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Sample records for printed high-frequency phased-array

  1. Fully Printed High-Frequency Phased-Array Antenna on Flexible Substrate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yihong; Lu, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    To address the issues of flexible electronics needed for surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back-to-Earth communications necessary for manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, a room-temperature printing process has been developed to create active, phased-array antennas (PAAs) on a flexible Kapton substrate. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proven feasible for phased-array antenna systems. The carrier mobility of an individual CNT is estimated to be at least 100,000 sq cm/V(dot)s. The CNT network in solution has carrier mobility as high as 46,770 sq cm/V(dot)s, and has a large current-density carrying capacity of approx. 1,000 mA/sq cm , which corresponds to a high carrying power of over 2,000 mW/ sq cm. Such high carrier mobility, and large current carrying capacity, allows the achievement of high-speed (>100 GHz), high-power, flexible electronic circuits that can be monolithically integrated on NASA s active phasedarray antennas for various applications, such as pressurized rovers, pressurized habitats, and spacesuits, as well as for locating beacon towers for lunar surface navigation, which will likely be performed at S-band and attached to a mobile astronaut. A fully printed 2-bit 2-element phasedarray antenna (PAA) working at 5.6 GHz, incorporating the CNT FETs as phase shifters, is demonstrated. The PAA is printed out at room temperature on 100-mm thick Kapton substrate. Four CNT FETs are printed together with microstrip time delay lines to function as a 2-bit phase shifter. The FET switch exhibits a switching speed of 0.2 ns, and works well for a 5.6-GHz RF signal. The operating frequency is measured to be 5.6 GHz, versus the state-of-the-art flexible FET operating frequency of 52 MHz. The source-drain current density is measured to be over 1,000 mA/sq cm, while the conventional organic FETs, and single carbon nanotube-based FETs, are typically in the m

  2. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  3. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array. PMID:23258939

  4. Fully Printed, Flexible, Phased Array Antenna for Lunar Surface Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Hen, Ray T.; Lu, Xuejun; Chen, Maggie Yihong

    2013-01-01

    NASAs future exploration missions focus on the manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, which will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back to Earth. Flexible antennas are highly desired in many scenarios. Active phased array antennas (active PAAs) with distributed control and processing electronics at the surface of an antenna aperture offer numerous advantages for radar communications. Large-area active PAAs on flexible substrates are of particular interest in NASA s space radars due to their efficient inflatable package that can be rolled up during transportation and deployed in space. Such an inflatable package significantly reduces stowage volume and mass. Because of these performance and packaging advantages, large-area inflatable active PAAs are highly desired in NASA s surface-to-orbit and surface-to-relay communications. To address the issues of flexible electronics, a room-temperature printing process of active phased-array antennas on a flexible Kapton substrate was developed. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proved feasible for the PAA system. This innovation is a new type of fully inkjet-printable, two-dimensional, high-frequency PAA on a flexible substrate at room temperature. The designed electronic circuit components, such as the FET switches in the phase shifter, metal interconnection lines, microstrip transmission lines, etc., are all printed using a special inkjet printer. Using the developed technology, entire 1x4, 2x2, and 4x4 PAA systems were developed, packaged, and demonstrated at 5.3 GHz. Several key solutions are addressed in this work to solve the fabrication issues. The source/drain contact is developed using droplets of silver ink printed on the source/drain areas prior to applying CNT thin-film. The wet silver ink droplets allow the silver to

  5. Design and development of high frequency matrix phased-array ultrasonic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Spencer, Roger L.

    2012-05-01

    High frequency matrix phased-array (MPA) probes have been designed and developed for more accurate and repeatable assessment of weld conditions of thin sheet metals commonly used in the auto industry. Unlike the line focused ultrasonic beam generated by a linear phased-array (LPA) probe, a MPA probe can form a circular shaped focused beam in addition to the typical beam steering capabilities of phased-array probes. A CIVA based modeling and simulation method has been used to design the probes in terms of various probe parameters such as number of elements, element size, overall dimensions, frequency etc. Challenges associated with the thicknesses of thin sheet metals have been resolved by optimizing these probe design parameters. A further improvement made on the design of the MPA probe proved that a three-dimensionally shaped matrix element can provide a better performing probe at a much lower probe manufacturing cost by reducing the total number of elements and lowering the operational frequency. This three dimensional probe naturally matches to the indentation shape of the weld on the thin sheet metals and hence a wider inspection area with the same level of spatial resolution obtained by a twodimensional flat MPA probe operating at a higher frequency. The two aspects, a wider inspection area and a lower probe manufacturing cost, make this three-dimensional MPA sensor more attractive to auto manufacturers demanding a quantitative nondestructive inspection method.

  6. PMN-PT Single-Crystal High-Frequency Kerfless Phased Array

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruimin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor E.; Lam, Kwok Ho; Hsu, Hsiu-sheng; Zheng, Fan; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of a miniature high-frequency kerfless phased array prepared from a PMN-PT single crystal for forward-looking intravascular or endoscopic imaging applications. After lapping down to around 40 μm, the PMN-PT material was utilized to fabricate 32-element kerfless phased arrays using micromachining techniques. The aperture size of the active area was only 1.0 × 1.0 mm. The measured results showed that the array had a center frequency of 40 MHz, a bandwidth of 34% at −6 dB with a polymer matching layer, and an insertion loss of 20 dB at the center frequency. Phantom images were acquired and compared with simulated images. The results suggest that the feasibility of developing a phased array mounted at the tip of a forward-looking intravascular catheter or endoscope. The fabricated array exhibits much higher sensitivity than PZT ceramic-based arrays and demonstrates that PMN-PT is well suited for this application. PMID:24859667

  7. PMN-PT single-crystal high-frequency kerfless phased array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruimin; Cabrera-Munoz, Nestor E; Lam, Kwok Ho; Hsu, Hsiu-sheng; Zheng, Fan; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the design, fabrication, and characterization of a miniature high-frequency kerfless phased array prepared from a PMN-PT single crystal for forward-looking intravascular or endoscopic imaging applications. After lapping down to around 40 μm, the PMN-PT material was utilized to fabricate 32-element kerfless phased arrays using micromachining techniques. The aperture size of the active area was only 1.0 × 1.0 mm. The measured results showed that the array had a center frequency of 40 MHz, a bandwidth of 34% at -6 dB with a polymer matching layer, and an insertion loss of 20 dB at the center frequency. Phantom images were acquired and compared with simulated images. The results suggest that the feasibility of developing a phased array mounted at the tip of a forward-looking intravascular catheter or endoscope. The fabricated array exhibits much higher sensitivity than PZT ceramic-based arrays and demonstrates that PMN-PT is well suited for this application.

  8. Scan blindness in infinite phased arrays of printed dipoles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pozar, D. M.; Schaubert, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive study of infinite phased arrays of printed dipole antennas is presented, with emphasis on the scan blindness phenomenon. A rigorous and efficient moment method procedure is used to calculate the array impedance versus scan angle. Data are presented for the input reflection coefficient for various element spacings and substrate parameters. A simple theory, based on coupling from Floquet modes to surface wave modes on the substrate, is shown to predict the occurrence of scan blindness. Measurements from a waveguide simulator of a blindness condition confirm the theory.

  9. Demonstration of Two-Way Extremely High Frequency (EHF) Satellite Communication (SATCOM) Using Submarine-Survivable Phased Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    successfully using both the Military Strategic and Tactical Relay (MILSTAR) and Ultra High Frequency Follow-On ( UFO ) military satellites. The antennas...a Navy-qualified submarine FOT and High Power Amplifier (HPA) system, toward a MILSTAR or UFO EHF satellite. FULL-DUPLEX STATIC TESTING...both the K & Q band phased arrays. Both the MILSTAR and UFO satellites were used for this testing, based on availability. Using the Type 8 Mod 3

  10. High frequency GaAlAs modulator and photodetector for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Chorey, C. M.; Hill, S. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1988-01-01

    A waveguide Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator and an interdigitated photoconductive detector designed to operate at 820 nm, fabricated on different GaAlAs/GaAs heterostructure materials, are being investigated for use in optical interconnects in phased array antenna systems. Measured optical attenuation effects in the modulator are discussed and the observed modulation performance up to 1 GHz is presented. Measurements of detector frequency response are described and results presented.

  11. High frequency GaAlAs modulator and photodetector for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claspy, P. C.; Chorey, C. M.; Hill, S. M.; Bhasin, K. B.

    1989-01-01

    A waveguide Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator and an interdigitated photoconductive detector designed to operate at 820 nm, fabricated on different GaAlAs/GaAs heterostructure materials, are being investigated for use in optical interconnects in phased array antenna systems. Measured optical attenuation effects in the modulator are discussed and the observed modulation performance up to 1 GHz is presented. Measurements of detector frequency response are described and results presented.

  12. Fabrication and performance of a miniaturized 64-element high-frequency endoscopic phased array.

    PubMed

    Bezanson, Andre; Adamson, Rob; Brown, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a 40-MHz, 64-element phased-array transducer packaged in a 2.5 x 3.1 mm endoscopic form factor. The array is a forward-looking semi-kerfed design based on a 0.68Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3) - 0.32PbTiO3 (PMN-32%PT) single-crystal wafer with an element-to-element pitch of 38 µm. To achieve a miniaturized form factor, a novel technique of wire bonding the array elements to a polyimide flexible circuit board oriented parallel to the forward looking ultrasound beam and perpendicular to the array was developed. A technique of partially dicing into the back of the array was also implemented to improve the directivity of the array elements. The array was fabricated with a single-layer P(VDF-TrFE)-copolymer matching layer and a polymethylpentene (TPX) lens for passive elevation focusing to a depth of 7 mm. The two-way -6-dB pulse bandwidth was measured to be 55% and the average electromechanical coupling (k(eff)) for the individual elements was measured to be 0.62. The one-way -6-dB directivities from several array elements were measured to be ±20°, which was shown to be an improvement over an identical kerfless array. The -3-dB elevation focus resulting from the TPX lens was measured to be 152 µm at the focal depth, and the focused lateral resolution was measured to be 80 µm at a steering angle of 0°. To generate beam profiles and images, the probe was connected to a commercial ultrasound imaging platform which was reprogrammed to allow for phased array transmit beamforming and receive data collection. The collected RF data were then processed offline using a numerical computing script to generate sector images. The radiation pattern for the beamformed transmit pulse was collected along with images of wire phantoms in water and tissue-equivalent medium with a dynamic range of 60 dB. Finally, ex vivo tissue images were generated of porcine brain tissue.

  13. A Sub-Nyquist, Variable Sampling, High-Frequency Phased Array Beamformer.

    PubMed

    Samson, Christopher A; Bezanson, Andre; Brown, Jeremy A

    2017-03-01

    A digital receive beamformer implementing a "one sample per pixel" variable sampling technique is described. The sampling method reduces the required sampling rates by a factor of 3, and reduces the data capture rate by a factor of 2, in comparison with the previous systems based on variable sampling. The sampling method is capable of estimating broadband pulse envelopes accurate for bandwidths up to 83.0%. This beamforming method has been implemented on a field-programmable gate array with maximum transmit and receive delay errors measured to be less than ±1.0 ns. The beamformer was tested and verified on a previously described 45-MHz 64-element phased array. The system generates images with 128 lines, 512 pixels per RF line, and 2 transmit focal zones. The system generates images with approximately 55 dB of dynamic range and was tested by imaging wire targets submersed in a water bath, wire targets embedded in a tissue phantom, and real-time in vivo imaging of a human wrist.

  14. In-situ Calibration Methods for Phased Array High Frequency Radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, P. J.; Flament, M.; Chavanne, C.; Flores-vidal, X.; Rodriguez, I.; Marié, L.; Hilmer, T.

    2016-12-01

    HF radars measure currents through the Doppler-shift of electromagnetic waves Bragg-scattered by surface gravity waves. While modern clocks and digital synthesizers yield range errors negligible compared to the bandwidth-limited range resolution, azimuth calibration issues arise for beam-forming phased arrays. Sources of errors in the phases of the received waves can be internal to the radar system (phase errors of filters, cable lengths, antenna tuning) and geophysical (standing waves, propagation and refraction anomalies). They result in azimuthal biases (which can be range-dependent) and beam-forming side-lobes (which induce Doppler ambiguities). We analyze the experimental calibrations of 17 deployments of WERA HF radars, performed between 2003 and 2012 in Hawaii, the Adriatic, France, Mexico and the Philippines. Several strategies were attempted: (i) passive reception of continuous multi-frequency transmitters on GPS-tracked boats, cars, and drones; (ii) bi-static calibrations of radars in mutual view; (iii) active echoes from vessels of opportunity of unknown positions or tracked through AIS; (iv) interference of unknown remote transmitters with the chirped local oscillator. We found that: (a) for antennas deployed on the sea shore, a single-azimuth calibration is sufficient to correct phases within a typical beam-forming azimuth range; (b) after applying this azimuth-independent correction, residual pointing errors are 1-2 deg. rms; (c) for antennas deployed on irregular cliffs or hills, back from shore, systematic biases appear for some azimuths at large incidence angles, suggesting that some of the ground-wave electromagnetic energy propagates in a terrain-following mode between the sea shore and the antennas; (d) for some sites, fluctuations of 10-25 deg. in radio phase at 20-40 deg. azimuthal period, not significantly correlated among antennas, are omnipresent in calibrations along a constant-range circle, suggesting standing waves or multiple paths in

  15. X-band printed phased array antennas using high-performance CNT/ion gel/Ag transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubb, Peter M.; Bidoky, Fazel; Mahajan, Ankit; Subbaraman, Harish; Li, Wentao; Frisbie, Daniel; Chen, Ray T.

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports a fully printed phased array antenna developed on a 125 micron thick flexible Kapton substrate. Switching for the phase delay lines is accomplished using printed carbon nanotube transistors with ion gel dielectric layers. Design of each element of the phased array antenna is reported, including a low loss constant impedance power divider, a phase shifter network, and patch antenna design. Steering of an X-band PAA operating at 10GHz from 0 degrees to 22.15 degrees is experimentally demonstrated. In order to completely package the array with electrical interconnects, a single substrate interconnect scheme is also investigated.

  16. Cobalt Nanoparticle Inks for Printed High Frequency Applications on Polycarbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelo, Mikko; Myllymäki, Sami; Juuti, Jari; Uusimäki, Antti; Jantunen, Heli

    2015-12-01

    In this work the high frequency properties of low curing temperature cobalt nanoparticle inks printed on polycarbonate substrates were investigated. The inks consisted of 30-70 vol.% metallic cobalt nanoparticles and poly (methylene methacrylate) polymer, having excellent adhesion on polycarbonate and a curing temperature of 110°C. The influence of binder material content on the electromagnetic properties of the ink was investigated using the shorted microstrip transmission-line perturbation method. Changes in mechanical properties were evaluated with adhesion tests using the pull-out strength test and the ASTM D 3359-B cross-hatch tape peel test. The microstructure of the printed patterns was investigated with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The inks remained mechanically durable with metal contents up to 60 vol.%, achieving pull-off strength of up to 5.2 MPa and the highest marks in adhesion of the tape peel test. The inks obtained a relative permeability of 1.5-3 in the 45 MHz-10 GHz band with a magnetic loss tangent of 0.01-0.06. The developed inks can be utilized in various printed electronics applications such as antenna miniaturization, antenna substrates and magnetic sensors or sensing.

  17. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  18. Printed silver nanowire antennas with low signal loss at high-frequency radio.

    PubMed

    Komoda, Natsuki; Nogi, Masaya; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Kohno, Kazuo; Akiyama, Yutaka; Otsuka, Kanji

    2012-05-21

    Silver nanowires are printable and conductive, and are believed to be promising materials in the field of printed electronics. However, the resistivity of silver nanowire printed lines is higher than that of metallic particles or flakes even when sintered at high temperatures of 100-400 °C. Therefore, their applications have been limited to the replacement of transparent electrodes made from high-resistivity materials, such as doped metallic oxides, conductive polymers, carbon nanotubes, or graphenes. Here we report that using printed silver nanowire lines, signal losses obtained in the high-frequency radio were lower than those obtained using etched copper foil antennas, because their surfaces were much smoother than those of etched copper foil antennas. This was the case even though the resistivity of silver nanowire lines was 43-71 μΩ cm, which is much higher than that of etched copper foil (2 μΩ cm). When printed silver nanowire antennas were heated at 100 °C, they achieved signal losses that were much lower than those of silver paste antennas comprising microparticles, nanoparticles, and flakes. Furthermore, using a low temperature process, we succeeded in remotely controlling a commercialized radio-controlled car by transmitting a 2.45 GHz signal via a silver nanowire antenna printed on a polyethylene terephthalate film.

  19. Printed silver nanowire antennas with low signal loss at high-frequency radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoda, Natsuki; Nogi, Masaya; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Kohno, Kazuo; Akiyama, Yutaka; Otsuka, Kanji

    2012-05-01

    Silver nanowires are printable and conductive, and are believed to be promising materials in the field of printed electronics. However, the resistivity of silver nanowire printed lines is higher than that of metallic particles or flakes even when sintered at high temperatures of 100-400 °C. Therefore, their applications have been limited to the replacement of transparent electrodes made from high-resistivity materials, such as doped metallic oxides, conductive polymers, carbon nanotubes, or graphenes. Here we report that using printed silver nanowire lines, signal losses obtained in the high-frequency radio were lower than those obtained using etched copper foil antennas, because their surfaces were much smoother than those of etched copper foil antennas. This was the case even though the resistivity of silver nanowire lines was 43-71 μΩ cm, which is much higher than that of etched copper foil (2 μΩ cm). When printed silver nanowire antennas were heated at 100 °C, they achieved signal losses that were much lower than those of silver paste antennas comprising microparticles, nanoparticles, and flakes. Furthermore, using a low temperature process, we succeeded in remotely controlling a commercialized radio-controlled car by transmitting a 2.45 GHz signal via a silver nanowire antenna printed on a polyethylene terephthalate film.Silver nanowires are printable and conductive, and are believed to be promising materials in the field of printed electronics. However, the resistivity of silver nanowire printed lines is higher than that of metallic particles or flakes even when sintered at high temperatures of 100-400 °C. Therefore, their applications have been limited to the replacement of transparent electrodes made from high-resistivity materials, such as doped metallic oxides, conductive polymers, carbon nanotubes, or graphenes. Here we report that using printed silver nanowire lines, signal losses obtained in the high-frequency radio were lower than those

  20. Optically interconnected phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul B.; Kunath, Richard R.

    1988-01-01

    Phased-array antennas are required for many future NASA missions. They will provide agile electronic beam forming for communications and tracking in the range of 1 to 100 GHz. Such phased arrays are expected to use several hundred GaAs monolithic integrated circuits (MMICs) as transmitting and receiving elements. However, the interconnections of these elements by conventional coaxial cables and waveguides add weight, reduce flexibility, and increase electrical interference. Alternative interconnections based on optical fibers, optical processing, and holography are under evaluation as possible solutions. In this paper, the current status of these techniques is described. Since high-frequency optical components such as photodetectors, lasers, and modulators are key elements in these interconnections, their performance and limitations are discussed.

  1. Pad-printed thick-film transducers for high-frequency and high-power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, Wanda W.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Levassort, Franck; Lou-Moeller, Rasmus; Filoux, Erwan; Mamou, Jonathan; Silverman, Ronald H.; Lethiecq, Marc

    2011-03-01

    High-frequency-ultrasound transducers are widely used but are typically based either on planar piezoceramic sections that are lapped down to smaller thicknesses or on piezopolymers that may be deformed into more complex geometries. Piezoceramics then require dicing to obtain arrays or can be fractured into spherical geometries to achieve focusing. Piezopolymers are not as efficient for very small element sizes and are normally available only in discrete thicknesses. Thick-film (TF) transducers provide a means of overcoming these limits because the piezoelectric film is deposited with the required thickness, size and geometry, thus avoiding any subsequent machining. Thick-film transducers offer the potential of a wide range of geometries such as single-elements and annular or linear arrays. Here, a single-element focused transducer was developed using a piezoceramic composition adapted to high-power operation which is commonly used at standard MHz frequencies. After fabrication, the transducer was characterized. Using specific transmit-receive electronics and a water tank adapted to high-frequency devices, the transducer was excited using a short pulse to evaluate its bandwidth and imaging capabilities. Finally, it was excited by a one-period sine wave using several power levels to evaluate its capacity to produce high-intensity focused ultrasound at frequencies over 20 MHz.

  2. Printed circuit-mounted surge suppressor matched to characteristic impedance of high frequency transmission line

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, A.O.

    1994-01-11

    A surge suppressor for a high frequency transmission line contains a microstrip architecture comprising a dielectric sheet on a first side of which a signal conductor stripe layer is formed and on a second side of which a ground plane conductor layer is formed. The strip layer is disposed along a generally central linear region of the first surface, so as to facilitate direct connection to the center conductor of a pair of end connectors, such as type F coaxial connectors. The ground plane conductor layer is attached to the shield layer of the coaxial connectors. A gas discharge tube is coupled between a first location of the stripe layer and the ground plane layer. The discharge device may be mounted on the first side of the microstrip structure and is connected to the ground plane layer on the opposite surface by way of a plated through hole. The ground plane layer has an aperture of a prescribed area in mutual alignment with the stripe layer so as to effectively remove the distributed capacitance between the stripe layer and the ground plane along a defined length of the stripe. This decrease in the distributed microstrip capacitance coupled with the fact that the removal of ground plane metal leaves the overlying section of the center conductor as a length of inductance compensate for the alteration of the characteristic impedance by the connection of the discharge device between the stripe conductor layer and the ground plane layer. 8 figs.

  3. Coplanar waveguide fed phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Ponchak, George E.; Lee, R. Q.; Fernandez, N. S.

    1990-01-01

    A K-band four element linear phased array was designed and tested. Coplanar waveguide (CPW) is used for the microwave distribution system. A CPW to twin strip transition is used to interface with the printed dipole antennas. MMIC phased shifters are used for phase control.

  4. Adaptive ground implemented phase array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearing, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The simulation of an adaptive ground implemented phased array of five antenna elements is reported for a very high frequency system design that is tolerant to the radio frequency interference environment encountered by a tracking data relay satellite. Signals originating from satellites are received by the VHF ring array and both horizontal and vertical polarizations from each of the five elements are multiplexed and transmitted down to ground station. A panel on the transmitting end of the simulation chamber contains up to 10 S-band RFI sources along with the desired signal to simulate the dynamic relationship between user and TDRS. The 10 input channels are summed, and desired and interference signals are separated and corrected until the resultant sum signal-to-interference ratio is maximized. Testing performed with this simulation equipment demonstrates good correlation between predicted and actual results.

  5. Phased array ghost elimination

    PubMed Central

    Kellman, Peter; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    Parallel imaging may be applied to cancel ghosts caused by a variety of distortion mechanisms, including distortions such as off-resonance or local flow, which are space variant. Phased array combining coefficients may be calculated that null ghost artifacts at known locations based on a constrained optimization, which optimizes SNR subject to the nulling constraint. The resultant phased array ghost elimination (PAGE) technique is similar to the method known as sensitivity encoding (SENSE) used for accelerated imaging; however, in this formulation is applied to full field-of-view (FOV) images. The phased array method for ghost elimination may result in greater flexibility in designing acquisition strategies. For example, in multi-shot EPI applications ghosts are typically mitigated by the use of an interleaved phase encode acquisition order. An alternative strategy is to use a sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order and cancel the resultant ghosts using PAGE parallel imaging. Cancellation of ghosts by means of phased array processing makes sequential, non-interleaved phase encode acquisition order practical, and permits a reduction in repetition time, TR, by eliminating the need for echo-shifting. Sequential, non-interleaved phase encode order has benefits of reduced distortion due to off-resonance, in-plane flow and EPI delay misalignment. Furthermore, the use of EPI with PAGE has inherent fat-water separation and has been used to provide off-resonance correction using a technique referred to as lipid elimination with an echo-shifting N/2-ghost acquisition (LEENA), and may further generalized using the multi-point Dixon method. Other applications of PAGE include cancelling ghosts which arise due to amplitude or phase variation during the approach to steady state. Parallel imaging requires estimates of the complex coil sensitivities. In vivo estimates may be derived by temporally varying the phase encode ordering to obtain a full k-space dataset in a scheme

  6. Nonlinear phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxford, Anthony J.; Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.

    2016-04-01

    A technique is presented for imaging acoustic nonlinearity within a specimen using ultrasonic phased arrays. Acoustic nonlinearity is measured by evaluating the difference in energy of the transmission bandwidth within the diffuse field produced through different focusing modes. The two different modes being classical beam forming, where delays are applied to different element of a phased array to physically focus the energy at a single location (parallel firing) and focusing in post processing, whereby one element at a time is fired and a focused image produced in post processing (sequential firing). Although these two approaches are linearly equivalent the difference in physical displacement within the specimen leads to differences in nonlinear effects. These differences are localized to the areas where the amplitude is different, essentially confining the differences to the focal point. Direct measurement at the focal point are however difficult to make. In order to measure this the diffuse field is used. It is a statistical property of the diffuse field that it represents the total energy in the system. If the energy in the diffuse field for both the sequential and parallel firing case is measured then the difference between these, within the input signal bandwidth, is largely due to differences at the focal spot. This difference therefore gives a localized measurement of where energy is moving out of the transmission bandwidth due to nonlinear effects. This technique is used to image fatigue cracks and other damage types undetectable with conventional linear ultrasonic measurements.

  7. Large phased-array radars

    SciTech Connect

    Brookner, D.E.

    1988-12-15

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  8. Large phased-array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookner, Eli, Dr.

    1988-12-01

    Large phased-array radars can play a very important part in arms control. They can be used to determine the number of RVs being deployed, the type of targeting of the RVs (the same or different targets), the shape of the deployed objects, and possibly the weight and yields of the deployed RVs. They can provide this information at night as well as during the day and during rain and cloud covered conditions. The radar can be on the ground, on a ship, in an airplane, or space-borne. Airborne and space-borne radars can provide high resolution map images of the ground for reconnaissance, of anti-ballistic missile (ABM) ground radar installations, missile launch sites, and tactical targets such as trucks and tanks. The large ground based radars can have microwave carrier frequencies or be at HF (high frequency). For a ground-based HF radar the signal is reflected off the ionosphere so as to provide over-the-horizon (OTH) viewing of targets. OTH radars can potentially be used to monitor stealth targets and missile traffic.

  9. Multibeam Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, Zoya; Romisch, Stefania; Rondineau, Sebastien

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a new architecture for Ka-band multi-beam arrays was developed and demonstrated experimentally. The goal of the investigation was to demonstrate a new architecture that has the potential of reducing the cost as compared to standard expensive phased array technology. The goals of this specific part of the project, as stated in the yearly statement of work in the original proposal are: 1. Investigate bounds on performance of multi-beam lens arrays in terms of beamwidths, volume (size), isolation between beams, number of simultaneous beams, etc. 2. Design a small-scale array to demonstrate the principle. The array will be designed for operation around 3OGHz (Ka-band), with two 10-degree beamwidth beams. 3. Investigate most appropriate way to accomplish fine-tuning of the beam pointing within 5 degrees around the main beam pointing angle.

  10. Printed high-frequency RF identification antenna on ultrathin polymer film by simple production process for soft-surface adhesive device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayata, Hiroki; Okamoto, Marin; Takeoka, Shinji; Iwase, Eiji; Fujie, Toshinori; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method for manufacturing electronic devices using ultrathin polymer films, and develop a high-frequency RF identification. To expand the market for flexible devices, it is important to enhance their adhesiveness and conformability to surfaces, to simplify their fabrication, and to reduce their cost. We developed a method to design an antenna for use on an operable RF identification whose wiring was subjected to commercially available inkjet or simple screen printing, and successfully fabricated the RF identification. By using ultrathin films made of polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS) as substrates — less than 750 nm — the films could be attached to various surfaces, including soft surfaces, by van der Waals force and without using glue. We succeeded in the simple fabrication of an ultrathin RF identification including a commercial or simple printing process.

  11. UAVSAR Phased Array Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, Neil; Zawadzki, Mark; Sadowy, Greg; Oakes, Eric; Brown, Kyle; Hodges, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a patch antenna array for an L-band repeat-pass interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) instrument that is to be flown on an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). The antenna operates at a center frequency of 1.2575 GHz and with a bandwidth of 80 MHz, consistent with a number of radar instruments that JPL has previously flown. The antenna is designed to radiate orthogonal linear polarizations in order to facilitate fully-polarimetric measurements. Beam-pointing requirements for repeat-pass SAR interferometry necessitate electronic scanning in azimuth over a range of -20degrees in order to compensate for aircraft yaw. Beam-steering is accomplished by transmit/receive (T/R) modules and a beamforming network implemented in a stripline circuit board. This paper, while providing an overview of phased array architecture, focuses on the electromagnetic design of the antenna tiles and associated interconnects. An important aspect of the design of this antenna is that it has an amplitude taper of 10dB in the elevation direction. This is to reduce multipath reflections from the wing that would otherwise be detrimental to interferometric radar measurements. This taper is provided by coupling networks in the interconnect circuits as opposed to attenuating the output of the T/R modules. Details are given of material choices and fabrication techniques that meet the demanding environmental conditions that the antenna must operate in. Predicted array performance is reported in terms of co-polarized and crosspolarized far-field antenna patterns, and also in terms of active reflection coefficient.

  12. Octave Bandwidth Printed Circuit Phased Array Element

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    superstrate layer over the antenna was also tried in the computer models, it would provide protection from weather, and was found to also improve the...element feed impedance match if the superstrate has a very low dielectric constant such as εr = 1.4 or less. The superstrate does not need any etching...or vias. The best superstrate thickness was about lambda/4 at the top of the band. Syntactic Foam Spacer with Plated-Thru Via Holes The modeling

  13. Modeling of phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rais; Kundu, Tribikram; Placko, Dominique

    2005-04-01

    Phased array transducers are multi-element transducers, where different elements are activated with different time delays. The advantage of these transducers is that no mechanical movement of the transducer is needed to scan an object. Focusing and beam steering is obtained simply by adjusting the time delay. In this paper the DPSM (distributed point source method) is used to model the ultrasonic field generated by a phased array transducer and to study the interaction effect when two phased array transducers are placed in a homogeneous fluid. Earlier investigations modeled the acoustic field for conventional transducers where all transducer points are excited simultaneously. In this research, combining the concepts of delayed firing and the DPSM, the phased array transducers are modeled semi-analytically. In addition to the single transducer modeling the ultrasonic fields from two phased array transducers placed face to face in a fluid medium is also modeled to study the interaction effect. The importance of considering the interaction effect in multiple transducer modeling is discussed, pointing out that neighboring transducers not only act as ultrasonic wave generators but also as scatterers.

  14. Optically controlled phased-array technology for space communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1988-01-01

    Using MMICs in phased-array applications above 20 GHz requires complex RF and control signal distribution systems. Conventional waveguide, coaxial cable, and microstrip methods are undesirable due to their high weight, high loss, limited mechanical flexibility and large volume. An attractive alternative to these transmission media, for RF and control signal distribution in MMIC phased-array antennas, is optical fiber. Presented are potential system architectures and their associated characteristics. The status of high frequency opto-electronic components needed to realize the potential system architectures is also discussed. It is concluded that an optical fiber network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but may require higher power.

  15. Diffraction-limited circular single spot from phased array lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuno, K.; Drenten, R.; Poel, C.v.d.; Opschoor, J.; Acket, G. )

    1989-11-01

    Anamorphic prism optics makes it possible to obtain a diffraction-limited ({Sigma}/8) circular single spot from index guided phased array lasers. It served not only for beam shaping but also for astigmatism correction and spatial filtering. The optical path analysis based on the interferometric fringe scanning phase measurements both in the near and far fields indicates that the phased array lasers can be applied to such diffraction-limited precise optical systems as optical disk recording, laser beam printing, or second harmonics generation.

  16. Cabling design for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, I. D.; Turkiewicz, L.

    1972-01-01

    The ribbon-cabling system used for the AEGIS phased array which provides minimum cable bulk, complete EMI shielding, rugged mechanical design, repeatable electrical characteristics, and ease of assembly and maintenance is described. The ribbon cables are 0.040-inch thick, and in widths up to 2 1/2 inches. Their terminations are molded connectors that can be grouped in a three-tier arrangement, with cable branching accomplished by a matrix-welding technique.

  17. Cabling design for phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruger, I. D.; Turkiewicz, L.

    1972-01-01

    The ribbon-cabling system used for the AEGIS phased array which provides minimum cable bulk, complete EMI shielding, rugged mechanical design, repeatable electrical characteristics, and ease of assembly and maintenance is described. The ribbon cables are 0.040-inch thick, and in widths up to 2 1/2 inches. Their terminations are molded connectors that can be grouped in a three-tier arrangement, with cable branching accomplished by a matrix-welding technique.

  18. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  19. Active membrane phased array radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moussessian, Alina; Del Castillo, Linda; Huang, John; Sadowy, Greg; Hoffman, James; Smith, Phil; Hatake, Toshiro; Derksen, Chuck; Lopez, Bernardo; Caro, Ed

    2005-01-01

    We have developed the first membrane-based active phased array in L-band (1.26GHz). The array uses membrane compatible Transmit/Receive (T/R) modules (membrane T/R) for each antenna element. We use phase shifters within each T/R module for electronic beam steering. We will discuss the T/R module design and integration with the membrane, We will also present transmit and receive beam-steering results for the array.

  20. Airborne electronically steerable phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of the second stage of a program for the design and development of a phased array capable of simultaneous and separate transmission and reception of radio frequency signals at S-band frequencies. The design goals of this stage were the development of three major areas of interest required for the final prototype model. These areas are the construction and testing of the low-weight, full-scale 128-element array of antenna elements, the development of the RF manifold feed system, and the construction and testing of a working module containing diplexer and transmit and receive circuits.

  1. Optical phased-array ladar.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Juan; Sanchez-Rubio, Antonio; Hatch, Robert; Payson, Harold

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate a ladar with 0.5 m class range resolution obtained by integrating a continuous-wave optical phased-array transmitter with a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode receiver array. In contrast with conventional ladar systems, an array of continuous-wave sources is used to effectively pulse illuminate a target by electro-optically steering far-field fringes. From the reference frame of a point in the far field, a steered fringe appears as a pulse. Range information is thus obtained by measuring the arrival time of a pulse return from a target to a receiver pixel. This ladar system offers a number of benefits, including broad spectral coverage, high efficiency, small size, power scalability, and versatility.

  2. Distributed phased array architecture study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Variations in amplifiers and phase shifters can cause degraded antenna performance, depending also on the environmental conditions and antenna array architecture. The implementation of distributed phased array hardware was studied with the aid of the DISTAR computer program as a simulation tool. This simulation provides guidance in hardware simulation. Both hard and soft failures of the amplifiers in the T/R modules are modeled. Hard failures are catastrophic: no power is transmitted to the antenna elements. Noncatastrophic or soft failures are modeled as a modified Gaussian distribution. The resulting amplitude characteristics then determine the array excitation coefficients. The phase characteristics take on a uniform distribution. Pattern characteristics such as antenna gain, half power beamwidth, mainbeam phase errors, sidelobe levels, and beam pointing errors were studied as functions of amplifier and phase shifter variations. General specifications for amplifier and phase shifter tolerances in various architecture configurations for C band and S band were determined.

  3. EHF multifunction phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solbach, Klaus

    1986-07-01

    The design of a low cost demonstration EHF multifunction-phased array antenna is described. Both, the radiating elements and the phase-shifter circuits are realized on microstrip substrate material in order to allow photolithographic batch fabrication. Self-encapsulated beam-lead PIN-diodes are employed as the electronic switch elements to avoid expensive hermetic encapsulation of the semiconductors or complete circuits. A space-feed using a horn-radiator to illuminate the array from the front-side is found to be the simplest and most inexpensive feed. The phased array antenna thus operates as a reflect-array, the antenna elements employed in a dual role for the collection of energy from the feed-horn and for the re-radiation of the phase-shifted waves (in transmit-mode). The antenna is divided into modules containing the radiator/phase-shifter plate plus drive- and BITE-circuitry at the back. Both drive- and BITE-components use gate-array integrated circuits especially designed for the purpose. Several bus-systems are used to supply bias and logical data flows to the modules. The beam-steering unit utilizes several signal processors and high-speed discrete adder circuits to combine the pointing, frequency and beam-shape information from the radar system computer with the stored phase-shift codes for the array elements. Since space, weight and power consumption are prime considerations only the most advanced technology is used in the design of both the microwave and the digital/drive circuitry.

  4. Quantitative ultrasonic phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    When imaging with ultrasonic phased arrays, what do we actually image? What quantitative information is contained in the image? Ad-hoc delay-and-sum methods such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and the total focusing method (TFM) fail to answer these questions. We have shown that a new quantitative approach allows the formation of flaw images by explicitly inverting the Thompson-Gray measurement model. To examine the above questions, we have set up a software simulation test bed that considers a 2-D scalar scattering problem of a cylindrical inclusion with the method of separation of variables. It is shown that in SAFT types of imaging the only part of the flaw properly imaged is the front surface specular response of the flaw. Other responses (back surface reflections, creeping waves, etc.) are improperly imaged and form artifacts in the image. In the case of TFM-like imaging the quantity being properly imaged is an angular integration of the front surface reflectivity. The other, improperly imaged responses are also averaged, leading to a reduction in some of the artifacts present. Our results have strong implications for flaw sizing and flaw characterization with delay-and-sum images.

  5. Proceedings: EPRI Second Phased Array Inspection Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2001-11-01

    The Second EPRI Phased Array Inspection Seminar focused on industrial applications of phased array technology that have been achieved to date or are planned for the near future. Presentations were made by developers of inspection techniques, inspection services vendors, and utility personnel who have performed inspections using arrays.

