Science.gov

Sample records for primate lentivirus replication

  1. High frequency of genetic recombination is a common feature of primate lentivirus replication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbo; Powell, Douglas; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2006-10-01

    Recent studies indicate that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recombines at exceedingly high rates, approximately 1 order of magnitude more frequently than simple gammaretroviruses such as murine leukemia virus and spleen necrosis virus. We hypothesize that this high frequency of genetic recombination is a common feature of primate lentiviruses. Alternatively, it is possible that HIV-1 is unique among primate lentiviruses in possessing high recombination rates. Among other primate lentiviruses, only the molecular mechanisms of HIV-2 replication have been extensively studied. There are reported differences between the replication mechanisms of HIV-1 and those of HIV-2, such as preferences for RNA packaging in cis and properties of reverse transcriptase and RNase H activities. These biological disparities could lead to differences in recombination rates between the two viruses. Currently, HIV-1 is the only primate lentivirus in which recombination rates have been measured. To test our hypothesis, we established recombination systems to measure the recombination rates of two other primate lentiviruses, HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus from African green monkeys (SIVagm), in one round of viral replication. We determined that, for markers separated by 588, 288, and 90 bp, HIV-2 recombined at rates of 7.4%, 5.5%, and 2.4%, respectively, whereas SIVagm recombined at rates of 7.8%, 5.6%, and 2.7%, respectively. These high recombination rates are within the same range as the previously measured HIV-1 recombination rates. Taken together, our results indicate that HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIVagm all possess high recombination frequencies; hence, the high recombination potential is most likely a common feature of primate lentivirus replication.

  2. A transitional endogenous lentivirus from the genome of a basal primate and implications for lentivirus evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Robert J.; Katzourakis, Aris; Tristem, Michael; Pybus, Oliver G.; Winters, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Lentiviruses chronically infect a broad range of mammalian species and have been transmitted from primates to humans, giving rise to multiple outbreaks of HIV infection over the past century. Although the circumstances surrounding these recent zoonoses are becoming clearer, the nature and timescale of interaction between lentiviruses and primates remains unknown. Here, we report the discovery of an endogenous lentivirus in the genome of the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a strepsirrhine primate from Madagascar, demonstrating that lentiviruses are capable of invading the primate germ line. Phylogenetic analysis places gray mouse lemur prosimian immunodeficiency virus (pSIVgml) basal to all known primate lentiviruses and, consistent with this, its genomic organization is intermediate between the nonprimate lentiviruses and their more derived primate counterparts. Thus, pSIVgml represents the first unambiguous example of a viral transitional form, revealing the acquisition and loss of genomic features during lentiviral evolution. Furthermore, because terrestrial mammal populations in Madagascar and Africa are likely to have been isolated from one another for at least 14 million years, the presence of pSIVgml in the gray mouse lemur genome indicates that lentiviruses must have been infecting primates for at least this period of time, or have been transmitted between Malagasy and African primate populations by a vector species capable of traversing the Mozambique channel. The discovery of pSIVgml illustrates the utility of endogenous sequences for the study of contemporary retroviruses and indicates that primate lentiviruses may be considerably older and more broadly distributed than previously thought. PMID:19075221

  3. Immune evasion and counteraction of restriction factors by HIV-1 and other primate lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Frank

    2010-07-22

    Retroviruses have evolved effective strategies to evade the host immune response, such as high variability and latent infection. In addition, primate lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, have acquired several "accessory" genes that antagonize antiviral host restriction factors and facilitate viral immune evasion, thereby allowing continuous and efficient viral replication despite apparently strong innate and acquired immune responses. Here, I summarize some of our current knowledge on the acquisition and function of the viral vif, vpr, vpu, and nef genes, with a particular focus on the evolution and specific properties of pandemic HIV-1 strains that may contribute to their efficient spread and high virulence. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endogenous lentivirus in Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus), a close relative of primates.

    PubMed

    Hron, Tomáš; Fábryová, Helena; Pačes, Jan; Elleder, Daniel

    2014-10-04

    A significant fraction of mammalian genomes is composed of endogenous retroviral (ERV) sequences that are formed by germline infiltration of various retroviruses. In contrast to other retroviral genera, lentiviruses only rarely form ERV copies. We performed a computational search aimed at identification of novel endogenous lentiviruses in vertebrate genomes. Using the in silico strategy, we have screened 104 publicly available vertebrate genomes for the presence of endogenous lentivirus sequences. In addition to the previously described cases, the search revealed the presence of endogenous lentivirus in the genome of Malayan colugo (Galeopterus variegatus). At least three complete copies of this virus, denoted ELVgv, were detected in the colugo genome, and approximately one hundred solo LTR sequences. The assembled consensus sequence of ELVgv had typical lentivirus genome organization including three predicted accessory genes. Phylogenetic analysis placed this virus as a distinct subgroup within the lentivirus genus. The time of insertion into the dermopteran lineage was estimated to be more than thirteen million years ago. We report the discovery of the first endogenous lentivirus in the mammalian order Dermoptera, which is a taxon close to the Primates. Lentiviruses have infiltrated the mammalian germline several times across millions of years. The colugo virus described here represents possibly the oldest documented endogenization event and its discovery can lead to new insights into lentivirus evolution. This is also the first report of an endogenous lentivirus in an Asian mammal, indicating a long-term presence of this retrovirus family in Asian continent.

  5. Primate Lentiviruses Modulate NF-κB Activity by Multiple Mechanisms to Fine-Tune Viral and Cellular Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Heusinger, Elena; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) plays a complex role during the replication of primate lentiviruses. On the one hand, NF-κB is essential for induction of efficient proviral gene expression. On the other hand, this transcription factor contributes to the innate immune response and induces expression of numerous cellular antiviral genes. Recent data suggest that primate lentiviruses cope with this challenge by boosting NF-κB activity early during the replication cycle to initiate Tat-driven viral transcription and suppressing it at later stages to minimize antiviral gene expression. Human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) initially exploit their accessory Nef protein to increase the responsiveness of infected CD4+ T cells to stimulation. Increased NF-κB activity initiates Tat expression and productive replication. These events happen quickly after infection since Nef is rapidly expressed at high levels. Later during infection, Nef proteins of HIV-2 and most SIVs exert a very different effect: by down-modulating the CD3 receptor, an essential factor for T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, they prevent stimulation of CD4+ T cells via antigen-presenting cells and hence suppress further induction of NF-κB and an effective antiviral immune response. Efficient LTR-driven viral transcription is maintained because it is largely independent of NF-κB in the presence of Tat. In contrast, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and its simian precursors have lost the CD3 down-modulation function of Nef and use the late viral protein U (Vpu) to inhibit NF-κB activity by suppressing its nuclear translocation. In this review, we discuss how HIV-1 and other primate lentiviruses might balance viral and antiviral gene expression through a tight temporal regulation of NF-κB activity throughout their replication cycle. PMID:28261165

  6. Primate Lentiviruses Modulate NF-κB Activity by Multiple Mechanisms to Fine-Tune Viral and Cellular Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Heusinger, Elena; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) plays a complex role during the replication of primate lentiviruses. On the one hand, NF-κB is essential for induction of efficient proviral gene expression. On the other hand, this transcription factor contributes to the innate immune response and induces expression of numerous cellular antiviral genes. Recent data suggest that primate lentiviruses cope with this challenge by boosting NF-κB activity early during the replication cycle to initiate Tat-driven viral transcription and suppressing it at later stages to minimize antiviral gene expression. Human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) initially exploit their accessory Nef protein to increase the responsiveness of infected CD4(+) T cells to stimulation. Increased NF-κB activity initiates Tat expression and productive replication. These events happen quickly after infection since Nef is rapidly expressed at high levels. Later during infection, Nef proteins of HIV-2 and most SIVs exert a very different effect: by down-modulating the CD3 receptor, an essential factor for T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, they prevent stimulation of CD4(+) T cells via antigen-presenting cells and hence suppress further induction of NF-κB and an effective antiviral immune response. Efficient LTR-driven viral transcription is maintained because it is largely independent of NF-κB in the presence of Tat. In contrast, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and its simian precursors have lost the CD3 down-modulation function of Nef and use the late viral protein U (Vpu) to inhibit NF-κB activity by suppressing its nuclear translocation. In this review, we discuss how HIV-1 and other primate lentiviruses might balance viral and antiviral gene expression through a tight temporal regulation of NF-κB activity throughout their replication cycle.

  7. Host gene evolution traces the evolutionary history of ancient primate lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Alex A.; Malik, Harmit S.; Emerman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have infected primate species long before  human immunodeficiency virus has infected humans. Dozens of species-specific lentiviruses are found in African primate species, including two strains that have repeatedly jumped into human populations within the past century. Traditional phylogenetic approaches have grossly underestimated the age of these primate lentiviruses. Instead, here we review how selective pressures imposed by these viruses have fundamentally altered the evolutionary trajectory of hosts genes and, even in cases where there now remains no trace of the viruses themselves, these evolutionary signatures can reveal the types of viruses that were once present. Examination of selection by ancient viruses on the adaptive evolution of host genes has been used to derive minimum age estimates for modern primate lentiviruses. This type of data suggests that ancestors of modern SIV existed in simian primates more than 10 Ma. Moreover, examples of host resistance and viral adaptation have implications not only for estimating the age and host range of ancient primate lentiviruses, but also the pathogenic potential of their modern counterparts. PMID:23938749

  8. Lentivirus Restriction by Diverse Primate APOBEC3A Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Kimberly; Guo, Kejun; Katuwal, Miki; Wilson, Darayu; Prochnow, Courtney; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chen, Xiaojiang S.; Santiago, Mario L.; Stephens, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaque APOBEC3A (rhA3A) is capable of restricting both simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIVΔvif) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1Δvif) greater extent than hA3A. We constructed chimeric A3A proteins to define the domains required for differential lentivirus restriction. Substitution of amino acids 25–33 from rhA3A into hA3A was sufficient to restrict HIVΔvif to levels similar to rhA3A restriction of SHIVΔvif. We tested if differential lentivirus restriction is conserved between A3A from Old World monkey and hominid lineages. A3A from African green monkey restricted SHIVΔvif but not HIV-1Δvif and colobus monkey A3A restricted both wild type and SHIVΔvif and HIV-1Δvif. In contrast the gibbon ape A3A restricted neither SHIVΔvif nor HIV-1Δvif. Restriction of SHIVΔvif and HIV-1Δvif by New World monkey A3A proteins was not conserved as the A3A from the squirrel monkey but not the northern owl monkey restricted SHIVΔvif. Finally, the colobus A3A protein appears to restrict by a novel post-entry mechanism. PMID:23648232

  9. Evolutionary and Functional Analysis of Old World Primate TRIM5 Reveals the Ancient Emergence of Primate Lentiviruses and Convergent Evolution Targeting a Conserved Capsid Interface

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Kevin R.; Kirmaier, Andrea; Autissier, Patrick; Johnson, Welkin E.

    2015-01-01

    The widespread distribution of lentiviruses among African primates, and the lack of severe pathogenesis in many of these natural reservoirs, are taken as evidence for long-term co-evolution between the simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) and their primate hosts. Evidence for positive selection acting on antiviral restriction factors is consistent with virus-host interactions spanning millions of years of primate evolution. However, many restriction mechanisms are not virus-specific, and selection cannot be unambiguously attributed to any one type of virus. We hypothesized that the restriction factor TRIM5, because of its unique specificity for retrovirus capsids, should accumulate adaptive changes in a virus-specific fashion, and therefore, that phylogenetic reconstruction of TRIM5 evolution in African primates should reveal selection by lentiviruses closely related to modern SIVs. We analyzed complete TRIM5 coding sequences of 22 Old World primates and identified a tightly-spaced cluster of branch-specific adaptions appearing in the Cercopithecinae lineage after divergence from the Colobinae around 16 million years ago. Functional assays of both extant TRIM5 orthologs and reconstructed ancestral TRIM5 proteins revealed that this cluster of adaptations in TRIM5 specifically resulted in the ability to restrict Cercopithecine lentiviruses, but had no effect (positive or negative) on restriction of other retroviruses, including lentiviruses of non-Cercopithecine primates. The correlation between lineage-specific adaptations and ability to restrict viruses endemic to the same hosts supports the hypothesis that lentiviruses closely related to modern SIVs were present in Africa and infecting the ancestors of Cercopithecine primates as far back as 16 million years ago, and provides insight into the evolution of TRIM5 specificity. PMID:26291613

  10. [Construction of recombinant lentivirus vaccine with single round replication].

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang-dong; Wang, Bin-you

    2006-03-01

    To develop a safe and effective lentivirus vaccine model and provide insights into the development of other lentivirus vaccines. In this study, a construct of pGPT was made by deleting env gene in the infectious Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) molecular clone of WU57. Since the overlaping of EIAV Rev gene with env gene, there was no Rev gene in the construct of pGPT. For compensation of Rev function, the construct of pGPTC was made by inserting 4 copies of constitutive RNA transport elements (CTEs) from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus into the construct of pGPT. In addition, a construct designated pTEB expressing EIAV Env protein was made while env gene-minus viruses were made by co-transfection of pGPT/pTEB or pGPTC/pTEB into 293 cells. Western blot was used to identify the development of recombinant virus particles. Then immunofluorescence assay was used to evaluate the infectivity of recombinant virus particles in vitro. EIAV proteins expression was detected in the supernatant of transfected 293 cells by Western blot within pGPTC/pTEB transfected cells. However, no evidence of EIAV proteins expression was observed within pGPT/pTEB transfected cells. EIAV proteins expression was detected in the first round but not in the second round infected EK cells with EIAV(GPTC) by immunofluorescence assay. Rev/RRE was necessary for expression of viral structural proteins; CTEs from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus was functionally interchangeable with EIAV Rev/RRE to help RNAs transportation out of nucleus to express structural proteins and EIAV particles were produced in the transfected 293 cells. A live EIAV recombinant virus with single round infection had been developed.

  11. Recombinant interferon-γ lentivirus co-infection inhibits adenovirus replication ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Sen; Tan, Wanlong; Xiao, Dong; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Tingting; Shi, Junwen; Shuai, Lifang; Li, Hongwei; Zhou, Jianhua; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in cultured lentivirus (LV) was explored for inhibition of target virus in cells co-infected with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). The ability of three different promoters of CMV, EF1α and Ubiquitin initiating the enhanced green fluorescence protein (GFP) activities within lentiviruses was systematically assessed in various cell lines, which showed that certain cell lines selected the most favorable promoter driving a high level of transgenic expression. Recombinant IFNγ lentivirus carrying CMV promoter (LV-CMV-IFNγ) was generated to co-infect 293A cells with a viral surrogate of recombinant GFP Ad5 in parallel with LV-CMV-GFP control. The best morphologic conditions were observed from the two lentiviruses co-infected cells, while single adenovirus infected cells underwent clear pathologic changes. Viral load of adenoviruses from LV-CMV-IFNγ or LV-CMV-GFP co-infected cell cultures was significantly lower than that from adenovirus alone infected cells (P=0.005-0.041), and the reduction of adenoviral load in the co-infected cells was 86% and 61%, respectively. Ad5 viral load from LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infected cells was significantly lower than that from LV-CMV-GFP co-infection (P=0.032), which suggested that IFNγ rather than GFP could further enhance the inhibition of Ad5 replication in the recombinant lentivirus co-infected cells. The results suggest that LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infection could significantly inhibit the target virus replication and might be a potential approach for alternative therapy of severe viral diseases.

  12. Recombinant Interferon-γ Lentivirus Co-Infection Inhibits Adenovirus Replication Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Sen; Tan, Wanlong; Xiao, Dong; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Tingting; Shi, Junwen; Shuai, Lifang; Li, Hongwei; Zhou, Jianhua; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in cultured lentivirus (LV) was explored for inhibition of target virus in cells co-infected with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). The ability of three different promoters of CMV, EF1α and Ubiquitin initiating the enhanced green fluorescence protein (GFP) activities within lentiviruses was systematically assessed in various cell lines, which showed that certain cell lines selected the most favorable promoter driving a high level of transgenic expression. Recombinant IFNγ lentivirus carrying CMV promoter (LV-CMV-IFNγ) was generated to co-infect 293A cells with a viral surrogate of recombinant GFP Ad5 in parallel with LV-CMV-GFP control. The best morphologic conditions were observed from the two lentiviruses co-infected cells, while single adenovirus infected cells underwent clear pathologic changes. Viral load of adenoviruses from LV-CMV-IFNγ or LV-CMV-GFP co-infected cell cultures was significantly lower than that from adenovirus alone infected cells (P = 0.005–0.041), and the reduction of adenoviral load in the co-infected cells was 86% and 61%, respectively. Ad5 viral load from LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infected cells was significantly lower than that from LV-CMV-GFP co-infection (P = 0.032), which suggested that IFNγ rather than GFP could further enhance the inhibition of Ad5 replication in the recombinant lentivirus co-infected cells. The results suggest that LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infection could significantly inhibit the target virus replication and might be a potential approach for alternative therapy of severe viral diseases. PMID:22916129

  13. Characterization of red-capped mangabey tetherin: implication for the co-evolution of primates and their lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tomoko; Takeuchi, Junko S.; Ren, Fengrong; Matsuda, Kenta; Sato, Kei; Kimura, Yuichi; Misawa, Naoko; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Nakano, Yusuke; Yamada, Eri; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Primate lentiviruses including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) evolved through the acquisition of antagonists against intrinsic host restriction factors, such as tetherin. It is widely accepted that HIV-1 has emerged by zoonotic transmission of SIV in chimpanzee (SIVcpz), and that SIVcpz Nef protein antagonizes chimpanzee tetherin. Although Nef of SIVcpz shares a common ancestor with that of SIVrcm, an SIV in red-capped mangabey (Cercocebus torquatus), it remains unclear whether SIVrcm Nef can antagonize tetherin of its natural host. In this study, we determine the sequence of red-capped mangabey tetherin for the first time and directly demonstrate that SIVrcm Nef is the bona fide antagonist of red-capped mangabey tetherin. These findings suggest that SIVrcm Nef is the functional ancestor of SIVcpz Nef. Moreover, molecular phylogenetic analyses reveal that tetherins of the genus Cercocebus have experienced adaptive evolution, which is presumably promoted by primate lentiviruses. PMID:24984862

  14. Primate and feline lentiviruses in current intrinsic immunity research: the cat is back.

    PubMed

    Poeschla, Eric M

    2011-10-15

    Retroviral restriction factor research is explaining long-standing lentiviral mysteries. Asking why a particular retrovirus cannot complete a critical part of its life cycle in cells of a particular species has been the starting point for numerous discoveries, including heretofore elusive functions of HIV-1 accessory genes. The potential for therapeutic application is substantial. Analyzing the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) life cycle has been instrumental and the source of some surprising observations in this field. FIV is restricted in cells of various primates by several restriction factors including APOBEC3 proteins and, uniquely, TRIM proteins from both Old and New World monkeys. In contrast, the feline genome does not encode functional TRIM5alpha or TRIMCyp proteins and HIV-1 is primarily blocked in feline cells by APOBEC3 proteins. These can be overcome by inserting FIV vif or even SIVmac vif into HIV-1. The domestic cat and its lentivirus are positioned to offer strategic research opportunities as the field moves forward.

  15. Inhibition of nitric oxide enhances ovine lentivirus replication in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Keane, Kevin A; Mason, Gary L; DeMartini, James C

    2002-12-01

    Ovine lentivirus (OvLV) also known as maedi-visna virus, infects and replicates primarily in macrophages. This investigation examined the role of nitric oxide in the replication of OvLV in cultured macrophages. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from OvLV-free sheep and cultured in Teflon coated flasks at a high concentration of lamb serum. The cells were subsequently infected with OvLV strain 85/34. OvLV replication was assessed under different experimental treatments by comparison of reverse transcriptase (RT) activity in culture supernatant. Cultures that were treated with exogenous nitric oxide via S-nitroso-acetylpenicillamine did not have altered levels of RT activity compared to cultures treated with the inactive control compound, acetylpenicillamine. However, blockage of nitric oxide production by treatment with aminoguanidine, a competitive inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), led to a significant rise in RT activity. This rise in RT activity was partially reversed in aminoguanidine treated cultures by L-arginine, the normal substrate for iNOS. Finally, the number of viral antigen producing cells was also quantified after aminoguanidine treatment and found to be significantly higher than untreated cultures. Collectively, these results indicate that nitric oxide is a negative regulator of OvLV replication in macrophages.

  16. The Potency of Nef-Mediated SERINC5 Antagonism Correlates with the Prevalence of Primate Lentiviruses in the Wild.

    PubMed

    Heigele, Anke; Kmiec, Dorota; Regensburger, Kerstin; Langer, Simon; Peiffer, Lukas; Stürzel, Christina M; Sauter, Daniel; Peeters, Martine; Pizzato, Massimo; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-09-14

    The cellular factor serine incorporator 5 (SERINC5) impairs HIV-1 infectivity but is antagonized by the viral Nef protein. We analyzed the anti-SERINC5 activity of Nef proteins across primate lentiviruses and examined whether SERINC5 represents a barrier to cross-species transmissions and/or within-species viral spread. HIV-1, HIV-2, and SIV Nefs counteract human, ape, monkey, and murine SERINC5 orthologs with similar potency. However, HIV-1 Nefs are more active against SERINC5 than HIV-2 Nefs, and chimpanzee SIV (SIVcpz) Nefs are more potent than those of their monkey precursors. Additionally, Nefs of HIV and most SIVs rely on the dileucine motif in the C-terminal loop for anti-SERINC5 activity, while the Nef from colobus SIV (SIVcol) evolved different inhibitory mechanisms. We also found a significant correlation between anti-SERINC5 potency and the SIV prevalence in the respective ape and monkey species. Thus, Nef-mediated SERINC5 antagonism may determine the ability of primate lentiviruses to spread within natural hosts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a replication-competent lentivirus assay for dendritic cell-targeting lentiviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Daniel C; McCloskey, Laura; Thorne, Barbara A; Tareen, Semih U; Nicolai, Christopher J; Campbell, David J; Bannister, Richard; Stewart, Hannah J; Pearson, Laura JE; Moyer, Bentley J; Robbins, Scott H; Zielinski, Leah; Kim, Tae; Radcliffe, Pippa A; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A; Gombotz, Wayne R; Miskin, James E; Kelley-Clarke, Brenna

    2015-01-01

    It is a current regulatory requirement to demonstrate absence of detectable replication-competent lentivirus (RCL) in lentiviral vector products prior to use in clinical trials. Immune Design previously described an HIV-1-based integration-deficient lentiviral vector for use in cancer immunotherapy (VP02). VP02 is enveloped with E1001, a modified Sindbis virus glycoprotein which targets dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) expressed on dendritic cells in vivo. Vector enveloped with E1001 does not transduce T-cell lines used in standard HIV-1-based RCL assays, making current RCL testing formats unsuitable for testing VP02. We therefore developed a novel assay to test for RCL in clinical lots of VP02. This assay, which utilizes a murine leukemia positive control virus and a 293F cell line expressing the E1001 receptor DC-SIGN, meets a series of evaluation criteria defined in collaboration with US regulatory authorities and demonstrates the ability of the assay format to amplify and detect a hypothetical RCL derived from VP02 vector components. This assay was qualified and used to test six independent GMP production lots of VP02, in which no RCL was detected. We propose that the evaluation criteria used to rationally design this novel method should be considered when developing an RCL assay for any lentiviral vector. PMID:26029728

  18. Development of an equine-tropic replication-competent lentivirus assay for equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Farley, Daniel C; Bannister, Richard; Leroux-Carlucci, Marie A; Evans, Nerys E; Miskin, James E; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2012-10-01

    The release of lentiviral vectors for clinical use requires the testing of vector material, production cells, and, if applicable, ex vivo-transduced cells for the presence of replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). Vectors derived from the nonprimate lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have been directly administered to patients in several clinical trials, with no toxicity observed to date. Because EIAV does not replicate in human cells, and because putative RCLs derived from vector components within human vector production cells would most likely be human cell-tropic, we previously developed an RCL assay using amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) as a surrogate positive control and human cells as RCL amplification/indicator cells. Here we report an additional RCL assay that tests for the presence of theoretical "equine-tropic" RCLs. This approach provides further assurance of safety by detecting putative RCLs with an equine cell-specific tropism that might not be efficiently amplified by the human cell-based RCL assay. We tested the ability of accessory gene-deficient EIAV mutant viruses to replicate in a highly permissive equine cell line to direct our choice of a suitable EIAV-derived positive control. In addition, we report for the first time the mathematical rationale for use of the Poisson distribution to calculate minimal infectious dose of positive control virus and for use in monitoring assay positive/spike control failures in accumulating data sets. No RCLs have been detected in Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant RCL assays to date, further demonstrating that RCL formation is highly unlikely in contemporary minimal lentiviral vector systems.

  19. The Presence of a vpu Gene and the Lack of Nef-Mediated Downmodulation of T Cell Receptor-CD3 Are Not Always Linked in Primate Lentiviruses ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Schmökel, Jan; Sauter, Daniel; Schindler, Michael; Leendertz, Fabian H.; Bailes, Elizabeth; Dazza, Marie-Christine; Saragosti, Sentob; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Peeters, Martine; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Nef is an accessory protein critical for the ability of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) to replicate efficiently in their respective hosts. Previous analyses of members of 15 different primate lentivirus lineages revealed a link between Nef function and the presence of a vpu gene. In particular, Nef proteins of all vpu-containing viruses had lost their ability to downmodulate the T cell (TCR-CD3) receptor. Here we examined Nef proteins from eight additional SIV lineages, including SIVgor, SIVwrc, SIVolc, SIVgri, SIVdrl, SIVlho, SIVden, and SIVasc, from western lowland gorillas, western red colobus monkeys, olive colobus monkeys, grivet monkeys, drills, L'Hoest's monkeys, Dent's mona monkeys, and red-tailed monkeys, respectively. We found that except for the nef gene of SIVdrl, all of them were efficiently expressed and modulated CD4, major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), CD28, CXCR4, and Ii cell surface expression and/or enhanced viral infectivity and replication. Furthermore, the Nef proteins of SIVgri, SIVlho, SIVwrc, SIVolc, and SIVgor antagonized tetherin. As expected, the Nef protein of SIVgor, which carries vpu, failed to downmodulate CD3, whereas those of SIVwrc, SIVgri, SIVlho, and SIVasc, which lack vpu, were capable of performing this function. Surprisingly, however, the Nef protein of the vpu-containing SIVden strain retained the ability to downmodulate TCR-CD3, whereas that of SIVolc, which does not contain vpu, was unable to perform this function. Although the SIVden Vpu is about 20 amino acids shorter than other Vpu proteins, it degrades CD4 and antagonizes tetherin. Our data show that there are exceptions to the link between the presence of a vpu gene and nef alleles deficient in CD3 modulation, indicating that host properties also affect the selective pressure for Nef-mediated disruption of TCR-CD3 signaling. Our results are also further evidence that tetherin antagonism is a common function of primate lentivirus

  20. Interaction with the p6 Domain of the Gag Precursor Mediates Incorporation into Virions of Vpr and Vpx Proteins from Primate Lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Selig, L.; Pages, J.-C.; Tanchou, V.; Prévéral, S.; Berlioz-Torrent, C.; Liu, L. X.; Erdtmann, L.; Darlix, J.-L.; Benarous, R.; Benichou, S.

    1999-01-01

    Vpr and Vpx proteins from human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV) are incorporated into virions in quantities equivalent to those of the viral Gag proteins. We demonstrate here that Vpr and Vpx proteins from distinct lineages of primate lentiviruses were able to bind to their respective Gag precursors. The capacity of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) Vpr mutants to bind to Pr55Gag was correlated with their incorporation into virions. Molecular analysis of these interactions revealed that they required the C-terminal p6 domain of the Gag precursors. While the signal for HIV-1 Vpr binding lies in the leucine triplet repeat region of the p6 domain reported to be essential for incorporation, SIVsm Gag lacking the equivalent region still bound to SIVsm Vpr and Vpx, indicating that the determinants for Gag binding are located upstream of this region of the p6 domain. Binding to Gag cleavage products showed that HIV-1 Vpr interacted directly with the nucleocapsid protein (NC), whereas SIVsm Vpr and Vpx did not interact with NC but with the p6 protein. These results (i) reveal differences between HIV-1 and SIVsm for the p6 determinants required for Vpr and Vpx binding to Gag and (ii) suggest that HIV-1 Vpr and SIVsm Vpr and Vpx interact with distinct cleavage products of the precursor following proteolytic processing in the virions. PMID:9847364

  1. Discovery of a lentivirus susceptibility gene in sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ovine lentivirus targets the host immune system and causes persistent retroviral infections affecting millions of sheep worldwide. In primates, lentivirus resistance is attributed to mutant virus coreceptors that are not expressed. In sheep, some animals are resistant to lentivirus infection despit...

  2. Ovine lentivirus expression and disease. Virus replication, but not entry, is restricted to macrophages of specific tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, S. J.; Pearson, L. D.; Zink, M. C.; Bickle, H. M.; Anderson, B. C.; Marcom, K. A.; DeMartini, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    To better define the relationship between lentivirus infection and lymphoproliferative or inflammatory disease, we studied postmortem specimens of 38 sheep naturally infected with ovine lentivirus (OvLV) and with different clinical manifestations of OvLV-associated disease. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and virus isolation were used to localize viral protein, viral RNA, and infectious virus to specific cells and tissues. Viral protein or infectious virus was found in cells morphologically and histochemically compatible with macrophages (M phi s), but only in lung, bone marrow, mammary gland, lymph node, spleen, synovium, brain, and spinal cord, frequently in association with lymphocyte infiltrates. In contrast, viral RNA was found in a variety of cell types, including epithelium, M phi s, and M phi-like cells, and in a wider range of tissues, with or without OvLV-associated lesions. In summary, these findings suggest that in vivo: 1), OvLV can enter a variety of cell types, 2), productive infection is restricted to cells of M phi lineage, and 3), cells expressing viral proteins are limited to specific tissues, those associated with OvLV-induced diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7531949

  3. Small ruminant lentivirus-induced arthritis: clinicopathologic findings in sheep infected by a highly replicative SRLV B2 genotype.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Biescas, E; Reina, R; Glaria, I; Marín, B; Marquina, A; Salazar, E; Álvarez, N; de Andrés, D; Fantova, E; Badiola, J J; Amorena, B; Luján, L

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinicopathologic features of an arthritis outbreak in sheep induced by small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV), linked to the presence of a new SRLV isolate phylogenetically assigned to caprine arthritis encephalitis virus-like subgroup B2. Thirteen SRLV seropositive Rasa Aragonesa adult ewes were selected from 5 SRLV highly infected flocks (mean seroprevalence, 90.7%) for presenting uni- or bilateral chronic arthritis in the carpal joint. A complete study was performed, including symptomatology, histopathology, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and microbiology. The carpus was the joint almost exclusively affected, with 10 sheep (76%) showing a moderate increase in carpal joint size (diameter range, 18-20 cm; normal range, 15-16 cm) without signs of locomotion problems and with 3 ewes (23%) showing severe inflammation with marked increase in diameter (21-24 cm), pain at palpation, and abnormal standing position. Grossly, chronic proliferative arthritis was observed in affected joints characterized by an increased thickness of the synovial capsule and synovial membrane proliferation. Microscopically, synovial membrane inflammation and proliferation and hyperplasia of synoviocytes were observed. More positive cases of SLRV infection were detected by immunocytochemistry of articular fluid than of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization also detected positive cells in the subsynovial connective tissue, lung, mediastinal lymph node, mammary gland, and mammary lymph node. All animals were negative for the presence of Mycoplasma or other bacteria in the articular space. The present outbreak likely represents an adaptation of a caprine virus to sheep. Our results underline the importance of the arthritis induced by SRLV in sheep, a clinical form that might be underestimated.

  4. "RCL-Pooling Assay": A Simplified Method for the Detection of Replication-Competent Lentiviruses in Vector Batches Using Sequential Pooling.

    PubMed

    Corre, Guillaume; Dessainte, Michel; Marteau, Jean-Brice; Dalle, Bruno; Fenard, David; Galy, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Nonreplicative recombinant HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors (LV) are increasingly used in gene therapy of various genetic diseases, infectious diseases, and cancer. Before they are used in humans, preparations of LV must undergo extensive quality control testing. In particular, testing of LV must demonstrate the absence of replication-competent lentiviruses (RCL) with suitable methods, on representative fractions of vector batches. Current methods based on cell culture are challenging because high titers of vector batches translate into high volumes of cell culture to be tested in RCL assays. As vector batch size and titers are continuously increasing because of the improvement of production and purification methods, it became necessary for us to modify the current RCL assay based on the detection of p24 in cultures of indicator cells. Here, we propose a practical optimization of this method using a pairwise pooling strategy enabling easier testing of higher vector inoculum volumes. These modifications significantly decrease material handling and operator time, leading to a cost-effective method, while maintaining optimal sensibility of the RCL testing. This optimized "RCL-pooling assay" ameliorates the feasibility of the quality control of large-scale batches of clinical-grade LV while maintaining the same sensitivity.

  5. Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus Infects but Does Not Replicate in Nonhuman Primate Primary Cells and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ritzhaupt, Armin; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Salomon, Daniel R.; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2002-01-01

    Porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) can infect human cell lines in vitro; hence, there is a presumed risk of viral exposure to a recipient when pig cells are transplanted into humans (xenotransplantation). Nonhuman primates (NHP) are considered a potential permissive animal model to study the risk of in vivo infection of PERV after xenotransplantation. We set out to determine whether PERV can infect and replicate in NHP primary cells or established cell lines from African green monkey, rhesus macaque, and baboon. We confirm that the NHP cell lines under investigation were infected with PERV as measured by detection of viral DNA and RNA by PCR and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, respectively, indicating that a functional receptor must be present on the cell surface. However, the load of detectable viral DNA in infected NHP cells declined over time, and the cells never had detectable reverse transcriptase activity. Utilizing quantitative real-time TaqMan PCR we found detectable levels of unintegrated DNA intermediates, but the levels were approximately 100-fold lower compared to HEK 293 cells infected with PERV. Virions released from infected NHP cells could productively infect naïve human cell lines, HEK 293 and HeLa, as shown by RT-PCR and RT assay. However, naïve NHP cells remained negative in RT-PCR and RT assay after exposure to virions from infected NHP cells. Together our data demonstrate that NHP cells are not permissive to productive replication by PERV, presumably due to inefficient cell entry and replication. In light of these observations, the appropriateness of NHP as suitable animal models to study PERV infection in vivo needs to be reevaluated. PMID:12388691

  6. Endogenous CD317/Tetherin limits replication of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus in rodent cells and is resistant to antagonists from primate viruses.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Schmidt, Sarah; Kern, Christian; Oberbremer, Lena; Keppler, Oliver T

    2010-11-01

    Human CD317 (BST-2/tetherin) is an intrinsic immunity factor that blocks the release of retroviruses, filoviruses, herpesviruses, and arenaviruses. It is unclear whether CD317 expressed endogenously in rodent cells has the capacity to interfere with the replication of the retroviral rodent pathogen murine leukemia virus (MLV) or, in the context of small-animal model development, contributes to the well-established late-phase restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CD317 relieved a virion release restriction and markedly enhanced the egress of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rat cells, including primary macrophages. Moreover, rodent CD317 potently inhibited MLV release, and siRNA-mediated depletion of CD317 in a mouse T-cell line resulted in the accelerated spread of MLV. Several virus-encoded antagonists have recently been reported to overcome the restriction imposed by human or monkey CD317, including HIV-1 Vpu, envelope glycoproteins of HIV-2 and Ebola virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K5, and SIV Nef. In contrast, both rat and mouse CD317 showed a high degree of resistance to these viral antagonists. These data suggest that CD317 is a broadly acting and conserved mediator of innate control of retroviral infection and pathogenesis that restricts the release of retroviruses and lentiviruses in rodents. The high degree of resistance of the rodent CD317 restriction factors to antagonists from primate viruses has implications for HIV-1 small-animal model development and may guide the design of novel antiviral interventions.

  7. Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLVs) Break the Species Barrier to Acquire New Host Range

    PubMed Central

    Minardi da Cruz, Juliano Cezar; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Lamara, Ali; Chebloune, Yahia

    2013-01-01

    Zoonotic events of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) from non-human primates to humans have generated the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the most devastating infectious disease of the last century with more than 30 million people dead and about 40.3 million people currently infected worldwide. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HIV-2), the two major viruses that cause AIDS in humans are retroviruses of the lentivirus genus. The genus includes arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) and Maedi-Visna virus (MVV), and a heterogeneous group of viruses known as small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs), affecting goat and sheep. Lentivirus genome integrates into the host DNA, causing persistent infection associated with a remarkable diversity during viral replication. Direct evidence of mixed infections with these two closely related SRLVs was found in both sheep and goats. The evidence of a genetic continuum with caprine and ovine field isolates demonstrates the absence of an efficient species barrier preventing cross-species transmission. In dual-infected animals, persistent infections with both CAEV and MVV have been described, and viral chimeras have been detected. This not only complicates animal trade between countries but favors the risk that highly pathogenic variants may emerge as has already been observed in the past in Iceland and, more recently, in outbreaks with virulent strains in Spain. SRLVs affecting wildlife have already been identified, demonstrating the existence of emergent viruses adapted to new hosts. Viruses adapted to wildlife ruminants may acquire novel biopathological properties which may endanger not only the new host species but also domestic ruminants and humans. SRLVs infecting sheep and goats follow a genomic evolution similar to that observed in HIV or in other lentiviruses. Lentivirus genetic diversity and host factors leading to the establishment of naturally occurring virulent versus avirulent infections, in addition to

  8. Parallel Germline Infiltration of a Lentivirus in Two Malagasy Lemurs

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Clément; Maxfield, David G.; Goodman, Steven M.; Feschotte, Cédric

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses normally infect the somatic cells of their host and are transmitted horizontally, i.e., in an exogenous way. Occasionally, however, some retroviruses can also infect and integrate into the genome of germ cells, which may allow for their vertical inheritance and fixation in a given species; a process known as endogenization. Lentiviruses, a group of mammalian retroviruses that includes HIV, are known to infect primates, ruminants, horses, and cats. Unlike many other retroviruses, these viruses have not been demonstrably successful at germline infiltration. Here, we report on the discovery of endogenous lentiviral insertions in seven species of Malagasy lemurs from two different genera—Cheirogaleus and Microcebus. Combining molecular clock analyses and cross-species screening of orthologous insertions, we show that the presence of this endogenous lentivirus in six species of Microcebus is the result of one endogenization event that occurred about 4.2 million years ago. In addition, we demonstrate that this lentivirus independently infiltrated the germline of Cheirogaleus and that the two endogenization events occurred quasi-simultaneously. Using multiple proviral copies, we derive and characterize an apparently full length and intact consensus for this lentivirus. These results provide evidence that lentiviruses have repeatedly infiltrated the germline of prosimian species and that primates have been exposed to lentiviruses for a much longer time than what can be inferred based on sequence comparison of circulating lentiviruses. The study sets the stage for an unprecedented opportunity to reconstruct an ancestral primate lentivirus and thereby advance our knowledge of host–virus interactions. PMID:19300488

  9. Random Codon Re-encoding Induces Stable Reduction of Replicative Fitness of Chikungunya Virus in Primate and Mosquito Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nougairede, Antoine; De Fabritus, Lauriane; Aubry, Fabien; Gould, Ernest A.; Holmes, Edward C.; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale codon re-encoding represents a powerful method of attenuating viruses to generate safe and cost-effective vaccines. In contrast to specific approaches of codon re-encoding which modify genome-scale properties, we evaluated the effects of random codon re-encoding on the re-emerging human pathogen Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and assessed the stability of the resultant viruses during serial in cellulo passage. Using different combinations of three 1.4 kb randomly re-encoded regions located throughout the CHIKV genome six codon re-encoded viruses were obtained. Introducing a large number of slightly deleterious synonymous mutations reduced the replicative fitness of CHIKV in both primate and arthropod cells, demonstrating the impact of synonymous mutations on fitness. Decrease of replicative fitness correlated with the extent of re-encoding, an observation that may assist in the modulation of viral attenuation. The wild-type and two re-encoded viruses were passaged 50 times either in primate or insect cells, or in each cell line alternately. These viruses were analyzed using detailed fitness assays, complete genome sequences and the analysis of intra-population genetic diversity. The response to codon re-encoding and adaptation to culture conditions occurred simultaneously, resulting in significant replicative fitness increases for both re-encoded and wild type viruses. Importantly, however, the most re-encoded virus failed to recover its replicative fitness. Evolution of these viruses in response to codon re-encoding was largely characterized by the emergence of both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations, sometimes located in genomic regions other than those involving re-encoding, and multiple convergent and compensatory mutations. However, there was a striking absence of codon reversion (<0.4%). Finally, multiple mutations were rapidly fixed in primate cells, whereas mosquito cells acted as a brake on evolution. In conclusion, random codon re

  10. Limited dissemination of pathogenic SIV after vaginal challenge of rhesus monkeys immunized with a live, attenuated lentivirus.

    PubMed

    Stone, Mars; Ma, Zhong-Min; Genescà, Meritxell; Fritts, Linda; Blozois, Shelley; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J

    2009-09-30

    In non-human primate models of AIDS, attenuated lentiviruses provide the most reliable protection from challenge with pathogenic virus but the extent to which the vaccine virus replicates after challenge is unclear. At 7 and 14 days after vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac239, plasma SIVenv RNA levels were significantly lower in female macaques immunized 6 months earlier with live, attenuated SHIV89.6 compared to unimmunized control animals. In 2 SHIV-immunized, unprotected macaques SIV replication produced moderate-level plasma viremia with dissemination of challenge virus to all tissues on day 14 after challenge. In protected, SHIV-immunized monkeys, SIV replication was controlled in all tissues, from the day of challenge through 14 days post-challenge. Further, in CD8(+) T cell-depleted SHIV-immunized animals, SIV replication and dissemination were more rapid than in control animals. These findings suggest that replication of a pathogenic AIDS virus can be controlled at the site of mucosal inoculation by live-attenuated lentivirus immunization.

  11. Cyclin A degradation by primate cytomegalovirus protein pUL21a counters its innate restriction of virus replication.

    PubMed

    Caffarelli, Nicolas; Fehr, Anthony R; Yu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin A is critical for cellular DNA synthesis and S phase progression of the cell cycle. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can reduce cyclin A levels and block cellular DNA synthesis, and cyclin A overexpression can repress HCMV replication. This interaction has only been previously observed in HCMV as murine CMV does not downregulate cyclin A, and the responsible viral factor has not been identified. We previously reported that the HCMV protein pUL21a disrupted the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), but a point mutant abrogating this activity did not phenocopy a UL21a-deficient virus, suggesting that pUL21a has an additional function. Here we identified a conserved arginine-x-leucine (RxL) cyclin-binding domain within pUL21a, which allowed pUL21a to interact with cyclin A and target it for proteasome degradation. Homologous pUL21a proteins from both chimpanzee and rhesus CMVs also contained the RxL domain and similarly degraded cyclin A, indicating that this function is conserved in primate CMVs. The RxL point mutation disabled the virus' ability to block cellular DNA synthesis and resulted in a growth defect similar to pUL21a-deficient virus. Importantly, knockdown of cyclin A rescued growth of UL21a-deficient virus. Together, these data show that during evolution, the pUL21a family proteins of primate CMVs have acquired a cyclin-binding domain that targets cyclin A for degradation, thus neutralizing its restriction on virus replication. Finally, the combined proteasome-dependent degradation of pUL21a and its cellular targets suggests that pUL21a may act as a novel suicide protein, targeting its protein cargos for destruction.

  12. Olive baboons: a non-human primate model for testing dengue virus type 2 replication.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Iris; Gil, Lázaro; Castro, Jorge; Odoyo, Damián; Hitler, Rikoi; Munene, Elephas; Romero, Yaremis; Ochola, Lucy; Cosme, Karelia; Kariuki, Thomas; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the use of a non-human primate, the olive baboon (Papio anubis), as a model of dengue infection. Olive baboons closely resemble humans genetically and physiologically and have been used extensively for assessing novel vaccine formulations. Two doses of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) were tested in baboons: 10(3) and 10(4) pfu. Similarly, African green monkeys received the same quantity of virus and acted as positive controls. Following exposure, high levels of viremia were detected in both animal species. There was a trend to detect more days of viremia and more homogeneous viral titers in animals receiving the low viral dose. In addition, baboons infected with the virus generally exhibited positive virus isolation 1 day later than African green monkeys. Humoral responses consisting of antiviral and neutralizing antibodies were detected in all animals after infection. We conclude that baboons provide an alternative non-human primate species for experimental DENV-2 infection and we recommend their use for further tests of vaccines, administering the lowest dose assayed: 10(3) pfu. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunization against Small Ruminant Lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Ramsés; de Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Multisystemic disease caused by Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLV) in sheep and goats leads to production losses, to the detriment of animal health and welfare. This, together with the lack of treatments, has triggered interest in exploring different strategies of immunization to control the widely spread SRLV infection and, also, to provide a useful model for HIV vaccines. These strategies involve inactivated whole virus, subunit vaccines, DNA encoding viral proteins in the presence or absence of plasmids encoding immunological adjuvants and naturally or artificially attenuated viruses. In this review, we revisit, comprehensively, the immunization strategies against SRLV and analyze this double edged tool individually, as it may contribute to either controlling or enhancing virus replication and/or disease. PMID:23917352

  14. Replication of live attenuated cold-adapted H2N2 influenza virus vaccine candidates in non human primates.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Andrew J; Santos, Celia P; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lu, Janine; Chen, Zhongying; Jin, Hong; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    The development of an H2N2 vaccine is a priority in pandemic preparedness planning. We previously showed that a single dose of a cold-adapted (ca) H2N2 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) based on the influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) virus was immunogenic and efficacious in mice and ferrets. However, in a Phase I clinical trial, viral replication was restricted and immunogenicity was poor. In this study, we compared the replication of four H2N2 LAIV candidate viruses, AA ca, A/Tecumseh/3/67 (TEC67 ca), and two variants of A/Japan/305/57 (JAP57 ca) in three non-human primate (NHP) species: African green monkeys (AGM), cynomolgus macaques (CM) and rhesus macaques (RM). One JAP57 ca virus had glutamine and glycine at HA amino acid positions 226 and 228 (Q-G) that binds to α2-3 linked sialic acids, and one had leucine and serine that binds to α2-3 and α2-6 linked residues (L-S). The replication of all ca viruses was restricted, with low titers detected in the upper respiratory tract of all NHP species, however replication was detected in significantly more CMs than AGMs. The JAP57 ca Q-G and TEC67 ca viruses replicated in a significantly higher percentage of NHPs than the AA ca virus, with the TEC67 ca virus recovered from the greatest percentage of animals. Altering the receptor specificity of the JAP57 ca virus from α2-3 to both α2-3 and α2-6 linked sialic acid residues did not significantly increase the number of animals infected or the titer to which the virus replicated. Taken together, our data show that in NHPs the AA ca virus more closely reflects the human experience than mice or ferret studies. We suggest that CMs and RMs may be the preferred species for evaluating H2N2 LAIV viruses, and the TEC67 ca virus may be the most promising H2N2 LAIV candidate for further evaluation.

  15. Replication of live attenuated cold-adapted H2N2 influenza virus vaccine candidates in non human primates

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, Andrew J.; Santos, Celia P.; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lu, Janine; Chen, Zhongying; Jin, Hong; Subbarao, Kanta

    2014-01-01

    The development of an H2N2 vaccine is a priority in pandemic preparedness planning. We previously showed that a single dose of a cold-adapted (ca) H2N2 live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) based on the influenza A/Ann Arbor/6/60 (AA ca) virus was immunogenic and efficacious in mice and ferrets. However, in a Phase I clinical trial, viral replication was restricted and immunogenicity was poor. In this study, we compared the replication of four H2N2 LAIV candidate viruses, AA ca, A/Tecumseh/3/67 (TEC67 ca), and two variants of A/Japan/305/57 (JAP57 ca) in three non-human primate (NHP) species: African green monkeys (AGM), cynomolgus macaques (CM) and rhesus macaques (RM). One JAP57 ca virus had glutamine and glycine at HA amino acid positions 226 and 228 (Q-G) that binds to α2-3 linked sialic acids, and one had leucine and serine that binds to α2-3 and α2-6 linked residues (L-S). The replication of all ca viruses was restricted, with low titers detected in the upper respiratory tract of all NHP species, however replication was detected in significantly more CMs than AGMs. The JAP57 ca Q-G and TEC67 ca viruses replicated in a significantly higher percentage of NHPs than the AA ca virus, with the TEC67 ca virus recovered from the greatest percentage of animals. Altering the receptor specificity of the JAP57 ca virus from α2-3 to both α2-3 and α2-6 linked sialic acid residues did not significantly increase the number of animals infected or the titer to which the virus replicated. Taken together, our data show that in NHPs the AA ca virus more closely reflects the human experience than mice or ferret studies. We suggest that CMs and RMs may be the preferred species for evaluating H2N2 LAIV viruses, and the TEC67 ca virus may be the most promising H2N2 LAIV candidate for further evaluation. PMID:25444799

  16. Identification of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Encapsidation Determinant and Transduction of Nondividing Human Cells by HIV-2-Based Lentivirus Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Poeschla, Eric; Gilbert, James; Li, Xinqiang; Huang, Shiang; Ho, Anthony; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1998-01-01

    Although previous lentivirus vector systems have used human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2 is less pathogenic in humans and is amenable to pathogenicity testing in a primate model. In this study, an HIV-2 molecular clone that is infectious but apathogenic in macaques was used to first define cis-acting regions that can be deleted to prevent HIV-2 genomic encapsidation and replication without inhibiting viral gene expression. Lentivirus encapsidation determinants are complex and incompletely defined; for HIV-2, some deletions between the major 5′ splice donor and the gag open reading frame have been shown to minimally affect encapsidation and replication. We find that a larger deletion (61 to 75 nucleotides) abrogates encapsidation and replication but does not diminish mRNA expression. This deletion was incorporated into a replication-defective, envelope-pseudotyped, three-plasmid HIV-2 lentivirus vector system that supplies HIV-2 Gag/Pol and accessory proteins in trans from an HIV-2 packaging plasmid. The HIV-2 vectors efficiently transduced marker genes into human T and monocytoid cell lines and, in contrast to a murine leukemia virus-based vector, into growth-arrested HeLa cells and terminally differentiated human macrophages and NTN2 neurons. Vector DNA could be detected in HIV-2 vector-transduced nondividing CD34+ CD38− human hematopoietic progenitor cells but not in those cells transduced with murine vectors. However, stable integration and expression of the reporter gene could not be detected in these hematopoietic progenitors, leaving open the question of the accessibility of these cells to stable lentivirus transduction. PMID:9658096

  17. Retroviral restriction and dependency factors in primates and carnivores

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, Hind J.; Poeschla, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have extended the rapidly developing retroviral restriction factor field to cells of carnivore species. Carnivoran genomes, and the domestic cat genome in particular, are revealing intriguing properties vis-à;-vis the primate and feline lentiviruses, not only with respect to their repertoires of virus-blocking restriction factors but also replication-enabling dependency factors. Therapeutic application of restriction factors is envisioned for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model has promise for testing important hypotheses at the basic and translational level. Feline cell-tropic HIV-1 clones have also been generated by a strategy of restriction factor evasion. We review progress in this area in the context of what is known about retroviral restriction factors such as TRIM5alpha, TRIMCyp, APOBEC3 proteins and BST-2/Tetherin. PMID:21715018

  18. Retroviral restriction and dependency factors in primates and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Fadel, Hind J; Poeschla, Eric M

    2011-10-15

    Recent studies have extended the rapidly developing retroviral restriction factor field to cells of carnivore species. Carnivoran genomes, and the domestic cat genome in particular, are revealing intriguing properties vis-à-vis the primate and feline lentiviruses, not only with respect to their repertoires of virus-blocking restriction factors but also replication-enabling dependency factors. Therapeutic application of restriction factors is envisioned for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease and the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) model has promise for testing important hypotheses at the basic and translational level. Feline cell-tropic HIV-1 clones have also been generated by a strategy of restriction factor evasion. We review progress in this area in the context of what is known about retroviral restriction factors such as TRIM5α, TRIMCyp, APOBEC3 proteins and BST-2/Tetherin.

  19. Inhibition of cellular activation of retroviral replication by CD8+ T cells derived from non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Powell, J D; Bednarik, D P; Folks, T M; Jehuda-Cohen, T; Villinger, F; Sell, K W; Ansari, A A

    1993-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells inhibit viral replication at the level of cellular activation, an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cell line (FEc1) from a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-seropositive sooty mangabey monkey was transfected with a human CD4 gene and shown to be replication-competent for HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Utilizing a dual-chamber culture system, it was found that inhibition of viral replication can be mediated by a soluble factor. The FEc1 cell line was transiently transfected with an LTR-driven CAT reporter gene. It was found that autologous CD8+ T cells markedly inhibited CAT activity. Furthermore, co-transfection of the FEc1 cell line with an LTR-driven tat plasmid and LTR-CAT was able to quantitatively mitigate the suppressive effect. Thus, this inhibition appears to be directed at cellular mechanisms of viral transcription. Control transfections with an LTR-driven CAT plasmid with a mutation at the NFkB binding site yielded no CAT activity, suggesting that most viral replication as measured by CAT activity is dependent, to a large extent, upon cellularly derived NFkB binding proteins.

  20. Evaluation of replication, immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated cold-adapted pandemic H1N1 influenza virus vaccine in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Boonnak, Kobporn; Paskel, Myeisha; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Vogel, Leatrice; Subbarao, Kanta

    2012-08-17

    We studied the replication of influenza A/California/07/09 (H1N1) wild type (CA09wt) virus in two non-human primate species and used one of these models to evaluate the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a live attenuated cold-adapted vaccine, which contains the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase from the H1N1 wild type (wt) virus and six internal protein gene segments of the A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-adapted (ca) master donor virus. We infected African green monkeys (AGMs) and rhesus macaques with 2×10(6) TCID(50) of CA09wt and CA09ca influenza viruses. The virus CA09wt replicated in the upper respiratory tract of all animals but the titers in upper respiratory tract tissues of rhesus macaques were significant higher than in AGMs (mean peak titers 10(4.5) TCID(50)/g and 10(2.0) TCID(50)/g on days 4 and 2 post-infection, respectively; p<0.01). Virus replication was observed in the lungs of all rhesus macaques (10(2.0)-10(5.4) TCID(50)/g) whereas only 2 out of 4 AGMs had virus recovered from the lungs (10(2.5)-10(3.5) TCID(50)/g). The CA09ca vaccine virus was attenuated and highly restricted in replication in both AGMs and rhesus macaques. We evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the CA09ca vaccine in rhesus macaques because CA09wt virus replicated more efficiently in this species. One or two doses of vaccine were administered intranasally and intratracheally to rhesus macaques. For the two-dose group, the vaccine was administered 4-weeks apart. Immunogenicity was assessed by measuring hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) antibodies in the serum and specific IgA antibodies to CA09wt virus in the nasal wash. One or two doses of the vaccine elicited a significant rise in HAI titers (range 40-320). Two doses of CA09ca elicited higher pH1N1-specific IgA titers than in the mock-immunized group (p<0.01). Vaccine efficacy was assessed by comparing titers of CA09wt challenge virus in the respiratory tract of mock-immunized and CA09ca vaccinated monkeys

  1. Lentivirus vectors using human and simian immunodeficiency virus elements.

    PubMed

    White, S M; Renda, M; Nam, N Y; Klimatcheva, E; Zhu, Y; Fisk, J; Halterman, M; Rimel, B J; Federoff, H; Pandya, S; Rosenblatt, J D; Planelles, V

    1999-04-01

    Lentivirus vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) constitute a recent development in the field of gene therapy. A key property of HIV-1-derived vectors is their ability to infect nondividing cells. Although high-titer HIV-1-derived vectors have been produced, concerns regarding safety still exist. Safety concerns arise mainly from the possibility of recombination between transfer and packaging vectors, which may give rise to replication-competent viruses with pathogenic potential. We describe a novel lentivirus vector which is based on HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and which we refer to as HIV/SIVpack/G. In this system, an HIV-1-derived genome is encapsidated by SIVmac core particles. These core particles are pseudotyped with VSV glycoprotein G. Because the nucleotide homology between HIV-1 and SIVmac is low, the likelihood of recombination between vector elements should be reduced. In addition, the packaging construct (SIVpack) for this lentivirus system was derived from SIVmac1A11, a nonvirulent SIV strain. Thus, the potential for pathogenicity with this vector system is minimal. The transduction ability of HIV/SIVpack/G was demonstrated with immortalized human lymphocytes, human primary macrophages, human bone marrow-derived CD34(+) cells, and primary mouse neurons. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first demonstration that the HIV-1-derived genome can be packaged by an SIVmac capsid. We demonstrate that the lentivirus vector described here recapitulates the biological properties of HIV-1-derived vectors, although with increased potential for safety in humans.

  2. Lentivirus Vectors Using Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Elements

    PubMed Central

    White, Sarah M.; Renda, Matthew; Nam, Na-Yon; Klimatcheva, Ekaterina; Zhu, Yonghong; Fisk, Jennifer; Halterman, Mark; Rimel, Bobbie J.; Federoff, Howard; Pandya, Snehal; Rosenblatt, Joseph D.; Planelles, Vicente

    1999-01-01

    Lentivirus vectors based on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) constitute a recent development in the field of gene therapy. A key property of HIV-1-derived vectors is their ability to infect nondividing cells. Although high-titer HIV-1-derived vectors have been produced, concerns regarding safety still exist. Safety concerns arise mainly from the possibility of recombination between transfer and packaging vectors, which may give rise to replication-competent viruses with pathogenic potential. We describe a novel lentivirus vector which is based on HIV, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and which we refer to as HIV/SIVpack/G. In this system, an HIV-1-derived genome is encapsidated by SIVmac core particles. These core particles are pseudotyped with VSV glycoprotein G. Because the nucleotide homology between HIV-1 and SIVmac is low, the likelihood of recombination between vector elements should be reduced. In addition, the packaging construct (SIVpack) for this lentivirus system was derived from SIVmac1A11, a nonvirulent SIV strain. Thus, the potential for pathogenicity with this vector system is minimal. The transduction ability of HIV/SIVpack/G was demonstrated with immortalized human lymphocytes, human primary macrophages, human bone marrow-derived CD34+ cells, and primary mouse neurons. To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first demonstration that the HIV-1-derived genome can be packaged by an SIVmac capsid. We demonstrate that the lentivirus vector described here recapitulates the biological properties of HIV-1-derived vectors, although with increased potential for safety in humans. PMID:10074131

  3. COS-1 cells as packaging host for production of lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Crystal J; Shioda, Toshi

    2011-03-01

    We present a protocol for in vitro production of recombinant lentiviruses using COS-1 African green monkey kidney epithelial cells and HEK293T human embryonic kidney epithelial cells as packaging cells. COS-1 and HEK293T express SV40 large T antigen, amplifying transfected circular plasmids harboring SV40 replication origin. Support protocols for evaluation of transfection efficiency by in situ β-galactosidase enzyme activity assay and titer of infection-capable virions are also provided. Advantages of using COS-1 packaging cells over the standard HEK293T cells for contamination-sensitive applications or automated processing are discussed.

  4. Strategies for retargeted gene delivery using vectors derived from lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Bartosch, Birke; Cosset, Francois-Loic

    2004-12-01

    With the development of the first viral vector systems 20 years ago [Mann et al., 1983; Watanabe and Temin, 1983] gene therapy strategies have come to the forefront of novel therapeutics [Cavazzana-Calvo et al., 2000]. A deeper understanding of vector biology and the molecular mechanisms of disease alongside tremendous advances in vector technology have significantly advanced the field of human gene therapy. Over the last few years several challenges needed to be overcome in order to bring gene therapy strategies closer to the clinic. These hurdles include the preparation of large amounts of stable, high titre vectors, minimising vector-related immunology and last but not least targeting infection and transgene expression to tissue or cells, which in many cases are not or only slowly dividing. Viral vectors are useful vehicles for the delivery of foreign genes into target cells, and retroviral vectors have been popular because of their ability to integrate into the host cell genome and maintain persistent gene expression. Moreover, lentiviruses, members of the retroviral family, have the ability to infect cells at both mitotic and post-mitotic stages of the cell cycle thus opening up the possibility to target non-dividing target cells and tissues. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) based vectors have been used in vitro and in vivo in a number of situations, however, safety concerns still exist, and therefore the development of vector systems based on primate as well as non-primate lentiviruses is ongoing. Concomitantly with lentiviral vector design, much has been learned about the incorporation of heterologous env proteins on lentiviral cores in order to combine specific targeting properties of envelope glycoproteins with the biological properties of lentiviral vectors. In this review article we will give an overview over advantages lentiviral vector systems offer. We will then discuss the current state of our understanding of the structure and function of viral

  5. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Sha, Jian; Kirtley, Michelle L; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C; Baze, Wallace B; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K; Lawrence, William S; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E; Andersson, Jourdan A; Kozlova, Elena V; Tiner, Bethany L; Peterson, Johnny W; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2016-07-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. SURE, why not? The SUbstitution-REciprocity method for measurement of odor quality discrimination thresholds: replication and extension to nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Laska, Matthias; Grimm, Nina

    2003-02-01

    Recently, Olsson and Cain (2000, Chem. Senses, 25: 493) introduced a psychometric method which, for the first time, allows the standardized determination of odor quality discrimination (OQD) thresholds. The method defines a threshold value that is an average fraction by which one odorant has to be substituted with another to reach a criterion level of discrimination. This measure of discrimination is reciprocal in the sense that it is a result of two separate psychometric functions involving two different standards but the same comparison stimuli. Using the same odor stimuli as Olsson and Cain, with six human subjects but adopting a slightly different experimental design, we were able to replicate their finding that the proportion of correct discriminations changes monotonically with the proportion of adulterant in mixtures of eugenol and citral. As the SURE (SUbstitution-REciprocity) method is based on discriminative responses, it should also be applicable with nonhuman species which can be trained to give unequivocal discriminative responses at the behavioral level. Using an olfactory conditioning paradigm, we therefore trained four squirrel monkeys to discriminate between exactly the same pairs of odor stimuli as our human subjects. We found the psychometric functions of the monkeys to be similar to those of the human subjects. Our results show that the SURE method can successfully be employed with nonhuman primates and thus offers a new approach to study the odor spaces of nonhuman species. Future studies should elucidate whether the SURE method allows for direct comparisons of OQD thresholds and of similarities and differences between odor quality perception of different species.

  7. A Replication-Defective Human Type 5 Adenovirus-Based Trivalent Vaccine Confers Complete Protection against Plague in Mice and Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kirtley, Michelle L.; Klages, Curtis; Erova, Tatiana E.; Telepnev, Maxim; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Fitts, Eric C.; Baze, Wallace B.; Sivasubramani, Satheesh K.; Lawrence, William S.; Patrikeev, Igor; Peel, Jennifer E.; Andersson, Jourdan A.; Kozlova, Elena V.; Tiner, Bethany L.; Peterson, Johnny W.; McWilliams, David; Patel, Snehal; Rothe, Eric; Motin, Vladimir L.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no plague vaccine exists in the United States for human use. The capsular antigen (Caf1 or F1) and two type 3 secretion system (T3SS) components, the low-calcium-response V antigen (LcrV) and the needle protein YscF, represent protective antigens of Yersinia pestis. We used a replication-defective human type 5 adenovirus (Ad5) vector and constructed recombinant monovalent and trivalent vaccines (rAd5-LcrV and rAd5-YFV) that expressed either the codon-optimized lcrV or the fusion gene designated YFV (consisting of ycsF, caf1, and lcrV). Immunization of mice with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by either the intramuscular (i.m.) or the intranasal (i.n.) route provided protection superior to that with the monovalent rAd5-LcrV vaccine against bubonic and pneumonic plague when animals were challenged with Y. pestis CO92. Preexisting adenoviral immunity did not diminish the protective response, and the protection was always higher when mice were administered one i.n. dose of the trivalent vaccine (priming) followed by a single i.m. booster dose of the purified YFV antigen. Immunization of cynomolgus macaques with the trivalent rAd5-YFV vaccine by the prime-boost strategy provided 100% protection against a stringent aerosol challenge dose of CO92 to animals that had preexisting adenoviral immunity. The vaccinated and challenged macaques had no signs of disease, and the invading pathogen rapidly cleared with no histopathological lesions. This is the first report showing the efficacy of an adenovirus-vectored trivalent vaccine against pneumonic plague in mouse and nonhuman primate (NHP) models. PMID:27170642

  8. Clearance of a Productive Lentivirus Infection in Calves Experimentally Inoculated with Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Thierry; Guiguen, François; Bouzar, Baya Amel; Villet, Stéphanie; Greenland, Timothy; Grezel, Délphine; Gounel, Françoise; Gallay, Kathy; Garnier, Céline; Durand, Jitka; Alogninouwa, Théodore; Mselli-Lakhal, Laïla; Mornex, Jean-François; Chebloune, Yahia

    2003-01-01

    Lentiviruses have long been considered host-specific pathogens, but several recent observations demonstrated their capacity to conquer new hosts from different species, genera, and families. From these cross-species infections emerged new animal and human infectious diseases. The successful colonization and adaptation of a lentivirus to a nonnatural host depends on unspecific and specific host barriers. Some of those barriers exert a relative control of viral replication (i.e., cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response, viral inhibitory factors), but none of them was found able to totally clear the infection once the retrovirus is fully adapted in its host. In this study we examined the evolution of the host-lentivirus interactions occurring in an experimental animal model of cross-species infection in order to analyze the efficiency of those barriers in preventing the establishment of a persistent infection. Five newborn calves were inoculated with caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV), and the evolution of infection was studied for more than 12 months. All the animals seroconverted in the first 0.75 to 1 month following the inoculation and remained seropositive for the remaining time of the experiment. Viral infection was productive during 4 months with isolation of replication competent virus from the blood cells and organs of the early euthanized animals. After 4 months of infection, neither replication-competent virus nor virus genome could be detected in blood cells or in the classical target organs, even after an experimental immunosuppression. No evidence of in vitro restriction of CAEV replication was observed in cells from tissues explanted from organs of these calves. These data provide the demonstration of a natural clearance of lentivirus infection following experimental inoculation of a nonnatural host, enabling perspectives of development of new potential vaccine strategies to fight against lentivirus infections. PMID:12743300

  9. Clearance of a productive lentivirus infection in calves experimentally inoculated with caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Morin, Thierry; Guiguen, François; Bouzar, Baya Amel; Villet, Stéphanie; Greenland, Timothy; Grezel, Délphine; Gounel, Françoise; Gallay, Kathy; Garnier, Céline; Durand, Jitka; Alogninouwa, Théodore; Mselli-Lakhal, Laïla; Mornex, Jean-François; Chebloune, Yahia

    2003-06-01

    Lentiviruses have long been considered host-specific pathogens, but several recent observations demonstrated their capacity to conquer new hosts from different species, genera, and families. From these cross-species infections emerged new animal and human infectious diseases. The successful colonization and adaptation of a lentivirus to a nonnatural host depends on unspecific and specific host barriers. Some of those barriers exert a relative control of viral replication (i.e., cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response, viral inhibitory factors), but none of them was found able to totally clear the infection once the retrovirus is fully adapted in its host. In this study we examined the evolution of the host-lentivirus interactions occurring in an experimental animal model of cross-species infection in order to analyze the efficiency of those barriers in preventing the establishment of a persistent infection. Five newborn calves were inoculated with caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV), and the evolution of infection was studied for more than 12 months. All the animals seroconverted in the first 0.75 to 1 month following the inoculation and remained seropositive for the remaining time of the experiment. Viral infection was productive during 4 months with isolation of replication competent virus from the blood cells and organs of the early euthanized animals. After 4 months of infection, neither replication-competent virus nor virus genome could be detected in blood cells or in the classical target organs, even after an experimental immunosuppression. No evidence of in vitro restriction of CAEV replication was observed in cells from tissues explanted from organs of these calves. These data provide the demonstration of a natural clearance of lentivirus infection following experimental inoculation of a nonnatural host, enabling perspectives of development of new potential vaccine strategies to fight against lentivirus infections.

