effects of sibship size and birth order on intelligence. (Author/GC)

  8. Non-invasive and non-destructive measurements of confluence in cultured adherent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Busschots, Steven; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J; Stordal, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Many protocols used for measuring the growth of adherent monolayer cells in vitro are invasive, destructive and do not allow for the continued, undisturbed growth of cells within flasks. Protocols often use indirect methods for measuring proliferation. Microscopy techniques can analyse cell proliferation in a non-invasive or non-destructive manner but often use expensive equipment and software algorithms. In this method images of cells within flasks are captured by photographing under a standard inverted phase contract light microscope using a digital camera with a camera lens adaptor. Images are analysed for confluence using ImageJ freeware resulting in a measure of confluence known as an Area Fraction (AF) output. An example of the AF method in use on OVCAR8 and UPN251 cell lines is included. •Measurements of confluence from growing adherent cell lines in cell culture flasks is obtained in a non-invasive, non-destructive, label-free manner.•The technique is quick, affordable and eliminates sample manipulation.•The technique provides an objective, consistent measure of when cells reach confluence and is highly correlated to manual counting with a haemocytometer. The average correlation co-efficient from a Spearman correlation (n = 3) was 0.99 ± 0.008 for OVCAR8 (p = 0.01) and 0.99 ± 0.01 for UPN251 (p = 0.01) cell lines.

  9. Experimental study of the free surface velocity field in an asymmetrical confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creelle, Stephan; Mignot, Emmanuel; Schindfessel, Laurent; De Mulder, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of open channel confluences is highly complex because of the combination of different processes that interact with each other. To gain further insights in how the velocity uniformization between the upstream channels and the downstream channel is proceeding, experiments are performed in a large scale 90 degree angled concrete confluence flume with a chamfered rectangular cross-section and a width of 0.98m. The dimensions and lay-out of the flume are representative for a prototype scale confluence in e.g. drainage and irrigation systems. In this type of engineered channels with sharp corners the separation zone is very large and thus the velocity difference between the most contracted section and the separation zone is pronounced. With the help of surface particle tracking velocimetry the velocity field is recorded from upstream of the confluence to a significant distance downstream of the confluence. The resulting data allow to analyze the evolution of the incoming flows (with a developed velocity profile) that interact with the stagnation zone and each other, causing a shear layer between the two bulk flows. Close observation of the velocity field near the stagnation zone shows that there are actually two shear layers in the vicinity of the upstream corner. Furthermore, the data reveals that the shear layer observed more downstream between the two incoming flows is actually one of the two shear layers next to the stagnation zone that continues, while the other shear layer ceases to exist. The extensive measurement domain also allows to study the shear layer between the contracted section and the separation zone. The shear layers of the stagnation zone between the incoming flows and the one between the contracted flow and separation zone are localized and parameters such as the maximum gradient, velocity difference and width of the shear layer are calculated. Analysis of these data shows that the shear layer between the incoming flows

  10. A Molecular Phylogeny of Living Primates

    PubMed Central

    Perelman, Polina; Johnson, Warren E.; Roos, Christian; Seuánez, Hector N.; Horvath, Julie E.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Kessing, Bailey; Pontius, Joan; Roelke, Melody; Rumpler, Yves; Schneider, Maria Paula C.; Silva, Artur; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of primates offer considerable potential to define and understand the processes that mold, shape, and transform the human genome. However, primate taxonomy is both complex and controversial, with marginal unifying consensus of the evolutionary hierarchy of extant primate species. Here we provide new genomic sequence (∼8 Mb) from 186 primates representing 61 (∼90%) of the described genera, and we include outgroup species from Dermoptera, Scandentia, and Lagomorpha. The resultant phylogeny is exceptionally robust and illuminates events in primate evolution from ancient to recent, clarifying numerous taxonomic controversies and providing new data on human evolution. Ongoing speciation, reticulate evolution, ancient relic lineages, unequal rates of evolution, and disparate distributions of insertions/deletions among the reconstructed primate lineages are uncovered. Our resolution of the primate phylogeny provides an essential evolutionary framework with far-reaching applications including: human selection and adaptation, global emergence of zoonotic diseases, mammalian comparative genomics, primate taxonomy, and conservation of endangered species. PMID:21436896

  11. A reduced complexity discrete particle model for understanding the sediment dynamics of steep upland river confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancock, M. J.; Lane, S. N.; Hardy, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    There has been a significant amount of research conducted in order to understand the flow fields at natural river confluences. Much of this has been made possible due to advances in the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). However, much of this research has been conducted on river confluences with negligible water surface slopes and any understanding of the sediment dynamics is largely implied from the flow fields. Therefore, a key challenge is to understand the flow and sediment dynamics of steep river confluences with dynamic boundaries. Two numerical modelling developments are presented which together are capable of increasing our understanding of the sediment dynamics of steep river confluences. The first is the application of a Height-of-Liquid (HOL) model within a CFD framework to explicitly solve the water surface elevation. This is a time-dependent, multiphase treatment of the fluid dynamics which solves for the change in volume of water and air in each vertical column of the mesh. The second is the development of a reduced complexity discrete particle transport model which uses the change in momentum on a spherical particle to predict the transport paths through the flow field determined from CFD simulations. The performance of the two models is tested using field data from a series of highly dynamic, steep gravel-bed confluences on a braidplain of the Borgne d'Arolla, Switzerland. The HOL model is validated against the water surface elevation and flow velocity data and is demonstrated to provide a reliable representation of the flow field in fast-flowing, supercritical flows. In order to validate the discrete particle model, individual particles were tracked using electronic tacheometry. The model is demonstrated to accurately represent the particle tracks obtained in the field and provides a new methodology to understand the dynamic morphology of braid plains.

  12. Floodplain evolution in a confluence zone: Paraná and Ivaí rivers, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morais, Eduardo Souza de; Santos, Manoel Luis dos; Cremon, Édipo Henrique; Stevaux, José Cândido

    2016-03-01

    In this study we investigated floodplain development at the confluence of the Paraná and Ivaí rivers, Brazil. We evaluated paleochannels with sedimentary facies and morphometry from cartographic products, which enabled us to identify compartments that indicate homologous morphogenesis. These results contributed to the distinction in the floodplain of areas reworked by the Paraná, Ivaí, or both river systems. Additionally, investigations that included dating deposits on the terrace that borders the floodplain and an alluvial fan (also in contact with the floodplain) reinforced the interpretation of the fluvial landscape. The identified stages of geomorphological evolution demonstrated the existence of a paleoconfluence of the Paraná and Ivaí rivers during the late Pleistocene that was located 6 km upstream from the current confluence. This paleoconfluence displays a different configuration in relation to the current confluence, and its features resemble and contribute to understanding the former braided channel pattern of the Paraná River. The abandonments of the Paraná River channels identified in this study were initial and crucial process in the development of the floodplain. This channel change favored the formation of extensive wetlands and consequently the confluence migration, which resulted in the fluvial reworking indicated by the paleochannels of the Ivaí River. Another implication from the confluence migration was a base level fall, which contributed to maintaining the stability of the Ivaí River and its embedded meanders. In addition, investigations of an alluvial fan in the Paraná River valley provided evidence of massive deposition of sediments from a tributary of the Ivaí River onto the floodplain, which is associated with a regional dry period in the late Holocene as well as neotectonic control.

  13. Interactions between groundwater and surface water at river banks and the confluence of rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambs, Luc

    2004-03-01

    Riparian vegetation depends on hydrological resources and has to adapt to changes in water levels and soil moisture conditions. The origin and mixing of water in the streamside corridor were studied in detail. The development of riparian woodland often reflects the evolution of hydrological events. River water levels and topography are certainly the main causes of the exchange between groundwater and river water through the riverbank. Stable isotopes, such as 18O, are useful tools that allow water movement to be traced. Two main water sources are typically present: (i) river water, depleted of heavy isotopes, originating upstream, and (ii) groundwater, which comes mainly from the local rainfall. On the Garonne River bank field site downstream of Toulouse, the mixing of these two waters is variable, and depends mainly on the river level and the geographical position. The output of the groundwater into the river water is not diffuse on a large scale, but localised at few places. At the confluence of two rivers, the water-mixing area is more complex because of the presence of a third source of water. In this situation, groundwater supports the hydrologic pressure of both rivers until they merge, this pressure could influence its outflow. Two cases will be presented. The first is the confluence of the Garonne and the Ariège Rivers in the south-west of France, both rivers coming from the slopes of the Pyrénées mountains. Localised groundwater outputs have been detected about 200 m before the confluence. The second case presented is the confluence of the Ganges and the Yamuna Rivers in the north of India, downstream of the city of Allahabad. These rivers are the two main tributaries of the Ganges, and both originate in the Himalayas. A strong stream of groundwater output was measured at the point of confluence.

  14. Detection in fixed and random noise in foveal and parafoveal vision explained by template learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, B. L.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Foveal and parafoveal contrast detection thresholds for Gabor and checkerboard targets were measured in white noise by means of a two-interval forced-choice paradigm. Two white-noise conditions were used: fixed and twin. In the fixed noise condition a single noise sample was presented in both intervals of all the trials. In the twin noise condition the same noise sample was used in the two intervals of a trial, but a new sample was generated for each trial. Fixed noise conditions usually resulted in lower thresholds than twin noise. Template learning models are presented that attribute this advantage of fixed over twin noise either to fixed memory templates' reducing uncertainty by incorporation of the noise or to the introduction, by the learning process itself, of more variability in the twin noise condition. Quantitative predictions of the template learning process show that it contributes to the accelerating nonlinear increase in performance with signal amplitude at low signal-to-noise ratios.

  15. Neural network system for purposeful behavior based on foveal visual preprocessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovan, Alexander V.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.; Klepatch, Arkadi A.

    1996-10-01

    Biologically plausible model of the system with an adaptive behavior in a priori environment and resistant to impairment has been developed. The system consists of input, learning, and output subsystems. The first subsystems classifies input patterns presented as n-dimensional vectors in accordance with some associative rule. The second one being a neural network determines adaptive responses of the system to input patterns. Arranged neural groups coding possible input patterns and appropriate output responses are formed during learning by means of negative reinforcement. Output subsystem maps a neural network activity into the system behavior in the environment. The system developed has been studied by computer simulation imitating a collision-free motion of a mobile robot. After some learning period the system 'moves' along a road without collisions. It is shown that in spite of impairment of some neural network elements the system functions reliably after relearning. Foveal visual preprocessor model developed earlier has been tested to form a kind of visual input to the system.

  16. Foveal xenon flash disruption of steady-state visual evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Schmeisser, E T

    1984-05-01

    The effects of foveal exposure to near maximum permissible levels of broad-band light from lamps of differing flash durations and visual angle subtense on steady-state visual evoked potentials ( SSVEP 's) were measured in four human volunteers. SSVEP 's in response to a counterphasing checkerboard pattern were recorded with a two-phase vector voltmeter used as an analog fourier analyzer and were averaged across repeated presentation of the flash from each lamp. Two microsecond flashes of approximately 0.4 degrees have minimal, although significant effects on early visual processing of a 2.77 degrees diameter 6/24 (20/80) target. Five hundred microsecond flashes of equivalent size have greater effects; larger flashes (11.3, degrees 500 mus) produced afterimages that totally obscured the target for approximately 3.4 s and also reduced the SSVEP to near zero. Recovery of the SSVEP was subjectively correlated with afterimage duration rather than target obscuration . Therefore, single short small retinal image flashes may have minimal transient effects on photopic suprathreshold vision.

  17. Parafoveal and foveal processing of abbreviations during eye fixations in reading: Making a case for case

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Timothy J.; Schotter, Elizabeth R.; Berry, Raymond W.; Rayner, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The processing of abbreviations in reading was examined with an eye movement experiment. Abbreviations were of two distinct types: Acronyms (abbreviations that can be read with the normal grapheme-phoneme correspondence rules, such as NASA) and initialisms (abbreviations in which the grapheme-phoneme correspondences are letter names, such as NCAA). Parafoveal and foveal processing of these abbreviations was assessed with the use of the boundary change paradigm (Rayner, 1975). Using this paradigm, previews of the abbreviations were either identical to the abbreviation (NASA or NCAA), orthographically legal (NUSO or NOBA), or illegal (NRSB or NRBA). The abbreviations were presented as capital letter strings within normal, predominantly lowercase sentences and also sentences in all capital letters such that the abbreviations would not be visually distinct. The results indicate that acronyms and initialisms undergo different processing during reading, and that readers can modulate their processing based on low-level visual cues (distinct capitalization) in parafoveal vision. In particular, readers may be biased to process capitalized letter strings as initialisms in parafoveal vision when the rest of the sentence is normal, lower case letters. PMID:21480754

  18. Spatial neural modulation transfer function of human foveal visual system for equiluminous chromatic gratings.

    PubMed

    Rovamo, J M; Kankaanpää, M I; Hallikainen, J

    2001-06-01

    To determine the spatial modulation transfer function (MTF) of the human foveal visual system for equiluminous chromatic gratings we measured contrast sensitivity as a function of retinal illuminance for spatial frequencies of 0.125-4 c/deg with equiluminous red-green and blue-yellow gratings. Contrast sensitivity for chromatic gratings first increased with luminance, obeying the Rose-DeVries law, but then the increase saturated and contrast sensitivity became independent of light level, obeying Weber's law. Critical retinal illuminance (I(c)) marking the transition point between the laws was found to be independent of spatial frequency at 165 phot. td. According to our detection model of human spatial vision the MTF of the retina and subsequent neural visual pathways (P(c)) is directly proportional to radicalI(c). Hence, P(c) is independent of spatial frequency, reflecting the lack of precortical lateral inhibition for equiluminous chromatic stimuli in spatiochromatically opponent retinal ganglion cells and dLGN neurons.

  19. Restoration of foveal photoreceptors after intravitreal ranibizumab injections for diabetic macular edema

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yuki; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Uji, Akihito; Ishihara, Kenji; Yoshitake, Shin; Fujimoto, Masahiro; Dodo, Yoko; Yoshitake, Tatsuya; Miwa, Yuko; Murakami, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor drugs are the first-line treatment for diabetic macular edema (DME), although the mechanism of the visual acuity (VA) improvement remains largely unknown. The association between photoreceptor damage and visual impairment encouraged us to retrospectively investigate the changes in the foveal photoreceptors in the external limiting membrane (ELM) and ellipsoid zone (EZ) on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) images in 62 eyes with DME treated with intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR) injections. The transverse lengths of the disrupted EZ and ELM were shortened significantly (P < 0.001 and P = 0.044, respectively) at 12 months. The qualitative investigation also showed restoration of the EZ and ELM lines on SD-OCT images. The EZ at 12 months lengthened in 34 of 38 eyes with discontinuous EZ and was preserved in 16 of 21 eyes with complete EZ at baseline. VA improvement was positively correlated with shortening of the disrupted EZ at 12 months (ρ = 0.463, P < 0.001), whereas the decrease in central subfield thickness was associated with neither VA improvement nor changes in EZ status (ρ = 0.215, P = 0.093 and (ρ = 0.209, P = 0.103, respectively). These data suggested that photoreceptor restoration contributes to VA improvement after pro re nata treatment with IVR injections for DME independent of resolved retinal thickening. PMID:27966644

  20. Detection in fixed and random noise in foveal and parafoveal vision explained by template learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, B. L.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Foveal and parafoveal contrast detection thresholds for Gabor and checkerboard targets were measured in white noise by means of a two-interval forced-choice paradigm. Two white-noise conditions were used: fixed and twin. In the fixed noise condition a single noise sample was presented in both intervals of all the trials. In the twin noise condition the same noise sample was used in the two intervals of a trial, but a new sample was generated for each trial. Fixed noise conditions usually resulted in lower thresholds than twin noise. Template learning models are presented that attribute this advantage of fixed over twin noise either to fixed memory templates' reducing uncertainty by incorporation of the noise or to the introduction, by the learning process itself, of more variability in the twin noise condition. Quantitative predictions of the template learning process show that it contributes to the accelerating nonlinear increase in performance with signal amplitude at low signal-to-noise ratios.

  1. Integration of parafoveal orthographic information during foveal word reading: beyond the sub-lexical level?

    PubMed

    Snell, Joshua; Vitu, Françoise; Grainger, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Prior research has shown that processing of a given target word is facilitated by the simultaneous presentation of orthographically related stimuli in the parafovea. Here we investigate the nature of such spatial integration processes by presenting orthographic neighbours of target words in the parafovea, considering that neighbours have been shown to inhibit, rather than facilitate, recognition of target words in foveal masked priming research. In Experiment 1, we used the gaze-contingent boundary paradigm to manipulate the parafoveal information subjects received while they fixated a target word within a sentence. In Experiment 2, we used the Flanking Letters Lexical Decision paradigm to manipulate parafoveal information while subjects read isolated words. Parafoveal words were either a higher-frequency orthographic neighbour of targets words (e.g., blue-blur) or a high-frequency unrelated word (e.g., hand-blur). We found that parafoveal orthographic neighbours facilitated, rather than inhibited, processing of the target. Thus, the present findings provide further evidence that orthographic information is integrated across multiple words and suggest that either the integration process does not enable simultaneous access to those words' lexical representations, or that lexical representations activated by spatially distinct stimuli do not compete for recognition.

  2. 42 CFR 71.53 - Nonhuman primates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nonhuman primates. 71.53 Section 71.53 Public... FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.53 Nonhuman primates. (a) Definitions. As used in this section the... nonhuman primates from a foreign country within a period of 31 days, beginning with the importation date...

  3. 42 CFR 71.53 - Nonhuman primates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nonhuman primates. 71.53 Section 71.53 Public... FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.53 Nonhuman primates. (a) Definitions. As used in this section the... nonhuman primates from a foreign country within a period of 31 days, beginning with the importation date...

  4. 42 CFR 71.53 - Nonhuman primates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nonhuman primates. 71.53 Section 71.53 Public... FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.53 Nonhuman primates. (a) Definitions. As used in this section the... nonhuman primates from a foreign country within a period of 31 days, beginning with the importation date...

  5. The Relationship of Central Foveal Thickness to Urinary Iodine Concentration in Retinitis Pigmentosa Patients with or without Cystoid Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Michael A.; Pearce, Elizabeth N.; Harper, Shyana; Weigel-DiFranco, Carol; Hart, Lois; Rosner, Bernard; Berson, Eliot L.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Current treatments for cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa are not always effective, may lead to adverse side effects, and may not restore loss of visual acuity. The present research lays the rationale for evaluating whether an iodine supplement could reduce cystoid macular edema in retinitis pigmentosa. Objective To determine whether central foveal thickness in the presence of cystoid macular edema is related to dietary iodine intake inferred from urinary iodine concentration in non-smoking adults with retinitis pigmentosa. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Institutional referral center. Participants Non-smoking adult patients with retinitis pigmentosa (n = 212, ages 18 to 69 years) with a visual acuity ≥ 20/200 in at least one eye. Main outcome measure The relationship of log central foveal thickness measured by optical coherence tomography to urinary iodine concentration measured from multiple spot samples and represented as a 3-level classification variable (< 100 μg/L, 100 μg/L - 199 μg/L, and ≥ 200 μg/L), assigning greater weight to patients with more reliable urinary iodine concentration estimates. Results Analyses were limited to 199 patients after excluding 11 patients who failed to return urine samples for measuring urinary iodine concentration and 2 outliers for urinary iodine concentration. Thirty-six percent of these patients had cystoid macular edema in one or both eyes. Although log central foveal thickness was inversely related to urinary iodine concentration based on all patients (p = 0.02), regression of log central foveal thickness on urinary iodine concentration separately for patients with and without cystoid macular edema showed a strong inverse significant relationship for the former group (p < 0.001) and no significant relationship for the latter group as tested (p = 0.66). In contrast, we found no significant association between cystoid macular edema prevalence and urinary iodine concentration based on the

  6. Cooperation and deception in primates.

    PubMed

    Hall, Katie; Brosnan, Sarah F

    2017-08-01

    Though competition and cooperation are often considered opposing forces in an arms race driving natural selection, many animals, including humans, cooperate in order to mitigate competition with others. Understanding others' psychological states, such as seeing and knowing, others' goals and intentions, and coordinating actions are all important for complex cooperation-as well as for predicting behavior in order to take advantage of others through tactical deception, a form of competition. We outline evidence of primates' understanding of how others perceive the world, and then consider how the evidence from both deception and cooperation fits this framework to give us a more complete understanding of the evolution of complex social cognition in primates. In experimental food competitions, primates flexibly manipulate group-mates' behavior to tactically deceive them. Deception can infiltrate cooperative interactions, such as when one takes an unfair share of meat after a coordinated hunt. In order to counter competition of this sort, primates maintain cooperation through partner choice, partner control, and third party punishment. Yet humans appear to stand alone in their ability to understand others' beliefs, which allows us not only to deceive others with the explicit intent to create a false belief, but it also allows us to put ourselves in others' shoes to determine when cheaters need to be punished, even if we are not directly disadvantaged by the cheater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Viral infections of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kalter, S S; Heberling, R L; Cooke, A W; Barry, J D; Tian, P Y; Northam, W J

    1997-10-01

    Approximately 53,000 serologic tests and viral isolation studies were performed on 1,700 nonhuman primate specimens for evidence of past and/or current viral infection. Information, other than the requested test, generally was not provided with the specimen. This lack of information does not permit any attempt at interpretation of results. Requested testing included a large number of diverse viral agents in approximately 40 primate species. The resulting data are in keeping with those of previous studies and offer an insight into the needs of colony management, as well as some general information on the overall frequency of infection with the indicated viruses. Inasmuch as the results represent testing of single specimens, they are not to be construed as "diagnostic," and simply indicate past infection as represented by the presence of antibody in the test animal. Viral isolation results are listed, and the number of positive results versus the number of animals tested emphasizes the limitations of the procedure. Investigations such as these continue to assist in the maintenance of healthy nonhuman primate colonies. This information also supports continued use of nonhuman primates for research in human viral infections and may be helpful in terms of animal selection for use in xenotransplants.

  8. Neuroethology of primate social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Steve W. C.; Brent, Lauren J. N.; Adams, Geoffrey K.; Klein, Jeffrey T.; Pearson, John M.; Watson, Karli K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    A neuroethological approach to human and nonhuman primate behavior and cognition predicts biological specializations for social life. Evidence reviewed here indicates that ancestral mechanisms are often duplicated, repurposed, and differentially regulated to support social behavior. Focusing on recent research from nonhuman primates, we describe how the primate brain might implement social functions by coopting and extending preexisting mechanisms that previously supported nonsocial functions. This approach reveals that highly specialized mechanisms have evolved to decipher the immediate social context, and parallel circuits have evolved to translate social perceptual signals and nonsocial perceptual signals into partially integrated social and nonsocial motivational signals, which together inform general-purpose mechanisms that command behavior. Differences in social behavior between species, as well as between individuals within a species, result in part from neuromodulatory regulation of these neural circuits, which itself appears to be under partial genetic control. Ultimately, intraspecific variation in social behavior has differential fitness consequences, providing fundamental building blocks of natural selection. Our review suggests that the neuroethological approach to primate behavior may provide unique insights into human psychopathology. PMID:23754410

  9. Pathogenesis of varicelloviruses in primates.

    PubMed

    Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2015-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue, simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and, although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation.

  10. The prominent role of urban confluences in the local and regional transport of atmospheric pollutants in the Valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazcilevich, A. D.; Díaz, E. N.; Tatarko, J.; Garcia, A. R.

    2010-12-01

    The meteorological phenomenon known as confluences is especially vigorous in city environments due to the daytime urban heat island effect. Through the analysis of episodes obtained using computational modeling, it is shown not only that confluences strongly influence the local transport of pollution affecting the potential exposure of local population, but also that they enhance the interaction of anthropogenic pollutants generated in Mexico City with natural pollutants emitted in surrounding forests and how confluences provide the necessary convective energy so pollutants are transported on a regional scale

  11. Push-pull training reduces foveal sensory eye dominance within the early visual channels

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingping P.; He, Zijiang J.; Ooi, Teng Leng

    2011-01-01

    A push-pull training protocol is applied to reduce sensory eye dominance in the foveal region. The training protocol consists of cueing the weak eye to force it to become dominant while the strong eye is suppressed when a pair of dichoptic orthogonal grating stimulus is subsequently presented to it (Ooi and He, 1999). We trained with four pairs of dichoptic orthogonal gratings (0°/90°, 90°/0°, 45°/135° and 135°/45° at 3 cpd) to affect the interocular inhibitory interaction tuned to the four trained orientations (0°, 45°, 90° and 135°). After a 10-day training session, we found a significant learning effect (reduced sensory eye dominance) at the trained orientations as well as at two other untrained orientations (22.5° and 67.5°). This suggests that the four pairs of oriented training stimuli are sufficient to produce a learning effect at any other orientation. The nearly complete transfer of the learning effect across orientation is attributed to the fact that the trained and untrained orientations are close enough to fall in the same orientation tuning function of the early visual cortical neurons (~37.5°). Applying the same notion of transfer of learning within the same feature channel, we also found a large transfer effect to an untrained spatial frequency (6 cpd), which is 1 octave higher than the trained spatial frequency (3 cpd). Furthermore, we found that stereopsis is improved, as is the competitive ability between the two eyes, after the push-pull training. Our data analysis suggests that these improvements are correlated with the reduced sensory eye dominance after the training, i.e., due to a more balanced interocular inhibition. We also found that the learning effect (reduced SED and stereo threshold) can be retained for more than a year after the termination of the push-pull training. PMID:21689673

  12. Assessing the Accuracy of Foveal Avascular Zone Measurements Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography: Segmentation and Scaling.

    PubMed

    Linderman, Rachel; Salmon, Alexander E; Strampe, Margaret; Russillo, Madia; Khan, Jamil; Carroll, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    The foveal avascular zone (FAZ) is altered in numerous diseases. We assessed factors (axial length, segmentation method, age, sex) impacting FAZ measurements from optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography images. We recruited 116 Caucasian subjects without ocular disease, and acquired two 3 × 3 mm AngioVue scans per each right eye (232 total scans). In images of the superficial plexus, the FAZ was segmented using the AngioVue semiautomatic nonflow measurement tool and ImageJ manual segmentation. In images from the full retinal thickness, the FAZ was segmented using the AngioAnalytics automatic FAZ tool. Repeatability, reliability, and reproducibility were calculated for FAZ measurements (acircularity, area). FAZ area (mean ± SD) for manual segmentation was 0.240 ± 0.0965 mm(2), greater than both semiautomatic (0.216 ± 0.0873 mm(2)) and automatic (0.218 ± 0.0869 mm(2)) segmentation (P < 0.05). Not correcting for axial length introduced errors up to 25% in FAZ area. Manual area segmentation had better repeatability (0.020 mm(2)) than semiautomatic (0.043 mm(2)) or automatic (0.056 mm(2)). FAZ acircularity had better repeatability with automatic than manual segmentation (0.086 vs. 0.114). Reliability of all area measurements was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.994 manual, 0.969 semiautomatic, 0.948 automatic). Reliability of acircularity measurements was 0.879 for manual and 0.606 for automatic. We identified numerous factors affecting FAZ measurements. These errors confound comparisons across studies and studies examining factors that may correlate with FAZ measures. Using FAZ measurements as biomarkers for disease progression requires assessing and controlling for different sources of error. Not correcting for ocular magnification can result in significant inaccuracy in FAZ measurements, while choice of segmentation method affects both repeatability and accuracy.

  13. Hydromorphodynamic effects of the width ratio and local tributary widening on discordant confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillén-Ludeña, S.; Franca, M. J.; Alegria, F.; Schleiss, A. J.; Cardoso, A. H.

    2017-09-01

    River training works performed in the last couple of centuries constrained the natural dynamics of channel networks in locations that include the confluences between tributaries and main channels. As a result, the dynamics of these confluences are currently characterized by homogeneous flow depths, flow velocities, and morphologic conditions, which are associated with impoverished ecosystems. The widening of river reaches is seen as a useful measure for river restoration, as it enhances the heterogeneity in flow depths, flow velocities, sediment transport, and bed substrates. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effects of local widening of the tributary mouth as well as the effects of the ratio between the width of the tributary and that of the main channel on the flow dynamics and bed morphology of river confluences. For that purpose, 12 experiments were conducted in a 70° laboratory confluence. In these experiments, three unit-discharge ratios were tested (qr = 0.37, 0.50, and 0.77) with two width ratios and two tributary configurations. The unit-discharge ratio is defined as the unit discharge in the tributary divided by that of the main channel, measured upstream of the confluence. The width ratio, which is defined as the width of the tributary divided by that of the main channel, was modified by changing the width of the main channel from 0.50 to 1.00 m (corresponding to Br = 0.30 and 0.15 respectively). The tributary configurations consisted of (i) a straight reach with a constant width (the so-called reference configuration) and (ii) a straight reach with a local widening at the downstream end (the so-called widened configuration). During the experiments, a uniform sediment mixture was continuously supplied to both channels. This experimental setup is novel among existing experimental studies on confluence dynamics, as it addresses new confluence configurations and includes a continuous sediment supply to both channels. The experiments were run

  14. CXCL11 Expression by Keratinocytes Occurs Transiently Between Reaching Confluence and Cellular Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Arthur C.; Marathi, Archana; Nam, Peter K.; Wells, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether differentiation or cellular confluence is responsible for CXCL11 expression patterns in re-epithelialization. Approach: In vitro model systems of re-epithelialization using the HaCaT keratinocyte cell line were utilized in monitoring expression of differentiation markers, including desmoplakin and various cytokeratins while evaluating for an association with chemokine CXCL11 expression. Results: CXCL11 expression was elevated in sparse culture with peak expression near the time of confluence. This somewhat followed the accumulation of desmoplakin in detergent-insoluble pool of proteins. However, in postconfluent, despite continued accumulation of desmoplakin within cells, CXCL11 expression decreased to baseline levels. This biphasic pattern was also seen in low calcium culture, an environment that inhibits keratinocyte differentiation and accumulation of desmosomal proteins. Highest CXCL11-expressing areas best correlated with newly confluent areas within culture expressing basal keratin 14, but also activated keratin 6. Innovation: Achievement of a threshold cellular density induces cell signaling cascade through CXCR3 that, in addition to other undiscovered pathways, can progress cutaneous wounds from the proliferative into the remodeling phases of cutaneous wound healing. Conclusion: These results suggest that the achievement of confluence with increased cellular density by migrating keratinocytes at the wound edge triggers expression of CXCL11. Since CXCR3 stimulation in endothelial cells results in apoptosis and causes neovascular pruning, whereas stimulation of CXCR3 in fibroblasts results decreased motility and cellular contraction, we speculate that CXCL11 expression by epidermal cells upon achieving cellular confluence could be the source of CXCR3 stimulation in the dermis ushering a transition from proliferative to remodeling phases of wound healing. PMID:28078185

  15. Field implementation of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for studying flow dynamics at river confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Q. W.; Rhoads, B. L.

    2014-12-01

    The complex hydrodynamics of river confluences have been the focus of numerous investigations over the past several decades. Confluences are locations in river systems characterized by complex patterns of turbulent flow structure, especially within the mixing interface that develops between the two flows. To date, most field investigations of flow structure at stream confluences have been based on point measurements of velocity time series (e.g using ADVs) or on time-averaged data with high spatial resolution, but poor temporal resolution (e.g. using ADCPs). Past approaches have failed to capture the spatial and temporal density of velocity measurements needed to adequately characterize complex turbulent flow structures. In contrast, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) has been used successfully in laboratory studies to define in considerable detail the characteristics of turbulent structures. This study uses field-based PIV to characterize surficial flow structure within a small stream confluence. Landscape mulch served as seeding material for the PIV. Particle motion was recorded at a high frame rate using a small action camera mounted above the surface of the flow. Near-surface 3D velocities of flow were measured with an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) to evaluate velocity data generated by the PIV analysis. Results show that field-based PIV captures nicely complex patterns of fluid motion at the surface of the flow, revealing the two-dimensional characteristics of coherent flow structures. Velocities resulting from the PIV analysis match measured velocities most closely where the flow is least complex and where seeding material remains uniformly distributed throughout the flow. Overall the method appears promising for qualitatively assessing flow structure and for quantifying the size, duration, and vorticity of turbulent structures. Field-based PIV is a valuable technique that can be used along with traditional velocity measurements to more completely and

  16. Mixing dynamics at the confluence of two large rivers undergoing weak density variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, Cintia L.; Armengol, Joan; Dolz, Josep; Prats, Jordi; Rueda, Francisco J.

    2014-04-01

    Simulations of tracer experiments conducted with a three-dimensional primitive-equation hydrodynamic and transport model are used to understand the processes controlling the rate of mixing between two rivers (Ebro and Segre), with distinct physical and chemical properties, at their confluence, upstream of a meandering reservoir (Ribarroja reservoir). Mixing rates downstream of the confluence are subject to hourly scale oscillations, driven partly by changes in inflow densities and also as a result of turbulent eddies that develop within the shear layer between the confluent rivers and near a dead zone located downstream of the confluence. Even though density contrasts are low—at most O(10-1) kg m-3 difference among sources—and almost negligible from a dynamic point of view—compared with inertial forces—they are important for mixing. Mixing rates between the confluent streams under weakly buoyant conditions can be of up to 40% larger than those occurring under neutrally buoyant conditions. The buoyancy effects on mixing rates are interpreted as the result of changes in the contact area available for mixing (distortion of the mixing layer). For strong density contrasts, though, when the contact area between the streams becomes nearly horizontal, larger density differences between streams will lead to weaker mixing rates, as a result of the stabilizing effect of vertical density gradients.

  17. Post-confluence surface water and sediment distribution patterns of the Solimões-Amazon and Negro Rivers: a remote sensing-based geomorphic study of surface patterns at the large rivers confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Edward; Latrubesse, Edgardo

    2015-04-01

    River channel confluences are recognized as critical features of the fluvial system, because both intensive and extensive hydro-physical and geo-ecological processes take place within this momentous interface. Despite the relevant findings on confluences as listed above, only a few cases concentrated on field measurements in large rivers. Along with improvements in hydrographic and geochemical surveying techniques, trials have been occasionally made to improve understanding of larger rivers confluences and their downstream hydro-morphodynamics, such as in some reaches of the Amazon, Brahmaputra, Jamuna, and Paraná Rivers. However, finite collections of point-based and cross-sectional measurements obtained from field using acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), multi-beam echo sounder, global positioning system (GPS) or other geochemical applications (e.g. isotope tracing) around river confluences provide limited information of post-confluence hydro-geomorphologic behaviors. The identification of sediment routing through channel junctions and the role of confluence on downstream sediment transport is still poorly understood. Into this context, satellite remote sensing is the most relevant and efficient mean to regularly monitor the river sediment discharge over the large (regional to continental) scale. In this paper, we aim to characterize the spatiotemporal patterns of post-confluence sediment transport by mapping the surface water distribution using the ultimate example of large river confluence on Earth, where distinct water types drain: The Solimões-Amazon (muddy-white water) versus Negro (black water) Rivers, exploring the seasonal and inter-annual variations of water types and the spatial distribution patterns of surface waters through the branches of the main stem.

  18. Natural history and effect of therapeutic interventions on subretinal fluid causing foveal detachment in macular telangiectasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hemal; Müller, Simone; Egan, Catherine A; Degli Esposti, Simona; Tufail, Adnan; Sim, Dawn A; Holz, Frank G; Browning, Andrew C; Amoaku, Winfried M; Charbel Issa, Peter; Gillies, Mark C

    2017-07-01

    To report the natural history of subretinal fluid (SRF) causing foveal detachment in macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel) and our experience of therapeutic intervention with intravitreal steroids or antivascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor (anti-VEGF) agents in some cases. Retrospective case series. Three of the MacTel study's largest registries were searched to identify eyes with foveal detachment. We identified 7 eyes from 6 exclusively female patients. The prevalence of foveal detachment was low, present in 1.4% of the assessed MacTel population. Age at presentation ranged from 50 to 66 years. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 8 years. There was late-phase leakage on fluorescein angiography from what was presumed to be ectatic capillaries. The SRF fluctuated without a rapid decline in visual acuity in cases that were not treated. When they were, intravitreal anti-VEGF and steroid therapy in general reduced SRF, at least temporarily, but did not halt the gradual long-term decrease in visual acuity. In one case, optical coherence tomography angiography showed significant reduction in the extent of the predominantly deep intraretinal vascular complex 1 month after anti-VEGF therapy. As the natural history of this unusual MacTel phenotype is not characterised by rapid visual decline, intervention with intravitreal anti-VEGF or steroid therapy may not be necessary. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Foveal and Macular Thickness Evaluation by Spectral OCT SLO and Its Relation with Axial Length in Various Degree of Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Nancy Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the foveal and macular thickness in various degrees of myopia and its association with axial length in low, moderate and high degrees of myopia. Design: A cross-sectional study was done in the Department of Ophthalmology, MGMCRI, Pondicherry, India. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty five eyes eyes of 64 myopic subjects between the age group of 20-40 who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were selected and complete ophthalmic examination was done. Cycloplegic refraction was done and the subjects were categorized into low (n=43 eyes), moderate (n=43 eyes) and high (n=36) degrees of myopia. The foveal and macular thickness was assessed using spectral OCT- SLO and axial length was measured by A-scan biometry. Results: The foveae minimum of high myopia (178 ± 26.4 microns) was significantly thicker compared to moderate myopia (p= 0.028). There was no significant intergroup difference in the thickness significance of the outer and inner macular between mild, moderate and high degree of myopia. The mean axial length of high myopia (26.7±0.97mm) was significantly higher compared to moderate (24.6±0.81mm) and low myopia (23.5±0.81mm) with a p-value of p = 0.001. There was a positive correlation of axial length with foveae minimum, fovea and superior inner macula in respect to myopia (p<0.05). Conclusion: The foveal and macular thickness in myopia is influenced by the axial length. Early detection of such changes in macular thickness by using OCT is helpful in understanding the mechanism and factors affecting the structural changes of myopic eyes. Also it implicates the importance of refractive error induced retinal macular changes while interpreting OCT. PMID:25954643

  20. Underground hibernation in a primate.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Marina B; Dausmann, Kathrin H; Ranaivoarisoa, Jean F; Yoder, Anne D

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation in mammals is a remarkable state of heterothermy wherein metabolic rates are reduced, core body temperatures reach ambient levels, and key physiological functions are suspended. Typically, hibernation is observed in cold-adapted mammals, though it has also been documented in tropical species and even primates, such as the dwarf lemurs of Madagascar. Western fat-tailed dwarf lemurs are known to hibernate for seven months per year inside tree holes. Here, we report for the first time the observation that eastern dwarf lemurs also hibernate, though in self-made underground hibernacula. Hence, we show evidence that a clawless primate is able to bury itself below ground. Our findings that dwarf lemurs can hibernate underground in tropical forests draw unforeseen parallels to mammalian temperate hibernation. We expect that this work will illuminate fundamental information about the influence of temperature, resource limitation and use of insulated hibernacula on the evolution of hibernation.