  6. Delamination Detection Using Guided Wave Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Yu, Lingyu; Leckey, Cara

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method for detecting multiple delaminations in composite laminates using non-contact phased arrays. The phased arrays are implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). The array imaging algorithm is performed in the frequency domain where both the guided wave dispersion effect and direction dependent wave properties are considered. By using the non-contact SLDV array with a frequency domain imaging algorithm, an intensity image of the composite plate can be generated for delamination detection. For the proof of concept, a laboratory test is performed using a non-contact phased array to detect two delaminations (created through quasi-static impact test) at different locations in a composite plate. Using the non-contact phased array and frequency domain imaging, the two impact-induced delaminations are successfully detected. This study shows that the non-contact phased array method is a potentially effective method for rapid delamination inspection in large composite structures.

  7. Method for Fabricating and Packaging an M.Times.N Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbaraman, Harish (Inventor); Xu, Xiaochuan (Inventor); Chen, Yihong (Inventor); Chen, Ray T. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method for fabricating an M.times.N, P-bit phased-array antenna on a flexible substrate is disclosed. The method comprising ink jet printing and hardening alignment marks, antenna elements, transmission lines, switches, an RF coupler, and multilayer interconnections onto the flexible substrate. The substrate of the M.times.N, P-bit phased-array antenna may comprise an integrated control circuit of printed electronic components such as, photovoltaic cells, batteries, resistors, capacitors, etc. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  8. Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Titanium Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, P.; Klaassen, R.; Kurkcu, N.; Barshinger, J.; Chalek, C.; Nieters, E.; Sun, Zongqi; Fromont, F. de

    2007-03-21

    Aerospace forging inspections typically use multiple, subsurface-focused sound beams in combination with digital C-scan image acquisition and display. Traditionally, forging inspections have been implemented using multiple single element, fixed focused transducers. Recent advances in phased array technology have made it possible to perform an equivalent inspection using a single phased array transducer. General Electric has developed a system to perform titanium forging inspection based on medical phased array technology and advanced image processing techniques. The components of that system and system performance for titanium inspection will be discussed.

  9. A phased array tracking antenna for vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohmori, Shingo; Mano, Kazukiko; Tanaka, Kenji; Matsunaga, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Makio

    1990-01-01

    An antenna system including antenna elements and a satellite tracking method is considered a key technology in implementing land mobile satellite communications. In the early stage of land mobile satellite communications, a mechanical tracking antenna system is considered the best candidate for vehicles, however, a phased array antenna will replace it in the near future, because it has many attractive advantages such as a low and compact profile, high speed tracking, and potential low cost. Communications Research Laboratory is now developing a new phased array antenna system for land vehicles based on research experiences of the airborne phased array antenna, which was developed and evaluated in satellite communication experiments using the ETS-V satellite. The basic characteristics of the phased array antenna for land vehicles are described.

  10. Analysis of phased-array diode lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, A.; Streifer, W.

    1985-07-01

    An improved, more accurate analysis of phased-array diode lasers is presented, which yields results that differ both qualitatively and quantitatively from those previously employed. A numerical example indicating decreased splitting in array mode gains is included.

  11. Fundamental Limitations of Phased Array Antenna Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-15

    Radiation Q of InfinitePlanar Dipole Phased Arrays, IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, (01 2014): 153. doi: Yong Heui Cho, Do-Hoon Kwon...element bandwidth bounds were found in terms of the strengths of the induced electric and magnetic dipole moments, taking into account of the coupling...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 15-12-2015 1-Oct-2012 30-Sep-2015 Final Report: Fundamental Limitations of Phased Array Antenna Elements The views

  12. Large-scale nanophotonic phased array.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jie; Timurdogan, Erman; Yaacobi, Ami; Hosseini, Ehsan Shah; Watts, Michael R

    2013-01-10

    Electromagnetic phased arrays at radio frequencies are well known and have enabled applications ranging from communications to radar, broadcasting and astronomy. The ability to generate arbitrary radiation patterns with large-scale phased arrays has long been pursued. Although it is extremely expensive and cumbersome to deploy large-scale radiofrequency phased arrays, optical phased arrays have a unique advantage in that the much shorter optical wavelength holds promise for large-scale integration. However, the short optical wavelength also imposes stringent requirements on fabrication. As a consequence, although optical phased arrays have been studied with various platforms and recently with chip-scale nanophotonics, all of the demonstrations so far are restricted to one-dimensional or small-scale two-dimensional arrays. Here we report the demonstration of a large-scale two-dimensional nanophotonic phased array (NPA), in which 64 × 64 (4,096) optical nanoantennas are densely integrated on a silicon chip within a footprint of 576 μm × 576 μm with all of the nanoantennas precisely balanced in power and aligned in phase to generate a designed, sophisticated radiation pattern in the far field. We also show that active phase tunability can be realized in the proposed NPA by demonstrating dynamic beam steering and shaping with an 8 × 8 array. This work demonstrates that a robust design, together with state-of-the-art complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology, allows large-scale NPAs to be implemented on compact and inexpensive nanophotonic chips. In turn, this enables arbitrary radiation pattern generation using NPAs and therefore extends the functionalities of phased arrays beyond conventional beam focusing and steering, opening up possibilities for large-scale deployment in applications such as communication, laser detection and ranging, three-dimensional holography and biomedical sciences, to name just a few.

  13. Microwave properties of sphere-, flake-, and disc-shaped BaFe12O19 nanoparticle inks for high-frequency applications on printed electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myllymäki, S.; Maček Kržmanc, M.; Sloma, M.; Juuti, J.; Nelo, M.; Teirikangas, M.; Jakubowska, M.; Suvorov, D.; Jantunen, H.

    2016-12-01

    Spherical (diameter 50-200 nm), flake- (diameter 40-200 nm), and disc-shaped (diameter 10-20 nm) BaFe12O19 nanoparticles were synthesized with a wet chemical method, and their permittivity, electric loss tangent, permeability, and magnetic loss tangent were measured in the 0.045-10 GHz range. The materials were prepared using a solution of 12% PMMA resin in a butyldiglycol solvent for 10-50 wt% filling content. Microstrip transmission-line perturbation was used to measure complex permeability and the split post dielectric resonator method was employed to measure dielectric properties. The frequency dependence of the permeability and permittivity spectra of the composites was affected by their shape and filling fraction. The composites made with spherical particles had higher permeability values (1.4-1.75) at 1 GHz than the composites made with flake (1.25-1.6) or disc particles (1.1-1.3), but the spherical particles caused more losses. The flake particle composite provided permeability and magnetic loss characteristics at both 1 GHz and 7 GHz superior to those of the sphere particle composite in low-loss RF applications. The magnetic loss tangent of PMMA/BaFe12O19 was 0.2-0.3 at 1 GHz, being lower than that of state-of-the-art PANI/BaFe12O19 composites. The sphere composite inks showed permeability values less than 1 at 1-4 GHz ferromagnetic resonance (FMR); they could be used as a tunable material in microwave applications. The sphere and flake composite inks also had sufficient printing quality for the screen-printing fabrication method.

  14. Basis of Ionospheric Modification by High-Frequency Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    for conducting ionospheric heating experiments in Gakona, Alaska, as part of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) [5], is being...upgraded. The upgraded HAARP HF transmitting system will be a phased-array antenna of 180 elements. Each element is a cross dipole, which radiates a...supported by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ), the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hanscom Air Force Base, MA, and by the Office

  15. Optically controlled phased-array antenna technology for space communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1988-01-01

    Using MMICs in phased-array applications above 20 GHz requires complex RF and control signal distribution systems. Conventional waveguide, coaxial cable, and microstrip methods are undesirable due to their high weight, high loss, limited mechanical flexibility and large volume. An attractive alternative to these transmission media, for RF and control signal distribution in MMIC phased-array antennas, is optical fiber. Presented are potential system architectures and their associated characteristics. The status of high frequency opto-electronic components needed to realize the potential system architectures is also discussed. It is concluded that an optical fiber network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but may require higher power.

  16. Monitoring techniques for phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronen, J.; Clarke, R. H.

    1985-12-01

    The problem of monitoring phased-array antennas in general and microwave landing system (MLS) in particular is considered. Various methods of monitoring phased-array antennas are suggested. One is based on changes in the far field radiation pattern arising from defects in the array. Another method uses the near-field to far-field transformation, based on the concept of the plane-wave spectrum, for the detection of defects in the antenna. A third method is based on near-field measurements and uses the properties of the Fresnel integral. The methods were simulated on the computer and, where possible, were tested by experiment. A comparative assessment of the methods is given, and an operational monitoring system is suggested for the MLS phased array.

  17. Phased-array radar for airborne systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahim, Raghbir S.; Foshee, James J.; Chang, Kai

    2003-09-01

    Phased array antenna systems, which support high pulse rates and high transmit power, are well suited for radar and large-scale surveillance. Sensors and communication systems can function as the eyes and ears for ballistic missile defense applications, providing early warning of attack, target detection and identification, target tracking, and countermeasure decision. In such applications, active array radar systems that contain solid-state transmitter sources and low-noise preamplifiers for transmission and reception are preferred over the conventional radar antennas, because the phased array radar offers the advantages of power management and efficiency, reliability, signal reception, beam steering target detection. The current phased array radar designs are very large, complex and expensive and less efficient because of high RF losses in the phase control circuits used for beam scan. Several thousands of phase shifters and drivers may be required for a single system thus making the system very complex and expensive. This paper describes the phased array radar system based on high power T/R modules, wide-band radiating planar antenna elements and very low loss wide-band phase control circuits (requiring reduced power levels) for beam scan. The phase shifter design is based on micro-strip feed lines perturbed by the proximity of voltage controlled piezoelectric transducer (PET). Measured results have shown an added insertion loss of less than 1 dB for a phase shift of 450 degrees from 2 to 20 GHz. The new wideband phased array radar design provides significant reduction in size cost and weight. Compared to the conventional phased array systems, the cost saving is more than 15 to 1.

  18. Improved Phased Array Imaging of a Model Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Robert P.; Podboy, Gary G.

    2010-01-01

    An advanced phased array system, OptiNav Array 48, and a new deconvolution algorithm, TIDY, have been used to make octave band images of supersonic and subsonic jet noise produced by the NASA Glenn Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig (SHJAR). The results are much more detailed than previous jet noise images. Shock cell structures and the production of screech in an underexpanded supersonic jet are observed directly. Some trends are similar to observations using spherical and elliptic mirrors that partially informed the two-source model of jet noise, but the radial distribution of high frequency noise near the nozzle appears to differ from expectations of this model. The beamforming approach has been validated by agreement between the integrated image results and the conventional microphone data.

  19. Proposed Functional Description for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah

    1996-01-01

    Generally speaking, many photonic engineers, while working in a systems development mode, still focus on presenting the unique physical details of the optical elements, instead of using functional representation to describe the system. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce symbols that can be used to represent the functional intent of most of the phased array architecture.

  20. An experimental X band phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, N. P. R.; Limaye, K. U.; Ramalingam, R. P.; Gangadharan, T. S.; Bhandopadhyay, G.; Deshpande, P. A.

    1983-10-01

    The details of an X band experimental 11 x 11 element Phased Array Antenna of phased lens configuration with a monopulse space feed developed at LRDE are presented. The studies carried and the results obtained on collimation, beam steering, pattern variation with scan, array operation in two-dimensional search, dedicated track and track while scan (TWS) are also given.

  1. Ultrasonic fingerprinting by phased array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sednev, D.; Kataeva, O.; Abramets, V.; Pushenko, P.; Tverdokhlebova, T.

    2016-06-01

    Increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel that must be under national and international control requires a novel approach to safeguard techniques and equipment. One of the proposed approaches is utilize intrinsic features of casks with spent fuel. In this article an application of a phased array ultrasonic method is considered. This study describes an experimental results on ultrasonic fingerprinting of austenitic steel seam weld.

  2. Microelectromechanical Switches for Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Simons, Rainee N.; Scardelletti, Maximillian; Varaljay, Nicholas C.

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented on the fabrication and testing of a MicroElectro-Mechanical (MEM) microstrip series switch. This switch is being developed for use in a K-band phased array antenna that NASA will use for communication links in its Earth orbiting satellites. Preliminary insertion loss and isolation measurements are presented.

  3. Optical signal processing of phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weverka, Robert T.

    This thesis develops optical processors that scale to very high processing speed. Optical signal processing is often promoted on the basis of smaller size, lower weight and lower power consumption as well as higher signal processing speed. While each of these requirements has applications, it is the ones that require processing speed beyond that available in electronics that are most compelling. Thirty years ago, optical processing was the only method fast enough to process Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), one of the more demanding signal processing tasks at this time. Since that time electronic processing speed has improved sufficiently to tackle that problem. We have sought out the problems that require significantly higher processing speed and developed optical processors that tackle these more difficult problems. The components that contribute to high signal processing speed are high input signal bandwidth, a large number of parallel input channels each with this high bandwidth, and a large number of parallel operations required on each input channel. Adaptive signal processing for phased array radar has all of these factors. The processors developed for this task scale well in three dimensions, which allows them to maximize parallelism for high speed. This thesis explores an example of a negative feedback adaptive phased array processor and an example of a positive feedback phased array processor. The negative feedback processor uses and array of inputs in up to two dimensions together with the time history of the signal in the third dimension to adapt the array pattern to null out incoming jammer signals. The positive feedback processor uses the incoming signals and assumptions about the radar scene to correct for position errors in a phased array. Discovery and analysis of these new processors are facilitated by an original volume holographic analysis technique developed in the thesis. The thesis includes a new acoustooptic Bragg cell geometry developed with

  4. Control of the necrosed tissue volume during noninvasive ultrasound surgery using a 16-element phased array.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Hynynen, K

    1995-03-01

    Focused high-power ultrasound beams are well suited for noninvasive local destruction of deep target volumes. In order to avoid cavitation and to utilize only thermal tissue damage, high frequencies (1-5 MHz) are used in ultrasonic surgery. However, the focal spots generated by sharply focused transducers become so small that only small tumors can be treated in a reasonable time. Phased array ultrasound transducers can be employed to electronically scan a focal spot or to produce multiple foci in the desired region to increase the treated volume. In this article, theoretical and experimental studies of spherically curved square-element phased arrays for use in ultrasonic surgery were performed. The simulation results were compared with experimental results from a 16-element array. It was shown that the phased array could control the necrosed tissue volume by using closely spaced multiple foci. The phased array can also be used to enlarge a necrosed tissue volume in only one direction at a time, i.e., lateral or longitudinal. The spherically curved 16 square-element phased array can produce useful results by varying the phase and amplitude setting. Four focal points can be easily generated with a distance of two or four wavelengths between the two closest peaks. The maximum necrosed tissue volume generated by the array can be up to sixteen times the volume induced by a similar spherical transducer. Therefore the treatment time could be reduced compared with single transducer treatment.

  5. MSAT-X electronically steered phased array antenna system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, H. H.; Foy, W.; Schaffner, G.; Pagels, W.; Vayner, M.; Nelson, J.; Peng, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    A low profile electronically steered phased array was successfully developed for the Mobile Satellite Experiment Program (MSAT-X). The newly invented cavity-backed printed crossed-slot was used as the radiating element. The choice of this element was based on its low elevation angle gain coverage and low profile. A nineteen-way radial type unequal power divider and eighteen three-bit diode phase shifters constitute the beamformer module which is used to scan the beams electronically. A complete hybrid mode pointing system was also developed. The major features of the antenna system are broad coverage, low profile, and fast acquisition and tracking performance, even under fading conditions. Excellent intersatellite isolation (better than 26 dB) was realized, which will provide good quality mobile satellite communication in the future.

  6. Development of a C-Scan phased array ultrasonic imaging system using a 64-element 35MHz transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fan; Hu, Changhong; Zhang, Lequan; Snook, Kevin; Liang, Yu; Hackenberger, Wesley S.; Liu, Ruibin; Geng, Xuecang; Jiang, Xiaoning; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-04-01

    Phased array imaging systems provide the features of electronic beam steering and dynamic depth focusing that cannot be obtained with conventional linear array systems. This paper presents a system design of a digital ultrasonic imaging system, which is capable of handling a 64-element 35MHz center frequency phased array transducer. The system consists of 5 parts: an analog front-end, a data digitizer, a DSP based beamformer, a computer controlled motorized linear stage, and a computer for post image processing and visualization. Using a motorized linear stage, C-scan images, parallel to the surface of scanned objects may be generated. This digital ultrasonic imaging system in combination a 35 MHz phased array appears to be a promising tool for NDT applications with high spatial resolution. It may also serve as an excellent research platform for high frequency phased array design and testing as well as ultrasonic array signal algorithm developing using system's raw RF data acquisition function.

  7. Phased Array Inspection of Irregular Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to research and develop new conformable phased arrays that allow reliable ultrasonic inspection of components with an irregular surface. Two alternative approaches have been considered: flexible contact arrays in which the array itself conforms to the surface and a membrane device in which a standard array is coupled to the surface via a fluid-filled membrane. A linear flexible contact phased array was purchased from CEA France and a conformable membrane device was designed and manufactured at Imperial College. Initial investigations were conducted to evaluate both approaches when coupling to test pieces with machined surfaces representative of typical welded pipes without removal of the weld caps. The research incorporated beam modelling using the CEA CIVA software and comparisons with experimental measurements. It is shown that the conformable membrane approach using a standard array transducer is competitive with the bespoke flexible array.

  8. Ka-Band Phased Array System Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R.; Johnson, S.; Sands, O.; Lambert, K.

    2001-01-01

    Phased Array Antennas (PAAs) using patch-radiating elements are projected to transmit data at rates several orders of magnitude higher than currently offered with reflector-based systems. However, there are a number of potential sources of degradation in the Bit Error Rate (BER) performance of the communications link that are unique to PAA-based links. Short spacing of radiating elements can induce mutual coupling between radiating elements, long spacing can induce grating lobes, modulo 2 pi phase errors can add to Inter Symbol Interference (ISI), phase shifters and power divider network introduce losses into the system. This paper describes efforts underway to test and evaluate the effects of the performance degrading features of phased-array antennas when used in a high data rate modulation link. The tests and evaluations described here uncover the interaction between the electrical characteristics of a PAA and the BER performance of a communication link.

  9. Photorefractive processing for large adaptive phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weverka, Robert T.; Wagner, Kelvin; Sarto, Anthony

    1996-03-01

    An adaptive null-steering phased-array optical processor that utilizes a photorefractive crystal to time integrate the adaptive weights and null out correlated jammers is described. This is a beam-steering processor in which the temporal waveform of the desired signal is known but the look direction is not. The processor computes the angle(s) of arrival of the desired signal and steers the array to look in that direction while rotating the nulls of the antenna pattern toward any narrow-band jammers that may be present. We have experimentally demonstrated a simplified version of this adaptive phased-array-radar processor that nulls out the narrow-band jammers by using feedback-correlation detection. In this processor it is assumed that we know a priori only that the signal is broadband and the jammers are narrow band. These are examples of a class of optical processors that use the angular selectivity of volume holograms to form the nulls and look directions in an adaptive phased-array-radar pattern and thereby to harness the computational abilities of three-dimensional parallelism in the volume of photorefractive crystals. The development of this processing in volume holographic system has led to a new algorithm for phased-array-radar processing that uses fewer tapped-delay lines than does the classic time-domain beam former. The optical implementation of the new algorithm has the further advantage of utilization of a single photorefractive crystal to implement as many as a million adaptive weights, allowing the radar system to scale to large size with no increase in processing hardware.

  10. A Phased Array Magnetometer for Sensing IED

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-04

    of information is estimated to average 1 tiour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering...Device Organization (JIEDDO) (Contract No: FA9550-07- 1 -0107) Program Dr. Byung-Lip "Les" Lee Manager Project Title A Phased Array...Los Angeles, CA 90095-1597 Voice: 310-825-6030 Fax:310-206-2302 1 . OVERALL OBJECTIVE The objective of this project was to develop the fundamental

  11. Optical Matrix Inverter for Phased Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    cancelling was presented. -, 14 SUBJECTTERMS 15 NUMBER OF PAGES Phased Arrays, Optical Algebraic Processors, Optical Matrix 64 Inverter, Optical...optical algebraic processors to such problems. The advantages gained by using optical systems over their electronic counterparts are investigated...are both time consuming algebra problems. B. No a priori Information is Known This is the most general case where we assume no information about jammers

  12. RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF A GENERALIZED PHASED ARRAY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The phased array has become a key component in the design of advanced antenna systems. This computer program was developed to examine the radiation characteristics of a generalized phased array antenna. Using a very efficient numerical technique, this program calculates the array's radiated power and its directivity. The results can be used to determine the radiation pattern of a generalized phased array at near- or far-field observation points. This program is a key research tool at the NASA Lewis Research Center for analyzing advanced space communication antenna systems. Results from this program compare favorably with experimental Lewis results for arrays of 2x2 and 3x3 elements. Given the array geometry and element characteristics, generalized phased array attributes can be broken into two areas: 1) the power radiated and its directivity at any given point, and 2) the co- and cross-polarization field components. This program allows arbitrarily located source elements with an analytically described cosine pattern. The formulation is based on a Romberg integration scheme and takes into account arbitrary element polarization, E and H plane element patterns, and mutual coupling. The input consists of the array geometry; phase, amplitude, linear and circular polarization of each source element; and the cosine functions of the element pattern. The output is a series of observation angles with their associated field magnitude and polarizations. Total radiated power and peak directivity are also calculated. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 computer operating under TSS with a central memory requirement of approximately 22K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM Scientific Subroutine Package (SSP) is required to run the program. This program was developed in 1986.

  13. Technology Development for Millimeter Wave Phased Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-01

    design would use the technology of integration-the same technology that has brought us computing power at such a low cost. The integrated phased array ...circuitry and/or the feed network, which can degrade sidelobe levels or polarization. A Two Layer Substrate Figure 2.8 shows a possible two-layer design ...feed substrates. Coupling is again through aper- tures in the ground plane of the antenna substrate. This design also allows the use of a low dielectric

  14. Phased array-fed antenna configuration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosswell, W. F.; Ball, D. E.; Taylor, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The scope of this contract entails a configuration study for a phased array fed transmit antenna operating in the frequency band of 17.7 to 20.2 GHz. This initial contract provides a basis for understanding the design limitations and advantages of advanced phased array and cluster feeds (both utilizing intergral MMIC modules) illuminating folded reflector optics (both near field and focused types). Design parametric analyses are performed utilizing as constraints the objective secondary performance requirements of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (Table 1.0). The output of the study provides design information which serves as a data base for future active phased array fed antenna studies such as detailed designs required to support the development of a ground tested breadboard. In general, this study is significant because it provides the antenna community with an understanding of the basic principles which govern near field phased scanned feed effects on secondary reflector system performance. Although several articles have been written on analysis procedures and results for these systems, the authors of this report have observed phenomenon of near field antenna systems not previously documented. Because the physical justification for the exhibited performance is provided herein, the findings of this study add a new dimension to the available knowledge of the subject matter.

  15. Phased array observations with infield phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudale, Sanjay; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2017-07-01

    We present results from pulsar observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as a phased array with infield phasing. The antennas were kept in phase throughout the observation by applying antenna based phase corrections derived from visibilities that were obtained in parallel with the phased array beam data, and which were flagged and calibrated in real time using a model for the continuum emission in the target field. We find that, as expected, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) does not degrade with time. In contrast observations in which the phasing is done only at the start of the observation show a clear degradation of the SNR with time. We find that this degradation is well fit by a function of the form SNR (τ ) = α + β e^{-(τ /τ 0)^{5/3}}, which corresponds to the case where the phase drifts are caused by Kolmogorov type turbulence in the ionosphere. We also present general formulae (i.e. including the effects of correlated sky noise, imperfect phasing and self noise) for the SNR and synthesized beam size for phased arrays (as well as corresponding formulae for incoherent arrays). These would be useful in planning observations with large array telescopes.

  16. Phased array observations with infield phasing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudale, Sanjay; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2017-10-01

    We present results from pulsar observations using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) as a phased array with infield phasing. The antennas were kept in phase throughout the observation by applying antenna based phase corrections derived from visibilities that were obtained in parallel with the phased array beam data, and which were flagged and calibrated in real time using a model for the continuum emission in the target field. We find that, as expected, the signal to noise ratio (SNR) does not degrade with time. In contrast observations in which the phasing is done only at the start of the observation show a clear degradation of the SNR with time. We find that this degradation is well fit by a function of the form SNR(τ ) = α + β e^{-(τ /τ 0)^{5/3}}, which corresponds to the case where the phase drifts are caused by Kolmogorov type turbulence in the ionosphere. We also present general formulae (i.e. including the effects of correlated sky noise, imperfect phasing and self noise) for the SNR and synthesized beam size for phased arrays (as well as corresponding formulae for incoherent arrays). These would be useful in planning observations with large array telescopes.

  17. A MRI rotary phased array head coil.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing Keong; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2013-08-01

    A new rotary phased array (RPA) head coil that can provide homogenous brain images comparable to volumetric radiofrequency coils is proposed for magnetic resonance brain imaging applications. The design of the RPA head coil is a departure from conventional circumferential array design method, as coil elements of the RPA head coil have a "paddle-like" structure consisting of a pair of main conductors located on opposite sides, inserted equi-angularly around and over the head. A prototype 2T receive-only 4-element RPA head coil was constructed and experimentally tested against a conventional receive-only 4-element phased array head coil and a commercial receive-only quadrature birdcage head coil. Homogenous phantom images acquired by the RPA head coil show that signal intensity deep at the center of the phantom was improved as compared to the conventional phased array head coil and this improvement allow the RPA head coil to acquire homogenous brain images similar to brain images acquired with the birdcage head coil. In addition, partial parallel imaging was used in conjunction with the RPA head coil to enable rapid imaging.

  18. Proceedings of the Third EPRI Phased Array Ultrasound Seminar

    SciTech Connect

    2003-12-01

    Phased array technology for ultrasonic examination is providing innovative solutions for nuclear in-service examination applications. EPRI has been a prime mover in the development and deployment of phased array ultrasound applications in the domestic nuclear market over the past decade. As part of this strategic effort, EPRI has hosted a series of seminars on phased array technology and its applications.

  19. Design of a K-Band Transmit Phased Array For Low Earth Orbit Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Thomas; Miller, Stephen; Kershner, Dennis; Anzic, Godfrey

    2000-01-01

    The design of a light weight, low cost phased array antenna is presented. Multilayer printed wiring board (PWB) technology is utilized for Radio Frequencies (RF) and DC/Logic manifold distribution. Transmit modules are soldered on one side and patch antenna elements are on the other, allowing the use of automated assembly processes. The 19 GHz antenna has two independently steerable beams, each capable of transferring data at 622 Mbps. A passive, self-contained phase change thermal management system is also presented.

  20. Phased array antenna matching: Simulation and optimization of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudgeon, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    A computerized simulation of a planar phased array of circular waveguide elements is reported using mutual coupling and wide angle impedance matching in phased arrays. Special emphasis is given to circular polarization. The aforementioned computer program has as variable inputs: frequency, polarization, grid geometry, element size, dielectric waveguide fill, dielectric plugs in the waveguide for impedance matching, and dielectric sheets covering the array surface for the purpose of wide angle impedance matching. Parameter combinations are found which produce reflection peaks interior to grating lobes, while dielectric cover sheets are successfully employed to extend the usable scan range of a phased array. The most exciting results came from the application of computer aided optimization techniques to the design of this type of array.

  1. Phased array performance evaluation with photoelastic visualization

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzel, Robert; Dao, Gavin

    2014-02-18

    New instrumentation and a widening range of phased array transducer options are affording the industry a greater potential. Visualization of the complex wave components using the photoelastic system can greatly enhance understanding of the generated signals. Diffraction, mode conversion and wave front interaction, together with beam forming for linear, sectorial and matrix arrays, will be viewed using the photoelastic system. Beam focus and steering performance will be shown with a range of embedded and surface targets within glass samples. This paper will present principles and sound field images using this visualization system.

  2. Phased array antenna for space shuttle orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Shayla E.

    1987-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is developing a distributed phased array antenna at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center as a possible upgrade for the Space Shuttle Orbiter S-band phase modulation communications system. The antenna consists of an eight-element transmit section, eight-element receive section, and a single L-band receive element. The antenna design is constrained by the existing Orbiter system and space environment. The solution to the interface design problems led to an antenna system which provides improved link margins and yet supports previous operational configurations. This paper describes the system development, antenna hardware, and the interface consideration which led to the final design.

  3. Wide Angle Liquid Crystal Optical Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xing-Hua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    Accurate modeling of a high resolution, liquid crystal (LC) based, optical phased array (OPA) is shown. The simulation shows excellent agreement with a test 2-D LC OPA. The modeling method is extendable to cases where the array element size is close to the wavelength of light. The fringing fields of such a device are first studied, and subsequently reduced. This results in a device that demonstrates plus or minus 7.4 degrees of continuous beam steering at a wavelength of 1550 nm, and a diffraction efficiency (DE) higher than 72%.

  4. An Optical Phased Array for LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Wu, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated the development of an Optical Phased Array (OPA) micromechanical system (MEMS) used for beam steering, which shows great advantages over previous mechanisms such as opto-mechanical, acousto-optical (AO) or electro-optical (EO). We aim to integrate the OPA MEMS system into the application of automobile navigation, which is currently primarily dominated by opto-mechanical scanning based systems. Opto-mechanical scanning devices are usually bulky and relatively slow, while competing technologies (AO, EO) utilize devices that while small in size, cannot provide the steering speeds and versatility necessary for many applications. In drawing from phased array concepts that revolutionized RADAR technology by providing a compact, agile alternative to mechanically steered technology, the OPA based LIDAR program seeks to integrate thousands of closely packed optical emitting facets, precise relative electronic phase control of these facets, and all within a very small form factor. Comparing with other competing LIDAR system, the OPA based LIDAR system will have multiple degrees of freedom for phase control which enables not only agile beam steering but also beam forming and multiple beam generation, greatly expanding the diversity of applications.

  5. Optimizing an ELF/VLF Phased Array at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimaru, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study is to maximize the amplitude of 1-5 kHz ELF/VLF waves generated by ionospheric HF heating and measured at a ground-based ELF/VLF receiver. The optimization makes use of experimental observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) Observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the amplitude, phase, and propagation delay of the ELF/VLF waves were carefully measured. The HF beam was aimed at 15 degrees zenith angle in 8 different azimuthal directions, equally spaced in a circle, while broadcasting a 3.25 MHz (X-mode) signal that was amplitude modulated (square wave) with a linear frequency-time chirp between 1 and 5 kHz. The experimental observations are used to provide reference amplitudes, phases, and propagation delays for ELF/VLF waves generated at these specific locations. The presented optimization accounts for the trade-off between duty cycle, heated area, and the distributed nature of the source region in order to construct a "most efficient" phased array. The amplitudes and phases generated by modulated heating at each location are combined in post-processing to find an optimal combination of duty cycle, heating location, and heating order.

  6. Multiband Photonic Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Suning

    2015-01-01

    A multiband phased-array antenna (PAA) can reduce the number of antennas on shipboard platforms while offering significantly improved performance. Crystal Research, Inc., has developed a multiband photonic antenna that is based on a high-speed, optical, true-time-delay beamformer. It is capable of simultaneously steering multiple independent radio frequency (RF) beams in less than 1,000 nanoseconds. This high steering speed is 3 orders of magnitude faster than any existing optical beamformer. Unlike other approaches, this technology uses a single controlling device per operation band, eliminating the need for massive optical switches, laser diodes, and fiber Bragg gratings. More importantly, only one beamformer is needed for all antenna elements.

  7. Wavelet Analysis for Acoustic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, Inna; Zlotnick, Zvi

    2003-03-01

    Wavelet spectrum analysis is known to be one of the most powerful tools for exploring quasistationary signals. In this paper we use wavelet technique to develop a new Direction Finding (DF) Algorithm for the Acoustic Phased Array (APA) systems. Utilising multi-scale analysis of libraries of wavelets allows us to work with frequency bands instead of individual frequency of an acoustic source. These frequency bands could be regarded as features extracted from quasistationary signals emitted by a noisy object. For detection, tracing and identification of a sound source in a noisy environment we develop smart algorithm. The essential part of this algorithm is a special interacting procedure of the above-mentioned DF-algorithm and the wavelet-based Identification (ID) algorithm developed in [4]. Significant improvement of the basic properties of a receiving APA pattern is achieved.

  8. PHASED ARRAY FEED CALIBRATION, BEAMFORMING, AND IMAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, Jonathan; Elmer, Michael; Waldron, Jacob; Jones, David; Stemmons, Alan; Jeffs, Brian D.; Warnick, Karl F.; Richard Fisher, J.; Norrod, Roger D.

    2010-03-15

    Phased array feeds (PAFs) for reflector antennas offer the potential for increased reflector field of view and faster survey speeds. To address some of the development challenges that remain for scientifically useful PAFs, including calibration and beamforming algorithms, sensitivity optimization, and demonstration of wide field of view imaging, we report experimental results from a 19 element room temperature L-band PAF mounted on the Green Bank 20 Meter Telescope. Formed beams achieved an aperture efficiency of 69% and a system noise temperature of 66 K. Radio camera images of several sky regions are presented. We investigate the noise performance and sensitivity of the system as a function of elevation angle with statistically optimal beamforming and demonstrate cancelation of radio frequency interference sources with adaptive spatial filtering.

  9. Photonic Multitasking Interleaved Si Nanoantenna Phased Array.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dianmin; Holsteen, Aaron L; Maguid, Elhanan; Wetzstein, Gordon; Kik, Pieter G; Hasman, Erez; Brongersma, Mark L

    2016-12-14

    Metasurfaces provide unprecedented control over light propagation by imparting local, space-variant phase changes on an incident electromagnetic wave. They can improve the performance of conventional optical elements and facilitate the creation of optical components with new functionalities and form factors. Here, we build on knowledge from shared aperture phased array antennas and Si-based gradient metasurfaces to realize various multifunctional metasurfaces capable of achieving multiple distinct functions within a single surface region. As a key point, we demonstrate that interleaving multiple optical elements can be accomplished without reducing the aperture of each subelement. Multifunctional optical elements constructed from Si-based gradient metasurface are realized, including axial and lateral multifocus geometric phase metasurface lenses. We further demonstrate multiwavelength color imaging with a high spatial resolution. Finally, optical imaging functionality with simultaneous color separation has been obtained by using multifunctional metasurfaces, which opens up new opportunities for the field of advanced imaging and display.

  10. Quantitative flaw characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady John

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a critical diagnostic tool in many industries. It is used to characterize potentially dangerous flaws in critical components for aerospace, automotive, and energy applications. The use of phased array transducers allows for the extension of traditional techniques and the introduction of new methods for quantitative flaw characterization. An equivalent flaw sizing technique for use in time-of-flight diffraction setups is presented that provides an estimate of the size and orientation of isolated cracks, surface-breaking cracks, and volumetric flaws such as voids and inclusions. Experimental validation is provided for the isolated crack case. A quantitative imaging algorithm is developed that corrects for system effects and wave propagation, making the images formed directly related to the properties of the scatterer present. Simulated data is used to form images of cylindrical and spherical inclusions. The contributions of different signals to the image formation process are discussed and examples of the quantitative nature of the images are shown.

  11. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    SciTech Connect

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  12. Joint stars phased array radar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnitkin, Harold

    1994-10-01

    The Joint STARS phased array radar system is capable of performing long range airborne surveillance and was used during the Persian Gulf war on two E8-A aircraft to fly many around-the-clock missions to monitor the Kuwait and Iraq battlefield from a safe distance behind the front lines. This paper is a follow-on to previous publications on the subject of the Joint STARS antenna and deals mainly with mission performance and technical aspects not previously covered. Radar data of troop movements and armament installations will be presented, a brief review of the antenna design is given, followed by technical discussions concerning the three-port interferometry, gain and sidelobe design approach, cost control, range test implementation and future improvements.

  13. Multilevel photonic modules for millimeter-wave phased-array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paolella, Arthur C.; Joshi, Abhay M.; Wright, James G.; Coryell, Louis A.

    1998-11-01

    Optical signal distribution for phased array antennas in communication system is advantageous to designers. By distributing the microwave and millimeter wave signal through optical fiber there is the potential for improved performance and lower weight. In addition when applied to communication satellites this weight saving translates into substantially reduced launch costs. The goal of the Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program is the development of multi-level photonic modules for phased array antennas. The proposed module with ultimately comprise of a monolithic, InGaAs/InP p-i-n photodetector-p-HEMT power amplifier, opto-electronic integrated circuit, that has 44 GHz bandwidth and output power of 50 mW integrated with a planar antenna. The photodetector will have a high quantum efficiency and will be front-illuminated, thereby improved optical performance. Under Phase I a module was developed using standard MIC technology with a high frequency coaxial feed interconnect.

  14. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  15. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

  16. High frequency reference electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

  17. COMPOSITE CERAMIC ARMOR DEFECT ANALYSIS USING PHASED ARRAY ULTRASOUND

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-30

    background variation. Such an approximation applied to the FFT results of Conclusion Phased - array ultrasonic inspection methods have been...SNR values above 2.55) were statistically defective either. CONCLUSION Phased - array ultrasonic inspection methods have been successfully applied to...4 G.P. Singh and J. W. Davies, “Multiple Transducer Ultrasonic Techniques: Phased Arrays ” In Nondestructive Testing Handbook, 2nd Ed., 7, pp. 284

  18. MMIC devices for active phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the calculation and measurement of the scattering parameters of printed circuit discontinuities. These discontinuities occur in a variety of structures, such as transitions between rectangular waveguide and printed circuits, junctions between circuits of different dielectric constants, and filters and impedance matching circuits. Because of the variety of devices in which these discontinuities occur, it is very useful to understand them in as great a detail as possible. Both theoretical and experimental studies of discontinuities were considered. The theoretical studies have focused on finding ways to predict the scattering from discontinuities. The experimental studies have concentrated on developing measurement techniques for determining the scattering parameters of these discontinuities.