  10. Going Wild: Lessons from Naturally Occurring T-Lymphotropic Lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    VandeWoude, Sue; Apetrei, Cristian

    2006-01-01

    Over 40 nonhuman primate (NHP) species harbor species-specific simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs). Similarly, more than 20 species of nondomestic felids and African hyenids demonstrate seroreactivity against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antigens. While it has been challenging to study the biological implications of nonfatal infections in natural populations, epidemiologic and clinical studies performed thus far have only rarely detected increased morbidity or impaired fecundity/survival of naturally infected SIV- or FIV-seropositive versus -seronegative animals. Cross-species transmissions of these agents are rare in nature but have been used to develop experimental systems to evaluate mechanisms of pathogenicity and to develop animal models of HIV/AIDS. Given that felids and primates are substantially evolutionarily removed yet demonstrate the same pattern of apparently nonpathogenic lentiviral infections, comparison of the biological behaviors of these viruses can yield important implications for host-lentiviral adaptation which are relevant to human HIV/AIDS infection. This review therefore evaluates similarities in epidemiology, lentiviral genotyping, pathogenicity, host immune responses, and cross-species transmission of FIVs and factors associated with the establishment of lentiviral infections in new species. This comparison of consistent patterns in lentivirus biology will expose new directions for scientific inquiry for understanding the basis for virulence versus avirulence. PMID:17041142

  11. Molecular biology and pathogenesis of animal lentivirus infections.

    PubMed Central

    Clements, J E; Zink, M C

    1996-01-01

    Lentiviruses are a subfamily of retroviruses that are characterized by long incubation periods between infection of the host and the manifestation of clinical disease. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1, the causative agent of AIDS, is the most widely studied lentivirus. However, the lentiviruses that infect sheep, goats, and horses were identified and studied prior to the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. These and other animal lentiviruses provide important systems in which to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of this family of viruses. This review will focus on two animal lentivirus models: the ovine lentivirus visna virus; and the simian lentivirus, simian immunodeficiency virus. These animal lentiviruses have been used to examine, in particular, the pathogenesis of lentivirus-induced central nervous system disease as models for humans with AIDS as well as other chronic diseases. PMID:8665473

  12. Accessory genes confer a high replication rate to virulent feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Troyer, Ryan M; Thompson, Jesse; Elder, John H; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes AIDS in domestic cats, similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS in humans. The FIV accessory protein Vif abrogates the inhibition of infection by cat APOBEC3 restriction factors. FIV also encodes a multifunctional OrfA accessory protein that has characteristics similar to HIV Tat, Vpu, Vpr, and Nef. To examine the role of vif and orfA accessory genes in FIV replication and pathogenicity, we generated chimeras between two FIV molecular clones with divergent disease potentials: a highly pathogenic isolate that replicates rapidly in vitro and is associated with significant immunopathology in vivo, FIV-C36 (referred to here as high-virulence FIV [HV-FIV]), and a less-pathogenic strain, FIV-PPR (referred to here as low-virulence FIV [LV-FIV]). Using PCR-driven overlap extension, we produced viruses in which vif, orfA, or both genes from virulent HV-FIV replaced equivalent genes in LV-FIV. The generation of these chimeras is more straightforward in FIV than in primate lentiviruses, since FIV accessory gene open reading frames have very little overlap with other genes. All three chimeric viruses exhibited increased replication kinetics in vitro compared to the replication kinetics of LV-FIV. Chimeras containing HV-Vif or Vif/OrfA had replication rates equivalent to those of the virulent HV-FIV parental virus. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of feline APOBEC3 genes resulted in equalization of replication rates between LV-FIV and LV-FIV encoding HV-FIV Vif. These findings demonstrate that Vif-APOBEC interactions play a key role in controlling the replication and pathogenicity of this immunodeficiency-inducing virus in its native host species and that accessory genes act as mediators of lentiviral strain-specific virulence.

  13. Toward an AIDS vaccine: lessons from natural simian immunodeficiency virus infections of African nonhuman primate hosts.

    PubMed

    Sodora, Donald L; Allan, Jonathan S; Apetrei, Cristian; Brenchley, Jason M; Douek, Daniel C; Else, James G; Estes, Jacob D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Hirsch, Vanessa M; Kaur, Amitinder; Kirchhoff, Frank; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Pandrea, Ivona; Schmitz, Jörn E; Silvestri, Guido

    2009-08-01

    The design of an effective AIDS vaccine has eluded the efforts of the scientific community to the point that alternative approaches to classic vaccine formulations have to be considered. We propose here that HIV vaccine research could greatly benefit from the study of natural simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infections of African nonhuman primates. Natural SIV hosts (for example, sooty mangabeys, African green monkeys and mandrills) share many features of HIV infection of humans; however, they usually do not develop immunodeficiency. These natural, nonprogressive SIV infections represent an evolutionary adaptation that allows a peaceful coexistence of primate lentiviruses and the host immune system. This adaptation does not result in reduced viral replication but, rather, involves phenotypic changes to CD4(+) T cell subsets, limited immune activation and preserved mucosal immunity, all of which contribute to the avoidance of disease progression and, possibly, to the reduction of vertical SIV transmission. Here we summarize the current understanding of SIV infection of African nonhuman primates and discuss how unraveling these evolutionary adaptations may provide clues for new vaccine designs that might induce effective immune responses without the harmful consequences of excessive immune activation.

  14. Cyclophilin A is required for the replication of group M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus SIV(CPZ)GAB but not group O HIV-1 or other primate immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed Central

    Braaten, D; Franke, E K; Luban, J

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag polyprotein binds to cyclophilin A and incorporates this cellular peptidyl prolyl-isomerase into virions. Disruption of cyclophilin A incorporation, either by gag mutations or by cyclosporine A, inhibits virion infectivity, indicating that cyclophilin A plays an essential role in the HIV-1 life cycle. Using assays for packaging of cyclophilin A into virions and for viral replication sensitivity to cyclosporine A, as well as information gleaned from the alignment of Gag residues encoded by representative viral isolates, we demonstrate that of the five lineages of primate immunodeficiency viruses, only HIV-1 requires cyclophilin A for replication. Cloned viral isolates from clades A, B, and D of HIV-1 group M, as well as a phylogenetically related isolate from chimpanzee, all require cyclophilin A for replication. In contrast, the replication of two outlier (group O) HIV-1 isolates is unaffected by concentrations of cyclosporine A which disrupt cyclophilin A incorporation into virions, indicating that these viruses are capable of replicating independently of cyclophilin A. These studies identify the first phenotypic difference between HIV-1 group M and group O and are consistent with phylogenetic studies suggesting that the two HIV-1 groups were introduced into human populations via separate zoonotic transmission events. PMID:8676442

  15. Inhibition of lentivirus replication by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prunella vulgaris has been used historically in Chinese and Native American medicine. Various members of the mint family, including Prunella, have been reported to have antiviral activity. To characterize the anti-lentiviral activities of P. vulgaris, we tested water and ethanol extracts for their...

  16. Coevolutionary dynamics between tribe Cercopithecini tetherins and their lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Junko S.; Ren, Fengrong; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Yamada, Eri; Nakano, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Matsuda, Kenta; Izumi, Taisuke; Misawa, Naoko; Shintaku, Yuta; Wetzel, Katherine S.; Collman, Ronald G.; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Sato, Kei

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus, a primate lentivirus (PLV), causes AIDS in humans, whereas most PLVs are less or not pathogenic in monkeys. These notions suggest that the co-evolutionary process of PLVs and their hosts associates with viral pathogenicity, and therefore, that elucidating the history of virus-host co-evolution is one of the most intriguing topics in the field of virology. To address this, recent studies have focused on the interplay between intrinsic anti-viral proteins, such as tetherin, and viral antagonists. Through an experimental-phylogenetic approach, here we investigate the co-evolutionary interplay between tribe Cercopithecini tetherin and viral antagonists, Nef and Vpu. We reveal that tribe Cercopithecini tetherins are positively selected, possibly triggered by ancient Nef-like factor(s). We reconstruct the ancestral sequence of tribe Cercopithecini tetherin and demonstrate that all Nef proteins are capable of antagonizing ancestral Cercopithecini tetherin. Further, we consider the significance of evolutionary arms race between tribe Cercopithecini and their PLVs. PMID:26531727

  17. Primate cognition.

    PubMed

    Seed, Amanda; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-07-01

    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed by other primates. There may be differences between humans and other primates, however, in more complex cognitive skills, such as reasoning about relations, causality, time, and other minds. Of special importance, the human primate seems to possess a species-unique set of adaptations for "cultural intelligence," which are broad reaching in their effects on human cognition.

  18. Evolutionary Analyses Suggest a Function of MxB Immunity Proteins Beyond Lentivirus Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Patrick S.; Young, Janet M.; Emerman, Michael; Malik, Harmit S.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses impose diverse and dynamic challenges on host defenses. Diversifying selection of codons and gene copy number variation are two hallmarks of genetic innovation in antiviral genes engaged in host-virus genetic conflicts. The myxovirus resistance (Mx) genes encode interferon-inducible GTPases that constitute a major arm of the cell-autonomous defense against viral infection. Unlike the broad antiviral activity of MxA, primate MxB was recently shown to specifically inhibit lentiviruses including HIV-1. We carried out detailed evolutionary analyses to investigate whether genetic conflict with lentiviruses has shaped MxB evolution in primates. We found strong evidence for diversifying selection in the MxB N-terminal tail, which contains molecular determinants of MxB anti-lentivirus specificity. However, we found no overlap between previously-mapped residues that dictate lentiviral restriction and those that have evolved under diversifying selection. Instead, our findings are consistent with MxB having a long-standing and important role in the interferon response to viral infection against a broader range of pathogens than is currently appreciated. Despite its critical role in host innate immunity, we also uncovered multiple functional losses of MxB during mammalian evolution, either by pseudogenization or by gene conversion from MxA genes. Thus, although the majority of mammalian genomes encode two Mx genes, this apparent stasis masks the dramatic effects that recombination and diversifying selection have played in shaping the evolutionary history of Mx genes. Discrepancies between our study and previous publications highlight the need to account for recombination in analyses of positive selection, as well as the importance of using sequence datasets with appropriate depth of divergence. Our study also illustrates that evolutionary analyses of antiviral gene families are critical towards understanding molecular principles that govern host-virus interactions and

  19. Prospects for the therapeutic application of lentivirus-based gene therapy to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuya; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2008-02-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy is not sufficient to fully control HIV replication and problems of side effects and escape mutation have emerged. Current prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine strategies appear to be unable to confer full protection. However, given the rapid recent progress made in RNA interference and lentivirus technologies, it may soon be possible to develop effective gene therapies against HIV infection. We describe here the recent progress made in the lentivirus-based HIV-1-targeting RNAi system and the possibility that this system can be used to generate an anti-HIV-1 gene therapy. We speculate that this system would be most useful if it would be used in a coordinated manner with vaccines that can initiate and maintain potent anti-HIV immunity.

  20. Small Ruminant Lentiviruses: Genetic Variability, Tropism and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Hugo; Reina, Ramsés; Amorena, Beatriz; de Andrés, Damián; Martínez, Humberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) cause a multisystemic chronic disease affecting animal production and welfare. SRLV infections are spread across the world with the exception of Iceland. Success in controlling SRLV spread depends largely on the use of appropriate diagnostic tools, but the existence of a high genetic/antigenic variability among these viruses, the fluctuant levels of antibody against them and the low viral loads found in infected individuals hamper the diagnostic efficacy. SRLV have a marked in vivo tropism towards the monocyte/macrophage lineage and attempts have been made to identify the genome regions involved in tropism, with two main candidates, the LTR and env gene, since LTR contains primer binding sites for viral replication and the env-encoded protein (SU ENV), which mediates the binding of the virus to the host’s cell and has hypervariable regions to escape the humoral immune response. Once inside the host cell, innate immunity may interfere with SRLV replication, but the virus develops counteraction mechanisms to escape, multiply and survive, creating a quasi-species and undergoing compartmentalization events. So far, the mechanisms of organ tropism involved in the development of different disease forms (neurological, arthritic, pulmonary and mammary) are unknown, but different alternatives are proposed. This is an overview of the current state of knowledge on SRLV genetic variability and its implications in tropism as well as in the development of alternative diagnostic assays. PMID:23611847

  1. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review.

    PubMed

    Foley, Brian T; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Peeters, Martine

    2016-12-01

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. This review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written in 2000.

  2. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review

    DOE PAGES

    Foley, Brian T.; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; ...

    2016-10-24

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. As a result, this review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written inmore » 2000.« less

  3. Primate immunodeficiency virus classification and nomenclature: Review

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Brian T.; Leitner, Thomas; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Peeters, Martine

    2016-10-24

    The International Committee for the Taxonomy and Nomenclature of Viruses does not rule on virus classifications below the species level. The definition of species for viruses cannot be clearly defined for all types of viruses. The complex and interesting epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses demands a detailed and informative nomenclature system, while at the same time it presents challenges such that many of the rules need to be flexibly applied or modified over time. As a result, this review outlines the nomenclature system for primate lentiviruses and provides an update on new findings since the last review was written in 2000.

  4. Human parainfluenza virus type 2 V protein inhibits interferon production and signaling and is required for replication in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Schaap-Nutt, Anne; D’Angelo, Christopher; Scull, Margaret A.; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Nishio, Machiko; Pickles, Raymond J.; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Schmidt, Alexander C.

    2009-01-01

    In wild-type human parainfluenza virus type 2 (WT HPIV2), one gene (the P/V gene) encodes both the polymerase-associated phosphoprotein (P) and the accessory V protein. We generated a HPIV2 virus (rHPIV2-Vko) in which the P/V gene encodes only the P protein to examine the role of V in replication in vivo and as a potential live attenuated virus vaccine. Preventing expression of V protein severely impaired virus recovery from cDNA and growth in vitro, particularly in IFN-competent cells. rHPIV2-Vko, unlike WT HPIV2, strongly induced IFN-β and permitted IFN signaling, leading to establishment of a robust antiviral state. rHPIV2-Vko infection induced extensive syncytia and cytopathicity that was due to both apoptosis and necrosis. Replication of rHPIV2-Vko was highly restricted in the respiratory tract of African green monkeys and in differentiated primary human airway epithelial (HAE) cultures, suggesting that V protein is essential for efficient replication of HPIV2 in organized epithelial cells and that rHPIV2-Vko is over-attenuated for use as a live attenuated vaccine. PMID:19969320

  5. Canine distemper virus isolated from a monkey efficiently replicates on Vero cells expressing non-human primate SLAM receptors but not human SLAM receptor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Na; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Jianzhong; Xu, Weiwei; Li, Tiansong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wang, Lei; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Hualei; Zhao, Yongkun; Yang, Songtao; Gao, Yuwei; Hu, Guixue; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-08-02

    In 2008, an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in monkeys was reported in China. We isolated CDV strain (subsequently named Monkey-BJ01-DV) from lung tissue obtained from a rhesus monkey that died in this outbreak. We evaluated the ability of this virus on Vero cells expressing SLAM receptors from dog, monkey and human origin, and analyzed the H gene of Monkey-BJ01-DV with other strains. The Monkey-BJ01-DV isolate replicated to the highest titer on Vero cells expressing dog-origin SLAM (10(5.2±0.2) TCID50/ml) and monkey-origin SLAM (10(5.4±0.1) TCID50/ml), but achieved markedly lower titers on human-origin SLAM cells (10(3.3±0.3) TCID50/ml). Phylogenetic analysis of the full-length H gene showed that Monkey-BJ01-DV was highly related to other CDV strains obtained during recent CDV epidemics among species of the Canidae family in China, and these Monkey strains CDV (Monkey-BJ01-DV, CYN07-dV, Monkey-KM-01) possessed a number of amino acid specific substitutions (E276V, Q392R, D435Y and I542F) compared to the H protein of CDV epidemic in other animals at the same period. Our results suggested that the monkey origin-CDV-H protein could possess specific substitutions to adapt to the new host. Monkey-BJ01-DV can efficiently use monkey- and dog-origin SLAM to infect and replicate in host cells, but further adaptation may be required for efficient replication in host cells expressing the human SLAM receptor.

  6. Characterization of replication-competent retroviruses from nonhuman primates with virus-induced T-cell lymphomas and observations regarding the mechanism of oncogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Vanin, E F; Kaloss, M; Broscius, C; Nienhuis, A W

    1994-01-01

    Rapidly progressive T-cell lymphomas were observed in 3 of 10 rhesus monkeys several months after autologous transplantation of enriched bone marrow stem cells that had been transduced with a retroviral vector preparation containing replication-competent virus (R. E. Donahue, S. W. Kessler, D. Bodice, K. McDonagh, C. Dunbar, S. Goodman, B. Agricola, E. Byrne, M. Raffeld, R. Moen, J. Bacher, K. M. Zsebo, and A. W. Nienhuis, J. Exp. Med. 176:1124-1135, 1992). The animals with lymphoma appeared to be tolerant to retroviral antigens in that their sera lacked antibodies reactive with viral proteins and contained 10(4) to 10(5) infectious virus particles per ml. By molecular cloning and DNA sequencing, we have now demonstrated that the serum from one of the monkeys contained a replication-competent retrovirus that arose by recombination between vector and packaging encoding sequences (vector/helper [V/H] recombinant) in the producer clone used for transduction of bone marrow stem cells. Southern blot analysis demonstrated 14 or 25 copies of this genome per cell where present in two animals. The genome of a second replication-competent virus was also recovered by molecular cloning; it arose by recombination involving the genome of the V/H recombinant and endogenous murine retroviral genomes in the producer clone. Twelve copies of this amphotropic virus/mink cell focus-forming virus genome were present in tumor DNA of one animal, but it was not found in tumor DNA of the other two animals with lymphoma. Southern blot analysis of DNA from various tissues demonstrated common insertion site bands in several samples of tumor DNA from one animal, suggesting clonal origin of the lymphoma. Our data are most consistent with a pathogenic mechanism in which chronic productive retroviral infection allowed insertional mutagenesis of critical growth control genes, leading to cell transformation and clonal tumor evolution. Images PMID:8207799

  7. The Role of the Antiviral APOBEC3 Gene Family in Protecting Chimpanzees against Lentiviruses from Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Etienne, Lucie; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Sudmant, Peter H.; Wu, Lily I.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Emerman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species transmissions of viruses from animals to humans are at the origin of major human pathogenic viruses. While the role of ecological and epidemiological factors in the emergence of new pathogens is well documented, the importance of host factors is often unknown. Chimpanzees are the closest relatives of humans and the animal reservoir at the origin of the human AIDS pandemic. However, despite being regularly exposed to monkey lentiviruses through hunting, chimpanzees are naturally infected by only a single simian immunodeficiency virus, SIVcpz. Here, we asked why chimpanzees appear to be protected against the successful emergence of other SIVs. In particular, we investigated the role of the chimpanzee APOBEC3 genes in providing a barrier to infection by most monkey lentiviruses. We found that most SIV Vifs, including Vif from SIVwrc infecting western-red colobus, the chimpanzee’s main monkey prey in West Africa, could not antagonize chimpanzee APOBEC3G. Moreover, chimpanzee APOBEC3D, as well as APOBEC3F and APOBEC3H, provided additional protection against SIV Vif antagonism. Consequently, lentiviral replication in primary chimpanzee CD4+ T cells was dependent on the presence of a lentiviral vif gene that could antagonize chimpanzee APOBEC3s. Finally, by identifying and functionally characterizing several APOBEC3 gene polymorphisms in both common chimpanzees and bonobos, we found that these ape populations encode APOBEC3 proteins that are uniformly resistant to antagonism by monkey lentiviruses. PMID:26394054

  8. Good CoP, bad CoP? Interrogating the immune responses to primate lentiviral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P

    2012-10-01

    Correlates of protection (CoPs) against infection by primate lentiviruses remain undefined. Modest protection against HIV-1 was observed in one human vaccine trial, whereas previous trials and vaccine-challenge experiments in non-human primates have yielded inconsistent but intriguing results. Although high levels of neutralizing antibodies are known to protect macaques from mucosal and intravenous viral challenges, antibody or other adaptive immune responses associated with protection might also be mere markers of innate immunity or susceptibility. Specific strategies for augmenting the design of both human trials and animal experiments could help to identify mechanistic correlates of protection and clarify the influences of confounding factors. Robust protection may, however, require the combined actions of immune responses and other host factors, thereby limiting what inferences can be drawn from statistical associations. Here, we discuss how to analyze immune protection against primate lentiviruses, and how host factors could influence both the elicitation and effectiveness of vaccine-induced responses.

  9. Genetic analysis of small ruminant lentiviruses following lactogenic transmission.

    PubMed

    Pisoni, Giuliano; Bertoni, Giuseppe; Manarolla, Giovanni; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Scaccabarozzi, Licia; Locatelli, Clara; Moroni, Paolo

    2010-11-10

    Lactogenic transmission plays an important role in the biology of lentiviruses such as HIV and SIV or the small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV). In this work we analyzed the characteristics of viruses that goats, naturally infected with two strains of SRLV, transmitted to their kids. The spectrum of viral genotypes transmitted was broader and the efficiency of transmission greater compared to their human and simian counterparts. The newly described A10 subgroup of SRLV was more efficiently transmitted than the B1 genotype. The analysis of a particular stretch of the envelope glycoprotein encompassing a potential neutralizing epitope revealed that, as in SIV, the transmitted viruses were positively charged in this region, but, in contrast to SIV, they tended to lack a glycosylation site that might protect against antibody neutralization. We conclude that the physiology of the ruminant neonatal intestine, which permits the adsorption of infected maternal cells, shaped the evolution of these particular lentiviruses that represent a valid model of lactogenic lentivirus transmission.

  10. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel J. Lindner, M.D., Ph.D...YYYY) 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 201 31 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones...vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus, cDNA libraries

  11. Phosphatidylserine immobilization of lentivirus for localized gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungjin; Tuinstra, Hannah M.; Salvay, David M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2010-01-01

    Localized and efficient gene transfer can be promoted by exploiting the interaction between the vector and biomaterial. Regulation of the vector-material interaction was investigated by capitalizing on the binding between lentivirus and phosphatidylserine (PS), a component of the plasma membrane. PS was incorporated into microspheres composed of the copolymers of lactide and glycolide (PLG) using an emulsion process. Increasing the weight ratio of PS to PLG led to a greater incorporation of PS. Lentivirus, but not adenovirus, associated with PS-PLG microspheres, and binding was specific to PS relative to PLG alone or PLG modified with phosphatidylcholine. Immobilized lentivirus produced large numbers of transduced cells, and increased transgene expression relative to virus alone. Microspheres were subsequently formed into porous tissue engineering scaffolds, with retention of lentivirus binding. Lentivirus immobilization resulted in long-term and localized expression within a subcutaneously implanted scaffold. Microspheres were also formed into multiple channel bridges for implantation into the spinal cord. Lentivirus delivery from the bridge produced maximal expression at the implant and a gradient of expression rostrally and caudally. This specific binding of lentiviral vectors to biomaterial scaffolds may provide a versatile tool for numerous applications in regenerative medicine or within model systems that investigate tissue development. PMID:20206382

  12. CXCR4 Is Required by a Nonprimate Lentivirus: Heterologous Expression of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus in Human, Rodent, and Feline Cells

    PubMed Central

    Poeschla, Eric M.; Looney, David J.

    1998-01-01

    A heterologous feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) expression system permitted high-level expression of FIV proteins and efficient production of infectious FIV in human cells. These results identify the FIV U3 element as the sole restriction to the productive phase of replication in nonfeline cells. Heterologous FIV expression in a variety of human cell lines resulted in profuse syncytial lysis that was FIV env specific, CD4 independent, and restricted to cells that express CXCR4, the coreceptor for T-cell-line-adapted strains of human immunodeficiency virus. Stable expression of human CXCR4 in CXCR4-negative human and rodent cell lines resulted in extensive FIV Env-mediated, CXCR4-dependent cell fusion and infection. In feline cells, stable overexpression of human CXCR4 resulted in increased FIV infectivity and marked syncytium formation during FIV replication or after infection with FIV Env-expressing vectors. The use of CXCR4 is a fundamental feature of lentivirus biology independent of CD4 and a shared cellular link to infection and cytopathicity for distantly related lentiviruses that cause AIDS. Their conserved use implicates chemokine receptors as primordial lentivirus receptors. PMID:9658135

  13. Small ruminant lentivirus infections and diseases.

    PubMed

    Minguijón, E; Reina, R; Pérez, M; Polledo, L; Villoria, M; Ramírez, H; Leginagoikoa, I; Badiola, J J; García-Marín, J F; de Andrés, D; Luján, L; Amorena, B; Juste, R A

    2015-12-14

    Small ruminant lentiviruses include viruses with diverse genotypes that frequently cross the species barrier between sheep and goats and that display a great genetic variability. These characteristics stress the need to consider the whole host range and to perform local surveillance of the viruses to opt for optimum diagnostic tests, in order to establish control programmes. In the absence of effective vaccines, a comprehensive knowledge of the epidemiology of these infections is of major importance to limit their spread. This article intends to cover these aspects and to summarise information related to characteristics of the viruses, pathogenesis of the infection and description of the various syndromes produced, as well as the diagnostic tools available, the mechanisms involved in transmission of the pathogens and, finally, the control strategies that have been designed until now, with remarks on the drawbacks and the advantages of each one. We conclude that there are many variables influencing the expected cost and benefits of control programs that must be evaluated, in order to put into practice measures that might lead to control of these infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in Human APOBEC3C Enhances Restriction of Lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopp, Cristina J.; Adolph, Madison B.; Wu, Lily I.; Chelico, Linda; Emerman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Humans express seven human APOBEC3 proteins, which can inhibit viruses and endogenous retroelements through cytidine deaminase activity. The seven paralogs differ in the potency of their antiviral effects, as well as in their antiviral targets. One APOBEC3, APOBEC3C, is exceptional as it has been found to only weakly block viruses and endogenous retroelements compared to other APOBEC3s. However, our positive selection analyses suggest that APOBEC3C has played a role in pathogen defense during primate evolution. Here, we describe a single nucleotide polymorphism in human APOBEC3C, a change from serine to isoleucine at position 188 (I188) that confers potent antiviral activity against HIV-1. The gain-of-function APOBEC3C SNP results in increased enzymatic activity and hypermutation of target sequences when tested in vitro, and correlates with increased dimerization of the protein. The I188 is widely distributed in human African populations, and is the ancestral primate allele, but is not found in chimpanzees or gorillas. Thus, while other hominids have lost activity of this antiviral gene, it has been maintained, or re-acquired, as a more active antiviral gene in a subset of humans. Taken together, our results suggest that APOBEC3C is in fact involved in protecting hosts from lentiviruses. PMID:27732658

  15. Ovine lentivirus lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. Rapid induction in neonatal lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Lairmore, M. D.; Rosadio, R. H.; DeMartini, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    For examination of the characteristics of lentivirus-induced pulmonary disease in an animal model, neonatal lambs were given intratracheal injections of high-and low-passage ovine lentivirus (OvLV) isolates. In 6 of 6 lambs inoculated with low-passage OvLV or OvLV from lung lavage fluid, lesions of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (LIP) developed. In none of 7 lambs inoculated with a high-passage OvLV or 4 control lambs inoculated with medium alone or ultrafiltered lung fluid did lung lesions develop. Systemic distribution of lentivirus was greater and development of lentivirus antibody was more rapid in lambs inoculated with low-passage OvLV, compared with lambs inoculated with high passage OvLV. The number of lymphocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage samples was increased in lambs with lymphoid interstitial pneumonia. The development of lymphoid interstitial pneumonia was markedly accelerated, in comparison with previous reports of experimentally induced lentivirus pneumonia in sheep. In lentivirus-inoculated lambs pulmonary lesions developed comparable to lymphoid interstitial pneumonia associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and other human benign lymphoid disorders of the lung. Similarities between the disease manifestations and virologic properties of OvLV and human T-cell lymphotropic virus III argue for the relevance of OvLV-induced disease as a model for human retrovirus diseases. The ability of OvLV to cause accelerated pulmonary disease in neonates may be due to age-related susceptibility factors that enhance the pathogenicity of lentiviruses. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3022591

  16. G2/M Cell Cycle Arrest Correlates with Primate Lentiviral Vpr Interaction with the SLX4 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Gregory; Lawrence, Madeleine; Hué, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The accessory gene vpr, common to all primate lentiviruses, induces potent G2/M arrest in cycling cells. A recent study showed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) mediates this through activation of the SLX4/MUS81/EME1 exonuclease complex that forms part of the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway. To confirm these observations, we have examined the G2/M arrest phenotypes of a panel of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Vpr proteins. We show that SIV Vpr proteins differ in their ability to promote cell cycle arrest in human cells. While this is dependent on the DCAF1/DDB1/CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex, interaction with human DCAF1 does not predict G2/M arrest activity of SIV Vpr in human cells. In all cases, SIV Vpr-mediated cell cycle arrest in human cells correlated with interaction with human SLX4 (huSLX4) and could be abolished by small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion of any member of the SLX4 complex. In contrast, all but one of the HIV/SIV Vpr proteins tested, including those that lacked activity in human cells, were competent for G2/M arrest in grivet cells. Correspondingly, here cell cycle arrest correlated with interaction with the grivet orthologues of the SLX4 complex, suggesting a level of host adaptation in these interactions. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that G2/M arrest/SLX4 interactions are ancestral activities of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins and that the ability to dysregulate the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway is an essential function of Vpr in vivo. IMPORTANCE The Vpr protein of HIV-1 and related viruses is essential for the virus in vivo. The ability of Vpr to block the cell cycle at mitotic entry is well known, but the importance of this function for viral replication is unclear. Recent data have shown that HIV-1 Vpr targets the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway by interacting with and activating an endonuclease complex, SLX4/MUS81/EME1, that processes interstrand DNA cross-links. Here

  17. HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Freed, E O

    2001-11-01

    In general terms, the replication cycle of lentiviruses, including HIV-1, closely resembles that of other retroviruses. There are, however, a number of unique aspects of HIV replication; for example, the HIVs and SIVs target receptors and coreceptors distinct from those used by other retroviruses. Lentiviruses encode a number of regulatory and accessory proteins not encoded by the genomes of the prototypical "simple" retroviruses. Of particular interest from the gene therapy perspective, lentiviruses possess the ability to productively infect some types of non-dividing cells. This chapter, while reiterating certain points discussed in Chapter 1, will attempt to focus on issues unique to HIV-1 replication. The HIV-1 genome encodes the major structural and non-structural proteins common to all replication-competent retroviruses (Fig. 1, and Chapter 1). From the 5'- to 3'-ends of the genome are found the gag (for group-specific antigen), pol (for polymerase), and env (for envelope glycoprotein) genes. The gag gene encodes a polyprotein precursor whose name, Pr55Gag, is based on its molecular weight. Pr55Gag is cleaved by the viral protease (PR) to the mature Gag proteins matrix (also known as MA or p17), capsid (CA or p24), nucleocapsid (NC or p7), and p6. Two spacer peptides, p2 and p1, are also generated upon Pr55Gag processing. The pol-encoded enzymes are initially synthesized as part of a large polyprotein precursor, Pr160GagPol, whose synthesis results from a rare frameshifting event during Pr55Gag translation. The individual pol-encoded enzymes, PR, reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN), are cleaved from Pr160GagPol by the viral PR. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins are also synthesized as a polyprotein precursor (Fig. 1). Unlike the Gag and Pol precursors, which are cleaved by the viral PR, the Env precursor, known as gp160, is processed by a cellular protease during Env trafficking to the cell surface, gp160 processing results in the generation of the

  18. Diagnostic assays used to control small ruminant lentiviruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The serological diagnostic tests such as the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) assay and various types of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have contributed to the reduction of small ruminant lentivirus infections worldwide. Since there are no treatments or efficacious vaccines, the serolog...

  19. Reduced lentivirus susceptibility in sheep with TMEM154 mutations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Visna/Maedi, or ovine progressive pneumonia (OPP) as it is known in the U.S., is an incurable slow-acting disease of sheep caused by persistent lentivirus infection. This disease affects multiple tissues, including those of the respiratory and central nervous systems. Our aim was to identify ovine g...

  20. Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with Lentivirus Expression Libraries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    were validated; they induced myeloid colonies in vitro and engrafted in the marrow of SG3, but not NSG mice. Myelodysplastic syndrome , lentivirus...cDNA libraries, complementation The Cleveland Clinic Foundation Cleveland, OH 44195 Complementation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome Clones with...Martin-Padura, P. Mancuso, P. Marighetti, C. Rabascio, G. Pruneri, L. D. Shultz, and F. Bertolini. 2008. Human acute leukemia cells injected in NOD

  1. Interspecific transmission of small ruminant lentiviruses from goats to sheep

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Thiago S.; Pinheiro, Raymundo R.; Costa, Joselito N.; de Lima, Carla C.V.; Andrioli, Alice; de Azevedo, Dalva A.A.; dos Santos, Vanderlan W.S.; Araújo, Juscilânia F.; de Sousa, Ana Lídia M.; Pinheiro, Danielle N.S.; Fernandes, Flora M.C.; Costa, Antonio O.

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to evaluate the transmission of caprine lentivirus to sheep using different experimental groups. The first one (colostrum group) was formed by nine lambs receiving colostrum from goats positive for small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV). The second group (milk group) was established by nine lambs that received milk of these goats. Third was a control group, consisting of lambs that suckled colostrum and milk of negative mothers. Another experimental group (contact group) was formed by eight adult sheep, confined with two naturally infected goats. The groups were monitored by immunoblotting (IB), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) and nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR). All lambs that suckled colostrum and milk of infected goats and six sheep of the contact group had positive results in the nPCR, although seroconversion was detected only in three of the exposed animals, with no clinical lentiviruses manifestation, in 720 days of observation. There was a close relationship between viral sequences obtained from infected animals and the prototype CAEV-Cork. Thus, it was concluded that SRLV can be transmitted from goats to sheep, however, the degree of adaptation of the virus strain to the host species probably interferes with the infection persistence and seroconversion rate. PMID:26413072

  2. Interspecific transmission of small ruminant lentiviruses from goats to sheep.

    PubMed

    Souza, Thiago S de; Pinheiro, Raymundo R; Costa, Joselito N; Lima, Carla C V de; Andrioli, Alice; Azevedo, Dalva A A de; Santos, Vanderlan W S dos; Araújo, Juscilânia F; Sousa, Ana Lídia M de; Pinheiro, Danielle N S; Fernandes, Flora M C; Costa Neto, Antonio O

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to evaluate the transmission of caprine lentivirus to sheep using different experimental groups. The first one (colostrum group) was formed by nine lambs receiving colostrum from goats positive for small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV). The second group (milk group) was established by nine lambs that received milk of these goats. Third was a control group, consisting of lambs that suckled colostrum and milk of negative mothers. Another experimental group (contact group) was formed by eight adult sheep, confined with two naturally infected goats. The groups were monitored by immunoblotting (IB), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) and nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR). All lambs that suckled colostrum and milk of infected goats and six sheep of the contact group had positive results in the nPCR, although seroconversion was detected only in three of the exposed animals, with no clinical lentiviruses manifestation, in 720 days of observation. There was a close relationship between viral sequences obtained from infected animals and the prototype CAEV-Cork. Thus, it was concluded that SRLV can be transmitted from goats to sheep, however, the degree of adaptation of the virus strain to the host species probably interferes with the infection persistence and seroconversion rate.

  3. Trophoblast-specific gene manipulation using lentivirus-based vectors.

    PubMed

    Georgiades, Pantelis; Cox, Brian; Gertsenstein, Marina; Chawengsaksophak, Kallayanee; Rossant, Janet

    2007-03-01

    The trophoblast layers of the mammalian placenta carry out many complex functions required to pattern the developing embryo and maintain its growth and survival in the uterine environment. Genetic disruption of many gene pathways can result in embryonic lethality because of placental failure, potentially confusing the interpretation of mouse knockout phenotypes. Development of tools to specifically and efficiently manipulate gene expression in the trophoblast lineage would greatly aid understanding of the relative roles of different genetic pathways in the trophoblast versus embryonic lineages. We show that short-term lentivirus-mediated infection of mouse blastocysts can lead to rapid expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene specifically in the outer trophoblast progenitors and their later placental derivatives. Efficient trophoblast-specific gene knockdown can also be produced by lentivirus-mediated pol III-driven short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and efficient trophoblast-specific gene knockout by pol II-driven Cre recombinase lentiviral vectors. This lentivirus lineage-specific infection system thus facilitates both gain and loss of function studies during placental development in the mouse and potentially other mammalian species.

  4. Lentivirus-Based Stable Gene Delivery into Intestinal Organoids.

    PubMed

    Maru, Yoshiaki; Orihashi, Kaoru; Hippo, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Lentivirus-based gene delivery works efficiently for the majority of mammalian cells cultured under standard two-dimensional conditions. By contrast, intestinal epithelial organoids embedded into three-dimensional extracellular matrix appear to be resistant to lentiviral transduction. We observed that Matrigel, a matrix that reconstitutes a basement membrane and is indispensable for cell survival and proliferation, prevents lentiviruses from binding to intestinal cells. In this chapter, we describe a simple method of a highly efficient gene transduction into intestinal organoids. This method involves organoid dispersion into single intestinal epithelial cells, mixing these individual cells with lentiviral particles, plating on Matrigel, and subsequent re-embedding into Matrigel. Under these conditions, the majority of the cells are exposed to the virus in the absence of the matrix barrier while remaining attached to the matrix. Using a GFP-labeled lentivirus, we demonstrate that this method allows for highly efficient infection of intestinal organoids after overnight incubation of Matrigel-attached cells with lentiviral particles.

  5. Injection parameters and virus dependent choice of promoters to improve neuron targeting in the nonhuman primate brain.

    PubMed

    Lerchner, W; Corgiat, B; Der Minassian, V; Saunders, R C; Richmond, B J

    2014-03-01

    We, like many others, wish to use modern molecular methods to alter neuronal functionality in primates. For us, this requires expression in a large proportion of the targeted cell population. Long generation times make germline modification of limited use. The size and intricate primate brain anatomy poses additional challenges. We surved methods using lentiviruses and serotypes of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to introduce active molecular material into cortical and subcortical regions of old-world monkey brains. Slow injections of AAV2 give well-defined expression of neurons in the cortex surrounding the injection site. Somewhat surprisingly we find that in the monkey the use of cytomegalovirus promoter in lentivirus primarily targets glial cells but few neurons. In contrast, with a synapsin promoter fragment the lentivirus expression is neuron specific at high transduction levels in all cortical layers. We also achieve specific targeting of tyrosine hydroxlase (TH)- rich neurons in the locus coeruleus and substantia nigra with a lentvirus carrying a fragment of the TH promoter. Lentiviruses carrying neuron specific promoters are suitable for both cortical and subcortical injections even when injected quickly.

  6. Primate photopigments and primate color vision.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, G H

    1996-01-01

    The past 15 years have brought much progress in our understanding of several basic features of primate color vision. There has been particular success in cataloging the spectral properties of the cone photopigments found in retinas of a number of primate species and in elucidating the relationship between cone opsin genes and their photopigment products. Direct studies of color vision show that there are several modal patterns of color vision among groupings of primates: (i) Old World monkeys, apes, and humans all enjoy trichromatic color vision, although the former two groups do not seem prone to the polymorphic variations in color vision that are characteristic of people; (ii) most species of New World monkeys are highly polymorphic, with individual animals having any of several types of dichromatic or trichromatic color vision; (iii) less is known about color vision in prosimians, but evidence suggests that at least some diurnal species have dichromatic color vision; and (iv) some nocturnal primates may lack color vision completely. In many cases the photopigments and photopigment gene arrangements underlying these patterns have been revealed and, as a result, hints are emerging about the evolution of color vision among the primates. PMID:8570598

  7. Property in Nonhuman Primates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2011-01-01

    Property is rare in most nonhuman primates, most likely because their lifestyles are not conducive to it. Nonetheless, just because these species do not frequently maintain property does not mean that they lack the propensity to do so. Primates show respect for possession, as well as behaviors related to property, such as irrational decision…

  8. Property in Nonhuman Primates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Sarah F.

    2011-01-01

    Property is rare in most nonhuman primates, most likely because their lifestyles are not conducive to it. Nonetheless, just because these species do not frequently maintain property does not mean that they lack the propensity to do so. Primates show respect for possession, as well as behaviors related to property, such as irrational decision…

  9. Lentivirus Mediated Correction of Artemis-Deficient Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Punwani, Divya; Kawahara, Misako; Yu, Jason; Sanford, Ukina; Roy, Sushmita; Patel, Kiran; Carbonaro, Denise A; Karlen, Andrea D; Khan, Sara; Cornetta, Kenneth; Rothe, Michael; Schambach, Axel; Kohn, Donald B; Malech, Harry L; McIvor, R Scott; Puck, Jennifer M; Cowan, Morton J

    2017-01-01

    During B and T lymphocyte maturation, V(D)J recombination is initiated by creation of DNA double-strand breaks. Artemis is an exonuclease essential for their subsequent repair by nonhomologous end-joining. Mutations in DCLRE1C, the gene encoding Artemis, cause T(-)B(-)NK(+) severe combined immunodeficiency (ART-SCID) and also confer heightened sensitivity to ionizing radiation and alkylating chemotherapy. Although allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation can treat ART-SCID, conditioning regimens are poorly tolerated, leading to early mortality and/or late complications, including short stature, endocrinopathies, and dental aplasia. However, without alkylating chemotherapy as preconditioning, patients usually have graft rejection or limited T cell and no B cell recovery. Thus, addition of normal DCLRE1C cDNA to autologous hematopoietic stem cells is an attractive strategy to treat ART-SCID. We designed a self-inactivating lentivirus vector containing human Artemis cDNA under transcriptional regulation of the human endogenous Artemis promoter (AProArt). Fibroblasts from ART-SCID patients transduced with AProArt lentivirus showed correction of radiosensitivity. Mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) cells from an ART-SCID patient as well as hematopoietic stem cells from Artemis-deficient mice demonstrated restored T and B cell development following AProArt transduction. Murine hematopoietic cells transduced with AProArt exhibited no increase in replating potential in an in vitro immortalization assay, and analysis of AProArt lentivirus insertions showed no predilection for sites that could activate oncogenes. These efficacy and safety findings support institution of a clinical trial of gene addition therapy for ART-SCID.

  10. Occurrence of puma lentivirus infection in cougars from Washington.

    PubMed

    Evermann, J F; Foreyt, W J; Hall, B; McKeirnan, A J

    1997-04-01

    Puma lentivirus (PLV) antibodies were detected in 13 (25%) of 52 serum samples obtained from cougars (Felis concolor) collected by hunters. The serum samples were collected from November 1993 through January 1994 from four specific regions throughout the state of Washington (USA), and included the Olympic Mountains, the Cascade Mountains, the Blue Mountains, and the Selkirk Mountains. More (38%) seropositive cougar samples originated from the Cascade Mountains than from any other site. The overall seroprevalence for PLV infection in Washington cougars was higher than previously reported for cougars sampled in Oregon and Idaho (USA), but lower than in cougars sampled in Arizona, Colorado, and California (USA).

  11. Raptors and primate evolution.

    PubMed

    McGraw, W Scott; Berger, Lee R

    2013-01-01

    Most scholars agree that avoiding predators is a central concern of lemurs, monkeys, and apes. However, given uncertainties about the frequency with which primates actually become prey, the selective importance of predation in primate evolution continues to be debated. Some argue that primates are often killed by predators, while others maintain that such events are relatively rare. Some authors have contended that predation's influence on primate sociality has been trivial; others counter that predation need not occur often to be a powerful selective force. Given the challenges of documenting events that can be ephemeral and irregular, we are unlikely ever to amass the volume of systematic, comparative data we have on such topics as feeding, social dynamics, or locomotor behavior. Nevertheless, a steady accumulation of field observations, insight gained from natural experiments, and novel taphonomic analyses have enhanced understanding of how primates interact with several predators, especially raptors, the subject of this review.

  12. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ovine lentiviruses cause incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative diseases that affect millions of sheep worldwide. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been recently associated with lentivirus infections in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the two most common TMEM1...

  13. Expanding possibilities for intervention against small ruminant lentiviruses through genetic marker-assisted selective breeding

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small ruminant lentiviruses include members that infect sheep (ovine lentivirus [OvLV]; also known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus/maedi-visna virus) and goats (caprine arthritis encephalitis virus [CAEV]). Breed differences in seroprevalence and proviral concentration of OvLV had suggested a s...

  14. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian–human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H.; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G.; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F.; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Doms, Robert W.; Montefiori, David C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Kwong, Peter D.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.

    2016-01-01

    Most simian–human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants—S, M, Y, H, W, or F—that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env–rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors. PMID:27247400

  15. Envelope residue 375 substitutions in simian-human immunodeficiency viruses enhance CD4 binding and replication in rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Wang, Shuyi; Kong, Rui; Ding, Wenge; Lee, Fang-Hua; Parker, Zahra; Kim, Eunlim; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Paul; Policicchio, Ben; Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; Deleage, Claire; Hao, Xingpei; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Gorman, Jason; Gardner, Matthew; Lewis, Mark G; Hatziioannou, Theodora; Santra, Sampa; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Alam, S Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Farzan, Michael; Chertova, Elena; Keele, Brandon F; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Doms, Robert W; Montefiori, David C; Haynes, Barton F; Sodroski, Joseph G; Kwong, Peter D; Hahn, Beatrice H; Shaw, George M

    2016-06-14

    Most simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) bearing envelope (Env) glycoproteins from primary HIV-1 strains fail to infect rhesus macaques (RMs). We hypothesized that inefficient Env binding to rhesus CD4 (rhCD4) limits virus entry and replication and could be enhanced by substituting naturally occurring simian immunodeficiency virus Env residues at position 375, which resides at a critical location in the CD4-binding pocket and is under strong positive evolutionary pressure across the broad spectrum of primate lentiviruses. SHIVs containing primary or transmitted/founder HIV-1 subtype A, B, C, or D Envs with genotypic variants at residue 375 were constructed and analyzed in vitro and in vivo. Bulky hydrophobic or basic amino acids substituted for serine-375 enhanced Env affinity for rhCD4, virus entry into cells bearing rhCD4, and virus replication in primary rhCD4 T cells without appreciably affecting antigenicity or antibody-mediated neutralization sensitivity. Twenty-four RMs inoculated with subtype A, B, C, or D SHIVs all became productively infected with different Env375 variants-S, M, Y, H, W, or F-that were differentially selected in different Env backbones. Notably, SHIVs replicated persistently at titers comparable to HIV-1 in humans and elicited autologous neutralizing antibody responses typical of HIV-1. Seven animals succumbed to AIDS. These findings identify Env-rhCD4 binding as a critical determinant for productive SHIV infection in RMs and validate a novel and generalizable strategy for constructing SHIVs with Env glycoproteins of interest, including those that in humans elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or bind particular Ig germ-line B-cell receptors.

  16. Designing, Packaging, and Delivery of High Titer CRISPR Retro and Lentiviruses via Stereotaxic Injection

    PubMed Central

    Fricano-Kugler, Catherine J.; Williams, Michael R.; Salinaro, Julia R.; Li, Meijie; Luikart, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Replication defective lentiviruses or retroviruses are capable of stably integrating transgenes into the genome of an infected host cell. This technique has been widely used to encode fluorescent proteins, opto- or chemo-genetic controllers of cell activity, or heterologous expression of human genes in model organisms. These viruses have also successfully been used to deliver recombinases to relevant target sites in transgenic animals, or even deliver small hairpin or micro RNAs in order to manipulate gene expression. While these techniques have been fruitful, they rely on transgenic animals (recombinases) or frequently lack high efficacy and specificity (shRNA/miRNA). In contrast, the CRISPR/Cas system uses an exogenous Cas nuclease which targets specific sites in an organism's genome via an exogenous guide RNA in order to induce double stranded breaks in DNA. These breaks are then repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), producing insertion and deletion (indel) mutations that can result in deleterious missense or nonsense mutations. This manuscript provides detailed methods for the design, production, injection, and validation of single lenti/retro virus particles that can stably transduce neurons to express a fluorescent reporter, Cas9, and sgRNAs to knockout genes in a model organism. PMID:27285851

  17. Virological and phylogenetic characterization of attenuated small ruminant lentivirus isolates eluding efficient serological detection.

    PubMed

    Cardinaux, Laure; Zahno, Marie-Luise; Deubelbeiss, Martina; Zanoni, Reto; Vogt, Hans-Rudolf; Bertoni, Giuseppe

    2013-03-23

    Three field isolates of small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) were derived from a mixed flock of goats and sheep certified for many years as free of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV). The phylogenetic analysis of pol sequences permitted to classify these isolates as A4 subtype. None of the animals showed clinical signs of SRLV infection, confirming previous observations which had suggested that this particular subtype is highly attenuated, at least for goats. A quantitative real time PCR strategy based on primers and probes derived from a highly variable env region permitted us to classify the animals as uninfected, singly or doubly infected. The performance of different serological tools based on this classification revealed their profound inadequacy in monitoring animals infected with this particular SRLV subtype. In vitro, the isolates showed differences in their cytopathicity and a tendency to replicate more efficiently in goat than sheep cells, especially in goat macrophages. By contrast, in vivo, these viruses reached significantly higher viral loads in sheep than in goats. Both env subtypes infected goats and sheep with equal efficiency. One of these, however, reached significantly higher viral loads in both species. In conclusion, we characterized three isolates of the SRLV subtype A4 that efficiently circulate in a mixed herd of goats and sheep in spite of their apparent attenuation and a strict physical separation between goats and sheep. The poor performance of the serological tools applied indicates that, to support an SRLV eradication campaign, it is imperative to develop novel, subtype specific tools.

  18. Vaccine-Induced Enhancement of EIAV Replication and Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-14

    funding was to initiate the expansion of ongoing research in which the equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV)/Shetland pony animal lentivirus system is...enhancement of EIAV replication and disease. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES AIDS vaccines, equine infectious anemia virus, 16. PRICE CODE...Znstitutes of Health . RCM In the conduct of research utilizing recombinant DNA, the investigator(s) idhered to the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving

  19. Reduced Lentivirus Susceptibility in Sheep with TMEM154 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Michael P.; Clawson, Michael L.; Chitko-Mckown, Carol G.; Leymaster, Kreg A.; Smith, Timothy P. L.; Harhay, Gregory P.; White, Stephen N.; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M.; Mousel, Michelle R.; Lewis, Gregory S.; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.; Keen, James E.; Laegreid, William W.

    2012-01-01

    Visna/Maedi, or ovine progressive pneumonia (OPP) as it is known in the United States, is an incurable slow-acting disease of sheep caused by persistent lentivirus infection. This disease affects multiple tissues, including those of the respiratory and central nervous systems. Our aim was to identify ovine genetic risk factors for lentivirus infection. Sixty-nine matched pairs of infected cases and uninfected controls were identified among 736 naturally exposed sheep older than five years of age. These pairs were used in a genome-wide association study with 50,614 markers. A single SNP was identified in the ovine transmembrane protein (TMEM154) that exceeded genome-wide significance (unadjusted p-value 3×10−9). Sanger sequencing of the ovine TMEM154 coding region identified six missense and two frameshift deletion mutations in the predicted signal peptide and extracellular domain. Two TMEM154 haplotypes encoding glutamate (E) at position 35 were associated with infection while a third haplotype with lysine (K) at position 35 was not. Haplotypes encoding full-length E35 isoforms were analyzed together as genetic risk factors in a multi-breed, matched case-control design, with 61 pairs of 4-year-old ewes. The odds of infection for ewes with one copy of a full-length TMEM154 E35 allele were 28 times greater than the odds for those without (p-value<0.0001, 95% CI 5–1,100). In a combined analysis of nine cohorts with 2,705 sheep from Nebraska, Idaho, and Iowa, the relative risk of infection was 2.85 times greater for sheep with a full-length TMEM154 E35 allele (p-value<0.0001, 95% CI 2.36–3.43). Although rare, some sheep were homozygous for TMEM154 deletion mutations and remained uninfected despite a lifetime of significant exposure. Together, these findings indicate that TMEM154 may play a central role in ovine lentivirus infection and removing sheep with the most susceptible genotypes may help eradicate OPP and protect flocks from reinfection. PMID:22291605

  20. Reduced lentivirus susceptibility in sheep with TMEM154 mutations.

    PubMed

    Heaton, Michael P; Clawson, Michael L; Chitko-Mckown, Carol G; Leymaster, Kreg A; Smith, Timothy P L; Harhay, Gregory P; White, Stephen N; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Mousel, Michelle R; Lewis, Gregory S; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S; Keen, James E; Laegreid, William W

    2012-01-01

    Visna/Maedi, or ovine progressive pneumonia (OPP) as it is known in the United States, is an incurable slow-acting disease of sheep caused by persistent lentivirus infection. This disease affects multiple tissues, including those of the respiratory and central nervous systems. Our aim was to identify ovine genetic risk factors for lentivirus infection. Sixty-nine matched pairs of infected cases and uninfected controls were identified among 736 naturally exposed sheep older than five years of age. These pairs were used in a genome-wide association study with 50,614 markers. A single SNP was identified in the ovine transmembrane protein (TMEM154) that exceeded genome-wide significance (unadjusted p-value 3×10(-9)). Sanger sequencing of the ovine TMEM154 coding region identified six missense and two frameshift deletion mutations in the predicted signal peptide and extracellular domain. Two TMEM154 haplotypes encoding glutamate (E) at position 35 were associated with infection while a third haplotype with lysine (K) at position 35 was not. Haplotypes encoding full-length E35 isoforms were analyzed together as genetic risk factors in a multi-breed, matched case-control design, with 61 pairs of 4-year-old ewes. The odds of infection for ewes with one copy of a full-length TMEM154 E35 allele were 28 times greater than the odds for those without (p-value<0.0001, 95% CI 5-1,100). In a combined analysis of nine cohorts with 2,705 sheep from Nebraska, Idaho, and Iowa, the relative risk of infection was 2.85 times greater for sheep with a full-length TMEM154 E35 allele (p-value<0.0001, 95% CI 2.36-3.43). Although rare, some sheep were homozygous for TMEM154 deletion mutations and remained uninfected despite a lifetime of significant exposure. Together, these findings indicate that TMEM154 may play a central role in ovine lentivirus infection and removing sheep with the most susceptible genotypes may help eradicate OPP and protect flocks from reinfection.

  1. Protective Efficacy of Centralized and Polyvalent Envelope Immunogens in an Attenuated Equine Lentivirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K.; Ezzelarab, Corin; Cook, Sheila J.; Liu, Chong; Horohov, David; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Lentiviral Envelope (Env) antigenic variation and related immune evasion present major hurdles to effective vaccine development. Centralized Env immunogens that minimize the genetic distance between vaccine proteins and circulating viral isolates are an area of increasing study in HIV vaccinology. To date, the efficacy of centralized immunogens has not been evaluated in the context of an animal model that could provide both immunogenicity and protective efficacy data. We previously reported on a live-attenuated (attenuated) equine infectious anemia (EIAV) virus vaccine, which provides 100% protection from disease after virulent, homologous, virus challenge. Further, protective efficacy demonstrated a significant, inverse, linear relationship between EIAV Env divergence and protection from disease when vaccinates were challenged with viral strains of increasing Env divergence from the vaccine strain Env. Here, we sought to comprehensively examine the protective efficacy of centralized immunogens in our attenuated vaccine platform. We developed, constructed, and extensively tested a consensus Env, which in a virulent proviral backbone generated a fully replication-competent pathogenic virus, and compared this consensus Env to an ancestral Env in our attenuated proviral backbone. A polyvalent attenuated vaccine was established for comparison to the centralized vaccines. Additionally, an engineered quasispecies challenge model was created for rigorous assessment of protective efficacy. Twenty-four EIAV-naïve animals were vaccinated and challenged along with six-control animals six months post-second inoculation. Pre-challenge data indicated the consensus Env was more broadly immunogenic than the Env of the other attenuated vaccines. However, challenge data demonstrated a significant increase in protective efficacy of the polyvalent vaccine. These findings reveal, for the first time, a consensus Env immunogen that generated a fully-functional, replication

  2. Prevention strategies against small ruminant lentiviruses: an update.

    PubMed

    Reina, Ramsés; Berriatua, Eduardo; Luján, Lluís; Juste, Ramón; Sánchez, Antonio; de Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz

    2009-10-01

    Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs), including maedi-visna virus (MVV) of sheep and caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV), are widespread, cause fatal diseases and are responsible for major production losses in sheep and goats. Seventy years after the legendary maedi-visna sheep epidemic in Iceland, which led to the first isolation of a SRLV and subsequent eradication of the infection, no vaccine or treatment against infection has been fully successful. Research during the last two decades has produced sensitive diagnostic tools, leading to a variety of approaches to control infection. The underlying difficulty is to select the strategies applicable to different epidemiological conditions. This review updates the knowledge on diagnosis, risk of infection, immunisation approaches and criteria for selecting the different strategies to control the spread of SRLVs.

  3. Lentivirus-expressed siRNA vectors against Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kevin A; Masliah, Eliezer

    2010-01-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, and the accumulation of APP products ultimately leads to the familiar histopathological and clinical manifestations associated with this most common form of dementia. A protein that has been shown to promote APP accumulation is beta-secretase (beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1, or BACE1), which is increased in the cerebrospinal fluid in those affected with Alzheimer disease. Through in vivo studies using APP transgenic mice, we demonstrated that decreasing the expression of BACE1 via lentiviral vector delivery of BACE1 siRNA has the potential for significantly reducing the cleavage of APP, accumulation of these products, and consequent neurodegeneration. As such, lentiviral-expressed siRNA against BACE1 is a therapeutic possibility in the treatment of Alzheimer disease. We detail the use of lentivirus-expressed siRNA as a method to ameliorate Alzheimer disease neuropathology in APP transgenic mice.

  4. Is the high virulence of HIV-1 an unfortunate coincidence of primate lentiviral evolution?

    PubMed

    Kirchhoff, Frank

    2009-06-01

    In the subset of primate lentiviruses that contain a vpu gene - HIV-1 and its simian precursors - the Nef protein has lost the ability to down-modulate CD3, block T cell activation and suppress programmed death. Vpu counteracts a host restriction factor induced by the inflammatory cytokine interferon-alpha. I propose that the acquisition of vpu may have allowed the viral lineage that gave rise to HIV-1 to evolve towards greater pathogenicity by removing the selective pressure for a protective Nef function that prevents damagingly high levels of immune activation.

  5. Development of Cell-Defined Lentivirus-Based Microarray for Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hi Chul; Shum, David; Seol, Hyang Sook; Jang, Se Jin; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Kwon, Yong-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Although reverse transfection cell microarray (RTCM) is a powerful tool for mammalian cell studies, the technique is not appropriate for cells that are difficult to transfect. The lentivirus-infected cell microarray (LICM) technique was designed to improve overall efficiency. However, LICM presents new challenges because individual lentiviral particles can spread through the cell population, leading to cross-contamination. Therefore, we designed a cell-defined lentivirus microarray (CDLM) technique using cell-friendly biomaterials that are controlled by cell attachment timing. We selected poly-l-lysine (PLL) with Matrigel as the best combination of biomaterials for cell-defined culture. We used 2 µL PLL to determine by titration the optimum concentration required (0.04% stock, 0.005% final concentration). We also determined the optimum concentration of 10 µL of lentivirus particles for maximum reverse infection efficiency (1 × 10(8) infectious units [IFU]/mL stock, 62.5% final concentration) and established the best combination of components for the lentivirus mixture (10 µL of lentivirus particles and 2 µL each of siGLO Red dye, Matrigel, and 0.04% PLL). Finally, we validated both the effect of reverse infection in various cell lines and lentivirus spot activity in CDLM by storage period. This method provides an effective lentivirus-infected cell microarray for large-scale gene function studies.

  6. Serologic reactivity using conserved envelope epitopes in feline lentivirus-infected felids.

    PubMed

    Kania, S A; Kennedy, M A; Potgieter, L N

    1997-04-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on synthetic peptides identical to lentivirus envelope protein amino acid sequences was used to study serologic reactivity of lentivirus-infected domestic cats and nondomestic felids. One feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) peptide, P237, was consistently recognized by antibodies from FIV-infected cats, but 2 other FIV peptide antigens were not. The molecular basis for this serologic reactivity was examined. Lentivirus-infected nondomestic Felis species reacted intensely with a puma lentivirus (PLV) peptide corresponding to the conserved FIV peptide. However, lentivirus-infected Panthera species, from which a different lentivirus has been isolated, did not react with the PLV. FIV-infected domestic felids also did not have significant reactivity with the PLV peptide. The peptide ELISA is comparable in sensitivity and specificity to western blot analysis and a commercial enzyme immunoassay. Unlike the other assays, however, the peptide ELISA is inexpensive, requires a small amount of serum, enables the study of specific isotype reactivity, and discriminates between antibodies to FIV and those to PLV. Antibody tests based upon the FIV and the PLV peptides should be useful for detecting the possible introduction of FIV into exotic felids or of lentiviruses from nondomestic felids into the domestic cat population.

  7. HIV/AIDS Vaccine Candidates Based on Replication-Competent Recombinant Poxvirus NYVAC-C-KC Expressing Trimeric gp140 and Gag-Derived Virus-Like Particles or Lacking the Viral Molecule B19 That Inhibits Type I Interferon Activate Relevant HIV-1-Specific B and T Cell Immune Functions in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    García-Arriaza, Juan; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Heeney, Jonathan L; Seaman, Michael S; Montefiori, David C; Yates, Nicole L; Tomaras, Georgia D; Ferrari, Guido; Foulds, Kathryn E; Roederer, Mario; Self, Steven G; Borate, Bhavesh; Gottardo, Raphael; Phogat, Sanjay; Tartaglia, Jim; Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Cristillo, Anthony D; Weiss, Deborah E; Lee, Carter; Kibler, Karen V; Jacobs, Bertram L; Wagner, Ralf; Ding, Song; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Esteban, Mariano

    2017-05-01

    The nonreplicating attenuated poxvirus vector NYVAC expressing clade C(CN54) HIV-1 Env(gp120) and Gag-Pol-Nef antigens (NYVAC-C) showed limited immunogenicity in phase I clinical trials. To enhance the capacity of the NYVAC vector to trigger broad humoral responses and a more balanced activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, here we compared the HIV-1-specific immunogenicity elicited in nonhuman primates immunized with two replicating NYVAC vectors that have been modified by the insertion of the K1L and C7L vaccinia virus host range genes and express the clade C(ZM96) trimeric HIV-1 gp140 protein or a Gag(ZM96)-Pol-Nef(CN54) polyprotein as Gag-derived virus-like particles (termed NYVAC-C-KC). Additionally, one NYVAC-C-KC vector was generated by deleting the viral gene B19R, an inhibitor of the type I interferon response (NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R). An immunization protocol mimicking that of the RV144 phase III clinical trial was used. Two groups of macaques received two doses of the corresponding NYVAC-C-KC vectors (weeks 0 and 4) and booster doses with NYVAC-C-KC vectors plus the clade C HIV-1 gp120 protein (weeks 12 and 24). The two replicating NYVAC-C-KC vectors induced enhanced and similar HIV-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses, similar levels of binding IgG antibodies, low levels of IgA antibodies, and high levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses and HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. Small differences within the NYVAC-C-KC-ΔB19R group were seen in the magnitude of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, the induction of some cytokines, and the neutralization of some HIV-1 isolates. Thus, replication-competent NYVAC-C-KC vectors acquired relevant immunological properties as vaccine candidates against HIV/AIDS, and the viral B19 molecule exerts some control of immune functions.IMPORTANCE It is of special importance to find a safe and effective HIV/AIDS vaccine that can induce strong and broad T cell and humoral immune responses correlating with HIV-1

  8. Primate taxonomy: species and conservation.

    PubMed

    Rylands, Anthony B; Mittermeier, Russell A

    2014-01-01

    Primatology as a discrete branch of science involving the study of primate behavior and ecology took off in the 1960s after discovery of the importance of primates as models for biomedical research and the realization that primates provide insights into the evolutionary history of humans. Osman Hill's unfortunately incomplete monograph series on the comparative anatomy and taxonomy of the primates(1) and the Napiers' 1967 A Handbook of Living Primates(2) recorded the world's view of primate diversity at this time. This taxonomy remained the baseline for nearly three decades, with the diversity of each genus being represented by some species, but extensively as subspecies. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Immunoreactive cytokines within primates.

    PubMed

    Ahne, W; Mayr, A; Wiesner, H

    1996-12-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of primates (man, orang utan, gorilla, baboon), rodents (mouse, rat), carnivores (cat, dog), artiodactyls (cattle, goat, pig) and perissodactyls (horse) were isolated and stimulated with mitogens (5 micrograms/ml LPS, 5 micrograms/ml PHA) at 37 degrees C. Cytokines immunoreactive to monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed to human cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IL-2, IL-6, IFN-gamma) could be detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the case of primates only. The mAb used did not recognize cytokines of the other mammalian species investigated. The results demonstrate the close relationship within the primates from the immunophysiological point of view.