  1. Optogenetics in the nonhuman primate

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    The nonhuman primate brain, the model system closest to the human brain, plays a critical role in our understanding of neural computation, cognition, and behavior. The continued quest to crack the neural codes in the monkey brain would be greatly enhanced with new tools and technologies that can rapidly and reversibly control the activities of desired cells at precise times during specific behavioral states. Recent advances in adapting optogenetic technologies to monkeys have enabled precise control of specific cells or brain regions at the millisecond timescale, allowing for the investigation of the causal role of these neural circuits in this model system. Validation of optogenetic technologies in monkeys also represents a critical preclinical step on the translational path of new generation cell-type-specific neural modulation therapies. Here, I discuss the current state of the application of optogenetics in the nonhuman primate model system, highlighting the available genetic, optical and electrical technologies, and their limitations and potentials. PMID:22341328

  2. Underground hibernation in a primate

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Marina B.; Dausmann, Kathrin H.; Ranaivoarisoa, Jean F.; Yoder, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation in mammals is a remarkable state of heterothermy wherein metabolic rates are reduced, core body temperatures reach ambient levels, and key physiological functions are suspended. Typically, hibernation is observed in cold-adapted mammals, though it has also been documented in tropical species and even primates, such as the dwarf lemurs of Madagascar. Western fat-tailed dwarf lemurs are known to hibernate for seven months per year inside tree holes. Here, we report for the first time the observation that eastern dwarf lemurs also hibernate, though in self-made underground hibernacula. Hence, we show evidence that a clawless primate is able to bury itself below ground. Our findings that dwarf lemurs can hibernate underground in tropical forests draw unforeseen parallels to mammalian temperate hibernation. We expect that this work will illuminate fundamental information about the influence of temperature, resource limitation and use of insulated hibernacula on the evolution of hibernation. PMID:23636180

  3. Atmospheric boundary layer adjustment to the synoptic cycle at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence, South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, OtáVio C.; Pezzi, Luciano P.; Souza, Ronald B.; Anabor, Vagner; Degrazia, GerváSio A.

    2010-11-01

    This study analyzes and discusses atmospheric boundary layer vertical profiles of potential temperature, specific humidity, and wind speed at each of the sides of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. Such confluence is characterized by the meeting of water masses with very different characteristics: the southern waters of the Malvinas current can be several degrees colder and appreciably less salty than the northern Brazil current waters. At the same time, a synoptic cycle can be identified at the region, marked by the successive passages of frontal systems and extratropical cyclones. The different phases of the synoptic cycle lead to different thermal advections at the confluence, causing respective different patterns of atmospheric boundary layer adjustment to the surface heterogeneity induced by the confluence. In the present study, this adjustment along the synoptic cycle is analyzed using data from five experiments performed across the confluence from 2003 to 2008. In each of the campaigns a number of soundings were launched from a ship at both sides of the confluence. A climatological analysis with respect to the closest frontal passage is presented, and it suggests that the observations collected at each of the years analyzed are referent to a different day of the synoptic cycle. The average profiles at each side of the confluence are in agreement with previous modeling studies of warm and cold thermal advection patterns over an oceanic front. Furthermore, our study shows that peculiar transitional characteristics are also observed between the conditions of well-established warm and cold advection. At many phases of the synoptic cycle a strongly stratified boundary layer occurs at one or both sides of the confluence. Some of the observed characteristics, such as a large moisture accumulation near the surface, suggest that existing sensible and latent heat fluxes parameterizations fail under very strong stratifications, and the

  4. Primate Experiments on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aochi, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments to study how certain body systems are affected by the space environment are described. These experiments are to be conducted on space shuttle flights. How weightlessness affects two body systems of primates are the prime concern. Thermoregulation and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis are the two systems concerned. The thermoregulation project will provide data on how body temperature and circadian rhythms are affected in a weightlessness environment and the homeostasis in fluids and electrolyte levels will address the problem of body fluid shifts.

  5. Primate Experiments on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aochi, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments to study how certain body systems are affected by the space environment are described. These experiments are to be conducted on space shuttle flights. How weightlessness affects two body systems of primates are the prime concern. Thermoregulation and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis are the two systems concerned. The thermoregulation project will provide data on how body temperature and circadian rhythms are affected in a weightlessness environment and the homeostasis in fluids and electrolyte levels will address the problem of body fluid shifts.

  6. Soils, time, and primate paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Soils are the skin of the earth. From both poles to the equator, wherever rocks or sediment are exposed at the surface, soils are forming through the physical and chemical action of climate and living organisms. The physical attributes (color, texture, thickness) and chemical makeup of soils vary considerably, depending on the composition of the parent material and other variables: temperature, rainfall and soil moisture, vegetation, soil fauna, and the length of time that soil-forming processes have been at work. United States soil scientists1 have classified modern soils into ten major groups and numerous subgroups, each reflecting the composition and architecture of the soils and, to some extent, the processes that led to their formation. The physical and chemical processes of soil formation have been active throughout geologic time; the organic processes have been active at least since the Ordovician.2 Consequently, nearly all sedimentary rocks that were deposited in nonmarine settings and exposed to the elements contain a record of ancient, buried soils or paleosols. A sequence of these rocks, such as most ancient fluvial (stream) deposits, provides a record of soil paleoenvironments through time. Paleosols are also repositories of the fossils of organisms (body fossils) and the traces of those organisms burrowing, food-seeking, and dwelling activities (ichnofossils). Indeed, most fossil primates are found in paleosols. Careful study of ancient soils gives new, valuable insights into the correct temporal reconstruction of the primate fossil record and the nature of primate paleoenvironments. ?? 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Assessing Anxiety in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kristine; Pierre, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety can be broadly described as a psychological state in which normally innocuous environmental stimuli trigger negative emotional expectations. Human anxiety disorders are multidimensional and may be organic or acquired, situational or pervasive. The broad ranging nature of the anxiety phenotype speaks to the need for models that identify its various components and root causes to develop effective clinical treatments. The cross-species comparative approach to modeling anxiety disorders in animals aims to understand mechanisms that both contribute to and modulate anxiety. Nonhuman primate models provide an important bridge from nonprimate model systems because of the complexity of nonhuman primates’ biobehavioral capacities and their commonalities with human emotion. The broad goal of this review is to provide an overview of various procedures available to study anxiety in the nonhuman primate, with a focus on the behavioral aspects of anxiety. Commonly used methods covered in this review include assessing animals in their home environment or in response to an ethologically relevant threat, associative conditioning and startle response tests, and cognitive bias tests. We also discuss how these procedures can help veterinarians and researchers care for captive nonhuman primates. PMID:25225310

  8. Foveal contour interactions and crowding effects at the resolution limit of the visual system

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We describe several experiments on contour interactions and crowding effects at the resolution limit of the visual system. As test stimuli we used characters that are often employed in optometric practice for testing visual acuity: Landolt C's, Snellen E's and rectangular gratings. We tested several hypotheses that have been put forward to explain contour interaction and crowding effects. In Experiment 1 and Experiment 2, Landolt C's were the test stimuli, and bars, or Landolt C's, or gratings served as distractors. In Experiment 1, we showed that neither scale invariance, nor spatial frequency selectivity are characteristic of foveal crowding effects. These results allowed us to conclude that mechanisms other than lateral masking contribute to observers' performance in ‘crowded’ tasks. Hess, Dakin & Kappor (2000) suggested that the spatial-frequency band most appropriate for target recognition is shifted by the surrounding bars to higher spatial frequencies that cannot be resolved by observers. Our Experiment 2 rejects this hypothesis as the experimental data do not follow theoretical predictions. In Experiment 3 we employed Snellen E's both as test stimuli and as distractors. The masking functions were similar to those measured in Experiment 1 when the test Landolt C was surrounded by Landolt C's. In Experiment 4 we extended the range of test stimuli to rectangular gratings; same-frequency or high-frequency gratings were distractors. In this case, if the distracting gratings had random orientation from trial to trial, the critical spacing was twice larger than in the first three experiments. If the orientation of the distractors was fixed during the whole experiment, the critical spacing was similar to that measured in the first three experiments. We suggest that the visual system can use different mechanisms for the discrimination of different test stimuli in the presence of particular surround. Different receptive fields with different spatial

  9. Ecology and evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Misha

    2004-07-01

    More than one hundred years ago, Grant Allen suggested that colour vision in primates, birds and insects evolved as an adaptation for foraging on colourful advertisements of plants--fruits and flowers. Recent studies have shown that well developed colour vision appeared long before fruits and flowers evolved. Thus, colour vision is generally beneficial for many animals, not only for those eating colourful food. Primates are the only placental mammals that have trichromatic colour vision. This may indicate either that trichromacy is particularly useful for primates or that primates are unique among placental mammals in their ability to utilise the signals of three spectrally distinct types of cones or both. Because fruits are an important component of the primate diet, primate trichromacy could have evolved as a specific adaptation for foraging on fruits. Alternatively, primate trichromacy could have evolved as an adaptation for many visual tasks. Comparative studies of mammalian eyes indicate that primates are the only placental mammals that have in their retina a pre-existing neural machinery capable of utilising the signals of an additional spectral type of cone. Thus, the failure of non-primate placental mammals to evolve trichromacy can be explained by constraints imposed on the wiring of retinal neurones.

  10. Visual Search in the Real World: Color Vision Deficiency Affects Peripheral Guidance, but Leaves Foveal Verification Largely Unaffected.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Günter; 't Hart, Bernard M; Kohlbecher, Stefan; Bartl, Klaus; Schumann, Frank; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Schneider, Erich

    2015-01-01

    People with color vision deficiencies report numerous limitations in daily life, restricting, for example, their access to some professions. However, they use basic color terms systematically and in a similar manner as people with normal color vision. We hypothesize that a possible explanation for this discrepancy between color perception and behavioral consequences might be found in the gaze behavior of people with color vision deficiency. A group of participants with color vision deficiencies and a control group performed several search tasks in a naturalistic setting on a lawn. All participants wore a mobile eye-tracking-driven camera with a high foveal image resolution (EyeSeeCam). Search performance as well as fixations of objects of different colors were examined. Search performance was similar in both groups in a color-unrelated search task as well as in a search for yellow targets. While searching for red targets, participants with color vision deficiencies exhibited a strongly degraded performance. This was closely matched by the number of fixations on red objects shown by the two groups. Importantly, once they fixated a target, participants with color vision deficiencies exhibited only few identification errors. In contrast to controls, participants with color vision deficiencies are not able to enhance their search for red targets on a (green) lawn by an efficient guiding mechanism. The data indicate that the impaired guiding is the main influence on search performance, while foveal identification (verification) is largely unaffected by the color vision deficiency.

  11. The effect of varying the intensity and the duration of preexposure upon foveal dark adaptation in the human eye.

    PubMed

    MOTE, F A; RIOPELLE, A J

    1951-05-01

    The course of foveal dark adaptation was studied as a function of the intensity and duration of preexposure. Four intensities (11,300, 5,650, 1,130, and 565 mL.) and four durations (300, 150, 30, and 15 seconds) were used in all combinations of intensity and duration. The threshold-measuring instrument was a monocular Hecht-Shlaer adaptometer and the threshold measurements were recorded in log micromicrolamberts. There were two subjects and each went through the complete series of intensities and durations five times. The five logarithmic values obtained for each threshold were converted into a geometric mean and these means were the data used in the analysis of the results. The chief results were as follows:- 1. For each subject the final steady threshold value was in the region of 7.0 log micromicroL. 2. As the intensity, or duration, or both, were increased the initial foveal dark adaptation threshold rose, the slope of the curve decreased, and the time to reach a final steady threshold value increased. 3. For those values of preexposure intensity and time for which the product, I x t, is a constant it was found that for the two higher intensities and two longer durations and also for the two lower intensities and two shorter durations, the dark adaptation curves were the same. For other values of I x t = C the curves were generally not the same.

  12. Visual Search in the Real World: Color Vision Deficiency Affects Peripheral Guidance, but Leaves Foveal Verification Largely Unaffected

    PubMed Central

    Kugler, Günter; 't Hart, Bernard M.; Kohlbecher, Stefan; Bartl, Klaus; Schumann, Frank; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Schneider, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Background: People with color vision deficiencies report numerous limitations in daily life, restricting, for example, their access to some professions. However, they use basic color terms systematically and in a similar manner as people with normal color vision. We hypothesize that a possible explanation for this discrepancy between color perception and behavioral consequences might be found in the gaze behavior of people with color vision deficiency. Methods: A group of participants with color vision deficiencies and a control group performed several search tasks in a naturalistic setting on a lawn. All participants wore a mobile eye-tracking-driven camera with a high foveal image resolution (EyeSeeCam). Search performance as well as fixations of objects of different colors were examined. Results: Search performance was similar in both groups in a color-unrelated search task as well as in a search for yellow targets. While searching for red targets, participants with color vision deficiencies exhibited a strongly degraded performance. This was closely matched by the number of fixations on red objects shown by the two groups. Importantly, once they fixated a target, participants with color vision deficiencies exhibited only few identification errors. Conclusions: In contrast to controls, participants with color vision deficiencies are not able to enhance their search for red targets on a (green) lawn by an efficient guiding mechanism. The data indicate that the impaired guiding is the main influence on search performance, while foveal identification (verification) is largely unaffected by the color vision deficiency. PMID:26733851

  13. Impact of luminance distribution in the visual field on foveal contrast sensitivity in the context of mammographic softcopy reading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apelt, Dörte; Rascher-Friesenhausen, Richard; Klein, Jan; Strasburger, Hans; Preim, Bernhard; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto

    2009-02-01

    For quality control in mammographic softcopy reading (SCR) a number of recommendations exists. Among them is a room illuminance of 10 lx. Moreover, the use of masks on the image seems to be advantageous, due to a reduction of scattered light in the focus of view. Room illuminance affects the global luminance adaptation and the maximal monitor contrast; masking decreases the luminance in the central and near-peripheral region. We investigated the effects of masking and illuminance on foveal contrast sensitivity. A study with eight observers was conducted in the context of mammographic softcopy reading. Using Gabor patterns with varying spatial frequencies, orientations and contrast levels as stimuli and an orientation discrimination task, the intraobserver contrast sensitivity was determined for foveal vision. Tested illuminances for a non-masked image were 10, 30, 50 and 90 lx, and for a masked image 10 lx. Major findings are: (1) Masking does not lead to improved contrast sensitivity. Instead, all observers reported a strong fatigue effect during the presentation of the masked image. (2) Among the illuminances tested, only half of the observers showed the best contrast sensitivity at 10 lx. For the other observers best results were achieved at illuminance levels of 50 or 90 lx, respectively. The results can be used to appraise the effects of viewing conditions with the aim of drawing conclusions for mammographic SCR, and to initiate further studies.

  14. Mobile lipid production after confluence and pH stress in perfused C6 cells.

    PubMed

    Barba, I; Mann, P; Cabañas, M E; Arús, C; Gasparovic, C

    2001-02-01

    NMR-visible mobile lipid (ML) has been observed in aggressive tumors and also in in vitro tumor cell models subjected to growth-inhibiting conditions, such as confluence or low-pH stress. The aim of the present study was to determine if ML production after confluence or low pH stress in a cultured cell model of brain tumor is due to growth arrest alone. ML was observed in situ by one- and two-dimensional (1)H NMR in viable but growth-arrested C6 glioma cells superfused for a period of 48 h after harvesting. The rate of ML production in cells harvested at subconfluence was compared to the rate in cells confluent for one cell cycle and to the rate in subconfluent-harvested cells superfused at low pH (pH 6.1). Confluent-harvested cells produced ML at a markedly greater rate than that of cells harvested at subconfluence, suggesting the involvement of prior cell-cell contact rather than simple growth arrest. A high rate was also observed in subconfluent-harvested cells subjected to low pH, indicating that ML in pH-stressed cells also does not arise from growth arrest alone. Furthermore, two-dimensional data on the degree of unsaturation of the ML fatty acyl chains and one-dimensional (31)P and two-dimensional (1)H NMR data on the GPC content of the cells suggest distinct metabolic pathways for the production of ML following confluence and low-pH stress.

  15. Mixing and circulation at the confluence of two rivers entering a meandering reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, Cintia L.; Hoyer, Andrea B.; Armengol, Joan; Dolz, Josep; Rueda, Francisco J.

    2013-03-01

    A field data set collected under different conditions is analyzed to characterize the spatial arrangement of two large inflows (Ebro and Segre) with distinct physical-chemical characteristics as they join at the upstream end of Ribarroja reservoir in northern Spain. Given the short average residence time of water in the reservoir, the spatial arrangement of the rivers at their confluence and their mixing rates are likely the drivers of the stratification patterns observed near the dam. In winter, inflows have similar densities—Δρ/ρ0 ≈ O(10-5)—and their spatial distribution is largely determined by inertial forces, and in particular, by the discharge ratio. Downstream of the confluence, both rivers flow side by side and largely unmixed over long distances. In summer, with Δρ/ρ0 of O(10-3), the flow fields at the confluence are largely controlled by buoyancy forces. Atmospheric forcing during strong wind events and centrifugal forces caused by the meandering shape of the reservoir induce significant tilting of the isotherms, leading to localized high mixing rates. Mixing, in general, though is weak at this time of the year. In fall and early winter, density differences are largely controlled by conductivity differences between the incoming flows. The warmer Ebro water, with larger thermal inertia, flows beneath the colder Segre water. The spatial arrangement of the inflows is largely controlled by the discharge ratio and mixing between sources is strong, likely as a result of mixed water being denser than either of the incoming flows.

  16. The influence of flow inertia, buoyancy, wind, and flow unsteadiness on mixing at the asymmetrical confluence of two large rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramón, Cintia L.; Prats, Jordi; Rueda, Francisco J.

    2016-08-01

    The rates and patterns of mixing of two large rivers with large density differences at a strongly asymmetrical confluence in northern Spain are analyzed. We assess the factors controlling the site where the denser river plunges and the mixing rates between the rivers. In particular, we focus on the interaction between inertial and buoyancy forces, the effect of wind forcing, and the unsteady nature of the hydraulic forcing. The steady-state location of the plunge line is shown to be controlled by an inertia-buoyancy balance, which accounts for the relative magnitude of the buoyancy forcing associated with density differences between the confluent rivers, and the magnitudes of both the main-stream and the side-flow (tributary) inertia. The plunge line moves to upstream locations as the inertia of the tributary increases (for low tributary inertia) and/or the density contrast between the rivers increases. This has important consequences for river mixing since mixing rates increase as the plunging occurs at the confluence. The high mixing rates in this case occur as a result of a large mixing interface surface area and high diffusivities. As the plunging area moves upstream or downstream of the confluence, vertical diffusivities or the area of contact available for mixing decrease and constrain mixing rates. Wind forcing, depending on its velocity and direction, affects mixing rates through (1) altering the buoyancy-inertia equilibrium and so changing the location of the plunge line, (2) altering the pattern of secondary circulation within the confluence and/or (3) increasing shear at the confluence. Flow unsteadiness can lead to changes in the location of the plunge line through time and thus can strongly modify mixing rates at the confluence. The downstream movement of the plunge line is advection dominated, while its upstream movement seems to respond to a baroclinic response of the confluence.

  17. Ultraviolet absorbance by diatom populations from the Weddell-Scotia Confluence

    SciTech Connect

    Neale, P.J.; Spector, A.M.

    1994-12-31

    Austral spring ozone depletion results in exposure of phytoplankton in the Weddell-Scotia Confluence to enhanced surface ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280 to 320 nanometers). Since this is an area of high phytoplankton biomass during the early spring, an investigation was made of possible effects of increased UV-B on the phytoplankton productivity during October and November 1993 aboard the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer (UV-B/Ozone 93). The measurements made during the studies included phytoplankton UV absorbance (this paper) as well as phytoplankton photosynthesis, nutrient uptake, pigment composition, and growth rates. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Multiyear measurements of the oceanic and atmospheric boundary layers at the Brazil-Malvinas confluence region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Luciano Ponzi; de Souza, Ronald Buss; Acevedo, OtáVio; Wainer, Ilana; Mata, Mauricio M.; Garcia, Carlos A. E.; de Camargo, Ricardo

    2009-10-01

    This study analyzes and discusses data taken from oceanic and atmospheric measurements performed simultaneously at the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC) region in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean. This area is one of the most dynamical frontal regions of the world ocean. Data were collected during four research cruises in the region once a year in consecutive years between 2004 and 2007. Very few studies have addressed the importance of studying the air-sea coupling at the BMC region. Lateral temperature gradients at the study region were as high as 0.3°C km-1 at the surface and subsurface. In the oceanic boundary layer, the vertical temperature gradient reached 0.08°C m-1 at 500 m depth. Our results show that the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) at the BMC region is modulated by the strong sea surface temperature (SST) gradients present at the sea surface. The mean MABL structure is thicker over the warmside of the BMC where Brazil Current (BC) waters predominate. The opposite occurs over the coldside of the confluence where waters from the Malvinas (Falkland) Current (MC) are found. The warmside of the confluence presented systematically higher MABL top height compared to the coldside. This type of modulation at the synoptic scale is consistent to what happens in other frontal regions of the world ocean, where the MABL adjusts itself to modifications along the SST gradients. Over warm waters at the BMC region, the MABL static instability and turbulence were increased while winds at the lower portion of the MABL were strong. Over the coldside of the BC/MC front an opposite behavior is found: the MABL is thinner and more stable. Our results suggest that the sea-level pressure (SLP) was also modulated locally, together with static stability vertical mixing mechanism, by the surface condition during all cruises. SST gradients at the BMC region modulate the synoptic atmospheric pressure gradient. Postfrontal and prefrontal conditions produce opposite thermal

  19. Bion 11 mission: primate experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilyin, E. A.; Korolkov, V. I.; Skidmore, M. G.; Viso, M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Grindeland, R. E.; Lapin, B. A.; Gordeev, Y. V.; Krotov, V. P.; Fanton, J. W.; Bielitzki, J. T.; Golov, V. K.; Magedov, V. S.; Hines, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    A summary is provided of the major operations required to conduct the wide range of primate experiments on the Bion 11 mission, which flew for 14 days beginning December 24, 1996. Information is given on preflight preparations, including flight candidate selection and training; attachment and implantation of bioinstrumentation; flight and ground experiment designs; onboard life support and test systems; ground and flight health monitoring; flight monkey selection and transport to the launch site; inflight procedures and data collection; postflight examinations and experiments; and assessment of results.

  20. Influenza Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Engel, Gregory A.; Feeroz, M.M.; San, Sorn; Rompis, Aida; Lee, Benjamin P. Y.-H.; Shaw, Eric; Oh, Gunwha; Schillaci, Michael A.; Grant, Richard; Heidrich, John; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether nonhuman primates are infected with influenza viruses in nature, we conducted serologic and swab studies among macaques from several parts of the world. Our detection of influenza virus and antibodies to influenza virus raises questions about the role of nonhuman primates in the ecology of influenza. PMID:23017256

  1. The evolution of neocortex in primates.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Jon H

    2012-01-01

    We can learn about the evolution of neocortex in primates through comparative studies of cortical organization in primates and those mammals that are the closest living relatives of primates, in conjunction with brain features revealed by the skull endocasts of fossil archaic primates. Such studies suggest that early primates had acquired a number of features of neocortex that now distinguish modern primates. Most notably, early primates had an array of new visual areas, and those visual areas widely shared with other mammals had been modified. Posterior parietal cortex was greatly expanded with sensorimotor modules for reaching, grasping, and personal defense. Motor cortex had become more specialized for hand use, and the functions of primary motor cortex were enhanced by the addition and development of premotor and cingulate motor areas. Cortical architecture became more varied, and cortical neuron populations became denser overall than in nonprimate ancestors. Primary visual cortex had the densest population of neurons, and this became more pronounced in the anthropoid radiation. Within the primate clade, considerable variability in cortical size, numbers of areas, and architecture evolved.

  2. A mitogenomic phylogeny of living primates.

    PubMed

    Finstermeier, Knut; Zinner, Dietmar; Brameier, Markus; Meyer, Matthias; Kreuz, Eva; Hofreiter, Michael; Roos, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Primates, the mammalian order including our own species, comprise 480 species in 78 genera. Thus, they represent the third largest of the 18 orders of eutherian mammals. Although recent phylogenetic studies on primates are increasingly built on molecular datasets, most of these studies have focused on taxonomic subgroups within the order. Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes have proven to be extremely useful in deciphering within-order relationships even up to deep nodes. Using 454 sequencing, we sequenced 32 new complete mt genomes adding 20 previously not represented genera to the phylogenetic reconstruction of the primate tree. With 13 new sequences, the number of complete mt genomes within the parvorder Platyrrhini was widely extended, resulting in a largely resolved branching pattern among New World monkey families. We added 10 new Strepsirrhini mt genomes to the 15 previously available ones, thus almost doubling the number of mt genomes within this clade. Our data allow precise date estimates of all nodes and offer new insights into primate evolution. One major result is a relatively young date for the most recent common ancestor of all living primates which was estimated to 66-69 million years ago, suggesting that the divergence of extant primates started close to the K/T-boundary. Although some relationships remain unclear, the large number of mt genomes used allowed us to reconstruct a robust primate phylogeny which is largely in agreement with previous publications. Finally, we show that mt genomes are a useful tool for resolving primate phylogenetic relationships on various taxonomic levels.

  3. Modeling Olfactory Bulb Evolution through Primate Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Heritage, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive characterizations of primates have usually included a reduction in olfactory sensitivity. However, this inference of derivation and directionality assumes an ancestral state of olfaction, usually by comparison to a group of extant non-primate mammals. Thus, the accuracy of the inference depends on the assumed ancestral state. Here I present a phylogenetic model of continuous trait evolution that reconstructs olfactory bulb volumes for ancestral nodes of primates and mammal outgroups. Parent-daughter comparisons suggest that, relative to the ancestral euarchontan, the crown-primate node is plesiomorphic and that derived reduction in olfactory sensitivity is an attribute of the haplorhine lineage. The model also suggests a derived increase in olfactory sensitivity at the strepsirrhine node. This oppositional diversification of the strepsirrhine and haplorhine lineages from an intermediate and non-derived ancestor is inconsistent with a characterization of graded reduction through primate evolution. PMID:25426851

  4. Undifferentiated primate spermatogonia and their endocrine control.

    PubMed

    Plant, Tony M

    2010-08-01

    The biology of spermatogonial stem cells is currently an area of intensive research and contemporary studies in primates are emerging. Quantitative regulation of sperm output by the primate testis seems to be exerted primarily on the transition from undifferentiated to differentiating spermatogonia. This review examines recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms governing spermatogonial renewal and early differentiation in male primates, with a focus on the monkey. Emerging revisions to the classic view of dark and pale type A spermatogonia as reserve and renewing spermatogonial stem cells, respectively, are critically evaluated and essential features of endocrine control of undifferentiated spermatogonia throughout postnatal primate development are discussed. Obstacles in gaining a more complete understanding of primate spermatogonia are also identified.

  5. [Hormones and parturition in primates].

    PubMed

    Germain, G; Ferre, F

    1987-01-01

    In primates, the endocrine signals which correlate with the end of gestation, i.e. account for fetal maturity, and initiate the parturition, i.e. trigger the myometrium contractility, remain unknown. Direct and indirect evidence supports the view that, as with domestic mammals, progesterone (or the estrogen/-progesterone ratio) plays a prominent role in inhibiting the contractility of the pregnant uterus. In the past few years an increasing number of endocrine factors have been identified in the placenta. They may contribute to the control of local or systemic steroid production but their effects are extraordinarily intermingled and it is impossible today to state whether any of them are relevant to the mechanism of parturition. The trophoblast and the myometrium establish close contact in the primate pregnancy. This is evidenced by histological studies and also by the influence of the proximity of the placenta on tissue steroid concentrations and the mechanisms of hormone coupling in the myometrium. Specific types or subtypes of myometrium hormone receptors are now well identified (e.g. to oxytocin, to catecholamines) and this now permits a better understanding of the role of their endogenous agonists in the course of parturition. However, such data are still lacking for other factors (e.g. prostanoids, VIP, relaxin...) involved to varying degrees in this process.

  6. [Surgical treatment for gall bladder cancer with a confluence stone-a case report].

    PubMed

    Ota, Hideo; Ohtsuru, Minoru; Komai, Takanori; Katayama, Tomohiro; Machida, Tomohiko; Ishii, Takaaki; Hiraoka, Kunihiko; Sinozaki, Kouji; Kawasaki, Yasuhito; Ikeda, Yukio; Senba, Hidemine; Yasuda, Seiji

    2012-11-01

    The patient was a 71-year-old man. In September 2011, he experienced abdominal pain with high fever. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) diagnosed acute cholecystitis with a confluence stone (corlette classification type II). He underwent total cholecystectomy and placement of a T-tube in the main bile duct through the gall bladder duct. However, pathological investigations revealed gall bladder cancer in the neck and body part of the gall bladder, leading to a diagnosis of gall bladder adenocarcinoma(Gbn, Flat type, tub2, INF β,pSS, pHinf0, pBinf1, pPV0, pA0, pT3) with a confluence stone. We suspected that the tumor was present in the common bile duct. Therefore, in October 2011, he underwent choledochectomy, resection of the liver bed, lymph node dissection, and choledocho-jejunostomy. Pathological findings revealed that the tumor was present in the common bile duct. He died 8 months after the last surgery because of recurrence of peritoneal metastasis.

  7. A confluence-based expert system for the detection of heat exchanger fouling

    SciTech Connect

    Afgan, N.H.; Carvalho, M.D.G.

    1998-04-01

    Efficiency assessment of heat exchangers ensures appropriate use of the available energy. This article presents the concept of a heat exchanger on-line expert system based on qualitative reasoning. Using confluence of the heat exchanger effectiveness defined by the NTU (number of transfer units) concept for the simple parallel-stream heat exchanger, the methodology is developed to be used for the description of the generic behavior of those situations leading to the degradation of the effectiveness of the heat exchanger. The article describes the selection of the diagnostic variables, and their on-line measurements including the logging system for monitoring and acquisition of the data. For a specific heat exchanger, the expert system assessment was performed for a number of different situations. An appropriate diagnostic system in the specified time period produces a set of readings of the diagnostic variables, describing the state of the system. The set of diagnostic variables converted into the confluence parameters constitutes the qualitative description of the instantaneous state of the system. A retrieval strategy is used to find the corresponding state in the knowledge base with the set of the parameters describing the individual malfunction state of the system. Each malfunction state is accompanied by a recommendation for its correction specified by expert advice.

  8. Interplay of Proximal Flow Confluence and Distal Flow Divergence in Patient-Specific Vertebrobasilar System

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiaoping; Huang, Xu; Feng, Yundi; Tan, Wenchang; Liu, Huaijun

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one-quarter of ischemic strokes involve the vertebrobasilar arterial system that includes the upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence. A patient-specific hemodynamic analysis is needed to understand the posterior circulation. The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of hemodynamic parameters in the vertebrobasilar system, based on computer tomography angiography images. Here, the interplay of upstream flow confluence and downstream flow divergence was hypothesized to be a determinant factor for the hemodynamic distribution in the vertebrobasilar system. A computational fluid dynamics model was used to compute the flow fields in patient-specific vertebrobasilar models (n = 6). The inlet and outlet boundary conditions were the aortic pressure waveform and flow resistances, respectively. A 50% reduction of total outlet area was found to induce a ten-fold increase in surface area ratio of low time-averaged wall shear stress (i.e., TAWSS ≤ 4 dynes/cm2). This study enhances our understanding of the posterior circulation associated with the incidence of atherosclerotic plaques. PMID:27467755

  9. Bio-EdIP: An automatic approach for in vitro cell confluence images quantification.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Andrés; Ariza-Jiménez, Leandro; Uribe, Diego; Arroyave, Johanna C; Galeano, July; Cortés-Mancera, Fabian M

    2017-07-01

    Cell imaging is a widely-employed technique to analyze multiple biological processes. Therefore, simple, accurate and quantitative tools are needed to understand cellular events. For this purpose, Bio-EdIP was developed as a user-friendly tool to quantify confluence levels using cell culture images. The proposed algorithm combines a pre-processing step with subsequent stages that involve local processing techniques and a morphological reconstruction-based segmentation algorithm. Segmentation performance was assessed in three constructed image sets, comparing F-measure scores and AUC values (ROC analysis) for Bio-EdIP, its previous version and TScratch. Furthermore, segmentation results were compared with published algorithms using eight public benchmarks. Bio-EdIP automatically segmented cell-free regions from images of in vitro cell culture. Based on mean F-measure scores and ROC analysis, Bio-EdIP conserved a high performance regardless of image characteristics of the constructed dataset, when compared with its previous version and TScratch. Although acquisition quality of the public dataset affected Bio-EdIP segmentation, performance was better in two out of eight public sets. Bio-EdIP is a user-friendly interface, which is useful for the automatic analysis of confluence levels and cell growth processes using in vitro cell culture images. Here, we also presented new manually annotated data for algorithms evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The fate of arsenic in sediments formed at a river confluence affected by acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, P. A.; Pasten, P. A.; Pizarro, G.; Simonson, K.; Escauriaza, C. R.; Gonzalez, C.; Bonilla, C.

    2012-12-01

    Fluvial confluences receiving acid mine drainage may play a critical role in a watershed as a suite of interactions between chemistry and hydrodynamics occur, determining the fate of toxic contaminants like arsenic. Solid reactive phases of iron and/or aluminum oxi-hydroxides may form or transform, ranging from iron oxide nanoparticles that aggregate and form floccules that are transported in the suspended load up to gravel and arsenic-rich rock coatings. In order to further understand the role of reactive fluvial confluences, we have studied the mixing between the Caracarani River (flow=170-640 L/s, pH 8, conductivity 1.5 mS/cm, total As<0.1 mg/L and total Fe< 5 mg/L) and the Azufre River (flow=45-245 L/s, pH<2, conductivity > 10 mS/cm, total As>2 mg/L, total Fe=35-125 mg/L), located in the Lluta watershed in northern Chile. This site is an excellent natural laboratory located in a water-scarce area, where the future construction of a dam has prompted the attention of decision makers and scientists interested in weighing the risks derived by the accumulation of arsenic-rich sediments. Suspended sediments (> 0.45 μm), riverbed sediments, and coated rocks were collected upstream and downstream from the confluence. Suspended sediments >0.45 μm and riverbed sediments were analyzed by total reflection x-ray fluorescence for metals, while coated river bed rocks were analyzed by chemical extractions and a semi-quantitative approach through portable x-ray fluorescence. Water from the Caracarani and Azufre rivers were mixed in the laboratory at different ratios and mixing velocities aiming to characterize the effect of the chemical-hydrodynamic environment where arsenic solids were formed at different locations in the confluence. Despite a wide range of iron and arsenic concentrations in the suspended sediments from the field (As=1037 ± 1372 mg/kg, Fe=21.0 ± 24.5 g/kg), we found a rather narrow As/Fe ratio, increasing from 36.5 to 55.2 mgAs/kgFe when the bulk water p

  11. Impending extinction crisis of the world’s primates: Why primates matter

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Alejandro; Garber, Paul A.; Rylands, Anthony B.; Roos, Christian; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Di Fiore, Anthony; Nekaris, K. Anne-Isola; Nijman, Vincent; Heymann, Eckhard W.; Lambert, Joanna E.; Rovero, Francesco; Barelli, Claudia; Setchell, Joanna M.; Gillespie, Thomas R.; Mittermeier, Russell A.; Arregoitia, Luis Verde; de Guinea, Miguel; Gouveia, Sidney; Dobrovolski, Ricardo; Shanee, Sam; Shanee, Noga; Boyle, Sarah A.; Fuentes, Agustin; MacKinnon, Katherine C.; Amato, Katherine R.; Meyer, Andreas L. S.; Wich, Serge; Sussman, Robert W.; Pan, Ruliang; Kone, Inza; Li, Baoguo

    2017-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, our closest biological relatives, play important roles in the livelihoods, cultures, and religions of many societies and offer unique insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and the threat of emerging diseases. They are an essential component of tropical biodiversity, contributing to forest regeneration and ecosystem health. Current information shows the existence of 504 species in 79 genera distributed in the Neotropics, mainland Africa, Madagascar, and Asia. Alarmingly, ~60% of primate species are now threatened with extinction and ~75% have declining populations. This situation is the result of escalating anthropogenic pressures on primates and their habitats—mainly global and local market demands, leading to extensive habitat loss through the expansion of industrial agriculture, large-scale cattle ranching, logging, oil and gas drilling, mining, dam building, and the construction of new road networks in primate range regions. Other important drivers are increased bushmeat hunting and the illegal trade of primates as pets and primate body parts, along with emerging threats, such as climate change and anthroponotic diseases. Often, these pressures act in synergy, exacerbating primate population declines. Given that primate range regions overlap extensively with a large, and rapidly growing, human population characterized by high levels of poverty, global attention is needed immediately to reverse the looming risk of primate extinctions and to attend to local human needs in sustainable ways. Raising global scientific and public awareness of the plight of the world’s primates and the costs of their loss to ecosystem health and human society is imperative. PMID:28116351

  12. Habituation of steady-state visual evoked potentials in response to high-frequency polychromatic foveal visual stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Heng-Yuan; Chiu, George C; Zao, John K; Lai, Kuan-Lin; Gruber, Allen; Chien, Yu-Yi; Chou, Ching-Chi; Lu, Chih-Kai; Liu, Wen-Hao; Huang, Yu-Shan; Yang, Albert C; Wang, Yijun; Lin, Fang-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Pai; Wang, Shuu-Jiun; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to develop safe and robust methods for monitoring migraineurs' brain states, we explores the feasibility of using white, red, green and blue LED lights flickering around their critical flicker fusion (CFF) frequencies as foveal visual stimuli for inducing steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) and causing discernible habituation trends. After comparing the habituation indices, the multi-scale entropies and the time dependent intrinsic correlations of their SSVEP signals, we reached a tentative conclusion that sharp red and white light pulses flickering barely above their CFF frequencies can replace commonly used 13Hz stimuli to effectively cause SSVEP habituation among normal subjects. Empirical results showed that consecutive short bursts of light can produce more consistent responses than a single prolonged stimulation. Since these high frequency stimuli do not run the risk of triggering migraine or seizure attacks, further tests of these stimuli on migraine patients are warranted in order to verify their effectiveness.