  19. ALMA High Frequency Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, J. D.; Mason, B.; Impellizzeri, V.; Kameno, S.; Fomalont, E.; Chibueze, J.; Takahashi, S.; Remijan, A.; Wilson, C.; ALMA Science Team

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the ALMA High Frequency Campaign is to improve the quality and efficiency of science observing in Bands 8, 9, and 10 (385-950 GHz), the highest frequencies available to the ALMA project. To this end, we outline observing modes which we have demonstrated to improve high frequency calibration for the 12m array and the ACA, and we present the calibration of the total power antennas at these frequencies. Band-to-band (B2B) transfer and bandwidth switching (BWSW), techniques which improve the speed and accuracy of calibration at the highest frequencies, are most necessary in Bands 8, 9, and 10 due to the rarity of strong calibrators. These techniques successfully enable increased signal-to-noise on the calibrator sources (and better calibration solutions) by measuring the calibrators at lower frequencies (B2B) or in wider bandwidths (BWSW) compared to the science target. We have also demonstrated the stability of the bandpass shape to better than 2.4% for 1 hour, hidden behind random noise, in Band 9. Finally, total power observing using the dual sideband receivers in Bands 9 and 10 requires the separation of the two sidebands; this procedure has been demonstrated in Band 9 and is undergoing further testing in Band 10.

  20. Phased Array Transmit Antenna for a Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, R. W.; Heisen, P. T.; Miller, G. E.; McMeen, D. J.; Perko, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    Active phased array antennas with electronically scanned beams offer advantages over high gain parabolic dish antennas currently used on spacecraft. Benefits include the elimination of deployable structures, no moving parts, and no torque disturbances that moving antennas impart to the spacecraft. The latter results in the conservation of spacecraft power, and the ability to take precision optical data while transmitting data. Such an antenna has been built under a contract from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the New Millennium Program EO- 1 satellite where it will act as the primary highspeed scientific data communication link. The antenna operates at X-band, has an integral controller and power conditioner, communicates with the spacecraft over a 1773 optical data bus, and is space qualified for low earth orbit (705 Km altitude). The nominal mission length is one year, and the operational requirement is for one 10 minute transmission a day over Spitsbergen, Norway. Details of the antenna and its performance will be described in the following paper.

  1. Phased Array Transmit Antenna for a Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huggins, R. W.; Heisen, P. T.; Miller, G. E.; McMeen, D. J.; Perko, K. L.

    1999-01-01

    Active phased array antennas with electronically scanned beams offer advantages over high gain parabolic dish antennas currently used on spacecraft. Benefits include the elimination of deployable structures, no moving parts, and no torque disturbances that moving antennas impart to the spacecraft. The latter results in the conservation of spacecraft power, and the ability to take precision optical data while transmitting data. Such an antenna has been built under a contract from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the New Millennium Program EO- 1 satellite where it will act as the primary highspeed scientific data communication link. The antenna operates at X-band, has an integral controller and power conditioner, communicates with the spacecraft over a 1773 optical data bus, and is space qualified for low earth orbit (705 Km altitude). The nominal mission length is one year, and the operational requirement is for one 10 minute transmission a day over Spitsbergen, Norway. Details of the antenna and its performance will be described in the following paper.

  2. MMIC Phased Array Demonstrations with ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raquet, Charles A. (Compiler); Martzaklis, Konstantinos (Compiler); Zakrajsek, Robert J. (Compiler); Andro, Monty (Compiler); Turtle, John P.

    1996-01-01

    Over a one year period from May 1994 to May 1995, a number of demonstrations were conducted by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in which voice, data, and/or video links were established via NASA's advanced communications technology satellite (ACTS) between the ACTS link evaluation terminal (LET) in Cleveland, OH, and aeronautical and mobile or fixed Earth terminals having monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phased array antenna systems. This paper describes four of these. In one, a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the LeRC Learjet and the ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice (and in one case video as well) links between the ACTS and an Army vehicle. The fourth demonstrated a high data rate downlink from ACTS to a fixed terminal. Array antenna systems used in these demonstrations were developed by LeRC and featured LeRC and Air Force experimental arrays using gallium arsenide MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The single 30 GHz transmit array was developed by NASA/LeRC and Texas Instruments. The three 20 GHz receive arrays were developed in a cooperative effort with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force array development contracts with Boeing and Lockheed Martin. The paper describes the four proof-of-concept arrays and the array control system. The system configured for each of the demonstrations is described, and results are discussed.

  3. A digital sidelobe canceller for a linear phased-array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardrop, B.; Gould, D. M.

    The design and performance of a three auxiliary sidelobe canceller for use with a 25 element S-band phased-array is described. The phased-array incorporates a resistive-matrix multiple-beam former, and so the auxiliaries can be either elements of the array, or other beams. Experimental results showing its performance against multiple noise jammers are presented.

  4. Development of a 20-MHz wide-bandwidth PMN-PT single crystal phased-array ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chi-Man; Chen, Yan; Luo, Haosu; Dai, Jiyan; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Chan, Helen Lai-Wa

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a 20-MHz 64-element phased-array ultrasound transducer with a one-wavelength pitch is developed using a PMN-30%PT single crystal and double-matching layer scheme. High piezoelectric (d33>1000pC/N) and electromechanical coupling (k33>0.8) properties of the single crystal with an optimized fabrication process involving the photolithography technique have been demonstrated to be suitable for wide-bandwidth (⩾70%) and high-sensitivity (insertion loss ⩽30dB) phased-array transducer application. A -6dBbandwidth of 91% and an insertion loss of 29dBfor the 20-MHz 64-element phased-array transducer were achieved. This result shows that the bandwidth is improved comparing with the investigated high-frequency (⩾20MHz) ultrasound transducers using piezoelectric ceramic and single crystal materials. It shows that this phased-array transducer has potential to improve the resolution of biomedical imaging, theoretically. Based on the hypothesis of resolution improvement, this phased-array transducer is capable for small animal (i.e. mouse and zebrafish) studies.

  5. Ultrasonic phased array transducers for nondestructive evaluation of steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Shin, Hyeon Jae; Jang, You Hyun

    2000-05-01

    An ultrasonic phased array transducer has been developed and demonstrated for the nondestructive evaluation of steel structures. The number of array elements is 64 and the center frequency is about 5 MHz. This phased array transducer is designed to use with the phased array system that does steering, transmission focusing and dynamic receive focusing. Each of the array elements is individually excited according to the focal laws and steering angles. Measurements of ultrasonic beam profiles for the array transducer in a reference steel block are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Some of the phased array transducer design concepts for the application in steel structures are discussed. The two-dimensional ultrasonic images of the sample steel block including flat bottom holes and side drilled holes are presented. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate excellent feasibility of the utility of the phased array transducer in imaging and detection of defects in steel structures.

  6. High Frequency EPR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatteschi, D.

    EPR has traditionally been used in order to obtain structural information on transition metal compounds, with exciting frequencies in the range 9-35 GHz.The recent availability of high magnetic field has prompted the use of higher frequencies. In this contribution the advantages of using High-Field-High-Frequency EPR (HF EPR) experiments are reviewed. After a brief introduction aiming to recall the fundamentals of EPR spectroscopy, a short description of the experimental apparatus needed to perform HF EPR measurements is provided. The remaining sections report selected examples showing how much information can be obtained by HF EPR spectra. They range from individual ions with integer spin to molecular clusters. Particular attention is devoted to the so called Single Molecule Magnets, SMM, i.e. to molecular clusters which show slow relaxation of the magnetization at low temperature. This effect is due to Ising type magnetic anisotropy which has been efficiently monitored through HF EPR s pectroscopy.

  7. Phased-Array Study of Dual-Flow Jet Noise: Effect of Nozzles and Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soo Lee, Sang; Bridges, James

    2006-01-01

    A 16-microphone linear phased-array installed parallel to the jet axis and a 32-microphone azimuthal phased-array installed in the nozzle exit plane have been applied to identify the noise source distributions of nozzle exhaust systems with various internal mixers (lobed and axisymmetric) and nozzles (three different lengths). Measurements of velocity were also obtained using cross-stream stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV). Among the three nozzle lengths tested, the medium length nozzle was the quietest for all mixers at high frequency on the highest speed flow condition. Large differences in source strength distributions between nozzles and mixers occurred at or near the nozzle exit for this flow condition. The beamforming analyses from the azimuthal array for the 12-lobed mixer on the highest flow condition showed that the core flow and the lobe area were strong noise sources for the long and short nozzles. The 12 noisy spots associated with the lobe locations of the 12-lobed mixer with the long nozzle were very well detected for the frequencies 5 KHz and higher. Meanwhile, maps of the source strength of the axisymmetric splitter show that the outer shear layer was the most important noise source at most flow conditions. In general, there was a good correlation between the high turbulence regions from the PIV tests and the high noise source regions from the phased-array measurements.

  8. Coplanar waveguide feeds for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Lee, Richard Q.

    1992-01-01

    The design and performance of the following coplanar waveguide (CPW) microwave distribution networks for linear as well as circularly polarized microstrip patches and printed dipole arrays is presented: (1) CPW/microstrip line feed; (2) CPW/balanced stripline feed; (3) CPW/slotline feed; (4) grounded CPW (GCPW)/balanced coplanar stripline feed; and (5) CPW/slot coupled feed. Typical measured radiation patterns are presented, and their relative advantages and disadvantages are compared.

  9. Simulation of Temperature Field Induced by 8-Element Phased Array HIFU Transducer with Concave Spherical Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wujun; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Xiaojing; Jian, Xiqi; Li, Zhihua

    2011-09-01

    Multi-element High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) transducers can change their focal lengths and form multi-foci. In this paper the Westervelt formula and Pennes bio-heat transfer equation have been used along, with the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, to study the temperature distribution induced by an 8-element phased array HIFU transducer inside the human body. We evaluated the effects of the gap in the arc between two rings, the frequency of excitation function and pre-focal length on the temperature field. For HIFU therapy, skin burns were caused by high frequency, small pre-focal length, or a big gap between two rings. The focal region may be no longer an ellipsoid due to high frequency. In addition, the actual focal length is slightly different from the pre-focal length.

  10. S-band antenna phased array communications system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzer, D. R.; Chapman, J. E.; Griffin, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    The development of an S-band antenna phased array for spacecraft to spacecraft communication is discussed. The system requirements, antenna array subsystem design, and hardware implementation are examined. It is stated that the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost. The objectives of the development contract are defined as: (1) design of a medium gain active phased array S-band communications antenna, (2) development and test of a model of a seven element planar array of radiating elements mounted in the appropriate cavity matrix, and (3) development and test of a breadboard transmit/receive microelectronics module.

  11. Phased array ultrasonic inspection of Friction Stir Weldments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamarre, André; Moles, Michael; Lupien, Vincent

    2000-05-01

    Phased array ultrasonic inspection methods have been developed for the rapid inspection of Friction Stir Weldments (FSW) on Delta rocket cryogenic tanks. A comprehensive review was performed to identify NDE methods that are suitable for the detection of defects in this new welding process. The search included a review of traditional and advanced NDE methods that were capable of demonstrating both the sensitivity and inspection rates required for this examination. This paper will discuss the theory behind phased array techniques, fundamentals of several probe designs for FSW configurations, and the advantages of using phased arrays over conventional NDE methods for this applications.

  12. Cracks measurement using fiber-phased array laser ultrasound generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Cuixiang; Demachi, Kazuyuki; Fukuchi, Tetsuo; Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2013-04-01

    A phased array laser ultrasound generation system by using fiber optic delivery and a custom-designed focusing objective lens has been developed for crack inspection. The enhancement of crack tip diffraction by using phased array laser ultrasound is simulated with finite element method and validated by experiment. A non-contact and non-destructive measurement of inner-surface cracks by time-of-flight diffraction method using fiber-phased array laser ultrasound generation and electromagnetic acoustic transducer detection has been studied.

  13. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  14. High-frequency ECG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  15. MMIC devices for active phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    The study of printed circuit discontinuities is necessary in order to design, for example, transitions between rectangular waveguides and printed circuits. New developments with respect to the analytical approaches to this problem are discussed. A summary of the progress in the experimental approach is presented. The accurate solution for the modes in various millimeter-wave waveguides is essential in the analysis of many integrated circuit components, such as filters and impedance transformers. Problems associated with the numerical computation of these modes in two frequently used waveguide forms, namely, the finline and microstrip, are presented. The spectral domain method of formulation, with a moment method solution, is considered. This approach can be readily extended to analyze an arbitrary configuration of dielectric and metallized regions in a shielded enclosure. Galerkin's method is used, where the testing and basic functions are the same. It is shown that the mode functions, or eigenfunctions, are more sensitive to errors than the phase constants, or eigenvalues. The approximate mode functions do not satisfy the orthogonality relationship well, resulting in difficulties when these modal solutions are used to form an approximate Green's function or are used in a mode matching analysis.

  16. [Modeling and simulation of responses from ultrasonic linear phased array].

    PubMed

    He, Wenjing; Zhu, Yuanzhong; Wang, Yufeng; He, Lingli; Lai, Siyu

    2012-10-01

    Phased array transducers are very attractive because the beam generated by the arrays can be electronically focused and steered. The present work characterizes far-field 2D properties of phased array system by functions that are deduced from rectangle source, rectangle line array and phased array based on point source. Results are presented for the distribution of ultrasound intensity on plane xoz and on x-axis by simulation using numerical calculation. It is shown that the shape of response of rectangle line array is modulated by the single array element. It is also demonstrated that the delay time of phased array is the key to steer the beam, sacrificing the value of main lobe and increasing the number of side lobes.

  17. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L; Shung, K Kirk; Zhang, Hao F; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging.

  18. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John Frederick; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  19. Phase Noise in Photonic Phased-Array Antenna Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Ronald T., Jr.; Maleki, Lute

    1998-01-01

    The total noise of a phased-array antenna system employing a photonic feed network is analyzed using a model for the individual component noise including both additive and multiplicative equivalent noise generators.

  20. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S; Kadlec, Emil A; Shaner, Eric A; Klem, John F; Sinclair, Michael B; Brener, Igal

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (∼5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.

  1. Laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy with ultrasonic phased array transducer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Zhang, Xiangyang; Chiu, Chi Tat; Zhou, Bill L.; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhang, Hao F.; Jiao, Shuliang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report our latest progress on proving the concept that ultrasonic phased array can improve the detection sensitivity and field of view (FOV) in laser-scanning photoacoustic microscopy (LS-PAM). A LS-PAM system with a one-dimensional (1D) ultrasonic phased array was built for the experiments. The 1D phased array transducer consists of 64 active elements with an overall active dimension of 3.2 mm × 2 mm. The system was tested on imaging phantom and mouse ear in vivo. Experiments showed a 15 dB increase of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) when beamforming was employed compared to the images acquired with each single element. The experimental results demonstrated that ultrasonic phased array can be a better candidate for LS-PAM in high sensitivity applications like ophthalmic imaging. PMID:23162708

  2. Coherent optical monolithic phased-array antenna steering system

    DOEpatents

    Hietala, Vincent M.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    1994-01-01

    An optical-based RF beam steering system for phased-array antennas comprising a photonic integrated circuit (PIC). The system is based on optical heterodyning employed to produce microwave phase shifting by a monolithic PIC constructed entirely of passive components. Microwave power and control signal distribution to the antenna is accomplished by optical fiber, permitting physical separation of the PIC and its control functions from the antenna. The system reduces size, weight, complexity, and cost of phased-array antenna systems.

  3. MSAT mobile electronically steered phased array antenna development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Fred

    1988-01-01

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment (MSAT-X) breadboard antenna design demonstrates the feasibility of using a phased array in a mobile satellite application. An electronically steerable phased array capable of tracking geosynchronous satellites from anywhere in the Continental United States has been developed. The design is reviewed along with the test data. Cost analysis are presented which indicate that this design can be produced at a cost of $1620 per antenna.

  4. Designing of Phased Array Transducers for Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Ph.; Poguet, J.; Fleury, G.

    2004-02-01

    By increasing inspection speed, and deflection capabilities of the transducers, Phased-array technology has proved its interest to face new ∂ NDT challenges, and is becoming more and more popular in the main industrial fields of activities. This paper describes the main effects of specifications on transducer performances, and explains how to defined them. The second part speaks about the manufacturing step, showing the influence of component choice on performances. Several Phased-array applications examples illustrating these considerations will be presented.

  5. Genetic Algorithms as a Tool for Phased Array Radar Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. GENETIC ALGORITHMS AS A...REPORT DATE June 2002 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Genetic Algorithms as a Tool for Phased Array Radar...creative ways to design multi-function phased array radars. This thesis proposes that Genetic Algorithms, computer programs that mimic natural selection

  6. Optimizing Satellite Communications With Adaptive and Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, Mary Ann; Romanofsky, Robert; Lee, Richard Q.; Miranda, Felix; Popovic, Zoya; Langley, John; Barott, William C.; Ahmed, M. Usman; Mandl, Dan

    2004-01-01

    A new adaptive antenna array architecture for low-earth-orbiting satellite ground stations is being investigated. These ground stations are intended to have no moving parts and could potentially be operated in populated areas, where terrestrial interference is likely. The architecture includes multiple, moderately directive phased arrays. The phased arrays, each steered in the approximate direction of the satellite, are adaptively combined to enhance the Signal-to-Noise and Interference-Ratio (SNIR) of the desired satellite. The size of each phased array is to be traded-off with the number of phased arrays, to optimize cost, while meeting a bit-error-rate threshold. Also, two phased array architectures are being prototyped: a spacefed lens array and a reflect-array. If two co-channel satellites are in the field of view of the phased arrays, then multi-user detection techniques may enable simultaneous demodulation of the satellite signals, also known as Space Division Multiple Access (SDMA). We report on Phase I of the project, in which fixed directional elements are adaptively combined in a prototype to demodulate the S-band downlink of the EO-1 satellite, which is part of the New Millennium Program at NASA.

  7. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  8. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  9. Full-matrix capture with a customizable phased array instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, Gavin; Braconnier, Dominique; Gruber, Matt

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, a technique known as Full-Matrix Capture (FMC) has gained some headway in the NDE community for phased array applications. It's important to understand that FMC is the method that the instrumentation acquires the ultrasonic signals, but further post-processing is required in software to create a meaningful image for a particular application. Having a flexible software interface, small form factor, excellent signal-to-noise ratio per acquisition channel on a 64/64 or 128/128 phased array module with FMC capability proves beneficial in both industrial implementation and in further investigation of post-processing techniques. This paper will provide an example of imaging with a 5MHz linear phased array transducer with 128 elements using FMC and a popular post-processing algorithm known as Total-Focus Method (TFM).

  10. A 35 MHz PCMUT phased array for NDE ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snook, Kevin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Hu, Changhong; Geng, Xuecang; Liu, Ruibin; Welter, John; Shung, Kirk; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the development of a 35 MHz 64-channel Piezoelectric Composite based Micromachined Ultrasound Transducer (PCMUT) phased array for NDE ultrasound application is presented. A 35 MHz PMN-PT single crystal 1-3 composite based PC-MUT phased array was designed with extensive acoustic field and 1D modeling. The initial modeling results demonstrated that the focused detection resolution (10% of -3 dB beam width) could be as small as 30 μm in the azimuth direction. The maximum imaging depth for ceramic samples is around 20 mm. The PC-MUT array being developed will extend the state-of-art NDE phased array technology from approximately 20 MHz to 35 MHz, which will greatly enhance the imaging resolution for a broad range of NDE ultrasound applications.

  11. Phased arrays for satellites and the TDRSS antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    The design and performance of satellite phased-array systems are examined by considering several specific antennas built for spacecraft use. Particular consideration is given to: (1) the JARED (Jammer Reduction Antenna System) antenna, and adaptive phased array which can be used to null jammer signals while providing coverage to specific user areas; (2) the algorithm used in the JARED antenna; and (3) a technique that can be used to detect and locate jammers. The antennas used by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) are then described. A significant aspect of the TDRSS is the multiple access antenna which is a 30-element phased array, providing a single steered beam on transmit and the ability to receive data from 20 simultaneous users. Also included on the TDRSS is a mesh deployable reflector and a C-band and K-band communications system.

  12. Optical phased arrays with evanescently-coupled antennas

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Jie; Watts, Michael R; Yaacobi, Ami; Timurdogan, Erman

    2015-03-24

    An optical phased array formed of a large number of nanophotonic antenna elements can be used to project complex images into the far field. These nanophotonic phased arrays, including the nanophotonic antenna elements and waveguides, can be formed on a single chip of silicon using complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) processes. Directional couplers evanescently couple light from the waveguides to the nanophotonic antenna elements, which emit the light as beams with phases and amplitudes selected so that the emitted beams interfere in the far field to produce the desired pattern. In some cases, each antenna in the phased array may be optically coupled to a corresponding variable delay line, such as a thermo-optically tuned waveguide or a liquid-filled cell, which can be used to vary the phase of the antenna's output (and the resulting far-field interference pattern).

  13. Phased Array Radiometer Calibration Using a Radiated Noise Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutoch S.; Laymon, Charles A.; Meyer, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    Electronic beam steering capability of phased array antenna systems offer significant advantages when used in real aperture imaging radiometers. The sensitivity of such systems is limited by the ability to accurately calibrate variations in the antenna circuit characteristics. Passive antenna systems, which require mechanical rotation to scan the beam, have stable characteristics and the noise figure of the antenna can be characterized with knowledge of its physical temperature [1],[2]. Phased array antenna systems provide the ability to electronically steer the beam in any desired direction. Such antennas make use of active components (amplifiers, phase shifters) to provide electronic scanning capability while maintaining a low antenna noise figure. The gain fluctuations in the active components can be significant, resulting in substantial calibration difficulties [3]. In this paper, we introduce two novel calibration techniques that provide an end-to-end calibration of a real-aperture, phased array radiometer system. Empirical data will be shown to illustrate the performance of both methods.

  14. Phased array feed testing for astronomy with ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, Aaron P.; O'Sullivan, John; Reynolds, John; Gough, Russell; Hayman, Douglas; Hay, Stuart

    2010-10-01

    Phased array feeds enable radio telescopes to make faster surveys with fewer antennas. This paper presents testing of a phased array feed prototype to verify design methods for array feeds of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). We have tested a 5 × 4 port × 2 polarisation connected-chequerboard array at the prime focus of a 12 m diameter parabolic reflector. This prototype system currently achieves a system-temperature-on-efficiency ratio Tsys/η of 134 K at 1260 MHz and operates from 700 MHz to 1,800 MHz. The larger 94 port × 2 polarisation phased array feed being developed for ASKAP has a target Tsys/η of 50 K. The time taken by a radio telescope to survey a fixed area of sky to a fixed sensitivity is proportional to (Tsys/η)2.

  15. Phased arrays for satellites and the TDRSS antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbriale, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and performance of satellite phased-array systems are examined by considering several specific antennas built for spacecraft use. Particular consideration is given to: (1) the JARED (Jammer Reduction Antenna System) antenna, and adaptive phased array which can be used to null jammer signals while providing coverage to specific user areas; (2) the algorithm used in the JARED antenna; and (3) a technique that can be used to detect and locate jammers. The antennas used by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) are then described. A significant aspect of the TDRSS is the multiple access antenna which is a 30-element phased array, providing a single steered beam on transmit and the ability to receive data from 20 simultaneous users. Also included on the TDRSS is a mesh deployable reflector and a C-band and K-band communications system.

  16. Optoelectronic signal processing for phased-array antennas II; Proceedings of the Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, Jan. 16, 17, 1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Brian M.; Koepf, Gerhard A.

    Various papers on optoelectronic signal processing for phased-array antennas (PAAs) are presented. Individual topics addressed include: the dynamics of high-frequency lasers, an electrooptic phase modulator for PA applications, a laser mixer for microwave fiber optics, optical control of microwaves with III-V semiconductor optical waveguides, a high-dynamic-range modulator for microwave PAs, the high-modulation-rate potential of surface-emitter laser-diode arrays, an electrooptical switch for antenna beam steering, and adaptive PA radar processing using photorefractive crystals. Also discussed are an optical processor for array antenna beam shaping and steering, an integrated optical Butler matrix for beam forming in PAAs, an acoustooptic/photorefractive processor for adaptive antenna arrays, BER testing of fiber-optic data links for MMIC-based phased-array antennas, and the design of an optically controlled K(a)-band GaAs MMIC PAA.

  17. The Potential of Phased Arrays for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald J.

    2000-01-01

    Phased array antennas provide a set of operational capabilities which are very attractive for certain mission applications and not very attractive for others. Such antennas are by no means a panacea for telecommunications. In this paper the features of phased arrays are reviewed and their implications for space missions are considered in terms of benefits and costs. The primary capability provided by a phased array is electronic beam agility. The beam direction may be controlled at electronic speeds (vs. mechanical actuation) permitting time division multiplexing of multiple "users." Moreover, the beam direction can be varied over a full hemisphere (for a planar array). On the other hand, such antennas are typically much more complicated than the more commonly used reflectors and horns and this implies higher cost. In some applications, this increased cost must be accepted if the mission is to be carried out at all. The SIR-C radar is an example of such a case albeit not for deep space. Assuming for the sake of argument that the complexity and cost of a phased array can be significantly reduced, where can such antennas be of value in the future of planetary exploration? Potential applications to be discussed are planetary rovers, landers, and orbiters including both the areosynchronous and low orbit varieties. In addition, consideration is given to links from deep space to earth. As may be fairly obvious, the deep space link to earth would not benefit from the wide angle steering capability provided by a phase array whereas a rover could gain advantage from the capability to steer a beam anywhere in the sky. In the rover case, however, physical size of the aperture becomes a significant factor which, of course, has implications regarding the choice of frequency band. Recent research work concerning phased arrays has suggested that future phased arrays might be made less complex and, therefore, less costly. Successful realization of such phased arrays would enable

  18. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nick; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Phased array antennas showcase many advantages over mechanically steered systems. However, they are also more complex, heavy and most importantly costly. This presentation paper presents a concept which overcomes these detrimental attributes by eliminating all of the phase array backend (including phase shifters). Instead, a wave velocity reconfigurable transmission line is used in a series fed array arrangement to allow phase shifting with one small (100mil) mechanical motion. Different configurations of the reconfigurable wave velocity transmission line are discussed and simulated and experimental results are presented.

  19. Ultrasonic Phased-Array Characterization for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, John J.; Tennis, Richard F.; Pickens, Keith S.

    1995-01-01

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) recently fabricated and delivered the 100-channel Ultrasonic Phased-Array Testbed System (UPATS) for NASA's Langley Research Center. NASA prepared the specifications and provided the funding to develop UPATS in order to provide a tool for the improvement of ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and characterization of materials. UPATS incorporates state-of-the-art phased-array concepts such as beam steering, focusing, apodization, and phase-sensitive detection which make it possible to develop more sophisticated testing methodologies. It also can be used to investigate fundamental ultrasonic propagation and detection phenomena such as refraction, diffraction, scattering, and beam broadening.

  20. Ka-Band Multibeam Aperture Phased Array Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Kacpura, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems offer many advantages to low-Earth-orbiting satellite systems. Their large scan angles and multibeam capabilities allow for vibration-free, rapid beam scanning and graceful degradation operation for high rate downlink of data to users on the ground. Technology advancements continue to reduce the power, weight, and cost of these systems to make phased arrays a competitive alternative in comparison to the gimbled reflector system commonly used in science missions. One effort to reduce the cost of phased arrays is the development of a Ka-band multibeam aperture (MBA) phased array by Boeing Corporation under a contract jointly by the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Office of Naval Research. The objective is to develop and demonstrate a space-qualifiable dual-beam Ka-band (26.5-GHz) phased-array antenna. The goals are to advance the state of the art in Ka-band active phased-array antennas and to develop and demonstrate multibeam transmission technology compatible with spacecraft in low Earth orbit to reduce the cost of future missions by retiring certain development risks. The frequency chosen is suitable for space-to-space and space-to-ground communication links. The phased-array antenna has a radiation pattern designed by combining a set of individual radiating elements, optimized with the type of radiating elements used, their positions in space, and the amplitude and phase of the currents feeding the elements. This arrangement produces a directional radiation pattern that is proportional to the number of individual radiating elements. The arrays of interest here can scan the main beam electronically with a computerized algorithm. The antenna is constructed using electronic components with no mechanical parts, and the steering is performed electronically, without any resulting vibration. The speed of the scanning is limited primarily by the control electronics. The radiation performance degrades gracefully if a portion of the elements

  1. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are 1) the fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, 2) spatial beam forming, and 3) optical beam splitting techniques. Two novel optical beam forming approaches, i.e., the spatial beam forming with a 'smart pixel' spatial light modulator (SLM) and the optical beam splitting approaches are conceived with integrated quasi-optical components. Also presented are the transmit and receive array architectures with the new SLM.

  2. Microwave power transmitting phased array antenna research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    An initial design study and the development results of an S band RF power transmitting phased array antenna experiment system are presented. The array was to be designed, constructed and instrumented to permit wireless power transmission technology evaluation measurements. The planned measurements were to provide data relative to the achievable performance in the state of the art of flexible surface, retrodirective arrays, as a step in technically evaluating the satellite power system concept for importing to earth, via microwave beams, the nearly continuous solar power available in geosynchronous orbit. Details of the microwave power transmitting phased array design, instrumentation approaches, system block diagrams, and measured component and breadboard characteristics achieved are presented.

  3. Phase estimation for a phased array therapeutic interstitial ultrasound probe.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenya; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals about high intensity ultrasound interstitial therapy simulation. The simulated phased array ultrasound probe allows a dynamic electronic focusing of the therapeutic beam. In order to maximize the power deposit at the focal point we propose a method which allows to optimally defining the phase shift of the electrical control signal for each individual element.

  4. Phased arrays. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, W. E.

    1980-04-01

    The design, performance, radiation patterns, and applications of phased arrays are presented in these Federally-sponsored research reports. Applications include communications, radar, optical, spacecraft, and navigational aids. This updated bibliography contains 244 abstracts, 44 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  5. Code-modulated interferometric imaging system using phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Vikas; Greene, Kevin; Floyd, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Millimeter-wave (mm-wave) imaging provides compelling capabilities for security screening, navigation, and bio- medical applications. Traditional scanned or focal-plane mm-wave imagers are bulky and costly. In contrast, phased-array hardware developed for mass-market wireless communications and automotive radar promise to be extremely low cost. In this work, we present techniques which can allow low-cost phased-array receivers to be reconfigured or re-purposed as interferometric imagers, removing the need for custom hardware and thereby reducing cost. Since traditional phased arrays power combine incoming signals prior to digitization, orthogonal code-modulation is applied to each incoming signal using phase shifters within each front-end and two-bit codes. These code-modulated signals can then be combined and processed coherently through a shared hardware path. Once digitized, visibility functions can be recovered through squaring and code-demultiplexing operations. Pro- vided that codes are selected such that the product of two orthogonal codes is a third unique and orthogonal code, it is possible to demultiplex complex visibility functions directly. As such, the proposed system modulates incoming signals but demodulates desired correlations. In this work, we present the operation of the system, a validation of its operation using behavioral models of a traditional phased array, and a benchmarking of the code-modulated interferometer against traditional interferometer and focal-plane arrays.

  6. Guided wave phased array beamforming and imaging in composite plates.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingyu; Tian, Zhenhua

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes phased array beamforming using guided waves in anisotropic composite plates. A generic phased array algorithm is presented, in which direction dependent guided wave parameters and the energy skew effect are considered. This beamforming at an angular direction is achieved based on the classic delay-and-sum principle by applying phase delays to signals received at array elements and adding up the delayed signals. The phase delays are determined with the goal to maximize the array output at the desired direction and minimize it otherwise. For array characterization, the beam pattern of rectangular grid arrays in composite plates is derived. In addition to the beam pattern, the beamforming factor in terms of wavenumber distribution is defined to provide intrinsic explanations for phased array beamforming. The beamforming and damage detection in a composite plate are demonstrated using rectangular grid arrays made by a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. Detection images of the composite plate with multiple surface defects at various directions are obtained. The results show that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  7. Electro-optical processing of phased-array antenna data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casasent, D.; Casasayas, F.

    1975-01-01

    An on-line two-dimensional optical processor has been used to process simulated linear and planar phased-array radar data off-line but at real-time data rates. The input transducer is an electron-beam-addressed KD2PO4 light valve.

  8. Coordinated Radar Resource Management for Networked Phased Array Radars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    Research and Development Canada Ottawa, Canada K1A 0Z4 Email: Peter.Moo@drdc-rddc.gc.ca Abstract A phased array radar has the ability to rapidly and...search and Development Canada (DRDC) Ottawa to analyse the performance of radar resource management techniques for naval radars operating in a littoral

  9. Noise correlations and SNR in phased-array MRS.

    PubMed

    Martini, N; Santarelli, M F; Giovannetti, G; Milanesi, M; De Marchi, D; Positano, V; Landini, L

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) signals by multiple receiver coils can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or alternatively can reduce the scan time maintaining a reliable SNR. However, using phased array coils in MRS studies requires efficient data processing and data combination techniques in order to exploit the sensitivity improvement of the phased array coil acquisition method. This paper describes a novel method for the combination of MRS signals acquired by phased array coils, even in presence of correlated noise between the acquisition channels. In fact, although it has been shown that electric and magnetic coupling mechanisms produce correlated noise in the coils, previous algorithms developed for MRS data combination have ignored this effect. The proposed approach takes advantage of a noise decorrelation stage to maximize the SNR of the combined spectra. In particular Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was exploited to project the acquired spectra in a subspace where the noise vectors are orthogonal. In this subspace the SNR weighting method will provide the optimal overall SNR. Performance evaluation of the proposed method is carried out on simulated (1)H-MRS signals and experimental results are obtained on phantom (1)H-MR spectra using a commercially available 8-element phased array coil. Noise correlations between elements were generally low due to the optimal coil design, leading to a fair SNR gain (about 0.5%) in the center of the field of view (FOV). A greater SNR improvement was found in the peripheral FOV regions.

  10. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    DOE PAGES

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; ...

    2015-07-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization.more » As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (~5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. As a result, proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum.« less

  11. NASA Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA): An application study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittra, R.; Lee, S. W.; Gee, W.

    1982-01-01

    The proposed orbital geometry for the adaptive multibeam phased array (AMPA) communication system is reviewed and some of the system's capabilities and preliminary specifications are highlighted. Typical AMPA user link models and calculations are presented, the principal AMPA features are described, and the implementation of the system is demonstrated. System tradeoffs and requirements are discussed. Recommendations are included.

  12. Looking Below the Surface with Ultrasonic Phased Array

    SciTech Connect

    Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.

    2010-10-01

    This article is a brief tutorial on the benefits of volumetric ultrasonic phased array line scanning. The article describes the need, the approach, and the methods/practices used to analyze the data for flaw detection and characterization in the nuclear power plant component arena.

  13. Phased-array sources based on nonlinear metamaterial nanocavities

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Omri; Campione, Salvatore; Benz, Alexander; Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Liu, Sheng; Luk, Ting S.; Kadlec, Emil A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Klem, John F.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Brener, Igal

    2015-01-01

    Coherent superposition of light from subwavelength sources is an attractive prospect for the manipulation of the direction, shape and polarization of optical beams. This phenomenon constitutes the basis of phased arrays, commonly used at microwave and radio frequencies. Here we propose a new concept for phased-array sources at infrared frequencies based on metamaterial nanocavities coupled to a highly nonlinear semiconductor heterostructure. Optical pumping of the nanocavity induces a localized, phase-locked, nonlinear resonant polarization that acts as a source feed for a higher-order resonance of the nanocavity. Varying the nanocavity design enables the production of beams with arbitrary shape and polarization. As an example, we demonstrate two second harmonic phased-array sources that perform two optical functions at the second harmonic wavelength (∼5 μm): a beam splitter and a polarizing beam splitter. Proper design of the nanocavity and nonlinear heterostructure will enable such phased arrays to span most of the infrared spectrum. PMID:26126879

  14. Designing of a small wearable conformal phased array antenna for wireless communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sayan

    In this thesis, a unique design of a self-adapting conformal phased-array antenna system for wireless communications is presented. The antenna system is comprised of one microstrip antenna array and a sensor circuit. A 1x4 printed microstrip patch antenna array was designed on a flexible substrate with a resonant frequency of 2.47 GHz. However, the performance of the antenna starts to degrade as the curvature of the surface of the substrate changes. To recover the performance of the system, a flexible sensor circuitry was designed. This sensor circuitry uses analog phase shifters, a flexible resistor and operational-amplifier circuitry to compensate the phase of each array element of the antenna. The proposed analytical method for phase compensation has been first verified by designing an RF test platform consisting of a microstrip antenna array, commercially available analog phase shifters, analog voltage attenuators, 4-port power dividers and amplifiers. The platform can be operated through a LabVIEW GUI interface using a 12-bit digital-to-analog converter. This test board was used to design and calibrate the sensor circuitry by observing the behavior of the antenna array system on surfaces with different curvatures. In particular, this phased array antenna system was designed to be used on the surface of a spacesuit or any other flexible prototype. This work was supported in part by the Defense Miroelectronics Activity (DMEA), NASA ND EPSCoR and DARPA/MTO.