  10. Arteriviruses, Pegiviruses, and Lentiviruses Are Common among Wild African Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Adam L.; Lauck, Michael; Ghai, Ria R.; Nelson, Chase W.; Heimbruch, Katelyn; Hughes, Austin L.; Goldberg, Tony L.; Jasinska, Anna J.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are a historically important source of zoonotic viruses and are a gold-standard model for research on many human pathogens. However, with the exception of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) (family Retroviridae), the blood-borne viruses harbored by these animals in the wild remain incompletely characterized. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of two novel simian pegiviruses (family Flaviviridae) and two novel simian arteriviruses (family Arteriviridae) in wild African green monkeys from Zambia (malbroucks [Chlorocebus cynosuros]) and South Africa (vervet monkeys [Chlorocebus pygerythrus]). We examine several aspects of infection, including viral load, genetic diversity, evolution, and geographic distribution, as well as host factors such as age, sex, and plasma cytokines. In combination with previous efforts to characterize blood-borne RNA viruses in wild primates across sub-Saharan Africa, these discoveries demonstrate that in addition to SIV, simian pegiviruses and simian arteriviruses are widespread and prevalent among many African cercopithecoid (i.e., Old World) monkeys. IMPORTANCE Primates are an important source of viruses that infect humans and serve as an important laboratory model of human virus infection. Here, we discover two new viruses in African green monkeys from Zambia and South Africa. In combination with previous virus discovery efforts, this finding suggests that these virus types are widespread among African monkeys. Our analysis suggests that one of these virus types, the simian arteriviruses, may have the potential to jump between different primate species and cause disease. In contrast, the other virus type, the pegiviruses, are thought to reduce the disease caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in humans. However, we did not observe a similar protective effect in SIV-infected African monkeys coinfected with pegiviruses, possibly because SIV causes little to no disease in these hosts

  11. Hands of early primates.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Doug M; Yapuncich, Gabriel S; Chester, Stephen G B; Bloch, Jonathan I; Godinot, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Questions surrounding the origin and early evolution of primates continue to be the subject of debate. Though anatomy of the skull and inferred dietary shifts are often the focus, detailed studies of postcrania and inferred locomotor capabilities can also provide crucial data that advance understanding of transitions in early primate evolution. In particular, the hand skeleton includes characteristics thought to reflect foraging, locomotion, and posture. Here we review what is known about the early evolution of primate hands from a comparative perspective that incorporates data from the fossil record. Additionally, we provide new comparative data and documentation of skeletal morphology for Paleogene plesiadapiforms, notharctines, cercamoniines, adapines, and omomyiforms. Finally, we discuss implications of these data for understanding locomotor transitions during the origin and early evolutionary history of primates. Known plesiadapiform species cannot be differentiated from extant primates based on either intrinsic hand proportions or hand-to-body size proportions. Nonetheless, the presence of claws and a different metacarpophalangeal [corrected] joint form in plesiadapiforms indicate different grasping mechanics. Notharctines and cercamoniines have intrinsic hand proportions with extremely elongated proximal phalanges and digit rays relative to metacarpals, resembling tarsiers and galagos. But their hand-to-body size proportions are typical of many extant primates (unlike those of tarsiers, and possibly Teilhardina, which have extremely large hands). Non-adapine adapiforms and omomyids exhibit additional carpal features suggesting more limited dorsiflexion, greater ulnar deviation, and a more habitually divergent pollex than observed plesiadapiforms. Together, features differentiating adapiforms and omomyiforms from plesiadapiforms indicate increased reliance on vertical prehensile-clinging and grasp-leaping, possibly in combination with predatory behaviors in

  12. Primate wellness exams.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Deborah; Hampshire, Victoria

    2015-09-01

    Non-human primates (NHPs) continue to serve unique animal research needs. Decades of biomedical research have focused on humane restraint and social and environmental enrichment programs necessary to support NHPs, but the housing and care of NHPs remain challenging because of the occupational safety hazards faced by employees who are tasked with the care and use of these valuable animals. Key to obtaining reliable results, providing humane care and ensuring occupational safety when working with NHPs is a sound annual wellness examination. Clinical techniques in veterinary medicine have improved in parallel with efforts to improve psychological well-being, so the timing is opportune to update clinical techniques inside the primate facility.

  13. Inhibition of choroidal neovascularization by lentivirus-mediated PEDF gene transfer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ya-Jie; Mo, Bin; Liu, Lu; Yue, Yan-Kun; Yue, Chang-Li; Liu, Wu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effects of lentivirus-mediated pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) gene transfer performed in treatment of rats with established choroidal neovascularization (CNV), and investigates the mechanism by which PEDF inhibits CNV in rats. METHODS Brown Norway (BN) rats (n=204) were induced by exposure to a laser, and then randomly assigned to 3 groups: no treatment; treatments with intravitreal injection of lentivirus-PEDF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) or lentivirus-control GFP (free fluorescent protein). Following induction and treatment, the CNV tissue was assessed for form, size and vessel leakage by fluorescein fundus angiography (FFA), optical coherence tomography (OCT), histopathology, and examination of choroidal flat mounts. VEGF, Flk-1, and PEDF expression were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot. RESULTS A stable laser-induced rat model of CNV was successfully established, and used to demonstrate lentivirus-mediated PEDG gene transfer by intravitreal injection. Expression of green fluorescence labelled PEDF was observed in the retina up to 28d after injection. An intravitreal injection of lentivirus-PEDF-GFP at 7d led to a significant reduction in the size, thickness and area of CNV showed by FFA, OCT and choroidal flat mounts. PEDF was up-regulated while VEGF and Flk-1 were down-regulated in the lentivirus-PEDF-GFP group. The differences in VEGF and Flk-1 expression in the control and lentivirus-PEDF groups at 7, 14, 21 and 28d after laser induction were all statistically significant. CONCLUSION Lentivirus-mediated PEDF gene transfer is effective for use in treatment of laser-induced CNV, and PEDF exerts its therapeutic effects by inhibiting expression of VEGF and Flk-1. PMID:27588264

  14. [Construction of BAD Lentivirus Vector and Its Effect on Proliferation in A549 Cell Lines].

    PubMed

    Huang, Na; He, Yan-qi; Zhu, Jing; Li, Wei-min

    2015-05-01

    To construct the recombinant lentivirus expressing vector BAD (Bcl-2-associated death protein) gene and to study its effect on A549 cell proliferation. The BAD gene was amplified from plasmid pAV-MCMV-BAD-GFP by PCR. The purified BAD gene fragment was inserted into a lentivirus vector (pLVX-IRES-ZsGreen 1), and the insertion was identified by PCR, restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA sequencing. A549 cells were then transfected with the packaged recombinant lentivirus, and resistant cell clones were selected with flow cytometry. The expression of BAD in A549 cell lines stably transduction with a lentivirus was examined using Western blot. The effect of BAD overexpression on proliferation of A549 cells was evaluated by using CCK-8 kit. Restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing showed that the full-length BAD gene (507 bp) had been successfully subcloned into the lentiviral vector to result in the recombinant vector pLVX-IRES-ZsGreen 1. Monoclonal cell lines BAD-A549 was produced after transfection with the recombinant lentivirus and selected with flow cytometry. Stable expression of BAD protein was verified by Western blot. In vitro, the OD value in BAD group was significantly lower than that of control groups from 120-144 h (P<0. 05). A549 cell lines stably transduced with a lentivirus expressing the BAD gene had been successfully generated. In vitro, BAD overexpression significantly inhibited A549 cells proliferation.

  15. Mutations in Ovis aries TMEM154 are associated with lower small ruminant lentivirus proviral concentration in one sheep flock.

    PubMed

    Alshanbari, F A; Mousel, M R; Reynolds, J O; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Highland, M A; Lewis, G S; White, S N

    2014-08-01

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV), also called ovine progressive pneumonia virus or maedi-visna, is present in 24% of US sheep. Like human immunodeficiency virus, SRLV is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that causes lifelong infection. The production impacts from SRLV are due to a range of disease symptoms, including pneumonia, arthritis, mastitis, body condition wasting and encephalitis. There is no cure and no effective vaccine for preventing SRLV infection. However, breed differences in prevalence and proviral concentration indicate a genetic basis for susceptibility to SRLV. Animals with high blood proviral concentration show increased tissue lesion severity, so proviral concentration represents a live animal test for control post-infection in terms of proviral replication and disease severity. Recently, it was found that sheep with two copies of TMEM154 haplotype 1 (encoding lysine at position 35) had lower odds of SRLV infection. In this study, we examined the relationship between SRLV control post-infection and variants in two genes, TMEM154 and CCR5, in four flocks containing 1403 SRLV-positive sheep. We found two copies of TMEM154 haplotype 1 were associated with lower SRLV proviral concentration in one flock (P < 0.02). This identified the same favorable diplotype for SRLV control post-infection as for odds of infection. However, frequencies of haplotypes 2 and 3 were too low in the other three flocks to test. The CCR5 promoter deletion did not have consistent association with SRLV proviral concentration. Future work in flocks with more balanced allele frequencies is needed to confirm or refute TMEM154 association with control of SRLV post-infection. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  16. Mutations in Ovis aries TMEM154 are associated with lower small ruminant lentivirus proviral concentration in one sheep flock

    PubMed Central

    Alshanbari, F A; Mousel, M R; Reynolds, J O; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Highland, M A; Lewis, G S; White, S N

    2014-01-01

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV), also called ovine progressive pneumonia virus or maedi-visna, is present in 24% of US sheep. Like human immunodeficiency virus, SRLV is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that causes lifelong infection. The production impacts from SRLV are due to a range of disease symptoms, including pneumonia, arthritis, mastitis, body condition wasting and encephalitis. There is no cure and no effective vaccine for preventing SRLV infection. However, breed differences in prevalence and proviral concentration indicate a genetic basis for susceptibility to SRLV. Animals with high blood proviral concentration show increased tissue lesion severity, so proviral concentration represents a live animal test for control post-infection in terms of proviral replication and disease severity. Recently, it was found that sheep with two copies of TMEM154 haplotype 1 (encoding lysine at position 35) had lower odds of SRLV infection. In this study, we examined the relationship between SRLV control post-infection and variants in two genes, TMEM154 and CCR5, in four flocks containing 1403 SRLV-positive sheep. We found two copies of TMEM154 haplotype 1 were associated with lower SRLV proviral concentration in one flock (P < 0.02). This identified the same favorable diplotype for SRLV control post-infection as for odds of infection. However, frequencies of haplotypes 2 and 3 were too low in the other three flocks to test. The CCR5 promoter deletion did not have consistent association with SRLV proviral concentration. Future work in flocks with more balanced allele frequencies is needed to confirm or refute TMEM154 association with control of SRLV post-infection. PMID:24934128

  17. The presence of small ruminant lentiviruses in Mexican Pelibuey sheep.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, José H; Martínez, Humberto A; García, María M; Garrido, Germán; Gómez, Luis; Aguilar, José A; de Andrés, Damián F; Reina, Ramsés; Ramírez, Hugo

    2016-11-01

    The transmission frequency of small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) through the placenta is controversial and may be associated with breed susceptibility. In Mexico, SRLV infections in sheep have been poorly studied. This work explores the presence of antibodies and proviral DNA in Mexican Pelibuey sheep. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs; three commercial kits and two on the basis of synthetic peptides) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR; amplifying the long terminal repeat and gag segments) were performed to diagnose SRLV infection in 25 adult Pelibuey ewes with an average age of 2.5 years and 32 fetuses with gestational ages ranging from 40 to 90 days without clinical signs of SRLV. Two of the three commercial ELISAs and the synthetic peptide-based ones were positive for SRLV antibody detection in 28% and 24% of the ewes, respectively, whereas none of the fetuses were positive by any of the ELISAs. By PCR, 31% of the ewes and, interestingly, two fetuses were positive. Characteristic SRLV lesions were not found in the fetal and/or ewe tissues, including those with positive PCR results. These findings demonstrate the susceptibility of Pelibuey sheep to SRLV infection and the low transmission frequency through the placenta. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Update: nonhuman primate importation.

    PubMed

    1991-10-11

    Beginning in November 1989, a number of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) imported into the United States were found to have been infected with a previously unrecognized Ebola-like filovirus. This report summarizes findings of surveillance and serologic testing of nonhuman primates imported under special permits from June 1990 through September 1991.

  19. Glenohumeral mobility in primates.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lap Ki

    2007-01-01

    This study refutes the traditional idea that the glenohumeral joint of hominoids is more mobile than that of other primates, a belief that forms a basis for the two prominent theories of hominoid evolution. According to the brachiation theory, many anatomical features of the hominoid shoulder (including those of the glenohumeral joint) increase shoulder mobility and are interpreted as adaptations for brachiation. The slow climbing theory explains the same set of features as adaptations for slow climbing. The slow-climbing primates should therefore also possess these features, and their glenohumeral mobility should be the same as that of hominoids and be higher than that of other primates. This study presents three-dimensional glenohumeral mobility data, measured using a single video camera method on fresh specimens. The results show that the hominoid glenohumeral joint is actually less mobile than those of non-hominoid primates, including the habitually slow-climbing lorines, but it is characterized by a smooth excursion in the scapulocranial direction. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Nonhuman Primate Ocular Biometry

    PubMed Central

    Augusteyn, Robert C.; Maceo Heilman, Bianca; Ho, Arthur; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To examine ocular growth in nonhuman primates (NHPs) from measurements on ex vivo eyes. Methods We obtained NHP eyes from animals that had been killed as part of other studies or because of health-related issues. Digital calipers were used to measure the horizontal, vertical, and anteroposterior globe diameters as well as corneal horizontal and vertical diameters of excised globes from 98 hamadryas baboons, 551 cynomolgus monkeys, and 112 rhesus monkeys, at ages ranging from 23 to 360 months. Isolated lens sagittal thickness and equatorial diameter were measured by shadowphotogrammetry. Wet and fixed dry weights were obtained for lenses. Results Nonhuman primate globe growth continues throughout life, slowing toward an asymptotic maximum. The final globe size scales with negative allometry to adult body size. Corneal growth ceases at around 20 months. Lens diameter increases but thickness decreases with increasing age. Nonhuman primate lens wet and dry weight accumulation is monophasic, continuing throughout life toward asymptotic maxima. The dry/wet weight ratio reaches a maximum of 0.33. Conclusions Nonhuman primate ocular globe and lens growth differ in several respects from those in humans. Although age-related losses of lens power and accommodative amplitude are similar, lens growth and properties are different indicating care should be taken in extrapolating NHP observations to the study of human accommodation. PMID:26780314

  1. What Is a Primate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Describes a series of hands-on experiments that engage students in hypothesis testing and promotes active learning of the concepts of evolution and adaptation. Laboratory exercises demonstrate how features of the hands and eyes distinguish primates from other mammals. (SOE)

  2. What Is a Primate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    Describes a series of hands-on experiments that engage students in hypothesis testing and promotes active learning of the concepts of evolution and adaptation. Laboratory exercises demonstrate how features of the hands and eyes distinguish primates from other mammals. (SOE)

  3. Development and validation of puma (Felis concolor) cytokine and lentivirus real-time PCR detection systems.

    PubMed

    Sondgeroth, Kerry; Leutenegger, Christian; Vandewoude, Sue

    2005-04-08

    Studies of immune correlates of disease outcome associate humoral immune response mediated by T-helper 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-10) with more virulent disease relative to a cell-mediated response driven by T-helper 1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma), particularly in viral and other intra-cellular infections. Specifically, the kinetics of both human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection are closely associated with Type 1 versus Type 2 cytokine profiles. Puma (Felis concolor) lentivirus (PLV) is closely related to FIV, but based on phylogenetic and clinical studies, is more ancient and less pathogenic. The aims of this study were to validate feline real-time PCR primer/probe systems for puma cytokines and PLV as sensitive, quantitative assays for use in investigations of PLV pathogenicity. We demonstrate that primer/probe systems for IL-4, IL-10, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, GAPDH, and the pol region of PLV-1695 amplify puma cytokines and PLV-1695 with high amplification efficiency and sensitivity. Detection of PLV-1695 provirus in experimentally inoculated domestic cats proved to be of equivalent sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value to co-culture of one million peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Evaluation of cytokine induction during naturally occurring PLV infection will allow insight into mechanisms of host control associated with apathogenic infection. In addition, determination of viral loads during different stages of PLV infection or in different tissues from domestic cats or pumas will further elucidate capacity of these viruses to replicate and establish infection.

  4. Neurologic Disease in Captive Lions (Panthera leo) with Low-Titer Lion Lentivirus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Greg; Podell, Michael D.; Wack, Raymund; Kraft, Susan; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; VandeWoude, Sue

    2006-01-01

    Lion lentivirus (LLV; also known as feline immunodeficiency virus of lion, Panthera leo [FIVPle]) is present in free-ranging and captive lion populations at a seroprevalence of up to 100%; however, clinical signs are rarely reported. LLV displays up to 25% interclade sequence diversity, suggesting that it has been in the lion population for some time and may be significantly host adapted. Three captive lions diagnosed with LLV infection displayed lymphocyte subset alterations and progressive behavioral, locomotor, and neuroanatomic abnormalities. No evidence of infection with other potential neuropathogens was found. Antemortem electrodiagnostics and radiologic imaging indicated a diagnosis consistent with lentiviral neuropathy. PCR was used to determine a partial lentiviral genomic sequence and to quantify the proviral burden in eight postmortem tissue specimens. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the virus was consistent with the LLV detected in other captive and free-ranging lions. Despite progressive neurologic signs, the proviral load in tissues, including several regions of the brain, was low; furthermore, gross and histopathologic changes in the brain were minimal. These findings suggest that the symptoms in these animals resulted from nonspecific encephalopathy, similar to human immunodeficiency virus, FIV, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) neuropathies, rather than a direct effect of active viral replication. The association of neuropathy and lymphocyte subset alterations with chronic LLV infection suggests that long-term LLV infection can have detrimental effects for the host, including death. This is similar to reports of aged sootey mangabeys dying from diseases typically associated with end-stage SIV infection and indicates areas for further research of lentiviral infections of seemingly adapted natural hosts, including mechanisms of host control and viral adaptation. PMID:17005739

  5. Neurologic disease in captive lions (Panthera leo) with low-titer lion lentivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Greg; Podell, Michael D; Wack, Raymund; Kraft, Susan; Troyer, Jennifer L; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; VandeWoude, Sue

    2006-12-01

    Lion lentivirus (LLV; also known as feline immunodeficiency virus of lion, Panthera leo [FIVPle]) is present in free-ranging and captive lion populations at a seroprevalence of up to 100%; however, clinical signs are rarely reported. LLV displays up to 25% interclade sequence diversity, suggesting that it has been in the lion population for some time and may be significantly host adapted. Three captive lions diagnosed with LLV infection displayed lymphocyte subset alterations and progressive behavioral, locomotor, and neuroanatomic abnormalities. No evidence of infection with other potential neuropathogens was found. Antemortem electrodiagnostics and radiologic imaging indicated a diagnosis consistent with lentiviral neuropathy. PCR was used to determine a partial lentiviral genomic sequence and to quantify the proviral burden in eight postmortem tissue specimens. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the virus was consistent with the LLV detected in other captive and free-ranging lions. Despite progressive neurologic signs, the proviral load in tissues, including several regions of the brain, was low; furthermore, gross and histopathologic changes in the brain were minimal. These findings suggest that the symptoms in these animals resulted from nonspecific encephalopathy, similar to human immunodeficiency virus, FIV, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) neuropathies, rather than a direct effect of active viral replication. The association of neuropathy and lymphocyte subset alterations with chronic LLV infection suggests that long-term LLV infection can have detrimental effects for the host, including death. This is similar to reports of aged sootey mangabeys dying from diseases typically associated with end-stage SIV infection and indicates areas for further research of lentiviral infections of seemingly adapted natural hosts, including mechanisms of host control and viral adaptation.

  6. Convergent evolution of escape from hepaciviral antagonism in primates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Maulik R; Loo, Yueh-Ming; Horner, Stacy M; Gale, Michael; Malik, Harmit S

    2012-01-01

    The ability to mount an interferon response on sensing viral infection is a critical component of mammalian innate immunity. Several viruses directly antagonize viral sensing pathways to block activation of the host immune response. Here, we show that recurrent viral antagonism has shaped the evolution of the host protein MAVS--a crucial component of the viral-sensing pathway in primates. From sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of MAVS from 21 simian primates, we found that MAVS has evolved under strong positive selection. We focused on how this positive selection has shaped MAVS' susceptibility to Hepatitis C virus (HCV). We functionally tested MAVS proteins from diverse primate species for their ability to resist antagonism by HCV, which uses its protease NS3/4A to cleave human MAVS. We found that MAVS from multiple primates are resistant to inhibition by the HCV protease. This resistance maps to single changes within the protease cleavage site in MAVS, which protect MAVS from getting cleaved by the HCV protease. Remarkably, most of these changes have been independently acquired at a single residue 506 that evolved under positive selection. We show that "escape" mutations lower affinity of the NS3 protease for MAVS and allow it to better restrict HCV replication. We further show that NS3 proteases from all other primate hepaciviruses, including the highly divergent GBV-A and GBV-C viruses, are functionally similar to HCV. We conclude that convergent evolution at residue 506 in multiple primates has resulted in escape from antagonism by hepaciviruses. Our study provides a model whereby insights into the ancient history of viral infections in primates can be gained using extant host and virus genes. Our analyses also provide a means by which primates might clear infections by extant hepaciviruses like HCV.

  7. Impending extinction crisis of the world's primates: Why primates matter.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Alejandro; Garber, Paul A; Rylands, Anthony B; Roos, Christian; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Di Fiore, Anthony; Nekaris, K Anne-Isola; Nijman, Vincent; Heymann, Eckhard W; Lambert, Joanna E; Rovero, Francesco; Barelli, Claudia; Setchell, Joanna M; Gillespie, Thomas R; Mittermeier, Russell A; Arregoitia, Luis Verde; de Guinea, Miguel; Gouveia, Sidney; Dobrovolski, Ricardo; Shanee, Sam; Shanee, Noga; Boyle, Sarah A; Fuentes, Agustin; MacKinnon, Katherine C; Amato, Katherine R; Meyer, Andreas L S; Wich, Serge; Sussman, Robert W; Pan, Ruliang; Kone, Inza; Li, Baoguo

    2017-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, our closest biological relatives, play important roles in the livelihoods, cultures, and religions of many societies and offer unique insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and the threat of emerging diseases. They are an essential component of tropical biodiversity, contributing to forest regeneration and ecosystem health. Current information shows the existence of 504 species in 79 genera distributed in the Neotropics, mainland Africa, Madagascar, and Asia. Alarmingly, ~60% of primate species are now threatened with extinction and ~75% have declining populations. This situation is the result of escalating anthropogenic pressures on primates and their habitats-mainly global and local market demands, leading to extensive habitat loss through the expansion of industrial agriculture, large-scale cattle ranching, logging, oil and gas drilling, mining, dam building, and the construction of new road networks in primate range regions. Other important drivers are increased bushmeat hunting and the illegal trade of primates as pets and primate body parts, along with emerging threats, such as climate change and anthroponotic diseases. Often, these pressures act in synergy, exacerbating primate population declines. Given that primate range regions overlap extensively with a large, and rapidly growing, human population characterized by high levels of poverty, global attention is needed immediately to reverse the looming risk of primate extinctions and to attend to local human needs in sustainable ways. Raising global scientific and public awareness of the plight of the world's primates and the costs of their loss to ecosystem health and human society is imperative.

  8. A naturally occurring bovine APOBEC3 confers resistance to bovine lentiviruses: implication for the co-evolution of bovids and their lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Eri; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Nakano, Yusuke; Misawa, Naoko; Kobayashi, Tomoko; Ren, Fengrong; Izumi, Taisuke; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Sato, Kei

    2016-01-01

    Mammals have co-evolved with lentiviruses for a long time. As evidence, viral infectivity factor (Vif), encoded by lentiviruses, antagonizes the anti-viral action of cellular APOBEC3 of their hosts. Here, we address the co-evolutionary dynamics of bovine APOBEC3 and the following two bovine lentiviruses: bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) and Jembrana disease virus (JDV). We determined the sequences of three APOBEC3 genes of bovids belonging to the genera Bos and Bison and showed that bovine APOBEC3Z3 is under a strong positive selection. We found that APOBEC3Z3 of gaur, a bovid in the genus Bos, acquired resistance to JDV Vif-mediated degradation after diverging from the other bovids through conversion of the structural composition of the loop 1 domain. Interestingly, the resistance of gaur APOBEC3Z3 can be attributed to the positive selection of residue 62. This study provides the first evidence, suggesting that a co-evolutionary arms race between bovids and lentiviruses occurred in Asia. PMID:27665724

  9. Effect of point mutations in the N terminus of the lentivirus lytic peptide-1 sequence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane protein gp41 on Env stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheau-Fen; Ko, Chiung-Yuan; Wang, Chin-Tien; Chen, Steve S-L

    2002-05-03

    To understand the role of the lentivirus lytic peptide-1 region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein (gp) 41 in viral infection, we examined the effects on virus replication of single amino acid deletions spanning this region in an infectious provirus of the HXB2 strain. Among the mutants analyzed, only the deletion of one of the two adjacent valine residues located at positions 832 and 833 (termed the Delta 833 mutant for simplicity) greatly reduced the steady-state, cell-associated levels of the Env precursor and gp120, as opposed to the wild-type virus. The altered Env phenotype resulted in severely impaired virus infectivity and gp120 incorporation into this mutant virion. Analyses of additional mutants with deletions at Ile-830, Ala-836, and Ile-840 demonstrated that the Delta 830 mutant exhibited the most significant inhibitory effect on Env steady-state expression. These results indicate that the N terminus of the lentivirus lytic peptide-1 region is critical for Env steady-state expression. Among the mutant viruses encoding Env proteins in which residues Val-832 and Val-833 were individually substituted by nonconserved amino acids Ala, Ser, or Pro, which were expected to disrupt the alpha-helical structure in the increasingly severe manner of Pro > Ser > Ala, only the 833P mutant exhibited significantly reduced steady-state Env expression. Pulse labeling and pulse-chase studies demonstrated that the Delta 830, Delta 833, and 833P mutants of Env proteins degraded more rapidly in a time-dependent manner after biosynthesis than did the wild-type Env. The results indicate that residue 830 and 833 mutations are likely to induce a conformational change in Env that targets the mutant protein for cellular degradation. Our study has implications about the structural determinants located at the N terminus of the lentivirus lytic peptide-1 sequence of gp41 that affect the fate of Env in virus-infected cells.

  10. The evolutionary ecology of molecular replicators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    By reasonable criteria, life on the Earth consists mainly of molecular replicators. These include viruses, transposons, transpovirons, coviruses and many more, with continuous new discoveries like Sputnik Virophage. Their study is inherently multidisciplinary, spanning microbiology, genetics, immunology and evolutionary theory, and the current view is that taking a unified approach has great power and promise. We support this with a new, unified, model of their evolutionary ecology, using contemporary evolutionary theory coupling the Price equation with game theory, studying the consequences of the molecular replicators' promiscuous use of each others' gene products for their natural history and evolutionary ecology. Even at this simple expository level, we can make a firm prediction of a new class of replicators exploiting viruses such as lentiviruses like SIVs, a family which includes HIV: these have been explicitly stated in the primary literature to be non-existent. Closely connected to this departure is the view that multicellular organism immunology is more about the management of chronic infections rather than the elimination of acute ones and new understandings emerging are changing our view of the kind of theatre we ourselves provide for the evolutionary play of molecular replicators. This study adds molecular replicators to bacteria in the emerging field of sociomicrobiology. PMID:27853598

  11. The evolutionary ecology of molecular replicators.

    PubMed

    Nee, Sean

    2016-08-01

    By reasonable criteria, life on the Earth consists mainly of molecular replicators. These include viruses, transposons, transpovirons, coviruses and many more, with continuous new discoveries like Sputnik Virophage. Their study is inherently multidisciplinary, spanning microbiology, genetics, immunology and evolutionary theory, and the current view is that taking a unified approach has great power and promise. We support this with a new, unified, model of their evolutionary ecology, using contemporary evolutionary theory coupling the Price equation with game theory, studying the consequences of the molecular replicators' promiscuous use of each others' gene products for their natural history and evolutionary ecology. Even at this simple expository level, we can make a firm prediction of a new class of replicators exploiting viruses such as lentiviruses like SIVs, a family which includes HIV: these have been explicitly stated in the primary literature to be non-existent. Closely connected to this departure is the view that multicellular organism immunology is more about the management of chronic infections rather than the elimination of acute ones and new understandings emerging are changing our view of the kind of theatre we ourselves provide for the evolutionary play of molecular replicators. This study adds molecular replicators to bacteria in the emerging field of sociomicrobiology.

  12. Analog VLSI-based modeling of the primate oculomotor system.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, T K; Koch, C

    1999-01-01

    One way to understand a neurobiological system is by building a simulacrum that replicates its behavior in real time using similar constraints. Analog very large-scale integrated (VLSI) electronic circuit technology provides such an enabling technology. We here describe a neuromorphic system that is part of a long-term effort to understand the primate oculomotor system. It requires both fast sensory processing and fast motor control to interact with the world. A one-dimensional hardware model of the primate eye has been built that simulates the physical dynamics of the biological system. It is driven by two different analog VLSI chips, one mimicking cortical visual processing for target selection and tracking and another modeling brain stem circuits that drive the eye muscles. Our oculomotor plant demonstrates both smooth pursuit movements, driven by a retinal velocity error signal, and saccadic eye movements, controlled by retinal position error, and can reproduce several behavioral, stimulation, lesion, and adaptation experiments performed on primates.

  13. Lentivirus-mediated Gene Transfer in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Is Impaired in SHIV-infected, ART-treated Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Younan, Patrick M; Peterson, Christopher W; Polacino, Patricia; Kowalski, John P; Obenza, Willimark; Miller, Hannah W; Milless, Brian P; Gafken, Phil; DeRosa, Stephen C; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can reduce HIV viremia. We have developed an HIV/AIDS-patient model in Simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected pigtailed macaques that are stably suppressed on antiretroviral therapy (ART: raltegravir, emtricitabine and tenofovir). Following SHIV infection and ART, animals undergo autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT) with lentivirally transduced cluster of differentiation (CD)34(+) cells expressing the mC46 anti-HIV fusion protein. We show that SHIV(+), ART-treated animals had very low gene marking levels after HSCT. Pretransduction CD34(+) cells contained detectable levels of all three ART drugs, likely contributing to the low gene transfer efficiency. Following HSCT recovery and the cessation of ART, plasma viremia rebounded, indicating that myeloablative total body irradiation cannot completely eliminate viral reservoirs after autologous HSCT. The kinetics of recovery following autologous HSCT in SHIV(+), ART-treated macaques paralleled those observed following transplantation of control animals. However, T-cell subset analyses demonstrated a high percentage of C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)-expressing CD4(+) T-cells after HSCT. These data suggest that an extended ART interruption time may be required for more efficient lentiviral transduction. To avoid complications associated with ART interruption in the context of high percentages of CD4(+)CCR5(+)T-cells after HSCT, the use of vector systems not impaired by the presence of residual ART may also be beneficial.

  14. Replicating vaccines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early work on fish immunology and disease resistance demonstrated fish (like animals and humans) that survived infection were typically resistant to re-infection with the same pathogen. The concepts of resistance upon reinfection lead to the research and development of replicating (live) vaccines in...

  15. The interferon-induced antiviral protein PML (TRIM19) promotes the restriction and transcriptional silencing of lentiviruses in a context-specific, isoform-specific fashion.

    PubMed

    Masroori, Nasser; Merindol, Natacha; Berthoux, Lionel

    2016-03-22

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein, a type I interferon (IFN-I)-induced gene product and a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family, modulates the transcriptional activity of viruses belonging to various families. Whether PML has an impact on the replication of HIV-1 has not been fully addressed, but recent studies point to its possible involvement in the restriction of HIV-1 in human cells and in the maintenance of transcriptional latency in human cell lines in which HIV-1 is constitutively repressed. We investigated further the restriction of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac, by PML in murine cells and in a lymphocytic human cell line. In particular, we studied the relevance of PML to IFN-I-mediated inhibition and the role of individual human isoforms. We demonstrate that both human PML (hPML) and murine PML (mPML) inhibit the early post-entry stages of the replication of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac. In addition, HIV-1 was transcriptionally silenced by mPML and by hPML isoforms I, II, IV and VI in MEFs. This PML-mediated transcriptional repression was attenuated in presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. In contrast, depletion of PML had no effect on HIV-1 gene expression in a human T cell line. PML was found to contribute to the inhibition of HIV-1 by IFN-I. Specifically, IFN-α and IFN-β treatments of MEFs enhanced the PML-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 early replication stages. We show that PML can inhibit HIV-1 and other lentiviruses as part of the IFN-I-mediated response. The restriction takes place at two distinct steps, i.e. reverse transcription and transcription, and in an isoform-specific, cellular context-specific fashion. Our results support a model in which PML activates innate immune antilentiviral effectors. These data are relevant to the development of latency reversal-inducing pharmacological agents, since PML was previously proposed as a pharmacological target for such inhibitors. This study also has

  16. A lion lentivirus related to feline immunodeficiency virus: epidemiologic and phylogenetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E W; Yuhki, N; Packer, C; O'Brien, S J

    1994-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a novel lentivirus that is genetically homologous and functionally analogous to the human AIDS viruses, human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2. FIV causes immunosuppression in domestic cats by destroying the CD4 T-lymphocyte subsets in infected hosts. A serological survey of over 400 free-ranging African and Asian lions (Panthera leo) for antibodies to FIV revealed endemic lentivirus prevalence with an incidence of seropositivity as high as 90%. A lion lentivirus (FIV-Ple) was isolated by infection of lion lymphocytes in vitro. Seroconversion was documented in two Serengeti lions, and discordance of mother-cub serological status argues against maternal transmission (in favor of horizontal spread) as a major route of infection among lions. A phylogenetic analysis of cloned FIV-Ple pol gene sequences from 27 lions from four African populations (from the Serengeti reserve, Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Manyara, and Kruger Park) revealed remarkably high intra- and interindividual genetic diversity at the sequence level. Three FIV-Ple phylogenetic clusters or clades were resolved with phenetic, parsimony, and likelihood analytical procedures. The three clades, which occurred not only together in the same population but throughout Africa, were as divergent from each other as were homologous pol sequences of lentivirus isolated from distinct feline species, i.e., puma and domestic cat. The FIV-Ple clades, however, were more closely related to each other than to other feline lentiviruses (monophyletic for lion species), suggesting that the ancestors of FIV-Ple evolved in allopatric (geographically isolated) lion populations that converged recently. To date, there is no clear evidence of FIV-Ple-associated pathology, raising the possibility of a historic genetic accommodation of the lion lentivirus and its host leading to a coevolved host-parasite symbiosis (or commensalism) in the population similar to that hypothesized for endemic

  17. Mutations in ovine TMEM154 associated with reduced risk of ovine lentivirus infection are also associated with reduced proviral concentration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ovine lentivirus (OVLV), also called ovine progressive pneumonia virus or maedi-visna, is present in 24% of US sheep. Like human immunodeficiency virus, OVLV is macrophage-tropic lentivirus that causes lifelong infection. The adverse economic impact on the sheep industry is due to a range of disease...

  18. Deletion variant near ZNF389 is associated with control of ovine lentivirus in multiple flocks of sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ovine lentivirus (OvLV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus found in many countries that causes interstitial pneumonia, mastitis, arthritis and cachexia in sheep. There is no preventive vaccine and no cure, but breed differences suggest marker-assisted selective breeding might improve odds of infectio...

  19. Mutations in Ovis aries TMEM154 are associated with lower small ruminant lentivirus proviral concentration in one sheep flock

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV), also called ovine progressive pneumonia virus or maedi-visna, is present in 24% of U.S. sheep. Like human immunodeficiency virus, SRLV is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus that causes lifelong infection. The production impacts from SRLV are due to a range of disease sy...

  20. Evaluation of a combinatorial RNAi lentivirus vector targeting foot-and-mouth disease virus in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAOXI; ZHENG, HAIXUE; XU, MINJUN; ZHOU, YU; LI, XIANGPING; YANG, FAN; LIU, QINGYOU; SHI, DESHUN

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals, which leads to serious economical losses. FMDV is not adequately controlled by vaccination or biosecurity measures. To generate genetically modified FMDV-resistant animals, a combinatorial expression cassette producing three short hairpin (sh) RNAs was constructed using the lentivirus (LV) vector, LV-3shRNA. The three shRNAs were expressed under the regulation of DNA polymerase III promoters from a buffalo and a bovine source, with one targeted to the non-structural protein 3B, and the other two targeted to the viral polymerase protein 3D of FMDV, respectively. The role of LV-3shRNA in the inhibition of the replication of FMDV was determined in BHK-21 cells and in suckling mice. The results revealed that LV-3shRNA reduced viral growth 3-fold (24 h post-infection) when the cells were challenged with 107-times the tissue culture infective dose (TCID50)/ml of O serotype FMDV. The suckling mice pretreated with LV-3shRNA were completely protected on administration of 5-times the dose of FMDV otherwise sufficient to kill 50% of the experimental animals (LD50). These results demonstrated that the LV-mediated dual expression of three FMDV-specific shRNAs provided a novel strategy towards combating FMDV, which facilitates the permanent introduction of novel disease-resistance traits into the buffalo and bovine genomes in the future. PMID:26323462

  1. Visual influences on primate encephalization.

    PubMed

    Kirk, E Christopher

    2006-07-01

    Primates differ from most other mammals in having relatively large brains. As a result, numerous comparative studies have attempted to identify the selective variables influencing primate encephalization. However, none have examined the effect of the total amount of visual input on relative brain size. According to Jerison's principle of proper mass, functional areas of the brain devoted primarily to processing visual information should exhibit increases in size when the amount of visual input to those areas increases. As a result, the total amount of visual input to the brain could exert a large influence on encephalization because visual areas comprise a large proportion of total brain mass in primates. The goal of this analysis is to test the expectation of a direct relationship between visual input and encephalization using optic foramen size and optic nerve size as proxies for total visual input. Data were collected for a large comparative sample of primates and carnivorans, and three primary analyses were undertaken. First, the relationship between relative proxies for visual input and relative endocranial volume were examined using partial correlations and phylogenetic comparative methods. Second, to examine the generality of the results derived for extant primates, a parallel series of partial correlation and comparative analyses were undertaken using data for carnivorans. Third, data for various Eocene and Oligocene primates were compared with those for living primates in order to determine whether the fossil taxa demonstrate a similar relationship between relative brain size and visual input. All three analyses confirm the expectations of proper mass and favor the conclusion that the amount of visual input has been a major influence on the evolution of relative brain size in both primates and carnivorans. Furthermore, this study suggests that differences in visual input may partly explain (1) the high encephalization of primates relative to the primitive

  2. Equine infectious anemia virus replication is upregulated during differentiation of blood monocytes from acutely infected horses.

    PubMed Central

    Sellon, D C; Walker, K M; Russell, K E; Perry, S T; Covington, P; Fuller, F J

    1996-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus is a lentivirus that replicates in mature tissue macrophages of horses. Ponies were infected with equine infectious anemia virus. During febrile episodes, proviral DNA was detectable, but viral mRNA was not detectable. As cultured blood monocytes from these ponies differentiated into macrophages, viral expression was upregulated. In situ hybridization confirmed that viral transcription occurred in mature macrophages. PMID:8523576

  3. Development and limitations of lentivirus vectors as tools for tracking differentiation in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Frame, Fiona M; Hager, Stefanie; Pellacani, Davide; Stower, Mike J; Walker, Hannah F; Burns, Julie E; Collins, Anne T; Maitland, Norman J

    2010-11-15

    To investigate hierarchy in human prostate epithelial cells, we generated recombinant lentiviruses, infected primary cultures and cell lines, and followed their fate in vitro. The lentiviruses combined constitutive promoters including CMV and β-actin, or late-stage differentiation promoters including PSCA (prostate stem cell antigen) and PSAPb (prostate specific antigen/probasin) driving expression of monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric fluorescent proteins. Significantly, rare CD133(+) cells from primary prostate epithelial cultures were successfully infected and activation of late-stage promoters was observed in basal epithelial cultures following induction of differentiation. Lentiviruses also infected CD133(+) cells within the P4E6 cell line. However, promoter silencing was observed in several cell lines (P4E6, BPH-1, PC3). We examined the promoter methylation status of the lentiviral insertions in heterogeneously fluorescent cultures from PC3 clones and found that DNA methylation was not the primary mechanism of silencing of the CMV promoter. We also describe limitations to the lentivirus system including technical challenges due to low titers and low infection efficiency in primary cultures. However, we have identified a functional late-stage promoter that indicates differentiation from a basal to a luminal phenotype and demonstrate that this strategy for lineage tracking of prostate epithelial cells is valid with further optimisation.

  4. Small ruminant lentiviruses: Strain variation, viral tropism, and host genetics influence pathogenesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLV), which include the Maedi-Visna virus, also known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV), and caprine arthritis and encephalitis virus (CAEV), are of global economic importance to sheep and goat producers, respectively. These viruses belong to the genus Lentivi...

  5. Genetic testing for TMEM154 mutations associated with lentivirus susceptibility in sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affect millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV) elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal’s health, productivity, ...

  6. Polysaccharide-modified scaffolds for controlled lentivirus delivery in vitro and after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Aline; Shea, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    Gene delivering biomaterials have increasingly been employed to modulate the cellular microenvironment to promote tissue regeneration, yet low transduction efficiency has been a persistent challenge for in vivo applications. In this report, we investigated the surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) scaffolds with polysaccharides, which have been implicated in binding lentivirus but have not been used for delivery. Chitosan was directly conjugated onto PLG scaffolds, whereas heparin and hyaluronan were indirectly conjugated onto PLG scaffolds with multi-amine crosslinkers. The addition of chitosan and heparin onto PLG promoted the association of lentivirus to these scaffolds and enhanced their transduction efficiency in vitro relative to hyaluronan-conjugated and control scaffolds that had limited lentivirus association and transduction. Transduction efficiency in vitro was increased partly due to an enhanced retention of virus on the scaffold as well as an extended half-life of viral activity. Transduction efficiency was also evaluated in vivo using porous, multiple channel PLG bridges that delivered lentivirus to the injured mouse spinal cord. Transgene expression persisted for weeks after implantation, and was able to enhance axon growth and myelination. These studies support gene-delivering PLG scaffolds for in vivo regenerative medicine applications. PMID:23791981

  7. Sensitivity and specificity of a nested polymerase chain reaction for detection of lentivirus infection in lions (Panthera leo).

    PubMed

    Adams, Hayley; van Vuuren, Moritz; Kania, Stephen; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Keet, Dewald; New, John; Kennedy, Melissa

    2010-12-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus in the Retroviridae family that causes lifelong infection in domestic cats. The lentivirus of African lions (Panthera leo), referred to as FIVple, is endemic in certain lion populations in eastern and southern Africa. Lentivirus infection leads to immunologic dysfunction and immunosuppressive disease in domestic cats; however, little is known about the pathogenic effects of infection in lions, nor about the epidemiologic impact on free-ranging and captive populations. Whole blood and serum samples were collected opportunistically from free-ranging lions in Kruger National Park, Republic of South Africa (RSA). Whole blood and serum samples were also collected from captive wild lions in the RSA. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for detection of FIV was performed on all whole blood samples. In addition, serum samples were tested for cross-reactive antibodies to domestic feline lentivirus antigens and puma lentivirus synthetic envelope peptide antigen. The PCR assay successfully amplified the lion lentivirus from African lions. The relative sensitivity and relative specificity were 79% and 100%, respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values were 100% and 67%, respectively. This research represents the first study to compare genetic material with antibody-based methods of lentivirus detection on lions in RSA. Using PCR as an additional diagnostic test for FIV in lions will increase screening sensitivity and will allow viral characterization among circulating isolates and monitoring of changes in the viral epidemiology within geographic regions and populations over time.

  8. Ethics of primate use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, M. J.

    2010-11-01

    This article provides an overview of the ethical issues raised by the use of non-human primates (NHPs) in research involving scientific procedures which may cause pain, suffering, distress or lasting harm. It is not an exhaustive review of the literature and views on this subject, and it does not present any conclusions about the moral acceptability or otherwise of NHP research. Rather the aim has been to identify the ethical issues involved and to provide guidance on how these might be addressed, in particular by carefully examining the scientific rationale for NHP use, implementing fully the 3Rs principle of Russell and Burch (1959) and applying a robust "harm-benefit assessment" to research proposals involving NHPs.

  9. Brains, Genes and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Callaway, Edward M.; Churchland, Patricia; Caddick, Sarah J.; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E.; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A.; Miller, Cory T.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R.; Movshon, J. Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H.; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Silva, Afonso C.; Strick, Peter L.; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  10. Brains, genes, and primates.

    PubMed

    Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos; Callaway, Edward M; Caddick, Sarah J; Churchland, Patricia; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A; Miller, Cory T; Mitchell, Jude F; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R; Movshon, J Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Silva, Afonso C; Strick, Peter L; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-05-06

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators, and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive, and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CENTRIOLE REPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Joseph G.

    1961-01-01

    This paper describes the replication of centrioles during spermatogenesis in the Prosobranch snail, Viviparus malleatus Reeve. Sections for electron microscopy were cut from pieces of testis fixed in OsO4 and embedded in the polyester resin Vestopal W. Two kinds of spermatocytes are present. These give rise to typical uniflagellate sperm carrying the haploid number of 9 chromosomes, and atypical multiflagellate sperm with only one chromosome. Two centrioles are present in the youngest typical spermatocyte. Each is a hollow cylinder about 160 mµ in diameter and 330 mµ long. The wall consists of 9 sets of triplet fibers arranged in a characteristic pattern. Sometime before pachytene an immature centriole, or procentriole as it will be called, appears next to each of the mature centrioles. The procentriole resembles a mature centriole in most respects except length: it is more annular than tubular. The daughter procentriole lies with its axis perpendicular to that of its parent. It presumably grows to full size during the late prophase, although the maturation stages have not been observed with the electron microscope. It is suggested that centrioles possess a constant polarization. The distal end forms the flagellum or other centriole products, while the proximal end represents the procentriole and is concerned with replication. The four centrioles of prophase (two parents and two daughters) are distributed by the two meiotic divisions to the four typical spermatids, in which they function as the basal bodies of the flagella. Atypical spermatocytes at first contain two normal centrioles. Each of these becomes surrounded by a cluster of procentrioles, which progressively elongate during the late prophase. After two aberrant meiotic divisions the centriole clusters give rise to the basal bodies of the multiflagellate sperm. These facts are discussed in the light of the theory, first proposed by Pollister, that the supernumerary centrioles in the atypical cells are

  12. Primate Models in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas J.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2013-01-01

    Large animal models have long served as the proving grounds for advances in transplantation, bridging the gap between inbred mouse experimentation and human clinical trials. Although a variety of species have been and continue to be used, the emergence of highly targeted biologic- and antibody-based therapies has required models to have a high degree of homology with humans. Thus, the nonhuman primate has become the model of choice in many settings. This article will provide an overview of nonhuman primate models of transplantation. Issues of primate genetics and care will be introduced, and a brief overview of technical aspects for various transplant models will be discussed. Finally, several prominent immunosuppressive and tolerance strategies used in primates will be reviewed. PMID:24003248

  13. Captivity humanizes the primate microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Vangay, Pajau; Huang, Hu; Ward, Tonya; Hillmann, Benjamin M.; Al-Ghalith, Gabriel A.; Travis, Dominic A.; Long, Ha Thang; Tuan, Bui Van; Minh, Vo Van; Cabana, Francis; Nadler, Tilo; Toddes, Barbara; Murphy, Tami; Glander, Kenneth E.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Knights, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The primate gastrointestinal tract is home to trillions of bacteria, whose composition is associated with numerous metabolic, autoimmune, and infectious human diseases. Although there is increasing evidence that modern and Westernized societies are associated with dramatic loss of natural human gut microbiome diversity, the causes and consequences of such loss are challenging to study. Here we use nonhuman primates (NHPs) as a model system for studying the effects of emigration and lifestyle disruption on the human gut microbiome. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing in two model NHP species, we show that although different primate species have distinctive signature microbiota in the wild, in captivity they lose their native microbes and become colonized with Prevotella and Bacteroides, the dominant genera in the modern human gut microbiome. We confirm that captive individuals from eight other NHP species in a different zoo show the same pattern of convergence, and that semicaptive primates housed in a sanctuary represent an intermediate microbiome state between wild and captive. Using deep shotgun sequencing, chemical dietary analysis, and chloroplast relative abundance, we show that decreasing dietary fiber and plant content are associated with the captive primate microbiome. Finally, in a meta-analysis including published human data, we show that captivity has a parallel effect on the NHP gut microbiome to that of Westernization in humans. These results demonstrate that captivity and lifestyle disruption cause primates to lose native microbiota and converge along an axis toward the modern human microbiome. PMID:27573830

  14. Molecular replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The object of our research program is to understand how polynucleotide replication originated on the primitive Earth. This is a central issue in studies of the origins of life, since a process similar to modern DNA and RNA synthesis is likely to have formed the basis for the most primitive system of genetic information transfer. The major conclusion of studies so far is that a preformed polynucleotide template under many different experimental conditions will facilitate the synthesis of a new oligonucleotide with a sequence complementary to that of the template. It has been shown, for example, that poly(C) facilitates the synthesis of long oligo(G)s and that the short template CCGCC facilities the synthesis of its complement GGCGG. Very recently we have shown that template-directed synthesis is not limited to the standard oligonucleotide substrates. Nucleic acid-like molecules with a pyrophosphate group replacing the phosphate of the standard nucleic acid backbone are readily synthesized from deoxynucleotide 3'-5'-diphosphates on appropriate templates.

  15. Molecular replication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    The object of our research program is to understand how polynucleotide replication originated on the primitive Earth. This is a central issue in studies of the origins of life, since a process similar to modern DNA and RNA synthesis is likely to have formed the basis for the most primitive system of genetic information transfer. The major conclusion of studies so far is that a preformed polynucleotide template under many different experimental conditions will facilitate the synthesis of a new oligonucleotide with a sequence complementary to that of the template. It has been shown, for example, that poly(C) facilitates the synthesis of long oligo(G)s and that the short template CCGCC facilities the synthesis of its complement GGCGG. Very recently we have shown that template-directed synthesis is not limited to the standard oligonucleotide substrates. Nucleic acid-like molecules with a pyrophosphate group replacing the phosphate of the standard nucleic acid backbone are readily synthesized from deoxynucleotide 3'-5'-diphosphates on appropriate templates.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Multiple Genomic Regions Associated with Susceptibility to and Control of Ovine Lentivirus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-17

    2010) Small ruminant lentiviruses and human immunodeficiency virus: cousins that take a long view. Curr HIV Res 8: 26–52. 3. Cutlip RC, Lehmkuhl HD...1543. 8. Blacklaws BA (2012) Small ruminant lentiviruses: immunopathogenesis of visna- maedi and caprine arthritis and encephalitis virus. Comp...Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis 35: 259–269. 9. Reina R, Berriatua E, Lujan L, Juste R, Sanchez A, et al. (2009) Prevention strategies against small ruminant

  17. Sponge-mediated Lentivirus Delivery to Acute and Chronic Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Aline M.; Palma, Jaime L.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    The environment within the spinal cord after injury, which changes in the progression from the acute to chronic stages, limits the extent of regeneration. The delivery of inductive factors to promote regeneration following spinal cord injury has been promising, yet, few strategies are have are versatile to allow delivery during acute or chronic injury that would facilitate screening of candidate therapies. This report investigates the intrathecal delivery of lentiviruses for long-term expression of regenerative factors. Lentivirus-filled sponges were inserted into the intrathecal space surrounding the spinal cord, with transgene expression observed within multiple cell types that persists for 12 weeks for both intact and injured spinal cord, without any apparent damage to the spinal cord tissue. Sponges loaded with lentivirus encoding for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated for acute (delivered at 0 weeks) and chronic (at 4 weeks) injuries, and for multiple locations relative to the injury. In an acute model, sponges placed directly above the injury increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Sponges placed caudal to the injury had reduced impact on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the injury. In a chronic model, sponges increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Furthermore, the effect of Shh was shown to be mediated in part by reduction of Bmp signaling, monitored with an Msx2-sensitive reporter vector. The implantation of lentivirus-loaded biomaterials intrathecally provides the opportunity to induce the expression of a factor at a specified time without entering the spinal cord, and has the potential to promote gene delivery within the spinal cord, which can influence the extent of regeneration. PMID:25724274

  18. Sponge-mediated lentivirus delivery to acute and chronic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Aline M; Palma, Jaime L; Shea, Lonnie D

    2015-04-28

    The environment within the spinal cord after injury, which changes in the progression from the acute to chronic stages, limits the extent of regeneration. The delivery of inductive factors to promote regeneration following spinal cord injury has been promising, yet, few strategies are versatile to allow delivery during acute or chronic injury that would facilitate screening of candidate therapies. This report investigates the intrathecal delivery of lentiviruses for long-term expression of regenerative factors. Lentivirus-filled sponges were inserted into the intrathecal space surrounding the spinal cord, with transgene expression observed within multiple cell types that persists for 12 weeks for both intact and injured spinal cord, without any apparent damage to the spinal cord tissue. Sponges loaded with lentivirus encoding for Sonic hedgehog (Shh) were investigated for acute (delivered at 0 weeks) and chronic (at 4 weeks) injuries, and for multiple locations relative to the injury. In an acute model, sponges placed directly above the injury increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Sponges placed caudal to the injury had reduced impact on oligodendrocytes and astrocytes in the injury. In a chronic model, sponges increased oligodendrocyte and decreased astrocyte presence. Furthermore, the effect of Shh was shown to be mediated in part by reduction of Bmp signaling, monitored with an Msx2-sensitive reporter vector. The implantation of lentivirus-loaded biomaterials intrathecally provides the opportunity to induce the expression of a factor at a specified time without entering the spinal cord, and has the potential to promote gene delivery within the spinal cord, which can influence the extent of regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Multifunctional, multichannel bridges that deliver neurotrophin encoding lentivirus for regeneration following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tuinstra, Hannah M; Aviles, Misael O; Shin, Seungjin; Holland, Samantha J; Zelivyanskaya, Marina L; Fast, Alan G; Ko, Sarah Y; Margul, Daniel J; Bartels, Anne K; Boehler, Ryan M; Cummings, Brian J; Anderson, Aileen J; Shea, Lonnie D

    2012-02-01

    Therapeutic strategies following spinal cord injury must address the multiple barriers that limit regeneration. Multiple channel bridges have been developed that stabilize the injury following implantation and provide physical guidance for regenerating axons. These bridges have now been employed as a vehicle for localized delivery of lentivirus. Implantation of lentivirus loaded multiple channel bridges produced transgene expression that persisted for at least 4 weeks. Expression was maximal at the implant at the earliest time point, and decreased with increasing time of implantation, as well as rostral and caudal to the bridge. Immunohistochemical staining indicated transduction of macrophages, Schwann cells, fibroblasts, and astrocytes within the bridge and adjacent tissue. Subsequently, the delivery of lentivirus encoding the neurotrophic factors NT-3 or BDNF significantly increased the extent of axonal growth into the bridge relative to empty scaffolds. In addition to promoting axon growth, the induced expression of neurotrophic factors led to myelination of axons within the channels of the bridge, where the number of myelinated axons was significantly enhanced relative to control. Combining gene delivery with biomaterials to provide physical guidance and create a permissive environment can provide a platform to enhance axonal growth and promote regeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus expressing the envelope glycoprotein of Hantaan virus induced protective immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses cause acute hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Currently, several types of inactivated HFRS vaccines are widely used, however the limited ability of these immunogen to elicit neutralizing antibodies restricts vaccine efficacy. Development of an effective vaccine to overcome this weakness is must. Methods In the present study, a recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus bearing the hantaan virus (HTNV) envelope glycoproteins (GP), rLV-M, was constructed. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the rLV-M and a series of immunological assays were conducted to determine the immunogenicity of the recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by rLV-M were compared with those of the inactivated HFRS vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed the rLV-M expressed target proteins in HEK-293cells. In mice, the rLV-M efficiently induced GP-specific humoral responses and protection against HTNV infection. Furthermore, the rLV-M induced higher neutralizing antibody titers than the inactivated HFRS vaccine control. Conclusions The results indicated the potential of using a pseudotyped lentivirus as a delivery vector for a hantavirus vaccine immunogen. PMID:24093752

  1. The experimental study of genetic engineering human neural stem cells mediated by lentivirus to express multigene.

    PubMed

    Cai, Pei-qiang; Tang, Xun; Lin, Yue-qiu; Martin, Oudega; Sun, Guang-yun; Xu, Lin; Yang, Yun-kang; Zhou, Tian-hua

    2006-02-01

    To explore the feasibility to construct genetic engineering human neural stem cells (hNSCs) mediated by lentivirus to express multigene in order to provide a graft source for further studies of spinal cord injury (SCI). Human neural stem cells from the brain cortex of human abortus were isolated and cultured, then gene was modified by lentivirus to express both green fluorescence protein (GFP) and rat neurotrophin-3 (NT-3); the transgenic expression was detected by the methods of fluorescence microscope, dorsal root ganglion of fetal rats and slot blot. Genetic engineering hNSCs were successfully constructed. All of the genetic engineering hNSCs which expressed bright green fluorescence were observed under the fluorescence microscope. The conditioned medium of transgenic hNSCs could induce neurite flourishing outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion (DRG). The genetic engineering hNSCs expressed high level NT-3 which could be detected by using slot blot. Genetic engineering hNSCs mediated by lentivirus can be constructed to express multigene successfully.

  2. Goat umbilical cord cells are permissive to small ruminant lentivirus infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martins, Gabrielle R; Marinho, Rebeca C; Junior, Rosivaldo Q Bezerra; Alves, Antoniel de O; Câmara, Lilia M C; Albuquerque-Pinto, Luiz C; Teixeira, Maria F da S

    Small ruminant lentiviruses isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes and target organs can be propagated in vitro in fibroblasts derived from goat synovial membrane cells. These cells are obtained from tissues collected from embryos or fetuses and are necessary for the establishment of the fibroblast primary culture. A new alternative type of host cells, derived from goat umbilical cord, was isolated and characterized phenotypically with its main purpose being to obtain cell monolayers that could be used for the diagnosis and isolation of small ruminant lentiviruses in cell culture. To accomplish this goal, cells were isolated from umbilical cords; characterized phenotypically by flow cytometry analysis; differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineage; and submitted to viral challenge. The proliferation of goat umbilical cord cells was fast and cell monolayers formed after 15 days. These cells exhibited morphology, immunophenotype, growth characteristics, and lineage differentiation potential similar to mesenchymal stem cells of other origins. The goat umbilical cord derived cells stained positive for vimentin and CD90, but negative for cytokeratin, CD34 and CD105 markers. Syncytia and cell lysis were observed in cell monolayers infected by CAEV-Cork and MVV-K1514, showing that the cells are permissive to small ruminant lentivirus infection in vitro. These data demonstrate the proliferative competence of cells derived from goat umbilical cords and provide a sound basis for future research to standardize this cell lineage.

  3. Suppression of Human Tenon Fibroblast Cell Proliferation by Lentivirus-Mediated VEGF Small Hairpin RNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongqiu; Hua, Wen; Li, Xuedong; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The functions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in scar formation after trabeculectomy were investigated in a human Tenon fibroblast cell line from glaucoma patients using lentivirus-mediated VEGF shRNA. Methods. Human Tenon fibroblast (HTF) cells were isolated from scar tissue of glaucoma patients during secondary surgery. Lentivirus-VEGF-shRNA was constructed and transfected into HTF cells. Subsequently, VEGF mRNA and protein expression were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, and the effects of VEGF knockdown were analyzed. The inhibition of HTF proliferation was monitored according to total cell numbers using ScanArray. Results. Both mRNA and protein levels of VEGF were reduced by lentivirus-mediated VEGF-shRNA, and proliferation of HTF cells was inhibited. Conclusions. Primary cultures of human Tenon fibroblast (HTF) were established, and proliferation was decreased following inhibition of VEGF. VEGF may be a suitable therapeutic target for reducing scar tissue formation in glaucoma patients after filtration surgery.

  4. Epitope analysis of capsid and matrix proteins of North American ovine lentivirus field isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Marcom, K A; Pearson, L D; Chung, C S; Poulson, J M; DeMartini, J C

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against two phenotypically distinct ovine lentivirus (OvLV) strains were generated by fusion of BALB/c SP2/0-Ag 14 myeloma cells with spleen cells from mice immunized with purified OvLV. Hybridomas were selected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and analysis of reactivity on immunoblots. The majority (17 of 21) of the MAbs recognized the gag-encoded capsid protein, CA p27, of both strains. Four other MAbs recognized a smaller structural protein, presumably a matrix protein, MA p17. Three distinct epitopes on CA p27 and one on MA p17 were distinguished by the MAbs with competition ELISA. MAbs from each epitope group were able to recognize 17 North American field isolates of OvLV and the closely related caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV). Analysis of the data indicated that these epitopes were highly conserved among naturally occurring isolates. A representative MAb from each epitope group of anti-CA p27 MAbs reacted with four field strains of OvLV and CAEV on immunoblots. An anti-MA p17 MAb recognized the same OvLV strains on immunoblots but failed to recognize CAEV. MAbs which recognize conserved epitopes of gag-encoded lentivirus proteins (CA p27 and MA p17) are valuable tools. These MAbs can be used to develop sensitive diagnostic assays and to study the pathogenesis of lentivirus infections in sheep and goats. Images PMID:1715884

  5. Suppression of Human Tenon Fibroblast Cell Proliferation by Lentivirus-Mediated VEGF Small Hairpin RNA

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Wen; Li, Xuedong; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The functions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in scar formation after trabeculectomy were investigated in a human Tenon fibroblast cell line from glaucoma patients using lentivirus-mediated VEGF shRNA. Methods. Human Tenon fibroblast (HTF) cells were isolated from scar tissue of glaucoma patients during secondary surgery. Lentivirus-VEGF-shRNA was constructed and transfected into HTF cells. Subsequently, VEGF mRNA and protein expression were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively, and the effects of VEGF knockdown were analyzed. The inhibition of HTF proliferation was monitored according to total cell numbers using ScanArray. Results. Both mRNA and protein levels of VEGF were reduced by lentivirus-mediated VEGF-shRNA, and proliferation of HTF cells was inhibited. Conclusions. Primary cultures of human Tenon fibroblast (HTF) were established, and proliferation was decreased following inhibition of VEGF. VEGF may be a suitable therapeutic target for reducing scar tissue formation in glaucoma patients after filtration surgery. PMID:28168047

  6. Lentivirus-mediated Knockdown of HDAC1 Uncovers Its Role in Esophageal Cancer Metastasis and Chemosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min; He, Gang; Wang, Yan; Pang, Xueli; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylationase 1 (HDAC1) is ubiquitously expressed in various cell lines and tissues and play an important role of regulation gene expression. Overexpression of HDAC1 has been observed in various types of cancers, which indicated that it might be a target for cancer therapy. To test HDAC1 inhibition for cancer treatment, the gene expression of HDAC1 was knockdown mediated by a lentivirus system. Our data showed the gene expression of HDAC1 could be efficiently knockdown by RNAi mediated by lentivirus in esophageal carcinoma EC109 cells. Knockdown of HDAC1 led to significant decrease of cell growth and altered cell cycle distribution. The result of transwell assay showed that the numbers of cells travelled through the micropore membrane was significantly decreased as HDAC1 expression was knockdown. Moreover, HDAC1 knockdown inhibited the migration of EC109 cells as determining by scratch test. Additionally, enhancement of cisplatin-stimulated apoptosis was detected by HDAC1 knockdown. Our data suggested inhibition of HDAC1 expression by lentivirus mediated shRNA might be further applied for esophageal cancer chemotherapy. PMID:27698906

  7. Expanding Possibilities for Intervention against Small Ruminant Lentiviruses through Genetic Marker-Assisted Selective Breeding

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephen N.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2013-01-01

    Small ruminant lentiviruses include members that infect sheep (ovine lentivirus [OvLV]; also known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus/maedi-visna virus) and goats (caprine arthritis encephalitis virus [CAEV]). Breed differences in seroprevalence and proviral concentration of OvLV had suggested a strong genetic component in susceptibility to infection by OvLV in sheep. A genetic marker test for susceptibility to OvLV has been developed recently based on the TMEM154 gene with validation data from over 2,800 sheep representing nine cohorts. While no single genotype has been shown to have complete resistance to OvLV, consistent association in thousands of sheep from multiple breeds and management conditions highlight a new strategy for intervention by selective breeding. This genetic marker-assisted selection (MAS) has the potential to be a useful addition to existing viral control measures. Further, the discovery of multiple additional genomic regions associated with susceptibility to or control of OvLV suggests that additional genetic marker tests may be developed to extend the reach of MAS in the future. This review will cover the strengths and limitations of existing data from host genetics as an intervention and outline additional questions for future genetic research in sheep, goats, small ruminant lentiviruses, and their host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23771240

  8. Ongoing β-Cell Turnover in Adult Nonhuman Primates Is Not Adaptively Increased in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Saisho, Yoshifumi; Manesso, Erica; Butler, Alexandra E.; Galasso, Ryan; Kavanagh, Kylie; Flynn, Mickey; Zhang, Li; Clark, Paige; Gurlo, Tatyana; Toffolo, Gianna M.; Cobelli, Claudio; Wagner, Janice D.; Butler, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE β-Cell turnover and its potential to permit β-cell regeneration in adult primates are unknown. Our aims were 1) to measure β-cell turnover in adult nonhuman primates; 2) to establish the relative contribution of β-cell replication and formation of new β-cells from other precursors (defined thus as β-cell neogenesis); and 3) to establish whether there is an adaptive increase in β-cell formation (attempted regeneration) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in adult nonhuman primates. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adult (aged 7 years) vervet monkeys were administered STZ (45–55 mg/kg, n = 7) or saline (n = 9). Pancreas was obtained from each animal twice, first by open surgical biopsy and then by euthanasia. β-Cell turnover was evaluated by applying a mathematic model to measured replication and apoptosis rates. RESULTS β-Cell turnover is present in adult nonhuman primates (3.3 ± 0.9 mg/month), mostly (∼80%) derived from β-cell neogenesis. β-Cell formation was minimal in STZ-induced diabetes. Despite marked hyperglycemia, β-cell apoptosis was not increased in monkeys administered STZ. CONCLUSIONS There is ongoing β-cell turnover in adult nonhuman primates that cannot be accounted for by β-cell replication. There is no evidence of β-cell regeneration in monkeys administered STZ. Hyperglycemia does not induce β-cell apoptosis in nonhuman primates in vivo. PMID:21270238

  9. Live-Attenuated Lentivirus Immunization Modulates Innate Immunity and Inflammation while Protecting Rhesus Macaques from Vaginal Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Genescà, Meritxell; Ma, Zhong-Min; Wang, Yichuan; Assaf, Basel; Qureshi, Huma; Fritts, Linda; Huang, Ying; McChesney, Michael B.