  13. Effects of bed material grain-size distribution on bed morphology at a river confluence - numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadian, Rasool; Đorđević, Dejana; Ghanbari, Sara

    2017-04-01

    River confluences play an important role in the drainage of a catchment and transport of sediments and pollutants within this area. Riverbed morphology at these important nodes of the river drainage network might be very complex as shown by numerous laboratory studies in movable bed models and scarce bathymetric surveys in the field. Different parameters were varied in laboratory confluences to infer which of them control morphodynamic processes at the confluence. It was shown that the development of three characteristic morphological elements, i.e. a bar with an avalanche face at the entrance of a tributary channel to the confluence, a scour hole and a separation zone bar in the confluence hydrodynamics zone, depended on: 1) the confluence plan-view (symmetrical or asymmetrical), 2) the junction angle, 3) the channel width ratio, 4) discharge and momentum-flux ratios of the combining flows, 5) sediment loads supplied into one or both upstream channels and 6) the sediment size of the bed material and of supplied sediments. However, most of studies were conducted with uniform sediments. There are only a few laboratory and numerical studies on the effect of bed material gradation on the erosion and deposition patterns in the confluence hydrodynamics zone (CHZ). This study, thus, focuses on effects that bed material grain-size distribution (GSD) has on these patterns at a river confluence. A layout of a 60o laboratory confluence of two straight channels with channel width ratio BT/BR=0.71 (where BT and BR are widths of tributary and main channels, respectively) is chosen for this numerical study. The laboratory confluence was created to study sediment transport and bed morphology at the confluence whose bed is filled with uniform sediments of D = 1.95 mm size. The experimental data from this confluence are selected for validation of a 3D finite-volume based model SSIIM1 that is used in the present study. Effects of GSD are analysed for four materials having the same D

  14. Diversity components of impending primate extinctions.

    PubMed

    Jernvall, J; Wright, P C

    1998-09-15

    Many extant species are at risk to go extinct. This impending loss of species is likely to cause changes in future ecosystem functions. Ecological components of diversity, such as dietary or habitat specializations, can be used to estimate the impact of extinctions on ecosystem functions. As an approach to estimate the impact of future extinctions, we tested interdependency between ecological and taxonomic change based on current predictions of extinction rates in primates. We analyzed the ecological characteristics of extant primate faunas having species in various categories of endangerment of extinction and forecasted the future primate faunas as if they were paleontological faunas. Predicting future faunas combines the wealth of ecological information on living primates with large, fossil record-like changes in diversity. Predicted extinction patterns of living primates in Africa, Asia, Madagascar, and South America show that changes in ecology differ among the regions in ways that are not reducible to taxonomic measures. The ecological effects of primate extinctions are initially least severe in South America and larger in Asia and Africa. Disproportionately larger ecological changes are projected for Madagascar. The use of taxonomy as a proxy for ecology can mislead when estimating competence of future primate ecosystems.

  15. Comparing primate crania: The importance of fossils.

    PubMed

    Fleagle, John G; Gilbert, Christopher C; Baden, Andrea L

    2016-10-01

    Extant primate crania represent a small subset of primate crania that have existed. The main objective here is to examine how the inclusion of fossil crania changes our understanding of primate cranial diversity relative to analyses of extant primates. We hypothesize that fossil taxa will change the major axes of cranial shape, occupy new areas of morphospace, change the relative diversity of major primate clades, and fill in notable gaps separating major primate taxa/clades. Eighteen 3D landmarks were collected on 157 extant and fossil crania representing 90 genera. Data were subjected to a Generalized Procrustes Analysis then principal components analysis. Relative diversity between clades was assessed using an F-statistic. Fossil taxa do not significantly alter major axes of cranial shape, but they do occupy unique areas of morphospace, change the relative diversity between clades, and fill in notable gaps in primate cranial evolution. Strepsirrhines remain significantly less diverse than anthropoids. Fossil hominins fill the gap in cranial morphospace between extant great apes and modern humans. The morphospace outlined by living primates largely includes that occupied by fossil taxa, suggesting that the cranial diversity of living primates generally encompasses the total diversity that has evolved in this Order. The evolution of the anthropoid cranium was a significant event allowing anthropoids to achieve significantly greater cranial diversity compared to strepsirrhines. Fossil taxa fill in notable gaps within and between clades, highlighting their transitional nature and eliminating the appearance of large morphological distances between extant taxa, particularly in the case of extant hominids. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Special issue: Comparative biogeography of Neotropical primates.

    PubMed

    Lynch Alfaro, Jessica W; Cortés-Ortiz, Liliana; Di Fiore, Anthony; Boubli, Jean P

    2015-01-01

    New research presented in this special issue of Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution on the "Phylogeny and Biogeography of Neotropical Primates" greatly improves our understanding of the evolutionary history of the New World monkeys and provides insights into the multiple platyrrhine radiations, diversifications, extinctions, and recolonizations that have taken place over time and over space in the Neotropics. Here, we synthesize genetic and biogeographic research from the past several years to construct an overarching hypothesis for platyrrhine evolution. We also highlight continuing controversies in Neotropical primate biogeography, such as whether the location of origin of platyrrhines was Africa or Asia; whether Patagonian fossil primates are stem or crown platyrrhines; and whether cis- and trans-Andean Neotropical primates were subject to vicariance through Andes mountain building, or instead diversified through isolation in mountain valleys after skirting around the Andes on the northwestern coast of South America. We also consider the role of the Amazon River and its major tributaries in shaping platyrrhine biodiversity, and how and when primates from the Amazon reached the Atlantic Forest. A key focus is on primate colonizations and extirpations in Central America, the Andes, and the seasonally dry tropical forests and savannas (such as the Llanos, Caatinga, and Cerrado habitats), all ecosystems that have been understudied up until now for primates. We suggest that most primates currently inhabiting drier open habitats are relatively recent arrivals, having expanded from rainforest habitats in the Pleistocene. We point to the Pitheciidae as the taxonomic group most in need of further phylogenetic and biogeographic research. Additionally, genomic studies on the Platyrrhini are deeply needed and are expected to bring new surprises and insights to the field of Neotropical primate biogeography. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Workshop summary: neotropical primates in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Suzette D; Abee, Christian R; Mansfield, Keith G

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes presentations and discussions at an NIH-sponsored workshop on Neotropical Primates in Biomedical Research, held in September 2010. Neotropical primates (New World monkeys), with their smaller size, faster maturation, and shorter lifespans than Old World monkeys, are efficient models and present unique opportunities for studying human health and disease. After overviews of the most commonly used neotropical species-squirrel monkeys, marmosets, and owl monkeys-speakers described the use of neotropical primates in specific areas of immunology, infectious disease, neuroscience, and physiology research. Presentations addressed the development of new research tools: immune-based reagents, fMRI technologies suited to these small primates, sequencing of the marmoset genome, the first germline transgenic monkey, and neotropical primate induced pluripotent stem cells. In the discussions after the presentations, participants identified challenges to both continued use and development of new uses of neotropical primates in research and suggested the following actions to address the challenges: (1) mechanisms to support breeding colonies of some neotropical species to ensure a well-characterized domestic source; (2) resources for the continuing development of critical research tools to improve the immunological and hormonal characterization of neotropical primates; (3) improved opportunities for networking among investigators who use neotropical primates, training and other measures to improve colony and veterinary management, and continued research on neotropical primate management and veterinary care issues; (4) support for development activities to produce models that are more affordable and more efficient for moving research "from benchside to bedside"; and (5) establishment of a small program that would fund "orphan" species.

  18. Locally induced surface air confluence by complex terrain and its effects on air pollution in the valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazcilevich, Aron D.; García, Agustín R.; Caetano, Ernesto

    Using a meteorological computational model it is shown how, in the Valley of Mexico, a high pressure system together with the complex orography of the region induce the formation of a local confluence line. With the aid of a prognostic air quality model it is shown that the maximum pollutant mixing ratios are placed on and follow the confluence line which crosses over the most populated areas of Mexico City. This phenomenon provides an explanation of why and when pollutants assume its geographical distribution in the valley during high mixing ratio episodes.

  19. Hydrodynamic Model of Inundation Event at Confluence of Ohio and Mississippi Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, B. A.; Luke, A.; Shlaes, M.; Lant, J.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this project is to produce an accurate 2-D hydrodynamic model of an inundation event that occurred at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. The inundation occurred in the months of April and May 2011, with the city of interest being Cairo, Illinois. In order to relieve flooding within Cairo, a levee was detonated by the Army Corps of Engineers. Cairo is a small city of 2,800 people, and is prone to flooding due to its proximity to the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. Cairo is also the only city in the U.S. completely surrounded by levees. The advantage of a 2-D modeling approach compared to a 1-D approach is that the floodplain geomorphological processes are more accurately represented. Understanding non-channelized flow that occurs during inundation events is a subject of growing interest, and is being addressed in other projects such as the NASA-SWOT mission scheduled for launch in 2019. The 2-D model utilized in this study is LISFLOOD-FP. LISFLOOD-FP is a 2-D finite-difference flood inundation model that has been proven to accurately simulate flood inundation for urban, coastal, and fluvial environments. LISFLOOD-FP operates using known hydraulic principles along with continuity and momentum equations to describe the flow of water through channels and floodplains. The digital elevation model used to represent the area's topography was obtained from the USGS National Elevation Data set, and our model uses input data from USGS stream gauges located upstream of the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. The gauging station located in Cairo will be used for model validation. Currently, the steady state conditions of the Ohio and the Mississippi River are being modeled. In situ cross sectional data is being used to represent the channel. We have found that using averages of the cross sectional data do not accurately represent the river channels, so future model runs will incorporate interpolation between measurements. Once

  20. Hydrodynamic Model of Inundation Event at Confluence of Ohio and Mississippi Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, B. A.; Luke, A.; Alsdorf, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this project is to produce an accurate 2-D hydrodynamic model of an inundation event that occurred at the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. The inundation occurred in the months of April and May 2011, with the city of interest being Cairo, Illinois. In order to relieve flooding within Cairo, a Bird's Point Levee was detonated by the Army Corps of Engineers. Cairo is a small city of 2,800 people, and is prone to flooding due to its proximity to the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. Cairo is also the only city in the U.S. completely surrounded by levees. The advantage of a 2-D modeling approach compared to a 1-D approach is that the floodplain geomorphological processes are more accurately represented. Understanding non-channelized flow that occurs during inundation events is a subject of growing interest, and is being addressed in other projects such as the NASA-SWOT mission scheduled for launch in 2019. The 2-D model utilized in this study is LISFLOOD-FP. LISFLOOD-FP is a 2-D finite-difference flood inundation model that has been proven to accurately simulate flood inundation for urban, coastal, and fluvial environments. LISFLOOD-FP operates using known hydraulic principles along with continuity and momentum equations to describe the flow of water through channels and floodplains. The digital elevation model used to represent the area's topography was obtained from the USGS National Elevation Data set, and our model uses input data from USGS stream gauges located upstream of the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi River. The gauging station located in Cairo will be used for model validation. Currently, many flood simulations are being modeled with varying conditions and input files. In situ cross sectional data is being used to represent the channel. We have found that using averages of the cross sectional data do not accurately represent the river channels, so future model runs will incorporate interpolation between

  1. Numerical simulation of transverse mixing of waters at the confluence of two rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, Tatyana; Lepikhin, Anatoliy; Parshakova, Yanina

    2017-04-01

    Surface water bodies, both natural (rivers, lakes) and artificial (ponds, reservoirs) are the main source of drinking water. In this regard, special attention should be paid to their pollution, first of all, to extreme pollution, creating a direct danger to their consumption properties. Traditionally, it is believed that the primary mechanism of the pollutants transport in surface water bodies is the Fick diffusion for which the concentration and nature of the pollutants does not affect the transport mechanisms. However, recent studies have shown that these traditional concepts are not always acceptable. In some cases, even relatively low concentrations of pollutants can fundamentally change the hydrodynamics of a flow through a change in density. Density effects playing in these cases an important role can be very important in solving applied problems of water consumption. One an important question is the mechanism of the formation of the streams do not mixing at large distances from the place of confluence of two rivers with significantly different physical and chemical properties of water. In particular, the Vishera river and the Kama river in Perm Region, as evidenced by the numerous space- and aero photographs, virtually do not mix from the place of their confluence to the territory of Solikamsk-Berezniki industrial area. This is fundamentally important for solving the problem of regulation of technological impacts of this source of technogenic pollution, largest in the basin of the Kama river. In the present paper, the phenomenon of a significant weakening of the transverse mixing of water masses in the surface water bodies is investigated with the help of the numerical simulation of the transverse mixing of water masses at the confluence of two rivers. The calculations are carried out with the help of CFD package ANSYS Fluent using k-epsilon model to describe the turbulent pulsations. The dependence of the transverse mixing speed on the flow rates in the

  2. Hydrodynamics of concordant and discordant fixed bed open-channel confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birjukova Canelas, Olga; Lage Ferreira, Rui Miguel; Heleno Cardoso, António

    2017-04-01

    The detailed characterization of the flow field in river confluences constitutes a relevant step towards the understanding of the hydro-morpho-dynamics of these key zones of the fluvial system. With a few exceptions, existing works on this topic covered concordant bed scenarios, meaning that both confluent channels had the same elevation. This laboratory study aims to contribute to a detailed three-dimensional characterization of the flow field at a fixed bed confluence, as well as to shed light on how bed elevation discordance modifies the flow patterns of the converging flows. While the junction angle and the discharge ratio were kept fixed, two scenarios were studied on the basis of detailed water level and 3D ADV measurements at the denser mesh ever. The internal flow structure of the concordant bed scenario mostly complied with the classical conceptual models. A relevant difference concerns the size of the stagnation zone, much smaller close to the bed of the discordant bed confluence. A more significant difference is a horizontal flow structure, not previously identified in the literature, characterized by strong streamwise mean vorticity and strong secondary motion. It is observed for the discordant bed case, occurring along the inner wall of the main channel and downstream the junction corner. This structure is spatially well-correlated to a pronounced imbalance of cross-stream and vertical normal Reynolds stresses. This highlights the role of Reynolds stress anisotropy (RSA) that is generated in the shear layers than accompany the entrance of the tributary flow. Since this structure is not present in the concordant case, where RSA is also evident, it is argued that convective effects should also play a role in its formation, presumably due to deflection of the flow in the main channel by the tributary. The newly identified secondary motion should, thus, be a combination of Prandtĺs second kind and Prandtĺs first kind of secondary flow. The relative

  3. Primates in 21st century ecosystems: does primate conservation promote ecosystem conservation?

    PubMed

    Norconk, Marilyn A; Boinski, Sue; Forget, Pierre-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the American Journal of Primatology were among the participants in an invited symposium at the 2008 Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation meeting in Paramaribo, Suriname. They were asked to assess how essential primates are to tropical ecosystems and, given their research interests, discuss how primate research contributes to the broader understanding about how ecosystems function. This introduction to the issue is divided into three parts: a review of the roles that nonhuman primates play in tropical ecosystems; the implementation of large-scale landscape methods used to identify primate densities; and concerns about the increasingly porous boundaries between humans, nonhuman primates, and pathogens. Although 20th century primate research created a rich database on individual species, including both theoretical and descriptive approaches, the dual effects of high human population densities and widespread habitat destruction should warn us that creative, interdisciplinary and human-related research is needed to solve 21st century problems.

  4. The Automated Primate Research Laboratory (APRL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a self-contained automated primate research laboratory to study the effects of weightlessness on subhuman primates. Physiological parameters such as hemodynamics, respiration, blood constituents, waste, and diet and nutrition are analyzed for abnormalities in the simulated space environment. The Southeast Asian pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemistrina) was selected for the experiments owing to its relative intelligence and learning capacity. The objective of the program is to demonstrate the feasibility of a man-tended primate space flight experiment.

  5. Pulmonary pneumocystosis in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Chandler, F W; McClure, H M; Campbell, W G; Watts, J C

    1976-03-01

    Pulmonary infection with Pneumocystis carinii was detected in two aged owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus) and two young chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). The clinical histories of the owl monkeys were similar and included progressive weight loss, anorexia, failure to thrive, and death. One of the owl monkeys had no concurrent disease, whereas the other had been experimentally inoculated with Treponema pallidum 44 months before death. In both chimpanzees, an underlying myeloproliferative malignant neoplasm was associated with Pneumocystis infection. Pneumocystis organisms were found in alveolar spaces and alveolar lining cells by light and electron microscopy. Pathologic features of these untreated cases and a case in a chimpanzee treated with pentamidine isethionate were similar to those described in humans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pulmonary pneumocystosis associated with death in nonhuman primates.

  6. Characterizing Three-Dimensional Mixing Process in a River Confluence using Hydro-acoustical Backscatter and Flow Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Geunsoo; Kim, Dongsu; Kim, YoungDo; Lyu, Siwan; Kim, Seojun

    2017-04-01

    River confluences are zones where two rivers with different geomorphic and hydraulic characteristics amalgamate, resulting in rapid change in terms of flow regime, sediment entrainment and hydraulic geometry. In these confluence zones, the flow structure is basically complicated responded with concurrent mixing of physical and chemical aquatic properties, and continuous channel morphology could be changed due to erosion and sedimentation. In addition, the confluences are regions in which two rivers join and play an important role in river ecology. In order to characterize the mixing process of confluence for understanding the impacts of a river on the other river, therefore, it has been crucial to analyze the spatial mixing patterns for main streams depending on various inflow conditions of tributaries. However, most conventional studies have mostly relied upon hydraulic or water quality numerical models for understanding mixing pattern analysis of confluences, due to the difficulties to acquire a wide spatial range of in-situ data especially for characterizing this kind of mixing process. Even with intensive in-situ measurements, those researches tended to focus mainly on the hydraulic characteristics such as the flow and morphological complexity of confluence, so that very few studies comprehensively included sediment variation with flow at the same time. In this study, subsequently, flow and sediment mixing characteristics were concurrently investigated in the confluence between Nakdong and Nam river in South Korea, where it has been frequently questioned to determine how Nam river affects Nakdong river that recently have suffered various environmental problems such as green algae bloom and erosion/deposition in the confluence. We basically examined the mixing characteristics of confluence by using acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) which were used to measure hydraulic factors such as flow rate and depth, as well as measuring the suspended sediment

  7. Individual Differences in Men's Misperception of Women's Sexual Intent: Application and Extension of the Confluence Model.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Rhiana; Abbey, Antonia

    2016-05-01

    Men are more likely than women to misperceive a cross-sex companion's degree of sexual interest. The current study extends previous research by using the confluence model (Malamuth et al., 1991) to examine how narcissism and impulsive sensation-seeking are directly and indirectly associated with men's misperception of women's sexual interest. A community sample of young, single men (N = 470) completed audio computer-assisted self-interviews. Using path analyses, hostile masculinity and impersonal sexual orientation were proximal predictors of men's misperception of women's sexual intent. Additionally, narcissism was indirectly related to men's misperception through hostile masculinity. Impulsive sensation-seeking was directly and indirectly related to men's misperceptions through impersonal sexual orientation. Although there was a bivariate relationship between alcohol consumption and misperception, this relationship was not significant in the path model. Overall, these findings demonstrate the importance of considering how personality traits increase the risk for misperception.

  8. Mixing in three-dimensional turbulent flow near the river confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, T.; Lepikhin, A.; Konovalov, V.; Parshakova, Ya.; Tiunov, A.

    2012-04-01

    Main source of potable water for Perm city having about one million inhabitants is Chusovaya water intake located in the immediate vicinity of the confluence of Chusovaya and Sylva rivers. These rivers are similar in water content but significantly different in hydrochemical regime: the water of Sylva river is characterized by high hardness and the hardness of Chusovaya river is much lower. Since the hardness is an important indicator of water quality, there arises the goal to organize the water intake in such a way that water was characterized by minimal hardness. The solution to this problem in the discussed case is complicated due to the fact that the water intake is located in the zone of hydraulic backwater of the Kama hydroelectric power station and the hydrodynamic regime in this zone depends not only on the cumulative effect of hydrological regimes of Chusovaya and Sylva rivers but also on the filling level of the Kama water reservoir and on the reset mode on the Kama hydroelectric power station. From the viewpoint of ensuring the standard water quality, the dynamics of water hardness in the considered rivers and its dependence on the water flow rates is of the fundamental importance. This is especially significant for low flow rates typical for winter seasons. For large flow velocities and small differences in mineralization, one could expect sufficient homogeneity of water composition in depth due to intense vertical mixing. And in winter season, at low flow velocities and significant differences in mineralization, considerable vertical inhomogeneity of water composition may arise. Experimental measurements show that, in winter low flow season, specific electric conductivity and, consequently, mineralization and hardness of the water near the bottom several times larger than their values near the surface. To study the formation of vertical stratification in different conditions, numerical simulation of mixing in three-dimensional turbulent flows for the

  9. Bathymetrically controlled velocity-shear front at a tidal river confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blain, Cheryl Ann; Mied, Richard P.; McKay, Paul; Chen, Wei; Rhea, W. Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Nonbuoyant front formation at the confluence of Nanjemoy Creek and the main Potomac River (MD) channel is examined. Terra satellite ASTER imagery reveals a sediment color front emerging from Nanjemoy Creek when the Potomac is near maximum ebb. Nearly contemporaneous ASTER and Landsat ETM+ imagery are used to extract surface velocities, which suggest a velocity shear front is collocated with the color front. In situ velocities (measured by RiverRay traverses near the Nanjemoy Creek mouth) confirm the shear front's presence. A finite-element simulation (using ADCIRC) replicates the observed velocity-shear front and is applied to decipher its physics. Three results emerge: (1) the velocity-shear front forms, confined to a shoal downstream of the creek-river confluence for most of the tidal cycle, (2) a simulation with a flat bottom in Nanjemoy Creek and Potomac River (i.e., no bathymetry variation) indicates the velocity-shear front never forms, hence the front cannot exist without the bathymetry, and (3) an additional simulation with a blocked-off Creek entrance demonstrates that while the magnitude of the velocity shear is largely unchanged without the creek, shear front formation is delayed in time. Without the Creek, there is no advection of the M6 tidal constituent (generated by nonlinear interaction of the flow with bottom friction) onto the shoals, only a locally generated contribution. A tidal phase difference between Nanjemoy and Potomac causes the ebbing Nanjemoy Creek waters to intrude into the Potomac as far south as its deep channel, and draw from a similar location in the Potomac during Nanjemoy flood.

  10. Diurnal cycles control the fate of contaminants at an Andean river confluence impacted by legacy mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasten, P.; Guerra, P. A.; Simonson, K.; Bonilla, C.; Pizarro, G. E.; Escauriaza, C. R.; González, C.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of hydrologic-geochemical interactions in arid environments is a controlling factor in quality and quantity of water available for human consumption and agriculture. When acid drainage affects these watersheds, water quality is gravely degraded. Despite its effect on watersheds, the relationship between time changes in hydrological variables and water quality in arid regions has not been studied thoroughly. Temporal variations in acid drainage can control when the transport of toxic elements is increased. We performed field work at the Azufre River (pH 2, E.C~10.9 mS/cm) and Caracarani River (pH 8.7, E.C~1.2 mS/cm) confluence, located in the Northern Chilean Altiplano (at 4000 m asl). We registered stream flowrates (total flowrate~430 L/s), temperature and electric conductivity (E.C) hourly using in-stream data loggers during one year. We also measured turbidity and pH during one field survey at different distances from the junction, as a proxy of the formation of iron-aluminum particles that cycle trace elements in these environments. We found turbidity-pH diurnal cycles were caused by upstream hourly changes in upstream flowrate: when the Caracarani River flowrate reached its daily peak, particle formation occurred, while the dissolution of particles occurred when the Azufre River reached its maximum value. This last process occurred due to upstream freeze-thaw cycles. This study shows how the dynamics of natural confluences determines chemical transport. The formation of particles enriched in toxic elements can promote settling as a natural attenuation process, while their dissolution will produce their release and transport long distances downstream. It is important to consider time as an important variable in water quality monitoring and in water management infrastructure where pulses of contamination can have potentially negative effects in its use. Acknowledgements: Funding was provided by "Proyecto Fondecyt 1130936" and "CONICYT

  11. The use of nonhuman primates in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, R. C. (Editor); Bourne, G. H. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Space related biomedical research involving nonhuman primates is reviewed. The scientific assets of various species and the instruments used for monitoring physiological processes during long duration experimentations are described.

  12. Biokinetics of Plutonium in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Deepesh; Guilmette, Raymond A; Gesell, Thomas F; Harris, Jason T; Brey, Richard R

    2016-10-01

    A major source of data on metabolism, excretion and retention of plutonium comes from experimental animal studies. Although old world monkeys are one of the closest living relatives to humans, certain physiological differences do exist between these nonhuman primates and humans. The objective of this paper was to describe the metabolism of plutonium in nonhuman primates using the bioassay and retention data obtained from macaque monkeys injected with plutonium citrate. A biokinetic model for nonhuman primates was developed by adapting the basic model structure and adapting the transfer rates described for metabolism of plutonium in adult humans. Significant changes to the parameters were necessary to explain the shorter retention of plutonium in liver and skeleton of the nonhuman primates, differences in liver to bone partitioning ratio, and significantly higher excretion of plutonium in feces compared to that in humans.

  13. A Mitogenomic Phylogeny of Living Primates

    PubMed Central

    Finstermeier, Knut; Zinner, Dietmar; Brameier, Markus; Meyer, Matthias; Kreuz, Eva; Hofreiter, Michael; Roos, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Primates, the mammalian order including our own species, comprise 480 species in 78 genera. Thus, they represent the third largest of the 18 orders of eutherian mammals. Although recent phylogenetic studies on primates are increasingly built on molecular datasets, most of these studies have focused on taxonomic subgroups within the order. Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes have proven to be extremely useful in deciphering within-order relationships even up to deep nodes. Using 454 sequencing, we sequenced 32 new complete mt genomes adding 20 previously not represented genera to the phylogenetic reconstruction of the primate tree. With 13 new sequences, the number of complete mt genomes within the parvorder Platyrrhini was widely extended, resulting in a largely resolved branching pattern among New World monkey families. We added 10 new Strepsirrhini mt genomes to the 15 previously available ones, thus almost doubling the number of mt genomes within this clade. Our data allow precise date estimates of all nodes and offer new insights into primate evolution. One major result is a relatively young date for the most recent common ancestor of all living primates which was estimated to 66-69 million years ago, suggesting that the divergence of extant primates started close to the K/T-boundary. Although some relationships remain unclear, the large number of mt genomes used allowed us to reconstruct a robust primate phylogeny which is largely in agreement with previous publications. Finally, we show that mt genomes are a useful tool for resolving primate phylogenetic relationships on various taxonomic levels. PMID:23874967

  14. Effects of fish community on occurrences of Yangtze finless porpoise in confluence of the Yangtze and Wanhe Rivers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoke; Yu, Daoping; Wang, Huili; Wan, An; Chen, Minmin; Tao, Feng; Song, Zunrong

    2015-06-01

    The Yangtze finless porpoise is a subspecies of narrow-ridged finless porpoise endemic to the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River and the adjoining Poyang and Dongting Lakes. With the depletion of fish stocks in the Yangtze River in recent decades, food availability has become the most important factor affecting the survival of this subspecies. Despite this, the relationships between fish community and occurrences of porpoise are far from being fully understood. Therefore, during September 2013 to August 2014, the occurrences of porpoise were investigated in confluence of the Yangtze and Wanhe Rivers; fish community was also surveyed synchronously in confluence and two adjacent transects. The results showed that (1) the confluence had maximum fish species richness, and the main dominant species was upper fish, while the other two transects were mainly dominated by demersal fish. ANOVA analyses showed that individual number and yield of upper fish which can be eaten by porpoise (upper edible fish) in the confluence were significantly higher than other two transects. (2) Average group size of the porpoise was 3.7 ± 1.8 individuals. The occurrences of porpoise in different seasons had great differences, and the porpoise was more likely to be detected in autumn and winter. (3) Fish community had significant effects on occurrences of porpoise, and the main influencing factors were fish species richness, individual number, and yield of edible fish, especially the upper edible fish. The results of this study will have important implications for the conservation of porpoise.

  15. Contextualising primate origins--an ecomorphological framework.

    PubMed

    Soligo, Christophe; Smaers, Jeroen B

    2016-04-01

    Ecomorphology - the characterisation of the adaptive relationship between an organism's morphology and its ecological role - has long been central to theories of the origin and early evolution of the primate order. This is exemplified by two of the most influential theories of primate origins: Matt Cartmill's Visual Predation Hypothesis, and Bob Sussman's Angiosperm Co-Evolution Hypothesis. However, the study of primate origins is constrained by the absence of data directly documenting the events under investigation, and has to rely instead on a fragmentary fossil record and the methodological assumptions inherent in phylogenetic comparative analyses of extant species. These constraints introduce particular challenges for inferring the ecomorphology of primate origins, as morphology and environmental context must first be inferred before the relationship between the two can be considered. Fossils can be integrated in comparative analyses and observations of extant model species and laboratory experiments of form-function relationships are critical for the functional interpretation of the morphology of extinct species. Recent developments have led to important advancements, including phylogenetic comparative methods based on more realistic models of evolution, and improved methods for the inference of clade divergence times, as well as an improved fossil record. This contribution will review current perspectives on the origin and early evolution of primates, paying particular attention to their phylogenetic (including cladistic relationships and character evolution) and environmental (including chronology, geography, and physical environments) contextualisation, before attempting an up-to-date ecomorphological synthesis of primate origins. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  16. Ontogeny of the nasopalatine duct in primates.

    PubMed

    Shimp, Kristin L; Bhatnagar, Kunwar P; Bonar, Christopher J; Smith, Timothy D

    2003-09-01

    Ecological explanations have been put forward to account for the precocious or delayed development of patency in ducts leading to the vomeronasal organ (VNO) in certain mammals. Perinatal function may be related, in part, to the patency or fusion of the vomeronasal and nasopalatine (NPD) ducts. However, few studies have focused on NPD development in primates, which generally have a prolonged period of dependence during infancy. In this study we examined 24 prenatal primates and 13 neonatal primates, and a comparative sample of fetal mice and insectivores. In embryonic and early fetal Microcebus murinus, the NPD was completely fused, whereas in fetuses of later stages the duct was partially fused or completely patent. M. myoxinus of all stages demonstrated some degree of NPD fusion. In all other prenatal primates, the NPD was fused to some extent. Four prenatal insectivores (Tenrec ecaudatus) showed some degree of NPD fusion. In Mus musculus at 19 days gestation, the NPD was patent, although the anatomically separate VNO duct was fused. T. ecaudatus and most of the neonatal primates revealed complete NPD patency. An exception was Saguinus geoffroyi, which exhibited fusion of the NPD near the VNO opening. These observations may relate to differences in perinatal VNO function. The differences noted in our study suggest that M. murinus and M. myoxinus may differ in perinatal VNO functionality and perhaps in related behavior. Observations of neonatal primates suggest that NPD patency may be relatively common at birth and could serve other purposes in addition to being an access route for VNO stimuli.

  17. Foveal visual acuity is worse and shows stronger contour interaction effects for contrast-modulated than luminance-modulated Cs.

    PubMed

    Hairol, Mohd Izzuddin; Formankiewicz, Monika A; Waugh, Sarah J

    2013-05-01

    Contrast-modulated (CM) stimuli are processed by spatial mechanisms that operate at larger spatial scales than those processing luminance-modulated (LM) stimuli and may be more prone to deficits in developing, amblyopic, and aging visual systems. Understanding neural mechanisms of contour interaction or crowding will help in detecting disorders of spatial vision. In this study, contour interaction effects on visual acuity for LM and CM C and bar stimuli are assessed in normal foveal vision. In Experiment 1, visual acuity is measured for all-LM and all-CM stimuli, at ~3.5× above their respective modulation thresholds. In Experiment 2, visual acuity is measured for Cs and bars of different type (LM C with CM bars and vice versa). Visual acuity is degraded for CM compared with LM Cs (0.46 ± 0.04 logMAR vs. 0.18 ± 0.04 logMAR). With nearby bars, CM acuity is degraded further (0.23 ± 0.01 logMAR or ~2 lines on an acuity chart), significantly more than LM acuity (0.11 ± 0.01 logMAR, ~1 line). Contour interaction for CM stimuli extends over greater distances (arcmin) than it does for LM stimuli, but extents are similar with respect to acuities (~3.5× the C gap width). Contour interaction is evident when the Cs and bars are defined differently: it is stronger when an LM C is flanked by CM bars (0.17 ± 0.03 logMAR) than when a CM C is flanked by LM bars (0.08 ± 0.02 logMAR). Our results suggest that contour interaction for foveally viewed acuity stimuli involves feature integration, such that the outputs of receptive fields representing Cs and bars are combined. Contour interaction operates at LM and CM representational stages, it can occur across stage, and it is enhanced at the CM stage. Greater contour interaction for CM Cs and bars could hold value for visual acuity testing and earlier diagnosis of conditions for which crowding is important, such as in amblyopia.

  18. Effects of Foveal Ablation on the Pattern of Peripheral Refractive Errors in Normal and Form-deprived Infant Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Juan; Hung, Li-Fang

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine whether visual signals from the fovea contribute to the changes in the pattern of peripheral refractions associated with form deprivation myopia in monkeys. Methods. Monocular form-deprivation was produced in 18 rhesus monkeys by securing diffusers in front of their treated eyes between 22 ± 2 and 155 ± 17 days of age. In eight of these form-deprived monkeys, the fovea and most of the perifovea of the treated eye were ablated by laser photocoagulation at the start of the diffuser-rearing period. Each eye's refractive status was measured by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at 15° intervals along the horizontal meridian to eccentricities of 45°. Control data were obtained from 12 normal monkeys and five monkeys that had monocular foveal ablations and were subsequently reared with unrestricted vision. Results. Foveal ablation, by itself, did not produce systematic alterations in either the central or peripheral refractive errors of the treated eyes. In addition, foveal ablation did not alter the patterns of peripheral refractions in monkeys with form-deprivation myopia. The patterns of peripheral refractive errors in the two groups of form-deprived monkeys, either with or without foveal ablation, were qualitatively similar (treated eyes: F = 0.31, P = 0.74; anisometropia: F = 0.61, P = 0.59), but significantly different from those found in the normal monkeys (F = 8.46 and 9.38 respectively, P < 0.05). Conclusions. Central retinal signals do not contribute in an essential way to the alterations in eye shape that occur during the development of vision-induced axial myopia. PMID:21693598

  19. [Quantitative and spatial analysis in image processing: study of drusen distribution from the foveal center in age-related macular degeneration].

    PubMed

    Barthes, A; Conrath, J; Ridings, B

    2005-03-01

    Angiofluorograms were obtained from 58 patients presenting posterior pole drusen due to age-related macular degeneration. These frames underwent image processing by morphological mathematics algorithms. The detection sensitivity of this algorithm is 78%. We present a quantitative and spatial analysis of drusen distribution from the foveal center in the form of a graph. This technique may allow for multi-date comparisons, by using a graphic representation of this risk factor for age-related macular degeneration.

  20. Voice discrimination in four primates.

    PubMed

    Candiotti, Agnès; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lemasson, Alban

    2013-10-01

    One accepted function of vocalisations is to convey information about the signaller, such as its age-sex class, motivation, or relationship with the recipient. Yet, in natural habitats individuals not only interact with conspecifics but also with members of other species. This is well documented for African forest monkeys, which form semi-permanent mixed-species groups that can persist for decades. Although members of such groups interact with each other on a daily basis, both physically and vocally, it is currently unknown whether they can discriminate familiar and unfamiliar voices of heterospecific group members. We addressed this question with playbacks on monkey species known to form polyspecific associations in the wild: red-capped mangabeys, Campbell's monkeys and Guereza colobus monkeys. We tested subjects' discrimination abilities of contact calls of familiar and unfamiliar female De Brazza monkeys. When pooling all species, subjects looked more often towards the speaker when hearing contact calls of unfamiliar than familiar callers. When testing De Brazza monkeys with their own calls, we found the same effect with the longest gaze durations after hearing unfamiliar voices. This suggests that primates can discriminate, not only between familiar and unfamiliar voices of conspecifics, but also between familiar and unfamiliar voices of heterospecifics living within a close proximity.

  1. SNR analysis of high-frequency steady-state visual evoked potentials from the foveal and extrafoveal regions of human retina.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang-Cheng; Zao, John K; Tu, Kuan-Chung; Wang, Yijun; Huang, Yi-Pai; Chuang, Che-Wei; Kuo, Hen-Yuan; Chien, Yu-Yi; Chou, Ching-Chi; Jung, Tzyy-Ping

    2012-01-01

    With brain-computer interface (BCI) applications in mind, we analyzed the amplitudes and the signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEP) induced in the foveal and extra-foveal regions of human retina. Eight subjects (age 20-55) have been exposed to 2° circular and 16°-18° annular visual stimulation produced by white LED lights flickering between 5Hz and 65Hz in 5Hz increments. Their EEG signals were recorded using a 64-channel NeuroScan system and analyzed using non-parametric spectral and canonical convolution techniques. Subjects' perception of flickering and their levels of comfort towards the visual stimulation were also noted. Almost all subjects showed distinctively higher SNR in their foveal SSVEP responses between 25Hz and 45Hz. They also noticed less flickering and felt more comfortable with the visual stimulation between 30Hz and 45Hz. These empirical evidences suggest that lights flashing above the critical flicker fusion rates (CFF) of human vision may be used as effective and comfortable stimuli in SSVEP BCI applications.

  2. Social knowledge and signals in primates.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Thore J; Sheehan, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Primates are notable for having a rich and detailed understanding of their social environment and there has been great interest in the evolution and function of social knowledge in primates. Indeed, primates have been shown to have impressive understandings of not only other group members but also the complex relationships among them. To be useful, however, social knowledge requires memories from previous encounters and observations about individual traits that are stable. Here, we argue that social systems or traits that make social knowledge more costly or less accurate will favor signals that either supplement or replace social knowledge. Thus, the relationship between signals and social knowledge can be complementary or antagonistic depending on the type of signal. Our goal in this review is to elucidate the relationships between signals and social knowledge in primates. We categorize signals into three types, each with different relationships to social knowledge. (1) Identity signals directly facilitate social knowledge, (2) current-state signals supplement information gained through social knowledge, and (3) badges of status replace social knowledge. Primates rely extensively on identity information, but it remains to be determined to what extent this is based on receiver perception of individual variation or senders using identity signals. Primates frequently utilize current-state signals including signals of intent to augment their interactions with familiar individuals. Badges of status are rare in primates, and the cases where they are used point to a functional and evolutionary trade-off between badges of status and social knowledge. However, the nature of this relationship needs further exploration.