  15. EMAT phased array: A feasibility study of surface crack detection.

    PubMed

    Isla, J; Cegla, F

    2017-02-14

    Electromagnetic-acoustic transducers (EMATs) consist of a magnet and a coil. They are advantageous in some non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications because no direct contact with the specimen is needed to send and receive ultrasonic waves. However, EMATs commonly require excitation peak powers greater than 1kW and therefore the driving electronics and the EMAT coils have to be bulky. This has hindered the development of EMAT phased arrays with characteristics similar to those of conventional piezoelectric phased arrays. Phased arrays are widely used in NDE because they offer superior defect characterization in comparison to single-element transducers. In this paper, we report a series of novel techniques and design elements that make it possible to construct an EMAT phased array that performs similarly to conventional piezoelectric arrays used in NDE. One of the key enabling features is the use of coded excitation to reduce the excitation peak power to less than 4.8W (24 Vpp and 200mA) so that racetrack coils with dimensions 3.2×18mm(2) can be employed. Moreover, these racetrack coils are laid out along their shortest dimension so that 1/3 of their area is overlapped. This helps to reduce the crosstalk between the coils, i.e., the array elements, to less than -15dB. We show that an 8-element EMAT phased array operating at a central frequency of 1MHz can be used to detect defects which have a width and a depth of 0.2 and 0.8mm respectively and are located on the surface opposite to the array.

  16. Ultra-Wideband Phased Array for Millimeter-Wave 5G and ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, Markus H.; Volakis, John L.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2016-01-01

    Growing mobile data consumption has prompted the exploration of the millimeter-wave spectrum for large bandwidth, high speed communications. However, the allocated bands are spread across a wide swath of spectrum: fifth generation mobile architecture (5G): 28, 38, 39, 64-71 GHz, as well as Industrial, Scientific, and Medical bands (ISM): 24 and 60 GHz. Moreover, high gain phased arrays are required to overcome the significant path loss associated with these frequencies. Further, it is necessary to incorporate several of these applications in a single, small size and low cost platform. To this end, we have developed a scanning, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) array which covers all 5G, ISM, and other mm-W bands from 24-72 GHz. Critically, this is accomplished using mass-production Printed Circuit Board (PCB) fabrication.

  17. [Principals of high frequency surgery].

    PubMed

    Bergler, W F; Hörmann, K; Hammerschmitt, N; Huber, K

    2004-10-01

    Electrosurgical instruments are routinely and daily applied at a variety of indications in Otorhinolaryngology. They can be used for cutting, coagulation and devitalisation. All have in common that the high frequency energy is transported into the tissue via an instrument and by this causes a thermal change. Depending on the duration and characteristic of the electricity a vaporisation of the tissue is effected through coagulation, devitalisation and carbonisation. The knowledge of the effects on the tissue by the choice of the different instrument parameters and application systems is essential for an ingenious therapeutically indication. In principal the following application methods for electrosurgery by modulation of the high frequency parameters are distinguished: the monopolar and the bipolar coagulation and devitalisation and the monopolar and the bipolar cutting. This article deals with the physical basis, the effects in the tissue as well as the single application methods of the high frequency surgery.

  18. Binaural beats at high frequencies.

    PubMed

    McFadden, D; Pasanen, E G

    1975-10-24

    Binaural beats have long been believed to be audible only at low frequencies, but an interaction reminiscent of a binaural beat can sometimes be heard when different two-tone complexes of high frequency are presented to the two ears. The primary requirement is that the frequency separation in the complex at one ear be slightly different from that in the other--that is, that there be a small interaural difference in the envelope periodicities. This finding is in accord with other recent demonstrations that the auditory system is not deaf to interaural time differences at high frequencies.

  19. High-frequency broadband transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    London, S. E.; Tomashevich, S. V.

    1981-05-01

    A systematic review of the theory and design principles of high-frequency broadband transformers is presented. It is shown that the transformers of highest performance are those whose coils consist of strips of double-wire and multiwire transmission lines. Such devices are characterized by a wide operating frequency range, and make possible operation at microwave frequencies at high levels of transmitted power.

  20. High frequency integrated MOS filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, C.

    1990-01-01

    Several techniques exist for implementing integrated MOS filters. These techniques fit into the general categories of sampled and tuned continuous-time filters. Advantages and limitations of each approach are discussed. This paper focuses primarily on the high frequency capabilities of MOS integrated filters.

  1. A novel serrated columnar phased array ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Cheng; Sun, Zhenguo; Cai, Dong; Song, Hongwei; Chen, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Traditionally, wedges are required to generate transverse waves in a solid specimen and mechanical rotation device is needed for interrogation of a specimen with a hollow bore, such as high speed railway locomotive axles, turbine rotors, etc. In order to eliminate the mechanical rotation process, a novel array pattern of phased array ultrasonic transducers named as serrated columnar phased array ultrasonic transducer (SCPAUT) is designed. The elementary transducers are planar rectangular, located on the outside surface of a cylinder. This layout is aimed to generate electrically rotating transverse waveforms so as to inspect the longitudinal cracks on the outside surface of a specimen which has a hollow bore at the center, such as the high speed railway locomotive axles. The general geometry of the SCPAUT and the inspection system are illustrated. A FEM model and mockup experiment has been carried out. The experiment results are in good agreement with the FEM simulation results.

  2. A conceptual design for a microwave active phased array SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilchrist, Brian E.; Stacy, Nicholas J.; Daida, Jason; Vesecky, John F.

    1986-01-01

    The active phased array radar is well known for its assets of rapid electronic beam steering and adaptability to limited degrading influences. In a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) application, therefore, it should be possible to provide for rapid beam control in the cross-track (variable incidence angle) and along-track (spot-light mode) directions, as well as allowing for possible relaxation of antenna structural requirements. A design study has been conducted at Stanford University for a conceptual spaceborne C-band SAR application operating in the early to mid-1990's time frame. This study was intended to identify principal design issues, as well as unique features associated with an active phased array antenna SAR. A hypothetical design is used to illustrate these issues. Some of this work should have generic application to space-based communications activities.

  3. Removing Background Noise with Phased Array Signal Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Stephens, David

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test conducted to determine how well microphone phased array processing software could pull an acoustic signal out of background noise. The array consisted of 24 microphones in an aerodynamic fairing designed to be mounted in-flow. The processing was conducted using Functional Beam forming software developed by Optinav combined with cross spectral matrix subtraction. The test was conducted in the free-jet of the Nozzle Acoustic Test Rig at NASA GRC. The background noise was produced by the interaction of the free-jet flow with the solid surfaces in the flow. The acoustic signals were produced by acoustic drivers. The results show that the phased array processing was able to pull the acoustic signal out of the background noise provided the signal was no more than 20 dB below the background noise level measured using a conventional single microphone equipped with an aerodynamic forebody.

  4. Phased array receiver development using high performance HEMT MMICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Jones, W.; Carandang, R.; Lam, W.; Yonaki, J.; Streit, D.; Kasody, R.

    1991-07-01

    A set of HEMT MMICs including LNAs and phase shifters has been developed for an all-HEMT 20 GHz phased array receiver applications. These MMICs use state-of-the-art HEMT devices for low noise figure, innovative design techniques for compactness, and proven wafer processing for high yield. The LNA achieved a noise figure of 2.5 dB with an associated gain of 22 dB. The 3-bit phase shifter achieved 6 to 7.8 dB insertion loss for all states. With their performance and high process yield, these MMIC chips can be inserted into a system to demonstrate the next generation phased array performance.

  5. A design concept for an MMIC microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Smetana, J.; Acosta, R.

    1986-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka band advanced satellite communication antenna systems. The proposed design concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required. The proposed design concept takes into consideration the RF characteristics and actual phyical dimensions of the MMIC devices. Also, solutions to spatial constraints and interconnections associated with currently available packaging designs are discussed. Finally, the design of the microstrip radiating elements and their radiation characteristics are examined.

  6. A Phased Array Coil for Human Cardiac Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Constantinides, Chris D.; Westgate, Charles R.; O'Dell, Walter G.; Zerhouni, Elias A.; McVeigh, Elliot R.

    2007-01-01

    A prototype cardiac phased array receiver coil was constructed that comprised a cylindrical array and a separate planar array. Both arrays had two coil loops with the same coil dimensions. Data acquisition with the cylindrical array placed on the human chest, and the planar array placed under the back, yielded an overall enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over the entire heart by a factor of 1.1–2.85 over a commercially available flexible coil and a commercially available four-loop planar phased array coil. This improvement in SNR can be exploited in cardiac imaging to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the image acquisition time. PMID:7674903

  7. A design concept for an MMIC microstrip phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, R. Q.; Smetana, J.; Acosta, R.

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka band advanced satellite communication antenna systems. The proposed design concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required. The proposed design concept takes into consideration the RF characteristics and actual phyical dimensions of the MMIC devices. Also, solutions to spatial constraints and interconnections associated with currently available packaging designs are discussed. Finally, the design of the microstrip radiating elements and their radiation characteristics are examined.

  8. Phased Array Probe Optimization for the Inspection of Titanium Billets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasselkorde, E.; Cooper, I.; Wallace, P.; Lupien, V.

    2010-02-01

    The manufacturing process of titanium billets can produce multiple sub-surface defects that are particularly difficult to detect during the early stages of production. Failure to detect these defects can lead to subsequent in-service failure. A new and novel automated quality control system is being developed for the inspection of titanium billets destined for use in aerospace applications. The sensors will be deployed by an automated system to minimise the use of manual inspections, which should improve the quality and reliability of these critical inspections early on in the manufacturing process. This paper presents the first part of the work, which is the design and the simulation of the phased array ultrasonic inspection of the billets. A series of phased array transducers were designed to optimise the ultrasonic inspection of a ten inch diameter billet made from Titanium 6Al-4V. A comparison was performed between different probes including a 2D annular sectorial array.

  9. Large Phased Array Radar Using Networked Small Parabolic Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Multifunction phased array systems with radar, telecom, and imaging applications have already been established for flat plate phased arrays of dipoles, or waveguides. In this paper the design trades and candidate options for combining the radar and telecom functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN) into a single large transmit array of small parabolic reflectors will be discussed. In particular the effect of combing the radar and telecom functions on the sizes of individual antenna apertures and the corresponding spacing between the antenna elements of the array will be analyzed. A heterogeneous architecture for the DSN large transmit array is proposed to meet the radar and telecom requirements while considering the budget, scheduling, and strategic planning constrains.

  10. Robotic inspection of fiber reinforced composites using phased array UT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Jeffrey T.; De Odorico, Walter

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound is the current NDE method of choice to inspect large fiber reinforced airframe structures. Over the last 15 years Cartesian based scanning machines using conventional ultrasound techniques have been employed by all airframe OEMs and their top tier suppliers to perform these inspections. Technical advances in both computing power and commercially available, multi-axis robots now facilitate a new generation of scanning machines. These machines use multiple end effector tools taking full advantage of phased array ultrasound technologies yielding substantial improvements in inspection quality and productivity. This paper outlines the general architecture for these new robotic scanning systems as well as details the variety of ultrasonic techniques available for use with them including advances such as wide area phased array scanning and sound field adaptation for non-flat, non-parallel surfaces.

  11. Large Phased Array Radar Using Networked Small Parabolic Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amoozegar, Farid

    2006-01-01

    Multifunction phased array systems with radar, telecom, and imaging applications have already been established for flat plate phased arrays of dipoles, or waveguides. In this paper the design trades and candidate options for combining the radar and telecom functions of the Deep Space Network (DSN) into a single large transmit array of small parabolic reflectors will be discussed. In particular the effect of combing the radar and telecom functions on the sizes of individual antenna apertures and the corresponding spacing between the antenna elements of the array will be analyzed. A heterogeneous architecture for the DSN large transmit array is proposed to meet the radar and telecom requirements while considering the budget, scheduling, and strategic planning constrains.

  12. Detection Performance of a Diffusive Wave Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Stephen P.

    2004-04-01

    Diffusive wave phased arrays have been demonstrated to be a sensitive method of detecting inhomogeneities embedded in heavily scattering media. However, the increase in sensitivity is coupled with an increase in noise, so that the optimum performance may not be obtained when the sources are modulated in antiphase. The performance of a range of configurations in the presence of Gaussian noise is investigated by using probabilistic detection theory. A model of diffusive wave propagation through scattering media is used to demonstrate that the phase performance can be improved by controlling the relative phase difference between the two sources. However, the best performance is obtained by using the amplitude response of a single source system. The major benefit of a phased array system is therefore the rejection of common systematic noise.

  13. Fiber optic signal distribution for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecherle, G. S.

    1992-03-01

    The use of a 32-GHz phased-array transmitting antenna with fiberoptic signal distribution is considered in the context of a Mars relay satellite for NASA's Space Exploration Initiative. The specifications of the proposed application are assessed with specific attention given to the EIRP requirement of 86 dBW and its ramifications on the phased array, antenna, and photonic architecture. A photonic performance analysis is conducted to study phase-noise and SNR degradations to determine whether phase-locked loop (PLL) complexity is required. SNR and phase noise are examined as a function of the number of optical splits, and the number is shown to be limited to 350. Use of the PLL allows one laser to support 650 elements - as opposed to 250 - showing that only a single laser diode is needed to support the array for the Mars transmitter.

  14. Computation of the radiation characteristics of a generalized phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    With the advent of monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) technology, the phased array has become a key component in the design of advanced antenna systems. Array-fed antennas are used extensively in today's multiple beam satellite antennas. A computer program based on a very efficient numerical technique for calculating the radiated power (Romberg integration), directivity, and radiation pattern of a phased array is described. The formulation developed is very general, and takes into account arbitrary element polarization, E- and H-plane element pattern, element location, and complex element excitation. For comparison purposes sample cases have been presented. Excellent agreement has been obtained for all cases. Also included are a user guide and a copy of the computer program.

  15. Ultrasonic Phased Array Simulations of Welded Components at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate inspections of welded components have become of increasing importance as NASA develops new hardware such as Ares rocket segments for future exploration missions. Simulation and modeling will play an increasing role in the future for nondestructive evaluation in order to better understand the physics of the inspection process, to prove or disprove the feasibility for an inspection method or inspection scenario, for inspection optimization, for better understanding of experimental results, and for assessment of probability of detection. This study presents simulation and experimental results for an ultrasonic phased array inspection of a critical welded structure important for NASA future exploration vehicles. Keywords: nondestructive evaluation, computational simulation, ultrasonics, weld, modeling, phased array

  16. Adaptive multibeam phased array design for a Spacelab experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noji, T. T.; Fass, S.; Fuoco, A. M.; Wang, C. D.

    1977-01-01

    The parametric tradeoff analyses and design for an Adaptive Multibeam Phased Array (AMPA) for a Spacelab experiment are described. This AMPA Experiment System was designed with particular emphasis to maximize channel capacity and minimize implementation and cost impacts for future austere maritime and aeronautical users, operating with a low gain hemispherical coverage antenna element, low effective radiated power, and low antenna gain-to-system noise temperature ratio.

  17. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  18. Comparison of Two Detection Combination Algorithms for Phased Array Radars

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    data were generated by a simulator of multi-function radar ( MFR ) and the combination algorithms are evaluated with the recorded simulation data. With...electronically scanned phased array Multi-Function Radar ( MFR ), is a type of radar whose transmitter and receiver functions are composed of numerous...small transmit/receive modules. An MFR can perform many functions previously performed by individual, dedicated radars for search, tracking and

  19. Wireless Networks for Beamforming in Distributed Phased Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Radar (VSR) working on L- band is integrated with the AN/SPY-3 Multi Function Radar (MFR), which is an X- band active phased array radar designed to...following standards: Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11), Bluetooth, Ultra-Wide Band ( UWB ), and Wimax. In recent years, Wi-Fi has become increasingly popular by enabling...30 Figure 14. Maximum capacity for UWB and 802.11n (After [22]). .................................31 Figure 15. Two

  20. Progress of Multifunction Phased Array Radar (MPAR) Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-15

    radars (ARSRs), and Terminal Doppler Weather Radars (TDWRs), as well as the NWS/DOD/FAA Weather Surveillance Radar Model 88 Doppler (WSR-88D), 1...the exploration of simultaneous dual polarization for phased array radars . The ability of an MPAR system to simultaneously support both weather and...from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) National Severe Storm Laboratory’s (NSSL) National Weather Radar Testbed (NWRT) in

  1. Phased-Array Antenna With Optoelectronic Control Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Martzaklis, Konstantinos; Lee, Richard Q.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1995-01-01

    Prototype phased-array antenna features control of amplitude and phase at each radiating element. Amplitude- and phase-control signals transmitted on optical fiber to optoelectronic interface circuit (OEIC), then to monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) at each element. Offers advantages of flexible, rapid electronic steering and shaping of beams. Furthermore, greater number of elements, less overall performance of antenna degraded by malfunction in single element.

  2. Range sidelobe suppression in wideband phased array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, Melvin L., Jr.; Moss, Karen M.

    The authors delineate some considerations in achieving RSL (range sidelobe) suppression in wideband phased arrays. Attention is given to wideband radar characteristics suppression of spurious signals, and sources of wideband RSLs. It is suggested that the parallelism associated with the transmitter and antenna paths should mitigate associated uncorrelated time-varying error modulation. The exciter can be a major RSL contributor unless spurious signal suppression with the SSBM (single sideband modulator) is emphasized in design and calibration procedures.

  3. Optical RF distribution links for MMIC phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Raquet, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional methods to distribute RF signals to GaAs Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits Phased Array Antennas are inadequate for arrays having large numbers of elements. Optical RF distribution links have been proposed as a lightweight, mechanically flexible, and low volume solution. Three candidate techniques for providing optical RF distribution are discussed along with the electro-optic devices required to configure them. A discussion of the present status of applicable electro-optics devices is also included.

  4. Phased-array design for MST and ST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ecklund, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    All of the existing radar systems fully dedicated to clear-air radar studies use some type of phased-array antennas. The effects of beam-steering techniques including feed networks and phase shifters; sidelobe control; ground-clutter suppression; low altitude coverage; arrays with integrated radiating elements and feed networks; analysis of coaxial-collinear antennas; use of arrays with multiple beams; and array testing and measure on structural design of the antenna are discussed.

  5. A 32-GHz phased array transmit feed for spacecraft telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. A.; Rascoe, D. L.; Crist, R. A.; Huang, J.; Wamhof, P. D.; Lansing, F. S.

    1992-01-01

    A 21-element phased array transmit feed was demonstrated as part of an effort to develop and evaluate state-of-the-art transmitter and receiver components at 32 and 34 GHz for future deep-space missions. Antenna pattern measurements demonstrating electronic beam steering of the two-dimensional array are reported and compared with predictions based on measured performance of MMIC-based phase shifter and amplifier modules and Vivaldi slotline radiating elements.

  6. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  7. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  8. Infinite Phased Array of Microstrip Dipoles in Two Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Green’s function appropriate to the two-layer substrate- superstrate structure was used in the formulation of the method of moMents - (continued on back) 20...analysis is presented for an infinite phased array of microstrip dipoles embedded within a two layer substrate structure (sub- strate- superstrate ...characterization of input impedance as a function of phase scan angle. Results for several sub- strate- superstrate structures illustrate the utility of the single

  9. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection of Seeded Titanium Billet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, J. H.; Gray, T. A.; Khandelwal, P.; Dunhill, T.

    2004-02-01

    As part of efforts by Rolls-Royce to evaluate the use of ultrasonic phased arrays for inspection of titanium billets, a series of ultrasonic phased array inspections were performed at the Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (CNDE). The inspections were performed using a sectorial-annular array designed especially for titanium billets by R/D Tech and supplied to Rolls-Royce. The billet test piece is seeded with thirteen yttria disks, each located at successive depths below the outer diameter surface to just past the billet centerline. The phased array inspections employed both fixed-focus and dynamic-depth-focus (DDF) focal laws in conjunction with several depth gating schemes. Aperture and focal parameters were changed as a function of depth when using fixed-focus focal laws. Results include characterization of transducer performance and delay-time correction of imperfections, signal-to-noise measurements for the yttria disks in the billet test piece, and effects of probe misalignment on flaw sensitivity.

  10. PATL: A RFID Tag Localization based on Phased Array Antenna

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Lanxin; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Huang, Zhangqin

    2017-01-01

    In RFID systems, how to detect the position precisely is an important and challenging research topic. In this paper, we propose a range-free 2D tag localization method based on phased array antenna, called PATL. This method takes advantage of the adjustable radiation angle of the phased array antenna to scan the surveillance region in turns. By using the statistics of the tags’ number in different antenna beam directions, a weighting algorithm is used to calculate the position of the tag. This method can be applied to real-time location of multiple targets without usage of any reference tags or additional readers. Additionally, we present an optimized weighting method based on RSSI to increase the locating accuracy. We use a Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) UHF RFID reader which is integrated with a phased array antenna to evaluate our method. The experiment results from an indoor office environment demonstrate the average distance error of PATL is about 21 cm and the optimized approach achieves an accuracy of 13 cm. This novel 2D localization scheme is a simple, yet promising, solution that is especially applicable to the smart shelf visualized management in storage or retail area. PMID:28295014

  11. Control of complex components with Smart Flexible Phased Arrays.

    PubMed

    Casula, O; Poidevin, C; Cattiaux, G; Dumas, Ph

    2006-12-22

    The inspection is mainly performed in contact with ultrasonic wedge transducers; However, the shape cannot fit the changing geometries of components (butt weld, nozzle, elbow). The variable thickness of the coupling layer, between the wedge and the local surface, leads to beam distortions and losses of sensitivity. Previous studies have shown that these two phenomena contribute to reduce the inspection performances leading to shadow area, split beam.... Flexible phased arrays have been developed to fit the complex profile and improve such controls. The radiating surface is composed with independent piezoelectric elements mechanically assembled and a profilometer, embedded in the transducer, measures the local distortion. The computed shape is used by an algorithm to compute in real-time the adapted delay laws compensating the distortions of 2D or 3D profiles. Those delay laws are transferred to the real-time UT acquisition system, which applies them to the piezoelectric elements. This self-adaptive process preserves, during the scanning, the features of the focused beam (orientation and focal depth) in the specimen. To validate the concept of the Smart Flexible Phased Array Transducer, prototypes have been integrated to detect flaws machined in mock-ups with realistic irregular 2D and 3D shapes. Inspections have been carried out on samples showing the enhancement performances of the "Smart Flexible Phased Array" and validating the mechanical and acoustical behaviors of these probes.

  12. Phased-Array Satcom Antennas Developed for Aeronautical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Communications (AC) for Aeronautics research at the NASA Glenn Research Center integrates both aeronautics and space communications technologies to achieve the national objective of upgrading the present National Airspace System infrastructure by responding to the agency's aviation capacity and safety goals. One concept for future air traffic management, free flight, presents a significantly increased demand for communications systems capacity and performance in comparison to current air traffic management practices. Current aeronautical communications systems are incapable of supporting the anticipated demands, and the new digital data communications links that are being developed, or are in the early stages of implementation, are not primarily designed to carry the data-intensive free flight air traffic management (ATM) communications loads. Emerging satellite communications technologies are the best potential long-term solution to provide the capacity and performance necessary to enable a mature free flight concept to be deployed. NASA AC/ATM funded the development of a Boeing-designed Ku-band transmit phased-array antenna, a combined in-house and contract effort. Glenn designed and integrated an Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Communications terminal based on the transmit phased-array antenna and a companion receive phased-array antenna previously developed by Boeing.

  13. High Power Low Impedance Therapeutic Intracavitary Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukic, Aleksandra; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-03-01

    Ultrasound phased arrays can be used for noninvasive surgical applications, and are ideal for intracavitary applications, where their properties of dynamic focusing and beam steering compensate for the spatial constraints. Phase shifting without grating lobes requires small elements, which results in low width-thickness ratios and thus high electrical impedance. This study demonstrates, for the first time, a method of lateral coupling for the purposes of reduction of electrical impedance of linear phased arrays. Fabrication procedure for a lateral coupled array for therapeutic purposes is demonstrated. Impedance analysis of a thickness mode driven phased array is compared to a lateral coupling mode array. For a 1.5 MHz resonant frequency, impedance drop of 33 times is seen at antiresonance, and 6 times at resonance. Thickness mode phase peak is never higher than -41.3°, whereas it reaches to 42.3° in the lateral coupling mode. This allows for a phase crossing of 0° for lateral mode transducer, where the impedance is 111Ω, eliminating the need for matching circuits. Scanning laser vibrometer measurements of surface displacements show that a lateral mode element can achieve intensity levels greater than 20 W/cm2, when an unmatched element is tested.

  14. PATL: A RFID Tag Localization based on Phased Array Antenna.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lanxin; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Huang, Zhangqin

    2017-03-15

    In RFID systems, how to detect the position precisely is an important and challenging research topic. In this paper, we propose a range-free 2D tag localization method based on phased array antenna, called PATL. This method takes advantage of the adjustable radiation angle of the phased array antenna to scan the surveillance region in turns. By using the statistics of the tags' number in different antenna beam directions, a weighting algorithm is used to calculate the position of the tag. This method can be applied to real-time location of multiple targets without usage of any reference tags or additional readers. Additionally, we present an optimized weighting method based on RSSI to increase the locating accuracy. We use a Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) UHF RFID reader which is integrated with a phased array antenna to evaluate our method. The experiment results from an indoor office environment demonstrate the average distance error of PATL is about 21 cm and the optimized approach achieves an accuracy of 13 cm. This novel 2D localization scheme is a simple, yet promising, solution that is especially applicable to the smart shelf visualized management in storage or retail area.

  15. Simulation and data reconstruction for NDT phased array techniques.

    PubMed

    Chatillon, S; de Roumilly, L; Porre, J; Poidevin, C; Calmon, P

    2006-12-22

    Phased array techniques are now widely employed for industrial NDT applications in various contexts. Indeed, phased array present a great adaptability to the inspection configuration and the application of suitable delay laws allows to optimize the detection and characterization performances by taking into account the component geometry, the material characteristics, and the aim of the inspection. In addition, the amount of potential information issued from the inspection is in general greatly enhanced. It is the case when the employed method involve sequences of shots (sectorial scanning, multiple depth focusing etc) or when signals received on the different channels are stored. At last, application of electronic commutation make possible higher acquisition rates. Accompanying these advantages, it is clear that an optimal use of such techniques require the application of simulation-based algorithms at the different stages of the inspection process: When designing the probe by optimizing number and characteristics of element; When conceiving the inspection method by selecting suitable sequences of shots, computing optimized delay laws and evaluating the performances of the control in terms of zone coverage or flaw detection capabilities; When analysing the results by applying simulation-helped visualization and data reconstruction algorithms. For many years the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) has been being greatly involved in the development of such phased arrays simulation-based tools. In this paper, we will present recent advances of this activity and show different examples of application carried out on complex situations.

  16. Simultaneous Transmit and Receive Performance of an 8-Channel Digital Phased Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-16

    Simultaneous transmit and receive with digital phased arrays,” in IEEE International Symposium on Phased Array Systems and Technology , Oct. 2016, pp. 1–6. ...Simultaneous Transmit and Receive Performance of an 8-channel Digital Phased Array Jonathan P. Doane, Kenneth E. Kolodziej, Bradley T. Perry MIT...high isolation between adjacent transmitting and receiving sub-arrays in a digital phased array without analog cancellers or other complex front-end

  17. High-Frequency Channel Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    High-Frequency Channel Characterization Michael B. Porter, Paul Hursky, Martin Siderius Heat , Light, and Sound Research, Inc. 12730 High...Physical Sciences (Bruce Abraham) • Arizona State University (Tolga Duman, Subhadeep Roy) • Heat , Light, and Sound Research, Inc.(M. Porter, A. Abawi, P...NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Heat , Light, and Sound Research, Inc,12730 High

  18. Phased Arrays of Ground and Airborne Mobile Terminals for Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, John

    1996-01-01

    Phased array antenna is beginning to play an important in the arena of mobile/satellite communications. Two examples of mobile terminal phased arrays will be shown. Their technical background, challenges, and cost drivers will be discussed. A possible solution to combat some of the deficiencies of the conventional phased array by exploiting the phased reflectarray technology will be briefly presented.

  19. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study. Volume 1: Technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.; Gerson, H. I.; Srinivas, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The status of the technologies for phased-array-fed dual reflector systems is reviewed. The different aspects of these technologies, including optical performances, phased array systems, problems encountered in phased array design, beamforming networks, MMIC design and its incorporation into waveguide systems, reflector antenna structures, and reflector deployment mechanisms are addressed.

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Arrays for the Inspection of Thick-Section Welds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    phased - array ultrasonics in NDE , with specific reference to the inspection of thick- section welds. The...likely that ultrasonic phased arrays will eventually replace conventional ultrasonic methods in many non-destructive evaluation ( NDE ) applications...embraced by the NDE community. The purpose of this report is to present a summary of the advantages and limitations of phased - array ultrasonics

  1. Inspecting Composite Ceramic Armor Using Advanced Signal Processing Together with Phased Array Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-08

    processing techniques have been developed to help improve phased array ultrasonic inspection and analysis of multi-layered ceramic armor panels. The...INSPECTING COMPOSITE CERAMIC ARMOR USING ADVANCED SIGNAL PROCESSING TOGETHER WITH PHASED ARRAY ULTRASOUND J. S. Steckenrider Illinois College...immersion phased array ultrasound system. Some of these specimens had intentional design defects inserted interior to the specimens. Because of the very

  2. Transmit beamforming techniques for suppressing grating lobes in large pitch ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbatian, Zahra; Adamson, Rob; Bance, Manohar; Brown, Jeremy A.

    2011-03-01

    To date, clinical implementation of high-frequency ultrasound has been limited due to the difficulties in fabricating sufficiently small micro-array transducers. Specifically, if an array is desired with the ability to beam-steer to large angles, an inter-element pitch of approximately .5λ is required to avoid grating lobe artifacts. At high-frequencies (30-70MHz), this introduces major fabrication challenges since the required element pitch is between 10 and 25 microns. A new technique called Phase Coherence Imaging has been introduced in the literature for suppressing grating lobes in large-pitch arrays by calculating a weighting factor proportional to the instantaneous phase coherence of the received element echoes. If the reflected echoes in the grating lobe region are relatively broadband, only some of the echoes will overlap and the resulting weighting factor will be less. Unfortunately, most beamforming techniques result in relatively narrowband echoes in the grating lobe region, making this technique less effective. We have developed a technique that splits the N-element transmit aperture into N/K transmit elements and N receive elements in order to better suppress grating lobes by increasing the bandwidth of the grating lobe echoes. We have also developed a technique that uses a probing pulse from a virtual point source behind the array in order to pre-calculate weighting factors from broadband echoes before conventional transmit beamforming is used. Radiation patterns have been simulated and the amount of grating lobe suppression has been quantified using the proposed techniques. It has been shown that these techniques are very effective in suppressing grating lobes in large-pitch phased-arrays, potentially simplifying high-frequency array fabrication.

  3. Phased-array vector velocity estimation using transverse oscillations.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Michael J; Marcher, Jonne; Jensen, Jorgen A

    2012-12-01

    A method for estimating the 2-D vector velocity of blood using a phased-array transducer is presented. The approach is based on the transverse oscillation (TO) method. The purposes of this work are to expand the TO method to a phased-array geometry and to broaden the potential clinical applicability of the method. A phased-array transducer has a smaller footprint and a larger field of view than a linear array, and is therefore more suited for, e.g., cardiac imaging. The method relies on suitable TO fields, and a beamforming strategy employing diverging TO beams is proposed. The implementation of the TO method using a phased-array transducer for vector velocity estimation is evaluated through simulation and flow-rig measurements are acquired using an experimental scanner. The vast number of calculations needed to perform flow simulations makes the optimization of the TO fields a cumbersome process. Therefore, three performance metrics are proposed. They are calculated based on the complex TO spectrum of the combined TO fields. It is hypothesized that the performance metrics are related to the performance of the velocity estimates. The simulations show that the squared correlation values range from 0.79 to 0.92, indicating a correlation between the performance metrics of the TO spectrum and the velocity estimates. Because these performance metrics are much more readily computed, the TO fields can be optimized faster for improved velocity estimation of both simulations and measurements. For simulations of a parabolic flow at a depth of 10 cm, a relative (to the peak velocity) bias and standard deviation of 4% and 8%, respectively, are obtained. Overall, the simulations show that the TO method implemented on a phased-array transducer is robust with relative standard deviations around 10% in most cases. The flow-rig measurements show similar results. At a depth of 9.5 cm using 32 emissions per estimate, the relative standard deviation is 9% and the relative bias is -9

  4. Phased Array Ultrasonic Evaluation of Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Nozzle Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Steve; Engel, J.; Kimbrough, D.; Suits, M.; Hopson, George (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the phased array ultrasonic evaluation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) nozzle weld. Details are given on the nondestructive testing evaluation approach, conventional shear wave and phased array techniques, and an x-ray versus phased array risk analysis. The field set-up was duplicated to the greatest extent possible in the laboratory and the phased array ultrasonic technique was developed and validated prior to weld evaluation. Results are shown for the phased array ultrasonic evaluation and conventional ultrasonic evaluation results.

  5. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection Simulations of Welded Components at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.; Schumacher, E. J.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive and accurate inspections of welded components have become of increasing importance as NASA develops new hardware such as Ares rocket segments for future exploration missions. Simulation and modeling will play an increased role in the future for nondestructive evaluation in order to better understand the physics of the inspection process and help explain the experimental results. It will also help to prove or disprove the feasibility for an inspection method or inspection scenario, help optimize inspections, and allow to a first approximation limits of detectability. This study presents simulation and experimental results for an ultrasonic phased array inspection of a critical welded structure important for NASA future exploration vehicles.

  6. Reconfigurable Wave Velocity Transmission Lines for Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Host, Nicholas Keith; Chen, Chi-Chih; Volakis, John L.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discussed a novel phased array with an emphasis to simplify the array feed. Specifically, we will demonstrate a simple, low cost feeding approach by mechanically controlling the substrate thickness. The array feed lines are constructed from parallel plate transmission lines whose thickness are adjusted to control their effective dielectric constant (Epsilon_eff). As a result the phase delay/excitation at each array element will be adjusted per desired beam direction. The proposed antenna elements will be overlapping dipoles operating over a 2:1 bandwidth in the Ku-Band spectrum. Preliminary simulation and experimental demonstration of such an array will be presented.

  7. Optoelectronic Infrastructure for Radio Frequency and Optical Phased Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cai, Jianhong

    2015-01-01

    Optoelectronic integrated circuits offer radiation-hardened solutions for satellite systems in addition to improved size, weight, power, and bandwidth characteristics. ODIS, Inc., has developed optoelectronic integrated circuit technology for sensing and data transfer in phased arrays. The technology applies integrated components (lasers, amplifiers, modulators, detectors, and optical waveguide switches) to a radio frequency (RF) array with true time delay for beamsteering. Optical beamsteering is achieved by controlling the current in a two-dimensional (2D) array. In this project, ODIS integrated key components to produce common RF-optical aperture operation.

  8. SAR processing with stepped chirps and phased array antennas.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Wideband radar signals are problematic for phased array antennas. Wideband radar signals can be generated from series or groups of narrow-band signals centered at different frequencies. An equivalent wideband LFM chirp can be assembled from lesser-bandwidth chirp segments in the data processing. The chirp segments can be transmitted as separate narrow-band pulses, each with their own steering phase operation. This overcomes the problematic dilemma of steering wideband chirps with phase shifters alone, that is, without true time-delay elements.

  9. Coherent Optical Processing of Phased Array Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Interfacing a coherent optical processor, which utilizes an electron-beam addressed, potassium dideuterium phosphate (KDP) crystal modulator, with a linear phased array is studied. An abbreviated development of typical radar signals from a linear array is included. A plan for formating the spatial modulator with linear array signals is presented. The theoretical expectations which include target angle and Doppler are derived. A simulated set of M signals which are typical of a linear array of M elements was devised. This set of signals was used to modulate the wave front of collimated laser light via the KDP crystal according to the format presented.

  10. On the adaptive control of a phased array telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, M.; Meinhardt, J. A.; Carreras, R. A.; Baciak, M. G.

    1989-09-01

    An adaptive control philosophy known as model-reference adaptive control based on an 'ideal' behavior of the system called 'reference' system is considered. Software and hardware implementation of a model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) for a phased array telescope is discussed. The overall system configuration is presented and a model description of the system from both mathematical formulations and the MATRIXx SYSTEM-BUILD points of view is analyzed. A unified approach to to adaptive control design algorithm using MATRIXx is introduced. It is noted that a digital position monitor plays a focal point in the hardware realization of the MRAC algorithm.

  11. Ultrasonic Phased Array Simulations of Welded Components at NASA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.

    2009-03-01

    Comprehensive and accurate inspections of welded components have become of increasing importance as NASA develops new hardware such as Ares rocket segments for future exploration missions. Simulation and modeling will play an increasing role in the future for nondestructive evaluation in order to better understand the physics of the inspection process, to prove or disprove the feasibility for an inspection method or inspection scenario, for inspection optimization, for better understanding of experimental results, and for assessment of probability of detection. This study presents simulation and experimental results for an ultrasonic phased array inspection of a critical welded structure important for NASA future exploration vehicles.

  12. Photonic implementation of phased array antennas (rf scanning)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichter, James E.

    1999-07-01

    Phase Array Antennas provided angular scanning (beam steering) from fixed antenna structures. Photonics can accomplish the beam steering with improvements in size and weight along with the remoting benefits utilizing fiber optics. Photonic advantages include True Time Delay beam steering eliminating the beam squint imposed by phase shifted signals produced in an electronic implementation. Another benefit of beam steering is the ability to position nulls in the spacial pattern to reduce the interference signals. Hybrid circuits utilizing both photonic and electronic components take advantages of the best aspects of each technology. Various types of photonic implementations are included.