    2012-01-01

    Immunization with attenuated lentiviruses is the only reliable method of protecting rhesus macaques (RM) from vaginal challenge with pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). CD8+ lymphocyte depletion prior to SIVmac239 vaginal challenge demonstrated that a modest, Gag-specific CD8+ T cell response induced by immunization with simian-human immunodeficiency virus 89.6 (SHIV89.6) protects RM. Although CD8+ T cells are required for protection, there is no anamnestic expansion of SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in any tissues except the vagina after challenge. Further, SHIV immunization increased the number of viral target cells in the vagina and cervix, suggesting that the ratio of target cells to antiviral CD8+ T cells was not a determinant of protection. We hypothesized that persistent replication of the attenuated vaccine virus modulates inflammatory responses and limits T cell activation and expansion by inducing immunoregulatory T cell populations. We found that attenuated SHIV infection decreased the number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells, suppressed T cell activation, decreased mRNA levels of proinflammatory mediators, and increased mRNA levels of immunoregulatory molecules. Three days after SIV vaginal challenge, SHIV-immunized RM had significantly more T regulatory cells in the vagina than the unimmunized RM. By day 14 postchallenge, immune activation and inflammation were characteristic of unimmunized RM but were minimal in SHIV-immunized RM. Thus, a modest vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell response in the context of immunoregulatory suppression of T cell activation may protect against vaginal HIV transmission. PMID:22696662

  10. Live-attenuated lentivirus immunization modulates innate immunity and inflammation while protecting rhesus macaques from vaginal simian immunodeficiency virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Genescà, Meritxell; Ma, Zhong-Min; Wang, Yichuan; Assaf, Basel; Qureshi, Huma; Fritts, Linda; Huang, Ying; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J

    2012-09-01

    Immunization with attenuated lentiviruses is the only reliable method of protecting rhesus macaques (RM) from vaginal challenge with pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). CD8(+) lymphocyte depletion prior to SIVmac239 vaginal challenge demonstrated that a modest, Gag-specific CD8(+) T cell response induced by immunization with simian-human immunodeficiency virus 89.6 (SHIV89.6) protects RM. Although CD8(+) T cells are required for protection, there is no anamnestic expansion of SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in any tissues except the vagina after challenge. Further, SHIV immunization increased the number of viral target cells in the vagina and cervix, suggesting that the ratio of target cells to antiviral CD8(+) T cells was not a determinant of protection. We hypothesized that persistent replication of the attenuated vaccine virus modulates inflammatory responses and limits T cell activation and expansion by inducing immunoregulatory T cell populations. We found that attenuated SHIV infection decreased the number of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells, suppressed T cell activation, decreased mRNA levels of proinflammatory mediators, and increased mRNA levels of immunoregulatory molecules. Three days after SIV vaginal challenge, SHIV-immunized RM had significantly more T regulatory cells in the vagina than the unimmunized RM. By day 14 postchallenge, immune activation and inflammation were characteristic of unimmunized RM but were minimal in SHIV-immunized RM. Thus, a modest vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cell response in the context of immunoregulatory suppression of T cell activation may protect against vaginal HIV transmission.

  11. The malignant primate?

    PubMed

    de Grouchy, J

    1991-01-01

    Speciation and carcinogenesis result from genomic instability at the gametic or at the somatic levels. After an infinity of trials they occur, by chromosome rearrangements, in single individuals or in single cells and evolve by similar chromosomal or clonal evolutions. Loss of heterozygosity for the first event is essential in both processes: in evolution, a chromosomal rearrangement, a pericentric inversion or a Robertsonian fusion, must become homozygous to ensure a reproductive barrier for a new species; Knudson's two-event sequence is a similar situation in cancer. Position effect is equally important: we have shown overexpression of the SOD1 gene in the orangutan phylum probably by an intrachromosomal rearrangement; the t(9;22) in CML acts by typical position effect. Parental imprinting underlies the evolution of genome function and the unset of certain cancers. Evolution and malignancy are interweaved by viruses and oncogenes since the dawn of life. Cancer uses its intelligence to expand and to destroy the other tissues, using subtle metabolic pathways and a variety of tricks to metastasize other cells. It always wins but saws the branch on which it sits. Mankind also grows exponentially, killing thousands of other species, poisoning the oceans and soft waters, polluting the atmosphere, all for his egoistic needs. Man also travels and metastasizes other Earths. He modifies his genome or that of other species, and develops new technologies for his reproduction. He can destroy the planet in an eyeblink. To be or not to be the malignant primate, that will be the dilemma for the 21st Century.

  12. No need to replace an "anomalous" primate (Primates) with an "anomalous" bear (Carnivora, Ursidae).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Eliécer E; Pine, Ronald H

    2015-01-01

    By means of mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequencing of putative "yeti", "bigfoot", and other "anomalous primate" hair samples, a recent study concluded that two samples, presented as from the Himalayas, do not belong to an "anomalous primate", but to an unknown, anomalous type of ursid. That is, that they match 12S rRNA sequences of a fossil Polar Bear (Ursusmaritimus), but neither of modern Polar Bears, nor of Brown Bears (Ursusarctos), the closest relative of Polar Bears, and one that occurs today in the Himalayas. We have undertaken direct comparison of sequences; replication of the original comparative study; inference of phylogenetic relationships of the two samples with respect to those from all extant species of Ursidae (except for the Giant Panda, Ailuropodamelanoleuca) and two extinct Pleistocene species; and application of a non-tree-based population aggregation approach for species diagnosis and identification. Our results demonstrate that the very short fragment of the 12S rRNA gene sequenced by Sykes et al. is not sufficiently informative to support the hypotheses provided by these authors with respect to the taxonomic identity of the individuals from which these sequences were obtained. We have concluded that there is no reason to believe that the two samples came from anything other than Brown Bears. These analyses afforded an opportunity to test the monophyly of morphologically defined species and to comment on both their phylogenetic relationships and future efforts necessary to advance our understanding of ursid systematics.

  13. A Molecular Phylogeny of Living Primates

    PubMed Central

    Perelman, Polina; Johnson, Warren E.; Roos, Christian; Seuánez, Hector N.; Horvath, Julie E.; Moreira, Miguel A. M.; Kessing, Bailey; Pontius, Joan; Roelke, Melody; Rumpler, Yves; Schneider, Maria Paula C.; Silva, Artur; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Pecon-Slattery, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Comparative genomic analyses of primates offer considerable potential to define and understand the processes that mold, shape, and transform the human genome. However, primate taxonomy is both complex and controversial, with marginal unifying consensus of the evolutionary hierarchy of extant primate species. Here we provide new genomic sequence (∼8 Mb) from 186 primates representing 61 (∼90%) of the described genera, and we include outgroup species from Dermoptera, Scandentia, and Lagomorpha. The resultant phylogeny is exceptionally robust and illuminates events in primate evolution from ancient to recent, clarifying numerous taxonomic controversies and providing new data on human evolution. Ongoing speciation, reticulate evolution, ancient relic lineages, unequal rates of evolution, and disparate distributions of insertions/deletions among the reconstructed primate lineages are uncovered. Our resolution of the primate phylogeny provides an essential evolutionary framework with far-reaching applications including: human selection and adaptation, global emergence of zoonotic diseases, mammalian comparative genomics, primate taxonomy, and conservation of endangered species. PMID:21436896

  14. Unique functional properties of conserved arginine residues in the lentivirus lytic peptide domains of the C-terminal tail of HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Kuhlmann, Anne-Sophie; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Craigo, Jodi K; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2014-03-14

    A previous study from our laboratory reported a preferential conservation of arginine relative to lysine in the C-terminal tail (CTT) of HIV-1 envelope (Env). Despite substantial overall sequence variation in the CTT, specific arginines are highly conserved in the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP) motifs and are scarcely substituted by lysines, in contrast to gp120 and the ectodomain of gp41. However, to date, no explanation has been provided to explain the selective incorporation and conservation of arginines over lysines in these motifs. Herein, we address the functions in virus replication of the most conserved arginines by performing conservative mutations of arginine to lysine in the LLP1 and LLP2 motifs. The presence of lysine in place of arginine in the LLP1 motif resulted in significant impairment of Env expression and consequently virus replication kinetics, Env fusogenicity, and incorporation. By contrast, lysine exchanges in LLP2 only affected the level of Env incorporation and fusogenicity. Our findings demonstrate that the conservative lysine substitutions significantly affect Env functional properties indicating a unique functional role for the highly conserved arginines in the LLP motifs. These results provide for the first time a functional explanation to the preferred incorporation of arginine, relative to lysine, in the CTT of HIV-1 Env. We propose that these arginines may provide unique functions for Env interaction with viral or cellular cofactors that then influence overall Env functional properties.

  15. 42 CFR 71.53 - Nonhuman primates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nonhuman primates. 71.53 Section 71.53 Public... FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.53 Nonhuman primates. (a) Definitions. As used in this section the... nonhuman primates from a foreign country within a period of 31 days, beginning with the importation date...

  16. 42 CFR 71.53 - Nonhuman primates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nonhuman primates. 71.53 Section 71.53 Public... FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.53 Nonhuman primates. (a) Definitions. As used in this section the... nonhuman primates from a foreign country within a period of 31 days, beginning with the importation date...

  17. 42 CFR 71.53 - Nonhuman primates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nonhuman primates. 71.53 Section 71.53 Public... FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.53 Nonhuman primates. (a) Definitions. As used in this section the... nonhuman primates from a foreign country within a period of 31 days, beginning with the importation date...

  18. Archaeal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  19. APOBEC3G polymorphism as a selective barrier to cross-species transmission and emergence of pathogenic SIV and AIDS in a primate host.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Annabel; McCarthy, Kevin R; Ooms, Marcel; Letko, Michael; Morgan, Jennifer S; Simon, Viviana; Johnson, Welkin E

    2013-01-01

    Cellular restriction factors, which render cells intrinsically resistant to viruses, potentially impose genetic barriers to cross-species transmission and emergence of viral pathogens in nature. One such factor is APOBEC3G. To overcome APOBEC3G-mediated restriction, many lentiviruses encode Vif, a protein that targets APOBEC3G for degradation. As with many restriction factor genes, primate APOBEC3G displays strong signatures of positive selection. This is interpreted as evidence that the primate APOBEC3G locus reflects a long-term evolutionary "arms-race" between retroviruses and their primate hosts. Here, we provide direct evidence that APOBEC3G has functioned as a barrier to cross-species transmission, selecting for viral resistance during emergence of the AIDS-causing pathogen SIVmac in captive colonies of Asian macaques in the 1970s. Specifically, we found that rhesus macaques have multiple, functionally distinct APOBEC3G alleles, and that emergence of SIVmac and simian AIDS required adaptation of the virus to evade APOBEC3G-mediated restriction. Our evidence includes the first comparative analysis of APOBEC3G polymorphism and function in both a reservoir and recipient host species (sooty mangabeys and rhesus macaques, respectively), and identification of adaptations unique to Vif proteins of the SIVmac lineage that specifically antagonize rhesus APOBEC3G alleles. By demonstrating that interspecies variation in a known restriction factor selected for viral counter-adaptations in the context of a documented case of cross-species transmission, our results lend strong support to the evolutionary "arms-race" hypothesis. Importantly, our study confirms that APOBEC3G divergence can be a critical determinant of interspecies transmission and emergence of primate lentiviruses, including viruses with the potential to infect and spread in human populations.

  20. Cooperation and deception in primates.

    PubMed

    Hall, Katie; Brosnan, Sarah F

    2017-08-01

    Though competition and cooperation are often considered opposing forces in an arms race driving natural selection, many animals, including humans, cooperate in order to mitigate competition with others. Understanding others' psychological states, such as seeing and knowing, others' goals and intentions, and coordinating actions are all important for complex cooperation-as well as for predicting behavior in order to take advantage of others through tactical deception, a form of competition. We outline evidence of primates' understanding of how others perceive the world, and then consider how the evidence from both deception and cooperation fits this framework to give us a more complete understanding of the evolution of complex social cognition in primates. In experimental food competitions, primates flexibly manipulate group-mates' behavior to tactically deceive them. Deception can infiltrate cooperative interactions, such as when one takes an unfair share of meat after a coordinated hunt. In order to counter competition of this sort, primates maintain cooperation through partner choice, partner control, and third party punishment. Yet humans appear to stand alone in their ability to understand others' beliefs, which allows us not only to deceive others with the explicit intent to create a false belief, but it also allows us to put ourselves in others' shoes to determine when cheaters need to be punished, even if we are not directly disadvantaged by the cheater. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Viral infections of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kalter, S S; Heberling, R L; Cooke, A W; Barry, J D; Tian, P Y; Northam, W J

    1997-10-01

    Approximately 53,000 serologic tests and viral isolation studies were performed on 1,700 nonhuman primate specimens for evidence of past and/or current viral infection. Information, other than the requested test, generally was not provided with the specimen. This lack of information does not permit any attempt at interpretation of results. Requested testing included a large number of diverse viral agents in approximately 40 primate species. The resulting data are in keeping with those of previous studies and offer an insight into the needs of colony management, as well as some general information on the overall frequency of infection with the indicated viruses. Inasmuch as the results represent testing of single specimens, they are not to be construed as "diagnostic," and simply indicate past infection as represented by the presence of antibody in the test animal. Viral isolation results are listed, and the number of positive results versus the number of animals tested emphasizes the limitations of the procedure. Investigations such as these continue to assist in the maintenance of healthy nonhuman primate colonies. This information also supports continued use of nonhuman primates for research in human viral infections and may be helpful in terms of animal selection for use in xenotransplants.

  2. Neuroethology of primate social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Steve W. C.; Brent, Lauren J. N.; Adams, Geoffrey K.; Klein, Jeffrey T.; Pearson, John M.; Watson, Karli K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    A neuroethological approach to human and nonhuman primate behavior and cognition predicts biological specializations for social life. Evidence reviewed here indicates that ancestral mechanisms are often duplicated, repurposed, and differentially regulated to support social behavior. Focusing on recent research from nonhuman primates, we describe how the primate brain might implement social functions by coopting and extending preexisting mechanisms that previously supported nonsocial functions. This approach reveals that highly specialized mechanisms have evolved to decipher the immediate social context, and parallel circuits have evolved to translate social perceptual signals and nonsocial perceptual signals into partially integrated social and nonsocial motivational signals, which together inform general-purpose mechanisms that command behavior. Differences in social behavior between species, as well as between individuals within a species, result in part from neuromodulatory regulation of these neural circuits, which itself appears to be under partial genetic control. Ultimately, intraspecific variation in social behavior has differential fitness consequences, providing fundamental building blocks of natural selection. Our review suggests that the neuroethological approach to primate behavior may provide unique insights into human psychopathology. PMID:23754410

  3. Pathogenesis of varicelloviruses in primates.

    PubMed

    Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2015-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue, simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and, although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation.

  4. Development of recombinant capsid antigen/transmembrane epitope fusion proteins for serological diagnosis of animal lentivirus infections.

    PubMed

    Rosati, S; Profiti, M; Lorenzetti, R; Bandecchi, P; Mannelli, A; Ortoffi, M; Tolari, F; Ciabatti, I M

    2004-10-01

    Among animal lentiviruses, Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) and Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) are important pathogens associated with a variety of clinical pictures including immunodeficiency, anaemia, arthritis, pneumonia. The detection of viral antibody response represents a practical diagnostic approach in all lentivirus infections since they remain detectable long life. Capsid antigen (CA) is the major viral core protein and specific antibodies against this antigen are usually first recognised in infected sheep, goat and horse, remaining detectable for long period. Transmembrane (TM) domain of envelope glycoprotein contains a well conserved motif known to form an immunodominant epitope in several lentiviruses. In this study a simple strategy was developed to express the entire CA and the TM epitope in a single fusion protein from equine, feline and small ruminant lentiviruses in prokaryotic system and evaluated the diagnostic utility of a purified preparation in an indirect ELISA for each of the three infections. Results demonstrate that, for FIV and SRLV infections, the combination of CA and TM fractions increases the sensitivity of diagnostic tests based only on CA. The corresponding CA/TM antigen from EIAV showed excellent agreement with Coggins test.

  5. Highly Efficient Generation of Transgenic Sheep by Lentivirus Accompanying the Alteration of Methylation Status

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chenxi; Wang, Liqin; Li, Wenrong; Zhang, Xuemei; Tian, Yongzhi; Zhang, Ning; He, Sangang; Chen, Tong; Huang, Juncheng; Liu, Mingjun

    2013-01-01

    Background Low efficiency of gene transfer and silence of transgene expression are the critical factors hampering the development of transgenic livestock. Recently, transfer of recombinant lentivirus has been demonstrated to be an efficient transgene delivery method in various animals. However, the lentiviral transgenesis and the methylation status of transgene in sheep have not been well addressed. Methodology/Principle Findings EGFP transgenic sheep were generated by injecting recombinant lentivirus into zygotes. Of the 13 lambs born, 8 carried the EGFP transgene, and its chromosomal integration was identified in all tested tissues. Western blotting showed that GFP was expressed in all transgenic founders and their various tissues. Analysis of CpG methylation status of CMV promoter by bisulfate sequencing unraveled remarkable variation of methylation levels in transgenic sheep. The average methylation levels ranged from 37.6% to 79.1% in the transgenic individuals and 34.7% to 83% in the tested tissues. Correlative analysis of methylation status with GFP expression revealed that the GFP expression level was inversely correlated with methylation density. The similar phenomenon was also observed in tested tissues. Transgene integration determined by Southern blotting presented multiple integrants ranging from 2 to 6 copies in the genome of transgenic sheep. Conclusions/Significance Injection of lentiviral transgene into zygotes could be a promising efficient gene delivery system to generate transgenic sheep and achieved widespread transgene expression. The promoter of integrants transferred by lentiviral vector was subjected to dramatic alteration of methylation status and the transgene expression level was inversely correlative with promoter methylation density. Our work illustrated for the first time that generation of transgenic sheep by injecting recombinant lentivirus into zygote could be an efficient tool to improve sheep performance by genetic modification

  6. Reducing neuroinflammation by delivery of IL‐10 encoding lentivirus from multiple‐channel bridges

    PubMed Central

    Margul, Daniel J.; Park, Jonghyuck; Boehler, Ryan M.; Smith, Dominique R.; Johnson, Mitchell A.; McCreedy, Dylan A.; He, Ting; Ataliwala, Aishani; Kukushliev, Todor V.; Liang, Jesse; Sohrabi, Alireza; Goodman, Ashley G.; Walthers, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The spinal cord is unable to regenerate after injury largely due to growth‐inhibition by an inflammatory response to the injury that fails to resolve, resulting in secondary damage and cell death. An approach that prevents inhibition by attenuating the inflammatory response and promoting its resolution through the transition of macrophages to anti‐inflammatory phenotypes is essential for the creation of a growth permissive microenvironment. Viral gene delivery to induce the expression of anti‐inflammatory factors provides the potential to provide localized delivery to alter the host inflammatory response. Initially, we investigated the effect of the biomaterial and viral components of the delivery system to influence the extent of cell infiltration and the phenotype of these cells. Bridge implantation reduces antigen‐presenting cell infiltration at day 7, and lentivirus addition to the bridge induces a transient increase in neutrophils in the spinal cord at day 7 and macrophages at day 14. Delivery of a lentivirus encoding IL‐10, an anti‐inflammatory factor that inhibits immune cell activation and polarizes the macrophage population towards anti‐inflammatory phenotypes, reduced neutrophil infiltration at both day 7 and day 28. Though IL‐10 lentivirus did not affect macrophages number, it skewed the macrophage population toward an anti‐inflammatory M2 phenotype and altered macrophage morphology. Additionally, IL‐10 delivery resulted in improved motor function, suggesting reduced secondary damage and increased sparing. Taken together, these results indicate that localized expression of anti‐inflammatory factors, such as IL‐10, can modulate the inflammatory response following spinal cord injury, and may be a key component of a combinatorial approach that targets the multiple barriers to regeneration and functional recovery. PMID:27981242

  7. Viral load and clinical disease enhancement associated with a lentivirus cytotoxic T lymphocyte vaccine regimen

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; Wagner, Bettina; Horohov, David W.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2009-01-01

    Effective DNA-based vaccines against lentiviruses will likely induce CTL against conserved viral proteins. Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infects horses worldwide, and serves as a useful model for lentiviral immune control. Although attenuated live EIAV vaccines have induced protective immune responses, DNA-based vaccines have not. In particular, DNA-based vaccines have had limited success in inducing CTL responses against intracellular pathogens in the horse. We hypothesized that priming with a codon-optimized plasmid encoding EIAV Gag p15/p26 with co-administration of a plasmid encoding an equine IL-2/IgG fusion protein as a molecular adjuvant, followed by boosting with a vaccinia vector expressing Gag p15/p26, would induce protective Gag-specific CTL responses. Although the regimen induced Gag-specific CTL in four of seven vaccinated horses, CTL were not detected until after the vaccinia boost, and protective effects were not observed in EIAV challenged vaccinates. Unexpectedly, vaccinates had significantly higher viral loads and more severe clinical disease, associated with the presence of vaccine-induced CTL. It was concluded that 1.) further optimization of the timing and route of DNA immunization was needed for efficient CTL priming in vivo, 2.) co-administration of the IL-2/IgG plasmid did not enhance CTL priming by the Gag p15/p26 plasmid, 3.) vaccinia vectors are useful for lentivirus-specific CTL induction in the horse, 4.) Gag-specific CTL alone are either insufficient or a more robust Gag-specific CTL response is needed to limit EIAV viremia and clinical disease, and 5.) CTL-inducing vaccines lacking envelope immunogens can result in lentiviral disease enhancement. Although the mechanisms for enhancement associated with this vaccine regimen remain to be elucidated, these results have important implications for development of lentivirus T cell vaccines. PMID:19368787

  8. Evolution of puma lentivirus in bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in North America.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justin S; Bevins, Sarah N; Serieys, Laurel E K; Vickers, Winston; Logan, Ken A; Aldredge, Mat; Boydston, Erin E; Lyren, Lisa M; McBride, Roy; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Troyer, Jennifer L; Riley, Seth P; Boyce, Walter M; Crooks, Kevin R; VandeWoude, Sue

    2014-07-01

    Mountain lions (Puma concolor) throughout North and South America are infected with puma lentivirus clade B (PLVB). A second, highly divergent lentiviral clade, PLVA, infects mountain lions in southern California and Florida. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) in these two geographic regions are also infected with PLVA, and to date, this is the only strain of lentivirus identified in bobcats. We sequenced full-length PLV genomes in order to characterize the molecular evolution of PLV in bobcats and mountain lions. Low sequence homology (88% average pairwise identity) and frequent recombination (1 recombination breakpoint per 3 isolates analyzed) were observed in both clades. Viral proteins have markedly different patterns of evolution; sequence homology and negative selection were highest in Gag and Pol and lowest in Vif and Env. A total of 1.7% of sites across the PLV genome evolve under positive selection, indicating that host-imposed selection pressure is an important force shaping PLV evolution. PLVA strains are highly spatially structured, reflecting the population dynamics of their primary host, the bobcat. In contrast, the phylogeography of PLVB reflects the highly mobile mountain lion, with diverse PLVB isolates cocirculating in some areas and genetically related viruses being present in populations separated by thousands of kilometers. We conclude that PLVA and PLVB are two different viral species with distinct feline hosts and evolutionary histories. Importance: An understanding of viral evolution in natural host populations is a fundamental goal of virology, molecular biology, and disease ecology. Here we provide a detailed analysis of puma lentivirus (PLV) evolution in two natural carnivore hosts, the bobcat and mountain lion. Our results illustrate that PLV evolution is a dynamic process that results from high rates of viral mutation/recombination and host-imposed selection pressure.

  9. Evolution of Puma Lentivirus in Bobcats (Lynx rufus) and Mountain Lions (Puma concolor) in North America

    PubMed Central

    Bevins, Sarah N.; Serieys, Laurel E. K.; Vickers, Winston; Logan, Ken A.; Aldredge, Mat; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; McBride, Roy; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Riley, Seth P.; Boyce, Walter M.; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mountain lions (Puma concolor) throughout North and South America are infected with puma lentivirus clade B (PLVB). A second, highly divergent lentiviral clade, PLVA, infects mountain lions in southern California and Florida. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) in these two geographic regions are also infected with PLVA, and to date, this is the only strain of lentivirus identified in bobcats. We sequenced full-length PLV genomes in order to characterize the molecular evolution of PLV in bobcats and mountain lions. Low sequence homology (88% average pairwise identity) and frequent recombination (1 recombination breakpoint per 3 isolates analyzed) were observed in both clades. Viral proteins have markedly different patterns of evolution; sequence homology and negative selection were highest in Gag and Pol and lowest in Vif and Env. A total of 1.7% of sites across the PLV genome evolve under positive selection, indicating that host-imposed selection pressure is an important force shaping PLV evolution. PLVA strains are highly spatially structured, reflecting the population dynamics of their primary host, the bobcat. In contrast, the phylogeography of PLVB reflects the highly mobile mountain lion, with diverse PLVB isolates cocirculating in some areas and genetically related viruses being present in populations separated by thousands of kilometers. We conclude that PLVA and PLVB are two different viral species with distinct feline hosts and evolutionary histories. IMPORTANCE An understanding of viral evolution in natural host populations is a fundamental goal of virology, molecular biology, and disease ecology. Here we provide a detailed analysis of puma lentivirus (PLV) evolution in two natural carnivore hosts, the bobcat and mountain lion. Our results illustrate that PLV evolution is a dynamic process that results from high rates of viral mutation/recombination and host-imposed selection pressure. PMID:24741092

  10. Specific in vivo labeling with GFP retroviruses, lentiviruses, and adenoviruses for imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Robert M.; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2008-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized the field of imaging. Our laboratory pioneered in vivo imaging with fluorescent proteins. Fluorescent proteins have enabled imaging at the subcellular level in mice. We review here the use of different vectors carrying fluorescent proteins to selectively label normal and tumor tissue in vivo. We show that a GFP retrovirus and telomerase-driven GFP adenovirus can selectively label tumors in mice. We also show that a GFP lentivirus can selectively label the liver in mice. The practical application of these results are discussed.

  11. Cytoplasmic Viral Replication Complexes

    PubMed Central

    den Boon, Johan A.; Diaz, Arturo; Ahlquist, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Many viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm compartmentalize their genome replication and transcription in organelle-like structures that enhance replication efficiency and protection from host defenses. In particular, recent studies with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses have further elucidated the ultrastructure of membrane-bounded RNA replication complexes and their close coordination with virion assembly and budding. The structure, function and assembly of some positive-strand RNA virus replication complexes have parallels and potential evolutionary links with the replicative cores of double-strand RNA virus and retrovirus virions, and more general similarities with the replication factories of cytoplasmic DNA viruses. PMID:20638644

  12. In Vivo Stable Transduction of Humanized Liver Tissue in Chimeric Mice via High-Capacity Adenovirus–Lentivirus Hybrid Vector

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Miho; Tateno, Chise; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawasaki, Yoshiko; Kimura, Takahiro; Faure-Kumar, Emmanuelle; Palmer, Donna J.; Ng, Philip; Okamura, Haruki; Kasahara, Noriyuki

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We developed hybrid vectors employing high-capacity adenovirus as a first-stage carrier encoding all the components required for in situ production of a second-stage lentivirus, thereby achieving stable transgene expression in secondary target cells. Such vectors have never previously been tested in normal tissues, because of the scarcity of suitable in vivo systems permissive for second-stage lentivirus assembly. Here we employed a novel murine model in which endogenous liver tissue is extensively reconstituted with engrafted human hepatocytes, and successfully achieved stable transduction by the second-stage lentivirus produced in situ from first-stage adenovirus. This represents the first demonstration of the functionality of adenoviral-lentiviral hybrid vectors in a normal parenchymal organ in vivo. PMID:19725756

  13. Replication of Tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2016-08-04

    Tobacco mosaic virus and other tobamoviruses have served as models for studying the mechanisms of viral RNA replication. In tobamoviruses, genomic RNA replication occurs via several steps: (a) synthesis of viral replication proteins by translation of the genomic RNA; (b) translation-coupled binding of the replication proteins to a 5'-terminal region of the genomic RNA; (c) recruitment of the genomic RNA by replication proteins onto membranes and formation of a complex with host proteins TOM1 and ARL8; (d) synthesis of complementary (negative-strand) RNA in the complex; and (e) synthesis of progeny genomic RNA. This article reviews current knowledge on tobamovirus RNA replication, particularly regarding how the genomic RNA is specifically selected as a replication template and how the replication proteins are activated. We also focus on the roles of the replication proteins in evading or suppressing host defense systems.

  14. Worldwide prevalence of lentivirus infection in wild feline species: epidemiologic and phylogenetic aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, R A; Langley, R; Roelke, M E; Goeken, R M; Adger-Johnson, D; Goff, J P; Albert, J P; Packer, C; Laurenson, M K; Caro, T M

    1992-01-01

    The natural occurrence of lentiviruses closely related to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in nondomestic felid species is shown here to be worldwide. Cross-reactive antibodies to FIV were common in several free-ranging populations of large cats, including East African lions and cheetahs of the Serengeti ecosystem and in puma (also called cougar or mountain lion) populations throughout North America. Infectious puma lentivirus (PLV) was isolated from several Florida panthers, a severely endangered relict puma subspecies inhabiting the Big Cypress Swamp and Everglades ecosystems in southern Florida. Phylogenetic analysis of PLV genomic sequences from disparate geographic isolates revealed appreciable divergence from domestic cat FIV sequences as well as between PLV sequences found in different North American locales. The level of sequence divergence between PLV and FIV was greater than the level of divergence between human and certain simian immunodeficiency viruses, suggesting that the transmission of FIV between feline species is infrequent and parallels in time the emergence of HIV from simian ancestors. Images PMID:1382145

  15. Worldwide prevalence of lentivirus infection in wild feline species: epidemiologic and phylogenetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Olmsted, R A; Langley, R; Roelke, M E; Goeken, R M; Adger-Johnson, D; Goff, J P; Albert, J P; Packer, C; Laurenson, M K; Caro, T M

    1992-10-01

    The natural occurrence of lentiviruses closely related to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) in nondomestic felid species is shown here to be worldwide. Cross-reactive antibodies to FIV were common in several free-ranging populations of large cats, including East African lions and cheetahs of the Serengeti ecosystem and in puma (also called cougar or mountain lion) populations throughout North America. Infectious puma lentivirus (PLV) was isolated from several Florida panthers, a severely endangered relict puma subspecies inhabiting the Big Cypress Swamp and Everglades ecosystems in southern Florida. Phylogenetic analysis of PLV genomic sequences from disparate geographic isolates revealed appreciable divergence from domestic cat FIV sequences as well as between PLV sequences found in different North American locales. The level of sequence divergence between PLV and FIV was greater than the level of divergence between human and certain simian immunodeficiency viruses, suggesting that the transmission of FIV between feline species is infrequent and parallels in time the emergence of HIV from simian ancestors.

  16. Evolution of puma lentivirus in bobcats (Lynx rufus) and mountain lions (Puma concolor) in North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Justin S.; Bevins, Sarah N.; Serieys, Laurel E.K.; Vickers, Winston; Logan, Ken A.; Aldredge, Mat; Boydston, Erin E.; Lyren, Lisa M.; McBride, Roy; Roelke-Parker, Melody; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Troyer, Jennifer L.; Riley, Seth P.; Boyce, Walter M.; Crooks, Kevin R.; VandeWoude, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Mountain lions (Puma concolor) throughout North and South America are infected with puma lentivirus clade B (PLVB). A second, highly divergent lentiviral clade, PLVA, infects mountain lions in southern California and Florida. Bobcats (Lynx rufus) in these two geographic regions are also infected with PLVA, and to date, this is the only strain of lentivirus identified in bobcats. We sequenced full-length PLV genomes in order to characterize the molecular evolution of PLV in bobcats and mountain lions. Low sequence homology (88% average pairwise identity) and frequent recombination (1 recombination breakpoint per 3 isolates analyzed) were observed in both clades. Viral proteins have markedly different patterns of evolution; sequence homology and negative selection were highest in Gag and Pol and lowest in Vif and Env. A total of 1.7% of sites across the PLV genome evolve under positive selection, indicating that host-imposed selection pressure is an important force shaping PLV evolution. PLVA strains are highly spatially structured, reflecting the population dynamics of their primary host, the bobcat. In contrast, the phylogeography of PLVB reflects the highly mobile mountain lion, with diverse PLVB isolates cocirculating in some areas and genetically related viruses being present in populations separated by thousands of kilometers. We conclude that PLVA and PLVB are two different viral species with distinct feline hosts and evolutionary histories.

  17. Recombinant Jembrana disease virus proteins as antigens for the detection of antibody to bovine lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Burkala, E J; Narayani, I; Hartaningsih, N; Kertayadnya, G; Berryman, D I; Wilcox, G E

    1998-09-01

    Jembrana disease virus (JDV) is a recently identified bovine lentivirus causing an acute severe disease syndrome in banteng cattle (Bos javanicus) and a milder disease syndrome in Bos taurus cattle in Indonesia. The virus is closely related genetically to the previously identified bovine lentivirus, bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV). Recombinant clones were produced which contained the capsid (CA) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the respective gag and env open reading frames of JDV. The proteins were expressed as fusions to the glutathione-s-transferase (GST) enzyme in Escherichia coli and purification was achieved using affinity chromatography via immobilized reduced glutathione. The soluble recombinant CA and TM antigens of JDV were reacted in western immunoblots with both serum antibodies from JDV-infected Bos javanicus cattle and Bos taurus cattle immunized with BIV. The recombinant CA protein of JDV reacted equally well with both the JDV and BIV antisera. The recombinant TM protein of JDV also reacted with antibody from the JDV infected cattle and with the BIV antisera. The results indicated conservation of immunogenic epitopes of the CA and TM proteins of the two viruses. The production of the recombinant proteins should enable the development of rapid and sensitive serological tests for JDV and BIV, and tools for further study of the immune response to JDV and the differential epidemiology of JDV infections in cattle.

  18. Underground hibernation in a primate.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Marina B; Dausmann, Kathrin H; Ranaivoarisoa, Jean F; Yoder, Anne D

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation in mammals is a remarkable state of heterothermy wherein metabolic rates are reduced, core body temperatures reach ambient levels, and key physiological functions are suspended. Typically, hibernation is observed in cold-adapted mammals, though it has also been documented in tropical species and even primates, such as the dwarf lemurs of Madagascar. Western fat-tailed dwarf lemurs are known to hibernate for seven months per year inside tree holes. Here, we report for the first time the observation that eastern dwarf lemurs also hibernate, though in self-made underground hibernacula. Hence, we show evidence that a clawless primate is able to bury itself below ground. Our findings that dwarf lemurs can hibernate underground in tropical forests draw unforeseen parallels to mammalian temperate hibernation. We expect that this work will illuminate fundamental information about the influence of temperature, resource limitation and use of insulated hibernacula on the evolution of hibernation.

  19. Optogenetics in the nonhuman primate

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    The nonhuman primate brain, the model system closest to the human brain, plays a critical role in our understanding of neural computation, cognition, and behavior. The continued quest to crack the neural codes in the monkey brain would be greatly enhanced with new tools and technologies that can rapidly and reversibly control the activities of desired cells at precise times during specific behavioral states. Recent advances in adapting optogenetic technologies to monkeys have enabled precise control of specific cells or brain regions at the millisecond timescale, allowing for the investigation of the causal role of these neural circuits in this model system. Validation of optogenetic technologies in monkeys also represents a critical preclinical step on the translational path of new generation cell-type-specific neural modulation therapies. Here, I discuss the current state of the application of optogenetics in the nonhuman primate model system, highlighting the available genetic, optical and electrical technologies, and their limitations and potentials. PMID:22341328

  20. Underground hibernation in a primate

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Marina B.; Dausmann, Kathrin H.; Ranaivoarisoa, Jean F.; Yoder, Anne D.

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation in mammals is a remarkable state of heterothermy wherein metabolic rates are reduced, core body temperatures reach ambient levels, and key physiological functions are suspended. Typically, hibernation is observed in cold-adapted mammals, though it has also been documented in tropical species and even primates, such as the dwarf lemurs of Madagascar. Western fat-tailed dwarf lemurs are known to hibernate for seven months per year inside tree holes. Here, we report for the first time the observation that eastern dwarf lemurs also hibernate, though in self-made underground hibernacula. Hence, we show evidence that a clawless primate is able to bury itself below ground. Our findings that dwarf lemurs can hibernate underground in tropical forests draw unforeseen parallels to mammalian temperate hibernation. We expect that this work will illuminate fundamental information about the influence of temperature, resource limitation and use of insulated hibernacula on the evolution of hibernation. PMID:23636180

  1. Primate Experiments on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aochi, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments to study how certain body systems are affected by the space environment are described. These experiments are to be conducted on space shuttle flights. How weightlessness affects two body systems of primates are the prime concern. Thermoregulation and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis are the two systems concerned. The thermoregulation project will provide data on how body temperature and circadian rhythms are affected in a weightlessness environment and the homeostasis in fluids and electrolyte levels will address the problem of body fluid shifts.

  2. Primate Experiments on SLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aochi, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments to study how certain body systems are affected by the space environment are described. These experiments are to be conducted on space shuttle flights. How weightlessness affects two body systems of primates are the prime concern. Thermoregulation and fluid and electrolyte homeostasis are the two systems concerned. The thermoregulation project will provide data on how body temperature and circadian rhythms are affected in a weightlessness environment and the homeostasis in fluids and electrolyte levels will address the problem of body fluid shifts.

  3. Soils, time, and primate paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Soils are the skin of the earth. From both poles to the equator, wherever rocks or sediment are exposed at the surface, soils are forming through the physical and chemical action of climate and living organisms. The physical attributes (color, texture, thickness) and chemical makeup of soils vary considerably, depending on the composition of the parent material and other variables: temperature, rainfall and soil moisture, vegetation, soil fauna, and the length of time that soil-forming processes have been at work. United States soil scientists1 have classified modern soils into ten major groups and numerous subgroups, each reflecting the composition and architecture of the soils and, to some extent, the processes that led to their formation. The physical and chemical processes of soil formation have been active throughout geologic time; the organic processes have been active at least since the Ordovician.2 Consequently, nearly all sedimentary rocks that were deposited in nonmarine settings and exposed to the elements contain a record of ancient, buried soils or paleosols. A sequence of these rocks, such as most ancient fluvial (stream) deposits, provides a record of soil paleoenvironments through time. Paleosols are also repositories of the fossils of organisms (body fossils) and the traces of those organisms burrowing, food-seeking, and dwelling activities (ichnofossils). Indeed, most fossil primates are found in paleosols. Careful study of ancient soils gives new, valuable insights into the correct temporal reconstruction of the primate fossil record and the nature of primate paleoenvironments. ?? 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Assessing Anxiety in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Kristine; Pierre, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety can be broadly described as a psychological state in which normally innocuous environmental stimuli trigger negative emotional expectations. Human anxiety disorders are multidimensional and may be organic or acquired, situational or pervasive. The broad ranging nature of the anxiety phenotype speaks to the need for models that identify its various components and root causes to develop effective clinical treatments. The cross-species comparative approach to modeling anxiety disorders in animals aims to understand mechanisms that both contribute to and modulate anxiety. Nonhuman primate models provide an important bridge from nonprimate model systems because of the complexity of nonhuman primates’ biobehavioral capacities and their commonalities with human emotion. The broad goal of this review is to provide an overview of various procedures available to study anxiety in the nonhuman primate, with a focus on the behavioral aspects of anxiety. Commonly used methods covered in this review include assessing animals in their home environment or in response to an ethologically relevant threat, associative conditioning and startle response tests, and cognitive bias tests. We also discuss how these procedures can help veterinarians and researchers care for captive nonhuman primates. PMID:25225310

  5. Determinants Involved in Hepatitis C Virus and GB Virus B Primate Host Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Marnata, Caroline; Saulnier, Aure; Mompelat, Dimitri; Krey, Thomas; Cohen, Lisette; Boukadida, Célia; Warter, Lucile; Fresquet, Judith; Vasiliauskaite, Ieva; Escriou, Nicolas; Cosset, François-Loïc; Rey, Felix A.; Lanford, Robert E.; Karayiannis, Peter; Rose, Nicola J.; Lavillette, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) only infects humans and chimpanzees, while GB virus B (GBV-B), another hepatotropic hepacivirus, infects small New World primates (tamarins and marmosets). In an effort to develop an immunocompetent small primate model for HCV infection to study HCV pathogenesis and vaccine approaches, we investigated the HCV life cycle step(s) that may be restricted in small primate hepatocytes. First, we found that replication-competent, genome-length chimeric HCV RNAs encoding GBV-B structural proteins in place of equivalent HCV sequences designed to allow entry into simian hepatocytes failed to induce viremia in tamarins following intrahepatic inoculation, nor did they lead to progeny virus in permissive, transfected human Huh7.5 hepatoma cells upon serial passage. This likely reflected the disruption of interactions between distantly related structural and nonstructural proteins that are essential for virion production, whereas such cross talk could be restored in similarly designed HCV intergenotypic recombinants via adaptive mutations in NS3 protease or helicase domains. Next, HCV entry into small primate hepatocytes was examined directly using HCV-pseudotyped retroviral particles (HCV-pp). HCV-pp efficiently infected tamarin hepatic cell lines and primary marmoset hepatocyte cultures through the use of the simian CD81 ortholog as a coreceptor, indicating that HCV entry is not restricted in small New World primate hepatocytes. Furthermore, we observed genomic replication and modest virus secretion following infection of primary marmoset hepatocyte cultures with a highly cell culture-adapted HCV strain. Thus, HCV can successfully complete its life cycle in primary simian hepatocytes, suggesting the possibility of adapting some HCV strains to small primate hosts. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important human pathogen that infects over 150 million individuals worldwide and leads to chronic liver disease. The lack of a small animal

  6. Genome-Wide Association Identifies Multiple Genomic Regions Associated with Susceptibility to and Control of Ovine Lentivirus

    PubMed Central

    White, Stephen N.; Mousel, Michelle R.; Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M.; Reynolds, James O.; Leymaster, Kreg A.; Neibergs, Holly L.; Lewis, Gregory S.; Knowles, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), ovine lentivirus (OvLV) is macrophage-tropic and causes lifelong infection. OvLV infects one quarter of U.S. sheep and induces pneumonia and body condition wasting. There is no vaccine to prevent OvLV infection and no cost-effective treatment for infected animals. However, breed differences in prevalence and proviral concentration have indicated a genetic basis for susceptibility to OvLV. A recent study identified TMEM154 variants in OvLV susceptibility. The objective here was to identify additional loci associated with odds and/or control of OvLV infection. Methodology/Principal Findings This genome-wide association study (GWAS) included 964 sheep from Rambouillet, Polypay, and Columbia breeds with serological status and proviral concentration phenotypes. Analytic models accounted for breed and age, as well as genotype. This approach identified TMEM154 (nominal P = 9.2×10−7; empirical P = 0.13), provided 12 additional genomic regions associated with odds of infection, and provided 13 regions associated with control of infection (all nominal P<1×10−5). Rapid decline of linkage disequilibrium with distance suggested many regions included few genes each. Genes in regions associated with odds of infection included DPPA2/DPPA4 (empirical P = 0.006), and SYTL3 (P = 0.051). Genes in regions associated with control of infection included a zinc finger cluster (ZNF192, ZSCAN16, ZNF389, and ZNF165; P = 0.001), C19orf42/TMEM38A (P = 0.047), and DLGAP1 (P = 0.092). Conclusions/Significance These associations provide targets for mutation discovery in sheep susceptibility to OvLV. Aside from TMEM154, these genes have not been associated previously with lentiviral infection in any species, to our knowledge. Further, data from other species suggest functional hypotheses for future testing of these genes in OvLV and other lentiviral infections. Specifically, SYTL3 binds and may regulate RAB27A

  7. HIV-1 Vpr accelerates viral replication during acute infection by exploitation of proliferating CD4+ T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kei; Misawa, Naoko; Iwami, Shingo; Satou, Yorifumi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ishizaka, Yukihito; Ito, Mamoru; Aihara, Kazuyuki; An, Dong Sung; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The precise role of viral protein R (Vpr), an HIV-1-encoded protein, during HIV-1 infection and its contribution to the development of AIDS remain unclear. Previous reports have shown that Vpr has the ability to cause G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HIV-1-infected cells in vitro. In addition, vpr is highly conserved in transmitted/founder HIV-1s and in all primate lentiviruses, which are evolutionarily related to HIV-1. Although these findings suggest an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 pathogenesis, its direct evidence in vivo has not been shown. Here, by using a human hematopoietic stem cell-transplanted humanized mouse model, we demonstrated that Vpr causes G2 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis predominantly in proliferating CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells, which mainly consist of regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs), resulting in Treg depletion and enhanced virus production during acute infection. The Vpr-dependent enhancement of virus replication and Treg depletion is observed in CCR5-tropic but not CXCR4-tropic HIV-1-infected mice, suggesting that these effects are dependent on the coreceptor usage by HIV-1. Immune activation was observed in CCR5-tropic wild-type but not in vpr-deficient HIV-1-infected humanized mice. When humanized mice were treated with denileukin diftitox (DD), to deplete Tregs, DD-treated humanized mice showed massive activation/proliferation of memory T cells compared to the untreated group. This activation/proliferation enhanced CCR5 expression in memory CD4(+) T cells and rendered them more susceptible to CCR5-tropic wild-type HIV-1 infection than to vpr-deficient virus. Taken together, these results suggest that Vpr takes advantage of proliferating CCR5(+) CD4(+) T cells for enhancing viremia of CCR5-tropic HIV-1. Because Tregs exist in a higher cycling state than other T cell subsets, Tregs appear to be more vulnerable to exploitation by Vpr during acute HIV-1 infection.

  8. Feline lentivirus evolution in cross-species infection reveals extensive G-to-A mutation and selection on key residues in the viral polymerase.

    PubMed

    Poss, Mary; Ross, Howard A; Painter, Sally L; Holley, David C; Terwee, Julie A; Vandewoude, Sue; Rodrigo, Allen

    2006-03-01

    Factors that restrict a virus from establishing productive infection in a new host species are important to understand because cross-species transmission events are often associated with emergent viral diseases. To determine the evolutionary pressures on viruses in new host species, we evaluated the molecular evolution of a feline immunodeficiency virus derived from a wild cougar, Puma concolor, during infection of domestic cats. Analyses were based on the coding portion of genome sequences recovered at intervals over 37 weeks of infection of six cats inoculated by either intravenous or oral-nasal routes. All cats inoculated intravenously, but only one inoculated orally-nasally, became persistently viremic. There were notable accumulations of lethal errors and predominance of G-to-A alterations throughout the genome, which were marked in the viral polymerase gene, pol. Viral structural (env and gag) and accessory (vif and orfA) genes evolved neutrally or were under purifying selection. However, sites under positive selection were identified in reverse transcriptase that involved residues in the nucleotide binding pocket or those contacting the RNA-DNA duplex. The findings of extensive G-to-A alterations in this cross-species infection are consistent with the recently described editing of host cytidine deaminase on lentivirus genomes. Additionally, we demonstrate that the primary site of hypermutation is the viral pol gene and the dominant selective force acting on this feline immunodeficiency virus as it replicates in a new host species is on key residues of the virus polymerase.

  9. Ecology and evolution of primate colour vision.

    PubMed

    Vorobyev, Misha

    2004-07-01

    More than one hundred years ago, Grant Allen suggested that colour vision in primates, birds and insects evolved as an adaptation for foraging on colourful advertisements of plants--fruits and flowers. Recent studies have shown that well developed colour vision appeared long before fruits and flowers evolved. Thus, colour vision is generally beneficial for many animals, not only for those eating colourful food. Primates are the only placental mammals that have trichromatic colour vision. This may indicate either that trichromacy is particularly useful for primates or that primates are unique among placental mammals in their ability to utilise the signals of three spectrally distinct types of cones or both. Because fruits are an important component of the primate diet, primate trichromacy could have evolved as a specific adaptation for foraging on fruits. Alternatively, primate trichromacy could have evolved as an adaptation for many visual tasks. Comparative studies of mammalian eyes indicate that primates are the only placental mammals that have in their retina a pre-existing neural machinery capable of utilising the signals of an additional spectral type of cone. Thus, the failure of non-primate placental mammals to evolve trichromacy can be explained by constraints imposed on the wiring of retinal neurones.

  10. Secondary expansion of the transient subplate zone in the developing cerebrum of human and nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Alvaro; Krsnik, Zeljka; Kostović, Ivica; Rakic, Pasko

    2016-01-01

    The subplate (SP) was the last cellular compartment added to the Boulder Committee’s list of transient embryonic zones [Bystron I, Blakemore C, Rakic P (2008) Nature Rev Neurosci 9(2):110–122]. It is highly developed in human and nonhuman primates, but its origin, mode, and dynamics of development, resolution, and eventual extinction are not well understood because human postmortem tissue offers only static descriptive data, and mice cannot serve as an adequate experimental model for the distinct regional differences in primates. Here, we take advantage of the large and slowly developing SP in macaque monkey to examine the origin, settling pattern, and subsequent dispersion of the SP neurons in primates. Monkey embryos exposed to the radioactive DNA replication marker tritiated thymidine ([3H]dT, or TdR) at early embryonic ages were killed at different intervals postinjection to follow postmitotic cells' positional changes. As expected in primates, most SP neurons generated in the ventricular zone initially migrate radially, together with prospective layer 6 neurons. Surprisingly, mostly during midgestation, SP cells become secondarily displaced and widespread into the expanding SP zone, which becomes particularly wide subjacent to the association cortical areas and underneath the summit of its folia. We found that invasion of monoamine, basal forebrain, thalamocortical, and corticocortical axons is mainly responsible for this region-dependent passive dispersion of the SP cells. Histologic and immunohistochemical comparison with the human SP at corresponding fetal ages indicates that the same developmental events occur in both primate species. PMID:27503885

  11. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Over-expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mesenchymal stem cells transfected with recombinant lentivirus BDNF gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhu, J; Zhang, K; Liu, T; Zhang, Z

    2016-12-30

    This study was aimed at investigating the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified with recombinant lentivirus bearing BDNF gene. Lentivirus vectors bearing BDNF gene were constructed. MSCs were isolated from rats and cultured. The lentiviral vectors containing BDNF gene were transfected into the MSCs, and BDNF gene and protein expressions were monitored with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). RT-PCR and Western blot were used to measure gene and protein expressions, respectibvely in MSCs, MSCs-EGFP and MSCs-EGFP-BDNF groups. Green fluorescence assay confirmed successful transfection of BDNF gene recombinant lentivirus into MSCs. RT-PCR and Western blot revealed that BDNF gene and protein expressions in the MSCs-EGFP-BDNF group were significantly higher than that in MSCs group and MSCs-EGFP group. There were no statistically significant differences in gene expression between MSCs and MSCs-EGFP groups. MSCs can over-express BDNF when transfected with recombinant lentivirus bearing BDNF gene.

  13. Genome-Wide association identifies multiple genomic regions associated with susceptibility to and control of ovine lentivirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), ovine lentivirus (OvLV) is macrophage-tropic and causes lifelonginfection. OvLV infects one quarter of U.S. sheep and induces pneumonia and body condition wasting. There is no vaccine to prevent OvLV infection and no cost-effective treatment for i...

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Genotype A2 Small Ruminant Lentiviruses Isolated from Infected U.S. Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Aaron M.; Heaton, Michael P.; Clawson, Michael L.; Smith, Timothy P. L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Two distinct subgroups of genotype A2 small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) have been identified in the United States that infect sheep with specific host transmembrane protein 154 (TMEM154) diplotypes. Here, we report the first two complete genome sequences of SRLV strains infecting U.S. sheep belonging to genotype A2, subgroups 1 and 2. PMID:28360169

  15. Genetic subgroup of small ruminant lentiviruses that infects sheep homozygous for TMEM154 frameshift deletion mutation A4delta53

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small Ruminant Lentivirus (SRLV) infections of sheep are influenced by genetics on both the host and pathogen sides. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane 154 (TMEM154) gene associates with infection susceptibility, and distinct SRLV genetic subtypes infect sheep in association with their TM...

  16. Lentivirus-Mediated knockdown of tectonic family member 1 inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Junjie; Wang, Chengfeng; Liang, Qinchuan; Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Qingshuang; Wang, Shousen; Ma, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Tectonic family member 1 (TCTN1) encodes a member of the tectonic family which are evolutionarily conserved secreted and transmembrane proteins, involving in a diverse variety of developmental processes. It has been demonstrated that tectonics expressed in regions that participate in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during mouse embryonic development and was imperative for Hh-mediated patterning of the ventral neural tube. However, the expression and regulation of tectonics in human tumor is still not clear. In this study, shRNA-expressing lentivirus was constructed to knockdown TCTN1 in medulloblastoma cell line Daoy. The results showed that knockdown of TCTN1 inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in Daoy cell line, also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M boundary. Taken all together, our data suggest that TCTN1 might play an important role in the progression of medulloblastoma. PMID:26550235

  17. Lentivirus-Mediated knockdown of tectonic family member 1 inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Junjie; Wang, Chengfeng; Liang, Qinchuan; Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Qingshuang; Wang, Shousen; Ma, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Tectonic family member 1 (TCTN1) encodes a member of the tectonic family which are evolutionarily conserved secreted and transmembrane proteins, involving in a diverse variety of developmental processes. It has been demonstrated that tectonics expressed in regions that participate in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during mouse embryonic development and was imperative for Hh-mediated patterning of the ventral neural tube. However, the expression and regulation of tectonics in human tumor is still not clear. In this study, shRNA-expressing lentivirus was constructed to knockdown TCTN1 in medulloblastoma cell line Daoy. The results showed that knockdown of TCTN1 inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in Daoy cell line, also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M boundary. Taken all together, our data suggest that TCTN1 might play an important role in the progression of medulloblastoma.

  18. Comparison of lentiviruses pseudotyped with S proteins from coronaviruses and cell tropisms of porcine coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingjing; Deng, Feng; Ye, Gang; Dong, Wanyu; Zheng, Anjun; He, Qigai; Peng, Guiqing

    2016-02-01

    The surface glycoproteins of coronaviruses play an important role in receptor binding and cell entry. Different coronaviruses interact with their specific receptors to enter host cells. Lentiviruses pseudotyped with their spike proteins (S) were compared to analyze the entry efficiency of various coronaviruses. Our results indicated that S proteins from different coronaviruses displayed varied abilities to mediate pseudotyped virus infection. Furthermore, the cell tropisms of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) have been characterized by live and pseudotyped viruses. Both live and pseudoviruses could infected Vero- CCL-81 (monkey kidney), Huh-7 (human liver), and PK-15 (pig kidney) cells efficiently. CCL94 (cat kidney) cells could be infected efficiently by TGEV but not PEDV. Overall, our study provides new insights into the mechanisms of viral entry and forms a basis for antiviral drug screening.

  19. Bion 11 mission: primate experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilyin, E. A.; Korolkov, V. I.; Skidmore, M. G.; Viso, M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Grindeland, R. E.; Lapin, B. A.; Gordeev, Y. V.; Krotov, V. P.; Fanton, J. W.; Bielitzki, J. T.; Golov, V. K.; Magedov, V. S.; Hines, J. W.

    2000-01-01

    A summary is provided of the major operations required to conduct the wide range of primate experiments on the Bion 11 mission, which flew for 14 days beginning December 24, 1996. Information is given on preflight preparations, including flight candidate selection and training; attachment and implantation of bioinstrumentation; flight and ground experiment designs; onboard life support and test systems; ground and flight health monitoring; flight monkey selection and transport to the launch site; inflight procedures and data collection; postflight examinations and experiments; and assessment of results.

  20. Deletion variant near ZNF389 is associated with control of ovine lentivirus in multiple sheep flocks

    PubMed Central

    White, S N; Mousel, M R; Reynolds, J O; Herrmann-Hoesing, L M; Knowles, D P

    2014-01-01

    Ovine lentivirus (OvLV) is a macrophage-tropic lentivirus found in many countries that causes interstitial pneumonia, mastitis, arthritis and cachexia in sheep. There is no preventive vaccine and no cure, but breed differences suggest marker-assisted selective breeding might improve odds of infection and control of OvLV post-infection. Although variants in TMEM154 have consistent association with odds of infection, no variant in any gene has been associated with host control of OvLV post-infection in multiple animal sets. Proviral concentration is a live-animal diagnostic measure of OvLV control post-infection related to severity of OvLV-induced lesions. A recent genome-wide association study identified a region including four zinc finger genes associated with proviral concentration in one Rambouillet flock. To refine this region, we tested additional variants and identified a small insertion/deletion variant near ZNF389 that showed consistent association with proviral concentration in three animal sets (P < 0.05). These animal sets contained Rambouillet, Polypay and crossbred sheep from multiple locations and management conditions. Strikingly, one flock had exceptionally high prevalence (>87%, including yearlings) and mean proviral concentration (>950 copies/μg), possibly due to needle sharing. The best estimate of proviral concentration by genotype, obtained from all 1310 OvLV-positive animals tested, showed insertion homozygotes had less than half the proviral concentration of other genotypes (P < 0.0001). Future work will test additional breeds, management conditions and viral subtypes, and identify functional properties of the haplotype this deletion variant tracks. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic variant consistently associated with host control of OvLV post-infection in multiple sheep flocks. PMID:24303974

  1. Influenza Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Engel, Gregory A.; Feeroz, M.M.; San, Sorn; Rompis, Aida; Lee, Benjamin P. Y.-H.; Shaw, Eric; Oh, Gunwha; Schillaci, Michael A.; Grant, Richard; Heidrich, John; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether nonhuman primates are infected with influenza viruses in nature, we conducted serologic and swab studies among macaques from several parts of the world. Our detection of influenza virus and antibodies to influenza virus raises questions about the role of nonhuman primates in the ecology of influenza. PMID:23017256

  2. The evolution of neocortex in primates.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Jon H

    2012-01-01

    We can learn about the evolution of neocortex in primates through comparative studies of cortical organization in primates and those mammals that are the closest living relatives of primates, in conjunction with brain features revealed by the skull endocasts of fossil archaic primates. Such studies suggest that early primates had acquired a number of features of neocortex that now distinguish modern primates. Most notably, early primates had an array of new visual areas, and those visual areas widely shared with other mammals had been modified. Posterior parietal cortex was greatly expanded with sensorimotor modules for reaching, grasping, and personal defense. Motor cortex had become more specialized for hand use, and the functions of primary motor cortex were enhanced by the addition and development of premotor and cingulate motor areas. Cortical architecture became more varied, and cortical neuron populations became denser overall than in nonprimate ancestors. Primary visual cortex had the densest population of neurons, and this became more pronounced in the anthropoid radiation. Within the primate clade, considerable variability in cortical size, numbers of areas, and architecture evolved.

  3. A mitogenomic phylogeny of living primates.

    PubMed

    Finstermeier, Knut; Zinner, Dietmar; Brameier, Markus; Meyer, Matthias; Kreuz, Eva; Hofreiter, Michael; Roos, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Primates, the mammalian order including our own species, comprise 480 species in 78 genera. Thus, they represent the third largest of the 18 orders of eutherian mammals. Although recent phylogenetic studies on primates are increasingly built on molecular datasets, most of these studies have focused on taxonomic subgroups within the order. Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes have proven to be extremely useful in deciphering within-order relationships even up to deep nodes. Using 454 sequencing, we sequenced 32 new complete mt genomes adding 20 previously not represented genera to the phylogenetic reconstruction of the primate tree. With 13 new sequences, the number of complete mt genomes within the parvorder Platyrrhini was widely extended, resulting in a largely resolved branching pattern among New World monkey families. We added 10 new Strepsirrhini mt genomes to the 15 previously available ones, thus almost doubling the number of mt genomes within this clade. Our data allow precise date estimates of all nodes and offer new insights into primate evolution. One major result is a relatively young date for the most recent common ancestor of all living primates which was estimated to 66-69 million years ago, suggesting that the divergence of extant primates started close to the K/T-boundary. Although some relationships remain unclear, the large number of mt genomes used allowed us to reconstruct a robust primate phylogeny which is largely in agreement with previous publications. Finally, we show that mt genomes are a useful tool for resolving primate phylogenetic relationships on various taxonomic levels.

  4. Primary isolation and serial passage of hepatitis A virus strains in primate cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Binn, L N; Lemon, S M; Marchwicki, R H; Redfield, R R; Gates, N L; Bancroft, W H

    1984-01-01

    Although several primate cell types have been reported to support replication of hepatitis A virus, optimal conditions for the isolation and production of quantities of virus have not been defined. We therefore examined seven different primate cell types for their ability to support replication of primate-passaged and wild-type virus as reflected by intracytoplasmic accumulation of viral antigen (direct immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay) and propagation of cell culture-adapted virus. Of the cells tested, low-passage African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells were most sensitive for initial isolation. Viral replication was documented after inoculation of AGMK cells with seven of nine hepatitis A virus antigen-positive fecal specimens (from seven epidemiologically distinct sources). With six inocula, virus was successfully passed in serial cultures. AGMK-adapted virus was readily propagated in continuous AGMK (BS-C-1) cells. The optimal temperature for the growth of virus in BS-C-1 cells was 35 degrees C. Viral release into supernatant fluids was documented in the absence of any cytopathic effect, and infectivity titers in supernatant fluids 21 days after inoculation (50% tissue culture infective does [TCID50], 10(6.0)/ml) equalled or exceeded those in the cell fraction (TCID50, 10(5.5)/ml). Cells maintained in serum-free media readily supported viral growth, with yields of virus (TCID50, 10(6.5)/ml) equal to or greater than those obtained with cells maintained in 2% fetal bovine serum. PMID:6086708

  5. Primary isolation and serial passage of hepatitis A virus strains in primate cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Binn, L N; Lemon, S M; Marchwicki, R H; Redfield, R R; Gates, N L; Bancroft, W H

    1984-07-01

    Although several primate cell types have been reported to support replication of hepatitis A virus, optimal conditions for the isolation and production of quantities of virus have not been defined. We therefore examined seven different primate cell types for their ability to support replication of primate-passaged and wild-type virus as reflected by intracytoplasmic accumulation of viral antigen (direct immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay) and propagation of cell culture-adapted virus. Of the cells tested, low-passage African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells were most sensitive for initial isolation. Viral replication was documented after inoculation of AGMK cells with seven of nine hepatitis A virus antigen-positive fecal specimens (from seven epidemiologically distinct sources). With six inocula, virus was successfully passed in serial cultures. AGMK-adapted virus was readily propagated in continuous AGMK (BS-C-1) cells. The optimal temperature for the growth of virus in BS-C-1 cells was 35 degrees C. Viral release into supernatant fluids was documented in the absence of any cytopathic effect, and infectivity titers in supernatant fluids 21 days after inoculation (50% tissue culture infective does [TCID50], 10(6.0)/ml) equalled or exceeded those in the cell fraction (TCID50, 10(5.5)/ml). Cells maintained in serum-free media readily supported viral growth, with yields of virus (TCID50, 10(6.5)/ml) equal to or greater than those obtained with cells maintained in 2% fetal bovine serum.

  6. The epidemiology of lion lentivirus infection among a population of free-ranging lions (Panthera leo) in the Kruger National Park, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Adams, H; van Vuuren, M; Bosman, A-M; Keet, D; New, J; Kennedy, M

    2009-09-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus is a lentivirus of domestic cats that causes significant lifelong infection. Infection with this or similar lentiviruses has been detected in several nondomestic feline species, including African lions (Panthera leo). Although lion lentivirus (FIVple) infection is endemic in certain lion populations in eastern and southern Africa, little is known about its pathogenic effects or its epidemiological impact in free-ranging lions. This report describes the epidemiological investigation of lentivirus positivity of free-ranging lions in the Kruger National Park, South Africa. A nested polymerase chain reaction assay for virus detection was performed on all whole blood samples collected. In addition, serum samples were tested for cross-reactive antibodies to domestic feline lentivirus antigens and to puma lentivirus synthetic envelope peptide antigen. The results were analysed in conjunction with epidemiological data to provide a descriptive epidemiological study on lion lentivirus infection in a free-ranging population of lions. The overall prevalence of lentivirus infection was 69%, with a prevalence of 41% in the north of the park, and 80% in the south. Adult males had the highest prevalence when combining the factors of sex and age: 94%. The lowest prevalences were found among juveniles, with male juveniles at 29%. Adults were 5.58 times more likely to test positive for FIVple than juveniles, with adult males being 35 times more likely to be test positive for FIVple compared with juvenile males. This research represents the 1st epidemiological study of the lion lentivirus among free-ranging lions in the Kruger National Park.

  7. Modeling Olfactory Bulb Evolution through Primate Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Heritage, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive characterizations of primates have usually included a reduction in olfactory sensitivity. However, this inference of derivation and directionality assumes an ancestral state of olfaction, usually by comparison to a group of extant non-primate mammals. Thus, the accuracy of the inference depends on the assumed ancestral state. Here I present a phylogenetic model of continuous trait evolution that reconstructs olfactory bulb volumes for ancestral nodes of primates and mammal outgroups. Parent-daughter comparisons suggest that, relative to the ancestral euarchontan, the crown-primate node is plesiomorphic and that derived reduction in olfactory sensitivity is an attribute of the haplorhine lineage. The model also suggests a derived increase in olfactory sensitivity at the strepsirrhine node. This oppositional diversification of the strepsirrhine and haplorhine lineages from an intermediate and non-derived ancestor is inconsistent with a characterization of graded reduction through primate evolution. PMID:25426851

  8. Undifferentiated primate spermatogonia and their endocrine control.

    PubMed

    Plant, Tony M

    2010-08-01

    The biology of spermatogonial stem cells is currently an area of intensive research and contemporary studies in primates are emerging. Quantitative regulation of sperm output by the primate testis seems to be exerted primarily on the transition from undifferentiated to differentiating spermatogonia. This review examines recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms governing spermatogonial renewal and early differentiation in male primates, with a focus on the monkey. Emerging revisions to the classic view of dark and pale type A spermatogonia as reserve and renewing spermatogonial stem cells, respectively, are critically evaluated and essential features of endocrine control of undifferentiated spermatogonia throughout postnatal primate development are discussed. Obstacles in gaining a more complete understanding of primate spermatogonia are also identified.

  9. The evolution of replicators.

    PubMed

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-11-29

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators.