  3. Detection of diabetic macular oedema: validation of optical coherence tomography using both foveal thickness and intraretinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Martínez, Carmen; Azrak, Cesar; Navarro-Navarro, Aída; Baeza-Díaz, Manuel Vicente; Martínez-Toldos, José Juan; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2015-01-01

    No studies have yet evaluated jointly central foveal thickness (CFT) and the presence of intraretinal fluid (PIF) to diagnose diabetic macular oedema (DMO) using optic coherence tomography (OCT). We performed a cross-sectional observational study to validate OCT for the diagnosis of DMO using both CFT and PIF assessed by OCT (3D OCT-1 Maestro). A sample of 277 eyes from primary care diabetic patients was assessed in a Spanish region in 2014. Outcome: DMO diagnosed by stereoscopic mydriatic fundoscopy. OCT was used to measure CFT and PIF. A binary logistic regression model was constructed to predict the outcome using CFT and PIF. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) of the model was calculated and non-linear equations used to determine which CFT values had a high probability of the outcome (positive test), distinguishing between the presence or absence of PIF. Calculations were made of the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive (PLR) and negative (NLR) likelihood ratios. The model was validated using bootstrapping methodology. A total of 37 eyes had DMO. AUC: 0.88. Positive test: CFT ≥90 µm plus PIF (≥310 µm if no PIF). Clinical parameters: sensitivity, 0.83; specificity, 0.89; PLR, 7.34; NLR, 0.19. The parameters in the validation were similar. In conclusion, combining PIF and CFT provided a tool to very precisely discriminate the presence of DMO. Similar studies are needed to provide greater scientific evidence for the use of PIF in the diagnosis of DMO. PMID:26587352

  4. Measurement of Foveal Avascular Zone Dimensions and its Reliability in Healthy Eyes Using Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography.

    PubMed

    Shahlaee, Abtin; Pefkianaki, Maria; Hsu, Jason; Ho, Allen C

    2016-01-01

    To measure foveal avascular zone (FAZ) dimensions in healthy eyes using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and calculate interobserver variability. Reliability analysis. Thirty-four eyes of 17 healthy subjects underwent OCTA at the Retina Service of Wills Eye Hospital. Two masked graders performed measurements of FAZ dimensions including area, perimeter, and maximum horizontal and vertical diameters using ImageJ. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between graders was calculated. Mean area (mm(2)), perimeter (mm), and maximum horizontal and vertical diameters (mm) were 0.27 ± 0.101, 2.21 ± 0.451, 0.59 ± 0.126, and 0.56 ± 0.118, respectively, at the superficial and 0.34 ± 0.116, 2.50 ± 0.462, 0.69 ± 0.123, and 0.63 ± 0.110 at the deep network. Interobserver agreement was high for all superficial FAZ measurements (ICC ≥0.90) but did not meet the lowest acceptable grader agreement for the deep vascular network (ICC <0.85). Fellow eyes had statistically similar values (P > .05). Manual measurement of FAZ dimensions using OCTA is a noninvasive and reliable method for quantifying FAZ at the superficial vascular network. Assessing FAZ alterations in the deep vascular network may be subject to greater interobserver variability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sperm Morphology Assessment in Captive Neotropical Primates.

    PubMed

    Swanson, W F; Valle, R R; Carvalho, F M; Arakaki, P R; Rodas-Martínez, A Z; Muniz, Japc; García-Herreros, M

    2016-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate sperm morphology in four neotropical primate species to compare the sperm morphological traits and the sperm morphometric parameters as a basis for establishing normative sperm standards for each species. Data from 80 ejaculates collected from four primate species, Callithrix jacchus, Callimico goeldii, Alouatta caraya and Ateles geoffroyi, were analysed for detection of sperm morphological alterations using subjective World Health Organization (WHO-2010) standards and Sperm Deformity Index (SDI) criteria, objective computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA) and subpopulation sperm determination (SSD) methods. There were multiple differences (p < 0.01) observed among primate species in values obtained from WHO-2010, SDI, CASMA and SSD sperm analysis methods. In addition, multiple significant positive and negative correlations were observed between the sperm morphological traits (SDI, Sperm Deformity Index Head Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Midpiece Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Tail Defects, Normal Sperm, Head Defects, Midpiece Defects and Tail Defects) and the sperm morphometric parameters (SSD, Area (A), Perimeter (P), Length (L), Width (W), Ellipticity, Elongation and Rugosity) (p ≤ 0.046). In conclusion, our findings using different evaluation methods indicate that pronounced sperm morphological variation exists among these four neotropical primate species. Because of the strong relationship observed among morphological and morphometric parameters, these results suggest that application of objective analysis methods could substantially improve the reliability of comparative studies and help to establish valid normative sperm values for neotropical primates.

  6. How primates (including us!) respond to inequity.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Sarah F

    2008-01-01

    Responding negatively to inequity is not a uniquely human trait. Some of our closest evolutionary ancestors respond negatively when treated less well than a conspecific. Comparative work between humans and other primates can help elucidate the evolutionary underpinnings of humans' social preferences. Results from studies of nonhuman primates, in particular chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys, are presented in comparison to human results that have been collected during economic game studies in humans, such as in the Ultimatum Game or Impunity Game. Among nonhuman primates, a frequent behavioral reaction to inequity is to refuse to continue the interaction. While in some cases this response appears to be caused by the inequitable distribution, in others, it seems to be caused by another individual's inequitable behavior. While these reactions are similar to those of humans, this reaction does not appear to be a sense of fairness in the way that we think of it in humans. Neither nonhuman primate species alters their behavior when they are the benefited individual, and in an experimental situation, chimpanzees do not alter their behavior to obtain food for their partner as well as for themselves. Although there are differences between human and nonhuman primate responses, such studies allow us to better understand the evolution of our own responses to inequity. Given the strong behavioral reactions that even monkeys show to inequitable treatment, it is not surprising that humans are concerned with equity. Such comparisons increase understanding of issues such as healthcare disparities in humans.

  7. In vitro development of cloned bovine embryos produced by handmade cloning using somatic cells from distinct levels of cell culture confluence.

    PubMed

    Gerger, R P C; Ribeiro, E S; Forell, F; Bertolini, L R; Rodrigues, J L; Ambrósio, C E; Miglino, M A; Mezzalira, A; Bertolini, M

    2010-02-18

    The relationship between the level of cell confluence near the plateau phase of growth and blastocyst yield following somatic cell cloning is not well understood. We examined the effect of distinct cell culture confluence levels on in vitro development of cloned bovine embryos. In vitro-matured bovine oocytes were manually bisected and selected by DNA staining. One or two enucleated hemi-cytoplasts were paired and fused with an adult skin somatic cell. Cultured skin cells from an adult Nellore cow harvested at three distinct culture confluence levels (70-80, 80-90, and >95%) were used for construction of embryos and hemi-embryos. After activation, structures were cultured in vitro as one embryo (1 x 100%) or as aggregates of two hemi-embryos (2 x 50%) per microwell. Fusion, cleavage and blastocyst rates were compared using the chi(2) test. The fusion rate for hemi-embryos (51.4%) was lower than for embryos (67.6%), with no influence of degree of cell confluence. However, blastocyst rates improved linearly (7.0, 17.5, and 29.4%) with increases in cell confluence. We conclude that degree of cell culture confluence significantly influences subsequent embryo development; use of a cell population in high confluence (>90%) for nuclear transfer significantly improved blastocyst yield after cloning.

  8. Confluence induced threonine41/serine45 phospho-β-catenin dephosphorylation via ceramide-mediated activation of PP1cγ

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, Norma; Jones, Jeffrey A.; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2008-01-01

    It was previously observed that cell confluence induced up-regulation of neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2) and increased ceramide levels (Marchesini N, Osta W, Bielawski J, Luberto C, Obeid LM and Hannun YA. (2004) J Biol Chem, 279, 25101−11). In this study, we show that, in MCF7 cells, confluence induces the dephosphorylation of phosphorylated-β-catenin at threonine41/serine45. The effect of confluence on β-catenin dephosphorylation was prevented by down regulation of nSMase2 using siRNA; reciprocally, exogenous addition of short or very long chain ceramides induced dephosphorylation of β-catenin. The serine/threonine protein phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A and okadaic acid prevented β-catenin dephosphorylation during confluence. The specific phosphatase involved was determined by studies using siRNA against the major serine/threonine phosphatases, and the results showed that a specific siRNA against PP1cγ prevented dephosphorylation of β-catenin. Moreover, exogenous ceramides and confluence were found to induce the translocation of PP1cγ to the plasma membrane. All together these results establish: A) a specific intracellular pathway involving the activation of PP1 to mediate the effects of confluence-induced β-catenin dephosphorylation and B) PP1 as a lipid-regulated protein phosphatase downstream of nSMase2/ceramide. Finally, evidence is provided for a role for this pathway in regulating cell motility during confluence. PMID:17996206

  9. Operant nociception in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Bergman, Jack

    2014-09-01

    The effective management of pain is a longstanding public health concern. Morphine-like opioids have long been front-line analgesics, but produce undesirable side effects that can limit their application. Slow progress in the introduction of novel improved medications for pain management over the last 5 decades has prompted a call for innovative translational research, including new preclinical assays. Most current in vivo procedures (eg, tail flick, hot plate, warm water tail withdrawal) assay the effects of nociceptive stimuli on simple spinal reflexes or unconditioned behavioral reactions. However, clinical treatment goals may include the restoration of previous behavioral activities, which can be limited by medication-related side effects that are not measured in such procedures. The present studies describe an apparatus and procedure to study the disruptive effects of nociceptive stimuli on voluntary behavior in nonhuman primates, and the ability of drugs to restore such behavior through their analgesic actions. Squirrel monkeys were trained to pull a cylindrical thermode for access to a highly palatable food. Next, sessions were conducted in which the temperature of the thermode was increased stepwise until responding stopped, permitting the determination of stable nociceptive thresholds. Tests revealed that several opioid analgesics, but not d-amphetamine or Δ(9)-THC, produced dose-related increases in threshold that were antagonist sensitive and efficacy dependent, consistent with their effects using traditional measures of antinociception. Unlike traditional reflex-based measures, however, the results also permitted the concurrent evaluation of response disruption, providing an index with which to characterize the behavioral selectivity of antinociceptive drugs.

  10. Flow dynamics at a river confluence on Mississippi River: field measurement and large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Trung; Khosronejad, Ali; Bartelt, Nicole; Woldeamlak, Solomon; Peterson, Bonnie; Dewall, Petronella; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, University of Minnesota Team; Minnesota Department of Transportation Team

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a river confluence on Mississippi River branch in the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States. Field measurements by Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler using on-board GPS tracking were carried out for five campaigns in the summer of 2014 and 2015 to collect both river bed elevation data and flow fields. Large Eddy Simulation is carried out to simulate the flow field with the total of 100 million grid points for the domain length of 3.2 km. The simulation results agree well with field measurements at measured cross-sections. The results show the existence of wake mode on the mixing interface of two branches near the upstream junction corner. The mutual interaction between the shear layers emanating from the river banks leading to the formation of large scale energetic structures that leads to ``switching'' side of the flow coherent structures. Our result here is a feasibility study for the use of eddy-resolving simulations in predicting complex flow dynamics in medium-size natural rivers. This work is funded by Minnesota Dept. Transportation and Minnesota Institute of Supercomputing.

  11. LLC-PK sub 1 cells express Na sup + -lactate cotransport in apical membranes after confluency

    SciTech Connect

    Poustis-Delpont, C.; Mengual, R.; Sudaka, P. )

    1988-12-01

    L-({sup 3}H)lactate uptake was characterized in LLC-PK{sub 1} cell apical membrane vesicles obtained by intensive culture on microcarrier beads. The apical membrane preparation technique involved MgCl{sub 2} precipitation. Na{sup +}-dependent L-({sup 3}H)lactate uptake was present only after confluency; its appearance paralleled the subcellular localization of aminopeptidase in apical membranes. L-({sup 3}H)lactate uptake was Na{sup +}-dependent and electrogenic. Only the Na{sup +}-dependent component of L({sup 3}H)lactate uptake was saturable with one family of independent carriers. The apparent affinity constant was 1.1 {plus minus} 0.25 mM and the apparent maximal velocity was 29 {plus minus} 3 nmol{center dot}mg{sup {minus}1}{center dot}min{sup {minus}1}. The Na{sup +}-lactate cotransport stoichiometry was 2 Na{sup +} for 1 lactate. The specificity of the L-lactate transport system was compatible with that of the monocarboxylic acid pathway described previously brush-border membranes of kidney cortex and discrete from the tricarboxylic acid carrier, the D-glucose transporter, and the general pathway for anions. The LLC-PK{sub 1} cell line appears to be a useful tool for study of the regulation of L-lactate uptake and biosynthesis of the renal monocarboxylic acid transporter.

  12. Local atmospheric response to warm mesoscale ocean eddies in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Confluence region.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shusaku; Aono, Kenji; Fukui, Shin

    2017-09-19

    In the extratropical regions, surface winds enhance upward heat release from the ocean to atmosphere, resulting in cold surface ocean: surface ocean temperature is negatively correlated with upward heat flux. However, in the western boundary currents and eddy-rich regions, the warmer surface waters compared to surrounding waters enhance upward heat release-a positive correlation between upward heat release and surface ocean temperature, implying that the ocean drives the atmosphere. The atmospheric response to warm mesoscale ocean eddies with a horizontal extent of a few hundred kilometers remains unclear because of a lack of observations. By conducting regional atmospheric model experiments, we show that, in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Confluence region, wintertime warm eddies heat the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), and accelerate westerly winds in the near-surface atmosphere via the vertical mixing effect, leading to wind convergence around the eastern edge of eddies. The warm-eddy-induced convergence forms local ascending motion where convective precipitation is enhanced, providing diabatic heating to the atmosphere above MABL. Our results indicate that warm eddies affect not only near-surface atmosphere but also free atmosphere, and possibly synoptic atmospheric variability. A detailed understanding of warm eddy-atmosphere interaction is necessary to improve in weather and climate projections.

  13. Lateral mixing in the Mississippi River below the confluence with the Ohio River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, R. E.; Rostad, C. E.

    2004-05-01

    Lateral dispersion coefficients for two dispersants were determined for three sections of the Mississippi River below the confluence with the Ohio River. The dispersants were the specific conductance and an industrial organic compound (trimethyltriazinetrione). Three models based on the stream tube concept were used, and lateral dispersion coefficients computed from these models were comparable. Coefficients for the two dispersants also were comparable. Lateral dispersion coefficients were consistent with expectations based on the characteristics of the river sections. Overall average values were 0.444 m2/s for a relatively straight section of river, 1.69 m2/s for a section containing two sharp bends, and 2.22 m2/s for a long section containing four sharp bends and several small islands. The lateral dispersion coefficients measured for the Mississippi River are consistent with literature data and a water discharge relation. Results of this study provide lateral dispersion coefficients for a water discharge not previously reported in the literature as well as new values for the Mississippi River.

  14. Lateral mixing in the Mississippi River below the confluence with the Ohio River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Rostad, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    Lateral dispersion coefficients for two dispersants were determined for three sections of the Mississippi River below the confluence with the Ohio River. The dispersants were the specific conductance and an industrial organic compound (trimethyltriazinetrione). Three models based on the stream tube concept were used, and lateral dispersion coefficients computed from these models were comparable. Coefficients for the two dispersants also were comparable. Lateral dispersion coefficients were consistent with expectations based on the characteristics of the river sections. Overall average values were 0.444 m2/s for a relatively straight section of river, 1.69 m 2/s for a section containing two sharp bends, and 2.22 m 2/s for a long section containing four sharp bends and several small islands. The lateral dispersion coefficients measured for the Mississippi River are consistent with literature data and a water discharge relation. Results of this study provide lateral dispersion coefficients for a water discharge not previously reported in the literature as well as new values for the Mississippi River.

  15. Southern elephant seal trajectories, fronts and eddies in the Brazil/Malvinas Confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagna, Claudio; Piola, Alberto R.; Rosa Marin, Maria; Lewis, Mirtha; Fernández, Teresita

    2006-12-01

    This study describes the association between transient, mesoscale hydrographic features along the axis of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence, in the SW Atlantic, and the foraging behavior of 2-3-year-old (focal) juvenile southern elephant seals, Mirounga leonina, from Península Valdés, Argentina. Departing from the dominant pattern of foraging on predictable bathymetric fronts on the Patagonian shelf and slope, three females out of 12 satellite-tracked juveniles remained at the edge of young warm-core eddies and near the outer core of cold-core eddies, coinciding with the most productive areas of these temperature fronts. Seal trajectories along high-temperature gradients were always consistent with the speed and direction of surface currents inferred from the temperature distribution and confirmed by surface drifters. Movements of foraging seals were compared with those of surface drifters, coinciding in time and space and yielding independent and consistent data on regional water circulation parameters. The diving pattern recorded for one focal seal yielded shallower dives and a loose diel pattern in the eddy, and a marked diurnal cycle compatible with foraging on vertically migrating prey in the cold waters of the Malvinas Current. Pre-reproductive females that use the mesoscale fronts of the Argentine Basin as an alternative foraging area would benefit from lower competition with more experienced seals and with other top predators that reproduce along the coast of Patagonia.

  16. Sea surface temperature anomalies driven by oceanic local forcing in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silveira, Isabel Porto; Pezzi, Luciano Ponzi

    2014-03-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly events in the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC) were investigated through wavelet analysis and numerical modeling. Wavelet analysis was applied to recognize the main spectral signals of SST anomaly events in the BMC and in the Drake Passage as a first attempt to link middle and high latitudes. The numerical modeling approach was used to clarify the local oceanic dynamics that drive these anomalies. Wavelet analysis pointed to the 8-12-year band as the most energetic band representing remote forcing between high to middle latitudes. Other frequencies observed in the BMC wavelet analysis indicate that part of its variability could also be forced by low-latitude events, such as El Niño. Numerical experiments carried out for the years of 1964 and 1992 (cold and warm El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phases) revealed two distinct behaviors that produced negative and positive sea surface temperature anomalies on the BMC region. The first behavior is caused by northward cold flow, Río de la Plata runoff, and upwelling processes. The second behavior is driven by a southward excursion of the Brazil Current (BC) front, alterations in Río de la Plata discharge rates, and most likely by air-sea interactions. Both episodes are characterized by uncoupled behavior between the surface and deeper layers.

  17. Criminal and noncriminal sexual aggressors: integrating psychopathy in a hierarchical-mediational confluence model.

    PubMed

    Malamuth, Neil M

    2003-06-01

    In contrast to widely held beliefs, I suggest that research conducted with either criminal or noncriminal samples of sexually aggressive men actually reveals many similar characteristics shared by both groups. The Hierarchical-Mediational Confluence (HMC) model is presented here to integrate these findings. As relatively distal risk factors, it includes personality and behavioral characteristics associated with psychopaths and predictive of antisocial behavior generally. As more proximate risk factors, it includes personality and behavioral characteristics specifically associated with sexual aggression, such as attitudes condoning sexual aggression, dominance for sexual arousal, and heavy pornography consumption. In addition, the model predicts that the interactive combination of the various risk factors results in higher sexual aggression than expected by the additive combination of these risk factors, a prediction similar to the distinction between "primary" and "secondary" psychopaths. A series of studies supporting the HMC model is presented. Finally, some differences between criminal and noncriminal sexual aggressors are also noted. In particular, criminal sexual aggressors have often committed various other antisocial acts in addition to sexual aggression. In contrast, noncriminals primarily reveal only some elevation in personality characteristics potentiating such nonsexual antisocial behaviors, but report having committed only sexual aggression.

  18. Convergent evolution in primates and an insectivore

    SciTech Connect

    Boffelli, Dario; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-04-16

    The cardiovascular risk factor apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) has a puzzling distribution among mammals, its presence being limited to a subset of primates and a member of the insectivore lineage, the hedgehog. To explore the evolutionary history of apo(a), we performed extensive genomic sequence comparisons of multiple species with and without an apo(a) gene product, such as human, baboon, hedgehog, lemurand mouse. This analysis indicated that apo(a) arose independently in a subset of primates, including baboon and human, and an insectivore, the hedgehog, and was not simply lost by species lacking it. The similar structural domains shared by the hedgehog and primate apo(a) indicate that they were formed by a unique molecular mechanism involving the convergent evolution of paralogous genes in these distantspecies.

  19. Genetic correlates of the evolving primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Vallender, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The tremendous shifts in the size, structure, and function of the brain during primate evolution are ultimately caused by changes at the genetic level. Understanding what these changes are and how they effect the phenotypic changes observed lies at the heart of understanding evolutionary change. This chapter focuses on understanding the genetic basis of primate brain evolution, considering the substrates and mechanisms through which genetic change occurs. It also discusses the implications that our current understandings and tools have for what we have already discovered and where our studies will head in the future. While genetic and genomic studies have identified many regions undergoing positive selection during primate evolution, the findings are certainly not exhaustive and functional relevance remains to be confirmed. Nevertheless, a strong foundation has been built upon which future studies will emerge. PMID:22230621

  20. The ecology of primate material culture

    PubMed Central

    Koops, Kathelijne; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2014-01-01

    Tool use in extant primates may inform our understanding of the conditions that favoured the expansion of hominin technology and material culture. The ‘method of exclusion’ has, arguably, confirmed the presence of culture in wild animal populations by excluding ecological and genetic explanations for geographical variation in behaviour. However, this method neglects ecological influences on culture, which, ironically, may be critical for understanding technology and thus material culture. We review all the current evidence for the role of ecology in shaping material culture in three habitual tool-using non-human primates: chimpanzees, orangutans and capuchin monkeys. We show that environmental opportunity, rather than necessity, is the main driver. We argue that a better understanding of primate technology requires explicit investigation of the role of ecological conditions. We propose a model in which three sets of factors, namely environment, sociality and cognition, influence invention, transmission and retention of material culture. PMID:25392310

  1. The social nature of primate cognition

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Louise; Henzi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that the enlarged brain size of the primates was selected for by social, rather than purely ecological, factors has been strongly influential in studies of primate cognition and behaviour over the past two decades. However, the Machiavellian intelligence hypothesis, also known as the social brain hypothesis, tends to emphasize certain traits and behaviours, like exploitation and deception, at the expense of others, such as tolerance and behavioural coordination, and therefore presents only one view of how social life may shape cognition. This review outlines work from other relevant disciplines, including evolutionary economics, cognitive science and neurophysiology, to illustrate how these can be used to build a more general theoretical framework, incorporating notions of embodied and distributed cognition, in which to situate questions concerning the evolution of primate social cognition. PMID:16191591

  2. Recent advances in primate nutritional ecology.

    PubMed

    Righini, Nicoletta

    2017-04-01

    Nutritional ecology seeks to explain, in an ecological and evolutionary context, how individuals choose, acquire, and process food to satisfy their nutritional requirements. Historically, studies of primate feeding ecology have focused on characterizing diets in terms of the botanical composition of the plants consumed. Further, dietary studies have demonstrated how patch and food choice in relation to time spent foraging and feeding are influenced by the spatial and temporal distribution of resources and by social factors such as feeding competition, dominance, or partner preferences. From a nutritional perspective, several theories including energy and protein-to-fiber maximization, nutrient mixing, and toxin avoidance, have been proposed to explain the food choices of non-human primates. However, more recently, analytical frameworks such as nutritional geometry have been incorporated into primatology to explore, using a multivariate approach, the synergistic effects of multiple nutrients, secondary metabolites, and energy requirements on primate food choice. Dietary strategies associated with nutrient balancing highlight the tradeoffs that primates face in bypassing or selecting particular feeding sites and food items. In this Special Issue, the authors bring together a set of studies focusing on the nutritional ecology of a diverse set of primate taxa characterized by marked differences in dietary emphasis. The authors present, compare, and discuss the diversity of strategies used by primates in diet selection, and how species differences in ecology, physiology, anatomy, and phylogeny can affect patterns of nutrient choice and nutrient balancing. The use of a nutritionally explicit analytical framework is fundamental to identify the nutritional requirements of different individuals of a given species, and through its application, direct conservation efforts can be applied to regenerate and protect specific foods and food patches that offer the opportunity of a

  3. Asian Primate Species Richness Correlates with Rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Chen; Srivathsan, Amrita; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Salim, Agus; Shekelle, Myron

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of meta-analyses found significantly positive correlations between primate species richness and rainfall for Africa, Madagascar and the Neotropics, with the exception of Asia, leaving the open question whether that anomaly is the result of sampling bias, biogeography, or some other factor. This study re-examines the question using modelled data, with primate species richness data from the Southeast Asian Mammals Databank and rainfall data from the Climatic Research Unit. Data processing with Geographical Information Systems resulted in 390 sample points. Reduced major axis and ordinary least squares regressions were employed to examine the relationship for six regions, including the whole study area of Southeast Asia, and the subareas of Huxley West, Huxley East, Mainland Southeast Asia, Borneo, and Sumatra. The results showed a significant positive relationship between primate species richness and mean annual rainfall for Southeast Asia (r = 0.26, P<0.001). Comparing the results for the large islands and Mainland Southeast Asia showed that Sumatra had the highest correlation (r = 0.58; P<0.05). After controlling for the major biogeographic effect associated with Huxley’s Line, our results showed that primate species richness is positively associated with mean annual rainfall in Southeast Asia. Our findings contrast to prior studies of meta-analyses that showed no relationship between rainfall and primate species richness in Asia, and thereby bring Asia into agreement with results showing significant positive correlations between rainfall and primate species richness everywhere else in the world. The inference is that previous anomalous results for Asia were result of sampling bias in the meta-analysis. PMID:23383023

  4. Foveal slope measurements in diabetic retinopathy: Can it predict development of sight-threatening retinopathy? Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS II, Report no 8)

    PubMed Central

    Gella, Laxmi; Pal, Swakshyar Saumya; Ganesan, Suganeswari; Sharma, Tarun; Raman, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to assess the foveal slope configuration in subjects with type 2 diabetes in a population-based study. Materials and Methods: A subset of 668 subjects from Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study II, a population-based study, were included in the current study. All the subjects underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation including spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Foveal thickness was assessed in five central early treatment DR study quadrants from the three-dimensional scan and foveal slope was calculated in all the four quadrants. Results: Subjects with sight-threatening DR (STDR) had significantly shallow foveal slope in inferior quadrant (STDR: 7.33 ± 6.26 vs. controls: 10.31 ± 3.44; P = 0.021) when compared to controls and in superior (STDR: 7.62 ± 5.81 vs. no DR: 9.11 ± 2.82; P = 0.033), inferior (STDR: 7.33 ± 6.26 vs. no DR: 8.81 ± 2.81; P = 0.048), and temporal quadrants (STDR: 6.69 ± 5.70 vs. no DR: 7.97 ± 2.33; P = 0.030) when compared to subjects with no DR. Foveal slope was significantly shallow among the older age groups in subjects with no DR (P < 0.001) and non-STDR (P = 0.027). Average foveal slope in the diabetic subjects was independently and significantly correlated with increase in age (r = −0.241; P < 0.001) and central subfield thickness (r = −0.542; P < 0.001). Conclusion: Changes in foveal slope were seen with increasing age; however, in diabetes these segmental slope changes can be seen in late DR (STDR). PMID:26265635

  5. Foveal slope measurements in diabetic retinopathy: Can it predict development of sight-threatening retinopathy? Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study (SN-DREAMS II, Report no 8).

    PubMed

    Gella, Laxmi; Pal, Swakshyar Saumya; Ganesan, Suganeswari; Sharma, Tarun; Raman, Rajiv

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to assess the foveal slope configuration in subjects with type 2 diabetes in a population-based study. A subset of 668 subjects from Sankara Nethralaya Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) Epidemiology and Molecular Genetics Study II, a population-based study, were included in the current study. All the subjects underwent comprehensive ophthalmic evaluation including spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Foveal thickness was assessed in five central early treatment DR study quadrants from the three-dimensional scan and foveal slope was calculated in all the four quadrants. Subjects with sight-threatening DR (STDR) had significantly shallow foveal slope in inferior quadrant (STDR: 7.33 ± 6.26 vs. 10.31 ± 3.44; P = 0.021) when compared to controls and in superior (STDR: 7.62 ± 5.81 vs. no DR: 9.11 ± 2.82; P = 0.033), inferior (STDR: 7.33 ± 6.26 vs. no DR: 8.81 ± 2.81; P = 0.048), and temporal quadrants (STDR: 6.69 ± 5.70 vs. no DR: 7.97 ± 2.33; P = 0.030) when compared to subjects with no DR. Foveal slope was significantly shallow among the older age groups in subjects with no DR (P < 0.001) and non-STDR (P = 0.027). Average foveal slope in the diabetic subjects was independently and significantly correlated with increase in age (r = -0.241; P < 0.001) and central subfield thickness (r = -0.542; P < 0.001). Changes in foveal slope were seen with increasing age; however, in diabetes these segmental slope changes can be seen in late DR (STDR).

  6. Learning about primates' learning, language, and cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of many years of research on the methods of teaching primates the language and cognitive skills which were long considered to be unteachable to particular species of primates. It was found that chimpanzee subjects could not only learn a number of 'stock sentences' but to use them in variations and several combinations for the purpose of solving various problems. Apes placed in different rooms could be taught to communicate via computer, and collaborate with each other on doing specific tasks. Contrary to expectations, young rhesus monkeys proved to be able to learn as much as the chimpanzee species.

  7. Scaling of rotational inertia of primate mandibles.

    PubMed

    Ross, Callum F; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Platts, Ellen; Walsh, Treva; Heins, Liam; Gerstner, Geoffrey E; Taylor, Andrea B

    2017-05-01

    The relative importance of pendulum mechanics and muscle mechanics in chewing dynamics has implications for understanding the optimality criteria driving the evolution of primate feeding systems. The Spring Model (Ross et al., 2009b), which modeled the primate chewing system as a forced mass-spring system, predicted that chew cycle time would increase faster than was actually observed. We hypothesized that if mandibular momentum plays an important role in chewing dynamics, more accurate estimates of the rotational inertia of the mandible would improve the accuracy with which the Spring Model predicts the scaling of primate chew cycle period. However, if mass-related momentum effects are of negligible importance in the scaling of primate chew cycle period, this hypothesis would be falsified. We also predicted that greater "robusticity" of anthropoid mandibles compared with prosimians would be associated with higher moments of inertia. From computed tomography scans, we estimated the scaling of the moment of inertia (Ij) of the mandibles of thirty-one species of primates, including 22 anthropoid and nine prosimian species, separating Ij into the moment about a transverse axis through the center of mass (Ixx) and the moment of the center of mass about plausible axes of rotation. We found that across primates Ij increases with positive allometry relative to jaw length, primarily due to positive allometry of jaw mass and Ixx, and that anthropoid mandibles have greater rotational inertia compared with prosimian mandibles of similar length. Positive allometry of Ij of primate mandibles actually lowers the predictive ability of the Spring Model, suggesting that scaling of primate chew cycle period, and chewing dynamics in general, are more strongly influenced by factors other than scaling of inertial properties of the mandible, such as the dynamic properties of the jaw muscles and neural control. Differences in cycle period scaling between chewing and locomotion systems

  8. The primate semicircular canal system and locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Spoor, Fred; Garland, Theodore; Krovitz, Gail; Ryan, Timothy M.; Silcox, Mary T.; Walker, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The semicircular canal system of vertebrates helps coordinate body movements, including stabilization of gaze during locomotion. Quantitative phylogenetically informed analysis of the radius of curvature of the three semicircular canals in 91 extant and recently extinct primate species and 119 other mammalian taxa provide support for the hypothesis that canal size varies in relation to the jerkiness of head motion during locomotion. Primate and other mammalian species studied here that are agile and have fast, jerky locomotion have significantly larger canals relative to body mass than those that move more cautiously. PMID:17576932

  9. Effective primate conservation education: gaps and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Susan K

    2010-05-01

    Conservation education goals generally include influencing people's conservation awareness, attitudes, and behaviors. Effective programs can help foster sustainable behavior, improve public support for conservation, reduce vandalism and poaching in protected areas, improve compliance with conservation regulations, increase recreation carrying capacities, and influence policies and decisions that affect the environment. Primate conservation problems cut across many disciplines, and primate conservation education must likewise address cross-disciplinary issues. Conservation educators must incorporate both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills to develop effective programs, and the skill set must stretch beyond pedagogy. Expertise needed comes from the areas of planning, collaboration, psychology, entertainment, and evaluation. Integration of these elements can lead to greater program success.

  10. Learning about primates' learning, language, and cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of many years of research on the methods of teaching primates the language and cognitive skills which were long considered to be unteachable to particular species of primates. It was found that chimpanzee subjects could not only learn a number of 'stock sentences' but to use them in variations and several combinations for the purpose of solving various problems. Apes placed in different rooms could be taught to communicate via computer, and collaborate with each other on doing specific tasks. Contrary to expectations, young rhesus monkeys proved to be able to learn as much as the chimpanzee species.

  11. Primate feedstock for the evolution of consonants.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Adriano R; Maddieson, Ian; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    The evolution of speech remains an elusive scientific problem. A widespread notion is that vocal learning, underlined by vocal-fold control, is a key prerequisite for speech evolution. Although present in birds and non-primate mammals, vocal learning is ostensibly absent in non-human primates. Here we argue that the main road to speech evolution has been through controlling the supralaryngeal vocal tract, for which we find evidence for evolutionary continuity within the great apes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Regulation of estrogen sulfotransferase expression by confluence of MCF10A breast epithelial cells: role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiaqi; Fang, Hailin; Paulsen, Michelle; Ljungman, Mats; Kocarek, Thomas A; Runge-Morris, Melissa

    2011-11-01

    Estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) catalyzes the sulfonation of estrogens, which limits estrogen mitogenicity. We recently reported that SULT1E1 expression is low in preconfluent MCF10A human breast epithelial cells but increases when the cells become confluent. Pulse-chase labeling experiments with 5-bromouridine demonstrated that the confluence-mediated increase in SULT1E1 expression was due to increased mRNA synthesis. Because aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation has been shown to suppress SULT1E1 expression and loss of cell-cell contact has been shown to activate the AhR in other cell types, we tested whether the confluence-associated changes in SULT1E1 expression were mediated by the AhR. Relative to confluent MCF10A cells, preconfluent cells had higher levels of CYP1A1 mRNA and greater activation of an AhR-responsive luciferase reporter, demonstrating that the AhR was active in the preconfluent cells. AhR and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator mRNA and protein levels were also higher in preconfluent than in confluent cultures. Treatment of preconfluent cells with the AhR antagonist, 3'-methoxy-4'-nitroflavone (MNF), or AhR knockdown significantly increased SULT1E1 expression. MCF10A cells stably transfected with a luciferase reporter containing ∼7 kilobases of the SULT1E1 5'-flanking region showed both MNF- and confluence-inducible luciferase expression. Preconfluent cells transiently transfected with the reporter showed both MNF treatment- and AhR knockdown-mediated luciferase induction, but mutation of a computationally predicted dioxin response element (DRE) at nucleotide (nt) -3476 did not attenuate these effects. These results demonstrate that SULT1E1 expression in MCF10A cells is transcriptionally regulated by confluence through a suppressive action of the AhR, which is not mediated through a DRE at nt -3476.

  13. Proliferation of pulmonary endothelial cells: time-lapse cinematography of growth to confluence and restitution of monolayer after wounding.

    PubMed

    Ryan, U S; Absher, M; Olazabal, B M; Brown, L M; Ryan, J W

    1982-01-01

    A fundamental characteristic of vascular endothelium is that it exists as a monolayer, a condition that must be met in both vascular growth and repair. Maintenance of the monolayer is important both for the exchange of nutrients and for interactions between blood solutes and endothelial enzymes and transport systems. We have used time-lapse cinematography to compare proliferative behavior of bovine pulmonary endothelial cells in (1) establishment of a monolayer from a low-density seed (7.5 X 10(4) cells in a 60 mm dish) and (2) restitution of a confluent monolayer (approx. 2.9 x 10(6) cells in a 60 mm dish) following a mechanical wound (removal of cells from an area 5 x 15 mm by scraping). Culture 2 was not refed after wounding. In culture 2, approx. 30% of the cells accounted for repopulation (confluence in 40 hr). In culture 1, all cells entered into division. Participating cells of culture 2 began division immediately (69 divisions/filmed area in 10 hr, vs. four divisions in culture 1). Interdivision times (IDT) were longer and relatively constant in culture 1 until near confluence; none were less than 10 h, whereas in 2, 24% of the IDT's were less than or equal to 10 hr. Remarkably, IDTs of culture 2 decreased steadily until confluence was re-established. Cell migration in culture 1 was multidirectional while direction of migration in culture 2 was always into the wound area. Mean migration rate (MIG) in culture 2 was related to the site of origin of the cells, those dividing farthest from the unwounded area had fastest MIGs. Neither culture formed more than a single layer of cells. Although the cell kinetics of cultures 1 and 2 differed, the same goal, confluence, was achieved in either case.

  14. Variable partitioning of flow and sediment transfer through a large river diffluence-confluence unit across a monsoonal flood pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, C. R.; Aalto, R. E.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Leyland, J.; Nicholas, A. P.; Best, J.

    2016-12-01

    Bifurcations represent key morphological nodes within the channel networks of anabranching and braided fluvial channels, playing an important role in controlling local bed morphology, the routing of sediment and water, and defining the stability of the downstream reaches. Herein, we detail field observations of the three-dimensional flow structure, bed morphological changes and partitioning of both flow discharge and suspended sediment through a large diffluence-confluence unit on the Mekong River, Cambodia, across a range of flow stages (from 13,500 m3 s-1 to 27,000 m3 s-1) over the monsoonal flood-pulse cycle. We show that the discharge asymmetry (a measure of the disparity between discharges distributed down the left and right branches of the bifurcation) varies with flow discharge and that the influence of upstream curvature-induced cross-stream water surface slope and bed morphological changes are first-order controls in modulating the asymmetry in bifurcation discharge. Flow discharge is shown to play a key role in defining the morphodynamics of the diffluence-confluence unit downstream of the bifurcation. Our data show that during peak flows (Q 27,000 m3 s-1), the downstream island complex acts as a net sink of suspended sediment (with 2600 kg s-1 being deposited between the diffluence and confluence), whereas during lower flows, on both the rising and falling limbs of the flood wave, the sediment balance is in quasi-equilibrium. We propose a new conceptual model of bifurcation stability that incorporates varying flood discharge and in which the long term stability of the bifurcation, as well as the larger channel planform and morphology of the diffluence-confluence unit, are controlled by the variations in flood discharge.