  13. An optically controlled Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, Richard Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1992-08-01

    The design and development of a small, optically controlled phased array antenna suitable for communication satellite applications are discussed. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 GHz, four-bit monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters in customized quartz packages with corresponding optoelectronic interface circuits (OEIC's) for control signal reception.

  14. An optically controlled Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, Richard Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, Alan N.; Simons, Rainee N.

    1992-01-01

    The design and development of a small, optically controlled phased array antenna suitable for communication satellite applications are discussed. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 GHz, four-bit monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) phase shifters in customized quartz packages with corresponding optoelectronic interface circuits (OEIC's) for control signal reception.

  15. Optical phased array radiating optical vortex with manipulated topological charges.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaoliang; Pu, Mingbo; Li, Xiong; Huang, Cheng; Pan, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Cui, Jianhua; Luo, Xiangang

    2015-02-23

    Optical antennas are key elements in quantum optics emitting and sensing, and behave wide range applications in optical domain. However, integration of optical antenna radiating orbital angular momentum is still a challenge in nano-scale. We theoretically demonstrate a sub-wavelength phased optical antenna array, which manipulates the distribution of the orbital angular momentum in the near field. Orbital angular momentum with topological charge of 4 can be obtained by controlling the phase distribution of the fundamental mode orbital angular momentum in each antenna element. Our results indicate this phased array may be utilized in high integrated optical communication systems.

  16. A vertically integrated Ka-band phased array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, R. R.; Lee, R. Q.; Martzaklis, K. S.; Shalkhauser, K. A.; Downey, A. N.; Simons, R.

    1992-01-01

    The design, development, and experimental demonstration of a small phased array antenna suitable for applications on communications satellites are discussed. Each of the vertical layers was optimized for performance, and MMICs on custom carriers were characterized prior to insertion. A vertical integration architecture is used which minimizes the size of the array with its associated beamforming network (BFN). The antenna features a four-element linear microstrip array that uses aperture coupling of the antenna elements to the BFN; a modified Wilkinson power divider BFN; and 32 Ghz, 4-bit MMIC phase shifters on customized alumina carriers. Performance data are presented for all components, and far-field antenna radiation patterns are given.

  17. Jet Noise Source Localization Using Linear Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agboola, Ferni A.; Bridges, James

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted to further clarify the interpretation and application of linear phased array microphone results, for localizing aeroacoustics sources in aircraft exhaust jet. Two model engine nozzles were tested at varying power cycles with the array setup parallel to the jet axis. The array position was varied as well to determine best location for the array. The results showed that it is possible to resolve jet noise sources with bypass and other components separation. The results also showed that a focused near field image provides more realistic noise source localization at low to mid frequencies.

  18. Variable phase sine wave generator for active phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, W. M.

    1992-09-01

    A waveform generator is provided for generating a high frequency waveform. A pulse generator provides a pulse train at a low frequency. A pulse converter converts the pulse train into an alternatingly positive and negative groups of pulses. A bandpass filter passes the alternatingly positive and negative groups of pulses in a frequency band centered at the high frequency to output the generated waveform at the high frequency. When the groups of pulses are a pair of pulses, a sine wave is output from the bandpass filter. A pulse delay circuit can be used to variably delay the pulse train and thereby cause a phase change in the generated waveform.

  19. A 220 GHz reflection-type phased array concept study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Wikner, David A.

    2011-05-01

    The goal of this project is to enable light-weight, durable, and portable systems capable of performing standoff detection of person-borne improvised explosive devices (PB-IEDs) through the development of millimeter-wave reflection-type phased arrays. Electronic beam steering eliminates the need for complex mechanical scanners that are commonly implemented with millimeter-wave imaging systems and would reduce overall system size and weight. We present a concept study of a 220 GHz reflection-type phased array for the purpose of performing beam scanning of a confocal reflector system. Requirements for effective imaging of the desired target region are established, including spatial resolution, total scan angle, and number of image pixels achievable. We examine the effects of array architecture on beam characteristics as it is scanned off broadside, including Gaussicity and encircled energy. Benchmark requirements are determined and compared with the capabilities of several potential phase shifter technologies, including MEMS-based variable capacitor phase shifters, switches, and varactor diode-based phase shifters.

  20. Ultrasonic phased arrays for nondestructive inspection of forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Wuestenberg, H.; Rotter, B. ); Klanke, H.P. ); Harbecke, D. )

    1993-06-01

    Ultrasonic examinations on large forgings like rotor shafts for turbines or components for nuclear reactors are carried out at various manufacturing stages and during in-service inspections. During the manufacture, most of the inspections are carried out manually. Special in-service conditions, such as those at nuclear pressure vessels, have resulted in the development of mechanized scanning equipment. Ultrasonic probes have improved, and well-adapted sound fields and pulse shapes and based on special imaging procedures for the representation of the reportable reflectors have been applied. Since the geometry of many forgings requires the use of a multitude of angles for the inspections in-service and during manufacture, phased-array probes can be used successfully. The main advantages of the phased-array concept, e.g. the generation of a multitude of angles with the typical increase of redundancy in detection and quantitative evaluation and the possibility to produce pictures of defect situations, will be described in this contribution.

  1. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  2. High frequency power distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mikund R.

    1986-04-01

    The objective of this project was to provide the technology of high frequency, high power transmission lines to the 100 kW power range at 20 kHz frequency. In addition to the necessary design studies, a 150 m long, 600 V, 60 A transmission line was built, tested and delivered for full vacuum tests. The configuration analysis on five alternative configurations resulted in the final selection of the three parallel Litz straps configuration, which gave a virtually concentric design in the electromagnetic sense. Low inductance, low EMI and flexibility in handling are the key features of this configuration. The final design was made after a parametric study to minimize the losses, weight and inductance. The construction of the cable was completed with no major difficulties. The R,L,C parameters measured on the cable agreed well with the calculated values. The corona tests on insulation samples showed a safety factor of 3.

  3. Application of Phased-array Vibrator System in shallow oil shale exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, T.; Lin, J.; Xu, X.

    2011-12-01

    Due to the huge oil and gas demands in China, exploration of unconventional oil shale at shallow depths becomes more critical. 52.83% of the identified reserves in China are from Jilin province and Nong'an is one of the main areas of oil shale in Jilin. The average buried depth of oil shale in Nong'an is between 300m and 800m. Since explosive sources are not allowed to operate in civil area and the inconvenience of vibroseis, Phased-array Vibrator System (PAVS) is applied in the exploration of oil shale in Nong'an. We have developed a series electromagnetic Portable High-frequency Vibrator System (PHVS), including single, combination, and phased-array modes. Single mode is the simplest mode, with output force less than 500N, and thus is only suitable for engineering seismic prospecting. Combination mode is a source array, which uses a controller to synchronize all vibrator units and let them work consistently with each other. Thus, it can increase output force than single case. The field test indicates that it can improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of reflected waves in deep layer significantly. However, it contributes little for signals from shallow layers and sometimes it can even deteriorate shallow reflected signals than single source. This is because for signals reflected from shallow depths, the assumption in combination mode that seismic waves propagate along vertical rays is no longer valid. Therefore, they are not stacked constructively. Phased-array mode belongs to a new source array, whose key part is so-called delay/phase controller. By coordinating the signal of each unit using the controller, the seismic waves can be beamed into any interested direction, based on the underground structure and the depth of interested reflected layer. In this case, SNR of the concerned reflected wave can be improved apparently. PHVS in phased-array mode is called PAVS. We made two field tests to evaluate the performance of PAVS. In the first test, we compare PAVS with

  4. All-plasmonic Optical Phased Array Integrated on a Thin-film Platform.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuan-Song; Qu, Shi-Wei; Chen, Bao-Jie; Chan, Chi Hou

    2017-08-30

    Optical phased arrays have been demonstrated to enable a variety of applications ranging from high-speed on-chip communications to vertical surface emitting lasers. Despite the prosperities of the researches on optical phased arrays, presently, the reported designs of optical phased arrays are based on silicon photonics while plasmonic-based optical phased arrays have not been demonstrated yet. In this paper, a passive plasmonic optical phased array is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The beam of the proposed plasmonic optical phased array is steerable in the far-field area and a high directivity can be achieved. In addition, radio frequency phased array theory is demonstrated to be applicable to the description of the coupling conditions of the delocalized surface plasmons in optical phased arrays and thus the gap between the phased arrays at two distinctly different wavelengths can be bridged. The potential applications of the proposed plasmonic phased arrays include on-chip optical wireless nanolinks, optical interconnections and integrated plasmonic lasers.

  5. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  6. Receiver Would Control Phasing of a Phased-Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Charles E.; Young, Lawrence E.

    2006-01-01

    In a proposed digital signal-processing technique, a radio receiver would control the phasing of a phased-array antenna to aim the peaks of the antenna radiation pattern toward desired signal sources while aiming the nulls of the pattern toward interfering signal sources. The technique was conceived for use in a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, for which the desired signal sources would be GPS satellites and typical interference sources would be terrestrial objects that cause multipath propagation. The technique could also be used to optimize reception in spread-spectrum cellular-telephone and military communication systems. During reception of radio signals in a conventional phased-array antenna system, received signals at their original carrier frequencies are phase-shifted, then combined by analog circuitry. The combination signal is then subjected to down-conversion and demodulation. In a system according to the proposed technique (see figure), the signal received by each antenna would be subjected to down-conversion, spread-spectrum demodulation, and correlation; this processing would be performed separately from, and simultaneously with, similar processing of signals received by the other antenna elements. Following analog down-conversion to baseband, the signals would be digitized, and all subsequent processing would be digital. In the digital process, residual carriers would be removed and each signal would be correlated with a locally generated model pseudorandum-noise code, all following normal GPS procedure. As part of this procedure, accumulated values would be added in software and the resulting signals would be phase-shifted in software by the amounts necessary to synthesize the desired antenna directional gain pattern of peaks and nulls. The principal advantage of this technique over the conventional radio-frequency-combining technique is that the parallel digital baseband processing of the signals from the various antenna elements would be

  7. High Frequency Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qing Zhe; Daviso, Eugenio; Can, Thach V.; Markhasin, Evgeny; Jawla, Sudheer K.; Swager, Timothy M.; Temkin, Richard J.; Herzfeld, Judith; Griffin, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Conspectus During the three decades 1980–2010, magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR developed into the method of choice to examine many chemical, physical and biological problems. In particular, a variety of dipolar recoupling methods to measure distances and torsion angles can now constrain molecular structures to high resolution. However, applications are often limited by the low sensitivity of the experiments, due in large part to the necessity of observing spectra of low-γ nuclei such as the I = ½ species 13C or 15N. The difficulty is still greater when quadrupolar nuclei, like 17O or 27Al, are involved. This problem has stimulated efforts to increase the sensitivity of MAS experiments. A particularly powerful approach is dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) which takes advantage of the higher equilibrium polarization of electrons (which conventionally manifests in the great sensitivity advantage of EPR over NMR). In DNP, the sample is doped with a stable paramagnetic polarizing agent and irradiated with microwaves to transfer the high polarization in the electron spin reservoir to the nuclei of interest. The idea was first explored by Overhauser and Slichter in 1953. However, these experiments were carried out on static samples, at magnetic fields that are low by current standards. To be implemented in contemporary MAS NMR experiments, DNP requires microwave sources operating in the subterahertz regime — roughly 150–660 GHz — and cryogenic MAS probes. In addition, improvements were required in the polarizing agents, because the high concentrations of conventional radicals that are required to produce significant enhancements compromise spectral resolution. In the last two decades scientific and technical advances have addressed these problems and brought DNP to the point where it is achieving wide applicability. These advances include the development of high frequency gyrotron microwave sources operating in the subterahertz frequency range. In addition, low

  8. Phased array ultrasonic processing for enhanced and affordable diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, N.; Rougeron, G.; Leberre, S.; Pautel, R.

    2013-01-01

    Phased array ultrasonic reconstruction techniques are often presented as a prospect for better and enhanced diagnosis. However to date few applications of these techniques can be found in the industry, partly because of questions on sizing but also because they often require heavy acquisitions. A way forward is then to propose techniques requiring less intensive data acquisition to make them broadly affordable in practice. Several approaches ranging from full matrix capture to paintbrush acquisitions are presented in this paper in combination with associated reconstruction processing like the Total Focusing Method (TFM) and the Time Domain Topological Energy (TDTE) techniques. Emphasis is given to their relative relevancies and practical applicability on typical configurations of interest for industries. The paper also presents recent efforts made on the acceleration of processing computation times, in particular through the use of GPU architectures.

  9. Subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouchi, Akihiro; Sugawara, Azusa; Ohara, Yoshikazu; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-07-01

    To accurately measure closed crack length, we proposed an imaging method using a subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation using surface acoustic waves (SAW SPACE) with water immersion. We applied SAW SPACE to the hole specimen in a fundamental array (FA) image. The hole was imaged with high resolution. Subsequently, SAW SPACE was applied to fatigue crack and stress corrosion crack (SCC) specimens. A fatigue crack was imaged in FA and subharmonic array (SA) images, and the length of this particular fatigue crack measured in the images was almost the same as that measured by optical observation. The SCC was imaged and its length was accurately measured in the SA image, whereas it was underestimated in the FA image and by optical observation. Thus, we demonstrated that SAW SPACE with water immersion is useful for the accurate measurement of closed crack length and for imaging the distribution of open and closed parts of cracks with high resolution.

  10. Photorefractive phased array antenna beam-forming processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarto, Anthony W.; Wagner, Kelvin H.; Weverka, Robert T.; Blair, Steven M.; Weaver, Samuel P.

    1996-11-01

    A high bandwidth, large degree-of-freedom photorefractive phased-array antenna beam-forming processor which uses 3D dynamic volume holograms in photorefractive crystals to time integrate the adaptive weights to perform beam steering and jammer-cancellation signal-processing tasks is described. The processor calculates the angle-of-arrival of a desired signal of interest and steers the antenna pattern in the direction of this desired signal by forming a dynamic holographic grating proportional to the correlation between the incoming signal of interest from the antenna array and the temporal waveform of the desired signal. Experimental results of main-beam formation and measured array-functions are presented in holographic index grating and the resulting processor output.

  11. Phased-array-fed antenna configuration study, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Lee, B. S.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.

    1983-01-01

    Increased capacity in future satellite systems can be achieved through antenna systems which provide multiplicity of frequency reuses at K sub a band. A number of antenna configurations which can provide multiple fixed spot beams and multiple independent spot scanning beams at 20 GHz are addressed. Each design incorporates a phased array with distributed MMIC amplifiers and phasesifters feeding a two reflector optical system. The tradeoffs required for the design of these systems and the corresponding performances are presented. Five final designs are studied. In so doing, a type of MMIC/waveguide transition is described, and measured results of the breadboard model are presented. Other hardware components developed are described. This includes a square orthomode transducer, a subarray fed with a beamforming network to measure scanning performance, and another subarray used to study mutual coupling considerations. Discussions of the advantages and disadvantages of the final design are included.

  12. Time-delayed directional beam phased array antenna

    DOEpatents

    Fund, Douglas Eugene; Cable, John William; Cecil, Tony Myron

    2004-10-19

    An antenna comprising a phased array of quadrifilar helix or other multifilar antenna elements and a time-delaying feed network adapted to feed the elements. The feed network can employ a plurality of coaxial cables that physically bridge a microstrip feed circuitry to feed power signals to the elements. The cables provide an incremental time delay which is related to their physical lengths, such that replacing cables having a first set of lengths with cables having a second set of lengths functions to change the time delay and shift or steer the antenna's main beam. Alternatively, the coaxial cables may be replaced with a programmable signal processor unit adapted to introduce the time delay using signal processing techniques applied to the power signals.

  13. Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) Optics Adjustment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Scientists at Marshall's Adaptive Optics Lab demonstrate the Wave Front Sensor alignment using the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) optics adjustment. The primary objective of the PAMELA project is to develop methods for aligning and controlling adaptive optics segmented mirror systems. These systems can be used to acquire or project light energy. The Next Generation Space Telescope is an example of an energy acquisition system that will employ segmented mirrors. Light projection systems can also be used for power beaming and orbital debris removal. All segmented optical systems must be adjusted to provide maximum performance. PAMELA is an on going project that NASA is utilizing to investigate various methods for maximizing system performance.

  14. Tunable elastomer-based virtually imaged phased array.

    PubMed

    Metz, Philipp; Block, Hendrik; Behnke, Christopher; Krantz, Matthias; Gerken, Martina; Adam, Jost

    2013-02-11

    Virtually imaged phased arrays (VIPAs) offer a high potential for wafer-level integration and superior optical properties compared to conventional gratings. We introduce an elastomer-based tunable VIPA enabling fine tuning of the dispersion characteristics. It consists of a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer sandwiched between silver bottom and top coatings, which form the VIPA's high reflective and semi-transparent mirror, respectively. The latter also acts as an electrode for Joule heating, such that the optical PDMS resonator cavity tuning is carried out via a combination of thermal expansion and the thermo-optic effect. Analogous to the free spectral range (FSR), based on a VIPA specific dispersion law, we introduce a new characteristic VIPA performance measure, namely the free angular range (FAR). We report a tuning span of one FAR achieved by a 7.2K temperature increase of a 170μm PDMS VIPA. Both resonance quality and tunability are analyzed in numerical simulations and experiments.

  15. Low Noise Performance Perspectives Of Wideband Aperture Phased Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woestenburg, E. E. M.; Kuenen, J. C.

    2004-06-01

    A general analysis of phased array noise properties and measurements, applied to one square meter tiles of the Thousand Element Array (THEA), has resulted in a procedure to define the noise budget for a THEA-tile (Woestenburg and Dijkstra, 2003). The THEA system temperature includes LNA and receiver noise, antenna connecting loss, noise coupling between antenna elements and other possible contributions. This paper discusses the various noise contributions to the THEA system temperature and identifies the areas where improvement can be realized. We will present better understanding of the individual noise contributions using measurements and analysis of single antenna/receiver elements. An improved design for a 1-m2 Low Noise Tile (LNT) will be discussed and optimized low noise performance for the LNT is presented. We will also give future perspectives of the noise performance for such tiles, in relation to the requirements for SKA in the 1 GHz frequency range.

  16. A study of Inter-Injection-Locked phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Karl D.

    1989-10-01

    Progress in monolithic fabrication of microwave integrated circuits has led to reduced size and weight as well as improved performance of many microwave systems. At the shorter microwave and millimeter wavelengths, however, currently available solid-state devices often fail to deliver the required amount of power, so innovative power-combining schemes are still needed. A study of phased arrays driven by individual active solid-state devices has led to a number discoveries. It was found that the phases of a number of oscillators, if coupled together properly, can be controlled by means of only one master source and phase shifter. In addition to this experimental demonstration, power combing of planar oscillators in a quasioptical cavity was demonstrated and several effects of coupled oscillators were explored. Finally, the potential of resonant-tunnelling-diode oscillators as self-oscillating mixers was investigated.

  17. Monitoring Growth of Closed Fatigue Crack Using Subharmonic Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Endo, H.; Hashimoto, M.; Shintaku, Y.; Yamanaka, K.

    2010-02-01

    To ensure the safety and reliability of atomic power plants and airplanes, the technique of monitoring closed fatigue cracks is requisite. Here we monitored the distribution of the crack depths and closure behavior in the length direction after 48000 and 87000 fatigue cycles using subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE). The crack depths in the subharmonic images were larger than those in the fundamental images. Specifically, the difference was larger at near the side surface than at the center. The percentage of the closed part varied with the crack growth in the specimen. In addition, we fabricated shoe for SPACE to facilitate mechanical scanning. Thus, it was demonstrated that SPACE is useful in monitoring closed fatigue crack growth.

  18. Complex direct comb spectroscopy with a virtually imaged phased array.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Sarah K; Anstie, James D; Hébert, Nicolas Bourbeau; White, Richard T; Genest, Jérôme; Luiten, Andre N

    2016-03-15

    We demonstrate a simple interferometric technique to directly measure the complex optical transmittance over a large spectral range using a frequency-comb spectrometer based on a virtually imaged phased array. A Michelson interferometer encodes the phase deviations induced by a sample contained in one of its arms into an interferogram image. When combined with an additional image taken from each arm separately, along with a frequency-calibration image, this allows full reconstruction of the sample's optical transfer function. We demonstrate the technique with a vapor cell containing H13C14N, producing transmittance and phase spectra spanning 2.9 THz (∼23  nm) with ∼1 GHz resolution.

  19. Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) Optics Adjustment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Scientists at Marshall's Adaptive Optics Lab demonstrate the Wave Front Sensor alignment using the Phased Array Mirror Extendible Large Aperture (PAMELA) optics adjustment. The primary objective of the PAMELA project is to develop methods for aligning and controlling adaptive optics segmented mirror systems. These systems can be used to acquire or project light energy. The Next Generation Space Telescope is an example of an energy acquisition system that will employ segmented mirrors. Light projection systems can also be used for power beaming and orbital debris removal. All segmented optical systems must be adjusted to provide maximum performance. PAMELA is an on going project that NASA is utilizing to investigate various methods for maximizing system performance.

  20. Optically controlled phased-array antenna with PSK communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Martin J.; Sample, Peter; Lewis, Meirion F.; Wilson, Rebecca A.

    2004-11-01

    An optically controlled RF/microwave/mm-wave phased array antenna has been developed operating at 10 GHz with 30 kHz reconfiguration rate via the use of a micromachined silicon Spatial Light Modulator. A communications function has been demonstrated with a variety of Phase Shift Keying modulation schemes (BPSK, QPSK, MSK) at data rates up to 200 Mbit/s and low BER (<1×10-9). A single channel has been demonstrated at 35 GHz. The properties of photonic components are taken advantage of in several ways: (i) since the carrier frequency is derived from heterodyning of lasers, it is tuneable from almost DC-100 GHz, (ii) the use of optical fiber allows for EMI immune antenna remoting, and (iii) the wide information bandwidth of optical modulators, which in this configuration is carrier frequency independent. The above is achieved in a lightweight and compact format, with considerable scope for further reductions in size and weight.

  1. Multiple beam phased array for Space Station Control Zone Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halsema, P. B.

    The Space Station Communications Control Zone is a disk shaped region 40 nautical miles in diameter and 10 nautical miles thick centered about the Space Station. It is estimated that 6 simultaneous Multiple Access (MA) channels will be required to satisfy the projected communications needs within this zone. These channels will be used to communicate with MA users located anywhere within the Control Zone. This paper details the tradeoffs and design implementation of a multiple beam integrated phased array to provide antenna coverage of the Control Zone. The array is a compact, modular assembly using Gallium Arsenide circuits, microstrip elements, and advanced packaging techniques. This results in a small, reliable antenna system capable of meeting the projected Space Station requirements and flexible enough to grow and evolve as the Space Station communications needs develop.

  2. Cylindrical Antenna With Partly Adaptive Phased-Array Feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussein, Ziad; Hilland, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    A proposed design for a phased-array fed cylindrical-reflector microwave antenna would enable enhancement of the radiation pattern through partially adaptive amplitude and phase control of its edge radiating feed elements. Antennas based on this design concept would be attractive for use in radar (especially synthetic-aperture radar) and other systems that could exploit electronic directional scanning and in which there are requirements for specially shaped radiation patterns, including ones with low side lobes. One notable advantage of this design concept is that the transmitter/ receiver modules feeding all the elements except the edge ones could be identical and, as a result, the antenna would cost less than in the cases of prior design concepts in which these elements may not be identical.

  3. Integrated phased array for wide-angle beam steering.

    PubMed

    Yaacobi, Ami; Sun, Jie; Moresco, Michele; Leake, Gerald; Coolbaugh, Douglas; Watts, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate an on-chip optical phased array fabricated in a CMOS compatible process with continuous, fast (100 kHz), wide-angle (51°) beam-steering suitable for applications such as low-cost LIDAR systems. The device demonstrates the largest (51°) beam-steering and beam-spacing to date while providing the ability to steer continuously over the entire range. Continuous steering is enabled by a cascaded phase shifting architecture utilizing, low power and small footprint, thermo-optic phase shifters. We demonstrate these results in the telecom C-band, but the same design can easily be adjusted for any wavelength between 1.2 and 3.5 μm.

  4. Phased-Array Measurements of Single Flow Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Lee, Sang Soo

    2005-01-01

    A 16 microphone phased-array system has been successfully applied to measure jet noise source distributions. In this study, a round convergent nozzle was tested at various hot and cold flow conditions: acoustic Mach numbers are between 0.35 and 1.6 and static temperature ratios are varied from cold to 2.7. The classical beamforming method was applied on narrowband frequencies. From the measured source distributions locations of peak strength were tracked and found to be very consistent between adjacent narrowband frequencies. In low speed heated and unheated jets, the peak source locations vary smoothly from the nozzle exit to downstream as the frequency is decreased. When the static temperature ratio was kept constant, the peak source position moved downstream with increasing acoustic Mach number for the Strouhal numbers smaller than about 1.5. It was also noted that the peak source locations of low frequencies occur farther downstream than the end of potential core.

  5. Experimental Results for a Photonic Time Reversal Processor for Adaptive Control of an Ultra Wideband Phased Array Antenna

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Radar , Boston: Artech House, 1994. 2. H. Zmuda, “ Optical Beamforming for Phased Array Antennas,” Chapter 19, R...Beamforming, Phased Array Antennas, Time Reversal, Ultra Wideband Radar 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Photonic Processing for Microwave Phased Array ...Architecture for Broadband Adaptive Nulling with Linear and Conformal Phased Array Antennas”, Fiber and Integrated Optics , vol. 19, no. 2, March 2000, pp.

  6. Amplifying High Frequency Acoustic Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, C

    2004-02-05

    In search of the hypothetical Higgs boson, a prototype electron accelerator structure has been developed for use in the Next Linear Collider (NLC), SLAC's proposed version of the machine necessary to create the predicted particle. The Next Linear Test Accelerator (NLCTA), designed to provide O.5GeV-lTeV center-of-mass collision energy, generates electromagnetic breakdowns inside its copper structure while the beam is running. The sparks vaporize the surface of the copper, and will eventually ruin the accelerator. They also create high-frequency (hf) acoustic signals (100 kHz-1 MHz). Acoustic sensors have been placed on the structure, however current knowledge regarding sound propagation in copper limits spark location to within one centimeter. A system was needed that simulates the sparks so further study of acoustic propagation can be pursued; the goal is locate them to within one millimeter. Various tests were done in order to identify an appropriate hf signal source, and to identify appropriate acoustic sensors to use. A high-voltage spark generator and the same sensors used on the actual structure proved most useful for the system. Two high-pass filters were also fabricated in order to measure signals that might be created above 2MHz. The 11-gain filter was used on the acoustic simulation system that was developed, and the 100-gain filter will be used on the NLCTA.

  7. High Frequency Linacs for Hadrontherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Braccini, Saverio; Puggioni, Paolo

    The use of radiofrequency linacs for hadrontherapy was proposed about 20 years ago, but only recently has it been understood that the high repetition rate together with the possibility of very rapid energy variations offers an optimal solution to the present challenge of hadrontherapy: "paint" a moving tumor target in three dimensions with a pencil beam. Moreover, the fact that the energy, and thus the particle range, can be electronically adjusted implies that no absorber-based energy selection system is needed, which, in the case of cyclotron-based centers, is the cause of material activation. On the other side, a linac consumes less power than a synchrotron. The first part of this article describes the main advantages of high frequency linacs in hadrontherapy, the early design studies, and the construction and test of the first high-gradient prototype which accelerated protons. The second part illustrates some technical issues relevant to the design of copper standing wave accelerators, the present developments, and two designs of linac-based proton and carbon ion facilities. Superconductive linacs are not discussed, since nanoampere currents are sufficient for therapy. In the last two sections, a comparison with circular accelerators and an overview of future projects are presented.

  8. High-Frequency Inductor Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    The Finemet-type nanocrystalline alloy represents an advanced soft-magnetic metal-metal-type nanocomposite with an eddy-current-determined high- frequency limit. A survey of different heat treatments under tensile stress is presented to tailor the hysteresis loop by induced transversal anisotropy. The flattened loop having reduced effective permeability enhances the eddy- current limit in the MHz region; For example, continuous stress annealing in a tubular furnace of 1 m length at 650°C, pulling the ribbon with a velocity of 4 m/min under a tensile stress of 200 MPa, results in a wound core having a permeability of 120 and a frequency limit of 10 MHz. Careful annealing preserves the static coercivity below 10 A/m. The power loss at 0.1 T and 100 kHz is only 82 mW/cm3, which is an order of magnitude lower then the values obtained for Sendust™ cores in similar conditions.

  9. Modeling the radiation of ultrasonic phased-array transducers with Gaussian beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ruiju; Schmerr, Lester W; Sedov, Alexander

    2008-12-01

    A new transducer beam model, called a multi-Gaussian array beam model, is developed to simulate the wave fields radiated by ultrasonic phased-array transducers. This new model overcomes the restrictions on using ordinary multi-Gaussian beam models developed for large single-element transducers in phased-array applications. It is demonstrated that this new beam model can effectively model the steered and focused beams of a linear phased-array transducer.

  10. Development of ultrasonic phased array systems for applications in tube and pipe inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yanming; Yuan, Qingshan; Sun, Zhigang; Logan, Kevin; Lam, Clive

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports the development of ultrasonic phased array systems used for tubular inspection. First the design of a linear phased array is discussed with considerations of both theoretically and practically important factors. Then systems utilizing the linear phased array are introduced for different applications. To evaluate the system performance, tests were performed on flat bottom holes and artificial notches, including notches in longitudinal, transverse, and oblique orientations made according to API specifications. Test results have been presented.

  11. Affordable Wideband Multifunction Phased Array Antenna Architectures Using Frequency Scaled Radiating Elements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-04

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/5310--14-9431 Affordable Wideband Multifunction Phased Array Antenna Architectures Using...Wideband Multifunction Phased Array Antenna Architectures Using Frequency Scaled Radiating Elements Rashmi Mital, Dharmesh P. Patel, Jaganmohan B.L. Rao...number of antennas on ships to meet the numerous functional requirements. Recently, wideband phased array antennas are being developed that can

  12. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-12-31

    Outline: Discuss far-side weld problem and phased array techniques applied. Describe laboratory work on flawed piping specimens using L- and S-wave arrays and provide synopsis of results. Discuss conclusions ofr capability of phased array as applied to austenitic welds. Research Approach: Evaluate phased arrays on unifornly-welded piping specimens. Apply best methods to non-uniform welds. Correlate acoustic responses as function of weld microstructures.

  13. High frequency-heated air turbojet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miron, J. H. D.

    1986-01-01

    A description is given of a method to heat air coming from a turbojet compressor to a temperature necessary to produce required expansion without requiring fuel. This is done by high frequency heating, which heats the walls corresponding to the combustion chamber in existing jets, by mounting high frequency coils in them. The current transformer and high frequency generator to be used are discussed.

  14. Feasibility of using lateral mode coupling method for a large scale ultrasound phased array for noninvasive transcranial therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-01-01

    A hemispherical-focused, ultrasound phased array was designed and fabricated using 1372 cylindrical piezoelectric transducers that utilize lateral coupling for noninvasive transcranial therapy. The cylindrical transducers allowed the electrical impedance to be reduced by at least an order of magnitude, such that effective operation could be achieved without electronic matching circuits. In addition, the transducer elements generated the maximum acoustic average surface intensity of 27 W/cm(2). The array, driven at the low (306-kHz) or high frequency (840-kHz), achieved excellent focusing through an ex vivo human skull and an adequate beam steering range for clinical brain treatments. It could electronically steer the ultrasound beam over cylindrical volumes of 100-mm in diameter and 60-mm in height at 306 kHz, and 30-mm in diameter and 30-mm in height at 840 kHz. A scanning laser vibrometer was used to investigate the radial and length mode vibrations of the element. The maximum pressure amplitudes through the skull at the geometric focus were predicted to be 5.5 MPa at 306 kHz and 3.7 MPa at 840 kHz for RF power of 1 W on each element. This is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using cylindrical transducer elements and lateral coupling in construction of ultrasound phased arrays.

  15. Feasibility of Using Lateral Mode Coupling Method for a Large Scale Ultrasound Phased Array for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-01-01

    A hemispherical-focused, ultrasound phased array was designed and fabricated using 1372 cylindrical piezoelectric transducers that utilize lateral coupling for noninvasive transcranial therapy. The cylindrical transducers allowed the electrical impedance to be reduced by at least an order of magnitude, such that effective operation could be achieved without electronic matching circuits. In addition, the transducer elements generated the maximum acoustic average surface intensity of 27 W/cm2. The array, driven at the low (306 kHz) or high frequency (840 kHz), achieved excellent focusing through an ex vivo human skull and an adequate beam steering range for clinical brain treatments. It could electronically steer the ultrasound beam over cylindrical volumes of 100 mm in diameter and 60 mm in height at 306 kHz, and 30-mm in diameter and 30-mm in height at 840 kHz. A scanning laser vibrometer was used to investigate the radial and length mode vibrations of the element. The maximum pressure amplitudes through the skull at the geometric focus were predicted to be 5.5 MPa at 306 kHz and 3.7 MPa at 840 kHz for RF power of 1 W on each element. This is the first study demonstrating the feasibility of using cylindrical transducer elements and lateral coupling in construction of ultrasound phased arrays. PMID:19695987

  16. One Year of Monitoring the Vela Pulsar Using a Phased Array Feed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkissian, John M.; Reynolds, John E.; Hobbs, George; Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2017-07-01

    We have observed the Vela pulsar for 1 year using a phased array feed receiver on the 12-m antenna of the Parkes Test-Bed Facility. These observations have allowed us to investigate the stability of the phased array feed beam weights over time, to demonstrate that pulsars can be timed over long periods using phased array feed technology and to detect and study the most recent glitch event that occurred on 2016 December 12. The beam weights are shown to be stable to 1% on time scales on the order of three weeks. We discuss the implications of this for monitoring pulsars using phased array feeds on single dish telescopes.

  17. Cantilever RF-MEMS for monolithic integration with phased array antennas on a PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Armenta, C. J.; Porter, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development and operation of a novel electrostatic metal-to-metal contact cantilever radio-frequency microelectromechanical system (RF-MEMS) switch for monolithic integration with microstrip phased array antennas (PAAs) on a printed circuit board. The switch is fabricated using simple photolithography techniques on a Rogers 4003c substrate, with a footprint of 200 µm × 100 µm, based on a 1 µm-thick copper cantilever. An alternative wet-etching technique for effectively releasing the cantilever is described. Electrostatic and electromagnetic measurements show that the RF-MEMS presents an actuation voltage of 90 V for metal-to-metal contact, an isolation of -8.7 dB, insertion loss of -2.5 dB and a return loss of -15 dB on a 50 Ω microstrip line at 12.5 GHz. For proof-of-concept, a beam-steering 2 × 2 microstrip PAA, based on two 1-bit phase shifters suitable for the monolithic integration of the RF-MEMS, has been designed and measured at 12.5 GHz. Measurements show that the beam-steering system presents effective radiation characteristics with scanning capabilities from broadside towards 29° in the H-plane.

  18. Photonic true-time-delays based on multiplexed substrate-guided wave propagation for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ray T.; Li, Richard L.

    1996-11-01

    A compact and affordable photonic true-time-delay (TTD) beam steering device for phased array antenna applications using multiplexed substrate-guided wave propagation is presented. The TTD design uses holographic input and output couplers to change the direction of beam propagation as well as optical fanout. Optical delays of various delay lines can be adjusted easily through the substrate thickness and the total internal reflection angle inside the substrate material. Broadband microwave signals for feeding the radiating elements are generated through optical heterodyne technique and they are detected by metal-semiconductor-metal detector arrays. The physical aspects of phase-shifters and true-time-delays are first introduced. Then design issues on the photonic TTD architecture and practical constraints on making holographic grating couplers are discussed, especially concerning with recording gratings on DuPont photopolymer materials. Finally, the generation and detection of high frequency microwave signals up to 25 GHz by optical heterodyne techniques are illustrated.

  19. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    and OMCT forcing fields give no hint for increased excitation power in the Chandler band. Thus it is assumed, that continuous high frequency excitation due to stochastic weather phenomena is responsible for the perpetuation of the Chandler wobble.

  20. Thermal dispersion method for an ultrasonic phased-array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Euna; Lee, Wonseok; Roh, Yongrae

    2016-07-01

    When the driving voltage of an ultrasonic transducer is increased to improve the quality of ultrasound images, heat is generated inside the transducer, which can burn the patient’s skin and degrade transducer performance. In this study, the method to disperse the heat inside an ultrasonic phased-array transducer has been examined. The mechanism of temperature rise due to heat generation inside the transducer was investigated by numerical analysis and the effects of the thermal properties of the components of the transducer such as specific heat and thermal conductivity on the temperature rise were analyzed. On the basis of the results, a heat-dispersive structure was devised to reduce the temperature at the surface of the acoustic lens of the transducer. Prototype transducers were fabricated to check the efficacy of the heat-dispersive structure. By experiments, we have confirmed that the new heat-dispersive structure can reduce the internal temperature by as much as 50% in comparison with the conventional structure, which confirms the validity of the thermal dispersion mechanism developed in this work.