  10. The evolution of replicators.

    PubMed Central

    Szathmáry, E

    2000-01-01

    Replicators of interest in chemistry, biology and culture are briefly surveyed from a conceptual point of view. Systems with limited heredity have only a limited evolutionary potential because the number of available types is too low. Chemical cycles, such as the formose reaction, are holistic replicators since replication is not based on the successive addition of modules. Replicator networks consisting of catalytic molecules (such as reflexively autocatalytic sets of proteins, or reproducing lipid vesicles) are hypothetical ensemble replicators, and their functioning rests on attractors of their dynamics. Ensemble replicators suffer from the paradox of specificity: while their abstract feasibility seems to require a high number of molecular types, the harmful effect of side reactions calls for a small system size. No satisfactory solution to this problem is known. Phenotypic replicators do not pass on their genotypes, only some aspects of the phenotype are transmitted. Phenotypic replicators with limited heredity include genetic membranes, prions and simple memetic systems. Memes in human culture are unlimited hereditary, phenotypic replicators, based on language. The typical path of evolution goes from limited to unlimited heredity, and from attractor-based to modular (digital) replicators. PMID:11127914

  11. Enhanced Viral Replication by Cellular Replicative Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Ae; Seong, Rak-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Cellular replicative senescence is a major contributing factor to aging and to the development and progression of aging-associated diseases. In this study, we sought to determine viral replication efficiency of influenza virus (IFV) and Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) infection in senescent cells. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBE) or human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were allowed to undergo numbers of passages to induce replicative senescence. Induction of replicative senescence in cells was validated by positive senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Increased susceptibility to both IFV and VZV infection was observed in senescent HBE and HDF cells, respectively, resulting in higher numbers of plaque formation, along with the upregulation of major viral antigen expression than that in the non-senescent cells. Interestingly, mRNA fold induction level of virus-induced type I interferon (IFN) was attenuated by senescence, whereas IFN-mediated antiviral effect remained robust and potent in virus-infected senescent cells. Additionally, we show that a longevity-promoting gene, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), has antiviral role against influenza virus infection. In conclusion, our data indicate that enhanced viral replication by cellular senescence could be due to senescence-mediated reduction of virus-induced type I IFN expression. PMID:27799874

  12. [Hormones and parturition in primates].

    PubMed

    Germain, G; Ferre, F

    1987-01-01

    In primates, the endocrine signals which correlate with the end of gestation, i.e. account for fetal maturity, and initiate the parturition, i.e. trigger the myometrium contractility, remain unknown. Direct and indirect evidence supports the view that, as with domestic mammals, progesterone (or the estrogen/-progesterone ratio) plays a prominent role in inhibiting the contractility of the pregnant uterus. In the past few years an increasing number of endocrine factors have been identified in the placenta. They may contribute to the control of local or systemic steroid production but their effects are extraordinarily intermingled and it is impossible today to state whether any of them are relevant to the mechanism of parturition. The trophoblast and the myometrium establish close contact in the primate pregnancy. This is evidenced by histological studies and also by the influence of the proximity of the placenta on tissue steroid concentrations and the mechanisms of hormone coupling in the myometrium. Specific types or subtypes of myometrium hormone receptors are now well identified (e.g. to oxytocin, to catecholamines) and this now permits a better understanding of the role of their endogenous agonists in the course of parturition. However, such data are still lacking for other factors (e.g. prostanoids, VIP, relaxin...) involved to varying degrees in this process.

  13. Impending extinction crisis of the world’s primates: Why primates matter

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Alejandro; Garber, Paul A.; Rylands, Anthony B.; Roos, Christian; Fernandez-Duque, Eduardo; Di Fiore, Anthony; Nekaris, K. Anne-Isola; Nijman, Vincent; Heymann, Eckhard W.; Lambert, Joanna E.; Rovero, Francesco; Barelli, Claudia; Setchell, Joanna M.; Gillespie, Thomas R.; Mittermeier, Russell A.; Arregoitia, Luis Verde; de Guinea, Miguel; Gouveia, Sidney; Dobrovolski, Ricardo; Shanee, Sam; Shanee, Noga; Boyle, Sarah A.; Fuentes, Agustin; MacKinnon, Katherine C.; Amato, Katherine R.; Meyer, Andreas L. S.; Wich, Serge; Sussman, Robert W.; Pan, Ruliang; Kone, Inza; Li, Baoguo

    2017-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, our closest biological relatives, play important roles in the livelihoods, cultures, and religions of many societies and offer unique insights into human evolution, biology, behavior, and the threat of emerging diseases. They are an essential component of tropical biodiversity, contributing to forest regeneration and ecosystem health. Current information shows the existence of 504 species in 79 genera distributed in the Neotropics, mainland Africa, Madagascar, and Asia. Alarmingly, ~60% of primate species are now threatened with extinction and ~75% have declining populations. This situation is the result of escalating anthropogenic pressures on primates and their habitats—mainly global and local market demands, leading to extensive habitat loss through the expansion of industrial agriculture, large-scale cattle ranching, logging, oil and gas drilling, mining, dam building, and the construction of new road networks in primate range regions. Other important drivers are increased bushmeat hunting and the illegal trade of primates as pets and primate body parts, along with emerging threats, such as climate change and anthroponotic diseases. Often, these pressures act in synergy, exacerbating primate population declines. Given that primate range regions overlap extensively with a large, and rapidly growing, human population characterized by high levels of poverty, global attention is needed immediately to reverse the looming risk of primate extinctions and to attend to local human needs in sustainable ways. Raising global scientific and public awareness of the plight of the world’s primates and the costs of their loss to ecosystem health and human society is imperative. PMID:28116351

  14. Prelife catalysts and replicators

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Life is based on replication and evolution. But replication cannot be taken for granted. We must ask what there was prior to replication and evolution. How does evolution begin? We have proposed prelife as a generative system that produces information and diversity in the absence of replication. We model prelife as a binary soup of active monomers that form random polymers. ‘Prevolutionary’ dynamics can have mutation and selection prior to replication. Some sequences might have catalytic activity, thereby enhancing the rates of certain prelife reactions. We study the selection criteria for these prelife catalysts. Their catalytic efficiency must be above certain critical values. We find a maintenance threshold and an initiation threshold. The former is a linear function of sequence length, and the latter is an exponential function of sequence length. Therefore, it is extremely hard to select for prelife catalysts that have long sequences. We compare prelife catalysis with a simple model for replication. Assuming fast template-based elongation reactions, we can show that replicators have selection thresholds that are independent of their sequence length. Our calculation demonstrates the efficiency of replication and provides an explanation of why replication was selected over other forms of prelife catalysis. PMID:19692408

  15. Diversity components of impending primate extinctions.

    PubMed

    Jernvall, J; Wright, P C

    1998-09-15

    Many extant species are at risk to go extinct. This impending loss of species is likely to cause changes in future ecosystem functions. Ecological components of diversity, such as dietary or habitat specializations, can be used to estimate the impact of extinctions on ecosystem functions. As an approach to estimate the impact of future extinctions, we tested interdependency between ecological and taxonomic change based on current predictions of extinction rates in primates. We analyzed the ecological characteristics of extant primate faunas having species in various categories of endangerment of extinction and forecasted the future primate faunas as if they were paleontological faunas. Predicting future faunas combines the wealth of ecological information on living primates with large, fossil record-like changes in diversity. Predicted extinction patterns of living primates in Africa, Asia, Madagascar, and South America show that changes in ecology differ among the regions in ways that are not reducible to taxonomic measures. The ecological effects of primate extinctions are initially least severe in South America and larger in Asia and Africa. Disproportionately larger ecological changes are projected for Madagascar. The use of taxonomy as a proxy for ecology can mislead when estimating competence of future primate ecosystems.

  16. Estrogen regulation of microcephaly genes and evolution of brain sexual dimorphism in primates.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Lin, Qiang; Su, Bing

    2015-06-30

    Sexual dimorphism in brain size is common among primates, including humans, apes and some Old World monkeys. In these species, the brain size of males is generally larger than that of females. Curiously, this dimorphism has persisted over the course of primate evolution and human origin, but there is no explanation for the underlying genetic controls that have maintained this disparity in brain size. In the present study, we tested the effect of the female hormone (estradiol) on seven genes known to be related to brain size in both humans and nonhuman primates, and we identified half estrogen responsive elements (half EREs) in the promoter regions of four genes (MCPH1, ASPM, CDK5RAP2 and WDR62). Likewise, at sequence level, it appears that these half EREs are generally conserved across primates. Later testing via a reporter gene assay and cell-based endogenous expression measurement revealed that estradiol could significantly suppress the expression of the four affected genes involved in brain size. More intriguingly, when the half EREs were deleted from the promoters, the suppression effect disappeared, suggesting that the half EREs mediate the regulation of estradiol on the brain size genes. We next replicated these experiments using promoter sequences from chimpanzees and rhesus macaques, and observed a similar suppressive effect of estradiol on gene expression, suggesting that this mechanism is conserved among primate species that exhibit brain size dimorphism. Brain size dimorphism among certain primates, including humans, is likely regulated by estrogen through its sex-dependent suppression of brain size genes during development.

  17. Comparing primate crania: The importance of fossils.

    PubMed

    Fleagle, John G; Gilbert, Christopher C; Baden, Andrea L

    2016-10-01

    Extant primate crania represent a small subset of primate crania that have existed. The main objective here is to examine how the inclusion of fossil crania changes our understanding of primate cranial diversity relative to analyses of extant primates. We hypothesize that fossil taxa will change the major axes of cranial shape, occupy new areas of morphospace, change the relative diversity of major primate clades, and fill in notable gaps separating major primate taxa/clades. Eighteen 3D landmarks were collected on 157 extant and fossil crania representing 90 genera. Data were subjected to a Generalized Procrustes Analysis then principal components analysis. Relative diversity between clades was assessed using an F-statistic. Fossil taxa do not significantly alter major axes of cranial shape, but they do occupy unique areas of morphospace, change the relative diversity between clades, and fill in notable gaps in primate cranial evolution. Strepsirrhines remain significantly less diverse than anthropoids. Fossil hominins fill the gap in cranial morphospace between extant great apes and modern humans. The morphospace outlined by living primates largely includes that occupied by fossil taxa, suggesting that the cranial diversity of living primates generally encompasses the total diversity that has evolved in this Order. The evolution of the anthropoid cranium was a significant event allowing anthropoids to achieve significantly greater cranial diversity compared to strepsirrhines. Fossil taxa fill in notable gaps within and between clades, highlighting their transitional nature and eliminating the appearance of large morphological distances between extant taxa, particularly in the case of extant hominids. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Special issue: Comparative biogeography of Neotropical primates.

    PubMed

    Lynch Alfaro, Jessica W; Cortés-Ortiz, Liliana; Di Fiore, Anthony; Boubli, Jean P

    2015-01-01

    New research presented in this special issue of Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution on the "Phylogeny and Biogeography of Neotropical Primates" greatly improves our understanding of the evolutionary history of the New World monkeys and provides insights into the multiple platyrrhine radiations, diversifications, extinctions, and recolonizations that have taken place over time and over space in the Neotropics. Here, we synthesize genetic and biogeographic research from the past several years to construct an overarching hypothesis for platyrrhine evolution. We also highlight continuing controversies in Neotropical primate biogeography, such as whether the location of origin of platyrrhines was Africa or Asia; whether Patagonian fossil primates are stem or crown platyrrhines; and whether cis- and trans-Andean Neotropical primates were subject to vicariance through Andes mountain building, or instead diversified through isolation in mountain valleys after skirting around the Andes on the northwestern coast of South America. We also consider the role of the Amazon River and its major tributaries in shaping platyrrhine biodiversity, and how and when primates from the Amazon reached the Atlantic Forest. A key focus is on primate colonizations and extirpations in Central America, the Andes, and the seasonally dry tropical forests and savannas (such as the Llanos, Caatinga, and Cerrado habitats), all ecosystems that have been understudied up until now for primates. We suggest that most primates currently inhabiting drier open habitats are relatively recent arrivals, having expanded from rainforest habitats in the Pleistocene. We point to the Pitheciidae as the taxonomic group most in need of further phylogenetic and biogeographic research. Additionally, genomic studies on the Platyrrhini are deeply needed and are expected to bring new surprises and insights to the field of Neotropical primate biogeography. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Workshop summary: neotropical primates in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Suzette D; Abee, Christian R; Mansfield, Keith G

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes presentations and discussions at an NIH-sponsored workshop on Neotropical Primates in Biomedical Research, held in September 2010. Neotropical primates (New World monkeys), with their smaller size, faster maturation, and shorter lifespans than Old World monkeys, are efficient models and present unique opportunities for studying human health and disease. After overviews of the most commonly used neotropical species-squirrel monkeys, marmosets, and owl monkeys-speakers described the use of neotropical primates in specific areas of immunology, infectious disease, neuroscience, and physiology research. Presentations addressed the development of new research tools: immune-based reagents, fMRI technologies suited to these small primates, sequencing of the marmoset genome, the first germline transgenic monkey, and neotropical primate induced pluripotent stem cells. In the discussions after the presentations, participants identified challenges to both continued use and development of new uses of neotropical primates in research and suggested the following actions to address the challenges: (1) mechanisms to support breeding colonies of some neotropical species to ensure a well-characterized domestic source; (2) resources for the continuing development of critical research tools to improve the immunological and hormonal characterization of neotropical primates; (3) improved opportunities for networking among investigators who use neotropical primates, training and other measures to improve colony and veterinary management, and continued research on neotropical primate management and veterinary care issues; (4) support for development activities to produce models that are more affordable and more efficient for moving research "from benchside to bedside"; and (5) establishment of a small program that would fund "orphan" species.

  20. Primates in 21st century ecosystems: does primate conservation promote ecosystem conservation?

    PubMed

    Norconk, Marilyn A; Boinski, Sue; Forget, Pierre-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Contributors to this issue of the American Journal of Primatology were among the participants in an invited symposium at the 2008 Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation meeting in Paramaribo, Suriname. They were asked to assess how essential primates are to tropical ecosystems and, given their research interests, discuss how primate research contributes to the broader understanding about how ecosystems function. This introduction to the issue is divided into three parts: a review of the roles that nonhuman primates play in tropical ecosystems; the implementation of large-scale landscape methods used to identify primate densities; and concerns about the increasingly porous boundaries between humans, nonhuman primates, and pathogens. Although 20th century primate research created a rich database on individual species, including both theoretical and descriptive approaches, the dual effects of high human population densities and widespread habitat destruction should warn us that creative, interdisciplinary and human-related research is needed to solve 21st century problems.

  1. The Automated Primate Research Laboratory (APRL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Smith, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    A description is given of a self-contained automated primate research laboratory to study the effects of weightlessness on subhuman primates. Physiological parameters such as hemodynamics, respiration, blood constituents, waste, and diet and nutrition are analyzed for abnormalities in the simulated space environment. The Southeast Asian pig-tailed monkey (Macaca nemistrina) was selected for the experiments owing to its relative intelligence and learning capacity. The objective of the program is to demonstrate the feasibility of a man-tended primate space flight experiment.

  2. Pulmonary pneumocystosis in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Chandler, F W; McClure, H M; Campbell, W G; Watts, J C

    1976-03-01

    Pulmonary infection with Pneumocystis carinii was detected in two aged owl monkeys (Aotus trivirgatus) and two young chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). The clinical histories of the owl monkeys were similar and included progressive weight loss, anorexia, failure to thrive, and death. One of the owl monkeys had no concurrent disease, whereas the other had been experimentally inoculated with Treponema pallidum 44 months before death. In both chimpanzees, an underlying myeloproliferative malignant neoplasm was associated with Pneumocystis infection. Pneumocystis organisms were found in alveolar spaces and alveolar lining cells by light and electron microscopy. Pathologic features of these untreated cases and a case in a chimpanzee treated with pentamidine isethionate were similar to those described in humans. To our knowledge, this is the first report of pulmonary pneumocystosis associated with death in nonhuman primates.

  3. Who Needs Replication?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the editor of a recent Cambridge University Press book on research methods discusses replicating previous key studies to throw more light on their reliability and generalizability. Replication research is presented as an accepted method of validating previous research by providing comparability between the original and replicated…

  4. Project New Pride: Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, is establishing a new discretionary grant program entitled Replication of Project New Pride: A Serious Offender Youth Treatment Program. Project New Pride was chosen for replication because of its demonstrated effectiveness in Denver, Colorado,…

  5. Thermal Replication Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Dieter

    2011-03-01

    The hallmark of living matter is the replication of genetic molecules and their active storage against diffusion. We have argued in the past that thermal convection can host the million-fold accumulation even of single nucleotides and at the same time trigger exponential replication. Accumulation is driven by thermophoresis and convection in elongated chambers, replication by the inherent temperature cycling in convection. Optothermal pumping [2,3] allows to implement the thermal trap efficiently in a toroidal or linear geometry. Based on this method, we were in a position to combine accumulation and replication of DNA in the same chamber. As we are missing a solid chemistry of prebiotic replication, we used as a proxy reaction for to replication the polymerase chain reaction. Convective flow both drives the DNA replicating polymerase chain reaction (PCR) while concurrent thermophoresis accumulates the replicated 143 base pair DNA in bulk solution. The time constant for accumulation is 92 s while DNA is doubled every 50 s. The length of the amplified DNA is checked with thermophoresis. Finite element simulations confirm the findings. The experiments explore conditions in pores of hydrothermal rock which can serve as a model environment for the origin of life and has prospects towards the first autonomous evolution, hosting the Darwin process by molecular selection using the thermophoretic trap. On the other side, the implemented continuous evolution will be able to breed well specified DNA or RNA molecules in the future.

  6. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference of vascular endothelial growth factor in monkey eyes with iris neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Meng-Ke; Tao, Yong; Yu, Wen-Zhen; Kai, Wang

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To explore the in vivo anti-angiogenesis effects resulting from lentivirus-mediated RNAi of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in monkeys with iris neovascularization (INV). Methods Five specific recombinant lentiviral vectors for RNA interference, targeting Macaca mulatta VEGFA, were designed and the one with best knock down efficacy (LV-GFP-VEGFi1) in H1299 cells and RF/6A cells was selected by real-time PCR for in vivo use. A laser-induced retinal vein occlusion model was established in one eye of seven cynomolgus monkeys. In monkeys number1, 3, and 5 (Group 1), the virus (1×108 particles) was intravitreally injected into the preretinal space of the animal's eye immediately after laser coagulation; and in monkeys number 2, 4, and 6 (Group 2), the virus (1×108 particles) was injected at 10 days after laser coagulation. In monkey number 7, a blank control injection was performed. In monkeys number 1 and 2, virus without RNAi sequence was used; in monkeys number 3 and 4, virus with nonspecific RNAi sequence was used; and in monkeys 5 and 6, LV-GFP-VEGFi1 was used. Results In monkey number 5, at 23 days after laser treatment, no obvious INV was observed, while fluorescein angiography of the iris revealed high fluorescence at the margin of pupil and point posterior synechiae. At 50 days after laser treatment, only a slight ectropion uvea was found. However, in the other eyes, obvious INV or hyphema was observed. The densities of new iridic vessels all significantly varied: between monkey number 5 and number 3 (36.01±4.49/mm2 versus 48.68±9.30/mm2, p=0.025), between monkey number 3 and monkey number 7 (48.68±9.30/mm2 versus 74.38±9.23/mm2, p=0.002), and between monkey number 5 and number 7 (36.01±4.49/mm2 versus 74.38±9.23/mm2, p<0.001). Conclusions Lentivirus-mediated RNAi of VEGF may be a new strategy to treat iris neovascularization, while further studies are needed to investigate the long-term effect. PMID:20806089

  7. Lentivirus-mediated RNA interference of vascular endothelial growth factor in monkey eyes with iris neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Meng-Ke; Tao, Yong; Yu, Wen-Zhen; Kai, Wang; Jiang, Yan-Rong

    2010-08-25

    To explore the in vivo anti-angiogenesis effects resulting from lentivirus-mediated RNAi of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in monkeys with iris neovascularization (INV). Five specific recombinant lentiviral vectors for RNA interference, targeting Macaca mulatta VEGFA, were designed and the one with best knock down efficacy (LV-GFP-VEGFi1) in H1299 cells and RF/6A cells was selected by real-time PCR for in vivo use. A laser-induced retinal vein occlusion model was established in one eye of seven cynomolgus monkeys. In monkeys number 1, 3, and 5 (Group 1), the virus (1x10(8) particles) was intravitreally injected into the preretinal space of the animal's eye immediately after laser coagulation; and in monkeys number 2, 4, and 6 (Group 2), the virus (1x10(8) particles) was injected at 10 days after laser coagulation. In monkey number 7, a blank control injection was performed. In monkeys number 1 and 2, virus without RNAi sequence was used; in monkeys number 3 and 4, virus with nonspecific RNAi sequence was used; and in monkeys 5 and 6, LV-GFP-VEGFi1 was used. In monkey number 5, at 23 days after laser treatment, no obvious INV was observed, while fluorescein angiography of the iris revealed high fluorescence at the margin of pupil and point posterior synechiae. At 50 days after laser treatment, only a slight ectropion uvea was found. However, in the other eyes, obvious INV or hyphema was observed. The densities of new iridic vessels all significantly varied: between monkey number 5 and number 3 (36.01+/-4.49/mm(2) versus 48.68+/-9.30/mm(2), p=0.025), between monkey number 3 and monkey number 7 (48.68+/-9.30/mm(2) versus 74.38+/-9.23/mm(2), p=0.002), and between monkey number 5 and number 7 (36.01+/-4.49/mm(2) versus 74.38+/-9.23/mm(2), p<0.001). Lentivirus-mediated RNAi of VEGF may be a new strategy to treat iris neovascularization, while further studies are needed to investigate the long-term effect.

  8. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  9. Effect of lentiviruses carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein injected into the scala media through a cochleostomy in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Fu, Yong; Liu, Shaosheng; Xia, Guihua; Pan, Song

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to assess the feasibility of post-auricular microinjection of lentiviruses carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into the scala media through cochleostomies in rats, determine the expression of viral gene in the cochlea, and record the post-operative changes in the number and auditory function of cochlear hair cells (HCs). Healthy rats were randomly divided into two groups. The left ears of the animals in group I were injected with lentivirus carrying EGFP (n=10) via scala media lateral wall cochleostomies, and the left ears of the animals in group II were similarly injected with artificial endolymph (n=10). Prior to and 30 days post-injection, auditory function was assessed with click-auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing, EGFP expression was determined with cochlear frozen sections under fluorescence microscopy, and survival of HCs was estimated based on whole mount preparations. Thirty days after surgery, click-ABR testing revealed that there were significant differences in the auditory function, EGFP expression, and survival of HCs in the left ears before and after surgery in the same rats from each group. In group I, EGFP was noted in the strial marginal cells of the scala media, the organ of Corti, spiral nerves, and spiral ganglion cells. Lentiviruses were successfully introduced into the scala media through cochleostomies in rats, and the EGFP reporter gene was efficiently expressed in the organ of Corti, spiral nerves, and spiral ganglion cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Inducible Lentivirus-Mediated siRNA against TLR4 Reduces Nociception in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ruirui; Di, Huiting; Zhang, Jinming; Huang, Zhangxiang; Sun, Yuming; Yu, Weifeng; Wu, Feixiang

    2015-01-01

    Although bone cancer pain is still not fully understood by scientists and clinicians alike, studies suggest that toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays an important role in the initiation and/or maintenance of pathological pain state in bone cancer pain. A promising treatment for bone cancer pain is the downregulation of TLR4 by RNA interference; however, naked siRNA (small interference RNA) is not effective in long-term treatments. In order to concoct a viable prolonged treatment for bone cancer pain, an inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 (tetracycline inducible lentivirus carrying siRNA targeting TLR4) was prepared and the antinociception effects were observed in bone cancer pain rats induced by Walker 256 cells injection in left leg. Results showed that LvOn-siTLR4 intrathecal injection with doxycycline (Dox) oral administration effectively reduced the nociception induced by Walker 256 cells while inhibiting the mRNA and protein expression of TLR4. Proinflammatory cytokines as TNF-α and IL-1β in spinal cord were also decreased. These findings suggest that TLR4 could be a target for bone cancer pain treatment and tetracycline inducible lentivirus LvOn-siTLR4 represents a new potential option for long-term treatment of bone cancer pain.

  11. The use of nonhuman primates in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmonds, R. C. (Editor); Bourne, G. H. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Space related biomedical research involving nonhuman primates is reviewed. The scientific assets of various species and the instruments used for monitoring physiological processes during long duration experimentations are described.

  12. Biokinetics of Plutonium in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Poudel, Deepesh; Guilmette, Raymond A; Gesell, Thomas F; Harris, Jason T; Brey, Richard R

    2016-10-01

    A major source of data on metabolism, excretion and retention of plutonium comes from experimental animal studies. Although old world monkeys are one of the closest living relatives to humans, certain physiological differences do exist between these nonhuman primates and humans. The objective of this paper was to describe the metabolism of plutonium in nonhuman primates using the bioassay and retention data obtained from macaque monkeys injected with plutonium citrate. A biokinetic model for nonhuman primates was developed by adapting the basic model structure and adapting the transfer rates described for metabolism of plutonium in adult humans. Significant changes to the parameters were necessary to explain the shorter retention of plutonium in liver and skeleton of the nonhuman primates, differences in liver to bone partitioning ratio, and significantly higher excretion of plutonium in feces compared to that in humans.

  13. A Mitogenomic Phylogeny of Living Primates

    PubMed Central

    Finstermeier, Knut; Zinner, Dietmar; Brameier, Markus; Meyer, Matthias; Kreuz, Eva; Hofreiter, Michael; Roos, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Primates, the mammalian order including our own species, comprise 480 species in 78 genera. Thus, they represent the third largest of the 18 orders of eutherian mammals. Although recent phylogenetic studies on primates are increasingly built on molecular datasets, most of these studies have focused on taxonomic subgroups within the order. Complete mitochondrial (mt) genomes have proven to be extremely useful in deciphering within-order relationships even up to deep nodes. Using 454 sequencing, we sequenced 32 new complete mt genomes adding 20 previously not represented genera to the phylogenetic reconstruction of the primate tree. With 13 new sequences, the number of complete mt genomes within the parvorder Platyrrhini was widely extended, resulting in a largely resolved branching pattern among New World monkey families. We added 10 new Strepsirrhini mt genomes to the 15 previously available ones, thus almost doubling the number of mt genomes within this clade. Our data allow precise date estimates of all nodes and offer new insights into primate evolution. One major result is a relatively young date for the most recent common ancestor of all living primates which was estimated to 66-69 million years ago, suggesting that the divergence of extant primates started close to the K/T-boundary. Although some relationships remain unclear, the large number of mt genomes used allowed us to reconstruct a robust primate phylogeny which is largely in agreement with previous publications. Finally, we show that mt genomes are a useful tool for resolving primate phylogenetic relationships on various taxonomic levels. PMID:23874967

  14. Effect of prostaglandin reductase 1 (PTGR1) on gastric carcinoma using lentivirus-mediated system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuo; Luo, Fen; Wang, Jun; Mao, Xiang; Chen, Zongyou; Wang, Zhiming; Guo, Fenghua

    2015-01-01

    Gastric carcinoma is a digestive related malignant tumor with poor diagnosis and prognosis for advanced patients. PTGR1 (prostaglandin reductase 1), as a potential cancer biomarker, has not been reported in gastric carcinoma occurrence. To investigate the role of PTGR1 on gastric carcinoma cells, human PTGR1 was efficiently silenced by lentivirus-mediated system in MGC-803 cells confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot. Then cell proliferation, colony formation and cell cycle were determined after knockdown of PTGR1 by MTT assay, colony assay and flow cytometry, respectively and data suggested that PTGR1 down regulated MGC-803 cells significantly suppressed the proliferation and colony formation ability and induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase compared to controls (P < 0.001). Further investigation demonstrated knockdown of PTGR1 influenced cell proliferation and cell cycle via activating p21 and p53 signaling pathway described by Western blot assay. Our findings indicate that PTGR1 may be an oncogene in human gastric carcinoma and identified as a diagnosis and prognosis target for gastric carcinoma.

  15. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of NLK inhibits small-cell lung cancer growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Mutian; Li, Yaming; Tian, Xin; Dai, Shundong; Sun, Jing; Jin, Guojiang; Jiang, Shenyi

    2016-01-01

    Nemo-like kinase (NLK), an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase, has been recognized as a critical regulator of various cancers. In this study, we investigated the role of NLK in human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is the most aggressive form of lung cancer. NLK expression was evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction in 20 paired fresh SCLC tissue samples and found to be noticeably elevated in tumor tissues. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi efficiently suppressed NLK expression in NCI-H446 cells, resulting in a significant reduction in cell viability and proliferation in vitro. Moreover, knockdown of NLK led to cell cycle arrest at the S-phase via suppression of Cyclin A, CDK2, and CDC25A, which could contribute to cell growth inhibition. Furthermore, knockdown of NLK decreased the migration of NCI-H446 cells and downregulated matrix metalloproteinase 9. Treatment with NLK short hairpin RNA significantly reduced SCLC tumor growth in vivo. In conclusion, this study suggests that NLK plays an important role in the growth and metastasis of SCLC and may serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of SCLC. PMID:27895463

  16. Influence of small ruminant lentivirus infection on cheese yield in goats.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Dorota; Czopowicz, Michał; Bagnicka, Emilia; Rzewuska, Magdalena; Strzałkowska, Nina; Kaba, Jarosław

    2015-02-01

    Three-year cohort study was carried out to investigate the influence of small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection on cheese yield in goats. For this purpose records of milk yield, milk composition and cheese yield were collected in a dairy goat herd. Cheese yield was recorded as the amount of fresh cheese obtained from 1 kg milk. All goats were serologically tested for SRLV infection twice a year. The analysis included 247 records in total (71 for seropositive and 176 from seronegative individuals) and was carried out with the use of the four-level hierarchical linear model (α = 0·05). SRLV infection proved to be a statistically significant independent factor reducing cheese yield (P = 0·013)--when other covariates were held constant cheese yield was reduced by 4·6 g per each 1 kg milk in an infected goat compared with an uninfected goat. Other statistically significant covariates positively associated with cheese yield were protein contents, fat contents and the 3rd stage of lactation (P < 0·001 for all).

  17. Feline immunodeficiency virus and puma lentivirus in Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi): epidemiology and diagnostic issues.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Taylor, S K; Rotstein, D S; Pough, M B; Barr, M C; Baldwin, C A; Cunningham, M; Roelke, M; Ingram, D

    2006-04-01

    This study documents the seroprevalence of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and puma lentivirus (PLV) in free-ranging and captive Florida panthers (Puma concolor coryi) (n = 51) and translocated Texas cougars (P. concolor stanleyana) (n = 10) from 1985 to 1998. The sera were tested for anti-FIV antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot tests. The ELISAs were read kinetically (KELA) and the sera were retrospectively examined by PLV peptide ELISA. Eleven panthers and one cougar were positive by KELA; 4 panthers and 4 cougars were equivocal; 35 panthers and 5 cougars were negative; and 1 panther had no data. Seven of the 11 KELA-positive panthers were also positive by Western blot tests and all but one were positive by PLV peptide ELISA. Ten KELA-negative and Western blot-negative cats, were positive by PLV peptide ELISA. KELA results varied within cats from one sample period to the next, but PLV peptide ELISA results were consistent. Territorial sympatry and mating behaviour, noted from radiotelemetry location data on the cats, may have contributed to viral transmission between seropositive animals. These findings suggest that Florida panthers and the introduced Texas cougars have been exposed to FIV and/or PLV.

  18. Stable transfection into rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by lentivirus-mediated NT-3.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yu; Wang, Hongfei; Xia, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) is the most promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of spinal cord injuries. BMSCs have a wide variety of sources and are characterized by being exempt from immune rejection, marked secretory functions and neuronal plasticity during differentiation. The lentiviral vector, namely PLV.Ex3d.P/neo-EF1A-NT3-internal ribosome entry site-enhanced green fluorescent protein, was constructed and subsequently transfected into Sprague Dawley (SD) rat BMSCs. The gene and protein expression levels of the nucleic acid neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) were then detected. The results demonstrated that the constructed NT-3 gene lentiviral expression vector matched the expected design and that the NT-3 gene was transfected into the BMSCs via the lentivirus‑mediated method at a transfection efficiency of 60‑70%. NT-3 gene expression was detected within the stably transfected positive cells at the nucleic acid and protein levels. The cell morphology and biological activity of BMSCs did not alter significantly following transfection with NT-3. NT-3-transfected SD BMSCs were successfully constructed and served as effective vector seed cells with stable expression. These results can be used as a reference for subsequent studies on the transplantation therapy of rat spinal cord injuries using lentivirus-mediated NT-3-transfected SD BMSCs.

  19. Equine lentivirus, comparative studies on four serological tests for the diagnosis of equine infectious anaemia.

    PubMed

    Bürki, F; Rossmanith, W; Rossmanith, E

    1992-11-01

    Serological diagnosis of equine infectious anemia is of necessity group-reactive, i.e. based on viral core protein p26, because viral envelope components as well as the host's immune response to them undergo rapid antigenic change. Since 1970 the agar gel-immunodiffusion test ("Coggins-test") has been the diagnostic method of choice. Recently, ELISA tests have been introduced for faster and theoretically more sensitive serodiagnosis, while Western blots have been used to clarify doubtful results obtained in Coggins-tests. A commercial competitive ELISA was found to give practically equivalent results to the Coggins-test. The sensitivity of this market product is intentionally kept marginal in order to avoid false-positive "reactor horses". Another commercial ELISA, non-competitive, gave inconsistent results, creating great turmoil among horse owners when falsely positive. Caution is also indicated when interpreting Western blots. Sera of strongly positive horses gave as many as eleven bands, of medium positives fewer bands, and of the weakest reactors solely the p26 band. Single p26 banding was, however, also encountered in 5% healthy horses, in two of them consistently over time, which are accordingly considered non-specific. In order to be interpreted as positive, a Western blot for this equine lentivirus must band with its core protein plus at least one glycoprotein, similar to the recommended criterion for a positive reading of serum samples from AIDS patients.

  20. Post-entry blockade of small ruminant lentiviruses by wild ruminants.

    PubMed

    Sanjosé, Leticia; Crespo, Helena; Blatti-Cardinaux, Laure; Glaria, Idoia; Martínez-Carrasco, Carlos; Berriatua, Eduardo; Amorena, Beatriz; De Andrés, Damián; Bertoni, Giuseppe; Reina, Ramses

    2016-01-06

    Small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection causes losses in the small ruminant industry due to reduced animal production and increased replacement rates. Infection of wild ruminants in close contact with infected domestic animals has been proposed to play a role in SRLV epidemiology, but studies are limited and mostly involve hybrids between wild and domestic animals. In this study, SRLV seropositive red deer, roe deer and mouflon were detected through modified ELISA tests, but virus was not successfully amplified using a set of different PCRs. Apparent restriction of SRLV infection in cervids was not related to the presence of neutralizing antibodies. In vitro cultured skin fibroblastic cells from red deer and fallow deer were permissive to the SRLV entry and integration, but produced low quantities of virus. SRLV got rapidly adapted in vitro to blood-derived macrophages and skin fibroblastic cells from red deer but not from fallow deer. Thus, although direct detection of virus was not successfully achieved in vivo, these findings show the potential susceptibility of wild ruminants to SRLV infection in the case of red deer and, on the other hand, an in vivo SRLV restriction in fallow deer. Altogether these results may highlight the importance of surveilling and controlling SRLV infection in domestic as well as in wild ruminants sharing pasture areas, and may provide new natural tools to control SRLV spread in sheep and goats.

  1. Expression of cytokine mRNA in lentivirus-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, F.; Vogt, H. R.; Seow, H. F.; Bertoni, G.; Cheevers, W. P.; von Bodungen, U.; Zurbriggen, A.; Peterhans, E.

    1997-01-01

    Infection of goats with the lentivirus caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) leads to persistent infection and development of chronic arthritis. We analyzed the expression of cytokines and viral RNA in the joints of goats at early time points after experimental infection with CAEV and in those of animals suffering from chronic arthritis as a result of natural infection. In situ hybridization experiments showed that the pattern of cytokine expression in caprine arthritis was similar to that found in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with a few cells expressing the lymphocyte-derived cytokines interferon (IFN)-gamma and interleukin (IL)-2 and rather more cells expressing monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. IFN-gamma mRNA expression in experimentally infected joints peaked at day 12 and was mostly detected in areas containing viral RNA. At later time points, no IFN-gamma- or virus-expressing cells were found in inflamed joints but both were again detected in goats with severe arthritis. Interestingly, at the clinical stage of arthritis reflecting the chronic stage of infection, the inflammatory lesion was found to be immunologically compartmentalized. Humoral immune responses and cell-mediated immune responses appeared to concurrently occur in distinct areas of the synovial membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9327739

  2. Determinants of effective lentivirus-driven microRNA expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Takuya; Sadovsky, Elena; Gegick, Margaret E.; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of microRNA (miRNA) levels, including overexpression of mature species, has become an important biological tool, even motivating miRNA-based therapeutics. To assess key determinants of miRNA overexpression in a mammalian system in vivo, we sought to bypass the laborious generation of a transgenic animal by exploiting placental trophoblast-specific gene manipulation using lentiviral vectors, which has been instrumental in elucidating trophoblast biology. We examined the impact of several key components of miRNA stem loops and their flanking sequences on the efficiency of mature miRNA expression in vivo. By combining established and novel approaches for miRNA expression, we engineered lentivirus-driven miRNA expression plasmids, which we tested in the mouse placenta. We found that reverse sense inserts minimized single-strand splicing and degradation, and that maintaining longer, poly-A-containing arms flanking the miRNA stem-loop markedly enhanced transgenic miRNA expression. Additionally, we accomplished overexpression of diverse mammalian, drosophila, or C. elegans miRNAs, either based on native context or using a “cassette” replacement of the mature miRNA sequence. Together, we have identified primary miRNA sequences that are paramount for effective expression of mature miRNAs, and validated their role in mice. Principles established by our findings may guide the design of efficient miRNA vectors for in vivo use. PMID:27627961

  3. The transmission of Jembrana disease, a lentivirus disease of Bos javanicus cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Soeharsono, S.; Wilcox, G. E.; Putra, A. A.; Hartaningsih, N.; Sulistyana, K.; Tenaya, M.

    1995-01-01

    Methods of transmission of Jembrana disease, an acute and severe disease of Bali cattle (Bos javanicus) caused by a recently-identified bovine lentivirus known as Jembrana disease virus, are described. During the acute disease virus can be detected in saliva and milk. There is evidence of direct transmission from acutely affected animals in close contact with susceptible cattle, possibly by virus in these secretions infecting cattle by the conjunctival, intranasal or oral routes, by which it was possible to infect cattle experimentally. During the acute disease the titre of infectious virus in blood is high, about 10(8) 50% cattle infectious units (ID50)/ml, and it is probable that the virus is also transmitted mechanically by haematophagous arthropods. Recovered cattle are also a potential but probably infrequent source of infection; recovered cattle are persistently viraemic but the titre of infectious virus in blood decreases to about 10(1) ID50/ml by 60 days after recovery from the acute disease, and virus cannot be detected in secretions. PMID:7589275

  4. Safe two-plasmid production for the first clinical lentivirus vector that achieves >99% transduction in primary cells using a one-step protocol.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaobin; Humeau, Laurent; Slepushkin, Vladimir; Binder, Gwendolyn; Yu, Qiao; Slepushkina, Tatiana; Chen, Ziping; Merling, Randall; Davis, Brian; Chang, Yung-Nien; Dropulic, Boro

    2004-09-01

    We report the design of a unique two-plasmid production system for the first lentiviral vector to be evaluated in humans, VRX496. VRX496 is an optimized VSV-G pseudotyped vector derived from HIV-1 that expresses antisense to the HIV envelope gene. We found that a two-plasmid approach to production resulted in higher vector production titers when compared with a three-plasmid approach, which is particularly important for vector production at the large scale. Therefore, we carefully designed a single packaging construct, VIRPAC, for safety by reducing its homology with VRX496 and by insertion of functionally validated genetic elements designed to reduce the risk of generation of a replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). A native cis-acting ribozyme is used to prevent read through into the envelope gene from the upstream gag-pol genes in the packaging vector, thus preventing RNAs containing gag-pol and env together for comparable safety to a three-plasmid system. We demonstrate that there is no significant in vivo vector mobilization using a primary SCID-hu mouse transplantation model, which correlates with the presence of an anti-HIV payload and suggests that inclusion of antisense may be a useful tool to restrict mobilization in other vector constructs. Gene transfer is achieved using a one-step transduction procedure that is simple and clinically translatable, which reaches stable transduction efficiencies of >99% in CD4+ T lymphocytes within 3 days of culture initiation. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Chronic mitochondrial energy impairment produces selective striatal degeneration and abnormal choreiform movements in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Brouillet, E; Hantraye, P; Ferrante, R J; Dolan, R; Leroy-Willig, A; Kowall, N W; Beal, M F

    1995-01-01

    Although the gene defect responsible for Huntington disease (HD) has recently been identified, the pathogenesis of the disease remains obscure. One potential mechanism is that the gene defect may lead to an impairment of energy metabolism followed by slow excitotoxic neuronal injury. In the present study we examined whether chronic administration of 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), an irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, can replicate the neuropathologic and clinical features of HD in nonhuman primates. After 3-6 weeks of 3-NP administration, apomorphine treatment induced a significant increase in motor activity as compared with saline-treated controls. Animals showed both choreiform movements, as well as foot and limb dystonia, which are characteristic of HD. More prolonged 3-NP treatment in two additional primates resulted in spontaneous dystonia and dyskinesia accompanied by lesions in the caudate and putamen seen by magnetic resonance imaging. Histologic evaluation showed that there was a depletion of calbindin neurons, astrogliosis, sparing of NADPH-diaphorase neurons, and growth-related proliferative changes in dendrites of spiny neurons similar to changes in HD. The striosomal organization of the striatum and the nucleus accumbens were spared. These findings show that chronic administration of 3-NP to nonhuman primates can replicate many of the characteristic motor and histologic features of HD, further strengthening the possibility that a subtle impairment of energy metabolism may play a role in its pathogenesis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7624378

  6. Evolutionary conservation of chromosome territory arrangements in cell nuclei from higher primates.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Hideyuki; Müller, Stefan; Neusser, Michaela; von Hase, Johann; Calcagno, Enzo; Cremer, Marion; Solovei, Irina; Cremer, Christoph; Cremer, Thomas

    2002-04-02

    We demonstrate that the nuclear topological arrangement of chromosome territories (CTs) has been conserved during primate evolution over a period of about 30 million years. Recent evidence shows that the positioning of chromatin in human lymphocyte nuclei is correlated with gene density. For example, human chromosome 19 territories, which contain mainly gene-dense and early replicating chromatin, are located toward the nuclear center, whereas chromosome 18 territories, which consist mainly of gene-poor and later replicating chromatin, is located close to the nuclear border. In this study, we subjected seven different primate species to comparative analysis of the radial distribution pattern of human chromosome 18- and 19-homologous chromatin by three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our data demonstrate that gene-density-correlated radial chromatin arrangements were conserved during higher-primate genome evolution, irrespective of the major karyotypic rearrangements that occurred in different phylogenetic lineages. The evolutionarily conserved positioning of homologous chromosomes or chromosome segments in related species supports evidence for a functionally relevant higher-order chromatin arrangement that is correlated with gene-density.

  7. Contextualising primate origins--an ecomorphological framework.

    PubMed

    Soligo, Christophe; Smaers, Jeroen B

    2016-04-01

    Ecomorphology - the characterisation of the adaptive relationship between an organism's morphology and its ecological role - has long been central to theories of the origin and early evolution of the primate order. This is exemplified by two of the most influential theories of primate origins: Matt Cartmill's Visual Predation Hypothesis, and Bob Sussman's Angiosperm Co-Evolution Hypothesis. However, the study of primate origins is constrained by the absence of data directly documenting the events under investigation, and has to rely instead on a fragmentary fossil record and the methodological assumptions inherent in phylogenetic comparative analyses of extant species. These constraints introduce particular challenges for inferring the ecomorphology of primate origins, as morphology and environmental context must first be inferred before the relationship between the two can be considered. Fossils can be integrated in comparative analyses and observations of extant model species and laboratory experiments of form-function relationships are critical for the functional interpretation of the morphology of extinct species. Recent developments have led to important advancements, including phylogenetic comparative methods based on more realistic models of evolution, and improved methods for the inference of clade divergence times, as well as an improved fossil record. This contribution will review current perspectives on the origin and early evolution of primates, paying particular attention to their phylogenetic (including cladistic relationships and character evolution) and environmental (including chronology, geography, and physical environments) contextualisation, before attempting an up-to-date ecomorphological synthesis of primate origins. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  8. Ontogeny of the nasopalatine duct in primates.

    PubMed

    Shimp, Kristin L; Bhatnagar, Kunwar P; Bonar, Christopher J; Smith, Timothy D

    2003-09-01

    Ecological explanations have been put forward to account for the precocious or delayed development of patency in ducts leading to the vomeronasal organ (VNO) in certain mammals. Perinatal function may be related, in part, to the patency or fusion of the vomeronasal and nasopalatine (NPD) ducts. However, few studies have focused on NPD development in primates, which generally have a prolonged period of dependence during infancy. In this study we examined 24 prenatal primates and 13 neonatal primates, and a comparative sample of fetal mice and insectivores. In embryonic and early fetal Microcebus murinus, the NPD was completely fused, whereas in fetuses of later stages the duct was partially fused or completely patent. M. myoxinus of all stages demonstrated some degree of NPD fusion. In all other prenatal primates, the NPD was fused to some extent. Four prenatal insectivores (Tenrec ecaudatus) showed some degree of NPD fusion. In Mus musculus at 19 days gestation, the NPD was patent, although the anatomically separate VNO duct was fused. T. ecaudatus and most of the neonatal primates revealed complete NPD patency. An exception was Saguinus geoffroyi, which exhibited fusion of the NPD near the VNO opening. These observations may relate to differences in perinatal VNO function. The differences noted in our study suggest that M. murinus and M. myoxinus may differ in perinatal VNO functionality and perhaps in related behavior. Observations of neonatal primates suggest that NPD patency may be relatively common at birth and could serve other purposes in addition to being an access route for VNO stimuli.

  9. Recombination and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Aisha H.; Hawkins, Michelle; McGlynn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The links between recombination and replication have been appreciated for decades and it is now generally accepted that these two fundamental aspects of DNA metabolism are inseparable: Homologous recombination is essential for completion of DNA replication and vice versa. This review focuses on the roles that recombination enzymes play in underpinning genome duplication, aiding replication fork movement in the face of the many replisome barriers that challenge genome stability. These links have many conserved features across all domains of life, reflecting the conserved nature of the substrate for these reactions, DNA. PMID:25341919

  10. Poxvirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses are large, enveloped viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm and encode proteins for DNA replication and gene expression. Hairpin ends link the two strands of the linear, double-stranded DNA genome. Viral proteins involved in DNA synthesis include a 117-kDa polymerase, a helicase–primase, a uracil DNA glycosylase, a processivity factor, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, a protein kinase, and a DNA ligase. A viral FEN1 family protein participates in double-strand break repair. The DNA is replicated as long concatemers that are resolved by a viral Holliday junction endonuclease. PMID:23838441

  11. [Construction of shRNA lentivirus vector on rat DREAM gene and its analgesic effect on CCI rats].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunjiao; Cheng, Zhigang; Yu, Peng; Li, Jingyi; Bai, Nianyue; He, Zhenghua; Yang, Shenghui; Guo, Qulian

    2009-08-01

    To construct the recombinant lentivirus vector containing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) inhibited DREAM expression and to investigate the gene therapy of neuropathic pain by inhibiting the expression of DREAM gene by RNA interference. An effective short hairpin RNA targeting to rat DREAM was cloned into the plasmids on the base of Lentivirous vectors, pKCSHR-Puro/GFP, and both of the pKCSHR-Puro/GFP-DREAM and Lentivector package plasmids mix were transferred into the 293T cells. The culture supernatant was harvested, and the virus titer was detected 48 hours after transferring. Thirty-six sheer breed pathogen free adult Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 6 groups (6 in each group): normal control group (N); sham-operated group (S); CCI group (C0 group):CCI model without any intervention; Saline control group (C1 group); empty vector control group (C2 group); and LV-shRNADREAM lentiviral vector treatment group (C3 group). The rats in the last 3 groups respectively accepted injection of normal saline, blank vector, LV-shRNADREAM lentiviral vector in the subarachnoid on the 7th day after CCI, and the pain behavior was observed after 3, 7, 10, 14, 21 d after CCI. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression was detected by fluorescence microscope and the contents of DREAM mRNA and DREAM protein were detected by Realtime PCR and Western blot respectively in the rat lumbar spinal cord. The short hairpin RNA sequences targeting at rat DREAM were cloned into the vectors, and an entry clone and an expression clone were constructed successfully confirmed by sequence analysis. Lentiviral packaging was successful in 293 T cell line and the transfection titer of the lentivirus was 1 x 10(8) IFU/mL. LV-shRNADREAM lentivirus vector was transfected successfully in the rat spine with Intrathecal injection of LV-shRNADREAM. Compared with the other 3 groups, heat pain threshold and mechanical pain threshold in Group C3 improved significantly (P<0.01), and the expression of

  12. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  13. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  14. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  15. DNA Replication Origins

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Alan C.; Méchali, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    The onset of genomic DNA synthesis requires precise interactions of specialized initiator proteins with DNA at sites where the replication machinery can be loaded. These sites, defined as replication origins, are found at a few unique locations in all of the prokaryotic chromosomes examined so far. However, replication origins are dispersed among tens of thousands of loci in metazoan chromosomes, thereby raising questions regarding the role of specific nucleotide sequences and chromatin environment in origin selection and the mechanisms used by initiators to recognize replication origins. Close examination of bacterial and archaeal replication origins reveals an array of DNA sequence motifs that position individual initiator protein molecules and promote initiator oligomerization on origin DNA. Conversely, the need for specific recognition sequences in eukaryotic replication origins is relaxed. In fact, the primary rule for origin selection appears to be flexibility, a feature that is modulated either by structural elements or by epigenetic mechanisms at least partly linked to the organization of the genome for gene expression. PMID:23838439

  16. Replication of lightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming Y.; Matson, Lawrence E.; Lee, Heedong; Chen, Chenggang

    2009-08-01

    The fabrication of lightweight mirror assemblages via a replication technique offers great potential for eliminating the high cost and schedule associated with the grinding and polishing steps needed for conventional glass or SiC mirrors. A replication mandrel is polished to an inverse figure shape and to the desired finish quality. It is then, coated with a release layer, the appropriate reflective layer, and followed by a laminate for coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) tailorability and strength. This optical membrane is adhered to a mirror structural substrate with a low shrinkage, CTE tailored adhesive. Afterwards, the whole assembly is separated from the mandrel. The mandrel is then cleaned and reused for the next replication run. The ultimate goal of replication is to preserve the surface finish and figure of the optical membrane upon its release from the mandrel. Successful replication requires a minimization of the residual stresses within the optical coating stack, the curing stresses from the adhesive and the thermal stress resulting from CTE mismatch between the structural substrate, the adhesive, and the optical membrane. In this paper, the results on replicated trials using both metal/metal and ceramic/ceramic laminates adhered to light weighted structural substrates made from syntactic foams (both inorganic and organic) will be discussed.

  17. Voice discrimination in four primates.

    PubMed

    Candiotti, Agnès; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Lemasson, Alban

    2013-10-01

    One accepted function of vocalisations is to convey information about the signaller, such as its age-sex class, motivation, or relationship with the recipient. Yet, in natural habitats individuals not only interact with conspecifics but also with members of other species. This is well documented for African forest monkeys, which form semi-permanent mixed-species groups that can persist for decades. Although members of such groups interact with each other on a daily basis, both physically and vocally, it is currently unknown whether they can discriminate familiar and unfamiliar voices of heterospecific group members. We addressed this question with playbacks on monkey species known to form polyspecific associations in the wild: red-capped mangabeys, Campbell's monkeys and Guereza colobus monkeys. We tested subjects' discrimination abilities of contact calls of familiar and unfamiliar female De Brazza monkeys. When pooling all species, subjects looked more often towards the speaker when hearing contact calls of unfamiliar than familiar callers. When testing De Brazza monkeys with their own calls, we found the same effect with the longest gaze durations after hearing unfamiliar voices. This suggests that primates can discriminate, not only between familiar and unfamiliar voices of conspecifics, but also between familiar and unfamiliar voices of heterospecifics living within a close proximity.

  18. Targeting Prostate Cancer for Gene Therapy Utilizing Lentivirus and Oncolytic VSV Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    specific fashion. Ad ditionally, mutated form of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), an oncolytic virus capable of replicating in interferon (IFN) response...Our results indicated that direct injection of VSV (AV3) intra-prostaticaly lead to selective infection, replication, and overall i ncrease i n ap...ully re plication-competent a nd r apidly s pread through a nd ki ll cancerous cells. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus which

  19. Social knowledge and signals in primates.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Thore J; Sheehan, Michael J

    2013-07-01

    Primates are notable for having a rich and detailed understanding of their social environment and there has been great interest in the evolution and function of social knowledge in primates. Indeed, primates have been shown to have impressive understandings of not only other group members but also the complex relationships among them. To be useful, however, social knowledge requires memories from previous encounters and observations about individual traits that are stable. Here, we argue that social systems or traits that make social knowledge more costly or less accurate will favor signals that either supplement or replace social knowledge. Thus, the relationship between signals and social knowledge can be complementary or antagonistic depending on the type of signal. Our goal in this review is to elucidate the relationships between signals and social knowledge in primates. We categorize signals into three types, each with different relationships to social knowledge. (1) Identity signals directly facilitate social knowledge, (2) current-state signals supplement information gained through social knowledge, and (3) badges of status replace social knowledge. Primates rely extensively on identity information, but it remains to be determined to what extent this is based on receiver perception of individual variation or senders using identity signals. Primates frequently utilize current-state signals including signals of intent to augment their interactions with familiar individuals. Badges of status are rare in primates, and the cases where they are used point to a functional and evolutionary trade-off between badges of status and social knowledge. However, the nature of this relationship needs further exploration.

  20. Primate genotyping via high resolution melt analysis: rapid and reliable identification of color vision status in wild lemurs.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rachel L; Spriggs, Amanda N; MacFie, Tammie S; Baden, Andrea L; Irwin, Mitchell T; Wright, Patricia C; Louis, Edward E; Lawler, Richard R; Mundy, Nicholas I; Bradley, Brenda J

    2016-10-01

    Analyses of genetic polymorphisms can aid our understanding of intra- and interspecific variation in primate sociality, ecology, and behavior. Studies of primate opsin genes are prime examples of this, as single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the X-linked opsin gene underlie variation in color vision. For primate species with polymorphic trichromacy, genotyping opsin SNVs can generally indicate whether individual primates are red-green color-blind (denoted homozygous M or homozygous L) or have full trichromatic color vision (heterozygous ML). Given the potential influence of color vision on behavior and fitness, characterizing the color vision status of study subjects is becoming commonplace for many primate field projects. Such studies traditionally involve a multi-step sequencing-based method that can be costly and time-consuming. Here we present a new reliable, rapid, and relatively inexpensive method for characterizing color vision in primate populations using high resolution melt analysis (HRMA). Using lemurs as a case study, we characterized variation at exons 3 and/or 5 of the X-linked opsin gene for 87 individuals representing nine species. We scored opsin genotypes and color vision status using both traditional sequencing-based methods as well as our novel melting-curve based HRMA protocol. For each species, the melting curves of varying genotypes (homozygous M, homozygous L, heterozygous ML) differed in melting temperature and/or shape. Melting curves for each sample were consistent across replicates, and genotype-specific melting curves were consistent across DNA sources (blood vs. feces). We show that opsin genotypes can be quickly and reliably scored using HRMA once lab-specific reference curves have been developed based on known genotypes. Although the protocol presented here focuses on genotyping lemur opsin loci, we also consider the larger potential for applying this approach to various types of genetic studies of primate populations.

  1. Study of compartmentalization in the visna clinical form of small ruminant lentivirus infection in sheep

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A central nervous system (CNS) disease outbreak caused by small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLV) has triggered interest in Spain due to the rapid onset of clinical signs and relevant production losses. In a previous study on this outbreak, the role of LTR in tropism was unclear and env encoded sequences, likely involved in tropism, were not investigated. This study aimed to analyze heterogeneity of SRLV Env regions - TM amino terminal and SU V4, C4 and V5 segments - in order to assess virus compartmentalization in CNS. Results Eight Visna (neurologically) affected sheep of the outbreak were used. Of the 350 clones obtained after PCR amplification, 142 corresponded to CNS samples (spinal cord and choroid plexus) and the remaining to mammary gland, blood cells, bronchoalveolar lavage cells and/or lung. The diversity of the env sequences from CNS was 11.1-16.1% between animals and 0.35-11.6% within each animal, except in one animal presenting two sequence types (30% diversity) in the CNS (one grouping with those of the outbreak), indicative of CNS virus sequence heterogeneity. Outbreak sequences were of genotype A, clustering per animal and compartmentalizing in the animal tissues. No CNS specific signature patterns were found. Conclusions Bayesian approach inferences suggested that proviruses from broncoalveolar lavage cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells represented the common ancestors (infecting viruses) in the animal and that neuroinvasion in the outbreak involved microevolution after initial infection with an A-type strain. This study demonstrates virus compartmentalization in the CNS and other body tissues in sheep presenting the neurological form of SRLV infection. PMID:22281181

  2. Effect of ewe ovine lentivirus infection on ewe and lamb productivity.

    PubMed

    Keen, J E; Hungerford, L L; Littledike, E T; Wittum, T E; Kwang, J

    1997-05-01

    We used a previously described sensitive and specific ovine lentivirus (OLV) recombinant transmembrane (rTM) protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect anti-OLV antibodies and define OLV infection in breeding ewes from nine US Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) flocks. We estimated the production impacts of dam rTM ELISA seropositivity on ewe and lamb productivity in the birth-to-weaning interval using production data from 1466 breeding ewes (of which 1242 actually lambed) and their 2452 lambs born in spring 1992 using several multiple linear and logistic regression models. By adjusting for lamb weaning age, gender, type of birth and rearing, birth difficulty, dam age, and flock, the component of ewe or lamb productivity related to ewe OLV infection alone was isolated. The rTM ELISA-negative ewes produced significantly more total weight of weaned lamb per ewe-lambing (3.84 kg) and per ewe ram-exposed (4.95 kg) compared to their OLV-positive flockmates. Negative ewes also weaned 0.11 more lambs per ewe-lambing and 0.09 more lambs per ewe ram-exposed, gave birth to 0.13 more lambs per ewe ram-exposed, and were more likely to lamb after breeding (odds ratio (OR) = 1.9) compared to equivalent OLV-positive ewes. Lambs reared by OLV-negative ewes weighed 0.15 kg more at birth, gained 8 g more per day through weaning, and weighed 0.59 kg more at 56-day weaning. Preweaning mortality was lower (OR = 0.8) among lambs born to OLV-negative compared to OLV-positive ewes, although this difference was not significant. Our results suggest that subclinical OLV infection has important detrimental effects on sheep production which occur in cumulative fashion from breeding through weaning and that OLV control efforts may be financially justified in some sheep flocks.

  3. Targeting H19 by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference increases A549 cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Sun, Yan; Yi, Jiqun; Wang, Xiuwen; Liang, Jizhen; Pan, Zhaojun; Li, Li; Jiang, Gaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common and a lethal malignancy in the world and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most usual type. H19 long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plays essential roles in tumor development. But its role in tumor metastasis is still unclear. MACC1 RNAi and Lentivirus-mediated H19-specific shRNA was used to establish H19 stable knocking-down A549 cells. Transwell assays were performed to examine the effect of H19 knocking-down on A549 cells migration and invasion. The downstream signaling proteins targeted by H19 were also examined by western blot. AG1478 and U0126 were used as the inhibitor of EGFR and ERK1/2, respectively. The knockdown of H19 increased the migration and invasion of A549 cells, and knockdown of metastasis-associated in colon cancer 1 (MACC1) decreased the migration and invasion of A549 cells. Furthermore, MACC1 protein targeted by H19 was upregulated as well as the downstream signaling proteins including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), β-catenin, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Inhibited the expression of EGFR or ERK1/2 significantly decreased the migration and invasion of tumor cells. Our findings showed that H19 functions as a suppressor of NSCLC and plays an important role in the migration and invasion of NSCLC. More importantly, H19 may regulate NSCLC metastasis through modulating cellular signaling pathway proteins related to cell proliferation and cell adhesion, including MACC1, EGFR, β-catenin and ERK1/2. These results put forward our understanding of the detailed mechanism of H19 lncRNA regulating the process of NSCLC metastasis.

  4. Identification of broadly recognized, T helper 1 lymphocyte epitopes in an equine lentivirus

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Darrilyn G; Oaks, J Lindsay; Brown, Wendy C; McGuire, Travis C

    2002-01-01

    Equine infectious anaemia virus (EIAV) is a horse lentivirus causing lifelong, persistent infection. During acute infection, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are probably involved in terminating plasma viraemia. However, only a few EIAV CTL epitopes, restricted to fewer horse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I alleles, are known. As interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD4+, T helper 1 (Th1) lymphocytes promote CTL activity and help maintain memory CTL, identifying broadly recognized EIAV Th1 epitopes would contribute significantly to vaccine strategies seeking to promote strong CTL responses among horses with varying class I haplotypes. To this end, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 10 MHC disparate, EIAV-infected horses were tested in T-lymphocyte proliferation assays for recognition of peptides from the Gag p26 capsid region and a portion of Pol. Both regions are highly conserved among EIAV isolates, and this Pol region is 51–63% homologueous to other lentiviral Pol proteins. Seven of 10 horses recognized peptide Gag 221–245, and peptides Gag 242–261 and Pol 323–344 were recognized by five and four horses, respectively. Furthermore, the Gag peptides were recognized by two additional horses after resolving their initial plasma viraemia, indicating that these two peptides can be immunodominant early in infection. Gag peptide-responsive PBMC produced only IFN-γ, indicating a Th1 response, while Pol 323–344-responsive PBMC produced IFN-γ both with and without interleukin-4. PBMC from uninfected horses failed to either proliferate or secrete cytokines in response to peptide stimulation. Finally, CD4+ T lymphocytes were required for proliferation responses, as shown by assays using CD4- versus CD8-depleted PBMC. PMID:11918691

  5. An insight into a combination of ELISA strategies to diagnose small ruminant lentivirus infections.

    PubMed

    de Andrés, X; Ramírez, H; Bertolotti, L; San Román, B; Glaria, I; Crespo, H; Jáuregui, P; Minguijón, E; Juste, R; Leginagoikoa, I; Pérez, M; Luján, L; Badiola, J J; Polledo, L; García-Marín, J F; Riezu, J I; Borrás-Cuesta, F; de Andrés, D; Rosati, S; Reina, R; Amorena, B

    2013-04-15

    A single broadly reactive standard ELISA is commonly applied to control small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) spread, but type specific ELISA strategies are gaining interest in areas with highly prevalent and heterogeneous SRLV infections. Short (15-residue) synthetic peptides (n=60) were designed in this study using deduced amino acid sequence profiles of SRLV circulating in sheep from North Central Spain and SRLV described previously. The corresponding ELISAs and two standard ELISAs were employed to analyze sera from sheep flocks either controlled or infected with different SRLV genotypes. Two outbreaks, showing SRLV-induced arthritis (genotype B2) and encephalitis (genotype A), were represented among the infected flocks. The ELISA results revealed that none of the assays detected all the infected animals in the global population analyzed, the assay performance varying according to the genetic type of the strain circulating in the area and the test antigen. Five of the six highly reactive (57-62%) single peptide ELISAs were further assessed, revealing that the ELISA based on peptide 98M (type A ENV-SU5, consensus from the neurological outbreak) detected positives in the majority of the type-A specific sera tested (Se: 86%; Sp: 98%) and not in the arthritic type B outbreak. ENV-TM ELISAs based on peptides 126M1 (Se: 82%; Sp: 95%) and 126M2 0,65 0.77 (Se: 68%; Sp: 88%) detected preferentially caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAEV, type B) and visna/maedi (VMV, type A) virus infections respectively, which may help to perform a preliminary CAEV vs. VMV-like typing of the flock. The use of particular peptide ELISAs and standard tests individually or combined may be useful in the different areas under study, to determine disease progression, diagnose/type infection and prevent its spread.

  6. Genetic Testing for TMEM154 Mutations Associated with Lentivirus Susceptibility in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Petrik, Dustin T.; Simpson, Barry; Kijas, James W.; Clawson, Michael L.; Chitko-McKown, Carol G.; Harhay, Gregory P.; Leymaster, Kreg A.