  15. The influence of flow discharge variations on the morphodynamics of a diffluence-confluence unit on the Mekong River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, Christopher; Darby, Stephen; Parsons, Daniel; Leyland, Julian; Aalto, Rolf; Nicholas, Andrew; Best, Jim

    2017-04-01

    Bifurcations represent key morphological nodes within the channel networks of anabranching and braided fluvial channels, playing an important role in controlling local bed morphology, the routing of sediment and water, and defining the stability of the downstream reaches. Herein, we detail field observations of the three-dimensional flow structure, bed morphological changes and partitioning of both flow discharge and suspended sediment through a large diffluence-confluence unit on the Mekong River, Cambodia, across a range of flow stages (from 13,500 m3 s-1 to 27,000 m3 s-1) over the monsoonal flood-pulse cycle. We show that the discharge asymmetry (a measure of the disparity between discharges distributed down the left and right branches of the bifurcation) varies with flow discharge and that the influence of upstream curvature-induced cross-stream water surface slope and bed morphological changes are first-order controls in modulating the asymmetry in bifurcation discharge. Flow discharge is shown to play a key role in defining the morphodynamics of the diffluence-confluence unit downstream of the bifurcation. Our data show that during high flows (Q 27,000 m3 s-1), the downstream island complex acts as a net sink of suspended sediment (with 2600 kg s-1 being deposited between the diffluence and confluence), whereas during lower flows, on both the rising and falling limbs of the flood wave, the sediment balance is in quasi-equilibrium. We propose, therefore, that the long term stability of the bifurcation, as well as the larger channel planform and morphology of the diffluence-confluence unit, is therefore controlled by annual monsoonal flood pulses and the associated variations in discharge.

  16. Vocal turn-taking in a non-human primate is learned during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cecilia P; Mitchell, Jude F; Miller, Cory T

    2015-05-22

    Conversational turn-taking is an integral part of language development, as it reflects a confluence of social factors that mitigate communication. Humans coordinate the timing of speech based on the behaviour of another speaker, a behaviour that is learned during infancy. While adults in several primate species engage in vocal turn-taking, the degree to which similar learning processes underlie its development in these non-human species or are unique to language is not clear. We recorded the natural vocal interactions of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) occurring with both their sibling twins and parents over the first year of life and observed at least two parallels with language development. First, marmoset turn-taking is a learned vocal behaviour. Second, marmoset parents potentially played a direct role in guiding the development of turn-taking by providing feedback to their offspring when errors occurred during vocal interactions similarly to what has been observed in humans. Though species-differences are also evident, these findings suggest that similar learning mechanisms may be implemented in the ontogeny of vocal turn-taking across our Order, a finding that has important implications for our understanding of language evolution. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Statistical distribution of foveal transverse chromatic aberration, pupil centration, and angle psi in a population of young adult eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynders, Maurice; Lidkea, Bruce; Chisholm, William; Thibos, Larry N.

    1995-10-01

    Subjective transverse chromatic aberration (sTCA) manifest at the fovea was determined for a population of 85 young adults (19-38 years old) by means of a two-dimensional, two-color, vernier alignment technique. The statistical distribution of sTCA was well fitted by a bivariate Gaussian function with mean values that were not significantly different from zero in either the horizontal or the vertical direction. We conclude from this result that a hypothetical, average eye representing the population mean of human eyes with medium-sized pupils is free of foveal sTCA. However, the absolute magnitude of sTCA for any given individual was often significantly greater than zero and ranged from 0.05 to 2.67 arcmin for the red and the blue lights of a computer monitor (mean wavelengths, 605 and 497 nm, respectively). The statistical distribution of the absolute magnitude of sTCA was well described by a Rayleigh probability distribution with a mean of 0.8 arcmin. A simple device useful for population screening in a clinical setting was also tested and gave concordant results. Assuming that sTCA at the fovea is due to decentering of the pupil with respect to the visual axis, we infer from these results that the pupil is, on average, well centered in human eyes. The average magnitude of pupil decentration in individual eyes is less than 0.5 mm, which corresponds to psi =3 deg for the angle between the achromatic and the visual axes of the eye.

  18. Prognostic significance of foveal capillary drop-out and previous panretinal photocoagulation for diabetic macular oedema treated with ranibizumab

    PubMed Central

    Ebneter, Andreas; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate the prognostic significance of macular capillary drop-out and previous panretinal laser photocoagulation in diabetic macular oedema treated with intravitreal ranibizumab. Methods Retrospective observational case series. Treatment-naive patients with diabetic macular oedema that had been treated with intravitreal ranibizumab as per the RESTORE study protocol for at least 12 months were included. Some patients (n=15) had previous panretinal laser photocoagulation. Best-corrected visual acuity and central retina thickness were recorded monthly. The foveal avascular zone and the perifoveal capillaries were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed on fluorescein angiography on two occasions during the observational period. Results From the 46 eyes (46 patients) in this study, 13 (28%) had evidence of perifoveal capillary drop-out. Central retinal thickness was significantly thinner at baseline (p=0.02) and throughout the study period in these eyes compared with those with normal perifoveal capillaries. Both groups responded with a significant gain of best-corrected visual acuity to ranibizumab treatment (7.6±3.3 and 6.3±1.3 ETDRS letters, respectively). Eyes with previous panretinal laser photocoagulation displayed a comparable final outcome regarding function and morphology, requiring a similar intensity of intravitreal injections. Conclusions Perifoveal capillary drop-out did not limit the gain of visual acuity from intravitreal ranibizumab treatment. The reduction of central retina thickness was similar to that seen in eyes with normal perifoveal capillaries. Central retinal thickness in eyes with perifoveal capillary drop-out was generally reduced. However, this did not affect their benefit from treatment. Ranibizumab did not increase the amount of perifoveal capillary loss. PMID:26187951

  19. Subregional characterization of mesoscale eddies across the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Evan; Pascual, Ananda; Gaube, Peter; Ruiz, Simón; Pelegrí, Josep L.; Delepoulle, Antoine

    2017-04-01

    Horizontal and vertical motions associated with coherent mesoscale structures, including eddies and meanders, are responsible for significant global transports of many properties, including heat and mass. Mesoscale vertical fluxes also influence upper ocean biological productivity by mediating the supply of nutrients into the euphotic layer, with potential impacts on the global carbon cycle. The Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC) is a western boundary current region in the South Atlantic with intense mesoscale activity. This region has an active role in the genesis and transformation of water masses and thus is a critical component of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. The collision between the Malvinas and Brazil Currents over the Patagonian shelf/slope creates an energetic front that translates offshore to form a vigorous eddy field. Recent improvements in gridded altimetric sea level anomaly fields allow us to track BMC mesoscale eddies with high spatial and temporal resolutions using an automated eddy tracker. We characterize the eddies across fourteen 5° × 5° subregions. Eddy-centric composites of tracers and geostrophic currents diagnosed from a global reanalysis of surface and in situ data reveal substantial subregional heterogeneity. The in situ data are also used to compute the evolving quasi-geostrophic vertical velocity (QG-ω) associated with each instantaneous eddy instance. The QG-ω eddy composites have the expected dipole patterns of alternating upwelling/downwelling, however, the magnitude and sign of azimuthally averaged vertical velocity varies among subregions. Maximum eddy values are found near fronts and sharp topographic gradients. In comparison with regional eddy composites, subregional composites provide refined information about mesoscale eddy heterogeneity.

  20. Description of interview data regarding Pittsburgh and confluence toxic chemical accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.O.; Shumpert, B.L.; Sorensen, J.H.

    1990-11-01

    Evacuation is the protective action most often recommended in response to chemical releases in the United States. The appropriateness of a decision to evacuate depends on whether the affected areas can be cleared of residents before it is contaminated by the chemical release. In determining whether an evacuation can be completed in time, emergency officials must consider both technical and behavioral aspects. The technical components can be readily conceived and quantified. In contrast, the behavioral components are much more abstract and more difficult to estimate. This report summarizes the univariate analysis of responses to surveys conducted in two communities where evacuation was recommended following train derailments involving hazardous chemicals. The surveys were designed to identify the actions taken by residents upon receiving the emergency warning; determine when people received the warning, decided to take action, and implemented the action; and ascertain factors that might explain the nature and timing of their actions. The surveys were conducted in the Bloomfield section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and in the town of Confluence, Pennsylvania. The study confirms that compliance with an emergency warning to evacuate varies and that potentially dangerous delays can be expected. Significant differences were noted, however, in the rate and speed of compliance in the two communities. The surveys provide information on several factors that may be useful in determining the reasons for differences in the responses from the two communities as well as differences among individual respondents. Such factors include the time of day when the accident occurred, where the respondent was at the time, whether the family was together, previous disaster experience, pet ownership, the content of the warning message, and demographic characteristics. 4 refs., 4 figs., 18 tabs.

  1. [From influence to confluence : positioning the history of pre-modern Korean medicine in East Asia].

    PubMed

    Suh, Soyoung

    2010-12-31

    This article surveys studies focusing on pre-modern Korean medicine, which are both written in English and analyzed primary sources up to 1876. Overall, the history of pre-modern Korean medicine is an unknown filed in Anglophone academia. Yung Sik Kim's, James Palais's, and Carter Ecart's problematization of the nationalist framework of Korean scholarship partially explains the marginality of the field. Addressing these criticisms, this review argues that pre-modern Korean medicine's uneasy task lies in both elaborating Korea's own experience of medicine, while simultaneously avoiding making the "Korean" category itself essential. Korean narratives of premodern medicine need to go beyond the mere territorilalization of Korean medicine against its Chinese, Japanese, or Western counterparts, thereby to tackle the field's own boundary of research objects. The existing scholarship in English responds to this challenge by primarily examining the way in which Korea has shared textual tradition with China. Sirhak scholars' innovation in medicine, visual representation of Tongŭi bogam, Korean management of epidemics in the eleventh century, and Korean indexing of local botanicals, engages not only native achievements, but also the process of modifying medicine across geographical and political boundaries. More to the point, the emerging native narratives, although written in Korean, are implicitly resonant with those currently present in Anglophone academia. Taking "tension," "intertextuality," and "local traits" as a lens, this article assesses a series of current research in Korea. Aiming to go beyond appeals for a "distinctively" Korean experience of medicine, the future study of Korean pre-modern medicine will further elucidate confluences of different flows, such as "Chinese and Korean," "universal and local," "center and periphery," and "native and foreign," which will eventually articulate a range of Korean techniques of creating a bricolage in medicine.

  2. In Situ Observations of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence in March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emelianov, M. V.; Pelegrí, J. L.; Isern-Fontanet, J.; Orue, D.; Ramirez, S.; Salvador, J.; Saraceno, M.; Valla, D.

    2016-02-01

    The Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC) is the area where the Brazil and Malvinas Currents meet, respectively carrying waters of subtropical and subantarctic origin (Fig.1). As a result, the BMC plays a very important role in the meridional transfer of mass, heat, and salt, hence controlling the intensity of the returning limb of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). In this communication we describe the oceanographic conditions in the BMC region during March 2015, as sampled from the R/V Hespérides in the frame of the Spanish project "Tipping Corners in the AMOC" (CTM2011-28867). During the cruise we performed 66 hydrographic stations, and released 8 drifters and 9 floats (2 floats were recovered at the end of the cruise), in what turned out to be a high-resolution sampling of the frontal encountering of the Malvina and Brazil Currents and the resulting mesoscale and small-scale structures. The observations characterize the frontal collision of the two currents, each of them with speeds in excess of 1 m/s. This clashing creates a complex frontal system with very high horizontal gradients of physical and biochemical variables, certainly among the most intense open-ocean frontal systems in the world (e.g. cross-frontal gradients of temperature up to 1°C per kilometer). The frontal system is distinguished by thermohaline intrusions, eddies, filaments, and an offshore surface jet with speeds in excess of 2 m/s. Fig. 1. (Left) BMC with a schematic of the surface circulation pattern (Combes and Matano, J. Geophys. Res., 119, 731-756, 2014). (Right) Detail of the BMC for 20 March 2015, with the sea level altimetry (in color) and surface geostrophic velocity fields (vectors); the study area is located within the area bounded by the green dots.

  3. Approach to hepatocaval confluence during laparoscopic right hepatectomy: three variations on a theme.

    PubMed

    Ratti, Francesca; Cipriani, Federica; Catena, Marco; Paganelli, Michele; Aldrighetti, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Due to technical challenges and reduced pool of candidates, laparoscopic major hepatectomies remain relatively limited: In particular, right hepatectomy is technically more challenging than left since it requires liver mobilization, dissection of inferior vena cava (IVC) and hepatocaval confluence (HepCC), and section of right hepatic vein (RHV). Among 53 laparoscopic right hepatectomies (San Raffaele Hospital; 2013-2015), the approach to HepCC was standardized by three techniques: (1) primary approach to IVC and RHV with complete mobilization of right hemiliver; (2) anterior approach with hanging maneuver without liver mobilization (partial anterior approach-PAA); and (3) anterior approach without hanging maneuver without liver mobilization of right hemiliver (total anterior approach-TAA). The technique was defined preoperatively based on tumor size/position, IVC/RHV compression, and HepCC dislodgement. Type of parenchyma and risk of lesion rupture were also evaluated. Primary approach to IVC and RHV Before liver transection and after liver mobilization, IVC dissection is performed, and RHV is isolated and suspended on a vessel loop. RHV is sectioned after parenchymal transection. no compression by tumor of IVC/RHV, no HepCC dislodgement, soft parenchyma, no risk of lesion rupture. PAA IVC and HepCC are dissected free before transection, without previous liver mobilization; a tape is positioned in front of the anterior aspect of IVC, to perform the hanging maneuver. RHV section is performed after parenchymal transection. huge masses without compression of IVC/RHV, no HepCC dislodgement, liver stiffness, risk of lesion/parenchyma rupture. TAA Both IVC and RHV dissections are performed at the end of parenchymal transection, without previous mobilization of right lobe. huge masses with compression of IVC/RHV, HepCC dislodgement. Different approaches are available for HepCC dissection during laparoscopic right hepatectomy: Liver parenchyma characteristics, tumor size

  4. Nutritional contributions of insects to primate diets: implications for primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Jessica M; Raubenheimer, David; Bryer, Margaret A H; Takahashi, Maressa; Gilbert, Christopher C

    2014-06-01

    Insects and other invertebrates form a portion of many living and extinct primate diets. We review the nutritional profiles of insects in comparison with other dietary items, and discuss insect nutrients in relation to the nutritional needs of living primates. We find that insects are incorporated into some primate diets as staple foods whereby they are the majority of food intake. They can also be incorporated as complements to other foods in the diet, providing protein in a diet otherwise dominated by gums and/or fruits, or be incorporated as supplements to likely provide an essential nutrient that is not available in the typical diet. During times when they are very abundant, such as in insect outbreaks, insects can serve as replacements to the usual foods eaten by primates. Nutritionally, insects are high in protein and fat compared with typical dietary items like fruit and vegetation. However, insects are small in size and for larger primates (>1 kg) it is usually nutritionally profitable only to consume insects when they are available in large quantities. In small quantities, they may serve to provide important vitamins and fatty acids typically unavailable in primate diets. In a brief analysis, we found that soft-bodied insects are higher in fat though similar in chitin and protein than hard-bodied insects. In the fossil record, primates can be defined as soft- or hard-bodied insect feeders based on dental morphology. The differences in the nutritional composition of insects may have implications for understanding early primate evolution and ecology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Disproportional representation of primates in the ecological literature.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Eckhard W; Zinner, Dietmar; Ganzhorn, Jörg U

    2013-01-01

    We address the question why papers dealing with the ecology of primates are so sparsely represented in the general ecological literature. A literature analyses based on entries in Web of Science and PrimateLit reveals that despite a large number of papers published on primates in general and on the ecology of primates, only a very small fraction of these papers is published in high-ranking international ecological journals. We discuss a number of potential reasons for the disproportion and highlight the problems associated with experimental research on wild primates and constraints on sample size as major issues.

  6. Remarkable ancient divergences amongst neglected lorisiform primates

    PubMed Central

    Nekaris, K. Anne‐Isola; Perkin, Andrew; Bearder, Simon K.; Pimley, Elizabeth R.; Schulze, Helga; Streicher, Ulrike; Nadler, Tilo; Kitchener, Andrew; Zischler, Hans; Zinner, Dietmar; Roos, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lorisiform primates (Primates: Strepsirrhini: Lorisiformes) represent almost 10% of the living primate species and are widely distributed in sub‐Saharan Africa and South/South‐East Asia; however, their taxonomy, evolutionary history, and biogeography are still poorly understood. In this study we report the largest molecular phylogeny in terms of the number of represented taxa. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene for 86 lorisiform specimens, including ∼80% of all the species currently recognized. Our results support the monophyly of the Galagidae, but a common ancestry of the Lorisinae and Perodicticinae (family Lorisidae) was not recovered. These three lineages have early origins, with the Galagidae and the Lorisinae diverging in the Oligocene at about 30 Mya and the Perodicticinae emerging in the early Miocene. Our mitochondrial phylogeny agrees with recent studies based on nuclear data, and supports Euoticus as the oldest galagid lineage and the polyphyletic status of Galagoides. Moreover, we have elucidated phylogenetic relationships for several species never included before in a molecular phylogeny. The results obtained in this study suggest that lorisiform diversity remains substantially underestimated and that previously unnoticed cryptic diversity might be present within many lineages, thus urgently requiring a comprehensive taxonomic revision of this primate group. © 2015 The Linnean Society of London PMID:26900177

  7. Homeostasis in primates in hyperacceleration fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Various homeostatic responses of a nonhuman primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) to acute changes in the acceleration environment were examined. When these animals were exposed to a hyperdynamic field the body temperature was consistently depressed and the animals showed behavioral indications of increased drowsiness. Further, time of day played a significant role in influencing these responses.

  8. [Experimental whooping cough of nonhuman primate].

    PubMed

    Kubrava, D T; Medkova, A Iu; Siniashina, L N; Shevtsova, Z V; Matua, A Z; Kondzharia, I G; Barkaia, V S; Elistratova, Zh V; Karataev, G I; Mikvabia, Z Ia; Gintsburg, A L

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable success in study of Bordetella pertussis virulence factors, pathogenesis of whooping cough, duration of B. pertussis bacteria persistence, types and mechanisms of immune response are still keep underinvestigated. It can be explained by the absence ofadequate experimental animal model for pertussis study. Our study estimates clinical and laboratory parameters of whooping cough in non-human primates of the Old World in the process of intranasan infection by virulent B. pertussis bacteria. Also the duration of B. pertussis bacteria persistence in animals was investigated. 14 animal units of 4 species of non-human primates of the Old World were used for intranasal infection. The examination of infect animals included: visual exploration of nasopharynx, thermometry, clinical and biochemical blood analyses, identification ofB. pertussis, using microbiologic and molecular genetic analyses, estimation of innate and adoptive immune factors. The development of infectious process was accompanied by generation of B. pertussis bacteria, catarrhal inflammation of nasopharyngeal mucosa, leucocytosis, hypoglycemia specific for pertussis, and activation of innate and adaptive immunity for all primates regardless of specie were seen. While repeated experimental infection in primates single bacterial colonies were registered during only first week after challenge. It occurs like the absence of inflammation of nasopharyngeal mucosa and the lack of laboratory marks of whooping cough, recorded after first challenge. The evident booster effect of humoral immunity was observed. As a model for investigation of B. pertussis bacteria persistence and immune response against whooping cough we suggest the usage of rhesus macaque as more available to experiments.

  9. Chronic wasting disease agents in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Race, Brent; Meade-White, Kimberly D; Phillips, Katie; Striebel, James; Race, Richard; Chesebro, Bruce

    2014-05-01

    Chronic wasting disease is a prion disease of cervids. Assessment of its zoonotic potential is critical. To evaluate primate susceptibility, we tested monkeys from 2 genera. We found that 100% of intracerebrally inoculated and 92% of orally inoculated squirrel monkeys were susceptible, but cynomolgus macaques were not, suggesting possible low risk for humans.

  10. Nonhuman primate models in translational regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Daadi, Marcel M; Barberi, Tiziano; Shi, Qiang; Lanford, Robert E

    2014-12-01

    Humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs) are similar in size, behavior, physiology, biochemistry, structure and function of organs, and complexity of the immune system. Research on NHPs generates complementary data that bridge translational research from small animal models to humans. NHP models of human disease offer unique opportunities to develop stem cell-based therapeutic interventions that directly address relevant and challenging translational aspects of cell transplantation therapy. These include the use of autologous induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cellular products, issues related to the immune response in autologous and allogeneic setting, pros and cons of delivery techniques in a clinical setting, as well as the safety and efficacy of candidate cell lines. The NHP model allows the assessment of complex physiological, biochemical, behavioral, and imaging end points, with direct relevance to human conditions. At the same time, the value of using primates in scientific research must be carefully evaluated and timed due to expense and the necessity for specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. Often it is more efficient and useful to perform initial proof-of-concept studies for new therapeutics in rodents and/or other species before the pivotal studies in NHPs that may eventually lead to first-in-human trials. In this report, we present how the Southwest National Primate Research Center, one of seven NIH-funded National Primate Research Centers, may help the global community in translating promising technologies to the clinical arena.

  11. Optogenetics Advances in Primate Visual Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Remington, Evan

    2016-04-06

    In this issue of Neuron, Klein et al. (2016) used cell-type-specific optogenetics and electrical microstimulation to characterize the koniocellular geniculocortical projections in nonhuman primates. Their work offers a powerful platform for refining our understanding of the mechanisms of visual information processing in the lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex.

  12. Primate molecular phylogenetics in a genomic era.

    PubMed

    Ting, Nelson; Sterner, Kirstin N

    2013-02-01

    A primary objective of molecular phylogenetics is to use molecular data to elucidate the evolutionary history of living organisms. Dr. Morris Goodman founded the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution as a forum where scientists could further our knowledge about the tree of life, and he recognized that the inference of species trees is a first and fundamental step to addressing many important evolutionary questions. In particular, Dr. Goodman was interested in obtaining a complete picture of the primate species tree in order to provide an evolutionary context for the study of human adaptations. A number of recent studies use multi-locus datasets to infer well-resolved and well-supported primate phylogenetic trees using consensus approaches (e.g., supermatrices). It is therefore tempting to assume that we have a complete picture of the primate tree, especially above the species level. However, recent theoretical and empirical work in the field of molecular phylogenetics demonstrates that consensus methods might provide a false sense of support at certain nodes. In this brief review we discuss the current state of primate molecular phylogenetics and highlight the importance of exploring the use of coalescent-based analyses that have the potential to better utilize information contained in multi-locus data.

  13. Nonhuman primate models of focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jingjing; Li, Yi; Fu, Xinyu; Li, Lijuan; Hao, Xiaoting; Li, Shasha

    2017-01-01

    Rodents have been widely used in the production of cerebral ischemia models. However, successful therapies have been proven on experimental rodent stroke model, and they have often failed to be effective when tested clinically. Therefore, nonhuman primates were recommended as the ideal alternatives, owing to their similarities with the human cerebrovascular system, brain metabolism, grey to white matter ratio and even their rich behavioral repertoire. The present review is a thorough summary of ten methods that establish nonhuman primate models of focal cerebral ischemia; electrocoagulation, endothelin-1-induced occlusion, microvascular clip occlusion, autologous blood clot embolization, balloon inflation, microcatheter embolization, coil embolization, surgical suture embolization, suture, and photochemical induction methods. This review addresses the advantages and disadvantages of each method, as well as precautions for each model, compared nonhuman primates with rodents, different species of nonhuman primates and different modeling methods. Finally it discusses various factors that need to be considered when modelling and the method of evaluation after modelling. These are critical for understanding their respective strengths and weaknesses and underlie the selection of the optimum model. PMID:28400817

  14. Processing Of Visual Information In Primate Brains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H.; Van Essen, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Report reviews and analyzes information-processing strategies and pathways in primate retina and visual cortex. Of interest both in biological fields and in such related computational fields as artificial neural networks. Focuses on data from macaque, which has superb visual system similar to that of humans. Authors stress concept of "good engineering" in understanding visual system.

  15. Homeostasis in primates in hyperacceleration fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Various homeostatic responses of a nonhuman primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) to acute changes in the acceleration environment were examined. When these animals were exposed to a hyperdynamic field the body temperature was consistently depressed and the animals showed behavioral indications of increased drowsiness. Further, time of day played a significant role in influencing these responses.

  16. Quantification of neocortical ratios in stem primates.

    PubMed

    Long, Adam; Bloch, Jonathan I; Silcox, Mary T

    2015-07-01

    Extant euprimates (=crown primates) have a characteristically expanded neocortical region of the brain relative to that of other mammals, but the timing of that expansion in their evolutionary history is poorly resolved. Examination of anatomical landmarks on fossil endocasts of Eocene euprimates suggests that significant neocortical expansion relative to contemporaneous mammals was already underway. Here, we provide quantitative estimates of neocorticalization in stem primates (plesiadapiforms) relevant to the question of whether relative neocortical expansion was uniquely characteristic of the crown primate radiation. Ratios of neocortex to endocast surface areas were calculated for plesiadapiforms using measurements from virtual endocasts of the paromomyid Ignacius graybullianus (early Eocene, Wyoming) and the microsyopid Microsyops annectens (middle Eocene, Wyoming). These data are similar to a published estimate for the plesiadapid, Plesiadapis tricuspidens, but contrast with those calculated for early Tertiary euprimates in being within the 95% confidence intervals for archaic mammals generally. Interpretation of these values is complicated by the paucity of sampled endocasts for older stem primates and euarchontogliran outgroups, as well as by a combination of effects related to temporal trends, allometry, and taxon-unique specializations. Regardless, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that a shift in brain organization occurred in the first euprimates, likely in association with elaborations to the visual system.

  17. Processing Of Visual Information In Primate Brains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H.; Van Essen, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Report reviews and analyzes information-processing strategies and pathways in primate retina and visual cortex. Of interest both in biological fields and in such related computational fields as artificial neural networks. Focuses on data from macaque, which has superb visual system similar to that of humans. Authors stress concept of "good engineering" in understanding visual system.

  18. The Neuroendocrinology of Primate Maternal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Wendy; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    In nonhuman primates and humans, similar to other mammals, hormones are not strictly necessary for the expression of maternal behavior, but nevertheless influence variation in maternal responsiveness and parental behavior both within and between individuals. A growing number of correlational and experimental studies have indicated that high circulating estrogen concentrations during pregnancy increase maternal motivation and responsiveness to infant stimuli, while effects of prepartum or postpartum estrogens and progestogens on maternal behavior are less clear. Prolactin is thought to play a role in promoting paternal and alloparental care in primates, but little is known about the relationship between this hormone and maternal behavior. High circulating cortisol levels appear to enhance arousal and responsiveness to infant stimuli in young, relatively inexperienced female primates, but interfere with the expression of maternal behavior in older and more experienced mothers. Among neuropeptides and neurotransmitters, preliminary evidence indicates that oxytocin and endogenous opioids affect maternal attachment to infants, including maintenance of contact, grooming, and responses to separation. Brain serotonin affects anxiety and impulsivity, which in turn may affect maternal behaviors such as infant retrieval or rejection of infants’ attempts to make contact with the mother. Although our understanding of the neuroendocrine correlates of primate maternal behavior has grown substantially in the last two decades, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying these effects, e.g., the extent to which these mechanisms may involve changes in perception, emotion, or cognition. PMID:20888383

  19. Tropical warming and the dynamics of endangered primates.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, Ruscena; Post, Eric

    2010-04-23

    Many primate species are severely threatened, but little is known about the effects of global warming and the associated intensification of El Niño events on primate populations. Here, we document the influences of the El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) and hemispheric climatic variability on the population dynamics of four genera of ateline (neotropical, large-bodied) primates. All ateline genera experienced either an immediate or a lagged negative effect of El Niño events. ENSO events were also found to influence primate resource levels through neotropical arboreal phenology. Furthermore, frugivorous primates showed a high degree of interspecific population synchrony over large scales across Central and South America attributable to the recent trends in large-scale climate. These results highlight the role of large-scale climatic variation and trends in ateline primate population dynamics, and emphasize that global warming could pose additional threats to the persistence of multiple species of endangered primates.

  20. Occurrence and distribution of Indian primates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karanth, K.K.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Global and regional species conservation efforts are hindered by poor distribution data and range maps. Many Indian primates face extinction, but assessments of population status are hindered by lack of reliable distribution data. We estimated the current occurrence and distribution of 15 Indian primates by applying occupancy models to field data from a country-wide survey of local experts. We modeled species occurrence in relation to ecological and social covariates (protected areas, landscape characteristics, and human influences), which we believe are critical to determining species occurrence in India. We found evidence that protected areas positively influence occurrence of seven species and for some species are their only refuge. We found evergreen forests to be more critical for some primates along with temperate and deciduous forests. Elevation negatively influenced occurrence of three species. Lower human population density was positively associated with occurrence of five species, and higher cultural tolerance was positively associated with occurrence of three species. We find that 11 primates occupy less than 15% of the total land area of India. Vulnerable primates with restricted ranges are Golden langur, Arunachal macaque, Pig-tailed macaque, stump-tailed macaque, Phayre's leaf monkey, Nilgiri langur and Lion-tailed macaque. Only Hanuman langur and rhesus macaque are widely distributed. We find occupancy modeling to be useful in determining species ranges, and in agreement with current species ranking and IUCN status. In landscapes where monitoring efforts require optimizing cost, effort and time, we used ecological and social covariates to reliably estimate species occurrence and focus species conservation efforts. ?? Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Variation in the molecular clock of primates

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Priya; Amorim, Carlos Eduardo G.; Arndt, Peter F.; Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Events in primate evolution are often dated by assuming a constant rate of substitution per unit time, but the validity of this assumption remains unclear. Among mammals, it is well known that there exists substantial variation in yearly substitution rates. Such variation is to be expected from differences in life history traits, suggesting it should also be found among primates. Motivated by these considerations, we analyze whole genomes from 10 primate species, including Old World Monkeys (OWMs), New World Monkeys (NWMs), and apes, focusing on putatively neutral autosomal sites and controlling for possible effects of biased gene conversion and methylation at CpG sites. We find that substitution rates are up to 64% higher in lineages leading from the hominoid–NWM ancestor to NWMs than to apes. Within apes, rates are ∼2% higher in chimpanzees and ∼7% higher in the gorilla than in humans. Substitution types subject to biased gene conversion show no more variation among species than those not subject to it. Not all mutation types behave similarly, however; in particular, transitions at CpG sites exhibit a more clocklike behavior than do other types, presumably because of their nonreplicative origin. Thus, not only the total rate, but also the mutational spectrum, varies among primates. This finding suggests that events in primate evolution are most reliably dated using CpG transitions. Taking this approach, we estimate the human and chimpanzee divergence time is 12.1 million years,​ and the human and gorilla divergence time is 15.1 million years​. PMID:27601674

  2. Oral Administration of Forskolin, Homotaurine, Carnosine, and Folic Acid in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: Changes in Intraocular Pressure, Pattern Electroretinogram Amplitude, and Foveal Sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mutolo, Maria Giulia; Albanese, Giuseppe; Rusciano, Dario; Pescosolido, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of a food supplement containing forskolin, homotaurine, carnosine, folic acid, vitamins B1, B2, B6, and magnesium in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) already in treatment and compensated by intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering drugs, during a period of 12 months. Twenty-two patients (44 eyes) with POAG, with their IOP compensated by topical drugs, were enrolled and randomly assigned to the food supplement or control treatment group. The additional food supplement treatment consisted of 2 tablets per day (1 in the morning, 1 in the evening) given for 1 year of a balanced association of homotaurine, Coleus forskohlii root extract, L-carnosine, folic acid, vitamins B1, B2, B6, and magnesium. Pattern Electroretinogram (PERG) amplitude, foveal sensitivity obtained with the visual field analyzer frequency doubling technology, and IOP were detected at enrollment (T0), 3 months (T1), 6 months (T2), 9 months (T3), and 12 months (T4). We observed in treated patients a significant further decrease of IOP and an improvement of PERG amplitude at 6, 9, and 12 months, and foveal sensitivity at 12 months. All values remained substantially stable in control patients. The results of the present pilot study indicate that the components of the food supplement reach the eye in a detectable manner, as evidenced by the effects on the IOP. Moreover, they suggest a short-term neuroactive effect, as indicated by the improvement of PERG amplitude and foveal sensitivity in treated, but not in control patients.

  3. Evidence for a convergent slowdown in primate molecular rates and its implications for the timing of early primate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Steiper, Michael E.; Seiffert, Erik R.

    2012-01-01

    A long-standing problem in primate evolution is the discord between paleontological and molecular clock estimates for the time of crown primate origins: the earliest crown primate fossils are ∼56 million y (Ma) old, whereas molecular estimates for the haplorhine-strepsirrhine split are often deep in the Late Cretaceous. One explanation for this phenomenon is that crown primates existed in the Cretaceous but that their fossil remains have not yet been found. Here we provide strong evidence that this discordance is better-explained by a convergent molecular rate slowdown in early primate evolution. We show that molecular rates in primates are strongly and inversely related to three life-history correlates: body size (BS), absolute endocranial volume (EV), and relative endocranial volume (REV). Critically, these traits can be reconstructed from fossils, allowing molecular rates to be predicted for extinct primates. To this end, we modeled the evolutionary history of BS, EV, and REV using data from both extinct and extant primates. We show that the primate last common ancestor had a very small BS, EV, and REV. There has been a subsequent convergent increase in BS, EV, and REV, indicating that there has also been a convergent molecular rate slowdown over primate evolution. We generated a unique timescale for primates by predicting molecular rates from the reconstructed phenotypic values for a large phylogeny of living and extinct primates. This analysis suggests that crown primates originated close to the K–Pg boundary and possibly in the Paleocene, largely reconciling the molecular and fossil timescales of primate evolution. PMID:22474376

  4. Evidence for a convergent slowdown in primate molecular rates and its implications for the timing of early primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Steiper, Michael E; Seiffert, Erik R

    2012-04-17

    A long-standing problem in primate evolution is the discord between paleontological and molecular clock estimates for the time of crown primate origins: the earliest crown primate fossils are ~56 million y (Ma) old, whereas molecular estimates for the haplorhine-strepsirrhine split are often deep in the Late Cretaceous. One explanation for this phenomenon is that crown primates existed in the Cretaceous but that their fossil remains have not yet been found. Here we provide strong evidence that this discordance is better-explained by a convergent molecular rate slowdown in early primate evolution. We show that molecular rates in primates are strongly and inversely related to three life-history correlates: body size (BS), absolute endocranial volume (EV), and relative endocranial volume (REV). Critically, these traits can be reconstructed from fossils, allowing molecular rates to be predicted for extinct primates. To this end, we modeled the evolutionary history of BS, EV, and REV using data from both extinct and extant primates. We show that the primate last common ancestor had a very small BS, EV, and REV. There has been a subsequent convergent increase in BS, EV, and REV, indicating that there has also been a convergent molecular rate slowdown over primate evolution. We generated a unique timescale for primates by predicting molecular rates from the reconstructed phenotypic values for a large phylogeny of living and extinct primates. This analysis suggests that crown primates originated close to the K-Pg boundary and possibly in the Paleocene, largely reconciling the molecular and fossil timescales of primate evolution.

  5. Reproducibility and differences in area of foveal avascular zone measured by three different optical coherence tomographic angiography instruments.

    PubMed

    Shiihara, Hideki; Sakamoto, Taiji; Yamashita, Takehiro; Kakiuchi, Naoko; Otsuka, Hiroki; Terasaki, Hiroto; Sonoda, Shozo

    2017-08-29

    This study was performed to compare the area of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ-area) obtained by three optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) instruments. This was a cross-sectional, non-interventional study of twenty-seven healthy right eyes. The superficial and deep FAZ-area was measured manually with three OCTA instruments: Triton (Topcon), RS3000 (Nidek), and CIRRUS (Zeiss). The intra-rater, inter-rater, and inter-instrument correlation coefficients (CC) were assessed. The intra-rater and inter-rater CC were significantly high for the superficial and deep FAZ-areas (P < 0.001). The inter-instrument CC (95% confidence interval) for the superficial FAZ-area was 0.920 (0.803-0.965) for Triton vs RS3000, 0.899 (0.575-0.965) for RS3000 vs CIRRUS, and was 0.963 (0.913-0.983) for CIRRUS vs Triton (P < 0.001). For the deep FAZ-area, the inter-instrument CC was 0.813 (0.633-0.910) for Triton vs RS3000, 0.694 (0.369-0.857) for RS3000 vs CIRRUS, and 0.679 (0.153-0.872) for CIRRUS vs Triton (P < 0.001). The superficial FAZ-area (mm(2)) was 0.264 ± 0.071 with Triton, 0.278 ± 0.072 with RS3000 and 0.257 ± 0.066 with CIRRUS. For deep FAZ-area, it was 0.617 ± 0.175 with Triton, 0.646 ± 0.178 with RS3000 and 0.719 ± 0.175 with CIRRUS. The FAZ-area from these instruments was clinically interchangeable. However, the absolute values of FAZ-area are significantly different among them. These differences must be considered in comparing the FAZ-areas from different OCTA instruments.