  1. Ultrasound cylindrical phased array for transoesophageal thermal therapy: initial studies.

    PubMed

    Melodelima, David; Lafon, Cyril; Prat, Frederic; Birer, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-12-07

    This work was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of constructing a cylindrical phased array composed of 64 elements spread around the periphery (OD 10.6 mm) for transoesophageal ultrasound thermotherapy. The underlying operating principle of this applicator is to rotate a plane ultrasound beam electronically. For this purpose, eight adjacent transducers were successively excited with appropriate delay times so as to generate a plane wave. The exposure direction was changed by exciting a different set of eight elements. For these feasibility studies, we used a cylindrical prototype (OD 10.6 mm) composed of 16 elementary transducers distributed over a quarter of the cylinder, all operating at 4.55 MHz. The active part was mechanically reinforced by a rigid damper structure behind the transducers. It was shown that an ultrasound field similar to that emitted by a plane transducer could be generated. Ex vivo experiments on pig's liver demonstrated that the ultrasound beam could be accurately rotated to generate sector-based lesions to a suitable depth (up to 19 mm). Throughout these experiments, exposures lasting 20 s were delivered at an acoustic intensity of 17 W cm(-2). By varying the power from exposure to exposure, the depth of the lesion at different angles could be controlled.

  2. Matrix phased arrays for the inspection of CFRP-components

    SciTech Connect

    Kreutzbruck, M.; Brackrock, D.; Brekow, G.; Montag, H.-J.; Boehm, R.; Illerhaus, B.

    2014-02-18

    Lightweight components are increasingly used in different industrial sectors such as transportation, energy generation and automotive. This growing field includes different types of CFRP-structures, hybrid materials and glued components showing - compared to their pure metallic counterparts- a significant more complicated structure in terms of internal interfaces and anisotropy of material parameters. In this work we present the use of matrix phased array to increase the amount of obtained information to enhance the inspection quality. We used different types of carbon materials such as 6 mm thick uni- and bidirectional prepreg specimens containing impact damages. The latter were introduced with different energy levels ranging from 1.3 to 7.2 J. By scanning a 2.25 MHz matrix array with 6 × 10 elements above the prepreg surface and using different angels of incidence a complete 3D-image was generated which allows the detection of defects as small as 1mm in a depth of 4 mm. A comparison with conventional approaches show that the signal-to-noise ratio can be highly increased. This enables us to visualize the region of damage within the impact zone, clearly showing the cone-like damage distribution along increasing material depth. The detection quality allows the estimation of the opening angles of the cone shaped damage, which can be used for further evaluation and quantitation of energy dependent impact damages.

  3. Evolutionary Design of a Phased Array Antenna Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Linden, Derek; Lohn, Jason

    2006-01-01

    We present an evolved S-band phased array antenna element design that meets the requirements of NASA's TDRS-C communications satellite scheduled for launch early next decade. The original specification called for two types of elements, one for receive only and one for transmit/receive. We were able to evolve a single element design that meets both specifications thereby simplifying the antenna and reducing testing and integration costs. The highest performance antenna found using a genetic algorithm and stochastic hill-climbing has been fabricated and tested. Laboratory results are largely consistent with simulation. Researchers have been investigating evolutionary antenna design and optimization since the early 1990s, and the field has grown in recent years its computer speed has increased and electromagnetic simulators have improved. Many antenna types have been investigated, including wire antennas, antenna arrays and quadrifilar helical antennas. In particular, our laboratory evolved a wire antenna design for NASA's Space Technology 5 (ST5) spacecraft. This antenna has been fabricated, tested, and is scheduled for launch on the three spacecraft in 2006.

  4. Evolutionary Adaptive Discovery of Phased Array Sensor Signal Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy R. McJunkin; Milos Manic

    2011-05-01

    Tomography, used to create images of the internal properties and features of an object, from phased array ultasonics is improved through many sophisiticated methonds of post processing of data. One approach used to improve tomographic results is to prescribe the collection of more data, from different points of few so that data fusion might have a richer data set to work from. This approach can lead to rapid increase in the data needed to be stored and processed. It also does not necessarily lead to have the needed data. This article describes a novel approach to utilizing the data aquired as a basis for adapting the sensors focusing parameters to locate more precisely the features in the material: specifically, two evolutionary methods of autofocusing on a returned signal are coupled with the derivations of the forumulas for spatially locating the feature are given. Test results of the two novel methods of evolutionary based focusing (EBF) illustrate the improved signal strength and correction of the position of feature using the optimized focal timing parameters, called Focused Delay Identification (FoDI).

  5. Project PARAS: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuss, Kenneth; Hoffmann, Christopher; Dungan, Michael; Madden, Michael; Bendakhlia, Monia

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) scheme, would allow higher than currently available angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps and the ability to observe rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using passive phased array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150-m diameter antenna dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data are transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory panel is a novel hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and the bottom triangle. Attitude control and station keeping functions will be performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and four hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by either a photovoltaic array or a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. The total mass of the spacecraft is about 20,500 kg.

  6. Matrix phased arrays for the inspection of CFRP-components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzbruck, M.; Brackrock, D.; Brekow, G.; Montag, H.-J.; Boehm, R.; Illerhaus, B.

    2014-02-01

    Lightweight components are increasingly used in different industrial sectors such as transportation, energy generation and automotive. This growing field includes different types of CFRP-structures, hybrid materials and glued components showing - compared to their pure metallic counterparts- a significant more complicated structure in terms of internal interfaces and anisotropy of material parameters. In this work we present the use of matrix phased array to increase the amount of obtained information to enhance the inspection quality. We used different types of carbon materials such as 6 mm thick uni- and bidirectional prepreg specimens containing impact damages. The latter were introduced with different energy levels ranging from 1.3 to 7.2 J. By scanning a 2.25 MHz matrix array with 6 × 10 elements above the prepreg surface and using different angels of incidence a complete 3D-image was generated which allows the detection of defects as small as 1mm in a depth of 4 mm. A comparison with conventional approaches show that the signal-to-noise ratio can be highly increased. This enables us to visualize the region of damage within the impact zone, clearly showing the cone-like damage distribution along increasing material depth. The detection quality allows the estimation of the opening angles of the cone shaped damage, which can be used for further evaluation and quantitation of energy dependent impact damages.

  7. A conformal SHF phased array for aircraft satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, R.; Kudrna, K.

    1984-03-01

    A receive-only 7.5 GHz microstrip phased array has been developed by Ball Aerospace Systems Division (BASD). This 256 radiating element array provides a gain of 20 dBic over a conical scan region of 120 deg. Two arrays with one on either side of an aircraft would provide near hemispherical coverage. The array consists of four subarrays and can be expanded to achieve higher gain when required. The array is left-hand circularly polarized and has three-bit digital PIN diode phase shifters for steering the beam. A microprocessor-based beam steering controller is used for calculating the phase shifter settings for each beam position. Each subarray includes radiating elements, quadrature hybrids, phase shifters, corporate feed, R.F. chokes in microstrip medium and hybrid PIN diode drivers. The array is approximately 1.5 inches thick and is conformal to the aircraft skin. It is a bolt on assembly only requiring aircraft skin entries for the R.F. output and for control lines. Transmit capability can be provided by merely changing the artwork to go to 8.5 GHz.

  8. CryoPAF4: a cryogenic phased array feed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Lisa; Garcia, Dominic; Halman, Mark; Henke, Doug; Hovey, Gary; Jiang, Nianhua; Knee, Lewis; Lacy, Gordon; Loop, David; Rupen, Michael; Veidt, Bruce; Wierzbicki, Ramunas

    2016-07-01

    Phased array feed (PAF) receivers used on radio astronomy telescopes offer the promise of increased fields of view while maintaining the superlative performance attained with traditional single pixel feeds (SPFs). However, the much higher noise temperatures of room temperature PAFs compared to cryogenically-cooled SPFs have prevented their general adoption. Here we describe a conceptual design for a cryogenically cooled 2.8 - 5.18 GHz dual linear polarization PAF with estimated receiver temperature of 11 K. The cryogenic PAF receiver will comprise a 140 element Vivaldi antenna array and low-noise amplifiers housed in a 480 mm diameter cylindrical dewar covered with a RF transparent radome. A broadband two-section coaxial feed is integrated within each metal antenna element to withstand the cryogenic environment and to provide a 50 ohm impedance for connection to the rest of the receiver. The planned digital beamformer performs digitization, frequency band selection, beam forming and array covariance matrix calibration. Coupling to a 15 m offset Gregorian dual-reflector telescope, cryoPAF4 can expect to form 18 overlapping beams increasing the field of view by a factor of 8x compared to a single pixel receiver of equal system temperature.

  9. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    SciTech Connect

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-18

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  10. Ultrasonic phased array with surface acoustic wave for imaging cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Oshiumi, Taro; Nakajima, Hiromichi; Yamanaka, Kazushi; Wu, Xiaoyang; Uchimoto, Tetsuya; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Tsuji, Toshihiro; Mihara, Tsuyoshi

    2017-06-01

    To accurately measure crack lengths, we developed a real-time surface imaging method (SAW PA) combining an ultrasonic phased array (PA) with a surface acoustic wave (SAW). SAW PA using a Rayleigh wave with a high sensitivity to surface defects was implemented for contact testing using a wedge with the third critical angle that allows the Rayleigh wave to be generated. Here, to realize high sensitivity imaging, SAW PA was optimized in terms of the wedge and the imaging area. The improved SAW PA was experimentally demonstrated using a fatigue crack specimen made of an aluminum alloy. For further verification in more realistic specimens, SAW PA was applied to stainless-steel specimens with a fatigue crack and stress corrosion cracks (SCCs). The fatigue crack was visualized with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and its length was measured with a high accuracy of better than 1 mm. The SCCs generated in the heat-affected zones (HAZs) of a weld were successfully visualized with a satisfactory SNR, although responses at coarse grains appeared throughout the imaging area. The SCC lengths were accurately measured. The imaging results also precisely showed complicated distributions of SCCs, which were in excellent agreement with the optically observed distributions.

  11. High power compatible internally sensed optical phased array.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Lyle E; Ward, Robert L; Francis, Samuel P; Sibley, Paul G; Fleddermann, Roland; Sutton, Andrew J; Smith, Craig; McClelland, David E; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2016-06-13

    The technical embodiment of the Huygens-Fresnel principle, an optical phased array (OPA) is an arrangement of optical emitters with relative phases controlled to create a desired beam profile after propagation. One important application of an OPA is coherent beam combining (CBC), which can be used to create beams of higher power than is possible with a single laser source, especially for narrow linewidth sources. Here we present an all-fiber architecture that stabilizes the relative output phase by inferring the relative path length differences between lasers using the small fraction of light that is back-reflected into the fiber at the OPA's glass-air interface, without the need for any external sampling optics. This architecture is compatible with high power continuous wave laser sources (e.g., fiber amplifiers) up to 100 W per channel. The high-power compatible internally sensed OPA was implemented experimentally using commercial 15 W fiber amplifiers, demonstrating an output RMS phase stability of λ/194, and the ability to steer the beam at up to 10 kHz.

  12. Phased array ultrasonic approach to turbine blade attachment inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Nottingham, L.D.; Solomon, K.R.; Presson, J.H.

    1994-12-31

    In situations where particular combinations of material susceptibility, stress, steam conditions and steam chemistry come together, certain steam turbine rotors have exhibited stress corrosion cracking (SCC) on the disk side of the blade attachments, where the blades are held to the disk. Cracking has been most prevalent in multiple-hook, fir-tree attachment designs and normally occurs in the corners of the fir-tree hooks. While attempts have been made to perform ultrasonic inspection of the complex fir-tree attachment geometries, results have been mixed. False calls, poor repeatability, a general lack of resolution and lack of a meaningful sizing capability are standing issues. A unique approach to this inspection features a phased array ultrasonic test system that can both focus the ultrasonic beam and steer it to different points within the complex geometry. The focused beam leads directly to significant improvements in detection performance and resolution, as well as the ability to estimate the size of an indication. The ability to steer the beam to different points within the attachment enables comprehensive examination of all critical locations without repeatedly changing and calibrating numerous transducers. Together these features provide more rapid inspections and improved reliability.

  13. PARAS program: Phased array radio astronomy from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakubowski, Antoni K.; Haynes, David A.; Nuss, Ken; Hoffmann, Chris; Madden, Michael; Dungan, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An orbiting radio telescope is proposed which, when operated in a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBLI) scheme, would allow higher (than currently available) angular resolution and dynamic range in the maps, and the ability of observing rapidly changing astronomical sources. Using a passive phases array technology, the proposed design consists of 656 hexagonal modules forming a 150 meter diameter dish. Each observatory module is largely autonomous, having its own photovoltaic power supply and low-noise receiver and processor for phase shifting. The signals received by the modules are channeled via fiber optics to the central control computer in the central bus module. After processing and multiplexing, the data is transmitted to telemetry stations on the ground. The truss frame supporting each observatory pane is a hybrid structure consisting of a bottom graphite/epoxy tubular triangle and rigidized inflatable Kevlar tubes connecting the top observatory panel and bottom triangle. Attitude control and stationkeeping functions are performed by a system of momentum wheels in the bus and four propulsion modules located at the compass points on the periphery of the observatory dish. Each propulsion module has four monopropellant thrusters and six hydrazine arcjets, the latter supported by a nuclear reactor. The total mass of the spacecraft is 22,060 kg.

  14. Focalization of Acoustic Vortices Using Phased Array Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pazos-Ospina, J. F.; Quiceno, F.; Ealo, Joao L.; Muelas, H. Ruben Dario; Camacho, J.

    Acoustic vortices (AV) are helical wavefronts that exhibit a screw-type dislocation and a phase singularity along its principal axis of propagation, at which the pressure of the field is zero. AV can be generated using various methods among which stands out the use of phased array systems because they allow us to electronically control the acoustic beam by means of the application of a given delay law to the array elements. Little research has been reported regarding the focalization of AV to obtain a higher pressure distribution. In view of this, this work presents the study of different delay laws for generating and focusing AV. The analysis of the resultant geometry and pressure distribution of the focused beams is included. We demonstrate that it is possible to increase the pressure amplitude up to 3 times with respect to a non-focalized, at the focal distance. Experimental tests were carried out using a hexagonal multitransducer of 30 elements at 40 kHz. A good agreement between simulations and experimental results was obtained.

  15. Matrix phased array (MPA) imaging technology for resistance spot welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-02-01

    A three-dimensional MPA probe has been incorporated with a high speed phased array electronic board to visualize nugget images of resistance spot welds. The primary application area of this battery operated portable MPA ultrasonic imaging system is in the automotive industry which a conventional destructive testing process is commonly adopted to check the quality of resistance spot welds in auto bodies. Considering an average of five-thousand spot welds in a medium size passenger vehicle, the amount of time and effort given to popping the welds and measuring nugget size are immeasurable in addition to the millions of dollars' worth of scrap metals recycled per plant per year. This wasteful labor intensive destructive testing process has become less reliable as auto body sheet metal has transitioned from thick and heavy mild steels to thin and light high strength steels. Consequently, the necessity of developing a non-destructive inspection methodology has become inevitable. In this paper, the fundamental aspects of the current 3-D probe design, data acquisition algorithms, and weld nugget imaging process are discussed.

  16. Digital Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection system with dynamic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Shin, H. J.; Song, S. J.; Song, T. K.

    2000-05-01

    Enhancement of the ultrasonic flaw detection and characterization is expected through the development of a high performance PAULI (Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection) system which can provide high resolution two-dimensional (sector scan: S-scan) images. The high-resolution S-scan image renders inspection results more readable compared to the conventional A-scan and B-scan results. Therefore, it can improve inspection efficiency and reliability. In this study, the ultrasonic imaging technologies developed in medical applications were adapted to develop a digital PAULI system for nondestructive testing. To provide real-time S-scan images, the PAULI system uses 64 independent transceiver channels controlled by proper delay laws for steering and focusing the ultrasound beams along each scan lines. The PAULI system employs a novel dynamic receive focusing technique in order to optimize the lateral resolution by focusing the ultrasound wave at all imaging points. The dynamic receive focusing is achieved in real-time by digital signal processing methods. The feasibility of PAULI system is demonstrated for the NDE of steel structures.

  17. KPAF (K-band phased array feed) instrument concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, Lisa; Claude, Stéphane; Bornemann, Jens; Henke, Doug; Di Francesco, James; Jiang, Frank; Garcia, Dominic; Wevers, Ivan; Niranjanan, Pat

    2014-07-01

    Astronomical surveys are demanding more throughput from telescope receivers. Currently, microwave/millimeter telescopes with mature cryogenic single pixel receivers are upgrading to multi-pixel receivers by replacing the conventional feed horns with phased array feeds (PAFs) to increase the field of view and, thus, imaging speeds. This step in astronomy instrumentation has been taken by only a few research laboratories world-wide and primarily in Lband (0.7-1.5 GHz). We present a K-band (18-26 GHz) 5x5 modular PAF to demonstrate the feasibility of higher frequency receiving arrays. The KPAF system includes a tapered slot antenna array, a cryogenic commercial GaAs MMIC amplifier block, and a mixing stage to down-convert to L band for an existing beamformer. The noise temperature and power budget are outlined. Full antenna S-parameters and far-field beam patterns are simulated and measured using both planar near-field and far-field techniques. Cryogenic and room temperature amplifier noise measurements with varying bias levels are presented.

  18. 75 FR 81284 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology... of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) Technology... less than a week; however, for environmental disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill,...

  19. Phased Array Antenna Analysis Using Hybrid Finite Element Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Waveguide ; (b) Geometry Model for Method of Moments ........................ 4 2. Printed Dipole Radiator: (a) Actual Geometry with Microstrip Balun and...Finite Elem ents . ............................................. 19 11. Equivalence Model for Waveguide /Cavity Problem: (a) Original Problem; (b... Waveguide Array Active Reflection Coefficient - Comparison of Results Uscig Cavity Array (CAVIARR) and General Array (PARANA) Models . 76 45. Rectangular

  20. Development of a Fibre-Phased Array Laser-EMAT Ultrasonic System for Defect Inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, C.; Demachi, K.; Fukuchi, T.; Koyama, K.; Uesaka, M.; Chen, Z.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a phased array laser ultrasound system with using fibre optic delivery and a custom-designed focusing objective lens has been developed for enhancing the ultrasound generation. The fibre-phased array method is applied to improve the sensitivity and detecting ability of the laser-EMAT system for defect inspection.

  1. Ku band phased array in a large angular sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubost, G.; Gueho, S.; Beguin, D.

    The feasibility of a microstrip, flat, phased, square array performing at high frequency and exhibiting proper technological behavior is demonstrated. A total of 64 three-bit digital PIN diode phase shifters are used to steer the beam. Sum and difference patterns can be formed for every deflected directivity. Data are presented on the efficiency evaluation for different deflection angles, the highest sidelobe levels, the maximum directivity, and the measured average efficiency.

  2. Observing Pulsars with a Phased Array Feed at the Parkes Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, X.; Chippendale, A. P.; Hobbs, G.; Johnston, S.; Dai, S.; George, D.; Kramer, M.; Karuppusamy, R.; Malenta, M.; Spitler, L.; Tzioumis, T.; Wieching, G.

    2017-07-01

    During 2016 February, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science and the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy installed, commissioned, and carried out science observations with a phased array feed receiver system on the 64-m diameter Parkes radio telescope. Here, we demonstrate that the phased array feed can be used for pulsar observations and we highlight some unique capabilities. We demonstrate that the pulse profiles obtained using the phased array feed can be calibrated and that multiple pulsars can be simultaneously observed. Significantly, we find that an intrinsic polarisation leakage of -31 dB can be achieved with a phased array feed beam offset from the centre of the field of view. We discuss the possibilities for using a phased array feed for future pulsar observations and for searching for fast radio bursts with the Parkes and Effelsberg telescopes.

  3. Phased Array Beamforming and Imaging in Composite Laminates Using Guided Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Zhenhua; Leckey, Cara A. C.; Yu, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the phased array beamforming and imaging using guided waves in anisotropic composite laminates. A generic phased array beamforming formula is presented, based on the classic delay-and-sum principle. The generic formula considers direction-dependent guided wave properties induced by the anisotropic material properties of composites. Moreover, the array beamforming and imaging are performed in frequency domain where the guided wave dispersion effect has been considered. The presented phased array method is implemented with a non-contact scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) to detect multiple defects at different locations in an anisotropic composite plate. The array is constructed of scan points in a small area rapidly scanned by the SLDV. Using the phased array method, multiple defects at different locations are successfully detected. Our study shows that the guided wave phased array method is a potential effective method for rapid inspection of large composite structures.

  4. Monolithic optical phased-array transceiver in a standard SOI CMOS process.

    PubMed

    Abediasl, Hooman; Hashemi, Hossein

    2015-03-09

    Monolithic microwave phased arrays are turning mainstream in automotive radars and high-speed wireless communications fulfilling Gordon Moores 1965 prophecy to this effect. Optical phased arrays enable imaging, lidar, display, sensing, and holography. Advancements in fabrication technology has led to monolithic nanophotonic phased arrays, albeit without independent phase and amplitude control ability, integration with electronic circuitry, or including receive and transmit functions. We report the first monolithic optical phased array transceiver with independent control of amplitude and phase for each element using electronic circuitry that is tightly integrated with the nanophotonic components on one substrate using a commercial foundry CMOS SOI process. The 8 × 8 phased array chip includes thermo-optical tunable phase shifters and attenuators, nano-photonic antennas, and dedicated control electronics realized using CMOS transistors. The complex chip includes over 300 distinct optical components and over 74,000 distinct electrical components achieving the highest level of integration for any electronic-photonic system.

  5. Development of portable phased array UT system for real-time flaw imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, M.

    1995-08-01

    Many functions and features of phased array UT technology must be useful for NDE in the industrial field. Some phased array UT systems have been developed for the inspection of nuclear pressure vessel and turbine components. However, phased array UT is still a special NDE technique and it has not been used widely in the past. The reasons of that are system size, cost, operator performance, equipment design and others. TOSHIBA has newly developed PC controlled portable phased array system to solve those problems. The portable phased array UT system is very compact and light but it is able to drive up to 32-channel linear array probe, to display real-time linear/sector B-scan, to display accumulated B-scan with an encoder and to display profile overlaid B-scan. The first applications were turbine component inspections for precise flaw investigation and flaw image data recording.

  6. High Frequency Radar Astronomy With HAARP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    a period of several years, the High frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) transmitting array near Gakona, Alaska , has increased in total...High Frequency Radar Astronomy With HAARP Paul Rodriguez Naval Research Laboratory Information Technology Division Washington, DC 20375, USA Edward...high frequency (HF) radar facility used for research purposes. The basic science objective of HAARP is to study nonlinear effects associated with

  7. A Study of Microstrip Antennas for Multiple Band and High Frequency Operations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    34 Report No. RADC-TR-81-98. [61 Desoer , Charles A. and Ernest S. Kuh, " Basic Circuit Theory ," 1969 by McGraw-Hill, Inc. 4" 111-12 p. LIST OF FIGURES...improvement in the future. Throughout this report a basic understanding of phased array theory and terminology is assumed. As mentioned above, many excellent...Y. T. Lo, W. F. Richards, P. Simon, and D. D. Harrison, " Theory and Applications for Microstrip Antennas," Proceedings of the Printed Circuit Antenna

  8. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) Phased Array Demonstrated With ACTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) arrays developed by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Air Force Rome Laboratory were demonstrated in aeronautical terminals and in mobile or fixed Earth terminals linked with NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). Four K/Ka-band experimental arrays were demonstrated between May 1994 and May 1995. Each array had GaAs MMIC devices at each radiating element for electronic beam steering and distributed power amplification. The 30-GHz transmit array used in uplinks to ACTS was developed by Lewis and Texas Instruments. The three 20-GHz receive arrays used in downlinks from ACTS were developed in cooperation with the Air Force Rome Laboratory, taking advantage of existing Air Force integrated-circuit, active-phased-array development contracts with the Boeing Company and Lockheed Martin Corporation. Four demonstrations, each related to an application of high interest to both commercial and Department of Defense organizations, were conducted. The location, type of link, and the data rate achieved for each of the applications is shown. In one demonstration-- an aeronautical terminal experiment called AERO-X--a duplex voice link between an aeronautical terminal on the Lewis Learjet and ACTS was achieved. Two others demonstrated duplex voice links (and in one case, interactive video links as well) between ACTS and an Army high-mobility, multipurpose wheeled vehicle (HMMWV, or "humvee"). In the fourth demonstration, the array was on a fixed mount and was electronically steered toward ACTS. Lewis served as project manager for all demonstrations and as overall system integrator. Lewis engineers developed the array system including a controller for open-loop tracking of ACTS during flight and HMMWV motion, as well as a laptop data display and recording system used in all demonstrations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory supported the AERO-X program, providing elements of the ACTS Mobile Terminal. The successful

  9. Airborne ultrasonic phased arrays using ferroelectrets: a new fabrication approach.

    PubMed

    Ealo, Joao L; Camacho, Jorge J; Fritsch, Carlos

    2009-04-01

    In this work, a novel procedure that considerably simplifies the fabrication process of ferroelectret-based multielement array transducers is proposed and evaluated. Also, the potential of ferroelectrets being used as active material for air-coupled ultrasonic transducer design is demonstrated. The new construction method of multi-element transducers introduces 2 distinctive improvements. First, active ferroelectret material is not discretized into elements, and second, the need of structuring upper and/or lower electrodes in advance of the permanent polarization of the film is removed. The aperture discretization and the mechanical connection are achieved in one step using a through-thickness conductive tape. To validate the procedure, 2 linear array prototypes of 32 elements, with a pitch of 3.43 mm and a wide usable frequency range from 30 to 300 kHz, were built and evaluated using a commercial phased-array system. A low crosstalk among elements, below -30 dB, was measured by interferometry. Likewise, a homogeneous response of the array elements, with a maximum deviation of +/-1.8 dB, was obtained. Acoustic beam steering measurements were accomplished at different deflection angles using a calibrated microphone. The ultrasonic beam parameters, namely, lateral resolution, side lobe level, grating lobes, and focus depth, were congruent with theory. Acoustic images of a single reflector were obtained using one of the array elements as the receiver. Resulting images are also in accordance with numerical simulation, demonstrating the feasibility of using these arrays in pulse-echo mode. The proposed procedure simplifies the manufacturing of multidimensional arrays with arbitrary shape elements and not uniformly distributed. Furthermore, this concept can be extended to nonflat arrays as long as the transducer substrate conforms to a developable surface.

  10. High-speed 32×32 MEMS optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megens, Mischa; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.; Horsley, David A.

    2014-03-01

    Optical phased arrays (OPAs) with fast response time are of great interest for various applications such as displays, free space optical communications, and lidar. Existing liquid crystal OPAs have millisecond response time and small beam steering angle. Here, we report on a novel 32×32 MEMS OPA with fast response time (<4 microseconds), large field of view (+/-2°), and narrow beam divergence (0.1°). The OPA is composed of high-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors which function as phase shifters. Relative to beam steering systems based on a single rotating MEMS mirror, which are typically limited to bandwidths below 50 kHz, the MEMS OPA described here has the advantage of greatly reduced mass and therefore achieves a bandwidth over 500 kHz. The OPA is fabricated using deep UV lithography to create submicron mechanical springs and electrical interconnects, enabling a high (85%) fill-factor. Each HCG mirror is composed of only a single layer of polysilicon and achieves >99% reflectivity through the use of a subwavelength grating patterned into the mirror's polysilicon surface. Conventional metal-coated MEMS mirrors must be thick (1- 50 μm) to prevent warpage arising from thermal and residual stress. The single material construction used here results in a high degree of flatness even in a thin 400 nm HCG mirror. Beam steering is demonstrated using binary phase patterns and is accomplished with the help of a closed-loop phase control system based on a phase-shifting interferometer that provides in-situ measurement of the phase shift of each mirror in the array.

  11. Phased-array ultrasonic surface contour mapping system. Technical note

    SciTech Connect

    Fasching, G.E.; Loudin, W.J.; Paton, D.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1992-11-01

    The development of reliable mechanistic models for prediction of conventional and fluidized-bed combustor and gasifier operation and solids flow behavior in silos or other solids handling and storage components requires knowledge of the contained solids flow characteristics. This knowledge is gained from dynamic experimental measurements of bed top surface contours in addition to measurements of bulk bed properties. The surface contour mapping system (SCMS) provides a means of generating surface contour maps in real time with a unique, automatically focused, density-compensated, digital phased-array scanning, ultrasonic-range measurement system. The system is designed to operate in environments having gas temperatures up to 1,600 {degree}F and pressures to 1,000 psig. Computer simulation of several SCMS candidates and acoustic carrier modulation techniques indicates that a surface measurement resolution of {plus_minus}2 inches over a range of 5 to 20 feet distance between the transmit/receive (T/R) transducers and the bed surface can be expected. The simulation of a particular design, a 9-T/R, 25-pixel bed surface, in which the level of each pixel was randomly set between 5 and 7 feet below the plane of the T/R transducers, then measured using two different modulation techniques, produced excellent results. The simulation of this surface contour mapping system determined the value of the level of each of the 25 pixels to within {plus_minus}1 inch for over 95 percent of more than 100 test cases for one of the modulation techniques, and for over 99 percent of about 100 test cases for a second modulation technique. A hardware implementation of the design simulated but using only a two-T/R, three-pixel SCMS produced results very closely approximating those obtained during the simulation.

  12. Lightning protection devices for high frequencies equipments

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, J.

    1983-01-01

    Contents: Mechanism of a Lightning Stroke from Antenna to Ground; Principles of Protection Devices for Feeders; Electrical Characteristics of H.F. Protection Devices; Calculation of H.F. Protection Devices; Catalogue Devices for High Frequency Protection; Some Measurement Results for Tees; Measurement Results for Decoupling Line Devices; Installation of High Frequency Devices.

  13. Impact: a low cost, reconfigurable, digital beamforming common module building block for next generation phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Lee; Hoffmann, Ted; Fulton, Caleb; Yeary, Mark; Saunders, Austin; Thompson, Dan; Chen, Bill; Guo, Alex; Murmann, Boris

    2015-05-01

    Phased array systems offer numerous advantages to the modern warfighter in multiple application spaces, including Radar, Electronic Warfare, Signals Intelligence, and Communications. However, a lack of commonality in the underlying technology base for DoD Phased Arrays has led to static systems with long development cycles, slow technology refreshes in response to emerging threats, and expensive, application-specific sub-components. The IMPACT module (Integrated Multi-use Phased Array Common Tile) is a multi-channel, reconfigurable, cost-effective beamformer that provides a common building block for multiple, disparate array applications.

  14. Pulse-Echo Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Pat H.

    2010-01-01

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading. Keywords: Phased Array, Ultrasonics, Composites, Out-of-Autoclave

  15. Electronically controlled optical beam-steering by an active phased array of metallic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    DeRose, C T; Kekatpure, R D; Trotter, D C; Starbuck, A; Wendt, J R; Yaacobi, A; Watts, M R; Chettiar, U; Engheta, N; Davids, P S

    2013-02-25

    An optical phased array of nanoantenna fabricated in a CMOS compatible silicon photonics process is presented. The optical phased array is fed by low loss silicon waveguides with integrated ohmic thermo-optic phase shifters capable of 2π phase shift with ∼ 15 mW of applied electrical power. By controlling the electrical power to the individual integrated phase shifters fixed wavelength steering of the beam emitted normal to the surface of the wafer of 8° is demonstrated for 1 × 8 phased arrays with periods of both 6 and 9 μm.

  16. An optically controlled phased array antenna based on single sideband polarization modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yamei; Wu, Huan; Zhu, Dan; Pan, Shilong

    2014-02-24

    A novel optically controlled phased array antenna consisting a simple optical beamforming network and an N element linear patch antenna array is proposed and demonstrated. The optical beamforming network is realized by N independent phase shifters using a shared optical single sideband (OSSB) polarization modulator together with N polarization controllers (PCs), N polarization beam splitters (PBSs) and N photodetectors (PDs). An experiment is carried out. A 4-element linear patch antenna array operating at 14 GHz and a 1 × 4 optical beamforming network (OBFN) is employed to realize the phased array antenna. The radiation patterns of the phased array antenna at -30°, 0° and 30° are achieved.

  17. Phased Array Inspection of Titanium Disk Forgings Targeting no. 1/2 FBH Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.A.; Friedl, J.

    2005-04-09

    The phased array implementation of a focused zoned ultrasonic inspection to achieve a >3dB signal-to-noise for no. 1/2 flat bottom holes (FBH) in titanium is reported. Previous work established the ultrasound focusing required to achieve the targeted sensitivity. This work reports on the design of a phased array transducer capable of maintaining the needed focus to the depths required in the forging inspection. The performance of the phased array inspection is verified by examining signal-to-noise of no. 1/2 FBHs contained in coupons cut from actual forgings.

  18. Improved SNR of phased-array PERES coils via simulation study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alfredo O; Medina, Lucía

    2005-09-21

    A computational comparison of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was performed between a conventional phased array of two circular-shaped coils and a petal resonator surface array. The quasi-static model and phased-array optimum SNR were combined to derive an SNR formula for each array. Analysis of mutual inductance between coil petals was carried out to compute the optimal coil separation and optimum number of petal coils. Mutual interaction between coil arrays was not included in the model because this does not drastically affect coil performance. Phased arrays of PERES coils show a 114% improvement in SNR over that of the simplest circular configuration.

  19. Prestin and high frequency hearing in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Liu, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the evolution of ultrasonic hearing in echolocating bats and cetaceans has involved adaptive amino acid replacements in the cochlear gene prestin. A substantial number of these changes have occurred in parallel in both groups, suggesting that particular amino acid residues might confer greater auditory sensitivity to high frequencies. Here we review some of these findings, and consider whether similar signatures of prestin protein sequence evolution also occur in mammals that possess high frequency hearing for passive localization and conversely, whether this gene has undergone less change in mammals that lack high frequency hearing. PMID:21655450

  20. Propagation of high frequencies in Scandinavia

    SciTech Connect

    Bame, D.

    1989-04-01

    To determine if seismic signals at frequencies up to 50 Hz are useful for detecting events and discriminating between earthquakes and explosions, approximately 180 events from the three-component high-frequency seismic element (HFSE) installed at the center of the Norwegian Regional Seismic Array (NRSA) have been analyzed. The attenuation of high-frequency signals in Scandinavia varies with distance, azimuth, magnitude, and source effects. Most of the events were detected with HFSE, although detections were better on the NRSA where signal processing techniques were used. Based on a preliminary analysis, high-frequency data do not appear to be a useful discriminant in Scandinavia. 21 refs., 29 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. 78 FR 70567 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...] Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final Programmatic... Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) for the Nationwide Use of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High..., for environmental disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, SONAR equipment could be used...

  2. A parametric study of ultrasonic beam profiles for a linear phased array transducer.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Choi, S W

    2000-01-01

    A numerical simulation model is presented to investigate the influences of design parameters of linear phased array transducers on beam focusing and steering performance. The characteristic of ultrasonic beam profiles has been simulated on the basis of the Huygen's superposition principle. For the simulation, a linear phased array is considered as the composition of finite number of elements separated by equidistance. Individual elements are considered as two-dimensional point sources. The waves generated from piezoelectric elements are considered as simplified transient ultrasonic waves that are constructed with the cosine function enveloped with a Hanning window. The characteristic of ultrasonic wave propagation into a medium from the phased array transducer is described. The effects of the number, the interelement spacing, steering angle, the focal length, and frequency bandwidth of the piezoelectric elements on beam directivity and ultrasonic pressure field in a linear phased array transducer are systematically discussed.

  3. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  4. Manipulation of Liquids Using Phased Array Generation of Acoustic Radiation Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A phased array of piezoelectric transducers is used to control and manipulate contained as well as uncontained fluids in space and earth applications. The transducers in the phased array are individually activated while being commonly controlled to produce acoustic radiation pressure and acoustic streaming. The phased array is activated to produce a single pulse, a pulse burst or a continuous pulse to agitate, segregate or manipulate liquids and gases. The phased array generated acoustic radiation pressure is also useful in manipulating a drop, a bubble or other object immersed in a liquid. The transducers can be arranged in any number of layouts including linear single or multi- dimensional, space curved and annular arrays. The individual transducers in the array are activated by a controller, preferably driven by a computer.

  5. Phased Array Ultrasonic Sound Field Mapping in Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Larche, Michael R.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-05-31

    This study maps the phased array-generated acoustic sound fields through three types of CASS microstructure in four specimens to quantitatively assess the beam formation effectiveness in these materials.

  6. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  7. Monolithic optical integrated control circuitry for GaAs MMIC-based phased arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Ponchak, G. E.; Kascak, T. J.

    1985-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's) show promise in phased-array antenna applications for future space communications systems. Their efficient usage will depend on the control of amplitude and phase signals for each MMIC element in the phased array and in the low-loss radiofrequency feed. For a phased array contining several MMIC elements a complex system is required to control and feed each element. The characteristics of GaAs MMIC's for 20/30-GHz phased-array systems are discussed. The optical/MMIC interface and the desired characteristics of optical integrated circuits (OIC's) for such an interface are described. Anticipated fabrication considerations for eventual full monolithic integration of optical integrated circuits with MMIC's on a GaAs substrate are presented.

  8. Development of an X-Band Coupled-Oscillator Transmit/Receive Phased Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, J.; Pogorzelski, R.

    2007-08-01

    The development of an 8.4 GHz (X-band) coupled-oscillator phased array employing full-duplex transmit and receive capability is described. Attractive features of phased arrays for deep-space communication include enabling high-data-rate communication and providing low-mass electronic beam steering. The coupled-oscillator phased-array concept seeks to reduce the cost and power consumption incurred in a conventional phased array by simplifying the beam-steering mechanism of the array. In this article, the overall system-level architecture of a full-duplex transmit and receive coupled-oscillator array is described, and the progress made in designing various specific components of a linear 1 x 7 coupled-oscillator array is also detailed.