    2013-01-01

    In sheep, small ruminant lentiviruses cause an incurable, progressive, lymphoproliferative disease that affects millions of animals worldwide. Known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in the U.S., and Visna/Maedi virus (VMV) elsewhere, these viruses reduce an animal’s health, productivity, and lifespan. Genetic variation in the ovine transmembrane protein 154 gene (TMEM154) has been previously associated with OPPV infection in U.S. sheep. Sheep with the ancestral TMEM154 haplotype encoding glutamate (E) at position 35, and either form of an N70I variant, were highly-susceptible compared to sheep homozygous for the K35 missense mutation. Our current overall aim was to characterize TMEM154 in sheep from around the world to develop an efficient genetic test for reduced susceptibility. The average frequency of TMEM154 E35 among 74 breeds was 0.51 and indicated that highly-susceptible alleles were present in most breeds around the world. Analysis of whole genome sequences from an international panel of 75 sheep revealed more than 1,300 previously unreported polymorphisms in a 62 kb region containing TMEM154 and confirmed that the most susceptible haplotypes were distributed worldwide. Novel missense mutations were discovered in the signal peptide (A13V) and the extracellular domains (E31Q, I74F, and I102T) of TMEM154. A matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–time-of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) assay was developed to detect these and six previously reported missense and two deletion mutations in TMEM154. In blinded trials, the call rate for the eight most common coding polymorphisms was 99.4% for 499 sheep tested and 96.0% of the animals were assigned paired TMEM154 haplotypes (i.e., diplotypes). The widespread distribution of highly-susceptible TMEM154 alleles suggests that genetic testing and selection may improve the health and productivity of infected flocks. PMID:23408992

  7. Small ruminant lentivirus genetic subgroups associate with sheep TMEM154 genotypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Small ruminant lentiviruses (SRLVs) are prevalent in North American sheep and a major cause of production losses for the U.S. sheep industry. Sheep susceptibility to SRLV infection is influenced by genetic variation within the ovine transmembrane 154 gene (TMEM154). Animals with either of two distinct TMEM154 haplotypes that both encode glutamate at position 35 of the protein (E35) are at greater risk of SRLV infection than those homozygous with a lysine (K35) haplotype. Prior to this study, it was unknown if TMEM154 associations with infection are influenced by SRLV genetic subgroups. Accordingly, our goals were to characterize SRLVs naturally infecting sheep from a diverse U.S. Midwestern flock and test them for associations with TMEM154 E35K genotypes. Two regions of the SRLV genome were targeted for proviral amplification, cloning, sequence analysis, and association testing with TMEM154 E35K genotypes: gag and the transmembrane region of env. Independent analyses of gag and env sequences showed that they clustered in two subgroups (1 and 2), they were distinct from SRLV subtypes originating from Europe, and that subgroup 1 associated with hemizygous and homozygous TMEM154 K35 genotypes and subgroup 2 with hemi- and homozygous E35 genotypes (gag p < 0.001, env p = 0.01). These results indicate that SRLVs in the U.S. have adapted to infect sheep with specific TMEM154 E35K genotypes. Consequently, both host and SRLV genotypes affect the relative risk of SRLV infection in sheep. PMID:23895262

  8. Sperm Morphology Assessment in Captive Neotropical Primates.

    PubMed

    Swanson, W F; Valle, R R; Carvalho, F M; Arakaki, P R; Rodas-Martínez, A Z; Muniz, Japc; García-Herreros, M

    2016-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate sperm morphology in four neotropical primate species to compare the sperm morphological traits and the sperm morphometric parameters as a basis for establishing normative sperm standards for each species. Data from 80 ejaculates collected from four primate species, Callithrix jacchus, Callimico goeldii, Alouatta caraya and Ateles geoffroyi, were analysed for detection of sperm morphological alterations using subjective World Health Organization (WHO-2010) standards and Sperm Deformity Index (SDI) criteria, objective computer-assisted sperm morphometry analysis (CASMA) and subpopulation sperm determination (SSD) methods. There were multiple differences (p < 0.01) observed among primate species in values obtained from WHO-2010, SDI, CASMA and SSD sperm analysis methods. In addition, multiple significant positive and negative correlations were observed between the sperm morphological traits (SDI, Sperm Deformity Index Head Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Midpiece Defects, Sperm Deformity Index Tail Defects, Normal Sperm, Head Defects, Midpiece Defects and Tail Defects) and the sperm morphometric parameters (SSD, Area (A), Perimeter (P), Length (L), Width (W), Ellipticity, Elongation and Rugosity) (p ≤ 0.046). In conclusion, our findings using different evaluation methods indicate that pronounced sperm morphological variation exists among these four neotropical primate species. Because of the strong relationship observed among morphological and morphometric parameters, these results suggest that application of objective analysis methods could substantially improve the reliability of comparative studies and help to establish valid normative sperm values for neotropical primates.

  9. How primates (including us!) respond to inequity.

    PubMed

    Brosnan, Sarah F

    2008-01-01

    Responding negatively to inequity is not a uniquely human trait. Some of our closest evolutionary ancestors respond negatively when treated less well than a conspecific. Comparative work between humans and other primates can help elucidate the evolutionary underpinnings of humans' social preferences. Results from studies of nonhuman primates, in particular chimpanzees and capuchin monkeys, are presented in comparison to human results that have been collected during economic game studies in humans, such as in the Ultimatum Game or Impunity Game. Among nonhuman primates, a frequent behavioral reaction to inequity is to refuse to continue the interaction. While in some cases this response appears to be caused by the inequitable distribution, in others, it seems to be caused by another individual's inequitable behavior. While these reactions are similar to those of humans, this reaction does not appear to be a sense of fairness in the way that we think of it in humans. Neither nonhuman primate species alters their behavior when they are the benefited individual, and in an experimental situation, chimpanzees do not alter their behavior to obtain food for their partner as well as for themselves. Although there are differences between human and nonhuman primate responses, such studies allow us to better understand the evolution of our own responses to inequity. Given the strong behavioral reactions that even monkeys show to inequitable treatment, it is not surprising that humans are concerned with equity. Such comparisons increase understanding of issues such as healthcare disparities in humans.

  10. Operant nociception in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Kangas, Brian D; Bergman, Jack

    2014-09-01

    The effective management of pain is a longstanding public health concern. Morphine-like opioids have long been front-line analgesics, but produce undesirable side effects that can limit their application. Slow progress in the introduction of novel improved medications for pain management over the last 5 decades has prompted a call for innovative translational research, including new preclinical assays. Most current in vivo procedures (eg, tail flick, hot plate, warm water tail withdrawal) assay the effects of nociceptive stimuli on simple spinal reflexes or unconditioned behavioral reactions. However, clinical treatment goals may include the restoration of previous behavioral activities, which can be limited by medication-related side effects that are not measured in such procedures. The present studies describe an apparatus and procedure to study the disruptive effects of nociceptive stimuli on voluntary behavior in nonhuman primates, and the ability of drugs to restore such behavior through their analgesic actions. Squirrel monkeys were trained to pull a cylindrical thermode for access to a highly palatable food. Next, sessions were conducted in which the temperature of the thermode was increased stepwise until responding stopped, permitting the determination of stable nociceptive thresholds. Tests revealed that several opioid analgesics, but not d-amphetamine or Δ(9)-THC, produced dose-related increases in threshold that were antagonist sensitive and efficacy dependent, consistent with their effects using traditional measures of antinociception. Unlike traditional reflex-based measures, however, the results also permitted the concurrent evaluation of response disruption, providing an index with which to characterize the behavioral selectivity of antinociceptive drugs.

  11. Modeling DNA Replication Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Roy, D.; Shapiro, R.

    1997-06-01

    While there is now available a great deal of information on double stranded DNA from X-ray crystallography, high resolution NMR and computer modeling, very little is known about structures that are representative of the DNA core of replication intermediates. DNA replication occurs at a single strand/double strand junction and bulged out intermediates near the junction can lead to frameshift mutations. The single stranded domains are particularly challenging. Our interest is focused on strategies for modeling the DNA of these types of replication intermediates. Modeling such structures presents special problems in addressing the multiple minimum problem and in treating the electrostatic component of the force field. We are testing a number of search strategies for locating low energy structures of these types and we are also investigating two different distance dependent dielectric functions in the coulombic term of the force field. We are studying both unmodified DNA and DNA damaged by aromatic amines, carcinogens present in the environment in tobacco smoke, barbecued meats and automobile exhaust. The nature of the structure adopted by the carcinogen modified DNA at the replication fork plays a key role in determining whether the carcinogen will cause a mutation during replication that can initiate the carcinogenic process. In the present work results are presented for unmodified DNA.

  12. DNA Replication Timing

    PubMed Central

    Rhind, Nicholas; Gilbert, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Patterns of replication within eukaryotic genomes correlate with gene expression, chromatin structure, and genome evolution. Recent advances in genome-scale mapping of replication kinetics have allowed these correlations to be explored in many species, cell types, and growth conditions, and these large data sets have allowed quantitative and computational analyses. One striking new correlation to emerge from these analyses is between replication timing and the three-dimensional structure of chromosomes. This correlation, which is significantly stronger than with any single histone modification or chromosome-binding protein, suggests that replication timing is controlled at the level of chromosomal domains. This conclusion dovetails with parallel work on the heterogeneity of origin firing and the competition between origins for limiting activators to suggest a model in which the stochastic probability of individual origin firing is modulated by chromosomal domain structure to produce patterns of replication. Whether these patterns have inherent biological functions or simply reflect higher-order genome structure is an open question. PMID:23838440

  13. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    PubMed

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  14. Convergent evolution in primates and an insectivore

    SciTech Connect

    Boffelli, Dario; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Rubin, Edward M.

    2003-04-16

    The cardiovascular risk factor apolipoprotein(a) (apo(a)) has a puzzling distribution among mammals, its presence being limited to a subset of primates and a member of the insectivore lineage, the hedgehog. To explore the evolutionary history of apo(a), we performed extensive genomic sequence comparisons of multiple species with and without an apo(a) gene product, such as human, baboon, hedgehog, lemurand mouse. This analysis indicated that apo(a) arose independently in a subset of primates, including baboon and human, and an insectivore, the hedgehog, and was not simply lost by species lacking it. The similar structural domains shared by the hedgehog and primate apo(a) indicate that they were formed by a unique molecular mechanism involving the convergent evolution of paralogous genes in these distantspecies.

  15. Genetic correlates of the evolving primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Vallender, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The tremendous shifts in the size, structure, and function of the brain during primate evolution are ultimately caused by changes at the genetic level. Understanding what these changes are and how they effect the phenotypic changes observed lies at the heart of understanding evolutionary change. This chapter focuses on understanding the genetic basis of primate brain evolution, considering the substrates and mechanisms through which genetic change occurs. It also discusses the implications that our current understandings and tools have for what we have already discovered and where our studies will head in the future. While genetic and genomic studies have identified many regions undergoing positive selection during primate evolution, the findings are certainly not exhaustive and functional relevance remains to be confirmed. Nevertheless, a strong foundation has been built upon which future studies will emerge. PMID:22230621

  16. The ecology of primate material culture

    PubMed Central

    Koops, Kathelijne; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2014-01-01

    Tool use in extant primates may inform our understanding of the conditions that favoured the expansion of hominin technology and material culture. The ‘method of exclusion’ has, arguably, confirmed the presence of culture in wild animal populations by excluding ecological and genetic explanations for geographical variation in behaviour. However, this method neglects ecological influences on culture, which, ironically, may be critical for understanding technology and thus material culture. We review all the current evidence for the role of ecology in shaping material culture in three habitual tool-using non-human primates: chimpanzees, orangutans and capuchin monkeys. We show that environmental opportunity, rather than necessity, is the main driver. We argue that a better understanding of primate technology requires explicit investigation of the role of ecological conditions. We propose a model in which three sets of factors, namely environment, sociality and cognition, influence invention, transmission and retention of material culture. PMID:25392310

  17. The social nature of primate cognition

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Louise; Henzi, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that the enlarged brain size of the primates was selected for by social, rather than purely ecological, factors has been strongly influential in studies of primate cognition and behaviour over the past two decades. However, the Machiavellian intelligence hypothesis, also known as the social brain hypothesis, tends to emphasize certain traits and behaviours, like exploitation and deception, at the expense of others, such as tolerance and behavioural coordination, and therefore presents only one view of how social life may shape cognition. This review outlines work from other relevant disciplines, including evolutionary economics, cognitive science and neurophysiology, to illustrate how these can be used to build a more general theoretical framework, incorporating notions of embodied and distributed cognition, in which to situate questions concerning the evolution of primate social cognition. PMID:16191591

  18. Sequences in the cytoplasmic tail of the gibbon ape leukemia virus envelope protein that prevent its incorporation into lentivirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Christodoulopoulos, I; Cannon, P M

    2001-05-01

    Pseudotyping retrovirus and lentivirus vectors with different viral fusion proteins is a useful strategy to alter the host range of the vectors. Although lentivirus vectors are efficiently pseudotyped by Env proteins from several different subtypes of murine leukemia virus (MuLV), the related protein from gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) does not form functional pseudotypes. We have determined that this arises because of an inability of GaLV Env to be incorporated into lentivirus vector particles. By exploiting the homology between the GaLV and MuLV Env proteins, we have mapped the determinants of incompatibility in the GaLV Env. Three modifications that allowed GaLV Env to pseudotype human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particles were identified: removal of the R peptide (C-terminal half of the cytoplasmic domain), replacement of the whole cytoplasmic tail with the corresponding MuLV region, and mutation of two residues upstream of the R peptide cleavage site. In addition, we have previously proposed that removal of the R peptide from MuLV Env proteins enhances their fusogenicity by transmitting a conformational change to the ectodomain of the protein (Y. Zhao et al., J. Virol. 72:5392-5398, 1998). Our analysis of chimeric MuLV/GaLV Env proteins provides further evidence in support of this model and suggests that proper Env function involves both interactions within the cytoplasmic tail and more long-range interactions between the cytoplasmic tail, the membrane-spanning region, and the ectodomain of the protein.

  19. Effect of lentivirus-mediated RNA interference of APC-Cdh1 expression on spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Qi, Y-H; Yao, W-L; Zhang, C-H; Guo, Y-Q

    2014-02-28

    This study investigated cadherin-1 (Cdh1) expression in the sensorimotor cortex of rats after spinal cord injury (SCI). The repairing effect of Cdh1 was evaluated by silencing its expression with lentivirus-mediated RNAi. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into a normal group and an operation group. Rats of the operation group were given SCI by the Allen method (T10-T11). Cdh1 expression in the sensorimotor cortex was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot analysis. Thirty male SD rats were divided into a sham-operation (SO) group, a lentivirus vector (LV) group, and a recombinant lentivirus (RL) group. Rat behavior was evaluated using the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) test every week. Ten days after injection, Cdh1 expression was examined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. Six weeks after injury, animals were injected with biotinylated dextran amine-Texas Red (BDA-TR), and then at 8 weeks, spinal cords were removed and sectioned in serial order. The expression of Cdh1 mRNA was significantly higher in the operation than in the normal group (P < 0.05). The expression of Cdh1 mRNA was lower in the RL than in the SO or LV groups at 10 days after injection (P < 0.05). In addition, the BBB score was higher for the RL than for the SO or LV groups at 6 weeks after injury (P < 0.05). A novel population of BDA-labeled axons was observed extending past the lesion in the RL group, which was rarely observed in the SO and LV groups. These results suggest that the anaphase-promoting complex-Cdh1 may play an important role in inhibiting axonal growth.

  20. An EIAV field isolate reveals much higher levels of subtype variability than currently reported for the equine lentivirus family

    PubMed Central

    Craigo, Jodi K; Barnes, Shannon; Zhang, Baoshan; Cook, Sheila J; Howe, Laryssa; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2009-01-01

    Background Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus that infects horses, has been utilized as an animal model for the study of HIV. Furthermore, the disease associated with the equine lentivirus poses a significant challenge to veterinary medicine around the world. As with all lentiviruses, EIAV has been shown to have a high propensity for genomic sequence and antigenic variation, especially in its envelope (Env) proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated Env variation to be a major determinant of vaccine efficacy, emphasizing the importance of defining natural variation among field isolates of EIAV. To date, however, published EIAV sequences have been reported only for cell-adapted strains of virus, predominantly derived from a single primary virus isolate, EIAVWyoming (EIAVWY). Results We present here the first characterization of the Env protein of a natural primary isolate from Pennsylvania (EIAVPA) since the widely utilized and referenced EIAVWY strain. The data demonstrated that the level of EIAVPA Env amino acid sequence variation, approximately 40% as compared to EIAVWY, is much greater than current perceptions or published reports of natural EIAV variation between field isolates. This variation did not appear to give rise to changes in the predicted secondary structure of the proteins. While the EIAVPA Env was serologically cross reactive with the Env proteins of the cell-adapted reference strain, EIAVPV (derivative of EIAVWY), the two variant Envs were shown to lack any cross neutralization by immune serum from horses infected with the respective virus strains. Conclusion Taking into account the significance of serum neutralization to universal vaccine efficacy, these findings are crucial considerations towards successful EIAV vaccine development and the potential inclusion of field isolate Envs in vaccine candidates. PMID:19843328

  1. Replicated Composite Optics Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell

    1997-01-01

    Advanced optical systems for applications such as grazing incidence Wolter I x-ray mirror assemblies require extraordinary mirror surfaces in ten-ns of fine surface finish and figure. The impeccable mirror surface is on the inside of the rotational mirror form. One practical method of producing devices with these requirements is to first fabricate an exterior surface for the optical device then replicate that surface to have the inverse component with lightweight characteristics. The replicate optic is not better than the master or mandrel from which it is made. This task is a continuance of previous studies to identify methods and materials for forming these extremely low roughness optical components.

  2. Activation of new replication foci under conditions of replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, P; Waligórska, A; Bujnowicz, Ł; Hoang, A; Dobrucki, JW

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage, binding of drugs to DNA or a shortage of nucleotides can decrease the rate or completely halt the progress of replication forks. Although the global rate of replication decreases, mammalian cells can respond to replication stress by activating new replication origins. We demonstrate that a moderate level of stress induced by inhibitors of topoisomerase I, commencing in early, mid or late S-phase, induces activation of new sites of replication located within or in the immediate vicinity of the original replication factories; only in early S some of these new sites are also activated at a distance greater than 300 nm. Under high stress levels very few new replication sites are activated; such sites are located within the original replication regions. There is a large variation in cellular response to stress – while in some cells the number of replication sites increases even threefold, it decreases almost twofold in other cells. Replication stress results in a loss of PCNA from replication factories and a twofold increase in nuclear volume. These observations suggest that activation of new replication origins from the pool of dormant origins within replication cluster under conditions of mild stress is generally restricted to the original replication clusters (factories) active at a time of stress initiation, while activation of distant origins and new replication factories is suppressed. PMID:26212617

  3. Recent advances in primate nutritional ecology.

    PubMed

    Righini, Nicoletta

    2017-04-01

    Nutritional ecology seeks to explain, in an ecological and evolutionary context, how individuals choose, acquire, and process food to satisfy their nutritional requirements. Historically, studies of primate feeding ecology have focused on characterizing diets in terms of the botanical composition of the plants consumed. Further, dietary studies have demonstrated how patch and food choice in relation to time spent foraging and feeding are influenced by the spatial and temporal distribution of resources and by social factors such as feeding competition, dominance, or partner preferences. From a nutritional perspective, several theories including energy and protein-to-fiber maximization, nutrient mixing, and toxin avoidance, have been proposed to explain the food choices of non-human primates. However, more recently, analytical frameworks such as nutritional geometry have been incorporated into primatology to explore, using a multivariate approach, the synergistic effects of multiple nutrients, secondary metabolites, and energy requirements on primate food choice. Dietary strategies associated with nutrient balancing highlight the tradeoffs that primates face in bypassing or selecting particular feeding sites and food items. In this Special Issue, the authors bring together a set of studies focusing on the nutritional ecology of a diverse set of primate taxa characterized by marked differences in dietary emphasis. The authors present, compare, and discuss the diversity of strategies used by primates in diet selection, and how species differences in ecology, physiology, anatomy, and phylogeny can affect patterns of nutrient choice and nutrient balancing. The use of a nutritionally explicit analytical framework is fundamental to identify the nutritional requirements of different individuals of a given species, and through its application, direct conservation efforts can be applied to regenerate and protect specific foods and food patches that offer the opportunity of a

  4. Asian Primate Species Richness Correlates with Rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Chen; Srivathsan, Amrita; Feng, Chen-Chieh; Salim, Agus; Shekelle, Myron

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of meta-analyses found significantly positive correlations between primate species richness and rainfall for Africa, Madagascar and the Neotropics, with the exception of Asia, leaving the open question whether that anomaly is the result of sampling bias, biogeography, or some other factor. This study re-examines the question using modelled data, with primate species richness data from the Southeast Asian Mammals Databank and rainfall data from the Climatic Research Unit. Data processing with Geographical Information Systems resulted in 390 sample points. Reduced major axis and ordinary least squares regressions were employed to examine the relationship for six regions, including the whole study area of Southeast Asia, and the subareas of Huxley West, Huxley East, Mainland Southeast Asia, Borneo, and Sumatra. The results showed a significant positive relationship between primate species richness and mean annual rainfall for Southeast Asia (r = 0.26, P<0.001). Comparing the results for the large islands and Mainland Southeast Asia showed that Sumatra had the highest correlation (r = 0.58; P<0.05). After controlling for the major biogeographic effect associated with Huxley’s Line, our results showed that primate species richness is positively associated with mean annual rainfall in Southeast Asia. Our findings contrast to prior studies of meta-analyses that showed no relationship between rainfall and primate species richness in Asia, and thereby bring Asia into agreement with results showing significant positive correlations between rainfall and primate species richness everywhere else in the world. The inference is that previous anomalous results for Asia were result of sampling bias in the meta-analysis. PMID:23383023

  5. Construction of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors and its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chan; Dong, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Shuai; Li, Qing-Ping; Kang, Lan; Lei, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Lin; Zhai, Xue-Song

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to observe the inhibitive effects of p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors on the expression of p66Shc, and to explore its effects on alveolar epithelial cells apoptosis induced by hyperoxia. Methods The gene sequences were cloned into the pLenR-GPH-shRNA lentiviral vector, which was selected by Genebank searches. The pLenR-GPH-shRNA and lentiviral vector packaging plasmid mix were cotransfected into 293T cells to package lentiviral particles. Culture virus supernatant was harvested, and then the virus titer was determined by serial dilution assay. A549 cells were transduced with the constructed lentiviral vectors, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to evaluate p66Shc expression. This study is divided into a control group, a hyperoxia group, an A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, and a negative lentivirus group. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry after 24 hours; the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and caspase-9 were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. The production of reactive oxygen species and cellular mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescence microscopy. Results We successfully established the p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vectors, A549-p66ShcshRNA. The A549-p66ShcshRNA was transfected into alveolar epithelial cells, and the inhibitive effects on the expression of p66Shc were observed. Both RT-PCR and Western blot demonstrated downregulation of p66Shc expression in A549 cells. In the A549-p66ShcshRNA hyperoxia group, we found dampened oxidative stress. A549-p66ShcshRNA can cause p66Shc gene silencing, reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, reduce membrane potential decrease, reduce the apoptosis of A549 cells, and reduce alveolar epithelial cell injury, while the lentiviral empty vector group had no such changes. Conclusion p66Shc gene interfering lentivirus vector can affect the

  6. Learning about primates' learning, language, and cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of many years of research on the methods of teaching primates the language and cognitive skills which were long considered to be unteachable to particular species of primates. It was found that chimpanzee subjects could not only learn a number of 'stock sentences' but to use them in variations and several combinations for the purpose of solving various problems. Apes placed in different rooms could be taught to communicate via computer, and collaborate with each other on doing specific tasks. Contrary to expectations, young rhesus monkeys proved to be able to learn as much as the chimpanzee species.

  7. Scaling of rotational inertia of primate mandibles.

    PubMed

    Ross, Callum F; Iriarte-Diaz, Jose; Platts, Ellen; Walsh, Treva; Heins, Liam; Gerstner, Geoffrey E; Taylor, Andrea B

    2017-05-01

    The relative importance of pendulum mechanics and muscle mechanics in chewing dynamics has implications for understanding the optimality criteria driving the evolution of primate feeding systems. The Spring Model (Ross et al., 2009b), which modeled the primate chewing system as a forced mass-spring system, predicted that chew cycle time would increase faster than was actually observed. We hypothesized that if mandibular momentum plays an important role in chewing dynamics, more accurate estimates of the rotational inertia of the mandible would improve the accuracy with which the Spring Model predicts the scaling of primate chew cycle period. However, if mass-related momentum effects are of negligible importance in the scaling of primate chew cycle period, this hypothesis would be falsified. We also predicted that greater "robusticity" of anthropoid mandibles compared with prosimians would be associated with higher moments of inertia. From computed tomography scans, we estimated the scaling of the moment of inertia (Ij) of the mandibles of thirty-one species of primates, including 22 anthropoid and nine prosimian species, separating Ij into the moment about a transverse axis through the center of mass (Ixx) and the moment of the center of mass about plausible axes of rotation. We found that across primates Ij increases with positive allometry relative to jaw length, primarily due to positive allometry of jaw mass and Ixx, and that anthropoid mandibles have greater rotational inertia compared with prosimian mandibles of similar length. Positive allometry of Ij of primate mandibles actually lowers the predictive ability of the Spring Model, suggesting that scaling of primate chew cycle period, and chewing dynamics in general, are more strongly influenced by factors other than scaling of inertial properties of the mandible, such as the dynamic properties of the jaw muscles and neural control. Differences in cycle period scaling between chewing and locomotion systems

  8. The primate semicircular canal system and locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Spoor, Fred; Garland, Theodore; Krovitz, Gail; Ryan, Timothy M.; Silcox, Mary T.; Walker, Alan

    2007-01-01

    The semicircular canal system of vertebrates helps coordinate body movements, including stabilization of gaze during locomotion. Quantitative phylogenetically informed analysis of the radius of curvature of the three semicircular canals in 91 extant and recently extinct primate species and 119 other mammalian taxa provide support for the hypothesis that canal size varies in relation to the jerkiness of head motion during locomotion. Primate and other mammalian species studied here that are agile and have fast, jerky locomotion have significantly larger canals relative to body mass than those that move more cautiously. PMID:17576932

  9. Effective primate conservation education: gaps and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Susan K

    2010-05-01

    Conservation education goals generally include influencing people's conservation awareness, attitudes, and behaviors. Effective programs can help foster sustainable behavior, improve public support for conservation, reduce vandalism and poaching in protected areas, improve compliance with conservation regulations, increase recreation carrying capacities, and influence policies and decisions that affect the environment. Primate conservation problems cut across many disciplines, and primate conservation education must likewise address cross-disciplinary issues. Conservation educators must incorporate both theoretical and practical knowledge and skills to develop effective programs, and the skill set must stretch beyond pedagogy. Expertise needed comes from the areas of planning, collaboration, psychology, entertainment, and evaluation. Integration of these elements can lead to greater program success.

  10. Learning about primates' learning, language, and cognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of many years of research on the methods of teaching primates the language and cognitive skills which were long considered to be unteachable to particular species of primates. It was found that chimpanzee subjects could not only learn a number of 'stock sentences' but to use them in variations and several combinations for the purpose of solving various problems. Apes placed in different rooms could be taught to communicate via computer, and collaborate with each other on doing specific tasks. Contrary to expectations, young rhesus monkeys proved to be able to learn as much as the chimpanzee species.

  11. Primate feedstock for the evolution of consonants.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Adriano R; Maddieson, Ian; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    The evolution of speech remains an elusive scientific problem. A widespread notion is that vocal learning, underlined by vocal-fold control, is a key prerequisite for speech evolution. Although present in birds and non-primate mammals, vocal learning is ostensibly absent in non-human primates. Here we argue that the main road to speech evolution has been through controlling the supralaryngeal vocal tract, for which we find evidence for evolutionary continuity within the great apes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coronavirus Attachment and Replication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-28

    synthesis during RNA replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Virol. 49:303-309. Pedersen, N.C. 1976a. Feline infectious peritonitis: Something old...receptors on intestinal brush border membranes from normal host species were developed for canine (CCV), feline (FIPV), porcine (TGEV), human (HCV...gastroenteritis receptor on pig BBMs ...... ................. ... 114 Feline infectious peritonitis virus receptor on cat BBMs ... .............. 117 Human

  13. Evolution of Replication Machines

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Nina Y.; O'Donnell, Mike E.

    2016-01-01

    The machines that decode and regulate genetic information require the translation, transcription and replication pathways essential to all living cells. Thus, it might be expected that all cells share the same basic machinery for these pathways that were inherited from the primordial ancestor cell from which they evolved. A clear example of this is found in the translation machinery that converts RNA sequence to protein. The translation process requires numerous structural and catalytic RNAs and proteins, the central factors of which are homologous in all three domains of life, bacteria, archaea and eukarya. Likewise, the central actor in transcription, RNA polymerase, shows homology among the catalytic subunits in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. In contrast, while some “gears” of the genome replication machinery are homologous in all domains of life, most components of the replication machine appear to be unrelated between bacteria and those of archaea and eukarya. This review will compare and contrast the central proteins of the “replisome” machines that duplicate DNA in bacteria, archaea and eukarya, with an eye to understanding the issues surrounding the evolution of the DNA replication apparatus. PMID:27160337

  14. Replicated spectrographs in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Gary J.

    2014-06-01

    As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compare the information gathering power of these replicated instruments with the present state of the art in more traditional spectrographs, and with instruments under development for ELTs. Design principles for replication are explored along with lessons learned, and we look forward to future technologies that could make massively-replicated instruments even more compelling.

  15. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  16. Retrovirus infections in non-domestic felids: serological studies and attempts to isolate a lentivirus.

    PubMed

    Lutz, H; Isenbügel, E; Lehmann, R; Sabapara, R H; Wolfensberger, C

    1992-12-01

    An African lioness from the Zoo of Zurich had to be euthanized because of an inoperable tumor. The serum tested negative for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) p27 antigen by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) but was strongly positive for feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibodies by ELISA and Western blot. When her only offspring and mate were tested for FIV, high antibody titers to FIV were also found in their serum. Lymphocytes were prepared from these two lions on different occasions and co-cultivated with specific pathogen free (SPF) cat lymphocytes in the presence of concanavalin A and recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 6 weeks. The cell culture supernatants tested negative for Mg(2+)-dependent reverse transcriptase and FIV p24 by a double antibody sandwich ELISA throughout the culture period. Whole blood and buffy coat cells collected from these two lions were transmitted by intraperitoneal injection into two SPF cats. The two cats did not seroconvert for a period of 11 months nor could reverse transcriptase activity and FIV p24 antigen be demonstrated in the supernatant of several lymphocyte cultures. To determine the importance of lentivirus infections in zoo-kept wild felids, 124 serum samples were obtained from African lions, Indian and Siberian tigers, snow leopards, panthers, cheetahs and other wild cats from nine European zoos. In addition, serum samples collected from 12 Asiatic lions originating from Gir forest in the Indian State of Gujarat were included in this study. The sera were tested for antibodies to FIV, FeLV and feline syncytium-forming virus (FeSFV) by ELISA and Western blot using the respective viruses after gradient purification. In addition, some of the sera were also tested for antibodies to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and Visna-Maedi virus (VMV). Antibodies to FIV were found in 30/53 (57%) of African lions, one of 18 tigers and one of four panthers. All other sera including those collected from the 12 Asiatic

  17. Can grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus) succeed on a "complex" foraging task failed by nonhuman primates (Pan troglodytes, Pongo abelii, Sapajus apella) but solved by wrasse fish (Labroides dimidiatus)?

    PubMed

    Pepperberg, Irene M; Hartsfield, Leigh Ann

    2014-08-01

    Linking specific cognitive abilities of nonhuman species on a laboratory task to their evolutionary history-ecological niche can be a fruitful exercise in comparative psychology. Crucial issues, however, are the choice of task, the specific conditions of the task, and possibly the subjects' understanding or interpretation of the task. Salwiczek et al. (2012) compared cleaner wrasse fish (Labroides dimidaitus) to several nonhuman primate species (capuchins, Sapajus paella; chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes; orangutans, Pongo abelii) on a task purportedly related to the ecological demands of the fish, but not necessarily of the nonhuman primates; fish succeeded whereas almost all of the nonhuman primates that were tested failed. We replicated the two-choice paradigm of the task with three Grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus), whose ecology, evolutionary history, and cortical capacity are arguably more like those of nonhuman primates than fish. Greys succeeded at levels more like fish than all the nonhuman primates, suggesting possible alternative explanations for their success. Fish and nonhuman primate subjects also experienced a reversal of the initial conditions to test for generalization: Greys were similarly tested; they performed more like fish and capuchins (who now succeeded) than the apes (who continued to fail).

  18. Direct hippocampal injection of pseudo lentivirus-delivered nerve growth factor gene rescues the damaged cognitive function after traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Wan, Jie-qing; Gao, Guo-yi; Pan, Yao-hua; Ding, Sheng-hao; Fan, Yi-ling; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Ji-yao

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) treatment is a long-term process and requires repeated medicine administration, which, however, can cause high expense, infection, and hemorrhage to patients. To investigate how a long-term expression of nerve growth factor (Ngf) gene affects the injured hippocampus function post-TBI, in this study, a pseudo lentivirus carrying the β-Ngf fusion gene, with green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene, was constructed to show the gene expression and its ability of protecting cells from oxidative damage in vitro. Then, the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene was directly injected into the injured brain to evaluate its influence on the injured hippocampus function post-TBI in vivo. We found that the expression of the pseudo lentivirus-delivered β-Ngf fusion gene lasted more than four-week after the cell transduction and the encoded β-NGF fusion protein could induce the neuron-like PC12 cell differentiation. Moreover, the hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene sped the injured cognitive function recovery of the rat subjected to TBI. Together, our findings indicate that the long-term expression of the β-Ngf fusion gene, delivered by the pseudo lentivirus, can promote the neurite outgrowth of the neuron-like cells and protect the cells from the oxidative damage in vitro, and that the direct and single dose hippocampal injection of the pseudo lentivirus-carried β-Ngf fusion gene is able to rescue the hippocampus function after the TBI in the rat.

  19. Nutritional contributions of insects to primate diets: implications for primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Jessica M; Raubenheimer, David; Bryer, Margaret A H; Takahashi, Maressa; Gilbert, Christopher C

    2014-06-01

    Insects and other invertebrates form a portion of many living and extinct primate diets. We review the nutritional profiles of insects in comparison with other dietary items, and discuss insect nutrients in relation to the nutritional needs of living primates. We find that insects are incorporated into some primate diets as staple foods whereby they are the majority of food intake. They can also be incorporated as complements to other foods in the diet, providing protein in a diet otherwise dominated by gums and/or fruits, or be incorporated as supplements to likely provide an essential nutrient that is not available in the typical diet. During times when they are very abundant, such as in insect outbreaks, insects can serve as replacements to the usual foods eaten by primates. Nutritionally, insects are high in protein and fat compared with typical dietary items like fruit and vegetation. However, insects are small in size and for larger primates (>1 kg) it is usually nutritionally profitable only to consume insects when they are available in large quantities. In small quantities, they may serve to provide important vitamins and fatty acids typically unavailable in primate diets. In a brief analysis, we found that soft-bodied insects are higher in fat though similar in chitin and protein than hard-bodied insects. In the fossil record, primates can be defined as soft- or hard-bodied insect feeders based on dental morphology. The differences in the nutritional composition of insects may have implications for understanding early primate evolution and ecology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Disproportional representation of primates in the ecological literature.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Eckhard W; Zinner, Dietmar; Ganzhorn, Jörg U

    2013-01-01

    We address the question why papers dealing with the ecology of primates are so sparsely represented in the general ecological literature. A literature analyses based on entries in Web of Science and PrimateLit reveals that despite a large number of papers published on primates in general and on the ecology of primates, only a very small fraction of these papers is published in high-ranking international ecological journals. We discuss a number of potential reasons for the disproportion and highlight the problems associated with experimental research on wild primates and constraints on sample size as major issues.

  1. The Sea Urchin sns5 Chromatin Insulator Shapes the Chromatin Architecture of a Lentivirus Vector Integrated in the Mammalian Genome.

    PubMed

    Baiamonte, Elena; Spinelli, Giovanni; Maggio, Aurelio; Acuto, Santina; Cavalieri, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    Lentivirus vectors are presently the favorite vehicles for therapeutic gene transfer in hematopoietic cells. Nonetheless, these vectors integrate randomly throughout the genome, exhibiting variegation of transgene expression due to the spreading of heterochromatin into the vector sequences. Moreover, the cis-regulatory elements harbored by the vector could disturb the proper transcription of resident genes neighboring the integration site. The incorporation of chromatin insulators in flanking position to the transferred unit can alleviate both the above-mentioned dangerous effects, due to the insulator-specific barrier and enhancer-blocking activities. In this study, we report the valuable properties of the sea urchin-derived sns5 insulator in improving the expression efficiency of a lentivirus vector integrated in the mammalian erythroid genome. We show that these results neither reflect an intrinsic sns5 enhancer activity nor rely on the recruitment of the erythroid-specific GATA-1 factor to sns5. Furthermore, by using the Chromosome Conformation Capture technology, we report that a single copy of the sns5-insulated vector is specifically organized into an independent chromatin loop at the provirus locus. Our results not only provide new clues concerning the molecular mechanism of sns5 function in the erythroid genome but also reassure the use of sns5 to improve the performance of gene therapy vectors.

  2. Heparin-chitosan nanoparticle functionalization of porous poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels for localized lentivirus delivery of angiogenic factors

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Aline M.; Gomez, Andrew J.; Palma, Jaime L.; Yap, Woon Teck

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels have been extensively used for regenerative medicine strategies given their tailorable mechanical and chemical properties. Gene delivery represents a promising strategy by which to enhance the bioactivity of the hydrogels, though the efficiency and localization of gene transfer have been challenging. Here, we functionalized porous poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels with heparin-chitosan nanoparticles to retain the vectors locally and enhance lentivirus delivery while minimizing changes to hydrogel architecture and mechanical properties. The immobilization of nanoparticles, as compared to homogeneous heparin and/or chitosan, is essential to lentivirus immobilization and retention of activity. Using this gene-delivering platform, we over-expressed the angiogenic factors sonic hedgehog (Shh) and vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) to promote blood vessel recruitment to the implant site. Shh enhanced endothelial recruitment and blood vessel formation around the hydrogel compared to both Vegf-delivering and control hydrogels. The nanoparticle-modified porous hydrogels for delivering gene therapy vectors can provide a platform for numerous regenerative medicine applications. PMID:25023395

  3. Remarkable ancient divergences amongst neglected lorisiform primates

    PubMed Central

    Nekaris, K. Anne‐Isola; Perkin, Andrew; Bearder, Simon K.; Pimley, Elizabeth R.; Schulze, Helga; Streicher, Ulrike; Nadler, Tilo; Kitchener, Andrew; Zischler, Hans; Zinner, Dietmar; Roos, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Lorisiform primates (Primates: Strepsirrhini: Lorisiformes) represent almost 10% of the living primate species and are widely distributed in sub‐Saharan Africa and South/South‐East Asia; however, their taxonomy, evolutionary history, and biogeography are still poorly understood. In this study we report the largest molecular phylogeny in terms of the number of represented taxa. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene for 86 lorisiform specimens, including ∼80% of all the species currently recognized. Our results support the monophyly of the Galagidae, but a common ancestry of the Lorisinae and Perodicticinae (family Lorisidae) was not recovered. These three lineages have early origins, with the Galagidae and the Lorisinae diverging in the Oligocene at about 30 Mya and the Perodicticinae emerging in the early Miocene. Our mitochondrial phylogeny agrees with recent studies based on nuclear data, and supports Euoticus as the oldest galagid lineage and the polyphyletic status of Galagoides. Moreover, we have elucidated phylogenetic relationships for several species never included before in a molecular phylogeny. The results obtained in this study suggest that lorisiform diversity remains substantially underestimated and that previously unnoticed cryptic diversity might be present within many lineages, thus urgently requiring a comprehensive taxonomic revision of this primate group. © 2015 The Linnean Society of London PMID:26900177

  4. Homeostasis in primates in hyperacceleration fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Various homeostatic responses of a nonhuman primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) to acute changes in the acceleration environment were examined. When these animals were exposed to a hyperdynamic field the body temperature was consistently depressed and the animals showed behavioral indications of increased drowsiness. Further, time of day played a significant role in influencing these responses.

  5. [Experimental whooping cough of nonhuman primate].

    PubMed

    Kubrava, D T; Medkova, A Iu; Siniashina, L N; Shevtsova, Z V; Matua, A Z; Kondzharia, I G; Barkaia, V S; Elistratova, Zh V; Karataev, G I; Mikvabia, Z Ia; Gintsburg, A L

    2013-01-01

    Despite considerable success in study of Bordetella pertussis virulence factors, pathogenesis of whooping cough, duration of B. pertussis bacteria persistence, types and mechanisms of immune response are still keep underinvestigated. It can be explained by the absence ofadequate experimental animal model for pertussis study. Our study estimates clinical and laboratory parameters of whooping cough in non-human primates of the Old World in the process of intranasan infection by virulent B. pertussis bacteria. Also the duration of B. pertussis bacteria persistence in animals was investigated. 14 animal units of 4 species of non-human primates of the Old World were used for intranasal infection. The examination of infect animals included: visual exploration of nasopharynx, thermometry, clinical and biochemical blood analyses, identification ofB. pertussis, using microbiologic and molecular genetic analyses, estimation of innate and adoptive immune factors. The development of infectious process was accompanied by generation of B. pertussis bacteria, catarrhal inflammation of nasopharyngeal mucosa, leucocytosis, hypoglycemia specific for pertussis, and activation of innate and adaptive immunity for all primates regardless of specie were seen. While repeated experimental infection in primates single bacterial colonies were registered during only first week after challenge. It occurs like the absence of inflammation of nasopharyngeal mucosa and the lack of laboratory marks of whooping cough, recorded after first challenge. The evident booster effect of humoral immunity was observed. As a model for investigation of B. pertussis bacteria persistence and immune response against whooping cough we suggest the usage of rhesus macaque as more available to experiments.

  6. Chronic wasting disease agents in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Race, Brent; Meade-White, Kimberly D; Phillips, Katie; Striebel, James; Race, Richard; Chesebro, Bruce

    2014-05-01

    Chronic wasting disease is a prion disease of cervids. Assessment of its zoonotic potential is critical. To evaluate primate susceptibility, we tested monkeys from 2 genera. We found that 100% of intracerebrally inoculated and 92% of orally inoculated squirrel monkeys were susceptible, but cynomolgus macaques were not, suggesting possible low risk for humans.

  7. Nonhuman primate models in translational regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Daadi, Marcel M; Barberi, Tiziano; Shi, Qiang; Lanford, Robert E

    2014-12-01

    Humans and nonhuman primates (NHPs) are similar in size, behavior, physiology, biochemistry, structure and function of organs, and complexity of the immune system. Research on NHPs generates complementary data that bridge translational research from small animal models to humans. NHP models of human disease offer unique opportunities to develop stem cell-based therapeutic interventions that directly address relevant and challenging translational aspects of cell transplantation therapy. These include the use of autologous induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cellular products, issues related to the immune response in autologous and allogeneic setting, pros and cons of delivery techniques in a clinical setting, as well as the safety and efficacy of candidate cell lines. The NHP model allows the assessment of complex physiological, biochemical, behavioral, and imaging end points, with direct relevance to human conditions. At the same time, the value of using primates in scientific research must be carefully evaluated and timed due to expense and the necessity for specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. Often it is more efficient and useful to perform initial proof-of-concept studies for new therapeutics in rodents and/or other species before the pivotal studies in NHPs that may eventually lead to first-in-human trials. In this report, we present how the Southwest National Primate Research Center, one of seven NIH-funded National Primate Research Centers, may help the global community in translating promising technologies to the clinical arena.

  8. Optogenetics Advances in Primate Visual Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Mehrdad; Remington, Evan

    2016-04-06

    In this issue of Neuron, Klein et al. (2016) used cell-type-specific optogenetics and electrical microstimulation to characterize the koniocellular geniculocortical projections in nonhuman primates. Their work offers a powerful platform for refining our understanding of the mechanisms of visual information processing in the lateral geniculate nucleus and primary visual cortex.

  9. Primate molecular phylogenetics in a genomic era.

    PubMed

    Ting, Nelson; Sterner, Kirstin N

    2013-02-01

    A primary objective of molecular phylogenetics is to use molecular data to elucidate the evolutionary history of living organisms. Dr. Morris Goodman founded the journal Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution as a forum where scientists could further our knowledge about the tree of life, and he recognized that the inference of species trees is a first and fundamental step to addressing many important evolutionary questions. In particular, Dr. Goodman was interested in obtaining a complete picture of the primate species tree in order to provide an evolutionary context for the study of human adaptations. A number of recent studies use multi-locus datasets to infer well-resolved and well-supported primate phylogenetic trees using consensus approaches (e.g., supermatrices). It is therefore tempting to assume that we have a complete picture of the primate tree, especially above the species level. However, recent theoretical and empirical work in the field of molecular phylogenetics demonstrates that consensus methods might provide a false sense of support at certain nodes. In this brief review we discuss the current state of primate molecular phylogenetics and highlight the importance of exploring the use of coalescent-based analyses that have the potential to better utilize information contained in multi-locus data.

  10. Nonhuman primate models of focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jingjing; Li, Yi; Fu, Xinyu; Li, Lijuan; Hao, Xiaoting; Li, Shasha

    2017-01-01

    Rodents have been widely used in the production of cerebral ischemia models. However, successful therapies have been proven on experimental rodent stroke model, and they have often failed to be effective when tested clinically. Therefore, nonhuman primates were recommended as the ideal alternatives, owing to their similarities with the human cerebrovascular system, brain metabolism, grey to white matter ratio and even their rich behavioral repertoire. The present review is a thorough summary of ten methods that establish nonhuman primate models of focal cerebral ischemia; electrocoagulation, endothelin-1-induced occlusion, microvascular clip occlusion, autologous blood clot embolization, balloon inflation, microcatheter embolization, coil embolization, surgical suture embolization, suture, and photochemical induction methods. This review addresses the advantages and disadvantages of each method, as well as precautions for each model, compared nonhuman primates with rodents, different species of nonhuman primates and different modeling methods. Finally it discusses various factors that need to be considered when modelling and the method of evaluation after modelling. These are critical for understanding their respective strengths and weaknesses and underlie the selection of the optimum model. PMID:28400817

  11. Processing Of Visual Information In Primate Brains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H.; Van Essen, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Report reviews and analyzes information-processing strategies and pathways in primate retina and visual cortex. Of interest both in biological fields and in such related computational fields as artificial neural networks. Focuses on data from macaque, which has superb visual system similar to that of humans. Authors stress concept of "good engineering" in understanding visual system.

  12. Homeostasis in primates in hyperacceleration fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Various homeostatic responses of a nonhuman primate, the squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) to acute changes in the acceleration environment were examined. When these animals were exposed to a hyperdynamic field the body temperature was consistently depressed and the animals showed behavioral indications of increased drowsiness. Further, time of day played a significant role in influencing these responses.

  13. Quantification of neocortical ratios in stem primates.

    PubMed

    Long, Adam; Bloch, Jonathan I; Silcox, Mary T

    2015-07-01

    Extant euprimates (=crown primates) have a characteristically expanded neocortical region of the brain relative to that of other mammals, but the timing of that expansion in their evolutionary history is poorly resolved. Examination of anatomical landmarks on fossil endocasts of Eocene euprimates suggests that significant neocortical expansion relative to contemporaneous mammals was already underway. Here, we provide quantitative estimates of neocorticalization in stem primates (plesiadapiforms) relevant to the question of whether relative neocortical expansion was uniquely characteristic of the crown primate radiation. Ratios of neocortex to endocast surface areas were calculated for plesiadapiforms using measurements from virtual endocasts of the paromomyid Ignacius graybullianus (early Eocene, Wyoming) and the microsyopid Microsyops annectens (middle Eocene, Wyoming). These data are similar to a published estimate for the plesiadapid, Plesiadapis tricuspidens, but contrast with those calculated for early Tertiary euprimates in being within the 95% confidence intervals for archaic mammals generally. Interpretation of these values is complicated by the paucity of sampled endocasts for older stem primates and euarchontogliran outgroups, as well as by a combination of effects related to temporal trends, allometry, and taxon-unique specializations. Regardless, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that a shift in brain organization occurred in the first euprimates, likely in association with elaborations to the visual system.

  14. Processing Of Visual Information In Primate Brains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Charles H.; Van Essen, David C.

    1991-01-01

    Report reviews and analyzes information-processing strategies and pathways in primate retina and visual cortex. Of interest both in biological fields and in such related computational fields as artificial neural networks. Focuses on data from macaque, which has superb visual system similar to that of humans. Authors stress concept of "good engineering" in understanding visual system.

  15. The Neuroendocrinology of Primate Maternal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Wendy; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    In nonhuman primates and humans, similar to other mammals, hormones are not strictly necessary for the expression of maternal behavior, but nevertheless influence variation in maternal responsiveness and parental behavior both within and between individuals. A growing number of correlational and experimental studies have indicated that high circulating estrogen concentrations during pregnancy increase maternal motivation and responsiveness to infant stimuli, while effects of prepartum or postpartum estrogens and progestogens on maternal behavior are less clear. Prolactin is thought to play a role in promoting paternal and alloparental care in primates, but little is known about the relationship between this hormone and maternal behavior. High circulating cortisol levels appear to enhance arousal and responsiveness to infant stimuli in young, relatively inexperienced female primates, but interfere with the expression of maternal behavior in older and more experienced mothers. Among neuropeptides and neurotransmitters, preliminary evidence indicates that oxytocin and endogenous opioids affect maternal attachment to infants, including maintenance of contact, grooming, and responses to separation. Brain serotonin affects anxiety and impulsivity, which in turn may affect maternal behaviors such as infant retrieval or rejection of infants’ attempts to make contact with the mother. Although our understanding of the neuroendocrine correlates of primate maternal behavior has grown substantially in the last two decades, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying these effects, e.g., the extent to which these mechanisms may involve changes in perception, emotion, or cognition. PMID:20888383

  16. Differential regulation of NF-κB-mediated proviral and antiviral host gene expression by primate lentiviral Nef and Vpu proteins.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Daniel; Hotter, Dominik; Van Driessche, Benoît; Stürzel, Christina M; Kluge, Silvia F; Wildum, Steffen; Yu, Hangxing; Baumann, Bernd; Wirth, Thomas; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Leoz, Marie; Hahn, Beatrice H; Van Lint, Carine; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2015-02-03

    NF-κB is essential for effective transcription of primate lentiviral genomes and also activates antiviral host genes. Here, we show that the early protein Nef of most primate lentiviruses enhances NF-κB activation. In contrast, the late protein Vpu of HIV-1 and its simian precursors inhibits activation of NF-κB, even in the presence of Nef. Although this effect of Vpu did not correlate with its ability to interact with β-TrCP, it involved the stabilization of IκB and reduced nuclear translocation of p65. Interestingly, however, Vpu did not affect casein kinase II-mediated phosphorylation of p65. Lack of Vpu was associated with increased NF-κB activation and induction of interferon and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) in HIV-1-infected T cells. Thus, HIV-1 and its simian precursors employ Nef to boost NF-κB activation early during the viral life cycle to initiate proviral transcription, while Vpu is used to downmodulate NF-κB-dependent expression of ISGs at later stages. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Generation and characterization of a breast carcinoma model by PyMT overexpression in mammary epithelial cells of tree shrew, an animal close to primates in evolution.

    PubMed

    Ge, Guang-Zhe; Xia, Hou-Jun; He, Bao-Li; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Liu, Wen-Jing; Shao, Ming; Wang, Chun-Yan; Xiao, Ji; Ge, Fei; Li, Fu-Bing; Li, Yi; Chen, Ceshi

    2016-02-01

    The tree shrew is becoming an attractive experimental animal model for human breast cancer owing to a closer relationship to primates/humans than rodents. Tree shrews are superior to classical primates because tree shrew are easier to manipulate, maintain and propagate. It is required to establish a high-efficiency tree shrew breast cancer model for etiological research and drug assessment. Our previous studies suggest that 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induce breast tumors in tree shrews with a low frequency (<50%) and long latency (∼ 7-month), making these methods less than ideal. We induced mammary tumors in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) by injection of lentivirus expressing the PyMT oncogene into mammary ducts of 22 animals. Most tree shrews developed mammary tumors with a latency of about three weeks, and by 7 weeks all injected tree shrews had developed mammary tumors. Among these, papillary carcinoma is the predominant tumor type. One case showed lymph node and lung metastasis. Interestingly, the expression levels of phosphorylated AKT, ERK and STAT3 were elevated in 41-68% of PyMT-induced mammary tumors, but not all tumors. Finally, we observed that the growth of PyMT-induced tree shrew mammary tumors was significantly inhibited by Cisplatin and Epidoxorubicin. PyMT-induced tree shrew mammary tumor model may be suitable for further breast cancer research and drug development, due to its high efficiency and short latency. © 2015 UICC.

  18. Tropical warming and the dynamics of endangered primates.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, Ruscena; Post, Eric

    2010-04-23

    Many primate species are severely threatened, but little is known about the effects of global warming and the associated intensification of El Niño events on primate populations. Here, we document the influences of the El Niño southern oscillation (ENSO) and hemispheric climatic variability on the population dynamics of four genera of ateline (neotropical, large-bodied) primates. All ateline genera experienced either an immediate or a lagged negative effect of El Niño events. ENSO events were also found to influence primate resource levels through neotropical arboreal phenology. Furthermore, frugivorous primates showed a high degree of interspecific population synchrony over large scales across Central and South America attributable to the recent trends in large-scale climate. These results highlight the role of large-scale climatic variation and trends in ateline primate population dynamics, and emphasize that global warming could pose additional threats to the persistence of multiple species of endangered primates.

  19. Positive selection of the TRIM family regulatory region in primate genomes.

    PubMed

    He, Dan-Dan; Lu, Yueer; Gittelman, Rachel; Jin, Yabin; Ling, Fei; Joshua, Akey

    2016-10-12

    Viral selection pressure has acted on restriction factors that play an important role in the innate immune system by inhibiting the replication of viruses during primate evolution. Tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) family members are some of these restriction factors. It is becoming increasingly clear that gene expression differences, rather than protein-coding regions changes, could play a vital role in the anti-retroviral immune mechanism. Increasingly, recent studies have created genome-scale catalogues of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs), which demark potentially functional regulatory DNA. To improve our understanding of the molecular evolution mechanism of antiviral differences between species, we leveraged 14 130 DHSs derived from 145 cell types to characterize the regulatory landscape of the TRIM region. Subsequently, we compared the alignments of the DHSs across six primates and found 375 DHSs that are conserved in non-human primates but exhibit significantly accelerated rates of evolution in the human lineage (haDHSs). Furthermore, we discovered 31 human-specific potential transcription factor motifs within haDHSs, including the KROX and SP1, that both interact with HIV-1 Importantly, the corresponding haDHS was correlated with antiviral factor TRIM23 Thus, our results suggested that some viruses may contribute, through regulatory DNA differences, to organismal evolution by mediating TRIM gene expression to escape immune surveillance.

  20. A new method for recording complex positional behaviours and habitat interactions in primates.

    PubMed

    Myatt, J P; Crompton, R H; Thorpe, S K S

    2011-01-01

    In an arboreal habitat, primates have to cope with a complex meshwork of flexible supports in order to obtain food, find mates and avoid predators. To understand how animals interact with such complex environments we can study their positional behaviour. However, due to the intricate variation in locomotion and posture it can be difficult to capture details such as limb use (i.e. weight and balance), limb flexion and substrate use. This paper presents a suitable method replicable for any primate species, based on the movement notation technique, Sutton Movement Writing (SMW), aiming to record the spatial arrangement of limbs during positional behaviours on multiple, compliant supports. This method was piloted during a year-long field study of wild orangutans (Pongo abelii) and validated and tested for inter- and intraobserver reliability using videos from the field. Overall, SMW shows considerable promise for increasing the resolution with which positional behaviours can be recorded under field conditions and provides a way to extract numerical data for use in statistical analyses. This will facilitate our understanding of how behaviours vary in response to the environment, and the capabilities of primates to perform key tasks in their distinct niches.

  1. Occurrence and distribution of Indian primates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karanth, K.K.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Global and regional species conservation efforts are hindered by poor distribution data and range maps. Many Indian primates face extinction, but assessments of population status are hindered by lack of reliable distribution data. We estimated the current occurrence and distribution of 15 Indian primates by applying occupancy models to field data from a country-wide survey of local experts. We modeled species occurrence in relation to ecological and social covariates (protected areas, landscape characteristics, and human influences), which we believe are critical to determining species occurrence in India. We found evidence that protected areas positively influence occurrence of seven species and for some species are their only refuge. We found evergreen forests to be more critical for some primates along with temperate and deciduous forests. Elevation negatively influenced occurrence of three species. Lower human population density was positively associated with occurrence of five species, and higher cultural tolerance was positively associated with occurrence of three species. We find that 11 primates occupy less than 15% of the total land area of India. Vulnerable primates with restricted ranges are Golden langur, Arunachal macaque, Pig-tailed macaque, stump-tailed macaque, Phayre's leaf monkey, Nilgiri langur and Lion-tailed macaque. Only Hanuman langur and rhesus macaque are widely distributed. We find occupancy modeling to be useful in determining species ranges, and in agreement with current species ranking and IUCN status. In landscapes where monitoring efforts require optimizing cost, effort and time, we used ecological and social covariates to reliably estimate species occurrence and focus species conservation efforts. ?? Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Variation in the molecular clock of primates

    PubMed Central

    Moorjani, Priya; Amorim, Carlos Eduardo G.; Arndt, Peter F.; Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Events in primate evolution are often dated by assuming a constant rate of substitution per unit time, but the validity of this assumption remains unclear. Among mammals, it is well known that there exists substantial variation in yearly substitution rates. Such variation is to be expected from differences in life history traits, suggesting it should also be found among primates. Motivated by these considerations, we analyze whole genomes from 10 primate species, including Old World Monkeys (OWMs), New World Monkeys (NWMs), and apes, focusing on putatively neutral autosomal sites and controlling for possible effects of biased gene conversion and methylation at CpG sites. We find that substitution rates are up to 64% higher in lineages leading from the hominoid–NWM ancestor to NWMs than to apes. Within apes, rates are ∼2% higher in chimpanzees and ∼7% higher in the gorilla than in humans. Substitution types subject to biased gene conversion show no more variation among species than those not subject to it. Not all mutation types behave similarly, however; in particular, transitions at CpG sites exhibit a more clocklike behavior than do other types, presumably because of their nonreplicative origin. Thus, not only the total rate, but also the mutational spectrum, varies among primates. This finding suggests that events in primate evolution are most reliably dated using CpG transitions. Taking this approach, we estimate the human and chimpanzee divergence time is 12.1 million years,​ and the human and gorilla divergence time is 15.1 million years​. PMID:27601674

  3. Reversible Switching of Cooperating Replicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urtel, Georg C.; Rind, Thomas; Braun, Dieter

    2017-02-01

    How can molecules with short lifetimes preserve their information over millions of years? For evolution to occur, information-carrying molecules have to replicate before they degrade. Our experiments reveal a robust, reversible cooperation mechanism in oligonucleotide replication. Two inherently slow replicating hairpin molecules can transfer their information to fast crossbreed replicators that outgrow the hairpins. The reverse is also possible. When one replication initiation site is missing, single hairpins reemerge from the crossbreed. With this mechanism, interacting replicators can switch between the hairpin and crossbreed mode, revealing a flexible adaptation to different boundary conditions.

  4. DNA replication in thermophiles.

    PubMed

    Majerník, A I; Jenkinson, E R; Chong, J P J

    2004-04-01

    DNA replication enzymes in the thermophilic Archaea have previously attracted attention due to their obvious use in methods such as PCR. The proofreading ability of the Pyrococcus furiosus DNA polymerase has resulted in a commercially successful product (Pfu polymerase). One of the many notable features of the Archaea is the fact that their DNA processing enzymes appear on the whole to be more like those found in eukaryotes than bacteria. These proteins also appear to be simpler versions of those found in eukaryotes. For these reasons, archaeal organisms make potentially interesting model systems to explore the molecular mechanisms of processes such as DNA replication, repair and recombination. Why archaeal DNA-manipulation systems were adopted over bacterial systems by eukaryotic cells remains a most interesting question that we suggest may be linked to thermophily.

  5. Analysis of Pupil Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaan, F. H. P.; Greenaway, A. H.

    2007-04-01

    Pupil replication and hypertelescope systems for imaging telluric exoplanets in scattered light are treated. Analytic expressions for the spread functions in one and two dimensions and in the presence of various forms of error are given. Error effects considered include aperture misalignment, tilts, piston, pointing errors, and unequal beam amplitude. The performance of the two approaches is contrasted, and the analytic results are compared with simulation results.

  6. A New Replicator: A theoretical framework for analysing replication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Replicators are the crucial entities in evolution. The notion of a replicator, however, is far less exact than the weight of its importance. Without identifying and classifying multiplying entities exactly, their dynamics cannot be determined appropriately. Therefore, it is importance to decide the nature and characteristics of any multiplying entity, in a detailed and formal way. Results Replication is basically an autocatalytic process which enables us to rest on the notions of formal chemistry. This statement has major implications. Simple autocatalytic cycle intermediates are considered as non-informational replicators. A consequence of which is that any autocatalytically multiplying entity is a replicator, be it simple or overly complex (even nests). A stricter definition refers to entities which can inherit acquired changes (informational replicators). Simple autocatalytic molecules (and nests) are excluded from this group. However, in turn, any entity possessing copiable information is to be named a replicator, even multicellular organisms. In order to deal with the situation, an abstract, formal framework is presented, which allows the proper identification of various types of replicators. This sheds light on the old problem of the units and levels of selection and evolution. A hierarchical classification for the partition of the replicator-continuum is provided where specific replicators are nested within more general ones. The classification should be able to be successfully applied to known replicators and also to future candidates. Conclusion This paper redefines the concept of the replicator from a bottom-up theoretical approach. The formal definition and the abstract models presented can distinguish between among all possible replicator types, based on their quantity of variable and heritable information. This allows for the exact identification of various replicator types and their underlying dynamics. The most important claim is that

  7. Targeting Prostate Cancer for Gene Therapy Utilizing Lentivirus and Oncolytic VSV Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed non- skin carcinoma, and one of the leading causes of cancerrelated deaths in North American men. Presently...primary and metastatic cancer cells while sparing normal cells. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) is an oncolytic virus which is able to replicate in...capable of selectively infecting and killing malignant prostate cells while sparing normal cells. This cancer-specific cell death was not due to

  8. Transplantation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Retinal Cells into the Subretinal Space of a Non-Human Primate

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jennifer R.; Lamba, Deepak A.; Klesert, Todd R.; Torre, Anna La; Hoshino, Akina; Taylor, Russell J.; Jayabalu, Anu; Engel, Abbi L.; Khuu, Thomas H.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay; Reh, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated the ability of retinal cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to survive, integrate into the host retina, and mediate light responses in murine mouse models. Our aim is to determine whether these cells can also survive and integrate into the retina of a nonhuman primate, Saimiri sciureus, following transplantation into the subretinal space. Methods hESCs were differentiated toward retinal neuronal fates using our previously published technique and cultured for 60 to 70 days. Differentiated cells were further treated with 20 μM N-[N-(3,5-Difluorophenacetyl)-L-alanyl]-S-phenylglycine t-butyl ester (DAPT) for a period of 5 days immediately prior to subretinal transplantation. Differentiated cells were labeled with a lentivirus expressing GFP. One million cells (10,000 cells/μL) were injected into the submacular space into a squirrel monkey eye, using an ab externo technique. Results RetCam imaging demonstrated the presence and survival of human donor cells 3 months after transplantation in the S. sciureus eye. Injected cells consolidated in the temporal macula. GFP+ axonal projections were observed to emanate from the central consolidation of cells at 1 month, with some projecting into the optic nerve by 3 months after transplantation. Conclusions Human ES cell-derived retinal neurons injected into the submacular space of a squirrel monkey survive at least 3 months postinjection without immunosuppression. Some donor cells appeared to integrate into the host inner retina, and numerous donor axonal projections were noted throughout, with some projecting into the optic nerve. Translational Relevance These data illustrate the feasibility of hESC-derived retinal cell replacement in the nonhuman primate eye. PMID:28516002

  9. Mechanisms of DNA replication termination.

    PubMed

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2017-08-01

    Genome duplication is carried out by pairs of replication forks that assemble at origins of replication and then move in opposite directions. DNA replication ends when converging replication forks meet. During this process, which is known as replication termination, DNA synthesis is completed, the replication machinery is disassembled and daughter molecules are resolved. In this Review, we outline the steps that are likely to be common to replication termination in most organisms, namely, fork convergence, synthesis completion, replisome disassembly and decatenation. We briefly review the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in simian virus 40 (SV40) and also focus on recent advances in eukaryotic replication termination. In particular, we discuss the recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases that control replisome disassembly in yeast and higher eukaryotes, and how their activity is regulated to avoid genome instability.

  10. Evidence for a convergent slowdown in primate molecular rates and its implications for the timing of early primate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Steiper, Michael E.; Seiffert, Erik R.

    2012-01-01

    A long-standing problem in primate evolution is the discord between paleontological and molecular clock estimates for the time of crown primate origins: the earliest crown primate fossils are ∼56 million y (Ma) old, whereas molecular estimates for the haplorhine-strepsirrhine split are often deep in the Late Cretaceous. One explanation for this phenomenon is that crown primates existed in the Cretaceous but that their fossil remains have not yet been found. Here we provide strong evidence that this discordance is better-explained by a convergent molecular rate slowdown in early primate evolution. We show that molecular rates in primates are strongly and inversely related to three life-history correlates: body size (BS), absolute endocranial volume (EV), and relative endocranial volume (REV). Critically, these traits can be reconstructed from fossils, allowing molecular rates to be predicted for extinct primates. To this end, we modeled the evolutionary history of BS, EV, and REV using data from both extinct and extant primates. We show that the primate last common ancestor had a very small BS, EV, and REV. There has been a subsequent convergent increase in BS, EV, and REV, indicating that there has also been a convergent molecular rate slowdown over primate evolution. We generated a unique timescale for primates by predicting molecular rates from the reconstructed phenotypic values for a large phylogeny of living and extinct primates. This analysis suggests that crown primates originated close to the K–Pg boundary and possibly in the Paleocene, largely reconciling the molecular and fossil timescales of primate evolution. PMID:22474376

  11. Evidence for a convergent slowdown in primate molecular rates and its implications for the timing of early primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Steiper, Michael E; Seiffert, Erik R

    2012-04-17

    A long-standing problem in primate evolution is the discord between paleontological and molecular clock estimates for the time of crown primate origins: the earliest crown primate fossils are ~56 million y (Ma) old, whereas molecular estimates for the haplorhine-strepsirrhine split are often deep in the Late Cretaceous. One explanation for this phenomenon is that crown primates existed in the Cretaceous but that their fossil remains have not yet been found. Here we provide strong evidence that this discordance is better-explained by a convergent molecular rate slowdown in early primate evolution. We show that molecular rates in primates are strongly and inversely related to three life-history correlates: body size (BS), absolute endocranial volume (EV), and relative endocranial volume (REV). Critically, these traits can be reconstructed from fossils, allowing molecular rates to be predicted for extinct primates. To this end, we modeled the evolutionary history of BS, EV, and REV using data from both extinct and extant primates. We show that the primate last common ancestor had a very small BS, EV, and REV. There has been a subsequent convergent increase in BS, EV, and REV, indicating that there has also been a convergent molecular rate slowdown over primate evolution. We generated a unique timescale for primates by predicting molecular rates from the reconstructed phenotypic values for a large phylogeny of living and extinct primates. This analysis suggests that crown primates originated close to the K-Pg boundary and possibly in the Paleocene, largely reconciling the molecular and fossil timescales of primate evolution.

  12. Replication of grazing incidence optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.

    1986-01-01

    The replication of grazing incidence optics is reviewed. Electroform and epoxy replication are described and compared. It is concluded that for light weight and deep nesting, replication has a distinct advantage over direct production. The resolution of optics produced in this manner is however, limited to about 10 arc seconds; a typical value is 40 arc seconds. Epoxy replicated pieces tend to have better optical figures than electroformed optics, but the latter can be made thinner to make more deeply nested systems.