  6. Visual Acuity Is Correlated with the Area of the Foveal Avascular Zone in Diabetic Retinopathy and Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Balaratnasingam, Chandrakumar; Inoue, Maiko; Ahn, Seungjun; McCann, Jesse; Dhrami-Gavazi, Elona; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A; Freund, K Bailey

    2016-11-01

    To determine if the area of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) is correlated with visual acuity (VA) in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Cross-sectional study. Ninety-five eyes of 66 subjects with DR (65 eyes), branch retinal vein occlusion (19 eyes), and central retinal vein occlusion (11 eyes). Structural optical coherence tomography (OCT; Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering) and OCT angiography (OCTA; Avanti, Optovue RTVue XR) data from a single visit were analyzed. FAZ area, point thickness of central fovea, central 1-mm subfield thickness, the occurrence of intraretinal cysts, ellipsoid zone disruption, and disorganization of retinal inner layers (DRIL) length were measured. VA was also recorded. Correlations between FAZ area and VA were explored using regression models. Main outcome measure was VA. Mean age was 62.9±13.2 years. There was no difference in demographic and OCT-derived anatomic measurements between branch retinal vein occlusion and central retinal vein occlusion groups (all P ≥ 0.058); therefore, data from the 2 groups were pooled together to a single RVO group for further statistical comparisons. Univariate and multiple regression analysis showed that the area of the FAZ was significantly correlated with VA in DR and RVO (all P ≤ 0.003). The relationship between FAZ area and VA varied with age (P = 0.026) such that for a constant FAZ area, an increase in patient age was associated with poorer vision (rise in logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity). Disruption of the ellipsoid zone was significantly correlated with VA in univariate and multiple regression analysis (both P < 0.001). Occurrence of intraretinal cysts, DRIL length, and lens status were significantly correlated with VA in the univariate regression analysis (P ≤ 0.018) but not the multiple regression analysis (P ≥ 0.210). Remaining variables evaluated in this study were not predictive of VA (all P ≥ 0.225). The area of the FAZ is

  7. Taxonomy and conservation of Vietnam's primates: a review.

    PubMed

    Blair, Mary E; Sterling, Eleanor J; Hurley, Martha M

    2011-11-01

    Vietnam has the highest number of primate taxa overall (24-27) and the highest number of globally threatened primate taxa (minimum 20) in Mainland Southeast Asia. Conservation management of these species depends in part on resolving taxonomic uncertainties, which remain numerous among the Asian primates. Recent research on genetic, morphological, and acoustic diversity in Vietnam's primates has clarified some of these uncertainties, although a number of significant classification issues still remain. Herein, we summarize and compare the major current taxonomic classifications of Vietnam's primates, discuss recent advances in the context of these taxonomies, and suggest key areas for additional research to best inform conservation efforts in a region crucial to global primate diversity. Among the most important next steps for the conservation of Vietnam's primates is a new consensus list of Asian primates that resolves current differences between major taxonomies, incorporates recent research advances, and recognizes units of diversity at scales below the species-level, whether termed populations, morphs, or subspecies. Priority should be placed on recognizing distinct populations, regardless of the species concept in use, in order to foster the evolutionary processes necessary for primate populations to cope with inevitable environmental changes. The long-term conservation of Vietnam's primates depends not only on an accepted and accurate taxonomy but also on funding for on-the-ground conservation activities, including training, and the continued dedication and leadership of Vietnamese researchers and managers.

  8. Canine size, shape, and bending strength in primates and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ruff, Christopher B

    2008-05-01

    Anthropoid primates are well known for their highly sexually dimorphic canine teeth, with males possessing canines that are up to 400% taller than those of females. Primate canine dimorphism has been extensively documented, with a consensus that large male primate canines serve as weapons for intrasexual competition, and some evidence that large female canines in some species may likewise function as weapons. However, apart from speculation that very tall male canines may be relatively weak and that seed predators have strong canines, the functional significance of primate canine shape has not been explored. Because carnivore canine shape and size are associated with killing style, this group provides a useful comparative baseline for primates. We evaluate primate maxillary canine tooth size, shape and relative bending strength against body size, skull size, and behavioral and demographic measures of male competition and sexual selection, and compare them to those of carnivores. We demonstrate that, relative to skull length and body mass, primate male canines are on average as large as or larger than those of similar sized carnivores. The range of primate female canine sizes embraces that of carnivores. Male and female primate canines are generally as strong as or stronger than those of carnivores. Although we find that seed-eating primates have relatively strong canines, we find no clear relationship between male primate canine strength and demographic or behavioral estimates of male competition or sexual selection, in spite of a strong relationship between these measures and canine crown height. This suggests either that most primate canines are selected to be very strong regardless of variation in behavior, or that primate canine shape is inherently strong enough to accommodate changes in crown height without compromising canine function.

  9. The Impact of Confluence Types of the Right Gastroepiploic Vein on No. 6 Lymphadenectomy During Laparoscopic Radical Gastrectomy.

    PubMed

    Cao, Long-Long; Huang, Chang-Ming; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Chao-Hui; Li, Ping; Xie, Jian-Wei; Wang, Jia-Bin; Lin, Jian-Xian; Chen, Qi-Yue; Lin, Mi; Tu, Ru-Hong

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated anatomical variations in the confluence types of the right gastroepiploic vein (RGEV) to improve knowledge regarding no. 6 lymphadenectomy for laparoscopic gastrectomy.The RGEV drainage patterns of 144 patients who were diagnosed with gastric cancer and underwent laparoscopic distal gastrectomy at our department from July 2010 to June 2011 were prospectively collected and retrospectively analyzed, and we compared the impact of different drainage patterns on no. 6 lymphadenectomy.The RGEV confluence types were classified into 6 categories in this study. Types I, II, and III, which were observed in 53 (36.8%), 27 (18.8%), and 21 (14.6%) cases, respectively, were the most frequently found during gastrectomy. All 3 of these types included a gastropancreatic trunk and were defined as the gastropancreatic group (GP group). In addition, 15 cases (10.4%) were categorized as type IV, 19 (13.2%) were categorized as type V, and 9 (6.3%) were categorized as type VI. These 3 types, which could form a gastrocolic trunk, were defined as the gastrocolic group (GC group). No significant differences were found with respect to the clinicopathological characteristics, postoperative morbidity, perioperative mortality, and 3-year overall survival rates after surgery between the 2 groups (all P > 0.05). However, the mean no. 6 lymph node (No. 6 LN) dissection time, the mean blood loss due to No. 6 LN dissection and the rate of infrapyloric vascular injury were significantly increased in the GC group compared with the GP group (all P < 0.05).The RGEV exhibits 6 types of drainage patterns, and the division points of this vein during laparoscopic gastrectomy depend on the different drainage patterns. For types IV, V, and VI, the surgeon should carefully vascularize and divide the RGEV above its confluences during surgery.

  10. Water-quality conditions near the confluence of the Snake and Boise Rivers, Canyon County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Etheridge, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) have been established under authority of the Federal Clean Water Act for the Snake River-Hells Canyon reach, on the border of Idaho and Oregon, to improve water quality and preserve beneficial uses such as public consumption, recreation, and aquatic habitat. The TMDL sets targets for seasonal average and annual maximum concentrations of chlorophyll-a at 14 and 30 micrograms per liter, respectively. To attain these conditions, the maximum total phosphorus concentration at the mouth of the Boise River in Idaho, a tributary to the Snake River, has been set at 0.07 milligrams per liter. However, interactions among chlorophyll-a, nutrients, and other key water-quality parameters that may affect beneficial uses in the Snake and Boise Rivers are unknown. In addition, contributions of nutrients and chlorophyll-a loads from the Boise River to the Snake River have not been fully characterized. To evaluate seasonal trends and relations among nutrients and other water-quality parameters in the Boise and Snake Rivers, a comprehensive monitoring program was conducted near their confluence in water years (WY) 2009 and 2010. The study also provided information on the relative contribution of nutrient and sediment loads from the Boise River to the Snake River, which has an effect on water-quality conditions in downstream reservoirs. State and site-specific water-quality standards, in addition to those that relate to the Snake River-Hells Canyon TMDL, have been established to protect beneficial uses in both rivers. Measured water-quality conditions in WY2009 and WY2010 exceeded these targets at one or more sites for the following constituents: water temperature, total phosphorus concentrations, total phosphorus loads, dissolved oxygen concentration, pH, and chlorophyll-a concentrations (WY2009 only). All measured total phosphorus concentrations in the Boise River near Parma exceeded the seasonal target of 0.07 milligram per liter. Data collected

  11. Experimental evidence that primate trichromacy is well suited for detecting primate social colour signals

    PubMed Central

    Higham, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Primate trichromatic colour vision has been hypothesized to be well tuned for detecting variation in facial coloration, which could be due to selection on either signal wavelengths or the sensitivities of the photoreceptors themselves. We provide one of the first empirical tests of this idea by asking whether, when compared with other visual systems, the information obtained through primate trichromatic vision confers an improved ability to detect the changes in facial colour that female macaque monkeys exhibit when they are proceptive. We presented pairs of digital images of faces of the same monkey to human observers and asked them to select the proceptive face. We tested images that simulated what would be seen by common catarrhine trichromatic vision, two additional trichromatic conditions and three dichromatic conditions. Performance under conditions of common catarrhine trichromacy, and trichromacy with narrowly separated LM cone pigments (common in female platyrrhines), was better than for evenly spaced trichromacy or for any of the dichromatic conditions. These results suggest that primate trichromatic colour vision confers excellent ability to detect meaningful variation in primate face colour. This is consistent with the hypothesis that social information detection has acted on either primate signal spectral reflectance or photoreceptor spectral tuning, or both. PMID:28615496

  12. Nonhuman primate dermatology: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Joseph A.; Didier, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In general, veterinary dermatologists do not have extensive clinical experience of nonhuman primate (NHP) dermatoses. The bulk of the published literature does not provide an organized evidence-based approach to the NHP dermatologic case. The veterinary dermatologist is left to extract information from both human and veterinary dermatology, an approach that can be problematic as it forces the clinician to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions based on two very disparate bodies of literature. A more cohesive approach to NHP dermatology – without relying on assumptions that NHP pathology most commonly behaves similarly to other veterinary and human disease – is required. This review of the dermatology of NHP species includes discussions of primary dermatoses, as well as diseases where dermatologic signs represent a significant secondary component, provides a first step towards encouraging the veterinary community to study and report the dermatologic diseases of nonhuman primates. PMID:19490576

  13. [Ecotourism disturbances to non-human primates].

    PubMed

    Fan, Peng-Lai; Xiang, Zuo-Fu

    2013-02-01

    In tandem with economic growth and rising living conditions, ecotourism has increasingly gained popularity among the Chinese public. Non-human primates, as charismatic animals and the closest relatives of human beings, have shown a strong affinity in attracting the general public and raising money, and for that reason a variety of monkey parks, valleys, and islands are becoming increasingly popular in China. Though successful in raising a substantial sum of money for the managing agency of a nature reserve, there may be negative impacts on monkey groups used in ecotourism. Here, to establish effective guards for non-human primates involved in ecotourism, we present a review on tourism disturbance and summarize the negative impacts on behavioral patterns, reproduction, and health condition of animals.

  14. Evolution of alkaline phosphatases in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Rogers, C; Harris, H

    1982-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] in placenta, intestine, liver, kidney, bone, and lung from a variety of primate species has been characterized by quantitative inhibition, thermostability, and immunological studies. Characteristic human placental-type alkaline phosphatase occurs in placentas of great apes (chimpanzee and orangutan) but not in placentas of other primates, including gibbon. It is also present in trace amounts in human lung but not in lung or other tissues of various Old and New World monkeys. However, a distinctive alkaline phosphatase resembling it occurs in substantial amounts in lungs from Old World monkeys but not New World monkeys. It appears that duplication of alkaline phosphatase genes and mutations of genetic elements controlling their tissue expression have occurred relatively recently in mammalian evolution. Images PMID:6950431

  15. Optogenetics in primates: a shining future?

    PubMed

    Gerits, Annelies; Vanduffel, Wim

    2013-07-01

    To understand the functional role of specific neurons in micro- and macro-brain circuitry, health, and disease, it is critical to control their activity precisely. This ambitious goal was first achieved by optogenetics, allowing researchers to increase or decrease neural activity artificially with high temporal and spatial precision. In contrast to the revolution optogenetics engendered in invertebrate and rodent research, only a few studies have reported optogenetic-induced neuronal and behavioral effects in primates. Such studies are nonetheless critical before optogenetics can be applied in a clinical setting. Here, we review the state-of-the-art tools for performing optogenetics in mammals, emphasizing recent neuronal and behavioral results obtained in nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anuja; Qiu, Zhifang; Farnsworth, Steven L; Hemmi, Jacob J; Li, Miao; Pickering, Alexander V; Hornsby, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells from nonhuman primates (NHPs) have unique roles in cell biology and regenerative medicine. Because of the relatedness of NHPs to humans, NHP iPS cells can serve as a source of differentiated derivatives that can be used to address important questions in the comparative biology of primates. Additionally, when used as a source of cells for regenerative medicine, NHP iPS cells serve an invaluable role in translational experiments in cell therapy. Reprogramming of NHP somatic cells requires the same conditions as previously established for human cells. However, throughout the process, a variety of modifications to the human cell protocols must be made to accommodate significant species differences.

  17. REPEATABILITY OF AUTOMATED VESSEL DENSITY AND SUPERFICIAL AND DEEP FOVEAL AVASCULAR ZONE AREA MEASUREMENTS USING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY: Diurnal Findings.

    PubMed

    Yanik Odabaş, Özge; Demirel, Sibel; Özmert, Emin; Batıoğlu, Figen

    2017-05-02

    To evaluate the repeatability of vessel density and superficial and deep foveal avascular zone measurements using optical coherence tomography angiography, and to specify a diurnal change range. Forty-six eyes of 25 healthy individuals were included. Optical coherence tomography angiography measurements were planned for three consecutive sessions, with 3 hours in between them. AngioVue software of the RTVue XR Avanti was used. Superficial and deep retinal layer vessel density values, including the whole retina, fovea, and each parafoveal zone, were obtained from the software. The intraclass correlation, coefficient of variation, and coefficient of repeatability were calculated for each parameter. The whole image intraclass correlation value was 0.81 for the superficial and 0.86 for the deep layer among the three consecutive sessions. The smallest real difference (coefficient of repeatability) value of whole image measurements was 7.72% for the superficial and 9.84% for the deep retinal layer. Foveal avascular zone area intraclass correlation value was 0.97 for the superficial and 0.83 for the deep retinal layer. The optical coherence tomography angiography analysis provides quantitative data about the retinal microvasculature, which could be used to distinguish between normal and pathology. Changes in superficial vessel density >8% and deep vessel density >10% may be considered as real clinical change rather than variation.

  18. Cognitive consequences of cooperative breeding in primates?

    PubMed

    Burkart, Judith Maria; van Schaik, Carel P

    2010-01-01

    Several hypotheses propose that cooperative breeding leads to increased cognitive performance, in both nonhuman and human primates, but systematic evidence for such a relationship is missing. A causal link might exist because motivational and cognitive processes necessary for the execution and coordination of helping behaviors could also favor cognitive performance in contexts not directly related to caregiving. In callitrichids, which among primates rely most strongly on cooperative breeding, these motivational and cognitive processes include attentional biases toward monitoring others, the ability to coordinate actions spatially and temporally, increased social tolerance, increased responsiveness to others' signals, and spontaneous prosociality. These processes are likely to enhance performance particularly in socio-cognitive contexts. Therefore, cooperatively breeding primates are expected to outperform their independently breeding sister taxa in socio-cognitive tasks. We evaluate this prediction by reviewing the literature and comparing cognitive performance in callitrichids with that of their sister taxa, i.e. squirrel monkeys, which are independent breeders, and capuchin monkeys, which show an intermediate breeding system. Consistent with our prediction, this review reveals that callitrichids systematically and significantly outperform their sister taxa in the socio-cognitive, but not in the non-social domain. This comparison is complemented with more qualitative evaluations of prosociality and cognitive performance in non-primate cooperative breeders, which suggest that among mammals, cooperative breeding generally produces conditions conducive to socio-cognitive performance. In the hominid lineage, however, the adoption of extensive allomaternal care presumably resulted in more pervasive cognitive consequences, because the motivational consequences of cooperative breeding was added to an ape-level cognitive system already capable of understanding simple

  19. Endoscopy and Endosurgery in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Chai, Norin

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopy in nonhuman primates (NHPs) has resulted in improvements in research and clinical care for more than 4 decades. The indications and procedures are the same as in humans and the approach is similar to that in dogs, cats, and humans. Selected procedures are discussed including rhinoscopy, tracheobronchoscopy, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, laparoscopy, and endoscopic salpingectomy. This short overview provides practitioners with pragmatic elements for safe and effective endoscopy in NHPs.

  20. Relaxin and the control of primate parturition.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gerson

    2013-01-01

    In primate pregnancy, circulating relaxin, solely a product of the corpus luteum, peaks in the first trimester of pregnancy then declines and levels off for the remainder of pregnancy. Relaxin actions in pregnancy include increasing cervical pro-MMP-1 and pro-MMP-3 and decreasing TIMP-1, changes which soften the cervix. Relaxin, from early pregnancy, increases endometrial natural killer cells, macrophages and neutrophils, blood flow and arterial number. Hyperrelaxinemia correlates with preterm birth.

  1. Molecular evolution of prolactin in primates.

    PubMed

    Wallis, O Caryl; Mac-Kwashie, Akofa O; Makri, Georgia; Wallis, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Pituitary prolactin, like growth hormone (GH) and several other protein hormones, shows an episodic pattern of molecular evolution in which sustained bursts of rapid change contrast with long periods of slow evolution. A period of rapid change occurred in the evolution of prolactin in primates, leading to marked sequence differences between human prolactin and that of nonprimate mammals. We have defined this burst more precisely by sequencing the coding regions of prolactin genes for a prosimian, the slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), and a New World monkey, the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Slow loris prolactin is very similar in sequence to pig prolactin, so the episode of rapid change occurred during primate evolution, after the separation of lines leading to prosimians and higher primates. Marmoset prolactin is similar in sequence to human prolactin, so the accelerated evolution occurred before divergence of New World monkeys and Old World monkeys/apes. The burst of change was confined largely to coding sequence (nonsynonymous sites) for mature prolactin and is not marked in other components of the gene sequence. This and the observations that (1) there was no apparent loss of function during the episode of rapid evolution, (2) the rate of evolution slowed toward the basal rate after this burst, and (3) the distribution of substitutions in the prolactin molecule is very uneven support the idea that this episode of rapid change was due to positive adaptive selection. In the slow loris and marmoset there is no evidence for duplication of the prolactin gene, and evidence from another New World monkey (Cebus albifrons) and from the chimpanzee and human genome sequences, suggests that this is the general position in primates, contrasting with the situation for GH genes. The chimpanzee prolactin sequence differs from that of human at two residues and comparison of human and chimpanzee prolactin gene sequences suggests that noncoding regions associated with regulating

  2. Theory of Auditory Thresholds in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Michael J.

    2001-03-01

    The influence of thermal pressure fluctuations at the tympanic membrane has been previously investigated as a possible determinant of the threshold of hearing in humans (L.J. Sivian and S.D. White, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. IV, 4;288(1933).). More recent work has focussed more precisely on the relation between statistical mechanics and sensory signal processing by biological means in creatures' brains (W. Bialek, in ``Physics of Biological Systems: from molecules to species'', H. Flyvberg et al, (Eds), p. 252; Springer 1997.). Clinical data on the frequency dependence of hearing thresholds in humans and other primates (W.C. Stebbins, ``The Acoustic Sense of Animals'', Harvard 1983.) has long been available. I have derived an expression for the frequency dependence of hearing thresholds in primates, including humans, by first calculating the frequency dependence of thermal pressure fluctuations at eardrums from damped normal modes excited in model ear canals of given simple geometry. I then show that most of the features of the clinical data are directly related to the frequency dependence of the ratio of thermal noise pressure arising from without to that arising from within the masking bandwidth which signals must dominate in order to be sensed. The higher intensity of threshold signals in primates smaller than humans, which is clinically observed over much but not all of the human auditory spectrum is shown to arise from their smaller meatus dimensions. note

  3. Emotions, stress, and maternal motivation in primates.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, Dario

    2011-06-01

    Recent research conducted with nonhuman primates confirms that adaptive emotional processes, such as maternal attraction arousability and maternal anxiety arousability, enhance and sustain female motivation to interact with infants, invest in them, and protect them during the postpartum period. Changes in these emotional processes, and concomitant changes in maternal motivation, facilitate the reduction and eventual termination of maternal investment associated with infant weaning. Although laboratory studies of rodents and socially deprived rhesus monkeys have suggested that nulliparous females are neophobic and find infant stimuli aversive, recent primate research indicates that neophobia or aversion to infant stimuli do not occur in females with normal developmental experience. Furthermore, although some rodent and human studies have shown that lactation is accompanied by physiological hyporesponsiveness to stress, other studies of rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans indicate that mothers are highly vulnerable to stress and that stress-induced dysregulation of emotions can interfere with maternal motivation and parenting behavior. It is possible that some aspects of the emotional and experiential regulation of maternal motivation and parental behavior are different in different mammalian species. However, variation in the environments in which subjects are tested and in their developmental experience may also be responsible for the some discrepancies between the results of different studies.

  4. The ecology of primate material culture.

    PubMed

    Koops, Kathelijne; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; van Schaik, Carel P

    2014-11-01

    Tool use in extant primates may inform our understanding of the conditions that favoured the expansion of hominin technology and material culture. The 'method of exclusion' has, arguably, confirmed the presence of culture in wild animal populations by excluding ecological and genetic explanations for geographical variation in behaviour. However, this method neglects ecological influences on culture, which, ironically, may be critical for understanding technology and thus material culture. We review all the current evidence for the role of ecology in shaping material culture in three habitual tool-using non-human primates: chimpanzees, orangutans and capuchin monkeys. We show that environmental opportunity, rather than necessity, is the main driver. We argue that a better understanding of primate technology requires explicit investigation of the role of ecological conditions. We propose a model in which three sets of factors, namely environment, sociality and cognition, influence invention, transmission and retention of material culture. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. The appropriation of glucose through primate neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, Amy L; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2014-12-01

    The human brain is considerably larger and more energetically costly than that of other primate species. As such, discovering how human ancestors were able to provide sufficient energy to their brains is a central theme in the study of hominin evolution. However, many discussions of metabolism frequently omit the different ways in which energy, primarily glucose, is used once made available to the brain. In this review, we discuss two glucose metabolic pathways, oxidative phosphorylation and aerobic glycolysis, and their respective contributions to the energetic and anabolic budgets of the brain. While oxidative phosphorylation is a more efficient producer of energy, aerobic glycolysis contributes essential molecules for the growth of the brain and maintaining the structure of its cells. Although both pathways occur in the brain throughout the lifetime, aerobic glycolysis is a critical pathway during development, and oxidative phosphorylation is highest during adulthood. We outline how elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis may support the protracted neurodevelopmental sequence of humans compared with other primates. Finally, we review the genetic evidence for differences in metabolic function in the brains of primates and explore genes that may provide insight into how glucose metabolism may differ across species.

  6. Visual specialization and brain evolution in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Barton, R A

    1998-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed to explain the evolution of species differences in brain size, but no consensus has emerged. One unresolved question is whether brain size differences are a result of neural specializations or of biological constraints affecting the whole brain. Here I show that, among primates, brain size variation is associated with visual specialization. Primates with large brains for their body size have relatively expanded visual brain areas, including the primary visual cortex and lateral geniculate nucleus. Within the visual system, it is, in particular, one functionally specialized pathway upon which selection has acted: evolutionary changes in the number of neurons in parvocellular, but not magnocellular, layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus are correlated with changes in both brain size and ecological variables (diet and social group size). Given the known functions of the parvocellular pathway, these results suggest that the relatively large brains of frugivorous species are products of selection on the ability to perceive and select fruits using specific visual cues such as colour. The separate correlation between group size and visual brain evolution, on the other hand, may indicate the visual basis of social information processing in the primate brain. PMID:9821360

  7. Dietary quality and encephalization in platyrrhine primates

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kari L.; Kay, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The high energetic costs of building and maintaining large brains are thought to constrain encephalization. The ‘expensive-tissue hypothesis’ (ETH) proposes that primates (especially humans) overcame this constraint through reduction of another metabolically expensive tissue, the gastrointestinal tract. Small guts characterize animals specializing on easily digestible diets. Thus, the hypothesis may be tested via the relationship between brain size and diet quality. Platyrrhine primates present an interesting test case, as they are more variably encephalized than other extant primate clades (excluding Hominoidea). We find a high degree of phylogenetic signal in the data for diet quality, endocranial volume and body size. Controlling for phylogenetic effects, we find no significant correlation between relative diet quality and relative endocranial volume. Thus, diet quality fails to account for differences in platyrrhine encephalization. One taxon, in particular, Brachyteles, violates predictions made by ETH in having a large brain and low-quality diet. Dietary reconstructions of stem platyrrhines further indicate that a relatively high-quality diet was probably in place prior to increases in encephalization. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shift in diet quality was a primary constraint release for encephalization in platyrrhines and, by extrapolation, humans. PMID:21831898

  8. THE KINEMATICS OF PRIMATE MIDFOOT FLEXIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Thomas M.; Ball, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a unique assessment of primate intrinsic foot joint kinematics based upon bone pin rigid cluster tracking. It challenges the assumption that human evolution resulted in a reduction of midfoot flexibility, which has been identified in other primates as the “midtarsal break.” Rigid cluster pins were inserted into the foot bones of human, chimpanzee, baboon and macaque cadavers. The positions of these bone pins were monitored during a plantarflexion-dorsiflexion movement cycle. Analysis resolved flexion-extension movement patterns and the associated orientation of rotational axes for the talonavicular, calcaneocuboid and lateral cubometatarsal joints. Results show that midfoot flexibility occurs primarily at the talonavicular and cubometatarsal joints. The rotational magnitudes are roughly similar between humans and chimps. There is also a similarity among evaluated primates in the observed rotations of the lateral cubometatarsal joint, but there was much greater rotation observed for the talonavicular joint, which may serve to differentiate monkeys from the hominines. It appears that the capability for a midtarsal break is present within the human foot. A consideration of the joint axes shows that the medial and lateral joints have opposing orientations, which has been associated with a rigid locking mechanism in the human foot. However, the potential for this same mechanism also appears in the chimpanzee foot. These findings demonstrate a functional similarity within the midfoot of the hominines. Therefore, the kinematic capabilities and restrictions for the skeletal linkages of the human foot may not be as unique as has been previously suggested. PMID:25234343

  9. Phylogenomics of primates and their ancestral populations

    PubMed Central

    Siepel, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Genome assemblies are now available for nine primate species, and large-scale sequencing projects are underway or approved for six others. An explicitly evolutionary and phylogenetic approach to comparative genomics, called phylogenomics, will be essential in unlocking the valuable information about evolutionary history and genomic function that is contained within these genomes. However, most phylogenomic analyses so far have ignored the effects of variation in ancestral populations on patterns of sequence divergence. These effects can be pronounced in the primates, owing to large ancestral effective population sizes relative to the intervals between speciation events. In particular, local genealogies can vary considerably across loci, which can produce biases and diminished power in many phylogenomic analyses of interest, including phylogeny reconstruction, the identification of functional elements, and the detection of natural selection. At the same time, this variation in genealogies can be exploited to gain insight into the nature of ancestral populations. In this Perspective, I explore this area of intersection between phylogenetics and population genetics, and its implications for primate phylogenomics. I begin by “lifting the hood” on the conventional tree-like representation of the phylogenetic relationships between species, to expose the population-genetic processes that operate along its branches. Next, I briefly review an emerging literature that makes use of the complex relationships among coalescence, recombination, and speciation to produce inferences about evolutionary histories, ancestral populations, and natural selection. Finally, I discuss remaining challenges and future prospects at this nexus of phylogenetics, population genetics, and genomics. PMID:19801602

  10. Carboxyfullerene neuroprotection postinjury in Parkinsonian nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Laura L; Tian, LinLin; Quick, Kevin L; Hardt, Josh I; Karimi, Morvarid; Brown, Chris; Loftin, Susan; Flores, Hugh; Moerlein, Stephen M; Polich, John; Tabbal, Samer D; Mink, Jonathan W; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of the potent antioxidant C3 to salvage nigrostriatal neuronal function after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) exposure in nonhuman primates. C3 is a first-in-class functionalized water-soluble fullerene that reduces oxygen radical species associated with neurodegeneration in in vitro studies. However, C3 has not been evaluated as a neuroprotective agent in a Parkinson model in vivo. Macaque fascicularis monkeys were used in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study design. MPTP-lesioned primates were given systemic C3 (n = 8) or placebo (n = 7) for 2 months starting 1 week after MPTP. Outcomes included in vivo behavioral measures of motor parkinsonism using a validated nonhuman primate rating scale, kinematic analyses of peak upper extremity velocity, positron emission tomography imaging of 6-[(18) F]fluorodopa (FD; reflects dopa decarboxylase) and [(11) C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ; reflects vesicular monoamine transporter type 2), ex vivo quantification of striatal dopamine, and stereologic counts of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunostained neurons in substantia nigra. After 2 months, C3 -treated monkeys had significantly improved parkinsonian motor ratings, greater striatal FD and DTBZ uptake, and higher striatal dopamine levels. None of the C3 -treated animals developed any toxicity. Systemic treatment with C3 reduced striatal injury and improved motor function despite administration after the MPTP injury process had begun. These data strongly support further development of C3 as a promising therapeutic agent for Parkinson disease. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  11. Testosterone and reproductive effort in male primates.

    PubMed

    Muller, Martin N

    2016-09-08

    Considerable evidence suggests that the steroid hormone testosterone mediates major life-history trade-offs in vertebrates, promoting mating effort at the expense of parenting effort or survival. Observations from a range of wild primates support the "Challenge Hypothesis," which posits that variation in male testosterone is more closely associated with aggressive mating competition than with reproductive physiology. In both seasonally and non-seasonally breeding species, males increase testosterone production primarily when competing for fecund females. In species where males compete to maintain long-term access to females, testosterone increases when males are threatened with losing access to females, rather than during mating periods. And when male status is linked to mating success, and dependent on aggression, high-ranking males normally maintain higher testosterone levels than subordinates, particularly when dominance hierarchies are unstable. Trade-offs between parenting effort and mating effort appear to be weak in most primates, because direct investment in the form of infant transport and provisioning is rare. Instead, infant protection is the primary form of paternal investment in the order. Testosterone does not inhibit this form of investment, which relies on male aggression. Testosterone has a wide range of effects in primates that plausibly function to support male competitive behavior. These include psychological effects related to dominance striving, analgesic effects, and effects on the development and maintenance of the armaments and adornments that males employ in mating competition.

  12. Foveal Machine Vision Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    80 4.3 Reversible State of Nature Integrated Perception .............................. 80 4.3.1 Algebraic Integrated Perception...more feasible. 3 4.3.1 Algebraic Integrated Perception The rexel data from a foveation, R, is used to update the probabilities of the states of...frames without information loss. As opposed to the fusion of numerical values by algebraic data integration, Bayesian learning fuses the stochastic

  13. Uncovering foveal crowding?

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Maria; Yehezkel, Oren; Polat, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Visual crowding, as context modulation, reduce the ability to recognize objects in clutter, sets a fundamental limit on visual perception and object recognition. It's considered that crowding does not exist in the fovea and extensive efforts explored crowding in the periphery revealed various models that consider several aspects of spatial processing. Studies showed that spatial and temporal crowding are correlated, suggesting a tradeoff between spatial and temporal processing of crowding. We hypothesized that limiting stimulus availability should decrease object recognition in clutter. Here we show, for the first time, that robust contour interactions exist in the fovea for much larger target-flanker spacing than reported previously: participants overcome crowded conditions for long presentations times but exhibit contour interaction effects for short presentation times. Thus, by enabling enough processing time in the fovea, contour interactions can be overcome, enabling object recognition. Our results suggest that contemporary models of context modulation should include both time and spatial processing. PMID:24518803

  14. Foveal development and nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Proudlock, Frank; Gottlob, Irene

    2011-09-01

    The combination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and genetic methods along with other clinical diagnostic tools permit the discrimination of infantile nystagmus subtypes with a precision that has not previously been possible. Analysis of specific diseases, such as albinism and achromatopsia as well as known genetic abnormalities, such as FRMD7 and PAX6 mutations, shows subtle but significant differences between nystagmus subtypes using eye movement recordings. In addition, OCT can be used to chart the progression of retinal diseases with age, for example, as has been shown in achromatopsia. OCT can also be used to predict the level of visual deficit due to retinal abnormalities, as demonstrated for albinism. These findings suggest that the classification of all infantile nystagmus into one single entity is premature.

  15. The oldest known primate skeleton and early haplorhine evolution.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xijun; Gebo, Daniel L; Dagosto, Marian; Meng, Jin; Tafforeau, Paul; Flynn, John J; Beard, K Christopher

    2013-06-06

    Reconstructing the earliest phases of primate evolution has been impeded by gaps in the fossil record, so that disagreements persist regarding the palaeobiology and phylogenetic relationships of the earliest primates. Here we report the discovery of a nearly complete and partly articulated skeleton of a primitive haplorhine primate from the early Eocene of China, about 55 million years ago, the oldest fossil primate of this quality ever recovered. Coupled with detailed morphological examination using propagation phase contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography, our phylogenetic analysis based on total available evidence indicates that this fossil is the most basal known member of the tarsiiform clade. In addition to providing further support for an early dichotomy between the strepsirrhine and haplorhine clades, this new primate further constrains the age of divergence between tarsiiforms and anthropoids. It also strengthens the hypothesis that the earliest primates were probably diurnal, arboreal and primarily insectivorous mammals the size of modern pygmy mouse lemurs.

  16. A comparative psychophysical approach to visual perception in primates.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Toyomi; Fujita, Kazuo

    2009-04-01

    Studies on the visual processing of primates, which have well developed visual systems, provide essential information about the perceptual bases of their higher-order cognitive abilities. Although the mechanisms underlying visual processing are largely shared between human and nonhuman primates, differences have also been reported. In this article, we review psychophysical investigations comparing the basic visual processing that operates in human and nonhuman species, and discuss the future contributions potentially deriving from such comparative psychophysical approaches to primate minds.

  17. Agroecosystems and primate conservation in the tropics: a review.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Alejandro; Raboy, Becky E; Oliveira, Leonardo C

    2012-08-01

    Agroecosystems cover more than one quarter of the global land area (ca. 50 million km(2) ) as highly simplified (e.g. pasturelands) or more complex systems (e.g. polycultures and agroforestry systems) with the capacity to support higher biodiversity. Increasingly more information has been published about primates in agroecosystems but a general synthesis of the diversity of agroecosystems that primates use or which primate taxa are able to persist in these anthropogenic components of the landscapes is still lacking. Because of the continued extensive transformation of primate habitat into human-modified landscapes, it is important to explore the extent to which agroecosystems are used by primates. In this article, we reviewed published information on the use of agroecosystems by primates in habitat countries and also discuss the potential costs and benefits to human and nonhuman primates of primate use of agroecosystems. The review showed that 57 primate taxa from four regions: Mesoamerica, South America, Sub-Saharan Africa (including Madagascar), and South East Asia, used 38 types of agroecosystems as temporary or permanent habitats. Fifty-one percent of the taxa recorded in agroecosystems were classified as least concern in the IUCN Red List, but the rest were classified as endangered (20%), vulnerable (18%), near threatened (9%), or critically endangered (2%). The large proportion of threatened primates in agroecosystems suggests that agroecosystems may play an important role in landscape approaches to primate conservation. We conclude by discussing the value of agroecosystems for primate conservation at a broad scale and highlight priorities for future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Predictors of orbital convergence in primates: a test of the snake detection hypothesis of primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Brandon C; Bradley, Brenda J; Kamilar, Jason M

    2011-09-01

    Traditional explanations for the evolution of high orbital convergence and stereoscopic vision in primates have focused on how stereopsis might have aided early primates in foraging or locomoting in an arboreal environment. It has recently been suggested that predation risk by constricting snakes was the selective force that favored the evolution of orbital convergence in early primates, and that later exposure to venomous snakes favored further degrees of convergence in anthropoid primates. Our study tests this snake detection hypothesis (SDH) by examining whether orbital convergence among extant primates is indeed associated with the shared evolutionary history with snakes or the risk that snakes pose for a given species. We predicted that orbital convergence would be higher in species that: 1) have a longer history of sympatry with venomous snakes, 2) are likely to encounter snakes more frequently, 3) are less able to detect or deter snakes due to group size effects, and 4) are more likely to be preyed upon by snakes. Results based on phylogenetically independent contrasts do not support the SDH. Orbital convergence shows no relationship to the shared history with venomous snakes, likelihood of encountering snakes, or group size. Moreover, those species less likely to be targeted as prey by snakes show significantly higher values of orbital convergence. Although an improved ability to detect camouflaged snakes, along with other cryptic stimuli, is likely a consequence of increased orbital convergence, this was unlikely to have been the primary selective force favoring the evolution of stereoscopic vision in primates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of cell confluence on the cAMP signalling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Belacel-Ouari, M; Zhang, L; Hubert, F; Assaly, R; Gerbier, R; Jockers, R; Dauphin, F; Lechêne, P; Fischmeister, R; Manoury, B; Leblais, V

    2017-07-01

    The influence of cell confluence on the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR)/cAMP/phosphodiesterase (PDE) pathway was investigated in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs). Cells were plated either at low density (LD: 3·10(3)cells/cm(2)) or high density (HD: 3·10(4)cells/cm(2)) corresponding to non-confluent or confluent cells, respectively, on the day of experiment. β-AR-stimulated cAMP was monitored in real-time using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP sensor, Epac2-camps. A brief application (15s) of the β-AR agonist isoprenaline (Iso) induced a typical transient FRET signal, reflecting cAMP production followed by its rapid degradation. The amplitude of this response, which increased with the concentration of Iso (10 or 100nM), was higher in HD than in LD cells, whatever the Iso concentration used. However, activation of adenylyl cyclase by L-858051 (100μM) induced a similar saturating response in both LD and HD cells. A β1-AR antagonist (CGP 20712A, 100nM) reduced the Iso (100nM) response in HD but not LD cells, whereas a β2-AR antagonist (ICI 118,551, 5nM) reduced this response in HD cells and almost abolished it in LD cells. Competitive [(125)I]-ICYP binding experiments with betaxolol, a β-AR ligand, identified two binding sites in HD cells, corresponding to β1- and β2-ARs with a proportion of 11% and 89%, respectively, but only one binding site in LD cells, corresponding to β2-ARs. Total cAMP-PDE activity (assessed by a radioenzymatic assay) was increased in HD cells compared to LD cells. This increase was associated with a rise in mRNA expression of five cAMP-PDEs subtypes (PDE1A, 3A, 4A, 4B and 7B) in HD cells, and a decrease in basal [cAMP]i (assessed by an EIA assay). PDE4 inhibition with Ro-20-1724 (10μM) strongly prolonged the Iso response in LD and HD cells, whereas PDE3 inhibition with cilostamide (1μM) slightly prolonged Iso response only in LD cells. Interestingly, inhibition of PDE4 unmasked an effect of PDE3

  20. Why is a landscape perspective important in studies of primates?

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Fahrig, Lenore

    2014-10-01

    With accelerated deforestation and fragmentation through the tropics, assessing the impact that landscape spatial changes may have on biodiversity is paramount, as this information is required to design and implement effective management and conservation plans. Primates are expected to be particularly dependent on the landscape context; yet, our understanding on this topic is limited as the majority of primate studies are at the local scale, meaning that landscape-scale inferences are not possible. To encourage primatologists to assess the impact of landscape changes on primates, and help future studies on the topic, we describe the meaning of a "landscape perspective" and evaluate important assumptions of using such a methodological approach. We also summarize a number of important, but unanswered, questions that can be addressed using a landscape-scale study design. For example, it is still unclear if habitat loss has larger consistent negative effects on primates than habitat fragmentation per se. Furthermore, interaction effects between habitat area and other landscape effects (e.g., fragmentation) are unknown for primates. We also do not know if primates are affected by synergistic interactions among factors at the landscape scale (e.g., habitat loss and diseases, habitat loss and climate change, hunting, and land-use change), or whether landscape complexity (or landscape heterogeneity) is important for primate conservation. Testing for patterns in the responses of primates to landscape change will facilitate the development of new guidelines and principles for improving primate conservation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Sexual selection and the evolution of brain size in primates.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Michael A

    2006-12-20

    Reproductive competition among males has long been considered a powerful force in the evolution of primates. The evolution of brain size and complexity in the Order Primates has been widely regarded as the hallmark of primate evolutionary history. Despite their importance to our understanding of primate evolution, the relationship between sexual selection and the evolutionary development of brain size is not well studied. The present research examines the evolutionary relationship between brain size and two components of primate sexual selection, sperm competition and male competition for mates. Results indicate that there is not a significant relationship between relative brain size and sperm competition as measured by relative testis size in primates, suggesting sperm competition has not played an important role in the evolution of brain size in the primate order. There is, however, a significant negative evolutionary relationship between relative brain size and the level of male competition for mates. The present study shows that the largest relative brain sizes among primate species are associated with monogamous mating systems, suggesting primate monogamy may require greater social acuity and abilities of deception.