  9. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  10. Development of components for an S-band phased array antenna subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The system requirements, module test data, and S-band phased array subsystem test data are discussed. Of the two approaches to achieving antenna gain (mechanically steered reflector or electronically steered phased array), the phased array approach offers the greatest simplicity and lowest cost (size, weight, power, and dollars) for this medium gain. A competitive system design is described as well as hardware evaluation which will lead to timely availability of this technology for implementing such a system. The objectives of the study were: to fabricate and test six engineering model transmit/receive microelectronics modules; to design, fabricate, and test one dc and logic multilayer manifold; and to integrate and test an S-band phased array antenna subsystem composed of antenna elements, seven T/R modules, RF manifolds and dc manifold.

  11. Measured aperture-array noise temperature of the Mark II phased array feed for ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Shaw, R. D.; Hayman, D. B.; Macleod, A.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.; Cantrall, C.; Brothers, M. L.; Hotan, A. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have measured the aperture-array noise temperature of the first Mk. II phased array feed that CSIRO has built for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. As an aperture array, the Mk. II phased array feed achieves a beam equivalent noise temperature less than 40 K from 0.78 GHz to 1.7 GHz and less than 50 K from 0.7 GHz to 1.8 GHz for a boresight beam directed at the zenith. We believe these are the lowest reported noise temperatures over these frequency ranges for ambient-temperature phased arrays. The measured noise temperature includes receiver electronics noise, ohmic losses in the array, and stray radiation from sidelobes illuminating the sky and ground away from the desired field of view. This phased array feed was designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array.

  12. Development toward a ground-based interferometric phased array for radio detection of high energy neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avva, J.; Bechtol, K.; Chesebro, T.; Cremonesi, L.; Deaconu, C.; Gupta, A.; Ludwig, A.; Messino, W.; Miki, C.; Nichol, R.; Oberla, E.; Ransom, M.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Saltzberg, D.; Schlupf, C.; Shipp, N.; Varner, G.; Vieregg, A. G.; Wissel, S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The in-ice radio interferometric phased array technique for detection of high energy neutrinos looks for Askaryan emission from neutrinos interacting in large volumes of glacial ice, and is being developed as a way to achieve a low energy threshold and a large effective volume at high energies. The technique is based on coherently summing the impulsive Askaryan signal from multiple antennas, which increases the signal-to-noise ratio for weak signals. We report here on measurements and a simulation of thermal noise correlations between nearby antennas, beamforming of impulsive signals, and a measurement of the expected improvement in trigger efficiency through the phased array technique. We also discuss the noise environment observed with an analog phased array at Summit Station, Greenland, a possible site for an interferometric phased array for radio detection of high energy neutrinos.

  13. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  15. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  16. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Supply Warehouse, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  19. New customizable phased array UT instrument opens door for furthering research and better industrial implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, Gavin; Ginzel, Robert

    2014-02-18

    Phased array UT as an inspection technique in itself continues to gain wide acceptance. However, there is much room for improvement in terms of implementation of Phased Array (PA) technology for every unique NDT application across several industries (e.g. oil and petroleum, nuclear and power generation, steel manufacturing, etc.). Having full control of the phased array instrument and customizing a software solution is necessary for more seamless and efficient inspections, from setting the PA parameters, collecting data and reporting, to the final analysis. NDT researchers and academics also need a flexible and open platform to be able to control various aspects of the phased array process. A high performance instrument with advanced PA features, faster data rates, a smaller form factor, and capability to adapt to specific applications, will be discussed.

  20. 20-GHz phased-array-fed antennas utilizing distributed MMIC modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorbello, R. M.; Zaghloul, A. I.; Siddiqi, S.; Geller, B. D.; Lee, B. S.

    1986-01-01

    The feasibility of phased-array-fed dual-reflector systems with distributed power and phase control, and utilizing monolithic microwave integrated circuit modules, is demonstrated. Secondary radiation patterns for various antenna configurations, calculated using a method in which the phased array for each scanning direction is simulated by a fictitious point source, are computed to determine the achievable EIRP levels, sidelobe isolation, and cross-polarization isolation. The focal-region-fed Cassegrain reflector was found to be best suited for fixed multiple beam applications, while the phased-array-fed dual-reflector configuration was selected for multiple scanning beams. Key elements of the phased-array design including a radiating square horn and a square orthomode transducer were fabricated and tested.

  1. Two-dimensional beam steering using a thermo-optic silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Pruessner, Marcel W.; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Park, Doe; Fleet, Erin; DePrenger, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    Many components for free-space optical (FSO) communication systems have shrunken in size over the last decade. However, the steering systems have remained large and power hungry. Nonmechanical beam steering offers a path to reducing the size of these systems. Optical phased arrays can allow integrated beam steering elements. One of the most important aspects of an optical phased array technology is its scalability to a large number of elements. Silicon photonics can potentially offer this scalability using CMOS foundry techniques. A phased array that can steer in two dimensions using the thermo-optic effect is demonstrated. No wavelength tuning of the input laser is needed and the design allows a simple control system with only two inputs. A benchtop FSO link with the phased array in both transmit and receive mode is demonstrated.

  2. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz.

  3. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  4. High power, high frequency component test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen; Krawczonek, Walter

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has available a high frequency, high power laboratory facility for testing various components of aerospace and/or terrestrial power systems. This facility is described here. All of its capabilities and potential applications are detailed.

  5. An introduction to high frequency radioteletype systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinnau, Roger R.

    1989-10-01

    A basic introductory guide is provided to modern High Frequency (HF) data communications systems. Described are modern commercial radioteletype systems, data communication protocols, and various secrets of the trade.

  6. Neural coding of high-frequency tones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howes, W. L.

    1976-01-01

    Available evidence was presented indicating that neural discharges in the auditory nerve display characteristic periodicities in response to any tonal stimulus including high-frequency stimuli, and that this periodicity corresponds to the subjective pitch.

  7. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as RAZs. RAZs are displayed as go, no-go signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  8. High-frequency conductivity of photoionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Anakhov, M. V.; Uryupin, S. A.

    2016-08-15

    The tensor of the high-frequency conductivity of a plasma created via tunnel ionization of atoms in the field of linearly or circularly polarized radiation is derived. It is shown that the real part of the conductivity tensor is highly anisotropic. In the case of a toroidal velocity distribution of photoelectrons, the possibility of amplification of a weak high-frequency field polarized at a sufficiently large angle to the anisotropy axis of the initial nonequilibrium distribution is revealed.

  9. Ambiguity Function Analysis for the Hybrid Mimo Phased-Array Radar (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Multiple - Input Multiple Output , or MIMO , radar systems are next-generation radar systems with multiple transmit and receive...architecture that combines elements of traditional phased-array radar with the emerging technology of Multiple - Input Multiple Out- put ( MIMO ) radar. A HMPAR...a multisensor radar architecture that combines elements of traditional phased-array radar with the emerging technology of Multiple - Input Multiple

  10. Demonstration Results of the Triband, Multi-Beam Airborne Telemetry Phased Array (AirPA) System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    AirPA Phase 3 test event in September 2014, the element level digital beamforming phased array was successfully demonstrated at Edwards Air Force...Base in L-band, S-band, and C-band at a technology readiness level of 6. The system tracked both ground and air mobile transmitters using ARTM Tier 0...Phased Array, antenna, digital beam-forming, beamforming , DBF, L-band, S-band, C-band, CTEIP, NAVAIR 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  11. Simultaneous Transmit and Receive Performance of an 8-channel Digital Phased Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-16

    Lincoln Laboratory Lexington, Massachusetts, USA Abstract—The Aperture-Level Simultaneous Transmit and Re- ceive (ALSTAR) architecture enables extremely...In [1], the Aperture-Level Simultaneous Transmit and Receive (ALSTAR) architecture was proposed for achieving STAR using a fully digital phased array...Aperture-Level Simultaneous Transmit and Receive (ALSTAR) architecture enables STAR functionality in a digital phased array without the use of specialized

  12. An Update on Phased Array Results Obtained on the GE Counter-Rotating Open Rotor Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary; Horvath, Csaba; Envia, Edmane

    2013-01-01

    Beamform maps have been generated from 1) simulated data generated by the LINPROP code and 2) actual experimental phased array data obtained on the GE Counter-rotating open rotor model. The beamform maps show that many of the tones in the experimental data come from their corresponding Mach radius. If the phased array points to the Mach radius associated with a tone then it is likely that the tone is a result of the loading and thickness noise on the blades. In this case, the phased array correctly points to where the noise is coming from and indicates the axial location of the loudest source in the image but not necessarily the correct vertical location. If the phased array does not point to the Mach radius associated with a tone then some mechanism other than loading and thickness noise may control the amplitude of the tone. In this case, the phased array may or may not point to the actual source. If the source is not rotating it is likely that the phased array points to the source. If the source is rotating it is likely that the phased array indicates the axial location of the loudest source but not necessarily the correct vertical location. These results indicate that you have to be careful in how you interpret phased array data obtained on an open rotor since they may show the tones coming from a location other than the source location. With a subsonic tip speed open rotor the tones can come form locations outboard of the blade tips. This has implications regarding noise shielding.

  13. Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination of Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle Weld

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, S.; Engel, J.; Kimbrough, D.; Suits, M.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a Phased Array Ultrasonic Examination that was developed for the examination of a limited access circumferential Inconel 718 fusion weld of a Space Shuttle Main Engine Nozzle - Cone. The paper discusses the selection and formation criteria used for the phased array focal laws, the reference standard that simulated hardware conditions, the examination concept, and results. Several unique constraints present during this examination included limited probe movement to a single axis and one-sided access to the weld.

  14. Root crack sizing using phased array inspections and autoregressive spectral extrapolation signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, J.; Shakibi, B.; Moles, M.; Sinclair, A. N.

    2013-01-01

    Phased array inspection was conducted on a V-butt welded steel sample with multiple shallow flaws of varying depths. The inspection measurements were processed using Wiener filtering and Autoregressive Spectral Extrapolation (AS) to enhance the signals. Phased array inspections were conducted using multiple phased array probes of varying nominal central frequencies (2.25, 4, 5 and 10 MHz). This paper describes the measured results, which show high accuracy, typically in the range of 0.1-0.2 mm. The results concluded that: 1. There was no statistical difference between the calculated flaw depths from phased array inspections at different flaw tip angles. 2. There was no statistical difference in flaw depths calculated using phased array data collected from either side of the weld. 3. Flaws with depths less than the estimated probe signal shear wavelength could not be sized. 4. Finally, there was no statistical difference in the calculated flaw depths using phased array probes with different sampling frequencies and destructive measurements of the flaws.

  15. Signal detectability in diffusive media using phased arrays in conjunction with detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongyel; Kupinski, Matthew A

    2011-06-20

    We investigate Hotelling observer performance (i.e., signal detectability) of a phased array system for tasks of detecting small inhomogeneities and distinguishing adjacent abnormalities in uniform diffusive media. Unlike conventional phased array systems where a single detector is located on the interface between two sources, we consider a detector array, such as a CCD, on a phantom exit surface for calculating the Hotelling observer detectability. The signal detectability for adjacent small abnormalities (2 mm displacement) for the CCD-based phased array is related to the resolution of reconstructed images. Simulations show that acquiring high-dimensional data from a detector array in a phased array system dramatically improves the detectability for both tasks when compared to conventional single detector measurements, especially at low modulation frequencies. It is also observed in all studied cases that there exists the modulation frequency optimizing CCD-based phased array systems, where detectability for both tasks is consistently high. These results imply that the CCD-based phased array has the potential to achieve high resolution and signal detectability in tomographic diffusive imaging while operating at a very low modulation frequency. The effect of other configuration parameters, such as a detector pixel size, on the observer performance is also discussed.

  16. Optical phased array using single crystalline silicon high-contrast-gratings for beamsteering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Byung-Wook; Chan, Trevor; Megens, Mischa; Sun, Tianbo; Yang, Weijian; Rao, Yi; Horsley, David A.; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wu, Ming C.

    2013-03-01

    We present a single crystalline silicon optical phased array using high-contrast-gratings (HCG) for fast two dimensional beamforming and beamsteering at 0.5 MHz. Since there are various applications for beamforming and beamsteering such as 3D imaging, optical communications, and light detection and ranging (LIDAR), it is great interest to develop ultrafast optical phased arrays. However, the beamsteering speed of optical phased arrays using liquid crystal and electro-wetting are typically limited to tens of milliseconds. Optical phased arrays using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies can operate in the submegahertz range, but generally require metal coatings. The metal coating unfortunately cause bending of mirrors due to thermally induced stress. The novel MEMS-based optical phased array presented here consists of electrostatically driven 8 × 8 HCG pixels fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The HCG mirror is designed to have 99.9% reflectivity at 1550 nm wavelength without any reflective coating. The size of the HCG mirror is 20 × 20 μm2 and the mass is only 140 pg, much lighter than traditional MEMS mirrors. Our 8 × 8 optical phased array has a total field of view of +/-10° × 10° and a beam width of 2°. The maximum phase shift regarding the actuation gap defined by a 2 μm buried oxide layer of a SOI wafer is 1.7π at 20 V.

  17. A study program on large aperture electronic scanning phased array antennas for the shuttle imaging microwave system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Fundamental phased array theory and performance parameters are discussed in terms of their application to microwave radiometry, and four scanning phased arrays representing current examples of state-of-the-art phased array technology are evaluated for potential use as components of the multispectral antenna system for the space shuttle imaging microwave system (SIMS). A discussion of problem areas, both in performance and fabrication is included, with extrapolations of performance characteristics for phased array antennas of increased sizes up to 20 m by 20 m. The possibility of interlacing two or more phased arrays to achieve a multifrequency aperture is considered, and, finally, a specific antenna system is recommended for use with SIMS.

  18. Low-Cost Phased Array Antenna for Sounding Rockets, Missiles, and Expendable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullinix, Daniel; Hall, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Corbin, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost beamformer phased array antenna has been developed for expendable launch vehicles, rockets, and missiles. It utilizes a conformal array antenna of ring or individual radiators (design varies depending on application) that is designed to be fed by the recently developed hybrid electrical/mechanical (vendor-supplied) phased array beamformer. The combination of these new array antennas and the hybrid beamformer results in a conformal phased array antenna that has significantly higher gain than traditional omni antennas, and costs an order of magnitude or more less than traditional phased array designs. Existing omnidirectional antennas for sounding rockets, missiles, and expendable launch vehicles (ELVs) do not have sufficient gain to support the required communication data rates via the space network. Missiles and smaller ELVs are often stabilized in flight by a fast (i.e. 4 Hz) roll rate. This fast roll rate, combined with vehicle attitude changes, greatly increases the complexity of the high-gain antenna beam-tracking problem. Phased arrays for larger ELVs with roll control are prohibitively expensive. Prior techniques involved a traditional fully electronic phased array solution, combined with highly complex and very fast inertial measurement unit phased array beamformers. The functional operation of this phased array is substantially different from traditional phased arrays in that it uses a hybrid electrical/mechanical beamformer that creates the relative time delays for steering the antenna beam via a small physical movement of variable delay lines. This movement is controlled via an innovative antenna control unit that accesses an internal measurement unit for vehicle attitude information, computes a beam-pointing angle to the target, then points the beam via a stepper motor controller. The stepper motor on the beamformer controls the beamformer variable delay lines that apply the appropriate time delays to the individual array elements to properly

  19. Piezoelectric phased array acousto-ultrasonic interrogation of damage in thin plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purekar, Ashish S.

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) and Condition Based Maintenance (CBM) systems can provide substantial benefits for aging aerospace systems as well as newer systems still in the design process. In aging aerospace systems, a retrofitted SHM system would alert users of incipient damage preventing catastrophic failure. For newer systems, incorporating a SHM approach and using CBM techniques can reduce life-cycle costs. Central to such SHM and CBM systems is the ability to detect damage in a structure. Traditional approaches to damage detection in structures involve one of two methods. In the modal dynamics approach, the natural frequencies and modeshapes of a structure shift when damage occurs. The location, type, and amount of damage is determined by the shifts in the modal properties due to damage. Alternately, in an Ultrasonics approach, the structure is scanned with a specialized transducer which induces high frequency vibrations in the structure. Damage in the structure is inferred when these vibrations are altered. In the same vein as Ultrasonics, Acoustic Emission based methods listen for energy release in the structure upon defect growth. All of these techniques have limitations which hinder their usage in a practical system. This thesis attempts to develop a methodology with the benefits of the modal approach as well as the Ultrasonics/Acoustic Emission approach. The methodology is commonly referred to as an Acousto-Ultrasonic technique for damage detection. The structural dynamics of plate structures is described as wavelike in nature where the plate is a medium for wave propagation. For thin plates, bulk wave propagation is described using Lamb wave modes. The two fundamental modes of wave propagation are the in-plane acoustic mode and the transverse bending mode. The interaction of these waves with a discontinuity or damaged region changes the way the waves propagate. Part of the incident wavefront is reflected back while the rest is transmitted through

  20. A high frequency silicon pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, S. K.; Gross, C.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical and design considerations as well as fabrication and experimental work involved in the development of high-frequency silicon pressure sensors with an ultra-small diaphragm are discussed. A sensor is presented with a rectangular diaphragm of 0.0127 cm x 0.0254 cm x 1.06 micron; the sensor has a natural frequency of 625 kHz and a sensitivity of 0.82 mv/v-psi. High-frequency results from shock tube testing and low-frequency (less than 50 kHz) comparison with microphones are given.

  1. Metrology For High-Frequency Nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, T. Mitch; Imtiaz, Atif; Nembach, Hans T.; Rice, Paul; Kabos, Pavel

    2007-09-26

    Two metrological tools for high-frequency measurements of nanoscale systems are described: (i) two/N-port analysis of nanoscale devices as well as (ii) near-field scanning microwave microscopy (NSMM) for materials characterization. Calibrated two/N-port measurements were made on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) welded to a coplanar waveguide. Significant changes in the extracted high-frequency electrical response of the welded MWNT were measured when the contacts to the MWNT were modified. Additionally, NSMM was used to characterize films of nanotube soot deposited on copper and sapphire substrates. The material properties of the films showed a strong dependence on the substrate material.

  2. Design and experiment of 256-element ultrasound phased array for noninvasive focused ultrasound surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingzhu; Wan, Mingxi; Xu, Feng; Wang, Xiaodong; Chang, Xiaozhen

    2006-12-22

    A 256-element phased array high intensity focused ultrasound system has been designed and constructed in our laboratory. The 256-element spherical-section ultrasound phased array made from piezocomposite material operates at 1.1 MHz with 11-cm radius of curvature, 14-cm outer diameter, and 3.4-cm diameter central hole for mounting diagnostic ultrasound imaging probe. First, the explicit sound field calculation approach for the spherical-section phased array and the genetic optimal algorithm are briefly introduced as the optimal focus pattern control methods. Then, the design guidelines of 256-element spherical-section focused ultrasound phased array and 256-channel driver system are given. The results of single on and off axial focus, multiple on and off axial foci, half sub-array focus pattern provide further evidence for the 3D focus steering and sub-array mode for avoiding obstacles in focused ultrasound surgery. The multi-foci pattern can enlarge the treatment volume to 22 times larger than that of a single focus in one sonication. Finally, in vitro and transparent tissue-mimicking phantom experiment results confirm the ability of 256-element spherical-section phased array system to induce thermal lesions for noninvasive ultrasound surgery.

  3. Investigating a stepped ultrasonic phased array transducer for the evaluation and characterization of defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohenick, M.; Blickley, E.; Tittmann, B. R.; Kropf, M.

    2007-04-01

    Previous work has led to the design, simulation, and development of a linear phased array transducer. The intention of the array is to be used as a non-destructive ultrasonic device to monitor and evaluate the health of a given specimen. The phased array has been manufactured and tested for the detection and characterization of defects on a target. The array was fabricated with a four-row "stepped" design with four wires to transfer data and one wire for grounding. The "stepped" design allows for the interrogation of a larger region using time delays and beam sweeping without the use of additional electrical channels. The array was designed to be utilized in a water immersion environment with about one inch between the array and the target specimen. An OmniScan MX system was used to operate the phased array and perform real-time linear and sectorial scans on a set of rectangular plates. S-scans allow for beam sweeping over an angle range as well as adjustments for time delays and a true-depth display. The array was operated with sixteen active elements and an angle range of 0 to 30 degrees. The phased array was tested with a variety of targets and was used to investigate and characterize different types of defects such as cracking, warping, and corrosion. The ability of the phased array to distinguish between defect types as well as resolve defect size was evaluated.

  4. Psychophysical tuning curves at very high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Ifat; Plack, Christopher J.

    2005-10-01

    For most normal-hearing listeners, absolute thresholds increase rapidly above about 16 kHz. One hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of the hearing-threshold curve is imposed by the transmission characteristics of the middle ear, which attenuates the sound input [Masterton et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 45, 966-985 (1969)]. An alternative hypothesis is that the high-frequency limit of hearing is imposed by the tonotopicity of the cochlea [Ruggero and Temchin, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 13206-13210 (2002)]. The aim of this study was to test these hypotheses. Forward-masked psychophysical tuning curves (PTCs) were derived for signal frequencies of 12-17.5 kHz. For the highest signal frequencies, the high-frequency slopes of some PTCs were steeper than the slope of the hearing-threshold curve. The results also show that the human auditory system displays frequency selectivity for characteristic frequencies (CFs) as high as 17 kHz, above the frequency at which absolute thresholds begin to increase rapidly. The findings suggest that, for CFs up to 17 kHz, the high-frequency limitation in humans is imposed in part by the middle-ear attenuation, and not by the tonotopicity of the cochlea.

  5. Landau damping with high frequency impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz,M.

    2009-05-04

    Coupled bunch longitudinal stability in the presence of high frequency impedances is considered. A frequency domain technique is developed and compared with simulations. The frequency domain technique allows for absolute stability tests and is applied to the problem of longitudinal stability in RHIC with the new 56 MHz RF system.

  6. High-Resolution Ultrasonic Imaging of Dento-Periodontal Tissues Using a Multi-Element Phased Array System.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kim-Cuong T; Le, Lawrence H; Kaipatur, Neelambar R; Zheng, Rui; Lou, Edmond H; Major, Paul W

    2016-10-01

    Intraoral ultrasonography uses high-frequency mechanical waves to study dento-periodontium. Besides the advantages of portability and cost-effectiveness, ultrasound technique has no ionizing radiation. Previous studies employed a single transducer or an array of transducer elements, and focused on enamel thickness and distance measurement. This study used a phased array system with a 128-element array transducer to image dento-periodontal tissues. We studied two porcine lower incisors from a 6-month-old piglet using 20-MHz ultrasound. The high-resolution ultrasonographs clearly showed the cross-sectional morphological images of the hard and soft tissues. The investigation used an integration of waveform analysis, travel-time calculation, and wavefield simulation to reveal the nature of the ultrasound data, which makes the study novel. With the assistance of time-distance radio-frequency records, we robustly justified the enamel-dentin interface, dentin-pulp interface, and the cemento-enamel junction. The alveolar crest level, the location of cemento-enamel junction, and the thickness of alveolar crest were measured from the images and compared favorably with those from the cone beam computed tomography with less than 10% difference. This preliminary and fundamental study has reinforced the conclusions from previous studies, that ultrasonography has great potential to become a non-invasive diagnostic imaging tool for quantitative assessment of periodontal structures and better delivery of oral care.

  7. Nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam models and measurement models for phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinyu; Gang, Tie

    2009-01-01

    A nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model is proposed in order to overcome the limitation that paraxial Gaussian beam models lose accuracy in simulating the beam steering behavior of phased array transducers. Using this nonparaxial multi-Gaussian beam model, the focusing and steering sound fields generated by an ultrasonic linear phased array transducer are calculated and compared with the corresponding results obtained by paraxial multi-Gaussian beam model and more exact Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral model. In addition, with help of this novel nonparaxial method, an ultrasonic measurement model is provided to investigate the sensitivity of linear phased array transducers versus steering angles. Also the comparisons of model predictions with experimental results are presented to certify the accuracy of this provided measurement model.

  8. Adhesive defect detection in composite adhesive joints using phased array transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Baiyang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2015-03-01

    Composite materials are widely used in aircraft structures due to their high specific stiffness and strength. The laminated nature of composite structures makes them subject to disbond and delamination. These types of defects will compromise the integrity of the structure and therefore need to be monitored. To monitor aircraft structures, light weight transducers capable of large area coverage are beneficial. Ultrasonic guided waves are able to travel long distance and are sensitive to localized defects. The multi-modal characteristic of propagating guided waves requires optimal mode selection and excitation. Phased array transducers provide good versatility for optimal mode excitation since they can excite different guided wave modes preferentially. Phased array transducers designed for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications are employed in this work to study the interaction between adhesive defects and guided wave modes. Amplitude ratios and wave packet composition are utilized as defect indicators that are uniquely available due to the phased array transducers.

  9. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  10. Free space optical communication link using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Pruessner, Marcel; Mahon, Rita; Ferraro, Mike S.; Park, Doe; Fleet, Erin; DePrenger, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Many components for free space optical communication systems have shrunken in size over the last decade. However, the steering systems have remained large and power hungry. Non-mechanical beam steering offers a path to reducing the size of these systems. Optical phased arrays can allow integrated beam steering elements. One of the most important aspects of an optical phased array technology is its scalability to a large number of elements. Silicon photonics can potentially offer this scalability using CMOS foundry techniques. In this paper a small-scale silicon photonic optical phased array is demonstrated for both the transmitter and receiver functions in a free space optical link. The device using an array of thermo-optically controlled waveguide phase shifters and demonstrates one-dimensional steering with a single control electrode. Transmission of a digitized video data stream over the link is shown.

  11. Optical Phase Lock Loop Based Phased Array Transmitter for Optical Commmunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilenchik, Y.; Erkmen, B. I.; Satyan, N.; Yariv, A.; Farr, W. H.; Choi, J. M.

    2011-02-01

    We propose a novel deep space optical communication scheme, in which an integrated optical phased array (OPA) is used for both phase modulation and fine beam steering. In particular, an optical phase-locked loop (OPLL) based phased array with full electronic control over the phase is introduced and analyzed. The performance of such an array as a beam steering mechanism is evaluated and compared to realistic steering requirements for deep space applications. It is shown that an array with a high fill factor (>0.7) with about 300 elements per dimension is needed to meet these requirements. The effect of residual phase noise due to limited loop bandwidth is analyzed. Finally, the theory is validated by experimental results demonstrating successful beam steering using a two-element phased array.

  12. Phased array feed design technology for Large Aperture Microwave Radiometer (LAMR) Earth observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuman, H. K.

    1992-01-01

    An assessment of the potential and limitations of phased array antennas in space-based geophysical precision radiometry is described. Mathematical models exhibiting the dependence of system and scene temperatures and system sensitivity on phased array antenna parameters and components such as phase shifters and low noise amplifiers (LNA) are developed. Emphasis is given to minimum noise temperature designs wherein the LNA's are located at the array level, one per element or subarray. Two types of combiners are considered: array lenses (space feeds) and corporate networks. The result of a survey of suitable components and devices is described. The data obtained from that survey are used in conjunction with the mathematical models to yield an assessment of effective array antenna noise temperature for representative geostationary and low Earth orbit systems. Practical methods of calibrating a space-based, phased array radiometer are briefly addressed as well.

  13. [Regularized inhomogeneity correction method for phased array image in magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongyu; Pei, Xiaomin; Luo, Weitao; Dai, Jianpin

    2011-10-01

    Phased array coils (multiple receiver coil systems) have been extensively used for acquisition of MR images owing to their ability of increasing SNR, extending field-of-view (FOV), and reducing acquisition time. But the SOS algorithm,which is main method for phased array image reconstruction,will cause inhomogeneity in reconstructed image. A regularized least square method for phased array image combination is proposed in this paper. In the method, an additional reference scan is performed in advance. By using the reference scan, coil sensitivity map can be acquired, and image reconstructed from reference scan can be used as reference data in the regulation term. Experiments showed that the image uniformity was greatly improved by this method with scanning phantom and volunteer.

  14. Unidirectional waveguide grating antennas with uniform emission for optical phased arrays.

    PubMed

    Raval, Manan; Poulton, Christopher V; Watts, Michael R

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate millimeter-scale optical waveguide grating antennas with unidirectional emission for integrated optical phased arrays. Unidirectional emission eliminates the fundamental problem of blind spots in the element factor of a phased array caused by reflections of antenna radiation within the substrate. Over 90% directionality is demonstrated using a design consisting of two silicon nitride layers. Furthermore, the perturbation strength along the antenna is apodized to achieve uniform emission for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on a millimeter scale. This allows for a high effective aperture and receiving efficiency. The emission profile of the measured 3 mm long antenna has a standard deviation of 8.65% of the mean. These antennas are state of the art and will allow for integrated optical phased arrays with blind-spot-free high transmission output power and high receiving efficiency for LIDAR and free-space communication systems.

  15. Phased-array antenna control by a monolithic photonic integrated circuit, COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kravitz, S.H.; Hietala, V.M.; Vawter, G.A.; Meyer, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    Phased-array antenna systems are well known for rapid beam steering and their ability to bring high power to the target. Such systems are also quite complex and heavy, which have limited their usefulness. The issues of weight, size, power use, and complexity have been addressed through a system named COMPASS (Coherent Optical Monolithic Phased Array Steering System). All phased-array antenna systems need: (1) small size; (2) low power use; (3) high-speed beam steering; and (4) digitally-controlled phase shifting. COMPASS meets these basic requirements, and provides some very desirable additional features. These are: (1) phase control separate from the transmit/receive module; (2) simple expansion to large arrays; (3) fiber optic interconnect for reduced sensitivity to EMI; (4) an intrinsically radiation-hard GaAs chip; and (5) optical power provided by a commercially available continuous wave (CW) laser. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  16. The relationships between dispersion loss and sidelobe levels in wideband phased-array radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Robert L., III; Belcher, Melvin L.; Corey, Larry E.

    Wideband phased-array radar systems experience significant problems created by frequency dispersion in the phased-array antenna. This phenomena has previously been studied for systems employing linear frequency modulation (LFM). LFM's vulnerability to deceptive electronic countermeasures (ECM) and signal-to-noise loss due to the amplitude weighting required to sufficiently suppress range sidelobes limit its usefulness. Pseudo-random noise (PRN) coded waveforms are capable of solving both these problems. This paper examines how the phased-array antenna affects the radar's performance when PRN coded waveforms are used. Issues of dispersion loss, grating lobe rejection, and compressed pulse shapes are considered. Where appropriate, results are compared to results from LFM systems. Sets of normalized curves are presented that quantify these effects in terms of signal bandwidth, subarray size, and antenna scan angle.

  17. A new method for all optical space network based on fiber laser phase array technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian; Sun, Hongwei; Liu, Xianzhu; Wang, Tianshu; Zhang, Peng; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Lizhong; Liu, Jingjiao; Jiang, Huilin

    2014-12-01

    A new method that adopt fiber laser phase array source to form all optics network in the deep space communication was proposed in this paper. The far-field light intensity figure of 1.55μm fiber laser phase array source was simulated, and the scanning range with changing among array components the phase was obtained. The number of array components was 3×3, wavelength was 1.55πm, and core radius was 10μm. The scanning range was +/- 0.9909° when the distance of array components was 80μm. It was found that applying fiber laser phase array source can achieve scanning advantages with dynamic range in the all optics network.

  18. Identifying equivalent sound sources from aeroacoustic simulations using a numerical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pignier, Nicolas J.; O'Reilly, Ciarán J.; Boij, Susann

    2017-04-01

    An application of phased array methods to numerical data is presented, aimed at identifying equivalent flow sound sources from aeroacoustic simulations. Based on phased array data extracted from compressible flow simulations, sound source strengths are computed on a set of points in the source region using phased array techniques assuming monopole propagation. Two phased array techniques are used to compute the source strengths: an approach using a Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse and a beamforming approach using dual linear programming (dual-LP) deconvolution. The first approach gives a model of correlated sources for the acoustic field generated from the flow expressed in a matrix of cross- and auto-power spectral values, whereas the second approach results in a model of uncorrelated sources expressed in a vector of auto-power spectral values. The accuracy of the equivalent source model is estimated by computing the acoustic spectrum at a far-field observer. The approach is tested first on an analytical case with known point sources. It is then applied to the example of the flow around a submerged air inlet. The far-field spectra obtained from the source models for two different flow conditions are in good agreement with the spectra obtained with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings integral, showing the accuracy of the source model from the observer's standpoint. Various configurations for the phased array and for the sources are used. The dual-LP beamforming approach shows better robustness to changes in the number of probes and sources than the pseudo-inverse approach. The good results obtained with this simulation case demonstrate the potential of the phased array approach as a modelling tool for aeroacoustic simulations.

  19. Detection of wheel rim by immersion scan of phased array ultrasonic flaw testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yi-He; Guo, Jian-qiang; Wang, Ze-yong; Gao, Xiao-rong; Jiang, Xiang-dong; Li, Xi

    2015-02-01

    In order to achieve the in-service detection to high speed train wheel rims, this article analyzed the effects of the number of array elements to image focusing and image quality using water immersion ultrasonic phased array technology. Also, the effects of the depth of water to detecting technique had been researched. According to the results of the experiments, the number of optimal array elements, the corresponding thickness of immersion layer, and the optimal range of water's depth had been obtained. Thus, appropriate references had been provided to water immersion ultrasonic phased array testing.

  20. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection of Flaws on Weld Fusion Faces Using Full Matrix Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, R.; Russell, J.; Cawley, P.; Habgood, N.

    2009-03-01

    Work is being conducted to develop phased array inspection of stainless steel welded pipes. Ideally this uses waves reflected and mode converted at the inner surface of the pipe, but most commercial phased array controllers do not currently provide for this. Our solution was to use Full Matrix Capture (FMC) and process the data ourselves. This paper explains the FMC principle, describes the signal processing algorithms along with introducing the Almost Total Focusing Method (ATFM) and illustrates how the processed data was presented. The inspections were also modeled using the CEA CIVA software and compared to experimental results.

  1. EHF monolithic phased arrays - A stepping-stone to the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIlvenna, John F.; Schindler, John K.

    Current EHF monolithic phased-array technology is assessed; near-term technology needs are evaluated; and future developments in this field are projected. It is noted that such arrays are thought to be able to satisfy cost, real-estate, aerodynamic and radar-cross-section constraints. Test results on multielement monolithic subarrays operating at 20 and 44 GHz are examined. Finally, the connection between current state-of-the-art subarray technology and Smart Skins, the projected omnipotent phased array of the future, is discussed.

  2. A design concept for an MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Smetana, Jerry; Acosta, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka proposed design, which concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required.

  3. Pulse-echo phased array ultrasonic inspection of pultruded rod stitched efficient unitized structure (PRSEUS)

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, P. H.

    2011-06-23

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading.

  4. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam-forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  5. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design, and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  6. A design concept for an MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) microstrip phased array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Smetana, Jerry; Acosta, Roberto

    1987-01-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka proposed design, which concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required.

  7. Cost-effective optical switch matrix for microwave phased-array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, J. J.; Chia, S. L.; Li, W. Z.; Grove, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    An all-fiber (6x6) optical shutter switch matrix with the control system for microwave phased array has been demonstrated. The device offers the advantages of integrated configuration, low cost, low power consumption, small size, and light weight. The maximum extinction ratio (among 36 individual pixel) of this switch matrix at 840 nm is 24.2 dB, and the switching time is less than 120 microsec. In addition to phased array application, this low cost switch matrix is extremely attractive for fiber optic switching networks.

  8. High speed optical phased array using high contrast grating all-pass filters.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijian; Sun, Tianbo; Rao, Yi; Megens, Mischa; Chan, Trevor; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Horsley, David A; Wu, Ming C; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-08-25

    We report a high speed 8x8 optical phased array using tunable 1550 nm all-pass filters with ultrathin high contrast gratings (HCGs) as the microelectromechanical-actuated top reflectors. The all-pass filter design enables a highly efficient phase tuning (1.7 π) with a small actuation voltage (10 V) and actuation displacement of the HCG (50 nm). The microelectromechanical HCG structure facilitates a high phase tuning speed >0.5 MHz. Beam steering is experimentally demonstrated with the optical phased array.

  9. Inspection of Spot Welds Using a Portable Ultrasonic Phased-Array System

    SciTech Connect

    Reverdy, F.; Hopkins, D.

    2005-04-09

    Results were presented last year to demonstrate the feasibility of using an ultrasonic phased array to inspect spot welds. Analysis of the signals in the Fourier domain allows identification of satisfactory, undersized and defective welds. Signal- and image-processing techniques have been implemented with the goal of extracting the dimensions of the weld nugget. The results presented here were obtained using a portable phased-array controller. Toward developing a fully portable system, a housing for the probe is under development with an integrated mechanical scanning system.

  10. Liquid sodium testing of in-house phased array EMAT transducer for L-wave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bourdais, F.; Le Polles, T.; Baque, F.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development of an in-house phased array EMAT transducer for longitudinal wave inspection in liquid sodium. The work presented herein is part of an undergoing project aimed at improving in-service inspection techniques for the ASTRID reactor project. The design process of the phased array EMAT probe is briefly explained and followed by a review of experimental test results. We first present test results obtained in the laboratory while the last part of the paper describes the liquid sodium testing and the produced ultrasound images. (authors)

  11. Simulation of Transrib HIFU Propagation and the Strategy of Phased-array Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Wang, Mingjun

    Liver ablation is challenging in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) because of the presence of ribs and great inhomogeneity in multi-layer tissue. In this study, angular spectrum approach (ASA) has been used in the wave propagation from phased-array HIFU transducer, and diffraction, attenuation and the nonlinearity are accounted for by means of second order operator splitting method. Bioheat equation is used to simulate the subsequent temperature elevation and lesion formation with the formation of shifted focus and multiple foci. In summary, our approach could simulate the performance of phased-array HIFU in the clinics and then develop an appropriate treatment plan.