  13. Replication of grazing incidence optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulmer, Melville P.

    1986-01-01

    The replication of grazing incidence optics is reviewed. Electroform and epoxy replication are described and compared. It is concluded that for light weight and deep nesting, replication has a distinct advantage over direct production. The resolution of optics produced in this manner is however, limited to about 10 arc seconds; a typical value is 40 arc seconds. Epoxy replicated pieces tend to have better optical figures than electroformed optics, but the latter can be made thinner to make more deeply nested systems.

  14. Modified toolbox for optogenetics in the nonhuman primate

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ji; Ozden, Ilker; Brooks, Daniel I.; Wagner, Fabien; May, Travis; Agha, Naubahar S.; Brush, Benjamin; Borton, David; Nurmikko, Arto V.; Sheinberg, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Attracted by the appealing advantages of optogenetics, many nonhuman primate labs are attempting to incorporate this technique in their experiments. Despite some reported successes by a few groups, many still find it difficult to develop a reliable way to transduce cells in the monkey brain and subsequently monitor light-induced neuronal activity. Here, we describe a methodology that we have developed and successfully deployed on a regular basis with multiple monkeys. All devices and accessories are easy to obtain and results using these have been proven to be highly replicable. We developed the “in-chair” viral injection system and used tapered and thinner fibers for optical stimulation, which significantly improved the efficacy and reduced tissue damage. With these methods, we have successfully transduced cells in multiple monkeys in both deep and shallow cortical areas. We could reliably obtain neural modulation for months after injection, and no light-induced artifacts were observed during recordings. Further experiments using these methods have shown that optogenetic stimulation can be used to bias spatial attention in a visual choice discrimination task in a way comparable to electrical microstimulation, which demonstrates the potential use of our methods in both fundamental research and clinical applications. PMID:26158011

  15. Replication Research and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  16. Replication Research and Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  17. Taxonomy and conservation of Vietnam's primates: a review.

    PubMed

    Blair, Mary E; Sterling, Eleanor J; Hurley, Martha M

    2011-11-01

    Vietnam has the highest number of primate taxa overall (24-27) and the highest number of globally threatened primate taxa (minimum 20) in Mainland Southeast Asia. Conservation management of these species depends in part on resolving taxonomic uncertainties, which remain numerous among the Asian primates. Recent research on genetic, morphological, and acoustic diversity in Vietnam's primates has clarified some of these uncertainties, although a number of significant classification issues still remain. Herein, we summarize and compare the major current taxonomic classifications of Vietnam's primates, discuss recent advances in the context of these taxonomies, and suggest key areas for additional research to best inform conservation efforts in a region crucial to global primate diversity. Among the most important next steps for the conservation of Vietnam's primates is a new consensus list of Asian primates that resolves current differences between major taxonomies, incorporates recent research advances, and recognizes units of diversity at scales below the species-level, whether termed populations, morphs, or subspecies. Priority should be placed on recognizing distinct populations, regardless of the species concept in use, in order to foster the evolutionary processes necessary for primate populations to cope with inevitable environmental changes. The long-term conservation of Vietnam's primates depends not only on an accepted and accurate taxonomy but also on funding for on-the-ground conservation activities, including training, and the continued dedication and leadership of Vietnamese researchers and managers.

  18. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of LMP2A inhibits the growth of the Epstein-Barr-associated gastric carcinoma cell line GT38 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangjun; Chen, Weichang; Liu, Pengfei; Zhou, Jundong; Liu, Bingtuan; Ye, Wu; Wang, Wenping; Shen, Xiuyun

    2017-01-01

    In this study, lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was applied to inhibit latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) gene expression, in order to explore the effects of LMP2A silencing on the growth of an Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) cell line in vitro. Lentivirus-mediated RNAi technology was employed to specifically knock down the LMP2A gene in the EBV-positive gastric carcinoma cell line GT38. After infection, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, flow cytometry and colony formation assays were conducted to evaluate the expression of LMP2A and the biological behavior of the GT38 cell line in vitro. The results showed that the expression of the LMP2A gene was clearly downregulated in the infected cells, which indicated that a highly efficient and stable lentivirus vector was successfully constructed. In the GT38 cells in which the expression of LMP2A was downregulated, the proliferation and colony formation of the cells was significantly inhibited. In addition, it was found that the cell cycle of the GT38 cells was arrested in the G0/G1 phase and the apoptosis rate was increased. These results indicate that lentivirus-mediated RNAi knockdown of LMP2A inhibits the growth of the EBVaGC cell line GT38 in vitro, and suggests that LMP2A is a potential target for gene therapy in the treatment of EBVaGC. PMID:28123488

  19. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts

    PubMed Central

    DeSoto, K. Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication. PMID:28291224

  20. Canine size, shape, and bending strength in primates and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ruff, Christopher B

    2008-05-01

    Anthropoid primates are well known for their highly sexually dimorphic canine teeth, with males possessing canines that are up to 400% taller than those of females. Primate canine dimorphism has been extensively documented, with a consensus that large male primate canines serve as weapons for intrasexual competition, and some evidence that large female canines in some species may likewise function as weapons. However, apart from speculation that very tall male canines may be relatively weak and that seed predators have strong canines, the functional significance of primate canine shape has not been explored. Because carnivore canine shape and size are associated with killing style, this group provides a useful comparative baseline for primates. We evaluate primate maxillary canine tooth size, shape and relative bending strength against body size, skull size, and behavioral and demographic measures of male competition and sexual selection, and compare them to those of carnivores. We demonstrate that, relative to skull length and body mass, primate male canines are on average as large as or larger than those of similar sized carnivores. The range of primate female canine sizes embraces that of carnivores. Male and female primate canines are generally as strong as or stronger than those of carnivores. Although we find that seed-eating primates have relatively strong canines, we find no clear relationship between male primate canine strength and demographic or behavioral estimates of male competition or sexual selection, in spite of a strong relationship between these measures and canine crown height. This suggests either that most primate canines are selected to be very strong regardless of variation in behavior, or that primate canine shape is inherently strong enough to accommodate changes in crown height without compromising canine function.

  1. Self-Replicating RNA.

    PubMed

    Tews, Birke Andrea; Meyers, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    Self-replicating RNA derived from the genomes of positive strand RNA viruses represents a powerful tool for both molecular studies on virus biology and approaches to novel safe and effective vaccines. The following chapter summarizes the principles how such RNAs can be established and used for design of vaccines. Due to the large variety of strategies needed to circumvent specific pitfalls in the design of such constructs the technical details of the experiments are not described here but can be found in the cited literature.

  2. Experimental evidence that primate trichromacy is well suited for detecting primate social colour signals

    PubMed Central

    Higham, James P.

    2017-01-01

    Primate trichromatic colour vision has been hypothesized to be well tuned for detecting variation in facial coloration, which could be due to selection on either signal wavelengths or the sensitivities of the photoreceptors themselves. We provide one of the first empirical tests of this idea by asking whether, when compared with other visual systems, the information obtained through primate trichromatic vision confers an improved ability to detect the changes in facial colour that female macaque monkeys exhibit when they are proceptive. We presented pairs of digital images of faces of the same monkey to human observers and asked them to select the proceptive face. We tested images that simulated what would be seen by common catarrhine trichromatic vision, two additional trichromatic conditions and three dichromatic conditions. Performance under conditions of common catarrhine trichromacy, and trichromacy with narrowly separated LM cone pigments (common in female platyrrhines), was better than for evenly spaced trichromacy or for any of the dichromatic conditions. These results suggest that primate trichromatic colour vision confers excellent ability to detect meaningful variation in primate face colour. This is consistent with the hypothesis that social information detection has acted on either primate signal spectral reflectance or photoreceptor spectral tuning, or both. PMID:28615496

  3. Nonhuman primate dermatology: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Joseph A.; Didier, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    In general, veterinary dermatologists do not have extensive clinical experience of nonhuman primate (NHP) dermatoses. The bulk of the published literature does not provide an organized evidence-based approach to the NHP dermatologic case. The veterinary dermatologist is left to extract information from both human and veterinary dermatology, an approach that can be problematic as it forces the clinician to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions based on two very disparate bodies of literature. A more cohesive approach to NHP dermatology – without relying on assumptions that NHP pathology most commonly behaves similarly to other veterinary and human disease – is required. This review of the dermatology of NHP species includes discussions of primary dermatoses, as well as diseases where dermatologic signs represent a significant secondary component, provides a first step towards encouraging the veterinary community to study and report the dermatologic diseases of nonhuman primates. PMID:19490576

  4. [Ecotourism disturbances to non-human primates].

    PubMed

    Fan, Peng-Lai; Xiang, Zuo-Fu

    2013-02-01

    In tandem with economic growth and rising living conditions, ecotourism has increasingly gained popularity among the Chinese public. Non-human primates, as charismatic animals and the closest relatives of human beings, have shown a strong affinity in attracting the general public and raising money, and for that reason a variety of monkey parks, valleys, and islands are becoming increasingly popular in China. Though successful in raising a substantial sum of money for the managing agency of a nature reserve, there may be negative impacts on monkey groups used in ecotourism. Here, to establish effective guards for non-human primates involved in ecotourism, we present a review on tourism disturbance and summarize the negative impacts on behavioral patterns, reproduction, and health condition of animals.

  5. Evolution of alkaline phosphatases in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D J; Rogers, C; Harris, H

    1982-01-01

    Alkaline phosphatase [orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1] in placenta, intestine, liver, kidney, bone, and lung from a variety of primate species has been characterized by quantitative inhibition, thermostability, and immunological studies. Characteristic human placental-type alkaline phosphatase occurs in placentas of great apes (chimpanzee and orangutan) but not in placentas of other primates, including gibbon. It is also present in trace amounts in human lung but not in lung or other tissues of various Old and New World monkeys. However, a distinctive alkaline phosphatase resembling it occurs in substantial amounts in lungs from Old World monkeys but not New World monkeys. It appears that duplication of alkaline phosphatase genes and mutations of genetic elements controlling their tissue expression have occurred relatively recently in mammalian evolution. Images PMID:6950431

  6. Optogenetics in primates: a shining future?

    PubMed

    Gerits, Annelies; Vanduffel, Wim

    2013-07-01

    To understand the functional role of specific neurons in micro- and macro-brain circuitry, health, and disease, it is critical to control their activity precisely. This ambitious goal was first achieved by optogenetics, allowing researchers to increase or decrease neural activity artificially with high temporal and spatial precision. In contrast to the revolution optogenetics engendered in invertebrate and rodent research, only a few studies have reported optogenetic-induced neuronal and behavioral effects in primates. Such studies are nonetheless critical before optogenetics can be applied in a clinical setting. Here, we review the state-of-the-art tools for performing optogenetics in mammals, emphasizing recent neuronal and behavioral results obtained in nonhuman primates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anuja; Qiu, Zhifang; Farnsworth, Steven L; Hemmi, Jacob J; Li, Miao; Pickering, Alexander V; Hornsby, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells from nonhuman primates (NHPs) have unique roles in cell biology and regenerative medicine. Because of the relatedness of NHPs to humans, NHP iPS cells can serve as a source of differentiated derivatives that can be used to address important questions in the comparative biology of primates. Additionally, when used as a source of cells for regenerative medicine, NHP iPS cells serve an invaluable role in translational experiments in cell therapy. Reprogramming of NHP somatic cells requires the same conditions as previously established for human cells. However, throughout the process, a variety of modifications to the human cell protocols must be made to accommodate significant species differences.

  8. Anatomy of Mammalian Replication Domains

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic information is faithfully copied by DNA replication through many rounds of cell division. In mammals, DNA is replicated in Mb-sized chromosomal units called “replication domains.” While genome-wide maps in multiple cell types and disease states have uncovered both dynamic and static properties of replication domains, we are still in the process of understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these properties. A better understanding of the molecular basis of replication domain regulation will bring new insights into chromosome structure and function. PMID:28350365

  9. Cognitive consequences of cooperative breeding in primates?

    PubMed

    Burkart, Judith Maria; van Schaik, Carel P

    2010-01-01

    Several hypotheses propose that cooperative breeding leads to increased cognitive performance, in both nonhuman and human primates, but systematic evidence for such a relationship is missing. A causal link might exist because motivational and cognitive processes necessary for the execution and coordination of helping behaviors could also favor cognitive performance in contexts not directly related to caregiving. In callitrichids, which among primates rely most strongly on cooperative breeding, these motivational and cognitive processes include attentional biases toward monitoring others, the ability to coordinate actions spatially and temporally, increased social tolerance, increased responsiveness to others' signals, and spontaneous prosociality. These processes are likely to enhance performance particularly in socio-cognitive contexts. Therefore, cooperatively breeding primates are expected to outperform their independently breeding sister taxa in socio-cognitive tasks. We evaluate this prediction by reviewing the literature and comparing cognitive performance in callitrichids with that of their sister taxa, i.e. squirrel monkeys, which are independent breeders, and capuchin monkeys, which show an intermediate breeding system. Consistent with our prediction, this review reveals that callitrichids systematically and significantly outperform their sister taxa in the socio-cognitive, but not in the non-social domain. This comparison is complemented with more qualitative evaluations of prosociality and cognitive performance in non-primate cooperative breeders, which suggest that among mammals, cooperative breeding generally produces conditions conducive to socio-cognitive performance. In the hominid lineage, however, the adoption of extensive allomaternal care presumably resulted in more pervasive cognitive consequences, because the motivational consequences of cooperative breeding was added to an ape-level cognitive system already capable of understanding simple

  10. Endoscopy and Endosurgery in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Chai, Norin

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopy in nonhuman primates (NHPs) has resulted in improvements in research and clinical care for more than 4 decades. The indications and procedures are the same as in humans and the approach is similar to that in dogs, cats, and humans. Selected procedures are discussed including rhinoscopy, tracheobronchoscopy, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, laparoscopy, and endoscopic salpingectomy. This short overview provides practitioners with pragmatic elements for safe and effective endoscopy in NHPs.

  11. Relaxin and the control of primate parturition.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gerson

    2013-01-01

    In primate pregnancy, circulating relaxin, solely a product of the corpus luteum, peaks in the first trimester of pregnancy then declines and levels off for the remainder of pregnancy. Relaxin actions in pregnancy include increasing cervical pro-MMP-1 and pro-MMP-3 and decreasing TIMP-1, changes which soften the cervix. Relaxin, from early pregnancy, increases endometrial natural killer cells, macrophages and neutrophils, blood flow and arterial number. Hyperrelaxinemia correlates with preterm birth.

  12. Molecular evolution of prolactin in primates.

    PubMed

    Wallis, O Caryl; Mac-Kwashie, Akofa O; Makri, Georgia; Wallis, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Pituitary prolactin, like growth hormone (GH) and several other protein hormones, shows an episodic pattern of molecular evolution in which sustained bursts of rapid change contrast with long periods of slow evolution. A period of rapid change occurred in the evolution of prolactin in primates, leading to marked sequence differences between human prolactin and that of nonprimate mammals. We have defined this burst more precisely by sequencing the coding regions of prolactin genes for a prosimian, the slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus), and a New World monkey, the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus). Slow loris prolactin is very similar in sequence to pig prolactin, so the episode of rapid change occurred during primate evolution, after the separation of lines leading to prosimians and higher primates. Marmoset prolactin is similar in sequence to human prolactin, so the accelerated evolution occurred before divergence of New World monkeys and Old World monkeys/apes. The burst of change was confined largely to coding sequence (nonsynonymous sites) for mature prolactin and is not marked in other components of the gene sequence. This and the observations that (1) there was no apparent loss of function during the episode of rapid evolution, (2) the rate of evolution slowed toward the basal rate after this burst, and (3) the distribution of substitutions in the prolactin molecule is very uneven support the idea that this episode of rapid change was due to positive adaptive selection. In the slow loris and marmoset there is no evidence for duplication of the prolactin gene, and evidence from another New World monkey (Cebus albifrons) and from the chimpanzee and human genome sequences, suggests that this is the general position in primates, contrasting with the situation for GH genes. The chimpanzee prolactin sequence differs from that of human at two residues and comparison of human and chimpanzee prolactin gene sequences suggests that noncoding regions associated with regulating

  13. DNA replication origins in archaea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Jingfang; Yang, Haibo; Xiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to a replication initiator gene. Both the ORB sequence and the adjacent initiator gene are considerably diverse among different replication origins, while in silico and genetic analyses have indicated the specificity between the initiator genes and their cognate origins. These replicator-initiator pairings are reminiscent of the oriC-dnaA system in bacteria, and a model for the negative regulation of origin activity by a downstream cluster of ORB elements has been recently proposed in haloarchaea. Moreover, comparative genomic analyses have revealed that the mosaics of replicator-initiator pairings in archaeal chromosomes originated from the integration of extrachromosomal elements. This review summarizes the research progress in understanding of archaeal replication origins with particular focus on the utilization, control and evolution of multiple replication origins in haloarchaea.

  14. Renal Alterations in Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)-Infected Cats: A Natural Model of Lentivirus-Induced Renal Disease Changes

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Tozon, Natasa; Guidi, Grazia; Pistello, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with several renal syndromes including acute and chronic renal failures, but the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are unclear. HIV and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) share numerous biological and pathological features, including renal alterations. We investigated and compared the morphological changes of renal tissue of 51 experimentally and 21 naturally infected cats. Compared to the latter, the experimentally infected cats exhibited some mesangial widening and glomerulonephritis, milder proteinuria, and lower tubular and interstitial alterations. The numbers of giant protein tubular casts and tubular microcysts were also lower. In contrast, diffuse interstitial infiltrates and glomerular and interstitial amyloidosis were detected only in naturally infected cats. Similar alterations are found in HIV infected patients, thus supporting the idea of a causative role of FIV infection in renal disease, and underlining the relevance of the FIV and its natural host as an animal model for investigating lentivirus-associated nephropathy. PMID:23170163

  15. Regulatory parameters of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M; Price, G B

    1998-01-01

    One of the fundamental characteristics that help define life is the ability to propagate. At the basest level in the act of propagation is replication of the genetic information as the databank and architectural plans for each particular life form. Thus propagation of life requires the replication of the genome--for the purposes of our review, eukaryotic DNA replication. In this critical review, we have chosen to present the issues and supporting experimental evidence in question-and-answer format. Over the past 3 to 4 years, the research domain of eukaryotic DNA replication has developed a new dynamism. This new force in discovery of the fundamental elements and mechanisms for DNA replication in higher eukaryotes has been propelled by accepted methodologies for mapping (identification) of origins of DNA replication, applicable to mammalian DNA replication, and by the discovery of the origin recognition complex (ORC) in yeast, which has served as a model in the search for the mammalian equivalent.

  16. Chromatin and DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    MacAlpine, David M.; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program. PMID:23751185

  17. Chromatin and DNA replication.

    PubMed

    MacAlpine, David M; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-08-01

    The size of a eukaryotic genome presents a unique challenge to the cell: package and organize the DNA to fit within the confines of the nucleus while at the same time ensuring sufficient dynamics to allow access to specific sequences and features such as genes and regulatory elements. This is achieved via the dynamic nucleoprotein organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin, the nucleosome, comprises a core particle with 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around an octamer of histones. The nucleosome is a highly versatile and modular structure, both in its composition, with the existence of various histone variants, and through the addition of a series of posttranslational modifications on the histones. This versatility allows for both short-term regulatory responses to external signaling, as well as the long-term and multigenerational definition of large functional chromosomal domains within the nucleus, such as the centromere. Chromatin organization and its dynamics participate in essentially all DNA-templated processes, including transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Here we will focus mainly on nucleosomal organization and describe the pathways and mechanisms that contribute to assembly of this organization and the role of chromatin in regulating the DNA replication program.

  18. Theory of Auditory Thresholds in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Michael J.

    2001-03-01

    The influence of thermal pressure fluctuations at the tympanic membrane has been previously investigated as a possible determinant of the threshold of hearing in humans (L.J. Sivian and S.D. White, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. IV, 4;288(1933).). More recent work has focussed more precisely on the relation between statistical mechanics and sensory signal processing by biological means in creatures' brains (W. Bialek, in ``Physics of Biological Systems: from molecules to species'', H. Flyvberg et al, (Eds), p. 252; Springer 1997.). Clinical data on the frequency dependence of hearing thresholds in humans and other primates (W.C. Stebbins, ``The Acoustic Sense of Animals'', Harvard 1983.) has long been available. I have derived an expression for the frequency dependence of hearing thresholds in primates, including humans, by first calculating the frequency dependence of thermal pressure fluctuations at eardrums from damped normal modes excited in model ear canals of given simple geometry. I then show that most of the features of the clinical data are directly related to the frequency dependence of the ratio of thermal noise pressure arising from without to that arising from within the masking bandwidth which signals must dominate in order to be sensed. The higher intensity of threshold signals in primates smaller than humans, which is clinically observed over much but not all of the human auditory spectrum is shown to arise from their smaller meatus dimensions. note

  19. Emotions, stress, and maternal motivation in primates.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, Dario

    2011-06-01

    Recent research conducted with nonhuman primates confirms that adaptive emotional processes, such as maternal attraction arousability and maternal anxiety arousability, enhance and sustain female motivation to interact with infants, invest in them, and protect them during the postpartum period. Changes in these emotional processes, and concomitant changes in maternal motivation, facilitate the reduction and eventual termination of maternal investment associated with infant weaning. Although laboratory studies of rodents and socially deprived rhesus monkeys have suggested that nulliparous females are neophobic and find infant stimuli aversive, recent primate research indicates that neophobia or aversion to infant stimuli do not occur in females with normal developmental experience. Furthermore, although some rodent and human studies have shown that lactation is accompanied by physiological hyporesponsiveness to stress, other studies of rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans indicate that mothers are highly vulnerable to stress and that stress-induced dysregulation of emotions can interfere with maternal motivation and parenting behavior. It is possible that some aspects of the emotional and experiential regulation of maternal motivation and parental behavior are different in different mammalian species. However, variation in the environments in which subjects are tested and in their developmental experience may also be responsible for the some discrepancies between the results of different studies.

  20. The ecology of primate material culture.

    PubMed

    Koops, Kathelijne; Visalberghi, Elisabetta; van Schaik, Carel P

    2014-11-01

    Tool use in extant primates may inform our understanding of the conditions that favoured the expansion of hominin technology and material culture. The 'method of exclusion' has, arguably, confirmed the presence of culture in wild animal populations by excluding ecological and genetic explanations for geographical variation in behaviour. However, this method neglects ecological influences on culture, which, ironically, may be critical for understanding technology and thus material culture. We review all the current evidence for the role of ecology in shaping material culture in three habitual tool-using non-human primates: chimpanzees, orangutans and capuchin monkeys. We show that environmental opportunity, rather than necessity, is the main driver. We argue that a better understanding of primate technology requires explicit investigation of the role of ecological conditions. We propose a model in which three sets of factors, namely environment, sociality and cognition, influence invention, transmission and retention of material culture. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. The appropriation of glucose through primate neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Bauernfeind, Amy L; Babbitt, Courtney C

    2014-12-01

    The human brain is considerably larger and more energetically costly than that of other primate species. As such, discovering how human ancestors were able to provide sufficient energy to their brains is a central theme in the study of hominin evolution. However, many discussions of metabolism frequently omit the different ways in which energy, primarily glucose, is used once made available to the brain. In this review, we discuss two glucose metabolic pathways, oxidative phosphorylation and aerobic glycolysis, and their respective contributions to the energetic and anabolic budgets of the brain. While oxidative phosphorylation is a more efficient producer of energy, aerobic glycolysis contributes essential molecules for the growth of the brain and maintaining the structure of its cells. Although both pathways occur in the brain throughout the lifetime, aerobic glycolysis is a critical pathway during development, and oxidative phosphorylation is highest during adulthood. We outline how elevated levels of aerobic glycolysis may support the protracted neurodevelopmental sequence of humans compared with other primates. Finally, we review the genetic evidence for differences in metabolic function in the brains of primates and explore genes that may provide insight into how glucose metabolism may differ across species.

  2. Visual specialization and brain evolution in primates.

    PubMed Central

    Barton, R A

    1998-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed to explain the evolution of species differences in brain size, but no consensus has emerged. One unresolved question is whether brain size differences are a result of neural specializations or of biological constraints affecting the whole brain. Here I show that, among primates, brain size variation is associated with visual specialization. Primates with large brains for their body size have relatively expanded visual brain areas, including the primary visual cortex and lateral geniculate nucleus. Within the visual system, it is, in particular, one functionally specialized pathway upon which selection has acted: evolutionary changes in the number of neurons in parvocellular, but not magnocellular, layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus are correlated with changes in both brain size and ecological variables (diet and social group size). Given the known functions of the parvocellular pathway, these results suggest that the relatively large brains of frugivorous species are products of selection on the ability to perceive and select fruits using specific visual cues such as colour. The separate correlation between group size and visual brain evolution, on the other hand, may indicate the visual basis of social information processing in the primate brain. PMID:9821360

  3. Dietary quality and encephalization in platyrrhine primates

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kari L.; Kay, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The high energetic costs of building and maintaining large brains are thought to constrain encephalization. The ‘expensive-tissue hypothesis’ (ETH) proposes that primates (especially humans) overcame this constraint through reduction of another metabolically expensive tissue, the gastrointestinal tract. Small guts characterize animals specializing on easily digestible diets. Thus, the hypothesis may be tested via the relationship between brain size and diet quality. Platyrrhine primates present an interesting test case, as they are more variably encephalized than other extant primate clades (excluding Hominoidea). We find a high degree of phylogenetic signal in the data for diet quality, endocranial volume and body size. Controlling for phylogenetic effects, we find no significant correlation between relative diet quality and relative endocranial volume. Thus, diet quality fails to account for differences in platyrrhine encephalization. One taxon, in particular, Brachyteles, violates predictions made by ETH in having a large brain and low-quality diet. Dietary reconstructions of stem platyrrhines further indicate that a relatively high-quality diet was probably in place prior to increases in encephalization. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shift in diet quality was a primary constraint release for encephalization in platyrrhines and, by extrapolation, humans. PMID:21831898

  4. THE KINEMATICS OF PRIMATE MIDFOOT FLEXIBILITY

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Thomas M.; Ball, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a unique assessment of primate intrinsic foot joint kinematics based upon bone pin rigid cluster tracking. It challenges the assumption that human evolution resulted in a reduction of midfoot flexibility, which has been identified in other primates as the “midtarsal break.” Rigid cluster pins were inserted into the foot bones of human, chimpanzee, baboon and macaque cadavers. The positions of these bone pins were monitored during a plantarflexion-dorsiflexion movement cycle. Analysis resolved flexion-extension movement patterns and the associated orientation of rotational axes for the talonavicular, calcaneocuboid and lateral cubometatarsal joints. Results show that midfoot flexibility occurs primarily at the talonavicular and cubometatarsal joints. The rotational magnitudes are roughly similar between humans and chimps. There is also a similarity among evaluated primates in the observed rotations of the lateral cubometatarsal joint, but there was much greater rotation observed for the talonavicular joint, which may serve to differentiate monkeys from the hominines. It appears that the capability for a midtarsal break is present within the human foot. A consideration of the joint axes shows that the medial and lateral joints have opposing orientations, which has been associated with a rigid locking mechanism in the human foot. However, the potential for this same mechanism also appears in the chimpanzee foot. These findings demonstrate a functional similarity within the midfoot of the hominines. Therefore, the kinematic capabilities and restrictions for the skeletal linkages of the human foot may not be as unique as has been previously suggested. PMID:25234343

  5. Phylogenomics of primates and their ancestral populations

    PubMed Central

    Siepel, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Genome assemblies are now available for nine primate species, and large-scale sequencing projects are underway or approved for six others. An explicitly evolutionary and phylogenetic approach to comparative genomics, called phylogenomics, will be essential in unlocking the valuable information about evolutionary history and genomic function that is contained within these genomes. However, most phylogenomic analyses so far have ignored the effects of variation in ancestral populations on patterns of sequence divergence. These effects can be pronounced in the primates, owing to large ancestral effective population sizes relative to the intervals between speciation events. In particular, local genealogies can vary considerably across loci, which can produce biases and diminished power in many phylogenomic analyses of interest, including phylogeny reconstruction, the identification of functional elements, and the detection of natural selection. At the same time, this variation in genealogies can be exploited to gain insight into the nature of ancestral populations. In this Perspective, I explore this area of intersection between phylogenetics and population genetics, and its implications for primate phylogenomics. I begin by “lifting the hood” on the conventional tree-like representation of the phylogenetic relationships between species, to expose the population-genetic processes that operate along its branches. Next, I briefly review an emerging literature that makes use of the complex relationships among coalescence, recombination, and speciation to produce inferences about evolutionary histories, ancestral populations, and natural selection. Finally, I discuss remaining challenges and future prospects at this nexus of phylogenetics, population genetics, and genomics. PMID:19801602

  6. Carboxyfullerene neuroprotection postinjury in Parkinsonian nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Dugan, Laura L; Tian, LinLin; Quick, Kevin L; Hardt, Josh I; Karimi, Morvarid; Brown, Chris; Loftin, Susan; Flores, Hugh; Moerlein, Stephen M; Polich, John; Tabbal, Samer D; Mink, Jonathan W; Perlmutter, Joel S

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of the potent antioxidant C3 to salvage nigrostriatal neuronal function after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) exposure in nonhuman primates. C3 is a first-in-class functionalized water-soluble fullerene that reduces oxygen radical species associated with neurodegeneration in in vitro studies. However, C3 has not been evaluated as a neuroprotective agent in a Parkinson model in vivo. Macaque fascicularis monkeys were used in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study design. MPTP-lesioned primates were given systemic C3 (n = 8) or placebo (n = 7) for 2 months starting 1 week after MPTP. Outcomes included in vivo behavioral measures of motor parkinsonism using a validated nonhuman primate rating scale, kinematic analyses of peak upper extremity velocity, positron emission tomography imaging of 6-[(18) F]fluorodopa (FD; reflects dopa decarboxylase) and [(11) C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ; reflects vesicular monoamine transporter type 2), ex vivo quantification of striatal dopamine, and stereologic counts of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunostained neurons in substantia nigra. After 2 months, C3 -treated monkeys had significantly improved parkinsonian motor ratings, greater striatal FD and DTBZ uptake, and higher striatal dopamine levels. None of the C3 -treated animals developed any toxicity. Systemic treatment with C3 reduced striatal injury and improved motor function despite administration after the MPTP injury process had begun. These data strongly support further development of C3 as a promising therapeutic agent for Parkinson disease. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  7. Testosterone and reproductive effort in male primates.

    PubMed

    Muller, Martin N

    2016-09-08

    Considerable evidence suggests that the steroid hormone testosterone mediates major life-history trade-offs in vertebrates, promoting mating effort at the expense of parenting effort or survival. Observations from a range of wild primates support the "Challenge Hypothesis," which posits that variation in male testosterone is more closely associated with aggressive mating competition than with reproductive physiology. In both seasonally and non-seasonally breeding species, males increase testosterone production primarily when competing for fecund females. In species where males compete to maintain long-term access to females, testosterone increases when males are threatened with losing access to females, rather than during mating periods. And when male status is linked to mating success, and dependent on aggression, high-ranking males normally maintain higher testosterone levels than subordinates, particularly when dominance hierarchies are unstable. Trade-offs between parenting effort and mating effort appear to be weak in most primates, because direct investment in the form of infant transport and provisioning is rare. Instead, infant protection is the primary form of paternal investment in the order. Testosterone does not inhibit this form of investment, which relies on male aggression. Testosterone has a wide range of effects in primates that plausibly function to support male competitive behavior. These include psychological effects related to dominance striving, analgesic effects, and effects on the development and maintenance of the armaments and adornments that males employ in mating competition.

  8. Chk1 promotes replication fork progression by controlling replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Woodcock, Mick; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-09-14

    DNA replication starts at initiation sites termed replication origins. Metazoan cells contain many more potential origins than are activated (fired) during each S phase. Origin activation is controlled by the ATR checkpoint kinase and its downstream effector kinase Chk1, which suppresses origin firing in response to replication blocks and during normal S phase by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk2. In addition to increased origin activation, cells deficient in Chk1 activity display reduced rates of replication fork progression. Here we investigate the causal relationship between increased origin firing and reduced replication fork progression. We use the Cdk inhibitor roscovitine or RNAi depletion of Cdc7 to inhibit origin firing in Chk1-inhibited or RNAi-depleted cells. We report that Cdk inhibition and depletion of Cdc7 can alleviate the slow replication fork speeds in Chk1-deficient cells. Our data suggest that increased replication initiation leads to slow replication fork progression and that Chk1 promotes replication fork progression during normal S phase by controlling replication origin activity.

  9. Lentivirus-Mediated RNA Interference Targeting RhoA Slacks the Migration, Proliferation, and Myelin Formation of Schwann Cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jinkun; Qian, Changhui; Pan, Mengjie; Wang, Xianghai; Li, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yanmeng; Zhou, Zhitao; Yan, Qing; Li, Lixia; Liu, Zhongying; Wu, Wutian; Guo, Jiasong

    2017-03-01

    RhoA, a member of Rho GTPases family, is known to play an important role in remodeling actin cytoskeleton. During the development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells undergo proliferation, migration, and radial sorting and finally wrap the related axons compactly to form myelin sheath. All these processes involve actin cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the role of RhoA on Schwann cell during development is still unclear. To address this question, we first used a lentiviral vector-mediated short hairpin (sh) RNA targeting RhoA to knock down the expression of RhoA in the cultured Schwann cells in vitro. Effects of RhoA on Schwann cell proliferation and migration were examined by BrdU assay and transwell assay, respectively. Results of the present study indicated that downregulated RhoA expression in cultured Schwann cells significantly slacked the cells' capabilities of migration and proliferation. Then, we investigated the role of RhoA in the developing rat sciatic nerves. Immunohistology and Western blotting showed that RhoA was mainly expressed in Schwann cells in the sciatic nerves and was peaked at 2 weeks postnatal then kept in low level up to 8 weeks. In the subjected rats whose sciatic nerves were microinjected with lentiviral vectors at postnatal 3 days, we found that the lentiviruses mainly transfected Schwann cells, and the RhoA expression in the transfected Schwann cells was significantly knocked down. Four weeks after lentivirus microinjection, immunohistology and transmission electron microscopy illustrated that RhoA knockdown resulted in hypomyelination and significant decrease of the thickness of myelin in the transfected area. Overall data of current study suggested that RhoA plays a critical role in Schwann cell biology and is essential for myelination in developing peripheral nerve.

  10. New insights for Ets2 function in trophoblast using lentivirus-mediated gene knockdown in trophoblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Odiatis, C; Georgiades, P

    2010-07-01

    Mouse trophoblast stem (TS) cells represent a unique in vitro system that provides an unlimited supply of TS cells for the study of trophoblast differentiation and TS cell self-renewal. Although the mouse transcription factor Ets2 is required for TS cell self-renewal, its role in this and in TS cell differentiation has not been explored fully, partly due to the early lethality of Ets2 null mice. To address this, we developed a novel lentivirus-based system that resulted in efficient Ets2 knockdown in the overwhelming majority of TS cells. This system enables functional studies in TS cells, especially for genes required for TS cell self-renewal because TS cell derivation using gene-knockout embryos for such genes depends on TS cell self-renewal. Using morphological/morphometric criteria and gene expression analysis, we show that the requirement for Ets2 in self-renewal of TS cells cultured in 'stem cell medium' (SCM) involves maintenance of the expression of genes that inhibit TS cell differentiation in SCM, such as Cdx2 and Esrrb, and preservation of the undifferentiated TS cell morphology. During TS cell differentiation caused by Cdx2/Esrrb downregulation, due to either Ets2 knockdown in SCM or culture in differentiation medium (DM), Ets2 is also required for the promotion of trophoblast giant cell (TGC) and junctional zone trophoblast (JZT) differentiation. This TGC differentiation involves Ets2-dependent expression of Hand1, a gene required for the differentiation of all TGC types. This study uncovers new roles for Ets2 in TS cell self-renewal and differentiation and demonstrates the usefulness of this lentivirus system for gene function studies in TS cells.

  11. Lentivirus-mediated platelet gene therapy of murine hemophilia A with pre-existing anti-FVIII immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kuether, E. L.; Schroeder, J. A.; Fahs, S. A.; Cooley, B. C.; Chen, Y.; Montgomery, R. R.; Wilcox, D. A.; Shi, Q.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The development of inhibitory antibodies, referred to as inhibitors, against exogenous FVIII in a significant subset of patients with hemophilia A remains a persistent challenge to the efficacy of protein replacement therapy. Our previous studies using the transgenic approach provided proof-of-principle that platelet-specific expression could be successful for treating hemophilia A in the presence of inhibitory antibodies. Objective To investigate a clinically translatable approach for platelet gene therapy of hemophilia A with pre-existing inhibitors. Methods Platelet-FVIII expression in pre-immunized FVIIInull mice was introduced by transplantation of lentivirus-transduced bone marrow or enriched hematopoietic stem cells. FVIII expression was determined by a chromogenic assay. The transgene copy number per cell was quantitated by real time PCR. Inhibitor titer was measured by Bethesda assay. Phenotypic correction was assessed by the tail clipping assay and an electrolytic-induced venous injury model. Integration sites were analyzed by LAM-PCR. Results Therapeutic levels of platelet-FVIII expression were sustained long-term without evoking an anti-FVIII memory response in the transduced pre-immunized recipients. The tail clip survival test and the electrolytic injury model confirmed that hemostasis was improved in the treated animals. Sequential bone marrow transplants showed sustained platelet-FVIII expression resulting in phenotypic correction in pre-immunized secondary and tertiary recipients. Conclusions Lentivirus-mediated platelet-specific gene transfer improves hemostasis in hemophilic A mice with pre-existing inhibitors, indicating that this approach may be a promising strategy for gene therapy of hemophilia A even in the high-risk setting of pre-existing inhibitory antibodies. PMID:22632092

  12. Increased impulsive behavior and risk proneness following lentivirus-mediated dopamine transporter over-expression in rats' nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Adriani, W; Boyer, F; Gioiosa, L; Macrì, S; Dreyer, J-L; Laviola, G

    2009-03-03

    Multiple theories have been proposed for sensation seeking and vulnerability to impulse-control disorders [Zuckerman M, Kuhlman DM (2000) Personality and risk-taking: Common biosocial factors. J Pers 68:999-1029], and many of these rely on a dopamine system deficit. Available animal models reproduce only some behavioral symptoms and seem devoid of construct validity. We used lentivirus tools for over-expressing or silencing the dopamine transporter (DAT) and we evaluated the resulting behavioral profiles in terms of motivation and self-control. Wistar adult rats received stereotaxic inoculation of a lentivirus that allowed localized intra-accumbens delivery of a DAT gene enhancer/silencer, or the green fluorescent protein, GFP. These animals were studied for intolerance to delay, risk proneness and novelty seeking. As expected, controls shifted their demanding from a large reward toward a small one when the delivery of the former was increasingly delayed (or uncertain). Interestingly, in the absence of general locomotor effects, DAT over-expressing rats showed increased impulsivity (i.e. a more marked shift of demanding from the large/delayed toward the small/soon reward), and increased risk proneness (i.e. a less marked shift from the large/uncertain toward the small/sure reward), compared with controls. Rats with enhanced or silenced DAT expression did not show any significant preference for a novel environment. In summary, consistent with literature on comorbidity between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and pathological gambling, we demonstrate that DAT over-expression in rats' nucleus accumbens leads to impulsive and risk prone phenotype. Thus, a reduced dopaminergic tone following altered accumbal DAT function may subserve a sensation-seeker phenotype and the vulnerability to impulse-control disorders.

  13. The oldest known primate skeleton and early haplorhine evolution.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xijun; Gebo, Daniel L; Dagosto, Marian; Meng, Jin; Tafforeau, Paul; Flynn, John J; Beard, K Christopher

    2013-06-06

    Reconstructing the earliest phases of primate evolution has been impeded by gaps in the fossil record, so that disagreements persist regarding the palaeobiology and phylogenetic relationships of the earliest primates. Here we report the discovery of a nearly complete and partly articulated skeleton of a primitive haplorhine primate from the early Eocene of China, about 55 million years ago, the oldest fossil primate of this quality ever recovered. Coupled with detailed morphological examination using propagation phase contrast X-ray synchrotron microtomography, our phylogenetic analysis based on total available evidence indicates that this fossil is the most basal known member of the tarsiiform clade. In addition to providing further support for an early dichotomy between the strepsirrhine and haplorhine clades, this new primate further constrains the age of divergence between tarsiiforms and anthropoids. It also strengthens the hypothesis that the earliest primates were probably diurnal, arboreal and primarily insectivorous mammals the size of modern pygmy mouse lemurs.

  14. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Michel G; Norio, Paolo; Bechhoefer, John

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  15. A comparative psychophysical approach to visual perception in primates.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Toyomi; Fujita, Kazuo

    2009-04-01

    Studies on the visual processing of primates, which have well developed visual systems, provide essential information about the perceptual bases of their higher-order cognitive abilities. Although the mechanisms underlying visual processing are largely shared between human and nonhuman primates, differences have also been reported. In this article, we review psychophysical investigations comparing the basic visual processing that operates in human and nonhuman species, and discuss the future contributions potentially deriving from such comparative psychophysical approaches to primate minds.

  16. Agroecosystems and primate conservation in the tropics: a review.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Alejandro; Raboy, Becky E; Oliveira, Leonardo C

    2012-08-01

    Agroecosystems cover more than one quarter of the global land area (ca. 50 million km(2) ) as highly simplified (e.g. pasturelands) or more complex systems (e.g. polycultures and agroforestry systems) with the capacity to support higher biodiversity. Increasingly more information has been published about primates in agroecosystems but a general synthesis of the diversity of agroecosystems that primates use or which primate taxa are able to persist in these anthropogenic components of the landscapes is still lacking. Because of the continued extensive transformation of primate habitat into human-modified landscapes, it is important to explore the extent to which agroecosystems are used by primates. In this article, we reviewed published information on the use of agroecosystems by primates in habitat countries and also discuss the potential costs and benefits to human and nonhuman primates of primate use of agroecosystems. The review showed that 57 primate taxa from four regions: Mesoamerica, South America, Sub-Saharan Africa (including Madagascar), and South East Asia, used 38 types of agroecosystems as temporary or permanent habitats. Fifty-one percent of the taxa recorded in agroecosystems were classified as least concern in the IUCN Red List, but the rest were classified as endangered (20%), vulnerable (18%), near threatened (9%), or critically endangered (2%). The large proportion of threatened primates in agroecosystems suggests that agroecosystems may play an important role in landscape approaches to primate conservation. We conclude by discussing the value of agroecosystems for primate conservation at a broad scale and highlight priorities for future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Predictors of orbital convergence in primates: a test of the snake detection hypothesis of primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Brandon C; Bradley, Brenda J; Kamilar, Jason M

    2011-09-01

    Traditional explanations for the evolution of high orbital convergence and stereoscopic vision in primates have focused on how stereopsis might have aided early primates in foraging or locomoting in an arboreal environment. It has recently been suggested that predation risk by constricting snakes was the selective force that favored the evolution of orbital convergence in early primates, and that later exposure to venomous snakes favored further degrees of convergence in anthropoid primates. Our study tests this snake detection hypothesis (SDH) by examining whether orbital convergence among extant primates is indeed associated with the shared evolutionary history with snakes or the risk that snakes pose for a given species. We predicted that orbital convergence would be higher in species that: 1) have a longer history of sympatry with venomous snakes, 2) are likely to encounter snakes more frequently, 3) are less able to detect or deter snakes due to group size effects, and 4) are more likely to be preyed upon by snakes. Results based on phylogenetically independent contrasts do not support the SDH. Orbital convergence shows no relationship to the shared history with venomous snakes, likelihood of encountering snakes, or group size. Moreover, those species less likely to be targeted as prey by snakes show significantly higher values of orbital convergence. Although an improved ability to detect camouflaged snakes, along with other cryptic stimuli, is likely a consequence of increased orbital convergence, this was unlikely to have been the primary selective force favoring the evolution of stereoscopic vision in primates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Why is a landscape perspective important in studies of primates?

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Rodríguez, Víctor; Fahrig, Lenore

    2014-10-01

    With accelerated deforestation and fragmentation through the tropics, assessing the impact that landscape spatial changes may have on biodiversity is paramount, as this information is required to design and implement effective management and conservation plans. Primates are expected to be particularly dependent on the landscape context; yet, our understanding on this topic is limited as the majority of primate studies are at the local scale, meaning that landscape-scale inferences are not possible. To encourage primatologists to assess the impact of landscape changes on primates, and help future studies on the topic, we describe the meaning of a "landscape perspective" and evaluate important assumptions of using such a methodological approach. We also summarize a number of important, but unanswered, questions that can be addressed using a landscape-scale study design. For example, it is still unclear if habitat loss has larger consistent negative effects on primates than habitat fragmentation per se. Furthermore, interaction effects between habitat area and other landscape effects (e.g., fragmentation) are unknown for primates. We also do not know if primates are affected by synergistic interactions among factors at the landscape scale (e.g., habitat loss and diseases, habitat loss and climate change, hunting, and land-use change), or whether landscape complexity (or landscape heterogeneity) is important for primate conservation. Testing for patterns in the responses of primates to landscape change will facilitate the development of new guidelines and principles for improving primate conservation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Sexual selection and the evolution of brain size in primates.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Michael A

    2006-12-20

    Reproductive competition among males has long been considered a powerful force in the evolution of primates. The evolution of brain size and complexity in the Order Primates has been widely regarded as the hallmark of primate evolutionary history. Despite their importance to our understanding of primate evolution, the relationship between sexual selection and the evolutionary development of brain size is not well studied. The present research examines the evolutionary relationship between brain size and two components of primate sexual selection, sperm competition and male competition for mates. Results indicate that there is not a significant relationship between relative brain size and sperm competition as measured by relative testis size in primates, suggesting sperm competition has not played an important role in the evolution of brain size in the primate order. There is, however, a significant negative evolutionary relationship between relative brain size and the level of male competition for mates. The present study shows that the largest relative brain sizes among primate species are associated with monogamous mating systems, suggesting primate monogamy may require greater social acuity and abilities of deception.

  20. The adaptive value of primate color vision for predator detection.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, Daniel Marques Almeida; Maia, Rafael; de Albuquerque Ajuz, Rafael Cavalcanti; De Moraes, Pedro Zurvaino Palmeira Melo Rosa; Spyrides, Maria Helena Constantino; Pessoa, Valdir Filgueiras

    2014-08-01

    The complex evolution of primate color vision has puzzled biologists for decades. Primates are the only eutherian mammals that evolved an enhanced capacity for discriminating colors in the green-red part of the spectrum (trichromatism). However, while Old World primates present three types of cone pigments and are routinely trichromatic, most New World primates exhibit a color vision polymorphism, characterized by the occurrence of trichromatic and dichromatic females and obligatory dichromatic males. Even though this has stimulated a prolific line of inquiry, the selective forces and relative benefits influencing color vision evolution in primates are still under debate, with current explanations focusing almost exclusively at the advantages in finding food and detecting socio-sexual signals. Here, we evaluate a previously untested possibility, the adaptive value of primate color vision for predator detection. By combining color vision modeling data on New World and Old World primates, as well as behavioral information from human subjects, we demonstrate that primates exhibiting better color discrimination (trichromats) excel those displaying poorer color visions (dichromats) at detecting carnivoran predators against the green foliage background. The distribution of color vision found in extant anthropoid primates agrees with our results, and may be explained by the advantages of trichromats and dichromats in detecting predators and insects, respectively. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Evolutionary Glycomics: Characterization of Milk Oligosaccharides in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Nannan; Wu, Shuai; Kim, Jaehan; An, Hyun Joo; Hinde, Katie; Power, Michael L.; Gagneux, Pascal; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2011-01-01

    Free oligosaccharides are abundant components of mammalian milk and have primary roles as prebiotic compounds, in immune defense, and in brain development. Mass spectrometry-based technique is applied to profile milk oligosaccharides from apes (chimpanzee, gorilla, and siamang), new world monkeys (golden lion tamarin and common marmoset), and an old world monkey (rhesus). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the patterns of primate milk oligosaccharide composition from a phylogenetic perspective in order to assess the extent to which the compositions of hMOs derives from ancestral, primate patterns as opposed to more recent evolutionary events. Milk oligosaccharides were quantitated by nanoflow liquid chromatography on chip-based devices. The relative abundances of fucosylated and sialylated milk oligosaccharides in primates were also determined. For a systematic and comprehensive study of evolutionary patterns of milk oligosaccharides, cluster analysis of primate milk was performed using the chromatographic profile. In general, the oligosaccharides in primate milk, including humans, are more complex and exhibit greater diversity compared to the ones in non-primate milk. A detailed comparison of the oligosaccharides across evolution revealed non-sequential developmental pattern, i.e. that primate milk oligosaccharides do not necessarily cluster according to the primate phylogeny. This report represents the first comprehensive and quantitative effort to profile and elucidate the structures of free milk oligosaccharides so that they can be related to glycan function in different primates. PMID:21214271

  2. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A

    2014-05-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for various primate species, and analyses of several others are underway. Whole-genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other non-human primates offer valuable insights into genetic similarities and differences among species that are used as models for disease-related research. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics, and proposes a series of goals for the near future.

  3. Comparative primate genomics: emerging patterns of genome content and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jeffrey; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Preface Advances in genome sequencing technologies have created new opportunities for comparative primate genomics. Genome assemblies have been published for several primates, with analyses of several others underway. Whole genome assemblies for the great apes provide remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved. Genomic data for macaques and other nonhuman primates provide valuable insight into genetic similarities and differences among species used as models for disease-related research. This review summarizes current knowledge regarding primate genome content and dynamics and offers a series of goals for the near future. PMID:24709753

  4. DNA replication origins in archaea

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhenfang; Liu, Jingfang; Yang, Haibo; Xiang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to a replication initiator gene. Both the ORB sequence and the adjacent initiator gene are considerably diverse among different replication origins, while in silico and genetic analyses have indicated the specificity between the initiator genes and their cognate origins. These replicator–initiator pairings are reminiscent of the oriC-dnaA system in bacteria, and a model for the negative regulation of origin activity by a downstream cluster of ORB elements has been recently proposed in haloarchaea. Moreover, comparative genomic analyses have revealed that the mosaics of replicator-initiator pairings in archaeal chromosomes originated from the integration of extrachromosomal elements. This review summarizes the research progress in understanding of archaeal replication origins with particular focus on the utilization, control and evolution of multiple replication origins in haloarchaea. PMID:24808892

  5. Replicative Aging in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Steinkraus, K.A.; Kaeberlein, M.; Kennedy, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    Progress in aging research is now rapid, and surprisingly, studies in a single-celled eukaryote are a driving force. The genetic modulators of replicative life span in yeast are being identified, the molecular events that accompany aging are being discovered, and the extent to which longevity pathways are conserved between yeast and multicellular eukaryotes is being tested. In this review, we provide a brief retrospective view on the development of yeast as a model for aging and then turn to recent discoveries that have pushed aging research into novel directions and also linked aging in yeast to well-developed hypotheses in mammals. Although the question of what causes aging still cannot be answered definitively, that day may be rapidly approaching. PMID:18616424

  6. Proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), a host membrane-deforming protein, is critical for membranous web formation in hepatitis C virus replication.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ti-Chun; Su, Wen-Chi; Huang, Jing-Ying; Chen, Yung-Chia; Jeng, King-Song; Wang, Horng-Dar; Lai, Michael M C

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reorganizes intracellular membranes to establish sites of replication. How viral and cellular proteins target, bind, and rearrange specific membranes into the replication factory remains a mystery. We used a lentivirus-based RNA interference (RNAi) screening approach to identify the potential cellular factors that are involved in HCV replication. A protein with membrane-deforming activity, proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), was identified as a potential factor. Knockdown of PSTPIP2 in HCV subgenomic replicon-harboring and HCV-infected cells was associated with the reduction of HCV protein and RNA expression. PSTPIP2 was localized predominantly in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), which contain the RNA replication complex. PSTPIP2 knockdown caused a significant reduction of the formation of HCV- and NS4B-induced membranous webs. A PSTPIP2 mutant defective in inducing membrane curvature failed to support HCV replication, confirming that the membrane-deforming ability of PSTPIP2 is essential for HCV replication. Taking these results together, we suggest that PSTPIP2 facilitates membrane alterations and is a key player in the formation of the membranous web, which is the site of the HCV replication complex.

  7. A Highly Active Isoform of Lentivirus Restriction Factor SAMHD1 in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Nicolin; Gläsker, Sabine; Sitaram, Poojitha; Hofmann, Henning; Shepard, Caitlin N; Schultz, Megan L; Kim, Baek; Landau, Nathaniel R

    2017-01-20

    The triphosphohydrolase SAMHD1 (sterile α motif and histidine-aspartate domain-containing protein 1) restricts HIV-1 replication in nondividing myeloid cells by depleting the dNTP pool, preventing reverse transcription. SAMHD1 is also reported to have ribonuclease activity that degrades the virus genomic RNA. Human SAMHD1 is regulated by phosphorylation of its carboxyl terminus at Thr-592, which abrogates its antiviral function yet has only a small effect on its phosphohydrolase activity. In the mouse, SAMHD1 is expressed as two isoforms (ISF1 and ISF2) that differ at the carboxyl terminus due to alternative splicing of the last coding exon. In this study we characterized the biochemical and antiviral properties of the two mouse isoforms of SAMHD1. Both are antiviral in nondividing cells. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that SAMHD1 is phosphorylated at several amino acid residues, one of which (Thr-634) is homologous to Thr-592. Phosphomimetic mutation at Thr-634 of ISF1 ablates its antiviral activity yet has little effect on phosphohydrolase activity in vitro dGTP caused ISF1 to tetramerize, activating its catalytic activity. In contrast, ISF2, which lacks the phosphorylation site, was significantly more active, tetramerized, and was active without added dGTP. Neither isoform nor human SAMHD1 had detectable RNase activity in vitro or affected HIV-1 genomic RNA stability in newly infected cells. These data support a model in which SAMHD1 catalytic activity is regulated through tetramer stabilization by the carboxyl-terminal tail, phosphorylation destabilizing the complexes and inactivating the enzyme. ISF2 may serve to reduce the dNTP pool to very low levels as a means of restricting virus replication.

  8. Regulation of DNA replication licensing.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2012-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication is tightly regulated to occur only once per cell cycle. DNA licensing is a mechanism to guarantee this aim; that is, licensing of replication initiation is permitted during late M phase to G1 phase. The license is canceled by the start of DNA replication. Once DNA replication begins, the license is never given until the next late M phase. The licensing corresponds to the process of assembling components of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) on the replication origin DNA. This pre-RC is the target of several different regulation systems to prevent rereplication of DNA during a single cell cycle. In this review, the regulation mechanisms mainly in mammals to control assembling components of the pre-RC will be discussed.

  9. Comparative analysis of the primate X-inactivation center region and reconstruction of the ancestral primate XIST locus

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Julie E.; Sheedy, Christina B.; Merrett, Stephanie L.; Diallo, Abdoulaye Banire; Swofford, David L.; NISC Comparative Sequencing Program; Green, Eric D.; Willard, Huntington F.

    2011-01-01

    Here we provide a detailed comparative analysis across the candidate X-Inactivation Center (XIC) region and the XIST locus in the genomes of six primates and three mammalian outgroup species. Since lemurs and other strepsirrhine primates represent the sister lineage to all other primates, this analysis focuses on lemurs to reconstruct the ancestral primate sequences and to gain insight into the evolution of this region and the genes within it. This comparative evolutionary genomics approach reveals significant expansion in genomic size across the XIC region in higher primates, with minimal size alterations across the XIST locus itself. Reconstructed primate ancestral XIC sequences show that the most dramatic changes during the past 80 million years occurred between the ancestral primate and the lineage leading to Old World monkeys. In contrast, the XIST locus compared between human and the primate ancestor does not indicate any dramatic changes to exons or XIST-specific repeats; rather, evolution of this locus reflects small incremental changes in overall sequence identity and short repeat insertions. While this comparative analysis reinforces that the region around XIST has been subject to significant genomic change, even among primates, our data suggest that evolution of the XIST sequences themselves represents only small lineage-specific changes across the past 80 million years. PMID:21518738

  10. Measles Vaccination of Nonhuman Primates Provides Partial Protection against Infection with Canine Distemper Virus

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Ludlow, Martin; Verburgh, R. Joyce; van Amerongen, Geert; Yüksel, Selma; Nguyen, D. Tien; McQuaid, Stephen; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Duprex, W. Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Measles virus (MV) is being considered for global eradication, which would likely reduce compliance with MV vaccination. As a result, children will grow up without MV-specific immunity, creating a potential niche for closely related animal morbilliviruses such as canine distemper virus (CDV). Natural CDV infection causing clinical signs has never been reported in humans, but recent outbreaks in captive macaques have shown that CDV can cause disease in primates. We studied the virulence and tropism of recombinant CDV expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein in naive and measles-vaccinated cynomolgus macaques. In naive animals CDV caused viremia and fever and predominantly infected CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells. Virus was reisolated from the upper and lower respiratory tracts, but infection of epithelial or neuronal cells was not detectable at the time points examined, and the infections were self-limiting. This demonstrates that CDV readily infects nonhuman primates but suggests that additional mutations are necessary to achieve full virulence in nonnatural hosts. Partial protection against CDV was observed in measles-vaccinated macaques, as demonstrated by accelerated control of virus replication and limited shedding from the upper respiratory tract. While neither CDV infection nor MV vaccination induced detectable cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies, MV-specific neutralizing antibody levels of MV-vaccinated macaques were boosted by CDV challenge infection, suggesting that cross-reactive VN epitopes exist. Rapid increases in white blood cell counts in MV-vaccinated macaques following CDV challenge suggested that cross-reactive cellular immune responses were also present. This study demonstrates that zoonotic morbillivirus infections can be controlled by measles vaccination. IMPORTANCE Throughout history viral zoonoses have had a substantial impact on human health. Given the drive toward global eradication of measles, it is essential to

  11. Diurnality, nocturnality, and the evolution of primate visual systems.

    PubMed

    Ankel-Simons, F; Rasmussen, D T

    2008-01-01

    Much of the recent research on the evolution of primate visual systems has assumed that a minimum number of shifts have occurred in circadian activity patterns over the course of primate evolution. The evolutionary origins of key higher taxonomic groups have been interpreted by some researchers as a consequence of a rare shift from nocturnality to diurnality (e.g., Anthropoidea) or from diurnality to nocturnality (e.g., Tarsiidae). Interpreting the evolution of primate visual systems with an ecological approach without parsimony constraints suggests that the evolutionary transitions in activity pattern are more common than what would be allowed by parsimony models, and that such transitions are probably less important in the origin of higher level taxa. The analysis of 17 communities of primates distributed widely around the world and through geological time shows that primate communities consistently contain both nocturnal and diurnal forms, regardless of the taxonomic sources of the communities. This suggests that primates in a community will adapt their circadian pattern to fill empty diurnal or nocturnal niches. Several evolutionary transitions from one pattern to the other within narrow taxonomic groups are solidly documented, and these cases probably represent a small fraction of such transitions throughout the Cenozoic. One or more switches have been documented among platyrrhine monkeys, Malagasy prosimians, Eocene omomyids, Eocene adapoids, and early African anthropoids, with inconclusive but suggestive data within tarsiids. The interpretation of living and extinct primates as fitting into one of two diarhythmic categories is itself problematic, because many extant primates show significant behavioral activity both nocturnally and diurnally. Parsimony models routinely interpret ancestral primates to have been nocturnal, but analyses of morphological and genetic data indicate that they may have been diurnal, or that early primate radiations were likely to

  12. Primate malarias: Diversity, distribution and insights for zoonotic Plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Faust, Christina; Dobson, Andrew P

    2015-12-01

    Protozoans within the genus Plasmodium are well-known as the causative agents of malaria in humans. Numerous Plasmodium species parasites also infect a wide range of non-human primate hosts in tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide. Studying this diversity can provide critical insight into our understanding of human malarias, as several human malaria species are a result of host switches from non-human primates. Current spillover of a monkey malaria, Plasmodium knowlesi, in Southeast Asia highlights the permeability of species barriers in Plasmodium. Also recently, surveys of apes in Africa uncovered a previously undescribed diversity of Plasmodium in chimpanzees and gorillas. Therefore, we carried out a meta-analysis to quantify the global distribution, host range, and diversity of known non-human primate malaria species. We used published records of Plasmodium parasites found in non-human primates to estimate the total diversity of non-human primate malarias globally. We estimate that at least three undescribed primate malaria species exist in sampled primates, and many more likely exist in unstudied species. The diversity of malaria parasites is especially uncertain in regions of low sampling such as Madagascar, and taxonomic groups such as African Old World Monkeys and gibbons. Presence-absence data of malaria across primates enables us to highlight the close association of forested regions and non-human primate malarias. This distribution potentially reflects a long coevolution of primates, forest-adapted mosquitoes, and malaria parasites. The diversity and distribution of primate malaria are an essential prerequisite to understanding the mechanisms and circumstances that allow Plasmodium to jump species barriers, both in the evolution of malaria parasites and current cases of spillover into humans.

  13. Plant virus replication and movement.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-05-01

    Replication and intercellular spread of viruses depend on host mechanisms supporting the formation, transport and turnover of functional complexes between viral genomes, virus-encoded products and cellular factors. To enhance these processes, viruses assemble and replicate in membrane-associated complexes that may develop into "virus factories" or "viroplasms" in which viral components and host factors required for replication are concentrated. Many plant viruses replicate in association with the cortical ER-actin network that is continuous between cells through plasmodesmata. The replication complexes can be highly organized and supported by network interactions between the viral genome and the virus-encoded proteins. Intracellular PD targeting of replication complexes links the process of movement to replication and provides specificity for transport of the viral genome by the virus-encoded movement proteins. The formation and trafficking of replication complexes and also the development and anchorage of replication factories involves important roles of the cortical cytoskeleton and associated motor proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms of Theta Plasmid Replication.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Joshua; Camps, Manel

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are autonomously replicating pieces of DNA. This article discusses theta plasmid replication, which is a class of circular plasmid replication that includes ColE1-like origins of replication popular with expression vectors. All modalities of theta plasmid replication initiate synthesis with the leading strand at a predetermined site and complete replication through recruitment of the host's replisome, which extends the leading strand continuously while synthesizing the lagging strand discontinuously. There are clear differences between different modalities of theta plasmid replication in mechanisms of DNA duplex melting and in priming of leading- and lagging-strand synthesis. In some replicons duplex melting depends on transcription, while other replicons rely on plasmid-encoded trans-acting proteins (Reps); primers for leading-strand synthesis can be generated through processing of a transcript or in other replicons by the action of host- or plasmid-encoded primases. None of these processes require DNA breaks. The frequency of replication initiation is tightly regulated to facilitate establishment in permissive hosts and to achieve a steady state. The last section of the article reviews how plasmid copy number is sensed and how this feedback modulates the frequency of replication.

  15. Solving the Telomere Replication Problem

    PubMed Central

    Maestroni, Laetitia; Matmati, Samah; Coulon, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are complex nucleoprotein structures that protect the extremities of linear chromosomes. Telomere replication is a major challenge because many obstacles to the progression of the replication fork are concentrated at the ends of the chromosomes. This is known as the telomere replication problem. In this article, different and new aspects of telomere replication, that can threaten the integrity of telomeres, will be reviewed. In particular, we will focus on the functions of shelterin and the replisome for the preservation of telomere integrity. PMID:28146113

  16. Chromatin dynamics during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ziv, Raz; Voichek, Yoav; Barkai, Naama

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin is composed of DNA and histones, which provide a unified platform for regulating DNA-related processes, mostly through their post-translational modification. During DNA replication, histone arrangement is perturbed, first to allow progression of DNA polymerase and then during repackaging of the replicated DNA. To study how DNA replication influences the pattern of histone modification, we followed the cell-cycle dynamics of 10 histone marks in budding yeast. We find that histones deposited on newly replicated DNA are modified at different rates: While some marks appear immediately upon replication (e.g., H4K16ac, H3K4me1), others increase with transcription-dependent delays (e.g., H3K4me3, H3K36me3). Notably, H3K9ac was deposited as a wave preceding the replication fork by ∼5–6 kb. This replication-guided H3K9ac was fully dependent on the acetyltransferase Rtt109, while expression-guided H3K9ac was deposited by Gcn5. Further, topoisomerase depletion intensified H3K9ac in front of the replication fork and in sites where RNA polymerase II was trapped, suggesting supercoiling stresses trigger H3K9 acetylation. Our results assign complementary roles for DNA replication and gene expression in defining the pattern of histone modification. PMID:27225843

  17. Break-Induced DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ranjith P.; Lovett, Susan T.; Haber, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Recombination-dependent DNA replication, often called break-induced replication (BIR), was initially invoked to explain recombination events in bacteriophage but it has recently been recognized as a fundamentally important mechanism to repair double-strand chromosome breaks in eukaryotes. This mechanism appears to be critically important in the restarting of stalled and broken replication forks and in maintaining the integrity of eroded telomeres. Although BIR helps preserve genome integrity during replication, it also promotes genome instability by the production of loss of heterozygosity and the formation of nonreciprocal translocations, as well as in the generation of complex chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:23881940

  18. Why Primates? The Importance of Nonhuman Primates for Understanding Human Infancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Daniel J.; Santos, Laurie R.

    2006-01-01

    We introduce the thematic collection by noting some striking similarities in the cognitive abilities of human infants and nonhuman primates. What are the implications of these similarities for our comprehension of human infant cognition? After providing a brief historical and conceptual background on comparative behavioral research, we discuss how…

  19. Replication patterns and organization of replication forks in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Stokke, Caroline; Waldminghaus, Torsten; Skarstad, Kirsten

    2011-03-01

    We have investigated the replication patterns of the two chromosomes of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae grown in four different media. By combining flow cytometry and quantitative real-time PCR with computer simulations, we show that in rich media, V. cholerae cells grow with overlapping replication cycles of both the large chromosome (ChrI) and the small chromosome (ChrII). In Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, initiation occurs at four copies of the ChrI origin and two copies of the ChrII origin. Replication of ChrII was found to occur at the end of the ChrI replication period in all four growth conditions. Novel cell-sorting experiments with marker frequency analysis support these conclusions. Incubation with protein synthesis inhibitors indicated that the potential for initiation of replication of ChrII was present at the same time as that of ChrI, but was actively delayed until much of ChrI was replicated. Investigations of the localization of SeqA bound to new DNA at replication forks indicated that the forks were co-localized in pairs when cells grew without overlapping replication cycles and in higher-order structures during more rapid growth. The increased degree of fork organization during rapid growth may be a means by which correct segregation of daughter molecules is facilitated.