  2. The adaptive value of primate color vision for predator detection.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Daniel Marques Almeida; Maia, Rafael; de Albuquerque Ajuz, Rafael Cavalcanti; De Moraes, Pedro Zurvaino Palmeira Melo Rosa; Spyrides, Maria Helena Constantino; Pessoa, Valdir Filgueiras

    2014-08-01

    The complex evolution of primate color vision has puzzled biologists for decades. Primates are the only eutherian mammals that evolved an enhanced capacity for discriminating colors in the green-red part of the spectrum (trichromatism). However, while Old World primates present three types of cone pigments and are routinely trichromatic, most New World primates exhibit a color vision polymorphism, characterized by the occurrence of trichromatic and dichromatic females and obligatory dichromatic males. Even though this has stimulated a prolific line of inquiry, the selective forces and relative benefits influencing color vision evolution in primates are still under debate, with current explanations focusing almost exclusively at the advantages in finding food and detecting socio-sexual signals. Here, we evaluate a previously untested possibility, the adaptive value of primate color vision for predator detection. By combining color vision modeling data on New World and Old World primates, as well as behavioral information from human subjects, we demonstrate that primates exhibiting better color discrimination (trichromats) excel those displaying poorer color visions (dichromats) at detecting carnivoran predators against the green foliage background. The distribution of color vision found in extant anthropoid primates agrees with our results, and may be explained by the advantages of trichromats and dichromats in detecting predators and insects, respectively. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Evolutionary Glycomics: Characterization of Milk Oligosaccharides in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Nannan; Wu, Shuai; Kim, Jaehan; An, Hyun Joo; Hinde, Katie; Power, Michael L.; Gagneux, Pascal; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2011-01-01

    Free oligosaccharides are abundant components of mammalian milk and have primary roles as prebiotic compounds, in immune defense, and in brain development. Mass spectrometry-based technique is applied to profile milk oligosaccharides from apes (chimpanzee, gorilla, and siamang), new world monkeys (golden lion tamarin and common marmoset), and an old world monkey (rhesus). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of primate milk oligosaccharide composition from a phylogenetic perspective in order to assess the extent to which the compositions of hMOs derives from ancestral, primate patterns as opposed to more recent evolutionary events. Milk oligosaccharides were quantitated by nanoflow liquid chromatography on chip-based devices. The relative abundances of fucosylated and sialylated milk oligosaccharides in primates were also determined. For a systematic and comprehensive study of evolutionary patterns of milk oligosaccharides, cluster analysis of primate milk was performed using the chromatographic profile. In general, the oligosaccharides in primate milk, including humans, are more complex and exhibit greater diversity compared to the ones in non-primate milk. A detailed comparison of the oligosaccharides across evolution revealed non-sequential developmental pattern, i.e. that primate milk oligosaccharides do not necessarily cluster according to the primate phylogeny. This report represents the first comprehensive and quantitative effort to profile and elucidate the structures of free milk oligosaccharides so that they can be related to glycan function in different primates. PMID:21214271

  4. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A

    2014-05-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for various primate species, and analyses of several others are underway. Whole-genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other non-human primates offer valuable insights into genetic similarities and differences among species that are used as models for disease-related research. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics, and proposes a series of goals for the near future.

  5. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for several primates, with analyses of several others underway. Whole genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other nonhuman primates provide valuable insight into genetic similarities and differences among species used as models for disease-related research. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics and offers a series of goals for the near future. PMID:24709753

  6. [Ten-day Periodical of Traditional Chinese Medicine and its concept of confluence of Chinese and western medicine].

    PubMed

    Zhang, S B; Wang, Z W

    2016-09-28

    The Ten-day Periodical of Traditional Chinese Medicine, a TCM Journal founded by the Xiamen Professional School of Traditional Chinese Medicine in July 1934, had published a lot of essays written by many TCM physicians that interpret the concept of traditional Chinese medicine by western medicine, offering the academic way of probing confluence of Chinese and Western Medicine in Xiamen. The aim of the Journal includes "developing TCM academy" and the "confluence of TCM with western medicine" , the exploration of TCM and the penetration of Chinese and western medicine, and getting rid of blind faith on "science" to set up the belief of TCM and to prove the ideas of visceral theory and its gasification by the anatomical knowledge of western medicine. The Journal envisaged the difference between the TCM and WM, avoided blind convergence, representing the academic inheritance and progress of the era. Although the essays published might have made a forced analogy by over-praising TCM, however, its exploration and convergence of TCM and the experiences are helpful to modern scholars to properly manage the relation of TCM and WM to face the future challenge consciously.

  7. Monitoring and Simulating the 3-D Density Currents at the Confluence of the Snake and Clearwater Rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2004-12-01

    Summer temperatures in the Lower Snake River can be altered by releasing cold waters that originate from deep depths within Dworshak Reservoir. These cold releases are used to lower temperatures in the Clearwater River, a major tributary to the Lower Snake River, and to improve hydrodynamic and water quality conditions for migrating aquatic species. This project monitored the complex three-dimensional density currents at the Clearwater and Snake River confluence and the processes that led to stratification of Lower Granite Reservoir (LGR) during the late spring, summer, and fall of 2002. In addition to monitoring the LGR environment, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model was also applied. By utilizing both field data and a numerical model, a more holistic view of the 3-D density currents was discovered than by either method alone. During this process, it was discovered that several predictable stratification patterns would develop depending upon the discharge ratio and the thermal gradient between the two rivers. These results illustrate the complex hydrodynamic structure at the confluence of the Clearwater and Snake Rivers, which has previously been shown by fish biologists to be a difficult passage zone for migrating salmonids of various life stages.

  8. Angio-OCT de la zona avascular foveal en ojos con oclusión venosa de la retina.

    PubMed

    Wons, Juliana; Pfau, Maximilian; Wirth, Magdalena A; Freiberg, Florentina J; Becker, Matthias D; Michels, Stephan

    2017-07-11

    Objetivo: El objetivo del estudio comprendía visualizar y cuantificar las alteraciones patológicas de la zona avascular foveal (ZAF) mediante angio-OCT en ojos con oclusión venosa de la retina (OVR) en comparación con el ojo contralateral sano. Procedimientos: La angio-OCT se llevó a cabo mediante el sistema Avanti® RTVue 100 XR (Optovue Inc., Fremont, Calif., EE. UU.). Los bordes de la capa vascular superficial (CVS) se definieron como 3 μm por debajo de la membrana limitante interna y 15 μm por debajo de la capa plexiforme interna y, para la capa vascular profunda (CVP), como 15 y 70 μm por debajo de la membrana limitante interna y de la capa plexiforme interna, respectivamente. La longitud de la ZAF horizontal, vertical y máxima de la CVS y la CVP en cada ojo se midió de forma manual. Además, se midió el ángulo entre el diámetro máximo de la ZAF y el plano papilomacular. Resultados: La angio-OCT representó los defectos dentro de la vasculatura en el área perifoveal en ojos con oclusión de rama venosa de la retina (ORVR; n = 11) y con oclusión de la vena central de la retina (OVCR; n = 8). Esto resultó en un crecimiento del diámetro máximo de la ZAF en ojos con OVR (n = 19) en comparación con el ojo contralateral (n = 19; 921 ± 213 frente a 724 ± 145 µm; p = 0,008). Además, se observó una correlación significativa entre la mejor agudeza visual corregida (MAVC) y el diámetro máximo de la ZAF en la CVP (ρ de Spearman = -0,423, p < 0,01). Por último, en los ojos con OVR, el ángulo entre el plano papilomacular y el diámetro máximo de la ZAF se dio tan solo en el 21,05% (CVS) y en el 15,79% (CVP) de los casos a 0 ± 15 ó 90 ± 15°, respectivamente. En ojos sanos, estos ángulos (que supuestamente representan una configuración de la ZAF regular) fueron más prevalentes (CVS 68,42 frente a 21,05%, p = 0,003; CVP 73,68 frente a 15,79%, p < 0,001). Conclusiones: La angio-OCT muestra alteraciones morfológicas de la ZAF en ojos con

  9. VARIABILITY IN FOVEAL AVASCULAR ZONE AND CAPILLARY DENSITY USING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY ANGIOGRAPHY MACHINES IN HEALTHY EYES.

    PubMed

    Magrath, George N; Say, Emil Anthony T; Sioufi, Kareem; Ferenczy, Sandor; Samara, Wasim A; Shields, Carol L

    2016-12-16

    To evaluate the variability in foveal avascular zone (FAZ) and capillary density measurements on optical coherence tomography angiography using Optovue RTVue XR Avanti (OA) (Optovue) and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000 (ZC) (Carl Zeiss Meditec). In this prospective, comparative case series, parafoveal (3 × 3 mm) optical coherence tomography angiography scans were obtained on healthy volunteers using both the Avanti and Cirrus. The FAZ area and capillary density at the level of both the superficial and deep capillary plexus were measured automatically using the built-in ReVue software (Optovue) with the Avanti as well as manually using ImageJ (National Institutes of Health) with both machines. There were 50 eyes in 25 healthy volunteers included in the analysis. Mean subject age was 33 years and there were 14 women (56%). On optical coherence tomography, mean central macular thickness was significantly greater on OA (259.1 μm) than ZC (257.6 μm, P = 0.0228). On optical coherence tomography angiography, mean superficial and deep plexus FAZ measured 0.2855 mm and 0.3465 mm on Avanti automated (A-A), 0.2739 mm and 0.3637 mm on Avanti manual (A-M), and 0.2657 mm and 0.3993 mm on Cirrus manual (C-M), respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in superficial plexus FAZ measurements between the A-A and A-M (P = 0.4019) or A-A and C-M (P = 0.1336). The A-M measured significantly larger than C-M (P = 0.0396). Deep plexus FAZ measurements were similar on A-A and A-M (P = 0.6299), but both were significantly less compared with C-M (P < 0.0001 for A-A vs. C-M, P = 0.0184 for A-M vs. C-M). Mean superficial and deep plexus capillary densities were 53.6% and 59.3% on A-A, 48.1% and 47.7% on A-M, and 52.5% and 48.1% on C-M, respectively. Superficial plexus capillary density measurements were statistically similar on A-A and C-M (P = 0.0623), but both were significantly higher than A-M (P < 0.0001 for A-A vs. A-M, P < 0.0001 for A-M vs. C-M). However, deep plexus

  10. Comparative analysis of the primate X-inactivation center region and reconstruction of the ancestral primate XIST locus

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Julie E.; Sheedy, Christina B.; Merrett, Stephanie L.; Diallo, Abdoulaye Banire; Swofford, David L.; NISC Comparative Sequencing Program; Green, Eric D.; Willard, Huntington F.

    2011-01-01

    Here we provide a detailed comparative analysis across the candidate X-Inactivation Center (XIC) region and the XIST locus in the genomes of six primates and three mammalian outgroup species. Since lemurs and other strepsirrhine primates represent the sister lineage to all other primates, this analysis focuses on lemurs to reconstruct the ancestral primate sequences and to gain insight into the evolution of this region and the genes within it. This comparative evolutionary genomics approach reveals significant expansion in genomic size across the XIC region in higher primates, with minimal size alterations across the XIST locus itself. Reconstructed primate ancestral XIC sequences show that the most dramatic changes during the past 80 million years occurred between the ancestral primate and the lineage leading to Old World monkeys. In contrast, the XIST locus compared between human and the primate ancestor does not indicate any dramatic changes to exons or XIST-specific repeats; rather, evolution of this locus reflects small incremental changes in overall sequence identity and short repeat insertions. While this comparative analysis reinforces that the region around XIST has been subject to significant genomic change, even among primates, our data suggest that evolution of the XIST sequences themselves represents only small lineage-specific changes across the past 80 million years. PMID:21518738

  11. Diurnality, nocturnality, and the evolution of primate visual systems.

    PubMed

    Ankel-Simons, F; Rasmussen, D T

    2008-01-01

    Much of the recent research on the evolution of primate visual systems has assumed that a minimum number of shifts have occurred in circadian activity patterns over the course of primate evolution. The evolutionary origins of key higher taxonomic groups have been interpreted by some researchers as a consequence of a rare shift from nocturnality to diurnality (e.g., Anthropoidea) or from diurnality to nocturnality (e.g., Tarsiidae). Interpreting the evolution of primate visual systems with an ecological approach without parsimony constraints suggests that the evolutionary transitions in activity pattern are more common than what would be allowed by parsimony models, and that such transitions are probably less important in the origin of higher level taxa. The analysis of 17 communities of primates distributed widely around the world and through geological time shows that primate communities consistently contain both nocturnal and diurnal forms, regardless of the taxonomic sources of the communities. This suggests that primates in a community will adapt their circadian pattern to fill empty diurnal or nocturnal niches. Several evolutionary transitions from one pattern to the other within narrow taxonomic groups are solidly documented, and these cases probably represent a small fraction of such transitions throughout the Cenozoic. One or more switches have been documented among platyrrhine monkeys, Malagasy prosimians, Eocene omomyids, Eocene adapoids, and early African anthropoids, with inconclusive but suggestive data within tarsiids. The interpretation of living and extinct primates as fitting into one of two diarhythmic categories is itself problematic, because many extant primates show significant behavioral activity both nocturnally and diurnally. Parsimony models routinely interpret ancestral primates to have been nocturnal, but analyses of morphological and genetic data indicate that they may have been diurnal, or that early primate radiations were likely to

  12. Primate malarias: Diversity, distribution and insights for zoonotic Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Faust, Christina; Dobson, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    Protozoans within the genus Plasmodium are well-known as the causative agents of malaria in humans. Numerous Plasmodium species parasites also infect a wide range of non-human primate hosts in tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide. Studying this diversity can provide critical insight into our understanding of human malarias, as several human malaria species are a result of host switches from non-human primates. Current spillover of a monkey malaria, Plasmodium knowlesi, in Southeast Asia highlights the permeability of species barriers in Plasmodium. Also recently, surveys of apes in Africa uncovered a previously undescribed diversity of Plasmodium in chimpanzees and gorillas. Therefore, we carried out a meta-analysis to quantify the global distribution, host range, and diversity of known non-human primate malaria species. We used published records of Plasmodium parasites found in non-human primates to estimate the total diversity of non-human primate malarias globally. We estimate that at least three undescribed primate malaria species exist in sampled primates, and many more likely exist in unstudied species. The diversity of malaria parasites is especially uncertain in regions of low sampling such as Madagascar, and taxonomic groups such as African Old World Monkeys and gibbons. Presence-absence data of malaria across primates enables us to highlight the close association of forested regions and non-human primate malarias. This distribution potentially reflects a long coevolution of primates, forest-adapted mosquitoes, and malaria parasites. The diversity and distribution of primate malaria are an essential prerequisite to understanding the mechanisms and circumstances that allow Plasmodium to jump species barriers, both in the evolution of malaria parasites and current cases of spillover into humans.

  13. Why Primates? The Importance of Nonhuman Primates for Understanding Human Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Daniel J.; Santos, Laurie R.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce the thematic collection by noting some striking similarities in the cognitive abilities of human infants and nonhuman primates. What are the implications of these similarities for our comprehension of human infant cognition? After providing a brief historical and conceptual background on comparative behavioral research, we discuss how…

  14. Hibernation in a primate: does sleep occur?

    PubMed Central

    Dausmann, Kathrin H.; Faherty, Sheena L.; Klopfer, Peter; Krystal, Andrew D.; Schopler, Robert; Yoder, Anne D.

    2016-01-01

    During hibernation, critical physiological processes are downregulated and thermogenically induced arousals are presumably needed periodically to fulfil those physiological demands. Among the processes incompatible with a hypome tabolic state is sleep. However, one hibernating primate, the dwarf lemur Cheirogaleus medius, experiences rapid eye movement (REM)-like states during hibernation, whenever passively reaching temperatures above 30°C, as occurs when it hibernates in poorly insulated tree hollows under tropical conditions. Here, we report electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, temperature data and metabolic rates from two related species (C. crossleyi and C. sibreei), inhabiting high-altitude rainforests and hibernating underground, conditions that mirror, to some extent, those experienced by temperate hibernators. We compared the physiology of hibernation and spontaneous arousals in these animals to C. medius, as well as the much more distantly related non-primate hibernators, such as Arctic, golden-mantled and European ground squirrels. We observed a number of commonalities with non-primate temperate hibernators including: (i) monotonous ultra-low voltage EEG during torpor bouts in these relatively cold-weather hibernators, (ii) the absence of sleep during torpor bouts, (iii) the occurrence of spontaneous arousals out of torpor, during which sleep regularly occurred, (iv) relatively high early EEG non-REM during the arousal, and (v) a gradual transition to the torpid EEG state from non-REM sleep. Unlike C. medius, our study species did not display sleep-like states during torpor bouts, but instead exclusively exhibited them during arousals. During these short euthermic periods, non-REM as well as REM sleep-like stages were observed. Differences observed between these two species and their close relative, C. medius, for which data have been published, presumably reflect differences in hibernaculum temperature. PMID:27853604

  15. Basin-scale temporal evolution of the discharge ratios at confluences: The case of the Upper-Rhône watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardot, Romain; Moradi, Gelare; Fatichi, Simone; Molnar, Peter; Mettra, François; Lane, Stuart

    2017-04-01

    Confluences are key elements of dendritic drainage networks. They are known to have a very specific bed morphology. Field and experimental studies have shown that the river bed presents has erosion and deposition patterns linked to the specific fluid circulation that occur in the junction zone. Previous studies have emphasized that one of the main drivers of the morphology of the river bed is the symmetry ratio between the two incoming channels. The symmetry ratio is generally expressed as the ratio between the two drainage areas, reflecting the relative size and then the averaged discharge of the tributary to those of the main stem. However, previous studies have also shown that the bed morphology of confluences vary with time, especially with the variation of the discharge ratio (i.e. the ratio Qr=Qt/Qm, where t refers to the tributary, and m to the main stem). Variation of the discharge ratio is natural in any river basin because the response time of different basins is a function of basin size and shape, but also because the hydrological processes dominant in different basins may vary. For instance, the response of Alpine sub-basins to temperature and precipitation will depend upon the distribution of elevations in each basin, and so cause differences in discharge ratio through time. A distributed (250 x 250 m) hourly-based hydrological model of the Upper-Rhône basin (Fatichi et al., 2015) is used to determine the temporal variability of the discharge ratio at a large number confluences spread within the catchment. The discharge ratio is computed at each time-step and the occurrence of different ranges of ratio are investigated in the light of factors such as the the confluence position within the catchment and the characteristics of the two confluence sub-catchments. The results show that confluences located upper in the catchment tend to have a wider range of discharge ratios than those located further downstream, reflecting the 'scaling effect' of the

  16. Earliest known simian primate found in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Godinot, M; Mahboubi, M

    1992-05-28

    The record of early fossil Simiiformes (Anthropoidea) from the Late Eocene and Early Oligocene of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula has increased dramatically in recent years. We report here the discovery of a new, diminutive and much older (Early or Middle Eocene) simian from an Algerian locality, Glib Zegdou. This species is smaller than any other living or fossil African simiiform. Derived similarities shared with Aegyptopithecus suggest that the new genus is more closely related to propliopithecines than to oligopithecines, implying that these two subfamilies differentiated during the Early Eocene. The new discovery confirms predictions about the great antiquity of Simiiformes and emphasizes a long and endemic African history for higher primates.

  17. Biorhythms and space experiments with nonhuman primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Man's response to exposure to spaceflight and weightlessness is expressed in physiological adjustments which involve his health and ability to function. The amplitude and periodicity of fluctuations in biological processes affect various functions and responses to provocative stimuli. Primates and other species are subjected to tests to determine the consequences of an altered biorhythm on work and performance, emotional stability, biomedical evaluation in space, the ability to cope with the unexpected, and susceptibility to infection, toxicity, radiation, drugs, and stress. Factors in the environment or operational setup which can change the physiological baseline must be determined and controlled.

  18. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review.

    PubMed

    Foley, Brian T; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Peeters, Martine

    2016-12-01

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. This review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written in 2000.

  19. Embryonic stem cell lines of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Norio; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2002-06-26

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines have opened great potential and expectation for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Monkey and human ES cell lines, which are very similar to each other, have been established from monkey blastocysts and surplus human blastocysts from fertility clinics. Nonhuman primate ES cell lines provide important research tools for basic and applicative research. Firstly, they provide wider aspects of investigation of the regulative mechanisms of stem cells and cell differentiation among primate species. Secondly, their usage does not need clearance or permission from the regulative rules in many countries that are associated with the ethical aspects of human ES cells, although human and nonhuman embryos and fetuses are very similar to each other. Lastly and most importantly, they are indispensable for animal models of cell therapy to test effectiveness, safety, and immunological reaction of the allogenic transplantation in a setting similar to the treatment of human diseases. So far, ES cell lines have been established from rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), using blastocysts produced naturally or by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). These cell lines seem to have very similar characteristics. They express alkaline phosphatase activity and stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 and, in most cases, SSEA-3. Their pluripotency was confirmed by the formation of embryoid bodies and differentiation into various cell types in culture and also by the formation of teratomas that contained many types of differentiated tissues including derivatives of three germ layers after transplantation into the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. The noneffectiveness of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signal makes culture of primate and human ES cell lines prone to undergo spontaneous differentiation and thus it is

  20. Biorhythms and space experiments with nonhuman primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Man's response to exposure to spaceflight and weightlessness is expressed in physiological adjustments which involve his health and ability to function. The amplitude and periodicity of fluctuations in biological processes affect various functions and responses to provocative stimuli. Primates and other species are subjected to tests to determine the consequences of an altered biorhythm on work and performance, emotional stability, biomedical evaluation in space, the ability to cope with the unexpected, and susceptibility to infection, toxicity, radiation, drugs, and stress. Factors in the environment or operational setup which can change the physiological baseline must be determined and controlled.

  1. Two Influential Primate Classifications Logically Aligned

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Nico M.; Pier, Naomi M.; Reeder, Deeann M.; Chen, Mingmin; Yu, Shizhuo; Kianmajd, Parisa; Bowers, Shawn; Ludäscher, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    Classifications and phylogenies of perceived natural entities change in the light of new evidence. Taxonomic changes, translated into Code-compliant names, frequently lead to name:meaning dissociations across succeeding treatments. Classification standards such as the Mammal Species of the World (MSW) may experience significant levels of taxonomic change from one edition to the next, with potential costs to long-term, large-scale information integration. This circumstance challenges the biodiversity and phylogenetic data communities to express taxonomic congruence and incongruence in ways that both humans and machines can process, that is, to logically represent taxonomic alignments across multiple classifications. We demonstrate that such alignments are feasible for two classifications of primates corresponding to the second and third MSW editions. Our approach has three main components: (i) use of taxonomic concept labels, that is name sec. author (where sec. means according to), to assemble each concept hierarchy separately via parent/child relationships; (ii) articulation of select concepts across the two hierarchies with user-provided Region Connection Calculus (RCC-5) relationships; and (iii) the use of an Answer Set Programming toolkit to infer and visualize logically consistent alignments of these input constraints. Our use case entails the Primates sec. Groves (1993; MSW2–317 taxonomic concepts; 233 at the species level) and Primates sec. Groves (2005; MSW3–483 taxonomic concepts; 376 at the species level). Using 402 RCC-5 input articulations, the reasoning process yields a single, consistent alignment and 153,111 Maximally Informative Relations that constitute a comprehensive meaning resolution map for every concept pair in the Primates sec. MSW2/MSW3. The complete alignment, and various partitions thereof, facilitate quantitative analyses of name:meaning dissociation, revealing that nearly one in three taxonomic names are not reliable across

  2. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review

    DOE PAGES

    Foley, Brian T.; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; ...

    2016-10-24

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. As a result, this review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written inmore » 2000.« less

  3. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian T.; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Peeters, Martine

    2016-10-24

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. As a result, this review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written in 2000.

  4. Non-Human Primate Models of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Peña, Juliet C; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-08-01

    Among the animal models of tuberculosis (TB), the non-human primates, particularly rhesus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and cynomolgus macaques (Macaca mulatta), share the greatest anatomical and physiological similarities with humans. Macaques are highly susceptible to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and manifest the complete spectrum of clinical and pathological manifestations of TB as seen in humans. Therefore, the macaque models have been used extensively for investigating the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infection and for preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines against TB. This review focuses on published major studies that exemplify how the rhesus and cynomolgus macaques have enhanced and may continue to advance global efforts in TB research.

  5. Primates, Provisioning and Plants: Impacts of Human Cultural Behaviours on Primate Ecological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Asmita; McConkey, Kim R.; Radhakrishna, Sindhu

    2015-01-01

    Human provisioning of wildlife with food is a widespread global practice that occurs in multiple socio-cultural circumstances. Provisioning may indirectly alter ecosystem functioning through changes in the eco-ethology of animals, but few studies have quantified this aspect. Provisioning of primates by humans is known to impact their activity budgets, diets and ranging patterns. Primates are also keystone species in tropical forests through their role as seed dispersers; yet there is no information on how provisioning might affect primate ecological functions. The rhesus macaque is a major human-commensal species but is also an important seed disperser in the wild. In this study, we investigated the potential impacts of provisioning on the role of rhesus macaques as seed dispersers in the Buxa Tiger Reserve, India. We studied a troop of macaques which were provisioned for a part of the year and were dependent on natural resources for the rest. We observed feeding behaviour, seed handling techniques and ranging patterns of the macaques and monitored availability of wild fruits. Irrespective of fruit availability, frugivory and seed dispersal activities decreased when the macaques were provisioned. Provisioned macaques also had shortened daily ranges implying shorter dispersal distances. Finally, during provisioning periods, seeds were deposited on tarmac roads that were unconducive for germination. Provisioning promotes human-primate conflict, as commensal primates are often involved in aggressive encounters with humans over resources, leading to negative consequences for both parties involved. Preventing or curbing provisioning is not an easy task as feeding wild animals is a socio-cultural tradition across much of South and South-East Asia, including India. We recommend the initiation of literacy programmes that educate lay citizens about the ill-effects of provisioning and strongly caution them against the practice. PMID:26536365

  6. Demand for nonhuman primate resources in the age of biodefense.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jean L; Carrion, Richardo

    2005-01-01

    The demand for nonhuman primates will undoubtedly increase to meet biomedical needs in this current age of biodefense. The availability of funding has increased the research on select agents and has created a requirement to validate results in relevant primate models. This review provides a description of current and potential biological threats that are likely to require nonhuman primates for the development of vaccines and therapeutics. Primates have been an invaluable resource in the dissection of viral disease pathogenesis as well as in testing vaccine efficacy. DNA vaccine approaches have been studied successfully for Ebola, Lassa, and anthrax in nonhuman primate models. Nonhuman primate research with monkeypox has provided insight into the role of cytokines in limiting disease severity. Biodefense research that has focused on select agents of bacterial origin has also benefited from nonhuman primate studies. Rhesus macaques have traditionally been the model of choice for anthrax research and have yielded successful findings in vaccine development. In plague research, African green monkeys have contributed to vaccine development. However, the disadvantages of current vaccines will undoubtedly require the generation of new vaccines, thus increasing the need for nonhuman primate research. Unfortunately, the current biosafety level (BSL)-3 and BSL-4 facilities equipped to perform this research are limited, which may ultimately impede progress in this era of biodefense.

  7. 76 FR 13120 - Requirements for Importers of Nonhuman Primates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... (42 CFR 71.53) for the importation of live nonhuman primates (NHPs). Written comments were to be... the imporation of live nonhuman primates (NHPs) by extending existing requirements for the importation of Macaca fascicularis (cyanmologus), Chlororcebus aethlops (African green) and Macaca...

  8. Developmental processes and canine dimorphism in primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary T; Miller, Ellen R; Gunnell, Gregg F

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history of canine sexual dimorphism is important for interpreting the developmental biology, socioecology and phylogenetic position of primates. All current evidence for extant primates indicates that canine dimorphism is achieved through bimaturism rather than via differences in rates of crown formation time. Using incremental growth lines, we charted the ontogeny of canine formation within species of Eocene Cantius, the earliest known canine-dimorphic primate, to test whether canine dimorphism via bimaturism was developmentally canalized early in primate evolution. Our results show that canine dimorphism in Cantius is achieved primarily through different rates of crown formation in males and females, not bimaturism. This is the first demonstration of rate differences resulting in canine dimorphism in any primate and therefore suggests that canine dimorphism is not developmentally homologous across Primates. The most likely interpretation is that canine dimorphism has been selected for at least twice during the course of primate evolution. The power of this approach is its ability to identify underlying developmental processes behind patterns of morphological similarity, even in long-extinct primate species.

  9. Evaluation of tolerance to lentiviral LV-RPE65 gene therapy vector after subretinal delivery in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Matet, Alexandre; Kostic, Corinne; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Moulin, Alexandre; Rosolen, Serge G; Martin, Samia; Mavilio, Fulvio; Amirjanians, Vazrik; Stieger, Knut; Lorenz, Birgit; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Arsenijevic, Yvan

    2017-10-01

    Several approaches have been developed for gene therapy in RPE65-related Leber congenital amaurosis. To date, strategies that have reached the clinical stages rely on adeno-associated viral vectors and two of them documented limited long-term effect. We have developed a lentiviral-based strategy of RPE65 gene transfer that efficiently restored protein expression and cone function in RPE65-deficient mice. In this study, we evaluated the ocular and systemic tolerances of this lentiviral-based therapy (LV-RPE65) on healthy nonhuman primates (NHPs), without adjuvant systemic anti-inflammatory prophylaxis. For the first time, we describe the early kinetics of retinal detachment at 2, 4, and 7 days after subretinal injection using multimodal imaging in 5 NHPs. We revealed prolonged reattachment times in LV-RPE65-injected eyes compared to vehicle-injected eyes. Low- (n = 2) and high-dose (n = 2) LV-RPE65-injected eyes presented a reduction of the outer nuclear and photoreceptor outer segment layer thickness in the macula, that was more pronounced than in vehicle-injected eyes (n = 4). All LV-RPE65-injected eyes showed an initial perivascular reaction that resolved spontaneously within 14 days. Despite foveal structural changes, full-field electroretinography indicated that the overall retinal function was preserved over time and immunohistochemistry identified no difference in glial, microglial, or leucocyte ocular activation between low-dose, high-dose, and vehicle-injected eyes. Moreover, LV-RPE65-injected animals did not show signs of vector shedding or extraocular targeting, confirming the safe ocular restriction of the vector. Our results evidence a limited ocular tolerance to LV-RPE65 after subretinal injection without adjuvant anti-inflammatory prophylaxis, with complications linked to this route of administration necessitating to block this transient inflammatory event. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The outer subventricular zone and primate-specific cortical complexification.

    PubMed

    Dehay, Colette; Kennedy, Henry; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2015-02-18

    Evolutionary expansion and complexification of the primate cerebral cortex are largely linked to the emergence of the outer subventricular zone (OSVZ), a uniquely structured germinal zone that generates the expanded primate supragranular layers. The primate OSVZ departs from rodent germinal zones in that it includes a higher diversity of precursor types, inter-related in bidirectional non-hierarchical lineages. In addition, primate-specific regulatory mechanisms are operating in primate cortical precursors via the occurrence of novel miRNAs. Here, we propose that the origin and evolutionary importance of the OSVZ is related to genetic changes in multiple regulatory loops and that cell-cycle regulation is a favored target for evolutionary adaptation of the cortex.

  11. What Cognitive Representations Support Primate Theory of Mind?

    PubMed

    Martin, Alia; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-05-01

    Much recent work has examined the evolutionary origins of human mental state representations. This work has yielded strikingly consistent results: primates show a sophisticated ability to track the current and past perceptions of others, but they fail to represent the beliefs of others. We offer a new account of the nuanced performance of primates in theory of mind (ToM) tasks. We argue that primates form awareness relations tracking the aspects of reality that other agents are aware of. We contend that these awareness relations allow primates to make accurate predictions in social situations, but that this capacity falls short of our human-like representational ToM. We end by explaining how this new account makes important new empirical predictions about primate ToM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tube Radial Distribution Chromatography on a Microchip Incorporating Microchannels with a Three-to-One Channel Confluence Point.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naomichi; Yamashita, Kenichi; Maeda, Hideaki; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We developed a capillary chromatography system using a phase-separated solvent mixture as a carrier solution--i.e., a water-hydrophilic/hydrophobic organic solvent mixture--which we call "tube radial distribution chromatography" (TRDC). Here, we attempted to apply the TRDC system to a microchip incorporating microchannels with a double T-junction for injection of analyte solution and a three-to-one, narrow-to-wide channel confluence point for tube radial distribution phenomenon (TRDP) at room temperature. A ternary mixed solvent of water, acetonitrile and ethyl acetate was used as a carrier solution. TRDP in the wide microchannel was examined using various flow rates, temperatures, and component solvent ratios. Successful observation was carried out using a fluorescence microscope-CCD camera. Model analytes perylene (hydrophobic) and Eosin Y (hydrophilic) were separated by flowing through the microchannel, without any treatment such as packed columns or coating, at room temperature (25°C).

  13. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host-microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important

  14. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; Consortium, Primate Microbiome; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host–microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important

  15. Chemical carcinogenesis studies in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Shozo; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P.; Adamson, Richard H.

    2008-01-01

    This review covers chemical carcinogenesis studies in nonhuman primates performed by the National Cancer Institute, USA, to provide hitherto unavailable information on their susceptibility to compounds producing carcinogenic effects in rodents. From autopsy records of 401 breeders and untreated controls, incidences of spontaneous malignant tumors were found to be relatively low in cynomolgus (1.9%) and rhesus monkeys (3.8%), but higher in African green monkeys (8%). Various chemical compounds, and in particular 6 antineoplastic agents, 13 food-related compounds including additives and contaminants, 1 pesticide, 5 N-nitroso compounds, 3 heterocyclic amines, and 7 “classical” rodent carcinogens, were tested during the 34 years period, generally at doses 10∼40 times the estimated human exposure. Results were inconclusive in many cases but unequivocal carcinogenicity was demonstrated for IQ, procarbazine, methylnitrosourea and diethylnitrosamine. Furthermore, negative findings for saccharine and cyclamate were in line with results in other species. Thus susceptibility to carcinogens is at least partly shared by nonhuman primates and rodents. PMID:18941297

  16. Fish cognition: a primate's eye view.

    PubMed

    Bshary, Redouan; Wickler, Wolfgang; Fricke, Hans

    2002-03-01

    We provide selected examples from the fish literature of phenomena found in fish that are currently being examined in discussions of cognitive abilities and evolution of neocortex size in primates. In the context of social intelligence, we looked at living in individualized groups and corresponding social strategies, social learning and tradition, and co-operative hunting. Regarding environmental intelligence, we searched for examples concerning special foraging skills, tool use, cognitive maps, memory, anti-predator behaviour, and the manipulation of the environment. Most phenomena of interest for primatologists are found in fish as well. We therefore conclude that more detailed studies on decision rules and mechanisms are necessary to test for differences between the cognitive abilities of primates and other taxa. Cognitive research can benefit from future fish studies in three ways: first, as fish are highly variable in their ecology, they can be used to determine the specific ecological factors that select for the evolution of specific cognitive abilities. Second, for the same reason they can be used to investigate the link between cognitive abilities and the enlargement of specific brain areas. Third, decision rules used by fish could be used as 'null-hypotheses' for primatologists looking at how monkeys might make their decisions. Finally, we propose a variety of fish species that we think are most promising as study objects.

  17. Postradiation regional cerebral blood flow in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Cerveny, T.J.; Hampton, J.D.

    1986-06-01

    Early transient incapacitation (ETI) is the complete cessation of performance during the first 30 min after radiation exposure and performance decrement (PD) is a reduction in performance at the same time. Supralethal doses of radiation have been shown to produce a marked decrease in regional cerebral blood flow in primates concurrent with hypotension and a dramatic release of mast cell histamine. In an attempt to elucidate mechanisms underlying the radiation-induced ETI/PD phenomenon and the postradiation decrease in cerebral blood flow, primates were exposed to 100 Gy (1 Gy = 100 rads), whole-body, gamma radiation. Pontine and cortical blood flows were measured by hydrogen clearance, before and after radiation exposure. Systemic blood pressures were determined simultaneously. Systemic arterial histamine levels were determined preradiation and postradiation. Data obtained indicated that radiated animals showed a decrease in blood flow of 63% in the motor cortex and 51% in the pons by 10 min postradiation. Regional cerebral blood flow of radiated animals showed a slight recovery 20 min postradiation, followed by a fall to the 10 min nadir by 60 min postradiation. Immediately, postradiation systemic blood pressure fell 67% and remained at that level for the remainder of the experiment. Histamine levels in the radiated animals increased a hundredfold 2 min postradiation. This study indicates that regional cerebral blood flow decreases postradiation with the development of hypotension and may be associated temporally with the postradiation release of histamine.