  20. Hibernation in a primate: does sleep occur?

    PubMed Central

    Dausmann, Kathrin H.; Faherty, Sheena L.; Klopfer, Peter; Krystal, Andrew D.; Schopler, Robert; Yoder, Anne D.

    2016-01-01

    During hibernation, critical physiological processes are downregulated and thermogenically induced arousals are presumably needed periodically to fulfil those physiological demands. Among the processes incompatible with a hypome tabolic state is sleep. However, one hibernating primate, the dwarf lemur Cheirogaleus medius, experiences rapid eye movement (REM)-like states during hibernation, whenever passively reaching temperatures above 30°C, as occurs when it hibernates in poorly insulated tree hollows under tropical conditions. Here, we report electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, temperature data and metabolic rates from two related species (C. crossleyi and C. sibreei), inhabiting high-altitude rainforests and hibernating underground, conditions that mirror, to some extent, those experienced by temperate hibernators. We compared the physiology of hibernation and spontaneous arousals in these animals to C. medius, as well as the much more distantly related non-primate hibernators, such as Arctic, golden-mantled and European ground squirrels. We observed a number of commonalities with non-primate temperate hibernators including: (i) monotonous ultra-low voltage EEG during torpor bouts in these relatively cold-weather hibernators, (ii) the absence of sleep during torpor bouts, (iii) the occurrence of spontaneous arousals out of torpor, during which sleep regularly occurred, (iv) relatively high early EEG non-REM during the arousal, and (v) a gradual transition to the torpid EEG state from non-REM sleep. Unlike C. medius, our study species did not display sleep-like states during torpor bouts, but instead exclusively exhibited them during arousals. During these short euthermic periods, non-REM as well as REM sleep-like stages were observed. Differences observed between these two species and their close relative, C. medius, for which data have been published, presumably reflect differences in hibernaculum temperature. PMID:27853604

  1. The asymmetry of telomere replication contributes to replicative senescence heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeron, Thibault; Xu, Zhou; Doumic, Marie; Teresa Teixeira, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the absence of telomerase results in telomere shortening, eventually leading to replicative senescence, an arrested state that prevents further cell divisions. While replicative senescence is mainly controlled by telomere length, the heterogeneity of its onset is not well understood. This study proposes a mathematical model based on the molecular mechanisms of telomere replication and shortening to decipher the causes of this heterogeneity. Using simulations fitted on experimental data obtained from individual lineages of senescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, we decompose the sources of senescence heterogeneity into interclonal and intraclonal components, and show that the latter is based on the asymmetry of the telomere replication mechanism. We also evidence telomere rank-switching events with distinct frequencies in short-lived versus long-lived lineages, revealing that telomere shortening dynamics display important variations. Thus, the intrinsic heterogeneity of replicative senescence and its consequences find their roots in the asymmetric structure of telomeres. PMID:26468778

  2. Earliest known simian primate found in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Godinot, M; Mahboubi, M

    1992-05-28

    The record of early fossil Simiiformes (Anthropoidea) from the Late Eocene and Early Oligocene of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula has increased dramatically in recent years. We report here the discovery of a new, diminutive and much older (Early or Middle Eocene) simian from an Algerian locality, Glib Zegdou. This species is smaller than any other living or fossil African simiiform. Derived similarities shared with Aegyptopithecus suggest that the new genus is more closely related to propliopithecines than to oligopithecines, implying that these two subfamilies differentiated during the Early Eocene. The new discovery confirms predictions about the great antiquity of Simiiformes and emphasizes a long and endemic African history for higher primates.

  3. Biorhythms and space experiments with nonhuman primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Man's response to exposure to spaceflight and weightlessness is expressed in physiological adjustments which involve his health and ability to function. The amplitude and periodicity of fluctuations in biological processes affect various functions and responses to provocative stimuli. Primates and other species are subjected to tests to determine the consequences of an altered biorhythm on work and performance, emotional stability, biomedical evaluation in space, the ability to cope with the unexpected, and susceptibility to infection, toxicity, radiation, drugs, and stress. Factors in the environment or operational setup which can change the physiological baseline must be determined and controlled.

  4. Embryonic stem cell lines of nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Norio; Suemori, Hirofumi

    2002-06-26

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines have opened great potential and expectation for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Monkey and human ES cell lines, which are very similar to each other, have been established from monkey blastocysts and surplus human blastocysts from fertility clinics. Nonhuman primate ES cell lines provide important research tools for basic and applicative research. Firstly, they provide wider aspects of investigation of the regulative mechanisms of stem cells and cell differentiation among primate species. Secondly, their usage does not need clearance or permission from the regulative rules in many countries that are associated with the ethical aspects of human ES cells, although human and nonhuman embryos and fetuses are very similar to each other. Lastly and most importantly, they are indispensable for animal models of cell therapy to test effectiveness, safety, and immunological reaction of the allogenic transplantation in a setting similar to the treatment of human diseases. So far, ES cell lines have been established from rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), using blastocysts produced naturally or by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). These cell lines seem to have very similar characteristics. They express alkaline phosphatase activity and stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 and, in most cases, SSEA-3. Their pluripotency was confirmed by the formation of embryoid bodies and differentiation into various cell types in culture and also by the formation of teratomas that contained many types of differentiated tissues including derivatives of three germ layers after transplantation into the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. The noneffectiveness of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signal makes culture of primate and human ES cell lines prone to undergo spontaneous differentiation and thus it is

  5. Biorhythms and space experiments with nonhuman primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.

    1977-01-01

    Man's response to exposure to spaceflight and weightlessness is expressed in physiological adjustments which involve his health and ability to function. The amplitude and periodicity of fluctuations in biological processes affect various functions and responses to provocative stimuli. Primates and other species are subjected to tests to determine the consequences of an altered biorhythm on work and performance, emotional stability, biomedical evaluation in space, the ability to cope with the unexpected, and susceptibility to infection, toxicity, radiation, drugs, and stress. Factors in the environment or operational setup which can change the physiological baseline must be determined and controlled.

  6. Two Influential Primate Classifications Logically Aligned

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Nico M.; Pier, Naomi M.; Reeder, Deeann M.; Chen, Mingmin; Yu, Shizhuo; Kianmajd, Parisa; Bowers, Shawn; Ludäscher, Bertram

    2016-01-01

    Classifications and phylogenies of perceived natural entities change in the light of new evidence. Taxonomic changes, translated into Code-compliant names, frequently lead to name:meaning dissociations across succeeding treatments. Classification standards such as the Mammal Species of the World (MSW) may experience significant levels of taxonomic change from one edition to the next, with potential costs to long-term, large-scale information integration. This circumstance challenges the biodiversity and phylogenetic data communities to express taxonomic congruence and incongruence in ways that both humans and machines can process, that is, to logically represent taxonomic alignments across multiple classifications. We demonstrate that such alignments are feasible for two classifications of primates corresponding to the second and third MSW editions. Our approach has three main components: (i) use of taxonomic concept labels, that is name sec. author (where sec. means according to), to assemble each concept hierarchy separately via parent/child relationships; (ii) articulation of select concepts across the two hierarchies with user-provided Region Connection Calculus (RCC-5) relationships; and (iii) the use of an Answer Set Programming toolkit to infer and visualize logically consistent alignments of these input constraints. Our use case entails the Primates sec. Groves (1993; MSW2–317 taxonomic concepts; 233 at the species level) and Primates sec. Groves (2005; MSW3–483 taxonomic concepts; 376 at the species level). Using 402 RCC-5 input articulations, the reasoning process yields a single, consistent alignment and 153,111 Maximally Informative Relations that constitute a comprehensive meaning resolution map for every concept pair in the Primates sec. MSW2/MSW3. The complete alignment, and various partitions thereof, facilitate quantitative analyses of name:meaning dissociation, revealing that nearly one in three taxonomic names are not reliable across

  7. Non-Human Primate Models of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Peña, Juliet C; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2016-08-01

    Among the animal models of tuberculosis (TB), the non-human primates, particularly rhesus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and cynomolgus macaques (Macaca mulatta), share the greatest anatomical and physiological similarities with humans. Macaques are highly susceptible to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and manifest the complete spectrum of clinical and pathological manifestations of TB as seen in humans. Therefore, the macaque models have been used extensively for investigating the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis infection and for preclinical testing of drugs and vaccines against TB. This review focuses on published major studies that exemplify how the rhesus and cynomolgus macaques have enhanced and may continue to advance global efforts in TB research.

  8. Primates, Provisioning and Plants: Impacts of Human Cultural Behaviours on Primate Ecological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Asmita; McConkey, Kim R.; Radhakrishna, Sindhu

    2015-01-01

    Human provisioning of wildlife with food is a widespread global practice that occurs in multiple socio-cultural circumstances. Provisioning may indirectly alter ecosystem functioning through changes in the eco-ethology of animals, but few studies have quantified this aspect. Provisioning of primates by humans is known to impact their activity budgets, diets and ranging patterns. Primates are also keystone species in tropical forests through their role as seed dispersers; yet there is no information on how provisioning might affect primate ecological functions. The rhesus macaque is a major human-commensal species but is also an important seed disperser in the wild. In this study, we investigated the potential impacts of provisioning on the role of rhesus macaques as seed dispersers in the Buxa Tiger Reserve, India. We studied a troop of macaques which were provisioned for a part of the year and were dependent on natural resources for the rest. We observed feeding behaviour, seed handling techniques and ranging patterns of the macaques and monitored availability of wild fruits. Irrespective of fruit availability, frugivory and seed dispersal activities decreased when the macaques were provisioned. Provisioned macaques also had shortened daily ranges implying shorter dispersal distances. Finally, during provisioning periods, seeds were deposited on tarmac roads that were unconducive for germination. Provisioning promotes human-primate conflict, as commensal primates are often involved in aggressive encounters with humans over resources, leading to negative consequences for both parties involved. Preventing or curbing provisioning is not an easy task as feeding wild animals is a socio-cultural tradition across much of South and South-East Asia, including India. We recommend the initiation of literacy programmes that educate lay citizens about the ill-effects of provisioning and strongly caution them against the practice. PMID:26536365

  9. Ease of articulation: A replication.

    PubMed

    Shuster, Linda I; Cottrill, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Researchers, as well as the lay public and the popular press, have become increasingly concerned about the lack of reproducibility of research findings. Despite this concern, research has shown that replications of previously published work comprise a very small proportion of published studies. Moreover, there are fewer published direct replications of research studies by independent investigators, and this type of replication is much less likely to confirm the results of the original research than are replications by the original investigator or conceptual replications. A search of the communication disorders research literature reveals that direct replications by independent investigators are virtually non-existent. The purpose of this project was to describe the major issues related to research reproducibility and report the results of a direct replication of a study by Locke (1972) regarding ease of articulation. Two methods for rating ease of articulation were employed. We were able to reproduce the results of the original study for the first method, obtaining a moderate positive correlation between our rankings of phoneme difficulty and Locke's rankings. We obtained a very high positive correlation between our phoneme rankings and rankings obtained in the original study for the second method. Moreover, we found a higher correlation between difficulty rankings and order of speech sound acquisition for American English than was found in the original study. Direct replication is not necessary for all studies in communication disorders, but should be considered for high impact studies, treatment studies, and those that provide data to support models and theories. The reader will be able to: (1) describe the major concerns related to the replicability of research findings; (2) describe the status of research replications in communication disorders; (3) describe how ease of articulation may relate to the order of speech sound acquisition in children; (4) list some

  10. Rapid mold replication

    SciTech Connect

    Heestand, G.M.; Beeler, R.G. Jr.; Brown, D.L.

    1995-06-01

    The desire to reduce tooling costs have driven manufacturers to investigate new manufacturing methods and materials. In the plastics injection molding industry replicating molds to meet production needs is time consuming (up to 6 months) and costly in terms of lost business. We have recently completed a feasibility study demonstrating the capability of high rate Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EBPVD) in producing mold inserts in days, not months. In the current practice a graphite mandrel, in the shape of the insert`s negative image, was exposed to a jet of metal vapor atoms emanating from an electron beam heated source of an aluminum-bronze alloy. The condensation rate of the metal atoms on the mandrel was sufficient to allow the deposit to grow at over 30 {mu}m/min or 1.2 mils per minute. The vaporization process continued for approximately 14 hours after which the mandrel and deposit were removed from the EBPVD vacuum chamber. The mandrel and condensate were easily separated resulting in a fully dense aluminum-bronze mold insert about 2.5 cm or one inch thick. This mold was subsequently cleaned and drilled for water cooling passages and mounted on a fixture for operation in an actual injection molding machine. Results of the mold`s operation were extremely successful showing great promise for this technique. This paper describes the EBPVD feasibility demonstration in more detail and discusses future development work needed to bring this technique into practice.

  11. Analysis of viroid replication.

    PubMed

    Flores, Ricardo; Gas, Marída-Eugenia; Molina, Diego; Hernández, Carmen; Darós, José-Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Viroids, as a consequence of not encoding any protein, are extremely dependent on their hosts. Replication of these minimal genomes, composed exclusively by a circular RNA of 246-401 nt, occurs in the nucleus (family Pospiviroidae) or in the chloroplast (family Avsunviroidae) by an RNA-based rolling-circle mechanism with three steps: (1) synthesis of longer-than-unit strands catalyzed by host DNA-dependent RNA polymerases recruited and redirected to transcribe RNA templates, (2) cleavage to unit-length, which in family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, and (3) circularization through an RNA ligase or autocatalytically. This consistent but still fragmentary picture has emerged from a combination of studies with in vitro systems (analysis of RNA preparations from infected plants, transcription assays with nuclear and chloroplastic fractions, characterization of enzymes and ribozymes mediating cleavage and ligation of viroid strands, dissection of 5' terminal groups of viroid strands, and in situ hybridization and microscopy of subcellular fractions and tissues), and in vivo systems (tissue infiltration studies, protoplasts, studies in planta and use of transgenic plants expressing viroid RNAs).

  12. Ultima Replicated Optics Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James; Engelhaupt, Darell

    1997-01-01

    Designs are reviewed incorporating processes suitable for replication of precision spherical segments of very large (greater than 20 meter diameter) telescopes combining ultra-lightweight and high precision. These designs must be amenable to assembly and alignment after deployment . The methods considered lie outside the present scope of fabrication, deployment and alignment considered to date. Design guidelines for reducing the weight and low frequency resonance in low G environment were given by The Serius Group, Dr. Glenn Zeiders, and are considered baseline for this activity. The goal of a rigid design of 10 Kg/sq M is being persued for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and is not likely adequate for advanced efforts. Flexures have been considered for maintaining the figure of many lightweight structures by control loop processes. This adds to the complexity and weight to the extent that it becomes difficult to recover the benefits. Two fabrication guidelines lead to a stiffer and concurrently lighter structure. First the use of thin vertical wall triangular structural reinforcements to increase the resistance to bending is preferred over hexagonal or square similar sections. Secondly, the incorporation of a similar back sheet on a cellular structure markedly improves the geometric stiffness. Neither improves the short range stiffness. Also often overlooked is that selected material properties must include high microyield and low hysteresis in addition to high elastic modulus to weight (stiffness). The fabrication steps can easily exceed the strain requirement.

  13. Demand for nonhuman primate resources in the age of biodefense.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jean L; Carrion, Richardo

    2005-01-01

    The demand for nonhuman primates will undoubtedly increase to meet biomedical needs in this current age of biodefense. The availability of funding has increased the research on select agents and has created a requirement to validate results in relevant primate models. This review provides a description of current and potential biological threats that are likely to require nonhuman primates for the development of vaccines and therapeutics. Primates have been an invaluable resource in the dissection of viral disease pathogenesis as well as in testing vaccine efficacy. DNA vaccine approaches have been studied successfully for Ebola, Lassa, and anthrax in nonhuman primate models. Nonhuman primate research with monkeypox has provided insight into the role of cytokines in limiting disease severity. Biodefense research that has focused on select agents of bacterial origin has also benefited from nonhuman primate studies. Rhesus macaques have traditionally been the model of choice for anthrax research and have yielded successful findings in vaccine development. In plague research, African green monkeys have contributed to vaccine development. However, the disadvantages of current vaccines will undoubtedly require the generation of new vaccines, thus increasing the need for nonhuman primate research. Unfortunately, the current biosafety level (BSL)-3 and BSL-4 facilities equipped to perform this research are limited, which may ultimately impede progress in this era of biodefense.

  14. 76 FR 13120 - Requirements for Importers of Nonhuman Primates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... (42 CFR 71.53) for the importation of live nonhuman primates (NHPs). Written comments were to be... the imporation of live nonhuman primates (NHPs) by extending existing requirements for the importation of Macaca fascicularis (cyanmologus), Chlororcebus aethlops (African green) and Macaca...

  15. Developmental processes and canine dimorphism in primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Gary T; Miller, Ellen R; Gunnell, Gregg F

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the evolutionary history of canine sexual dimorphism is important for interpreting the developmental biology, socioecology and phylogenetic position of primates. All current evidence for extant primates indicates that canine dimorphism is achieved through bimaturism rather than via differences in rates of crown formation time. Using incremental growth lines, we charted the ontogeny of canine formation within species of Eocene Cantius, the earliest known canine-dimorphic primate, to test whether canine dimorphism via bimaturism was developmentally canalized early in primate evolution. Our results show that canine dimorphism in Cantius is achieved primarily through different rates of crown formation in males and females, not bimaturism. This is the first demonstration of rate differences resulting in canine dimorphism in any primate and therefore suggests that canine dimorphism is not developmentally homologous across Primates. The most likely interpretation is that canine dimorphism has been selected for at least twice during the course of primate evolution. The power of this approach is its ability to identify underlying developmental processes behind patterns of morphological similarity, even in long-extinct primate species.

  16. Lagomorphs (rabbits, pikas and hares) do not use telomere-directed replicative aging in vitro.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Nicholas R; Elder, Frederick F B; Shay, Jerry W; Wright, Woodring E

    2005-01-01

    Telomere shortening is used for replicative aging in primates and ungulates but not rodents. We examined telomere biology in rabbits to expand the comparative biology of telomere-directed replicative senescence within mammals. The order Lagomorpha consists of two families; Leporidae and Ochotonidae. We examined telomere biology in species representing three leporid genera (European White Rabbit, Black-tailed Jack Rabbit, and Swamp Rabbit) and the monotypic ochotonid genus (North American Pika). Of the leporids one species was a laboratory strain and the others were wild caught. The leporids neither exhibited cellular senescence after sustained periods in culture nor displayed detectable telomerase activity. Continued culture was possible because of their extremely long telomeric arrays. Immunofluorescence showed robust telomere signals at chromosome ends and significant internal chromosomal staining in some instances. Pika was unique in displaying endogenous telomerase activity throughout time in culture. These results show that it is unlikely that lagomorphs use telomere shortening and replicative senescence as a tumor protective mechanism.

  17. Viroporin potential of the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP) domains of the HIV-1 gp41 protein

    PubMed Central

    Costin, Joshua M; Rausch, Joshua M; Garry, Robert F; Wimley, William C

    2007-01-01

    Background Mechanisms by which HIV-1 mediates reductions in CD4+ cell levels in infected persons are being intensely investigated, and have broad implications for AIDS drug and vaccine development. Virally induced changes in membrane ionic permeability induced by lytic viruses of many families contribute to cytopathogenesis. HIV-1 induces disturbances in plasma membrane ion transport. The carboxyl terminus of TM (gp41) contains potential amphipathic α-helical motifs identified through their structural similarities to naturally occurring cytolytic peptides. These sequences have been dubbed lentiviral lytic peptides (LLP) -1, -2, and -3. Results Peptides corresponding to the LLP domains (from a clade B virus) partition into lipid membranes, fold into α-helices and disrupt model membrane permeability. A peptide corresponding to the LLP-1 domain of a clade D HIV-1 virus, LLP-1D displayed similar activity to the LLP-1 domain of the clade B virus in all assays, despite a lack of amino acid sequence identity. Conclusion These results suggest that the C-terminal domains of HIV-1 Env proteins may form an ion channel, or viroporin. Increased understanding of the function of LLP domains and their role in the viral replication cycle could allow for the development of novel HIV drugs. PMID:18028545

  18. Self-Inactivating Lentivirus Vector for Safe and Efficient In Vivo Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zufferey, Romain; Dull, Thomas; Mandel, Ronald J.; Bukovsky, Anatoly; Quiroz, Dulce; Naldini, Luigi; Trono, Didier

    1998-01-01

    In vivo transduction of nondividing cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based vectors results in transgene expression that is stable over several months. However, the use of HIV-1 vectors raises concerns about their safety. Here we describe a self-inactivating HIV-1 vector with a 400-nucleotide deletion in the 3′ long terminal repeat (LTR). The deletion, which includes the TATA box, abolished the LTR promoter activity but did not affect vector titers or transgene expression in vitro. The self-inactivating vector transduced neurons in vivo as efficiently as a vector with full-length LTRs. The inactivation design achieved in this work improves significantly the biosafety of HIV-derived vectors, as it reduces the likelihood that replication-competent retroviruses will originate in the vector producer and target cells, and hampers recombination with wild-type HIV in an infected host. Moreover, it improves the potential performance of the vector by removing LTR sequences previously associated with transcriptional interference and suppression in vivo and by allowing the construction of more-stringent tissue-specific or regulatable vectors. PMID:9811723

  19. Archaeology of Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Kira S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the characterization of the archaeal DNA replication system together with comparative genomic analysis have led to the identification of several previously uncharacterized archaeal proteins involved in replication and currently reveal a nearly complete correspondence between the components of the archaeal and eukaryotic replication machineries. It can be inferred that the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes and even the last common ancestor of all extant archaea possessed replication machineries that were comparable in complexity to the eukaryotic replication system. The eukaryotic replication system encompasses multiple paralogs of ancestral components such that heteromeric complexes in eukaryotes replace archaeal homomeric complexes, apparently along with subfunctionalization of the eukaryotic complex subunits. In the archaea, parallel, lineage-specific duplications of many genes encoding replication machinery components are detectable as well; most of these archaeal paralogs remain to be functionally characterized. The archaeal replication system shows remarkable plasticity whereby even some essential components such as DNA polymerase and single-stranded DNA-binding protein are displaced by unrelated proteins with analogous activities in some lineages. PMID:23881942

  20. The outer subventricular zone and primate-specific cortical complexification.

    PubMed

    Dehay, Colette; Kennedy, Henry; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2015-02-18

    Evolutionary expansion and complexification of the primate cerebral cortex are largely linked to the emergence of the outer subventricular zone (OSVZ), a uniquely structured germinal zone that generates the expanded primate supragranular layers. The primate OSVZ departs from rodent germinal zones in that it includes a higher diversity of precursor types, inter-related in bidirectional non-hierarchical lineages. In addition, primate-specific regulatory mechanisms are operating in primate cortical precursors via the occurrence of novel miRNAs. Here, we propose that the origin and evolutionary importance of the OSVZ is related to genetic changes in multiple regulatory loops and that cell-cycle regulation is a favored target for evolutionary adaptation of the cortex.

  1. What Cognitive Representations Support Primate Theory of Mind?

    PubMed

    Martin, Alia; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-05-01

    Much recent work has examined the evolutionary origins of human mental state representations. This work has yielded strikingly consistent results: primates show a sophisticated ability to track the current and past perceptions of others, but they fail to represent the beliefs of others. We offer a new account of the nuanced performance of primates in theory of mind (ToM) tasks. We argue that primates form awareness relations tracking the aspects of reality that other agents are aware of. We contend that these awareness relations allow primates to make accurate predictions in social situations, but that this capacity falls short of our human-like representational ToM. We end by explaining how this new account makes important new empirical predictions about primate ToM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    SciTech Connect

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham; Wells, Greg; Barna, Barbara P.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and the PPAR{gamma}-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPAR{gamma}. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPAR{gamma} plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPAR{gamma} or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by

  3. Regulating DNA Replication in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Maria de la Paz; Costas, Celina; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication in plants has requirements and constraints similar to those in other eukaryotes. However, some aspects are plant-specific. Studies of DNA replication control in plants, which have unique developmental strategies, can offer unparalleled opportunities of comparing regulatory processes with yeast and, particularly, metazoa to identify common trends and basic rules. In addition to the comparative molecular and biochemical studies, genomic studies in plants that started with Arabidopsis thaliana in the year 2000 have now expanded to several dozens of species. This, together with the applicability of genomic approaches and the availability of a large collection of mutants, underscores the enormous potential to study DNA replication control in a whole developing organism. Recent advances in this field with particular focus on the DNA replication proteins, the nature of replication origins and their epigenetic landscape, and the control of endoreplication will be reviewed. PMID:23209151

  4. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifazi, F.; Carbone, A.; Perez, E. D.; D'Apice, A.; dell'Agnello, L.; Duellmann, D.; Girone, M.; Re, G. L.; Martelli, B.; Peco, G.; Ricci, P. P.; Sapunenko, V.; Vagnoni, V.; Vitlacil, D.

    2008-07-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  5. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host-microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important

  6. Primate vaginal microbiomes exhibit species specificity without universal Lactobacillus dominance

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Suleyman; Yeoman, Carl J; Janga, Sarath Chandra; Thomas, Susan M; Ho, Mengfei; Leigh, Steven R; Consortium, Primate Microbiome; White, Bryan A; Wilson, Brenda A; Stumpf, Rebecca M

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial communities colonizing the reproductive tracts of primates (including humans) impact the health, survival and fitness of the host, and thereby the evolution of the host species. Despite their importance, we currently have a poor understanding of primate microbiomes. The composition and structure of microbial communities vary considerably depending on the host and environmental factors. We conducted comparative analyses of the primate vaginal microbiome using pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA genes of a phylogenetically broad range of primates to test for factors affecting the diversity of primate vaginal ecosystems. The nine primate species included: humans (Homo sapiens), yellow baboons (Papio cynocephalus), olive baboons (Papio anubis), lemurs (Propithecus diadema), howler monkeys (Alouatta pigra), red colobus (Piliocolobus rufomitratus), vervets (Chlorocebus aethiops), mangabeys (Cercocebus atys) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Our results indicated that all primates exhibited host-specific vaginal microbiota and that humans were distinct from other primates in both microbiome composition and diversity. In contrast to the gut microbiome, the vaginal microbiome showed limited congruence with host phylogeny, and neither captivity nor diet elicited substantial effects on the vaginal microbiomes of primates. Permutational multivariate analysis of variance and Wilcoxon tests revealed correlations among vaginal microbiota and host species-specific socioecological factors, particularly related to sexuality, including: female promiscuity, baculum length, gestation time, mating group size and neonatal birth weight. The proportion of unclassified taxa observed in nonhuman primate samples increased with phylogenetic distance from humans, indicative of the existence of previously unrecognized microbial taxa. These findings contribute to our understanding of host–microbe variation and coevolution, microbial biogeography, and disease risk, and have important

  7. Lentivirus Gene Transfer in Murine Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Is Compromised by a Delay in Proviral Integration and Results in Transduction Mosaicism and Heterogeneous Gene Expression in Progeny Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mikkola, Hanna; Woods, Niels-Bjarne; Sjögren, Marketa; Helgadottir, Hildur; Hamaguchi, Isao; Jacobsen, Sten-Eirik; Trono, Didier; Karlsson, Stefan

    2000-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-based lentivirus vectors containing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene were used to transduce murine Lin− c-kit+ Sca1+ primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells. Following transduction, the cells were plated into hematopoietic progenitor cell assays in methylcellulose and the colonies were scored for GFP positivity. After incubation for 20 h, lentivirus vectors transduced 27.3% ± 6.7% of the colonies derived from unstimulated target cells, but transduction was more efficient when the cells were supported with stem cell factor (SCF) alone (42.0% ± 5.5%) or SCF, interleukin-3 (IL-3), and IL-6 (53.3 ± 1.8%) during transduction. The, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped MGIN oncoretrovirus control vector required IL-3, IL-6, and SCF for significant transduction (39.3 ± 9.4%). Interestingly, only a portion of the progeny cells within the lentivirus-transduced methylcellulose colonies expressed GFP, in contrast to the homogeneous expression in oncoretrovirus-transduced colonies. Secondary plating of the primary GFP+ lentivirus vector-transduced colonies revealed vector PCR+ GFP+ (42%), vector PCR− GFP− (46%), and vector PCR+ GFP− (13%) secondary colonies, indicating true genetic mosaicism with respect to the viral genome in the progeny cells. The degree of vector mosaicism in individual colonies could be reduced by extending the culture time after transduction and before plating into the clonal progenitor cell assay, indicating a delay in the lentiviral integration process. Furthermore, supplementation with exogenous deoxynucleoside triphosphates during transduction decreased mosaicism within the colonies. Although cytokine stimulation during transduction correlates with higher transduction efficiency, rapid cell division after transduction may result in loss of the viral genome in the progeny cells. Therefore, optimal transduction may require activation without promoting intense cell proliferation prior

  8. Chemical carcinogenesis studies in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Shozo; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P.; Adamson, Richard H.

    2008-01-01

    This review covers chemical carcinogenesis studies in nonhuman primates performed by the National Cancer Institute, USA, to provide hitherto unavailable information on their susceptibility to compounds producing carcinogenic effects in rodents. From autopsy records of 401 breeders and untreated controls, incidences of spontaneous malignant tumors were found to be relatively low in cynomolgus (1.9%) and rhesus monkeys (3.8%), but higher in African green monkeys (8%). Various chemical compounds, and in particular 6 antineoplastic agents, 13 food-related compounds including additives and contaminants, 1 pesticide, 5 N-nitroso compounds, 3 heterocyclic amines, and 7 “classical” rodent carcinogens, were tested during the 34 years period, generally at doses 10∼40 times the estimated human exposure. Results were inconclusive in many cases but unequivocal carcinogenicity was demonstrated for IQ, procarbazine, methylnitrosourea and diethylnitrosamine. Furthermore, negative findings for saccharine and cyclamate were in line with results in other species. Thus susceptibility to carcinogens is at least partly shared by nonhuman primates and rodents. PMID:18941297

  9. Fish cognition: a primate's eye view.

    PubMed

    Bshary, Redouan; Wickler, Wolfgang; Fricke, Hans

    2002-03-01

    We provide selected examples from the fish literature of phenomena found in fish that are currently being examined in discussions of cognitive abilities and evolution of neocortex size in primates. In the context of social intelligence, we looked at living in individualized groups and corresponding social strategies, social learning and tradition, and co-operative hunting. Regarding environmental intelligence, we searched for examples concerning special foraging skills, tool use, cognitive maps, memory, anti-predator behaviour, and the manipulation of the environment. Most phenomena of interest for primatologists are found in fish as well. We therefore conclude that more detailed studies on decision rules and mechanisms are necessary to test for differences between the cognitive abilities of primates and other taxa. Cognitive research can benefit from future fish studies in three ways: first, as fish are highly variable in their ecology, they can be used to determine the specific ecological factors that select for the evolution of specific cognitive abilities. Second, for the same reason they can be used to investigate the link between cognitive abilities and the enlargement of specific brain areas. Third, decision rules used by fish could be used as 'null-hypotheses' for primatologists looking at how monkeys might make their decisions. Finally, we propose a variety of fish species that we think are most promising as study objects.

  10. Postradiation regional cerebral blood flow in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Cerveny, T.J.; Hampton, J.D.

    1986-06-01

    Early transient incapacitation (ETI) is the complete cessation of performance during the first 30 min after radiation exposure and performance decrement (PD) is a reduction in performance at the same time. Supralethal doses of radiation have been shown to produce a marked decrease in regional cerebral blood flow in primates concurrent with hypotension and a dramatic release of mast cell histamine. In an attempt to elucidate mechanisms underlying the radiation-induced ETI/PD phenomenon and the postradiation decrease in cerebral blood flow, primates were exposed to 100 Gy (1 Gy = 100 rads), whole-body, gamma radiation. Pontine and cortical blood flows were measured by hydrogen clearance, before and after radiation exposure. Systemic blood pressures were determined simultaneously. Systemic arterial histamine levels were determined preradiation and postradiation. Data obtained indicated that radiated animals showed a decrease in blood flow of 63% in the motor cortex and 51% in the pons by 10 min postradiation. Regional cerebral blood flow of radiated animals showed a slight recovery 20 min postradiation, followed by a fall to the 10 min nadir by 60 min postradiation. Immediately, postradiation systemic blood pressure fell 67% and remained at that level for the remainder of the experiment. Histamine levels in the radiated animals increased a hundredfold 2 min postradiation. This study indicates that regional cerebral blood flow decreases postradiation with the development of hypotension and may be associated temporally with the postradiation release of histamine.

  11. Primate pelvic anatomy and implications for birth

    PubMed Central

    Trevathan, Wenda

    2015-01-01

    The pelvis performs two major functions for terrestrial mammals. It provides somewhat rigid support for muscles engaged in locomotion and, for females, it serves as the birth canal. The result for many species, and especially for encephalized primates, is an ‘obstetric dilemma’ whereby the neonate often has to negotiate a tight squeeze in order to be born. On top of what was probably a baseline of challenging birth, locomotor changes in the evolution of bipedalism in the human lineage resulted in an even more complex birth process. Negotiation of the bipedal pelvis requires a series of rotations, the end of which has the infant emerging from the birth canal facing the opposite direction from the mother. This pattern, strikingly different from what is typically seen in monkeys and apes, places a premium on having assistance at delivery. Recently reported observations of births in monkeys and apes are used to compare the process in human and non-human primates, highlighting similarities and differences. These include presentation (face, occiput anterior or posterior), internal and external rotation, use of the hands by mothers and infants, reliance on assistance, and the developmental state of the neonate. PMID:25602069

  12. Primate Socioecology: New Insights from Males

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappeler, Peter M.

    Primate males have only recently returned to the center stage of socioecological research. This review surveys new studies that examine variation in the behavior of adult males and their role in social evolution. It is shown that group size, composition, and social behavior are determined not only by resource distribution, predation risk, and other ecological factors, but that life history traits and social factors, especially those related to sexual coercion, can have equally profound consequences for social systems. This general point is illustrated by examining male behavior at three levels: the evolution of permanent associations between males and females, the causes and consequences of variation in the number of males between group-living species, and the determinants of social relationships within and between the sexes. Direct and indirect evidence reviewed in connection with all three questions indicates that the risk of infanticide has been a pervasive force in primate social evolution. Several areas are identified for future research on male life histories that should contribute to a better understanding of male reproductive strategies and corresponding female counterstrategies.

  13. Men, primates, and germs: an ongoing affair.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jean Paul; Prugnolle, Frank; Leroy, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Humans and nonhuman primates are phylogenetically (i.e., genetically) related and share pathogens that can jump from one species to another. The specific strategies of three groups of pathogens for crossing the species barrier among primates will be discussed. In Africa, gorillas and chimpanzees have succumbed for years to simultaneous epizootics (i.e.. "multi-emergence") of Ebola virus in places where they are in contact with Chiropters, which could be animal reservoirs of these viruses. Human epidemics often follow these major outbreaks. Simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) have an ancient history of coevolution and many interspecific exchanges with their natural hosts. Chimpanzee and gorilla SIVs have crossed the species barrier at different times and places, leading to the emergence of HIV-1 and HIV-2. Other retroviruses, such as the Simian T-Lymphotropic Viruses and Foamiviruses, have also a unique ancient or recent history of crossing the species barrier. The identification of gorilla Plasmodium parasites that are genetically close to P. falciparum suggests that gorillas were the source of the deadly human P. falciparum. Nonhuman plasmodium species that can infect humans represent an underestimated risk.

  14. Dynamic actin gene family evolution in primates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liucun; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Yijun; Wen, Tieqiao; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Actin is one of the most highly conserved proteins and plays crucial roles in many vital cellular functions. In most eukaryotes, it is encoded by a multigene family. Although the actin gene family has been studied a lot, few investigators focus on the comparison of actin gene family in relative species. Here, the purpose of our study is to systematically investigate characteristics and evolutionary pattern of actin gene family in primates. We identified 233 actin genes in human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, rhesus monkey, and marmoset genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that actin genes in the seven species could be divided into two major types of clades: orthologous group versus complex group. Codon usages and gene expression patterns of actin gene copies were highly consistent among the groups because of basic functions needed by the organisms, but much diverged within species due to functional diversification. Besides, many great potential pseudogenes were found with incomplete open reading frames due to frameshifts or early stop codons. These results implied that actin gene family in primates went through "birth and death" model of evolution process. Under this model, actin genes experienced strong negative selection and increased the functional complexity by reproducing themselves.

  15. Hormones and Human and Nonhuman Primate Growth.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Robin Miriam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to review information pertaining to the hormonal regulation of nonhuman primate growth, with specific focus on the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis and adrenal androgens. Hormones of the GH-IGF axis are consistently associated with measures of growth - linear, weight, or both - during the growth period; in adulthood, concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-binding protein-3, and GH-binding protein are not associated with any measures of size. Comparing patterns of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS) may be especially relevant for understanding whether the childhood stage of growth and development is unique to humans and perhaps other apes. Genetic, hormonal, and morphological data on adrenarche in other nonhuman primate species suggest that this endocrine transition is delayed in humans, chimpanzees, and possibly gorillas, while present very early in postnatal life in macaques. This suggests that although perhaps permitted by an extension of the pre-adolescent growth period, childhood builds upon existing developmental substrates rather than having been inserted de novo into an ancestral growth trajectory. Hormones can provide insight regarding the evolution of the human growth trajectory. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Hunting, law enforcement, and African primate conservation.

    PubMed

    N'Goran, Paul K; Boesch, Christophe; Mundry, Roger; N'Goran, Eliezer K; Herbinger, Ilka; Yapi, Fabrice A; Kühl, Hjalmar S

    2012-06-01

    Primates are regularly hunted for bushmeat in tropical forests, and systematic ecological monitoring can help determine the effect hunting has on these and other hunted species. Monitoring can also be used to inform law enforcement and managers of where hunting is concentrated. We evaluated the effects of law enforcement informed by monitoring data on density and spatial distribution of 8 monkey species in Taï National Park, Côte d'Ivoire. We conducted intensive surveys of monkeys and looked for signs of human activity throughout the park. We also gathered information on the activities of law-enforcement personnel related to hunting and evaluated the relative effects of hunting, forest cover and proximity to rivers, and conservation effort on primate distribution and density. The effects of hunting on monkeys varied among species. Red colobus monkeys (Procolobus badius) were most affected and Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli) were least affected by hunting. Density of monkeys irrespective of species was up to 100 times higher near a research station and tourism site in the southwestern section of the park, where there is little hunting, than in the southeastern part of the park. The results of our monitoring guided law-enforcement patrols toward zones with the most hunting activity. Such systematic coordination of ecological monitoring and law enforcement may be applicable at other sites. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  17. Safety Signals in the Primate Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Genud-Gabai, Rotem; Klavir, Oded

    2013-01-01

    The ability to distinguish danger from safety is crucial for survival. On the other hand, anxiety disorders can result from failures to dissociate safe cues from those that predict dangerous outcomes. The amygdala plays a major role in learning and signaling danger, and recently, evidence accumulates that it also acquires information to signal safety. Traditionally, safety is explored by paradigms that change the value of a previously dangerous cue, such as extinction or reversal; or by paradigms showing that a safe cue can inhibit responses to another danger-predicting cue, as in conditioned-inhibition. In real-life scenarios, many cues are never paired or tested with danger and remain neutral all along. A detailed study of neural responses to unpaired conditioned-stimulus (CS−) can therefore indicate whether information on safety-by-comparison is also acquired in the amygdala. We designed a multiple-CS study, with CS− from both visual and auditory modalities. Using discriminative aversive-conditioning, we find that responses in the primate amygdala develop for CS− of the same modality and of a different modality from that of the aversive CS+. Moreover, we find that responses are comparable in proportion, sign (increase/decrease), onset, and magnitude. These results indicate that the primate amygdala actively acquires signals about safety, and strengthen the hypothesis that failure in amygdala processing can result in failure to distinguish dangerous cues from safe ones and lead to maladaptive behaviors. PMID:24227710

  18. Short hyperdynamic profiles influence primate temperature regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, C. A.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    Primates have been shown to be sensitive to hyperdynamic fields. That is, when exposed to + 2Gz, body temperature falls. The purpose of this study was to examine the relative sensitivity of these animals to short centrifugation profiles which mimic the gravitational envelope seen on the Space Shuttle during launch (8 minutes, 2.9 Gz max) and re-entry (19 min, 1.7 Gz max). Four loosely restrained squirrel monkeys, isolated from additional external stimuli, were exposed to these profiles. During launch simulation, the temperatures never fell markedly below control levels. However, subsequent to return to 1G, the recovery phase showed decreases in body temperature in all four animals averaging 0.4 C over the next 10 to 15 minutes. The two animals exposed to the reentry profile showed decreases in body temperature within five minutes of the onset of centrifugation. Maximum fall in body temperature was reached by the end of the centrifugation phase and averaged 0.7 C. Thus, the temperature regulation system of this primate is sensitive to short hyperdynamic field exposures.

  19. Social signals in primate orbitofrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Karli K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Primate evolution produced an increased capacity to respond flexibly to varying social contexts as well as expansion of the prefrontal cortex [1, 2]. Despite this association, how prefrontal neurons respond to social information remains virtually unknown. People with damage to orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) struggle to recognize facial expressions [3, 4], make poor social judgments [5] [6], and frequently make social faux pas [7, 8]. Here we test explicitly whether neurons in primate OFC signal social information and, if so, how such signals compare with responses to primary fluid rewards. We find OFC neurons distinguish images that belong to socially-defined categories, such as female perinea and faces, as well as the social dominance of those faces. These modulations signaled both how much monkeys valued these pictures and their interest in continuing to view them. Far more neurons signaled social category than signaled fluid value, despite the stronger impact of fluid rewards on monkeys’ choices. These findings indicate that OFC represents both the motivational value and attentional priority of other individuals, thus contributing to both the acquisition of information about others and subsequent social decisions. Our results betray a fundamental disconnect between preferences expressed through overt choice, which were primarily driven by the desire for more fluid, and preferential neuronal processing, which favored social computations. PMID:23122847

  20. Canine tooth size variability in primates.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, G

    1989-01-01

    I present an analysis of canine tooth size variability in male and female primates. The coefficient of variation (CV = SD X 100/mean) as an index of canine size variability proved to be dependent on mean canine size in males and, to a lower extent, in females. Therefore, variability tends to increase with increasing values of mean canine size. Using residuals from the regression of log SD on log mean canine size in male and female primates, I analysed the contribution of diet, habitat and mating system to canine size variability. Habitat and mating system are known to influence to a certain extent the degree of sexual dimorphism in canine size. Given the well-known relationship between sexual dimorphism and phenotypic variability, it was suggested that these factors might influence variability in canine size. Everything else being equal, males of polygynous species are characterized by more variable canine sizes than males of monogamous species. Habitat and diet did not contribute to the level of variability observed in either males or females. It is proposed that a high level of variability in canine size may be related to the likelihood that enlarged canines evolved as a result of male-male competition for mates in polygynous species.

  1. An audiometric comparison of primate audiograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Mark N.

    2001-05-01

    Audiogram data for 18 species of primates were collected from the literature and analyzed by measuring 13 audiometric variables: frequency and threshold of the primary peak, frequency and threshold of the secondary peak, frequency and threshold of the notch between peaks, low-frequency cutoff, high-frequency cutoff, total area of the audible field, low area, middle area, high area, and total audible range in octaves. All areal measurements were made using IGOR PRO 4.04 wave measurement software. Platyrrhines were found to have significantly better low-frequency sensitivity than like-sized lorisoids with an average of 15-dB difference between the means for the two groups. This difference remains significant even when interindividual variation is considered. Callithrix jacchus and Erythrocebus patas have unusual hearing patterns for primates of their size with marmosets showing a reduction in high-frequency sensitivity, while patas monkeys show a reduction in low-frequency sensitivity. It was also noted that chimps have a notch in sensitivity that falls within the range of greatest sensitivity for humans. These findings are discussed in relation to the morphological adaptations that appear to influence these hearing patterns and the evolutionary significance of such patterns for group communication and predator-prey interactions.

  2. The evolution of face processing in primates

    PubMed Central

    Parr, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to recognize faces is an important socio-cognitive skill that is associated with a number of cognitive specializations in humans. While numerous studies have examined the presence of these specializations in non-human primates, species where face recognition would confer distinct advantages in social situations, results have been mixed. The majority of studies in chimpanzees support homologous face-processing mechanisms with humans, but results from monkey studies appear largely dependent on the type of testing methods used. Studies that employ passive viewing paradigms, like the visual paired comparison task, report evidence of similarities between monkeys and humans, but tasks that use more stringent, operant response tasks, like the matching-to-sample task, often report species differences. Moreover, the data suggest that monkeys may be less sensitive than chimpanzees and humans to the precise spacing of facial features, in addition to the surface-based cues reflected in those features, information that is critical for the representation of individual identity. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the available data from face-processing tasks in non-human primates with the goal of understanding the evolution of this complex cognitive skill. PMID:21536559

  3. Primate pelvic anatomy and implications for birth.

    PubMed

    Trevathan, Wenda

    2015-03-05

    The pelvis performs two major functions for terrestrial mammals. It provides somewhat rigid support for muscles engaged in locomotion and, for females, it serves as the birth canal. The result for many species, and especially for encephalized primates, is an 'obstetric dilemma' whereby the neonate often has to negotiate a tight squeeze in order to be born. On top of what was probably a baseline of challenging birth, locomotor changes in the evolution of bipedalism in the human lineage resulted in an even more complex birth process. Negotiation of the bipedal pelvis requires a series of rotations, the end of which has the infant emerging from the birth canal facing the opposite direction from the mother. This pattern, strikingly different from what is typically seen in monkeys and apes, places a premium on having assistance at delivery. Recently reported observations of births in monkeys and apes are used to compare the process in human and non-human primates, highlighting similarities and differences. These include presentation (face, occiput anterior or posterior), internal and external rotation, use of the hands by mothers and infants, reliance on assistance, and the developmental state of the neonate. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. The evolution of face processing in primates.

    PubMed

    Parr, Lisa A

    2011-06-12

    The ability to recognize faces is an important socio-cognitive skill that is associated with a number of cognitive specializations in humans. While numerous studies have examined the presence of these specializations in non-human primates, species where face recognition would confer distinct advantages in social situations, results have been mixed. The majority of studies in chimpanzees support homologous face-processing mechanisms with humans, but results from monkey studies appear largely dependent on the type of testing methods used. Studies that employ passive viewing paradigms, like the visual paired comparison task, report evidence of similarities between monkeys and humans, but tasks that use more stringent, operant response tasks, like the matching-to-sample task, often report species differences. Moreover, the data suggest that monkeys may be less sensitive than chimpanzees and humans to the precise spacing of facial features, in addition to the surface-based cues reflected in those features, information that is critical for the representation of individual identity. The aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the available data from face-processing tasks in non-human primates with the goal of understanding the evolution of this complex cognitive skill.

  5. Advantages of COS-1 monkey kidney epithelial cells as packaging host for small-volume production of high-quality recombinant lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shannon L; Shioda, Toshi

    2009-04-01

    The HEK293T human embryonic kidney cells have been used widely as a packaging host for transfection-based production of recombinant lentiviruses. The present study describes advantages of using COS-1 African green monkey kidney cells versus HEK293T cells as a packaging host for small-volume production of high-quality recombinant lentiviruses. The particle performance index, defined as the ratio of infection-competent viral particles to the total number of particles, was three- to four-fold greater in transfection supernatants generated using COS-1 cells than that generated using HEK293T cells. Adhesion of HEK293T cells to the cell culture-treated plastic surface was weak, causing significant HEK293T cell contamination in the transfection supernatants produced by laboratory automation using the 96-well cell culture plates. In contrast, COS-1 cells adhered strongly to the plastic surface, and cell contamination was not detected in the transfection supernatants. These results suggest that COS-1 cells may be a useful alternative packaging host for use for automated generation of large numbers of high-quality lentivirus reagents, particularly because they eliminate the need for additional purification steps to remove viral particles from cell culture supernatant.

  6. Validation-based insertional mutagenesis for identification of Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bei; Zhang, XiaoYu; Zhao, Zhendong

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •We introduced a new mutagenesis strategy named VBIM to the viral research. •This method can identify either host factors or host restriction factors. •Using VBIM system, we identified Nup214 as a host factor for EV71 replication in RD cells. -- Abstract: Lentiviral validation-based insertional mutagenesis (VBIM) is a sophisticated, forward genetic approach that is used for the investigation of signal transduction in mammalian cells. Using VBIM, we conducted function-based genetic screening for host genes that affect enterovirus 71 (EV71) viral replication. This included host factors that are required for the life cycle of EV71 and host restriction factors that inhibit EV71 replication. Several cell clones, resistant to EV71, were produced using EV71 infection as a selection pressure and the nuclear pore protein 214 (Nup214) was identified as a host factor required for EV71 replication. In SD2-2, the corresponding VBIM lentivirus transformed clone, the expression of endogenous Nup214 was significantly down-regulated by the reverse inserted VBIM promoter. After Cre recombinase-mediated excision of the VBIM promoter, the expression of Nup214 recovered and the clone regained sensitivity to the EV71 infection. Furthermore, over-expression of Nup214 in the cells suggested that Nup214 was promoting EV71 replication. Results of this study indicate that a successful mutagenesis strategy has been established for screening host genes related to viral replication.

  7. Lentivirus-meditated frataxin gene delivery reverses genome instability in Friedreich ataxia patient and mouse model fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Khonsari, H; Schneider, M; Al-Mahdawi, S; Chianea, Y G; Themis, M; Parris, C; Pook, M A; Themis, M

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by deficiency of frataxin protein, with the primary sites of pathology being the large sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia and the cerebellum. FRDA is also often accompanied by severe cardiomyopathy and diabetes mellitus. Frataxin is important in mitochondrial iron–sulfur cluster (ISC) biogenesis and low-frataxin expression is due to a GAA repeat expansion in intron 1 of the FXN gene. FRDA cells are genomically unstable, with increased levels of reactive oxygen species and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Here we report the identification of elevated levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in FRDA patient and YG8sR FRDA mouse model fibroblasts compared to normal fibroblasts. Using lentivirus FXN gene delivery to FRDA patient and YG8sR cells, we obtained long-term overexpression of FXN mRNA and frataxin protein levels with reduced DSB levels towards normal. Furthermore, γ-irradiation of FRDA patient and YG8sR cells revealed impaired DSB repair that was recovered on FXN gene transfer. This suggests that frataxin may be involved in DSB repair, either directly by an unknown mechanism, or indirectly via ISC biogenesis for DNA repair enzymes, which may be essential for the prevention of neurodegeneration. PMID:27518705

  8. Production and Use of Lentivirus to Selectively Transduce Primary Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells for In Vitro Myelination Assays

    PubMed Central

    Peckham, Haley M.; Ferner, Anita H.; Giuffrida, Lauren; Murray, Simon S.; Xiao, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    Myelination is a complex process that involves both neurons and the myelin forming glial cells, oligodendrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) and Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). We use an in vitro myelination assay, an established model for studying CNS myelination in vitro. To do this, oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are added to the purified primary rodent dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to form myelinating co-cultures. In order to specifically interrogate the roles that particular proteins expressed by oligodendrocytes exert upon myelination we have developed protocols that selectively transduce OPCs using the lentivirus overexpressing wild type, constitutively active or dominant negative proteins before being seeded onto the DRG neurons. This allows us to specifically interrogate the roles of these oligodendroglial proteins in regulating myelination. The protocols can also be applied in the study of other cell types, thus providing an approach that allows selective manipulation of proteins expressed by a desired cell type, such as oligodendrocytes for the targeted study of signaling and compensation mechanisms. In conclusion, combining the in vitro myelination assay with lentiviral infected OPCs provides a strategic tool for the analysis of molecular mechanisms involved in myelination. PMID:25650722

  9. BRaf signaling principles unveiled by large-scale human mutation analysis with a rapid lentivirus-based gene replacement method.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae-Seok; Kang, Xi; Mirabella, Vincent; Zhang, Huaye; Bu, Qian; Araki, Yoichi; Hoang, Elizabeth T; Wang, Shiqiang; Shen, Ying; Choi, Sukwoo; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Chang, Qiang; Pang, Zhiping P; Huganir, Richard L; Zhu, J Julius

    2017-03-15

    Rapid advances in genetics are linking mutations on genes to diseases at an exponential rate, yet characterizing the gene mutation-cell behavior relationships essential for precision medicine remains a daunting task. More than 350 mutations on small GTPase BRaf are associated with various tumors, and ∼40 mutations are associated with the neurodevelopmental disorder cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC). We developed a fast cost-effective lentivirus-based rapid gene replacement method to interrogate the physiopathology of BRaf and ∼50 disease-linked BRaf mutants, including all CFC-linked mutants. Analysis of simultaneous multiple patch-clamp recordings from 6068 pairs of rat neurons with validation in additional mouse and human neurons and multiple learning tests from 1486 rats identified BRaf as the key missing signaling effector in the common synaptic NMDA-R-CaMKII-SynGap-Ras-BRaf-MEK-ERK transduction cascade. Moreover, the analysis creates the original big data unveiling three general features of BRaf signaling. This study establishes the first efficient procedure that permits large-scale functional analysis of human disease-linked mutations essential for precision medicine. © 2017 Lim et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. Lentivirus-Mediated Silencing of Myosin VI Inhibits Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Zhu, Zhenghong; Chang, Jianhua; Wang, Jialei; Shen, Xiaoyong

    2015-10-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is a unique actin motor, which moves toward the pointed ends of actin filaments. In this study, we found that MYO6 is overexpressed in lung cancer tissues and associated with lung cancer progression, particularly lymph node metastasis. To investigate its functions in lung cancer cells, we generated recombinant lentivirus taking shRNA of MYO6. Using two lung cancer cell lines, A549 and 95D, we found that Lv-shMYO6 could infect lung cancer cells with high efficiency and downregulate MYO6 on both mRNA and protein levels. After knockdown of MYO6, the proliferation rates of lung cancer cells were decreased significantly. The colony-formation ability of MYO6-silenced lung cancer cells was also impaired with reduced colony numbers and fewer cells per colony. Flow cytometry showed that cell cycle progression was stuck at the G0 /G1 phase, especially at the sub-G1 phase, which represents apoptotic cells. Moreover, knockdown of MYO6 downregulated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Further experiments using another shRNA of MYO6 confirmed the above results. These results suggest that MYO6 is crucial in maintaining cell cycle and cell growth of lung cancer cells. MYO6 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer treatment.

  11. [Effect of overexpression of CAV1 mediated by lentivirus on proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 cells].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei; Wang, Di-Di; Wang, Zhao; Zhu, Gui-Ming; Zhang, Peng-Xia

    2013-08-01

    This study was purposed to explore the effect of lentivirus-mediated CAV1 overexpression on proliferation and apoptosis in HL-60 cells. Recombinant lentiviral expression vector pcDNA-EF1-CAV1 was constructed, and cotransfected the 293TN cells with a mixture of pPACK packaging plasmids. Then collecting virus suspension infects the HL-60 cells, which make CAV1 gene stable transfection and high expression in the cells. The CAV1 protein expression status in HL-60 cells transfected was evaluated through Western blot method. Proliferative activity and apoptosis of HL-60 cells before and after transfection were detected by CCK-8 method and flow cytometry, respectively. The results showed that the PCR-positive clone screening and results of nucleotide sequencing confirmed that the CAV1 gene inserted into the expression vector pcDNA-EF1-GFP correctly, recombinant lentiviral particles Lv-CAV1 transfected HL-60 cells successfully and with transfection rate up to 90%. The result of Western blot showed that CAV1 protein expression in HL-60 cells significantly increased at 48 hours after transfection. CCK-8 result indicated that cell proliferation activity increased at 48 h after transfection (P < 0.05), flow cytometry testing results displayed that apoptosis rate of HL-60 cells obviously decreased after transfection (P < 0.01). It is concluded that the overexpression of CAV1 in HL-60 cells can inhibit cell proliferation activity and promote cell apoptosis.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Survival in the Infarcted Heart Is Enhanced by Lentivirus Vector-Mediated Heat Shock Protein 27 Expression

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Lisa M.; McMahon, Jill; Stocca, Alessia; Duffy, Aoife; Flynn, Aidan; O'Toole, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy offers the potential to promote recovery after myocardial infarction (MI). However, therapeutic efficacy may be limited by poor survival and retention of transplanted cells. A combination of gene and cell therapy has the capacity to prevent donor cell death and augment the reparative and regenerative effects of cell transfer. The present study investigates the effect of exogenous heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) expression in MSCs in an in vitro model of ischemia and in an in vivo rat MI model and aims to determine if this could enhance the therapeutic benefit associated with cell delivery. Hsp27 overexpression by lentivirus vector modification resulted in increased MSC survival in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, decreased apoptosis in the infarcted tissue and improved cardiac function was observed in the Hsp27 group, enhancing the therapeutic effect of MSCs. Together, these data demonstrate that ex vivo genetic modification—specifically Hsp27 overexpression—offers the possibility of enhancing the efficacy of MSC therapy in MI. PMID:23987185

  13. Impaired Expression of Cytokines as a Result of Viral Infections with an Emphasis on Small Ruminant Lentivirus Infection in Goats

    PubMed Central

    Jarczak, Justyna; Kaba, Jarosław; Reczyńska, Daria; Bagnicka, Emilia

    2016-01-01

    Knowing about the genes involved in immunity, and being able to identify the factors influencing their expressions, helps in gaining awareness of the immune processes. The qPCR method is a useful gene expression analysis tool, but studies on immune system genes are still limited, especially on the caprine immune system. Caprine arthritis encephalitis, a disease caused by small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV), causes economic losses in goat breeding, and there is no therapy against SRLV. The results of studies on vaccines against other viruses are promising. Moreover, the Marker-Assisted Selection strategy against SRLV is possible, as has been shown in sheep breeding. However, there are still many gaps in our knowledge on the caprine immune response to infection. All types of cytokines play pivotal roles in immunity, and SRLV infection influences the expression of many cytokines in different types of cells. This information encouraged the authors to examine the results of studies conducted on SRLV and other viral infections, with an emphasis on the expression of cytokine genes. This review attempts to summarize the results of studies on the expression of cytokines in the context of the SRLV infection. PMID:27399757

  14. Protective efficacy of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in a nonhuman primate model of Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Marzi, Andrea; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Ishijima, Mari; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Megumi; Matsuyama, Yukie; Igarashi, Manabu; Nakayama, Eri; Kuroda, Makoto; Saijo, Masayuki; Feldmann, Friederike; Brining, Douglas; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2012-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is the causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever in primates, with human case fatality rates up to 90%. Today, there is neither a licensed vaccine nor a treatment available for Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF). Single monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) have been successfully used in passive immunization experiments in rodent models, but have failed to protect nonhuman primates from lethal disease. In this study, we used two clones of human-mouse chimeric MAbs (ch133 and ch226) with strong neutralizing activity against ZEBOV and evaluated their protective potential in a rhesus macaque model of EHF. Reduced viral loads and partial protection were observed in animals given MAbs ch133 and ch226 combined intravenously at 24 hours before and 24 and 72 hours after challenge. MAbs circulated in the blood of a surviving animal until virus-induced IgG responses were detected. In contrast, serum MAb concentrations decreased to undetectable levels at terminal stages of disease in animals that succumbed to infection, indicating substantial consumption of these antibodies due to virus replication. Accordingly, the rapid decrease of serum MAbs was clearly associated with increased viremia in non-survivors. Our results indicate that EBOV neutralizing antibodies, particularly in combination with other therapeutic strategies, might be beneficial in reducing viral loads and prolonging disease progression during EHF.

  15. Centromere Stability: The Replication Connection

    PubMed Central

    Forsburg, Susan L.; Shen, Kuo-Fang

    2017-01-01

    The fission yeast centromere, which is similar to metazoan centromeres, contains highly repetitive pericentromere sequences that are assembled into heterochromatin. This is required for the recruitment of cohesin and proper chromosome segregation. Surprisingly, the pericentromere replicates early in the S phase. Loss of heterochromatin causes this domain to become very sensitive to replication fork defects, leading to gross chromosome rearrangements. This review examines the interplay between components of DNA replication, heterochromatin assembly, and cohesin dynamics that ensures maintenance of genome stability and proper chromosome segregation. PMID:28106789

  16. Control of equine infectious anemia virus replication following immune reconstitution in an Arabian foal with severe combined immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mealey, Robert H.; Fraser, Darrilyn G.; Oaks, J. Lindsay; Cantor, Glenn H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Acute infection with equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus of horses, results in a persistent high-level viremia in Arabian foals affected with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). This observation argues against the idea that the transient nature of acute lentiviral viremia is solely a function of viral population dynamics. To extend these studies, EIAV-specific immune reconstitution was attempted prior to EIAV challenge in 2 SCID foals, using adoptively transferred virus-stimulated lymphocytes derived from persistently EIAV-infected half sibling donors. Following transfer, lymphocyte engraftment occurred in 1 foal, and EIAV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes as well as neutralizing antibody activity developed. Following a brief period of plasma viremia in this foal, EIAV replication was controlled and plasma virus could not be detected by RT-PCR or culture. These results provide further direct evidence that a specific immune response is required for termination of plasma viremia in acute lentiviral infections. PMID:11683583

  17. The evolution of the primate foot from the earliest primates to the Miocene hominoids.

    PubMed

    Conroy, G C; Rose, M D

    1983-01-01

    The fossil evidence relating to the evolution of the primate foot is reviewed and evaluated. Many of the characteristic features of the primate foot had evolved by the early Tertiary over 40 million years ago. Probably the most significant of these developments was the progressive migration of the talus to a position over the calcaneum. These morphological features are followed through the Miocene hominoid genera from East Africa, Europe, and South Asia. While some features of Miocene hominoids, especially those relating to climbing abilities, are still evident in the predominantly bipedal earliest hominids of the Plio-Pleistocene, there is no evidence yet from the Miocene of the first stages in the evolution of that bipedalism.

  18. The Psychology of Replication and Replication in Psychology.

    PubMed

    Francis, Gregory

    2012-11-01

    Like other scientists, psychologists believe experimental replication to be the final arbiter for determining the validity of an empirical finding. Reports in psychology journals often attempt to prove the validity of a hypothesis or theory with multiple experiments that replicate a finding. Unfortunately, these efforts are sometimes misguided because in a field like experimental psychology, ever more successful replication does not necessarily ensure the validity of an empirical finding. When psychological experiments are analyzed with statistics, the rules of probability dictate that random samples should sometimes be selected that do not reject the null hypothesis, even if an effect is real. As a result, it is possible for a set of experiments to have too many successful replications. When there are too many successful replications for a given set of experiments, a skeptical scientist should be suspicious that null or negative findings have been suppressed, the experiments were run improperly, or the experiments were analyzed improperly. This article describes the implications of this observation and demonstrates how to test for too much successful replication by using a set of experiments from a recent research paper.

  19. Targeted knockout of TNF-α by injection of lentivirus-mediated siRNA into the subacromial bursa for the treatment of subacromial bursitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Li, Quan; Wei, Xianzhao; Xu, Jie; Chen, Qi; Song, Shuang; Lu, Zhe; Wang, Zimin

    2015-09-01

    Subacromial bursitis (SAB) is the major source of pain in rotator cuff disease. Although multiple investigations have provided support for the role of inflammatory cytokines in SAB, few have focussed on the use these cytokines in the treatment of SAB. The aim of the present study was to observe the therapeutic efficacy of lentivirus‑mediated RNA interference (RNAi) on carrageenan‑induced SAB by injecting lentivirus‑tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑RNAi expressing TNF‑α small interfering (si)RNA. Using screened siRNA segments, an siRNA was designed. A lentivirus vector expressing siRNA was established and packed as lentivirus particles. A lentivirus that expressed the negative sequence was used as a lentivirus‑negative control (NC). The carrageenan‑induced SAB model was established in 32 male Sprague‑Dawley rats. The modeled rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Lentivirus‑RNAi treatment group, lentivirus‑NC group, SAB group and phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) blank control group. The lentivirus was injected (1x10(7) transducing units) into the subacromial bursa of the rats in the lentivirus‑RNAi group and lentivirus‑NC group, whereas 100 µl PBS was injected at the same site in the SAB group and the PBS blank control group. At 5 weeks following injection, the animals were sacrificed and venous blood was obtained. The effect of TNF‑α interference and the expression of inflammatory cytokines were determined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, hematoxylin and eosin staining, Van Gieson's staining and immunofluorescence. The expression of TNF‑α was decreased in the lentivirus‑TNF‑α‑RNAi group compared with that in the SAB group. Morphological observations revealed that the number of inflammatory cells were reduced and damage to tendon fibers was attenuated in this group, suggesting that the downregulation of the protein expression levels of TNF‑α‑associated nuclear

  20. [Packaging of lentivirus carrying gene hβc and overexpression of gene hβc in NB4 cells].

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing-Hui; Wu, Yong; Zi, You-Mei; Li, Xian-Fang; Liao, Xiao-Ying; Chen, Yuan-Zhong

    2011-06-01

    This study was aimed to overexpress gene hβc in NB4 cells via the method of lentivirus-mediated gene transfer, to observe the differentiation behaviour change of hβc over-expressing NB4 cells treated with IL-3 or GM-CSF, to explore the relationship between hβc gene and the differentiation behaviour of NB4 cells. The targeted hβc gene was amplified by PCR from the cloned vector carrying ORF of hβc. The PCR product containing PmeI and BstBI site introduced by primer was digested, and then cloned into lentivirus vector pRRLSIN.cPPT.PGK/IRES/GFP.WPRE to construct a lentiviral vector carrying hβc, named pLV-hβc. And the pLV-hβc plasmid was confirmed by restriction and sequencing. The recombinant lentivirus was produced by co-transfecting three plasmids into 293T packing cells. After transfection, the lentiviral supernatant was collected to transfect NB4 cells. GFP expression was examined by fluorescent microscope and the expression of hβc gene was detected by Western blot. Then, the NB4 cells over-expressing hβc were treated with IL-3 (10 ng/ml), GM-CSF (10 ng/ml), ATRA (1 µmol/L) respectively, and the CD11b expression, morphology and differentiation behaviour changes of every groups were observed by flow cytometry and microscopy, while NB4 cells transfected with blank lentivirus (NB4-blank cells) were used as controls. The results showed that the recombinant lentivirus vector carrying hβc gene could efficiently transfect NB4 cells and made NB4 cells to stably over-express hβc gene. The expression of CD11b was up-regulated in NB4-hβc cells treated with of IL-3 or GM-CSF, but it was not as obvious as the effect of ATRA, and no morphological change was observed in NB4 hβc cells treated with the IL-3 or GM-CSF. It is concluded that IL-3 or GM-CSF can induce NB4 cells over-expressing hβc to differentiate to neutrophils, but can not make them fully matured.