  18. Primate pelvic anatomy and implications for birth

    PubMed Central

    Trevathan, Wenda

    2015-01-01

    The pelvis performs two major functions for terrestrial mammals. It provides somewhat rigid support for muscles engaged in locomotion and, for females, it serves as the birth canal. The result for many species, and especially for encephalized primates, is an ‘obstetric dilemma’ whereby the neonate often has to negotiate a tight squeeze in order to be born. On top of what was probably a baseline of challenging birth, locomotor changes in the evolution of bipedalism in the human lineage resulted in an even more complex birth process. Negotiation of the bipedal pelvis requires a series of rotations, the end of which has the infant emerging from the birth canal facing the opposite direction from the mother. This pattern, strikingly different from what is typically seen in monkeys and apes, places a premium on having assistance at delivery. Recently reported observations of births in monkeys and apes are used to compare the process in human and non-human primates, highlighting similarities and differences. These include presentation (face, occiput anterior or posterior), internal and external rotation, use of the hands by mothers and infants, reliance on assistance, and the developmental state of the neonate. PMID:25602069

  19. Primate Socioecology: New Insights from Males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappeler, Peter M.

    Primate males have only recently returned to the center stage of socioecological research. This review surveys new studies that examine variation in the behavior of adult males and their role in social evolution. It is shown that group size, composition, and social behavior are determined not only by resource distribution, predation risk, and other ecological factors, but that life history traits and social factors, especially those related to sexual coercion, can have equally profound consequences for social systems. This general point is illustrated by examining male behavior at three levels: the evolution of permanent associations between males and females, the causes and consequences of variation in the number of males between group-living species, and the determinants of social relationships within and between the sexes. Direct and indirect evidence reviewed in connection with all three questions indicates that the risk of infanticide has been a pervasive force in primate social evolution. Several areas are identified for future research on male life histories that should contribute to a better understanding of male reproductive strategies and corresponding female counterstrategies.

  20. Men, primates, and germs: an ongoing affair.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jean Paul; Prugnolle, Frank; Leroy, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Humans and nonhuman primates are phylogenetically (i.e., genetically) related and share pathogens that can jump from one species to another. The specific strategies of three groups of pathogens for crossing the species barrier among primates will be discussed. In Africa, gorillas and chimpanzees have succumbed for years to simultaneous epizootics (i.e.. "multi-emergence") of Ebola virus in places where they are in contact with Chiropters, which could be animal reservoirs of these viruses. Human epidemics often follow these major outbreaks. Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have an ancient history of coevolution and many interspecific exchanges with their natural hosts. Chimpanzee and gorilla SIVs have crossed the species barrier at different times and places, leading to the emergence of HIV-1 and HIV-2. Other retroviruses, such as the Simian T-Lymphotropic Viruses and Foamiviruses, have also a unique ancient or recent history of crossing the species barrier. The identification of gorilla Plasmodium parasites that are genetically close to P. falciparum suggests that gorillas were the source of the deadly human P. falciparum. Nonhuman plasmodium species that can infect humans represent an underestimated risk.

  1. Dynamic actin gene family evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liucun; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Yijun; Wen, Tieqiao; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Actin is one of the most highly conserved proteins and plays crucial roles in many vital cellular functions. In most eukaryotes, it is encoded by a multigene family. Although the actin gene family has been studied a lot, few investigators focus on the comparison of actin gene family in relative species. Here, the purpose of our study is to systematically investigate characteristics and evolutionary pattern of actin gene family in primates. We identified 233 actin genes in human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, rhesus monkey, and marmoset genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that actin genes in the seven species could be divided into two major types of clades: orthologous group versus complex group. Codon usages and gene expression patterns of actin gene copies were highly consistent among the groups because of basic functions needed by the organisms, but much diverged within species due to functional diversification. Besides, many great potential pseudogenes were found with incomplete open reading frames due to frameshifts or early stop codons. These results implied that actin gene family in primates went through "birth and death" model of evolution process. Under this model, actin genes experienced strong negative selection and increased the functional complexity by reproducing themselves.

  2. Hormones and Human and Nonhuman Primate Growth.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Robin Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review information pertaining to the hormonal regulation of nonhuman primate growth, with specific focus on the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis and adrenal androgens. Hormones of the GH-IGF axis are consistently associated with measures of growth - linear, weight, or both - during the growth period; in adulthood, concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3, and GH-binding protein are not associated with any measures of size. Comparing patterns of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) may be especially relevant for understanding whether the childhood stage of growth and development is unique to humans and perhaps other apes. Genetic, hormonal, and morphological data on adrenarche in other nonhuman primate species suggest that this endocrine transition is delayed in humans, chimpanzees, and possibly gorillas, while present very early in postnatal life in macaques. This suggests that although perhaps permitted by an extension of the pre-adolescent growth period, childhood builds upon existing developmental substrates rather than having been inserted de novo into an ancestral growth trajectory. Hormones can provide insight regarding the evolution of the human growth trajectory. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Hunting, law enforcement, and African primate conservation.

    PubMed

    N'Goran, Paul K; Boesch, Christophe; Mundry, Roger; N'Goran, Eliezer K; Herbinger, Ilka; Yapi, Fabrice A; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2012-06-01

    Primates are regularly hunted for bushmeat in tropical forests, and systematic ecological monitoring can help determine the effect hunting has on these and other hunted species. Monitoring can also be used to inform law enforcement and managers of where hunting is concentrated. We evaluated the effects of law enforcement informed by monitoring data on density and spatial distribution of 8 monkey species in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire. We conducted intensive surveys of monkeys and looked for signs of human activity throughout the park. We also gathered information on the activities of law-enforcement personnel related to hunting and evaluated the relative effects of hunting, forest cover and proximity to rivers, and conservation effort on primate distribution and density. The effects of hunting on monkeys varied among species. Red colobus monkeys (Procolobus badius) were most affected and Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli) were least affected by hunting. Density of monkeys irrespective of species was up to 100 times higher near a research station and tourism site in the southwestern section of the park, where there is little hunting, than in the southeastern part of the park. The results of our monitoring guided law-enforcement patrols toward zones with the most hunting activity. Such systematic coordination of ecological monitoring and law enforcement may be applicable at other sites. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  4. Safety Signals in the Primate Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Genud-Gabai, Rotem; Klavir, Oded

    2013-01-01

    The ability to distinguish danger from safety is crucial for survival. On the other hand, anxiety disorders can result from failures to dissociate safe cues from those that predict dangerous outcomes. The amygdala plays a major role in learning and signaling danger, and recently, evidence accumulates that it also acquires information to signal safety. Traditionally, safety is explored by paradigms that change the value of a previously dangerous cue, such as extinction or reversal; or by paradigms showing that a safe cue can inhibit responses to another danger-predicting cue, as in conditioned-inhibition. In real-life scenarios, many cues are never paired or tested with danger and remain neutral all along. A detailed study of neural responses to unpaired conditioned-stimulus (CS−) can therefore indicate whether information on safety-by-comparison is also acquired in the amygdala. We designed a multiple-CS study, with CS− from both visual and auditory modalities. Using discriminative aversive-conditioning, we find that responses in the primate amygdala develop for CS− of the same modality and of a different modality from that of the aversive CS+. Moreover, we find that responses are comparable in proportion, sign (increase/decrease), onset, and magnitude. These results indicate that the primate amygdala actively acquires signals about safety, and strengthen the hypothesis that failure in amygdala processing can result in failure to distinguish dangerous cues from safe ones and lead to maladaptive behaviors. PMID:24227710

  5. Short hyperdynamic profiles influence primate temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    Primates have been shown to be sensitive to hyperdynamic fields. That is, when exposed to + 2Gz, body temperature falls. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative sensitivity of these animals to short centrifugation profiles which mimic the gravitational envelope seen on the Space Shuttle during launch (8 minutes, 2.9 Gz max) and re-entry (19 min, 1.7 Gz max). Four loosely restrained squirrel monkeys, isolated from additional external stimuli, were exposed to these profiles. During launch simulation, the temperatures never fell markedly below control levels. However, subsequent to return to 1G, the recovery phase showed decreases in body temperature in all four animals averaging 0.4 C over the next 10 to 15 minutes. The two animals exposed to the reentry profile showed decreases in body temperature within five minutes of the onset of centrifugation. Maximum fall in body temperature was reached by the end of the centrifugation phase and averaged 0.7 C. Thus, the temperature regulation system of this primate is sensitive to short hyperdynamic field exposures.

  6. Social signals in primate orbitofrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Karli K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Primate evolution produced an increased capacity to respond flexibly to varying social contexts as well as expansion of the prefrontal cortex [1, 2]. Despite this association, how prefrontal neurons respond to social information remains virtually unknown. People with damage to orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) struggle to recognize facial expressions [3, 4], make poor social judgments [5] [6], and frequently make social faux pas [7, 8]. Here we test explicitly whether neurons in primate OFC signal social information and, if so, how such signals compare with responses to primary fluid rewards. We find OFC neurons distinguish images that belong to socially-defined categories, such as female perinea and faces, as well as the social dominance of those faces. These modulations signaled both how much monkeys valued these pictures and their interest in continuing to view them. Far more neurons signaled social category than signaled fluid value, despite the stronger impact of fluid rewards on monkeys’ choices. These findings indicate that OFC represents both the motivational value and attentional priority of other individuals, thus contributing to both the acquisition of information about others and subsequent social decisions. Our results betray a fundamental disconnect between preferences expressed through overt choice, which were primarily driven by the desire for more fluid, and preferential neuronal processing, which favored social computations. PMID:23122847

  7. Canine tooth size variability in primates.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G

    1989-01-01

    I present an analysis of canine tooth size variability in male and female primates. The coefficient of variation (CV = SD X 100/mean) as an index of canine size variability proved to be dependent on mean canine size in males and, to a lower extent, in females. Therefore, variability tends to increase with increasing values of mean canine size. Using residuals from the regression of log SD on log mean canine size in male and female primates, I analysed the contribution of diet, habitat and mating system to canine size variability. Habitat and mating system are known to influence to a certain extent the degree of sexual dimorphism in canine size. Given the well-known relationship between sexual dimorphism and phenotypic variability, it was suggested that these factors might influence variability in canine size. Everything else being equal, males of polygynous species are characterized by more variable canine sizes than males of monogamous species. Habitat and diet did not contribute to the level of variability observed in either males or females. It is proposed that a high level of variability in canine size may be related to the likelihood that enlarged canines evolved as a result of male-male competition for mates in polygynous species.

  8. An audiometric comparison of primate audiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Mark N.

    2001-05-01

    Audiogram data for 18 species of primates were collected from the literature and analyzed by measuring 13 audiometric variables: frequency and threshold of the primary peak, frequency and threshold of the secondary peak, frequency and threshold of the notch between peaks, low-frequency cutoff, high-frequency cutoff, total area of the audible field, low area, middle area, high area, and total audible range in octaves. All areal measurements were made using IGOR PRO 4.04 wave measurement software. Platyrrhines were found to have significantly better low-frequency sensitivity than like-sized lorisoids with an average of 15-dB difference between the means for the two groups. This difference remains significant even when interindividual variation is considered. Callithrix jacchus and Erythrocebus patas have unusual hearing patterns for primates of their size with marmosets showing a reduction in high-frequency sensitivity, while patas monkeys show a reduction in low-frequency sensitivity. It was also noted that chimps have a notch in sensitivity that falls within the range of greatest sensitivity for humans. These findings are discussed in relation to the morphological adaptations that appear to influence these hearing patterns and the evolutionary significance of such patterns for group communication and predator-prey interactions.

  9. The evolution of face processing in primates

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to recognize faces is an important socio-cognitive skill that is associated with a number of cognitive specializations in humans. While numerous studies have examined the presence of these specializations in non-human primates, species where face recognition would confer distinct advantages in social situations, results have been mixed. The majority of studies in chimpanzees support homologous face-processing mechanisms with humans, but results from monkey studies appear largely dependent on the type of testing methods used. Studies that employ passive viewing paradigms, like the visual paired comparison task, report evidence of similarities between monkeys and humans, but tasks that use more stringent, operant response tasks, like the matching-to-sample task, often report species differences. Moreover, the data suggest that monkeys may be less sensitive than chimpanzees and humans to the precise spacing of facial features, in addition to the surface-based cues reflected in those features, information that is critical for the representation of individual identity. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the available data from face-processing tasks in non-human primates with the goal of understanding the evolution of this complex cognitive skill. PMID:21536559

  10. Primate pelvic anatomy and implications for birth.

    PubMed

    Trevathan, Wenda

    2015-03-05

    The pelvis performs two major functions for terrestrial mammals. It provides somewhat rigid support for muscles engaged in locomotion and, for females, it serves as the birth canal. The result for many species, and especially for encephalized primates, is an 'obstetric dilemma' whereby the neonate often has to negotiate a tight squeeze in order to be born. On top of what was probably a baseline of challenging birth, locomotor changes in the evolution of bipedalism in the human lineage resulted in an even more complex birth process. Negotiation of the bipedal pelvis requires a series of rotations, the end of which has the infant emerging from the birth canal facing the opposite direction from the mother. This pattern, strikingly different from what is typically seen in monkeys and apes, places a premium on having assistance at delivery. Recently reported observations of births in monkeys and apes are used to compare the process in human and non-human primates, highlighting similarities and differences. These include presentation (face, occiput anterior or posterior), internal and external rotation, use of the hands by mothers and infants, reliance on assistance, and the developmental state of the neonate. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  11. The evolution of face processing in primates.

    PubMed

    Parr, Lisa A

    2011-06-12

    The ability to recognize faces is an important socio-cognitive skill that is associated with a number of cognitive specializations in humans. While numerous studies have examined the presence of these specializations in non-human primates, species where face recognition would confer distinct advantages in social situations, results have been mixed. The majority of studies in chimpanzees support homologous face-processing mechanisms with humans, but results from monkey studies appear largely dependent on the type of testing methods used. Studies that employ passive viewing paradigms, like the visual paired comparison task, report evidence of similarities between monkeys and humans, but tasks that use more stringent, operant response tasks, like the matching-to-sample task, often report species differences. Moreover, the data suggest that monkeys may be less sensitive than chimpanzees and humans to the precise spacing of facial features, in addition to the surface-based cues reflected in those features, information that is critical for the representation of individual identity. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the available data from face-processing tasks in non-human primates with the goal of understanding the evolution of this complex cognitive skill.

  12. Induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE/sub 2/) synthesis by human keratinocyte cultures is determined by culture confluence

    SciTech Connect

    Pentland, A.; Moran, C.; George, J.; Needleman, P.

    1986-03-01

    The authors recent data show PGE/sub 2/ is a growth promoting autocoid in non-confluent (NC) keratinocyte cultures. To study how confluence modulates PGE/sub 2/ synthesis induced by injury, an in vitro injury model was developed. Confluent keratinocyte cultures were focally lethally irradiated with ultraviolet light (UV), 320nm. Arachidonate (AA) metabolism in the resulting non-confluent cell network (C-UV) was then compared with metabolism in confluent (C), NC and NC-UV cultures. After UV, 24 hour collections of medium were obtained from C, NC and C-UV cultures and were measured for PGE/sub 2/ by RIA. NC cultures PGE/sub 2/ synthesis/..mu..g protein was 10X more than C cultures (controls), and decreased over 6 days until confluence. C-UV cultures PGE/sub 2/ synthesis/..mu..g protein increased for 2 days after UV, to 8X more than controls, then decreased to control values by day 6. Focal UV to NC cultures (killing isolated colonies), caused no change in PGE/sub 2/ synthesis. When C and C-UV cultures were exposed to (/sup 14/C)-AA for 1 hour, and the products formed analyzed by TLC, a 3 fold increase in PGE/sub 2//..mu..g protein as seen in C-UV cultures relative to C controls. NC synthesis was 4X greater than C controls. The products formed by all groups were the same. These data indicate that the pattern of metabolism of AA seen in NC cultures is similar to that seen in injury, and that the cell-cell contact modulates enhanced PGE/sub 2/ synthesis.

  13. [The variation of hepatic duct confluence and asymptomatic common bile duct stone with routine intraoperative cholangiogram during laparoscopic cholecystectomy].

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Young; Kim, Ki Ho; Kim, Il Dong; Suh, Byung Sun; Shin, Dong Woo; Kim, Sang Wook; Park, Jin Soo; Lim, Hye In

    2011-12-01

    Intraoperative cholangiogram (IOC) during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has been used to evaluate bile duct stone. But, the routine use of IOC remains controversial. With routine IOC during LC, we reviewed the variation of hepatic duct confluence and try to suggest the diagnostic criteria of asymptomatic common bile duct (CBD) stone. We reviewed the medical record of 970 consecutive patients who underwent LC with IOC from January 1999 to December 2009, retrospectively. Nine hundered seventy patients were enrolled. IOC were successful in 957 (98.7%) and unsuccessful in 13 (1.3%). Eighty two of 957 patients (8.2%) were excluded because of no or poor radiologic image. According to Couinaud's classification, 492 patients (56.2%) had type A hepatic duct confluence, 227 patients (26.1%) type B, 15 patients (17%) type C1, 43 patients (4.9%) type C2, 72 patients (8.2%) type D1, 21 patients (2.4%) type D2, 1 patient (0.1%) type E1, 1 patient (0.1%) type E2, 2 patients (0.2%) type F, and 1 patient (0.1%) no classified type. The CBD stone was found in 116 of 970 (12.2%) patients. In 281 patients, preoperative serologic and radiologic tests did not show abnormality. When preoperative findings were not remarkable, there was no difference of clinical features between patients with or without CBD stones. Although IOC during LC has some demerits, it is a safe and accurate method for the detection of CBD stone and the anatomic variation of intrahepatic duct.

  14. Confluence of Depression and Acute Psychological Stress Among Patients With Stable Coronary Heart Disease: Effects on Myocardial Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Burg, Matthew M.; Meadows, Judith; Shimbo, Daichi; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Soufer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression is prevalent in coronary heart disease (CHD) patients and increases risk for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) recurrence and mortality despite optimal medical care. The pathways underlying this risk remain elusive. Psychological stress (PS) can provoke impairment in myocardial perfusion and trigger ACS. A confluence of acute PS with depression might reveal coronary vascular mechanisms of risk. We tested whether depression increased risk for impaired myocardial perfusion during acute PS among patients with stable CHD. Methods and Results Patients (N=146) completed the Beck Depression Inventory‐I (BDI‐I), a measure of depression linked to recurrent ACS and post‐ACS mortality, and underwent single‐photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging at rest and during acute PS. The likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS as a function of depression severity was tested. On the BDI‐I, 41 patients scored in the normal range, 48 in the high normal range, and 57 in the depressed range previously linked to CHD prognosis. A BDI‐I score in the depressed range was associated with a significantly greater likelihood of new/worsening impairment in myocardial perfusion from baseline to PS (odds ratio =2.89, 95% CI: 1.26 to 6.63, P=0.012). This remained significant in models controlling ACS recurrence/mortality risk factors and medications. There was no effect for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor medications. Conclusions Depressed patients with CHD are particularly susceptible to impairment in myocardial perfusion during PS. The confluence of PS with depression may contribute to a better understanding of the depression‐associated risk for ACS recurrence and mortality. PMID:25359402

  15. [Characteristics of absorption and fluorescence spectra of dissolved organic matter from confluence of rivers: case study of Qujiang River-Jialing River and Fujiang River-Jialing River].

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin-Long; Jiang, Tao; Gao, Jie; Wei, Shi-Qiang; Lu, Song; Liu, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy combined with ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectra was used to investigate the change characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in confluences water of Qujiang River-Jialing River and Fujiang River-Jialing River, respectively. The results suggested that DOM showed a significant terrestrial input signal in all the sampling sites, FI < 1.4, HIX > 0.8, possibly representing remarkable signals of humus resulted from humic-like component. Moreover, the mixing zone of this study showed a non-conservative mixed behavior, which had a limited contribution, and was not the dominant factor to interpret the change characteristics of DOM in confluences zones. Different land-use types along all the rivers had an obvious impact on DOM inputs. Results of cluster analysis showed that a higher degree of aromaticity and humification components was observed as the predominant contributor to DOM when the land-use type was forest and farmland ecosystem, for example the confluences of Qujiang River-Jialing River. On the other hand, high concentrations of DOM with relative simple structures were found in the water when the urban land-use type was predominant, for example the confluences of Fujiang River-Jialing River. Meanwhile, a new fluorescent signal of protein-like components (peak T) appeared, which manifested a significant effect on the water quality resulted from anthropogenic activities.

  16. Hydrographic survey of Chaktomuk, the confluence of the Mekong, Tonlé Sap, and Bassac Rivers near Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Densmore, Brenda K.; Wilson, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed hydrographic maps of Mekong, Tonlé Sap, and Bassac Rivers showing the riverbed elevations surveyed April 21–May 2, 2012, referenced to Ha Tien 1960 were produced. The surveyed area included a 2-km stretch of the Mekong River between the confluence with the Tonlé Sap and Bassac Rivers, and extended 4 km upstream and 3.6 km downstream from the 2,000-m confluence stretch of the Mekong River. In addition, 0.7 km of the Bassac River downstream and 3.5 km of the Tonlé Sap River (from the confluence to Chroy Changvar Bridge) upstream from their confluence with the Mekong River were surveyed. Riverbed features (such as dunes, shoals, and the effects of sediment mining, which were observed during data collection) are visible on the hydrographic maps. All surveys were completed at low annual water levels as referenced to nearby Mekong River Commission streamflow-gaging stations. Riverbed elevations surveyed ranged from 24.08 m below to 1.54 m above Ha Tien 1960.

  17. The evolution of the primate foot from the earliest primates to the Miocene hominoids.

    PubMed

    Conroy, G C; Rose, M D

    1983-01-01

    The fossil evidence relating to the evolution of the primate foot is reviewed and evaluated. Many of the characteristic features of the primate foot had evolved by the early Tertiary over 40 million years ago. Probably the most significant of these developments was the progressive migration of the talus to a position over the calcaneum. These morphological features are followed through the Miocene hominoid genera from East Africa, Europe, and South Asia. While some features of Miocene hominoids, especially those relating to climbing abilities, are still evident in the predominantly bipedal earliest hominids of the Plio-Pleistocene, there is no evidence yet from the Miocene of the first stages in the evolution of that bipedalism.

  18. Characterization of Circulating Natural Killer Cells in Neotropical Primates

    PubMed Central

    Carville, Angela; Evans, Tristan I.; Reeves, R. Keith

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive use of nonhuman primates as models for infectious diseases and reproductive biology, imprecise phenotypic and functional definitions exist for natural killer (NK) cells. This deficit is particularly significant in the burgeoning use of small, less expensive New World primate species. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we identified peripheral blood NK cells as CD3-negative and expressing a cluster of cell surface molecules characteristic of NK cells (i.e., NKG2A, NKp46, NKp30) in three New World primate species – common marmosets, cotton-top tamarins, and squirrel monkeys. We then assessed subset distribution using the classical NK markers, CD56 and CD16. In all species, similar to Old World primates, only a minor subset of NK cells was CD56+, and the dominant subset was CD56–CD16+. Interestingly, CD56+ NK cells were primarily cytokine-secreting cells, whereas CD56–CD16+ NK cells expressed significantly greater levels of intracellular perforin, suggesting these cells might have greater potential for cytotoxicity. New World primate species, like Old World primates, also had a minor CD56–CD16– NK cell subset that has no obvious counterpart in humans. Herein we present phenotypic profiles of New World primate NK cell subpopulations that are generally analogous to those found in humans. This conservation among species should support the further use of these species for biomedical research. PMID:24244365

  19. Postcopulatory sexual selection influences baculum evolution in primates and carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Brindle, Matilda

    2016-01-01

    The extreme morphological variability of the baculum across mammals is thought to be the result of sexual selection (particularly, high levels of postcopulatory selection). However, the evolutionary trajectory of the mammalian baculum is little studied and evidence for the adaptive function of the baculum has so far been elusive. Here, we use Markov chain Monte Carlo methods implemented in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework to reconstruct baculum evolution across the mammalian class and investigate the rate of baculum length evolution within the primate order. We then test the effects of testes mass (postcopulatory sexual selection), polygamy, seasonal breeding and intromission duration on the baculum in primates and carnivores. The ancestral mammal did not have a baculum, but both ancestral primates and carnivores did. No relationship was found between testes mass and baculum length in either primates or carnivores. Intromission duration correlated with baculum presence over the course of primate evolution, and prolonged intromission predicts significantly longer bacula in extant primates and carnivores. Both polygamous and seasonal breeding systems predict significantly longer bacula in primates. These results suggest the baculum plays an important role in facilitating reproductive strategies in populations with high levels of postcopulatory sexual selection. PMID:27974519

  20. Contributions of Nonhuman Primates to Research on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Didier, E. S.; MacLean, A. G.; Mohan, M.; Didier, P. J.; Lackner, A. A.; Kuroda, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is the biological process of declining physiologic function associated with increasing mortality rate during advancing age. Humans and higher nonhuman primates exhibit unusually longer average life spans as compared with mammals of similar body mass. Furthermore, the population of humans worldwide is growing older as a result of improvements in public health, social services, and health care systems. Comparative studies among a wide range of organisms that include nonhuman primates contribute greatly to our understanding about the basic mechanisms of aging. Based on their genetic and physiologic relatedness to humans, nonhuman primates are especially important for better understanding processes of aging unique to primates, as well as for testing intervention strategies to improve healthy aging and to treat diseases and disabilities in older people. Rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are the predominant monkeys used in studies on aging, but research with lower nonhuman primate species is increasing. One of the priority topics of research about aging in nonhuman primates involves neurologic changes associated with cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases. Additional areas of research include osteoporosis, reproductive decline, caloric restriction, and their mimetics, as well as immune senescence and chronic inflammation that affect vaccine efficacy and resistance to infections and cancer. The purpose of this review is to highlight the findings from nonhuman primate research that contribute to our understanding about aging and health span in humans. PMID:26869153

  1. Historical contingency in the evolution of primate color vision.

    PubMed

    Dominy, Nathaniel J; Svenning, Jens Christian; Li, Wen Hsiung

    2003-01-01

    Primates are unique among eutherian mammals for possessing three types of retinal cone. Curiously, catarrhines, platyrrhines, and strepsirhines share this anatomy to different extents, and no hypothesis has hitherto accounted for this variability. Here we propose that the historical biogeography of figs and arborescent palms accounts for the global variation in primate color vision. Specifically, we suggest that primates invaded Paleogene forests characterized by figs and palms, the fruits of which played a keystone function. Primates not only relied on such resources, but also provided high-quality seed dispersal. In turn, figs and palms lost or simply did not evolve conspicuous coloration, as this conferred little advantage for attracting mammals. We suggest that the abundance and coloration of figs and palms offered a selective advantage to foraging groups with mixed capabilities for chromatic distinction. Climatic cooling at the end of the Eocene and into the Neogene resulted in widespread regional extinction or decimation of palms and (probably) figs. In regions where figs and palms became scarce, we suggest primates evolved routine trichromatic vision in order to exploit proteinaceous young leaves as a replacement resource. A survey of the hue and biogeography of extant figs and palms provides some empirical support. Where these resources are infrequent, primates are routinely trichromatic and consume young leaves during seasonal periods of fruit dearth. These results imply a link between the differential evolution of primate color vision and climatic changes during the Eocene-Oligocene transition.

  2. Fruits, foliage and the evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Regan, B C; Julliot, C; Simmen, B; Viénot, F; Charles-Dominique, P; Mollon, J D

    2001-03-29

    Primates are apparently unique amongst the mammals in possessing trichromatic colour vision. However, not all primates are trichromatic. Amongst the haplorhine (higher) primates, the catarrhines possess uniformly trichromatic colour vision, whereas most of the platyrrhine species exhibit polymorphic colour vision, with a variety of dichromatic and trichromatic phenotypes within the population. It has been suggested that trichromacy in primates and the reflectance functions of certain tropical fruits are aspects of a coevolved seed-dispersal system: primate colour vision has been shaped by the need to find coloured fruits amongst foliage, and the fruits themselves have evolved to be salient to primates and so secure dissemination of their seeds. We review the evidence for and against this hypothesis and we report an empirical test: we show that the spectral positioning of the cone pigments found in trichromatic South American primates is well matched to the task of detecting fruits against a background of leaves. We further report that particular trichromatic platyrrhine phenotypes may be better suited than others to foraging for particular fruits under particular conditions of illumination; and we discuss possible explanations for the maintenance of polymorphic colour vision amongst the platyrrhines.

  3. A comparative neurological approach to emotional expressions in primate vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Thibaud; Grandjean, Didier

    2017-02-01

    Different approaches from different research domains have crystallized debate over primate emotional processing and vocalizations in recent decades. On one side, researchers disagree about whether emotional states or processes in animals truly compare to those in humans. On the other, a long-held assumption is that primate vocalizations are innate communicative signals over which nonhuman primates have limited control and a mirror of the emotional state of the individuals producing them, despite growing evidence of intentional production for some vocalizations. Our goal is to connect both sides of the discussion in deciphering how the emotional content of primate calls compares with emotional vocal signals in humans. We focus particularly on neural bases of primate emotions and vocalizations to identify cerebral structures underlying emotion, vocal production, and comprehension in primates, and discuss whether particular structures or neuronal networks solely evolved for specific functions in the human brain. Finally, we propose a model to classify emotional vocalizations in primates according to four dimensions (learning, control, emotional, meaning) to allow comparing calls across species.

  4. Retrovirus Studies in Nonhuman Primates at Four Regional Primate Research Centers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-30

    rhesus macaques (Miller, et. al. 1990). Significance. The initial objective of this project was to determine if a nonhuman primate model for the sexual...rhesus monkeys infected with simian immunodeficiency virus. Am J Pathol. (Submitted) SPECIFIC AIM 2.2: Maternal - Fetal Transmission Studies Female rhesus...Perinatal Transmission of SIVsmm Studies to evaluate the perinatal transmission of SIVsmm were initiated by infecting 15 timed pregnant rhesus monkeys with

  5. The density and biomass of mesozooplankton and ichthyoplankton in the Negro and the Amazon Rivers during the rainy season: the ecological importance of the confluence boundary

    PubMed Central

    Rimachi, Elvis V.; Santos-Silva, Edinaldo N.; Calixto, Laura S.F.; Leite, Rosseval G.; Khen, Adi; Yamane, Tetsuo; Mazeroll, Anthony I.; Inuma, Jomber C.; Utumi, Erika Y.K.; Tanaka, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The boundary zone between two different hydrological regimes is often a biologically enriched environment with distinct planktonic communities. In the center of the Amazon River basin, muddy white water of the Amazon River meets with black water of the Negro River, creating a conspicuous visible boundary spanning over 10 km along the Amazon River. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the confluence boundary between the white and black water rivers concentrates prey and is used as a feeding habitat for consumers by investigating the density, biomass and distribution of mesozooplankton and ichthyoplankton communities across the two rivers during the rainy season. Our results show that mean mesozooplankton density (2,730 inds. m−3) and biomass (4.8 mg m−3) were higher in the black-water river compared to the white-water river (959 inds. m−3; 2.4 mg m−3); however an exceptionally high mesozooplankton density was not observed in the confluence boundary. Nonetheless we found the highest density of ichthyoplankton in the confluence boundary (9.7 inds. m−3), being up to 9-fold higher than in adjacent rivers. The confluence between white and black waters is sandwiched by both environments with low (white water) and high (black water) zooplankton concentrations and by both environments with low (white water) and high (black water) predation pressures for fish larvae, and may function as a boundary layer that offers benefits of both high prey concentrations and low predation risk. This forms a plausible explanation for the high density of ichthyoplankton in the confluence zone of black and white water rivers. PMID:28507821

  6. The density and biomass of mesozooplankton and ichthyoplankton in the Negro and the Amazon Rivers during the rainy season: the ecological importance of the confluence boundary.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ryota; Rimachi, Elvis V; Santos-Silva, Edinaldo N; Calixto, Laura S F; Leite, Rosseval G; Khen, Adi; Yamane, Tetsuo; Mazeroll, Anthony I; Inuma, Jomber C; Utumi, Erika Y K; Tanaka, Akira

    2017-01-01

    The boundary zone between two different hydrological regimes is often a biologically enriched environment with distinct planktonic communities. In the center of the Amazon River basin, muddy white water of the Amazon River meets with black water of the Negro River, creating a conspicuous visible boundary spanning over 10 km along the Amazon River. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the confluence boundary between the white and black water rivers concentrates prey and is used as a feeding habitat for consumers by investigating the density, biomass and distribution of mesozooplankton and ichthyoplankton communities across the two rivers during the rainy season. Our results show that mean mesozooplankton density (2,730 inds. m(-3)) and biomass (4.8 mg m(-3)) were higher in the black-water river compared to the white-water river (959 inds. m(-3); 2.4 mg m(-3)); however an exceptionally high mesozooplankton density was not observed in the confluence boundary. Nonetheless we found the highest density of ichthyoplankton in the confluence boundary (9.7 inds. m(-3)), being up to 9-fold higher than in adjacent rivers. The confluence between white and black waters is sandwiched by both environments with low (white water) and high (black water) zooplankton concentrations and by both environments with low (white water) and high (black water) predation pressures for fish larvae, and may function as a boundary layer that offers benefits of both high prey concentrations and low predation risk. This forms a plausible explanation for the high density of ichthyoplankton in the confluence zone of black and white water rivers.

  7. Evaluation of Flow Paths and Confluences for Saltwater Intrusion and Its Influence on Fish Species Diversity in a Deltaic River Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, X.; Cui, B.; Zhang, Z.; Fang, Y.; Jawitz, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Freshwater in a delta is often at risk of saltwater intrusion, which has been a serious issue in estuarine deltas all over the world. Salinity gradients and hydrologic connectivity in the deltas can be disturbed by saltwater intrusion, which can fluctuate frequently and locally in time and space to affect biotic processes and then to affect the distribution patterns of the riverine fishes throughout the river network. Therefore, identifying the major flow paths or locations at risk of saltwater intrusion in estuarine ecosystems is necessary for saltwater intrusion mitigation and fish species diversity conservation. In this study, we use the betweenness centrality (BC) as the weighted attribute of the river network to identify the critical confluences and detect the preferential flow paths for saltwater intrusion through the least-cost-path algorithm from graph theory approach. Moreover, we analyse the responses of the salinity and fish species diversity to the BC values of confluences calculated in the river network. Our results show that the most likely location of saltwater intrusion is not a simple gradient change from sea to land, but closely dependent on the river segments' characteristics. In addition, a significant positive correlation between the salinity and the BC values of confluences is determined in the Pearl River Delta. Changes in the BC values of confluences can produce significant variation in the fish species diversity. Therefore, the dynamics of saltwater intrusion are a growing consideration for understanding the patterns and subsequent processes driving fish community structure. Freshwater can be diverted into these major flow paths and critical confluences to improve river network management and conservation of fish species diversity under saltwater intrusion.

  8. Biomechanical research of joints: IV. the biohinge of primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Renxiang; Yu, Jie; Lan, Zu-yun; Qu, Wen-ji; Zhang, Hong-zi; Zhang, Kui; Zhang, Liang

    1991-04-01

    In this paper moire topography is applied to study the femoral articular facies of the knee of Primates. For compari son with each other of different families of Primates we suggest the comparative targets a y and the grade G of the moire contour fringes on two condyles of knee of Primates and comparative study of the articulation of knee between the Macaca assamensis M cellaud Presbytis phayrei Rhinopithecus roxellanae Hylobates concolor leucogenys Nycticebus concany Gorilla gorilla Anthropopithecus troglodytes Sirnia satyrus and human being are given. The results may be useful reference in the study of Biomechanics Zoology and Anthropology.

  9. The Evolution of Primate Communication and Metacommunication

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Against the prior view that primate communication is based only on signal decoding, comparative evidence suggests that primates are able, no less than humans, to intentionally perform or understand impulsive or habitual communicational actions with a structured evaluative nonconceptual content. These signals convey an affordance‐sensing that immediately motivates conspecifics to act. Although humans have access to a strategic form of propositional communication adapted to teaching and persuasion, they share with nonhuman primates the capacity to communicate in impulsive or habitual ways. They are also similarly able to monitor fluency, informativeness and relevance of messages or signals through nonconceptual cues. PMID:27134332

  10. Character displacement of Cercopithecini primate visual signals

    PubMed Central

    Allen, William L.; Stevens, Martin; Higham, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Animal visual signals have the potential to act as an isolating barrier to prevent interbreeding of populations through a role in species recognition. Within communities of competing species, species recognition signals are predicted to undergo character displacement, becoming more visually distinctive from each other, however this pattern has rarely been identified. Using computational face recognition algorithms to model primate face processing, we demonstrate that the face patterns of guenons (tribe: Cercopithecini) have evolved under selection to become more visually distinctive from those of other guenon species with whom they are sympatric. The relationship between the appearances of sympatric species suggests that distinguishing conspecifics from other guenon species has been a major driver of diversification in guenon face appearance. Visual signals that have undergone character displacement may have had an important role in the tribe’s radiation, keeping populations that became geographically separated reproductively isolated on secondary contact. PMID:24967517

  11. Primate training at Disney's Animal Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Colahan, Hollie; Breder, Chris

    2003-01-01

    A training program has been in place at Disney's Animal Kingdom since the nonhuman animals first arrived at the park. The Primate Team and the Behavioral Husbandry Team have worked together closely to establish a philosophy and framework for this program. This framework emphasizes setting goals, planning, implementing, documenting, and evaluating. The philosophy focuses on safety, staff training, and an integrated approach to training as an animal management tool. Behaviors to be trained include husbandry and veterinary as well as behaviors identified for specific species, individuals, or situations. Input from all the teams was used to prioritize these behaviors. Despite the challenges to maintaining such a program, the benefits to animal care and welfare have been enormous.

  12. Laser-induced primate glaucoma. II. Histopathology.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L; Pederson, J E

    1984-11-01

    A sustained, moderate pressure elevation was produced in 15 nonhuman primate eyes by application of laser energy to the trabecular meshwork. By light and electron microscopy, the trabecular beams were blunted, and scattered synechiae were present. Backward bowing of the lamina cribrosa, partial loss of the myelin sheath surrounding axonal segments just posterior to the lamina, and diffuse axonal loss involving the entire nerve cross section were noted. A quantitative analysis of this axonal loss revealed that eyes with moderate nerve head damage (cup-disc ratio, 0.6 to 0.8) had only 38% to 69% of the expected normal axonal count. The eyes with nearly total cupping (cup-disc ratio, 0.9 to 1.0) maintained between 10% and 36% of the normal axonal count. The disc changes in these experimental eyes are similar to those previously described in human eyes with glaucoma.