  12. A design concept for an MMIC (Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit) microstrip phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard Q.; Smetana, Jerry; Acosta, Roberto

    1987-02-01

    A conceptual design for a microstrip phased array with monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC) amplitude and phase controls is described. The MMIC devices used are 20 GHz variable power amplifiers and variable phase shifters recently developed by NASA contractors for applications in future Ka proposed design, which concept is for a general NxN element array of rectangular lattice geometry. Subarray excitation is incorporated in the MMIC phased array design to reduce the complexity of the beam forming network and the number of MMIC components required.

  13. Pulse-Echo Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection of Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (prseus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, P. H.

    2011-06-01

    A PRSEUS test article was subjected to controlled impact on the skin face followed by static and cyclic axial compressions. Phased array ultrasonic inspection was conducted before impact, and after each of the test conditions. A linear phased array probe with a manual X-Y scanner was used for interrogation. Ultrasound showed a delamination between the skin and stringer flange adjacent to the impact. As designed, the stitching in the flange arrested the lateral flaw formation. Subsequent ultrasonic data showed no delamination growth due to continued loading.

  14. Principles and applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C L; Trought, W S; Clark, W M; Von Ramm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1978-12-01

    The physical principles and clinical applications of a high-resolution, dynamically focused phased-array real time ultrasound are described. Advantages of the real time technique include rapid survey capability, efficient selection of an appropriate tomographic plane, identification of pulsating structures, and dynamic studies. The capabilities of a high resolution phased array with extended dynamic focusing to a range of 15-20 cm are demonstrated in vascular, abdominal, and obstetric imaging. Appropriate clinical examples showing normal and pathological anatomy are presented. Comparisons with conventional B scans are illustrated.

  15. Visualization of phased-array sound fields and flaw interaction using the photoelastic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitte, T.; Orth, T.; Kersting, T.

    2012-05-01

    In order to visualize ultrasound in steel the photoelastic imager is a complementary technique to simulations, with the advantage that real transducers are used. In this contribution we show the linear behavior of the derived photoelastic signal and compare the results to FEM calculations. We use the result for quantitative analysis of sound-fields of immersion and phased array transducers. Interesting results are derived by analysis of the influence of missing elements on the shape and intensity of phased array (PA) ultrasonic pulses. Furthermore the formation of grating lobes from PA excitation is demonstrated and the plurality of waves generated from a small notch is displayed exemplarily.

  16. Ultrasonic Phased Array Inspection for an Isogrid Structural Element with Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, D. J.; Tokars, R. P.; Martin, R. E.; Rauser, R. W.; Aldrin, J. C.; Schumacher, E. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this investigation, a T-shaped aluminum alloy isogrid stiffener element used in aerospace applications was inspected with ultrasonic phased array methods. The isogrid stiffener element had various crack configurations emanating from bolt holes. Computational simulation methods were used to mimic the experiments in order to help understand experimental results. The results of this study indicate that it is at least partly feasible to interrogate this type of geometry with the given flaw configurations using phased array ultrasonics. The simulation methods were critical in helping explain the experimental results and, with some limitation, can be used to predict inspection results.

  17. Process controlling of a high-frequency cauter during tissue treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurzer, Helmut; Maeckel, Rainer; Lademann, Juergen; Liess, Hans-Dieter

    1995-01-01

    We present the process controlling of a high-frequency surgery generator during tissue treatment. Hereby, the temporal behavior of the voltage and the current are measured and then the finger print of the generated light arc in the electrical characteristic is analyzed by the control unit. This unit forces the high-frequency generator to supply an appropriate electrical power for different kinds of tissue. The functional ability is verified by cuts with different set points of the controlled variable, therefore, different degrees of slough, and cuts through tissue heterojunctions.

  18. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  19. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  20. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Abukari, S. S. Mensah, S. Y.; Twum, A.; Mensah, N. G.; Adu, K. A.; Rabiu, M.

    2012-12-15

    We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ω{sub B} for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ω{sub B} for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  1. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-06-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  2. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  3. Apparatus for measuring high frequency currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagmann, Mark J. (Inventor); Sutton, John F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring high frequency currents includes a non-ferrous core current probe that is coupled to a wide-band transimpedance amplifier. The current probe has a secondary winding with a winding resistance that is substantially smaller than the reactance of the winding. The sensitivity of the current probe is substantially flat over a wide band of frequencies. The apparatus is particularly useful for measuring exposure of humans to radio frequency currents.

  4. High Frequency Guided Wave Virtual Array SAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Pardini, A.; Diaz, A.

    2003-03-01

    The principles of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) are generalized for application to high frequency plate wave signals. It is shown that a flaw signal received in long-range plate wave propagation can be analyzed as if the signals were measured by an infinite array of transducers in an unbounded medium. It is shown that SAFT-based flaw sizing can be performed with as few as three or less actual measurement positions.

  5. High-Frequency Percussive Ventilation Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    physiologic and clin- ical outcomes. Pediatric and adult inhalational injury studies have linked HFPV to an improvement in static lung compliance...sedation–analgesic combinations (usually fentanyl with the individual or combined use of midazolam and propofol and/or dexmedetomidine), patient...1998;84:1174–7. 34. Frantz ID III, Close RH. Alveolar pressure swings during high frequency ventilation in rabbits. Pediatr Res 1985;19:162–6. 35. Pillow

  6. [High-frequency oscillatory ventilation in neonates].

    PubMed

    2002-09-01

    High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) may be considered as an alternative in the management of severe neonatal respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. In patients with diffuse pulmonary disease, HFOV can applied as a rescue therapy with a high lung volume strategy to obtain adequate alveolar recruitment. We review the mechanisms of gas exchange, as well as the indications, monitoring and special features of the use HVOF in the neonatal period.

  7. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  8. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Spencer P.

    2015-01-01

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  9. High frequency x-ray generator basics.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Wlad T

    2002-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present basic functional principles of high frequency x-ray generators. The emphasis is put on physical concepts that determine the engineering solutions to the problem of efficient generation and control of high voltage power required to drive the x-ray tube. The physics of magnetically coupled circuits is discussed first, as a background for the discussion of engineering issues related to high-frequency power transformer design. Attention is paid to physical processes that influence such factors as size, efficiency, and reliability of a high voltage power transformer. The basic electrical circuit of a high frequency generator is analyzed next, with focus on functional principles. This section investigates the role and function of basic components, such as power supply, inverter, and voltage doubler. Essential electronic circuits of generator control are then examined, including regulation of voltage, current and timing of electrical power delivery to the x-ray tube. Finally, issues related to efficient feedback control, including basic design of the AEC circuitry are reviewed.

  10. A Compact High Frequency Doppler Radio Scatterometer for Coastal Oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flament, P. J.; Harris, D.; Flament, M.; Fernandez, I. Q.; Hlivak, R.; Flores-vidal, X.; Marié, L.

    2016-12-01

    A low-power High Frequency Doppler Radar has been designed for large series production. The use of commercial-off-the-shelf components is maximized to minimize overall cost. Power consumption is reduced to 130W in full duty and 20W in stand-by under 20-36 V-DC, thus enabling solar/wind and/or fuel cell operation by default. For 8 channels, commercial components and sub-assemblies cost less than k20 excluding coaxial antenna cables, and less than four man-weeks of technician suffice for integration, testing and calibration, suggesting a final cost of about k36, based on production batches of 25 units. The instrument is integrated into passively-cooled 90x60x20 cm3 field-deployable enclosures, combining signal generation, transmitter, received, A/D converter and computer, alleviating the need for additional protection such as a container or building. It uses frequency-ramped continuous wave signals, and phased-array transmissions to decouple the direct path to the receivers. Five sub-assemblies are controlled by a Linux embedded computer: (i) direct digital synthesis of transmit and orthogonal local oscillator signals, derived from a low phase noise oven-controlled crystal; (ii) distributed power amplifiers totaling 5 W, integrated into λ/8 passive transmit antenna monopoles; (iii) λ/12 compact active receive antenna monopoles with embedded out-of-band rejection filters; (iv) analog receivers based on complex demodulation by double-balanced mixers, translating the HF spectrum to the audio band; (v) 24-bit analog-to-digital sigma-delta conversion at 12 kHz with 512x oversampling, followed by decimation to a final sampling frequency of 750 Hz. Except for the HF interference rejection filters, the electronics can operate between 3 and 50 MHz with no modification. At 13.5 MHz, 5 W transmit power, 15 min integration time, the high signal-to-noise ratio permits a typical range of 120 km for currents measurements with 8-antenna beam-forming. The University of Hawaii HFR

  11. Solid-state retrodirective phased array concepts for microwave power transmission from Solar Power Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, K. G.; Petroff, I. K.

    1980-01-01

    Two prototype solid-state phased array systems concepts for potential use in the Solar Power Satellite are described. In both concepts, the beam is centered on the rectenna by means of phase conjugation of a pilot signal emanating from the ground. Also discussed is on-going solid-state amplifier development.

  12. Progress and prospects of silicon-based design for optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Weiwei; Peng, Chao; Chang-Hasnain, Connie

    2016-03-01

    The high-speed, high-efficient, compact phase modulator array is indispensable in the Optical-phased array (OPA) which has been considered as a promising technology for realizing flexible and efficient beam steering. In our research, two methods are presented to utilize high-contrast grating (HCG) as high-efficient phase modulator. One is that HCG possesses high-Q resonances that origins from the cancellation of leaky waves. As a result, sharp resonance peaks appear on the reflection spectrum thus HCGs can be utilized as efficient phase shifters. Another is that low-Q mode HCG is utilized as ultra-lightweight mirror. With MEMS technology, small HCG displacement (~50 nm) leads to large phase change (~1.7π). Effective beam steering is achieved in Connie Chang-Hasnian's group. On the other hand, we theoretically and experimentally investigate the system design for silicon-based optical phased array, including the star coupler, phased array, emission elements and far-field patterns. Further, the non-uniform optical phased array is presented.

  13. Control, Filtering and Prediction for Phased Arrays in Directed Energy Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    AFRL /RDLT 3550 Aberdeen Ave SE Kirtland AFB, NM 87117... AFRL /RVIL Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 1 cy Dan Maker Official Record Copy AFRL /RDLT 1 cy ... AFRL -RD-PS- AFRL -RD-PS- TR-2016-0029 TR-2016-0029 CONTROL, FILTERING AND PREDICTION FOR PHASED ARRAYS IN DIRECTED ENERGY SYSTEMS Steve

  14. Advanced Signaling Strategies for the Hybrid MIMO Phased-Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Multiple - Input Multiple Output , or MIMO , radar systems are next-generation radar systems with... Multiple - Input Multiple Output ( MIMO ) radar. A HMPAR comprises a large number MP, of T/R elements, organized into M subarrays of P elements each. Within...multisensor radar architecture that combines elements of traditional phased-array radar with the emerging technology of Multiple - Input Multiple Out-

  15. An RF phased array applicator designed for hyperthermia breast cancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liyong; McGough, Robert J; Arabe, Omar Ali; Samulski, Thaddeus V

    2006-01-07

    An RF phased array applicator has been constructed for hyperthermia treatments in the intact breast. This RF phased array consists of four antennas mounted on a Lexan water tank, and geometric focusing is employed so that each antenna points in the direction of the intended target. The operating frequency for this phased array is 140 MHz. The RF array has been characterized both by electric field measurements in a water tank and by electric field simulations using the finite-element method. The finite-element simulations are performed with HFSS software, where the mesh defined for finite-element calculations includes the geometry of the tank enclosure and four end-loaded dipole antennas. The material properties of the water tank enclosure and the antennas are also included in each simulation. The results of the finite-element simulations are compared to the measured values for this configuration, and the results, which include the effects of amplitude shading and phase shifting, show that the electric field predicted by finite-element simulations is similar to the measured field. Simulations also show that the contributions from standing waves are significant, which is consistent with measurement results. Simulated electric field and bio-heat transfer results are also computed within a simple 3D breast model. Temperature simulations show that, although peak temperatures are generated outside the simulated tumour target, this RF phased array applicator is an effective device for regional hyperthermia in the intact breast.

  16. A prototype high-speed optically-steered X-band phased array antenna.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengfei; Tang, Suning; Raible, Daniel E

    2013-12-30

    We develop a prototype of optically-steered X-band phased array antenna with capabilities of multi-band and multi-beam operations. It exploits high-speed wavelength tunable lasers for optical true-time delays over a dispersive optical fiber link, enabling agile, broadband and vibration-free RF beam steering with large angle.

  17. Two dimensional thermo-optic beam steering using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahon, Rita; Preussner, Marcel W.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Kozak, Dmitry A.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Murphy, James L.

    2016-03-01

    Components for free space optical communication terminals such as lasers, amplifiers, and receivers have all seen substantial reduction in both size and power consumption over the past several decades. However, pointing systems, such as fast steering mirrors and gimbals, have remained large, slow and power-hungry. Optical phased arrays provide a possible solution for non-mechanical beam steering devices that can be compact and lower in power. Silicon photonics is a promising technology for phased arrays because it has the potential to scale to many elements and may be compatible with CMOS technology thereby enabling batch fabrication. For most free space optical communication applications, two-dimensional beam steering is needed. To date, silicon photonic phased arrays have achieved two-dimensional steering by combining thermo-optic steering, in-plane, with wavelength tuning by means of an output grating to give angular tuning, out-of-plane. While this architecture might work for certain static communication links, it would be difficult to implement for moving platforms. Other approaches have required N2 controls for an NxN element phased array, which leads to complexity. Hence, in this work we demonstrate steering using the thermo-optic effect for both dimensions with a simplified steering mechanism requiring only two control signals, one for each steering dimension.

  18. Through Weld Inspection of Wrought Stainless Steel Piping Using Phased-Array Ultrasonic Probes.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2004-08-05

    A study was conducted to assess the ability of phased-array ultrasonic techniques to detect and accurately determine the size of flaws from the far-side of wrought austenitic piping welds. Far-side inspections of these welds are currently performed on a “best effort” basis and do not conform to ASME Code Section XI Appendix VIII performance demonstration requirements. For this study, four circumferential welds in 610mm diameter, 36mm thick ASTM A-358, Grade 304 vintage austenitic stainless steel pipe were examined. The welds were fabricated with varied welding parameters; both horizontal and vertical pipe orientations were used, with air and water backing, to simulate field welding conditions. A series of saw cuts, electro-discharge machined (EDM) notches, and implanted fatigue cracks were placed into the heat affected zones of the welds. The saw cuts and notches range in depth from 7.5% to 28.4% through-wall. The implanted cracks ranged in depth from 5% through wall to 64% through wall. The welds were examined with two phased-array probes, a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive longitudinal wave array and a 2.0 MHz transmit-receive shear wave array. These examinations showed that both phased-array transducers were able to detect and accurately length-size, but not depth size, all of the notches and flaws through the welds. The phased-array results were not strongly affected by the different welding techniques used in each weld.

  19. A 24-GHz portable FMCW radar with continuous beam steering phased array (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhengyu; Li, Changzhi

    2017-05-01

    A portable 24-GHz frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) radar with continuous beam steering phased array is presented. This board-level integrated radar system consists of a phased array antenna, a radar transceiver and a baseband. The phased array used by the receiver is a 4-element linear array. The beam of the phased array can be continuously steered with a range of ±30° on the H-plane through an array of vector controllers. The vector controller is based on the concept of vector sum with binary-phase-shift attenuators. Each vector controller is capable of independently controlling the phase and the amplitude of each element of the linear array. The radar transceiver is based on the six-port technique. A free-running voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) is controlled by an analog "sawtooth" voltage generator to produce frequency-modulated chirp signal. This chirp signal is used as the transmitter signal, as well as the local oscillator (LO) signal to drive the six-port circuit. The transmitter antenna is a single patch antenna. In the baseband, the beat signal of the FMCW radar is detected by the six-port circuit and then processed by a laptop in real time. Experiments have been performed to reveal the capabilities of the proposed radar system for applications including indoor inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, vital sign detection, and short-range navigation, etc. (This abstract is for the profiles session.)

  20. Real-time B-scan ultrasonic imaging using a digital phased array system for NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunki-Jacobs, Robert; Thomas, Lewis

    A demonstration is presented of the ability to produce real-time images of metals on the basis of a phased-array ultrasound system. Attention is given to the critical role played by a beam-former. It is established that the present imaging system's resolution approaches the theoretical capabilities of the given aperture size and wavelength.

  1. Comparison of RF Photonics-Based Beamformers for Super-Wide Bandwidth Phased Array Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, M.; Sigov, A.; Tyschuk, Y.; Golovin, V.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate the NI AWRDE E-CAD tool-based simulation experiments to compare the three arrangements of photonic beam forming networks. The results confirm clearly the benefits of the proposed arrangement based on combination of multichannel fiber Bragg grating and switchable optical delay lines providing super-wide operating bandwidth and the better economical characteristics of microwave-band phased array antennas.

  2. An RF phased array applicator designed for hyperthermia breast cancer treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liyong; McGough, Robert J.; Arabe, Omar Ali; Samulski, Thaddeus V.

    2006-01-01

    An RF phased array applicator has been constructed for hyperthermia treatments in the intact breast. This RF phased array consists of four antennas mounted on a Lexan water tank, and geometric focusing is employed so that each antenna points in the direction of the intended target. The operating frequency for this phased array is 140 MHz. The RF array has been characterized both by electric field measurements in a water tank and by electric field simulations using the finite-element method. The finite-element simulations are performed with HFSS software, where the mesh defined for finite-element calculations includes the geometry of the tank enclosure and four end-loaded dipole antennas. The material properties of the water tank enclosure and the antennas are also included in each simulation. The results of the finite-element simulations are compared to the measured values for this configuration, and the results, which include the effects of amplitude shading and phase shifting, show that the electric field predicted by finite-element simulations is similar to the measured field. Simulations also show that the contributions from standing waves are significant, which is consistent with measurement results. Simulated electric field and bio-heat transfer results are also computed within a simple 3D breast model. Temperature simulations show that, although peak temperatures are generated outside the simulated tumour target, this RF phased array applicator is an effective device for regional hyperthermia in the intact breast.

  3. Printed-Circuit Cross-Slot Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foy, Wong; Chung, Hsien-Hsien; Peng, Sheng Y.

    1990-01-01

    Coupling between perpendicular slots suppressed. Balanced feed configuration minimizes coupling between slots of printed-circuit cross-slot antenna unit. Unit and array have conventional cavity-backed-printed-circuit, crossed-slot antenna design. Strip-line feeders behind planar conductive antenna element deliver power to horizontal slot in opposite phase. As result, little or no power propagates into vertical slot. Similar considerations apply to strip lines that feed vertical slot. Units of this type elements of phased-array antennas for radar, mobile/satellite communications, and other applications requiring flush mounting and/or rapid steering of beams with circular polarization.

  4. High-Sensitivity Phased Arrays for Radio Astronomy and Satellite Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diao, Junming

    Radio astronomy is used to study stars, galaxies, black holes and gas clouds radiation at radio frequencies. Detecting extremely weak signals from deep space radio sources requires high sensitive feed system associated with large dish antennas. The key figure of merit is survey speed, or the time required to map a region of the sky to a given source flux density. Survey speed is proportional to the frequency bandwidth, the field of view or observable region of the sky, and the squared sensitivity, where sensitivity is related to reflector aperture efficiency and system noise temperature. Compared to the traditional single feed, phased array feeds with significantly expanded field of view are considered as the next generation feed for radio telescope. This dissertation outlines the design, analysis and measurement of high sensitivity L-band and mm-wave phased array feeds for the 100-meter Green Bank Telescope. Theoretical works for radio astronomy includes design guideline for high sensitivity phased array feed, fundamental frequency bandwidth limit, array antenna loss influenced by mutual coupling and beamformer coefficients and possibility of superdirectivity for radio telescopes and other antennas. These study are helpful to understand and guide the design of a phased array feed system. In the absence of dish antennas, sparse phased arrays with aperiodic structure have been developed for satellite communications. A compromise between the peak side lobe level, array element density, directivity and design complexity is studied. We have found that the array peak side lobe level can be reduced by enhancing the array element direction at the main lobe direction, increasing the array element density and enlarging the array size. A Poynting streamline approach develops to understand the properties of a receiving antenna and the mutual coupling effects between array elements. This method has been successfully used to generate effective area shape for many types of

  5. Prostate cancer: comparison of local staging accuracy of pelvic phased-array coil alone versus integrated endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Local staging accuracy of prostate cancer using endorectal coil MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Fütterer, Jurgen J; Engelbrecht, Marc R; Jager, Gerrit J; Hartman, Robert P; King, Bernard F; Hulsbergen-Van de Kaa, Christina A; Witjes, J Alfred; Barentsz, Jelle O

    2007-04-01

    To compare the visibility of anatomical details and prostate cancer local staging performance of pelvic phased-array coil and integrated endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil MR imaging, with histologic analysis serving as the reference standard. MR imaging was performed in 81 consecutive patients with biopsy-proved prostate cancer, prior to radical prostatectomy, on a 1.5T scanner. T2-weighted fast spin echo images of the prostate were obtained using phased-array coil and endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Prospectively, one radiologist, retrospectively, two radiologists and two less experienced radiologists working in consensus, evaluated and scored all endorectal-pelvic phased-array imaging, with regard to visibility of anatomical details and local staging. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was performed. Anatomical details of the overall prostate were significantly better evaluated using the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil setup (P<0.05). The overall local staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the pelvic phased-array coil was 59% (48/81), 56% (20/36) and 62% (28/45), and for the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils 83% (67/81), 64% (23/36) and 98% (44/45) respectively, for the prospective reader. Accuracy and specificity were significantly better with endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils (P<0.05). The overall staging accuracy, sensitivity and specificity for the retrospective readers were 78-79% (P<0.05), 56-58% and 96%, for the endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils. Area under the ROC curve (Az) was significantly higher for endorectal-pelvic phased-array coils (Az=0.74) compared to pelvic phased-array coil (Az=0.57), for the prospective reader. The use of endorectal-pelvic phased array coils resulted in significant improvement of anatomic details, extracapsular extension accuracy and specificity. Overstaging is reduced significantly with equal sensitivity when an endorectal-pelvic phased-array coil is used.

  6. High-frequency Rayleigh-wave method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.; Luo, Y.; Chen, C.; Liu, J.; Ivanov, J.; Zeng, C.

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (???2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannel recording system have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave techniques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a non-invasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  7. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  8. High frequency dynamic pressure calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, P. A.; Zasimowich, R. F.

    A high frequency dynamic calibration technique for pressure transducers has been developed using a siren pressure generator (SPG). The SPG is an inlet-area-modulated device generating oscillating waveforms with dynamic pressure amplitudes up to 58.6 kPa (8.5 psi) in a frequency range of 1 to 10 kHz. A description of the generator, its operating characteristics and instrumentation used for pressure amplitude and frequency measurements is given. Waveform oscillographs and spectral analysis of the pressure transducers' output signals are presented.

  9. RF Breakdown in High Frequency Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Doebert, S

    2004-05-27

    RF breakdown in high-frequency accelerators appears to limit the maximum achievable gradient as well as the reliability of such devices. Experimental results from high power tests, obtained mostly in the framework of the NLC/GLC project at 11 GHz and from the CLIC study at 30 GHz, will be used to illustrate the important issues. The dependence of the breakdown phenomena on rf pulse length, operating frequency and fabrication material will be described. Since reliability is extremely important for large scale accelerators such as a linear collider, the measurements of breakdown rate as a function of the operating gradient will be highlighted.

  10. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  11. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  12. Inverter design for high frequency power distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    A class of simple resonantly commutated inverters are investigated for use in a high power (100 KW - 1000 KW) high frequency (10 KHz - 20 KHz) AC power distribution system. The Mapham inverter is found to provide a unique combination of large thyristor turn-off angle and good utilization factor, much better than an alternate 'current-fed' inverter. The effects of loading the Mapham inverter entirely with rectifier loads are investigated by simulation and with an experimental 3 KW 20 KHz inverter. This inverter is found to be well suited to a power system with heavy rectifier loading.

  13. Leaf Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles W.

    1985-01-01

    Using many different media, students can turn leaves into images which can be used for study, bulletin boards, collections, and identification. The simple techniques described include pastel printing, smoke prints, ink or tempura printing, bleach printing on t-shirts, ditto machine printing using carbon paper, and making cutouts. (DH)

  14. Leaf Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Charles W.

    1985-01-01

    Using many different media, students can turn leaves into images which can be used for study, bulletin boards, collections, and identification. The simple techniques described include pastel printing, smoke prints, ink or tempura printing, bleach printing on t-shirts, ditto machine printing using carbon paper, and making cutouts. (DH)

  15. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  16. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  17. High-Frequency Fluctuations During Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara-Almonte, J.; Ji, H.; Daughton, W. S.; Roytershteyn, V.; Yamada, M.; Yoo, J.; Fox, W. R., II

    2014-12-01

    During collisionless reconnection, the decoupling of the field from the plasma is known to occur only within the localized ion and electron diffusion regions, however predictions from fully kinetic simulations do not agree with experimental observations on the size of the electron diffusion region, implying differing reconnection mechanisms. Previous experiments, along with 2D and 3D simulations, have conclusively shown that this discrepancy cannot be explained by either classical collisions or Lower-Hybrid Drift Instability (Roytershtyn 2010, 2013). Due to computational limitations, however, previous simulations were constrained to have minimal scale separation between the electron skin depth and the Debye length (de/λD ~ 10), much smaller than in experiments (de/λD ~ 300). This lack of scale-separation can drastically modify the electrostatic microphysics within the diffusion layer. Using 3D, fully explicit kinetic simulations with a realistic and unprecedentedly large separation between the Debye length and the electron skin depth, de/λD = 64, we show that high frequency electrostatic waves (ω >> ωLH) can exist within the electron diffusion region. These waves generate small-scale turbulence within the electron diffusion region which acts to broaden the layer. Anomalous resistivity is also generated by the turbulence and significantly modifies the force balance. In addition to simulation results, initial experimental measurements of high frequency fluctuations (electrostatic and electromagnetic, f ≤ 1 GHz) in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) will be presented.

  18. High Frequency Plasma Generators for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divergilio, W. F.; Goede, H.; Fosnight, V. V.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a one year program to experimentally adapt two new types of high frequency plasma generators to Argon ion thrusters and to analytically study a third high frequency source concept are presented. Conventional 30 cm two grid ion extraction was utilized or proposed for all three sources. The two plasma generating methods selected for experimental study were a radio frequency induction (RFI) source, operating at about 1 MHz, and an electron cyclotron heated (ECH) plasma source operating at about 5 GHz. Both sources utilize multi-linecusp permanent magnet configurations for plasma confinement. The plasma characteristics, plasma loading of the rf antenna, and the rf frequency dependence of source efficiency and antenna circuit efficiency are described for the RFI Multi-cusp source. In a series of tests of this source at Lewis Research Center, minimum discharge losses of 220+/-10 eV/ion were obtained with propellant utilization of .45 at a beam current of 3 amperes. Possible improvement modifications are discussed.

  19. High frequency ultrasonic scattering by biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shung, K. Kirk; Maruvada, Subha

    2002-05-01

    High frequency (HF) diagnostic ultrasonic imaging devices at frequencies higher than 20 MHz have found applications in ophthalmology, dermatology, and vascular surgery. To be able to interpret these images and to further the development of these devices, a better understanding of ultrasonic scattering in biological tissues such as blood, liver, myocardium in the high frequency range is crucial. This work has previously been hampered by the lack of suitable transducers. With the availability of HF transducers going to 90 MHz, HF attenuation and backscatter experiments have been made on porcine red blood cell (RBC) suspensions, for which much data on attenuation and backscatter can be found in the literature in the lower frequency range for frequencies, from 30 to 90 MHz and on bovine tissues for frequencies from 10 to 30 MHz using a modified substitution method that allow the utilization of focused transducers. These results will be reviewed in this talk along with relevant theoretical models that could be applied to interpreting them. The relevance of the parameter that has been frequently used in the biomedical ultrasound literature to describe backscattering, the backscattering coefficient, will be critically examined.

  20. Protection circuitry for high frequency ultrasonic NDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaggares, N. Chris; Tang, Raymond K.; Sinclair, A. N., Prof.; Foster, F. S., Prof.; Haraierciwz, Kasia; Starkoski, Brian

    2000-05-01

    Most commercial ultrasonic NDE equipment employs a voltage spike to stimulate a piezoelectric transducer. To protect the signal processing unit from damage from this spike, a voltage limiter or "diode clamp" is included in the pulser-receiver, and limits the voltage reaching the amplifier or oscilloscope. In this project, the deleterious effects of such limiters on the ultrasonic echo in the high frequency (50-100 MHz range) have been quantified: these effects include significant distortion in the frequency content, and oscillations causing a drop in timing resolution by over a factor of 2. To address these problems, a high-voltage high-frequency switch has been designed to replace the voltage limiter; the switch directs the high-voltage spike away from the signal processing/display unit, towards an impedance-matched termination. A prototype circuit has been built, based on two high-voltage MOSFET's acting as a switch for the bi-polar stimulation pulse. The reduction in echo distortion and improvement in time resolution have been successfully modeled with the CAD tool HSPICE, although parasitic capacitance in the current generation of commercial MOSFET's is a continuing concern.

  1. Noise temperature in graphene at high frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengel, Raúl; Iglesias, José M.; Pascual, Elena; Martín, María J.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical method for obtaining the frequency-dependent noise temperature in monolayer graphene is presented. From the mobility and diffusion coefficient values provided by Monte Carlo simulation, the noise temperature in graphene is studied up to the THz range, considering also the influence of different substrate types. The influence of the applied electric field is investigated: the noise temperature is found to increase with the applied field, dropping down at high frequencies (in the sub-THz range). The results show that the low-frequency value of the noise temperature in graphene on a substrate tends to be reduced as compared to the case of suspended graphene due to the important effect of remote polar phonon interactions, thus indicating a reduced emitted noise power; however, at very high frequencies the influence of the substrate tends to be significantly reduced, and the differences between the suspended and on-substrate cases tend to be minimized. The values obtained are comparable to those observed in GaAs and semiconductor nitrides.

  2. A fast parallel imaging rotary phased array head coil with improved sensitivity profile deep in the center of the brain.

    PubMed

    Weber, Ewald; Li, Bing Keong; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    A new class of a receive-only 2T 4-element rotary phased array head coil has been proposed for MRI brain imaging applications. Coil elements of the rotary phased array head coil have "paddle-like" structures consisting of a pair of main conductors located on opposite sides, inserted equi-angularly around and over the head. Using such a unique design, the proposed rotary head coil can improve the sensitivity deep at the centre of the brain and produces highly homogeneous brain images. The rotary phased array head coil is numerically modeled using a hybrid MoM/FEM method and a prototype was constructed accordingly. In vivo MR brain imaging using the prototype rotary phased array head coil has been undertaken and the acquired brain images show high homogeneity as anticipated. In addition, parallel imaging, VD-GRAPPA, is used in conjunction with the rotary phased array head coil to enable rapid imaging.

  3. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    PubMed

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  4. Degradation of PAHs by high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Manariotis, Ioannis D; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V

    2011-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are persistent organic compounds, which have been reported in the literature to efficiently degrade at low (e.g. 20 kHz) and moderate (e.g. 506 kHz) ultrasound frequencies. The present study focuses on degradation of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and pyrene by ultrasound at three different relatively high frequencies (i.e. 582, 862, and 1142 kHz). The experimental results indicate that for all three frequencies and power inputs ≥ 133 W phenanthrene degrades to concentrations lower than our experimental detection limit (<1 μg/L). Phenanthrene degrades significantly faster at 582 kHz than at 862 and 1142 kHz. For all three frequencies, the degradation rates per unit mass are similar for naphthalene and phenanthrene and lower for pyrene. Furthermore, naphthalene degradation requires less energy than phenanthrene, which requires less energy than pyrene under the same conditions. No hexane-extractable metabolites were identified in the solutions.

  5. Computer modeling of tactical high frequency antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Bobby G., Jr.

    1992-06-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to compare the performance of three tactical high frequency antennas to be used as possible replacement for the Tactical Data Communications Central (TDCC) antennas. The antennas were modeled using the Numerical Electromagnetics Code, Version 3 (NEC3), and the Eyring Low Profile and Buried Antenna Modeling Program (PAT7) for several different frequencies and ground conditions. The performance was evaluated by comparing gain at the desired takeoff angles, the voltage standing wave ratio of each antenna, and its omni-directional capability. The buried antenna models, the ELPA-302 and horizontal dipole, were most effective when employed over poor ground conditions. The best performance under all conditions tested was demonstrated by the HT-20T. Each of these antennas have tactical advantages and disadvantages and can optimize communications under certain conditions. The selection of the best antenna is situation dependent. An experimental test of these models is recommended to verify the modeling results.

  6. High-frequency resonant-tunneling oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, E. R.; Parker, C. D.; Calawa, A. R.; Manfra, M. J.; Chen, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Advances in high-frequency resonant-tunneling-diode (RTD) oscillators are described. Oscillations up to a frequency of 420 GHz have been achieved in the GaAs/AlAs system. Recent results obtained with In0.53Ga0.47As/AlAs and InAs/AlSb RTDs show a greatly increased power density and indicate the potential for fundamental oscillations up to about 1 THz. These results are consistent with a lumped-element equivalent circuit model of the RTD. The model shows that the maximum oscillation frequency of the GaAs/AlAs RTDs is limited primarily by series resistance, and that the power density is limited by low peak-to-valley current ratio.

  7. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, C.T.

    1981-02-08

    This paper is intended as a survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma. We are rapidly approaching an era when this subject will become important in the laboratory. For pedagogical reasons we have chosen to examine plasma processes by relating them to a particular reference plasma which will consist of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT=1 KeV (10/sup 70/K) and an electron density N = 3 x 10/sup 23/cm/sup -3/, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cm/sup 3/ and an ion density N/sub i/ = 5 x 10/sup 22/ cm/sup -3/). We will consider the transport in such a plasma of photons ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy. Such photons will probably be frequently used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  8. High-frequency micromechanical columnar resonators

    PubMed Central

    Kehrbusch, Jenny; Ilin, Elena A; Bozek, Peter; Radzio, Bernhard; Oesterschulze, Egbert

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency silicon columnar microresonators are fabricated using a simple but effective technological scheme. An optimized fabrication scheme was invented to obtain mechanically protected microcolumns with lateral dimensions controlled on a scale of at least 1 μm. In this paper, we investigate the influence of the environmental conditions on the mechanical resonator properties. At ambient conditions, we observed a frequency stability δf/f of less than 10−6 during 5 h of operation at almost constant temperature. However, varying the temperature shifts the frequency by approximately −173 Hz °C− 1. In accordance with a viscous damping model of the ambient gas, we perceived that the quality factor of the first flexural mode decreased with the inverse of the square root of pressure. However, in the low-pressure regime, a linear dependence was observed. We also investigated the influence of the type of the immersing gas on the resonant frequency. PMID:27877296

  9. High-Frequency Mechanostimulation of Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Kadem, Laith F; Suana, K Grace; Holz, Michelle; Wang, Wei; Westerhaus, Hannes; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2017-01-02

    Cell adhesion is regulated by molecularly defined protein interactions and by mechanical forces, which can activate a dynamic restructuring of adhesion sites. Previous attempts to explore the response of cell adhesion to forces have been limited to applying mechanical stimuli that involve the cytoskeleton. In contrast, we here apply a new, oscillatory type of stimulus through push-pull azobenzenes. Push-pull azobenzenes perform a high-frequency, molecular oscillation upon irradiation with visible light that has frequently been applied in polymer surface relief grating. We here use these oscillations to address single adhesion receptors. The effect of molecular oscillatory forces on cell adhesion has been analyzed using single-cell force spectroscopy and gene expression studies. Our experiments demonstrate a reinforcement of cell adhesion as well as upregulated expression levels of adhesion-associated genes as a result of the nanoscale "tickling" of integrins. This novel type of mechanical stimulus provides a previously unprecedented molecular control of cellular mechanosensing.

  10. High-frequency ultrasonic wire bonding systems

    PubMed

    Tsujino; Yoshihara; Sano; Ihara

    2000-03-01

    The vibration characteristics of longitudinal-complex transverse vibration systems with multiple resonance frequencies of 350-980 kHz for ultrasonic wire bonding of IC, LSI or electronic devices were studied. The complex vibration systems can be applied for direct welding of semiconductor tips (face-down bonding, flip-chip bonding) and packaging of electronic devices. A longitudinal-complex transverse vibration bonding system consists of a complex transverse vibration rod, two driving longitudinal transducers 7.0 mm in diameter and a transverse vibration welding tip. The vibration distributions along ceramic and stainless-steel welding tips were measured at up to 980 kHz. A high-frequency vibration system with a height of 20.7 mm and a weight of less than 15 g was obtained.

  11. Fundamentals of bipolar high-frequency surgery.

    PubMed

    Reidenbach, H D

    1993-04-01

    In endoscopic surgery a very precise surgical dissection technique and an efficient hemostasis are of decisive importance. The bipolar technique may be regarded as a method which satisfies both requirements, especially regarding a high safety standard in application. In this context the biophysical and technical fundamentals of this method, which have been known in principle for a long time, are described with regard to the special demands of a newly developed field of modern surgery. After classification of this method into a general and a quasi-bipolar mode, various technological solutions of specific bipolar probes, in a strict and in a generalized sense, are characterized in terms of indication. Experimental results obtained with different bipolar instruments and probes are given. The application of modern microprocessor-controlled high-frequency surgery equipment and, wherever necessary, the integration of additional ancillary technology into the specialized bipolar instruments may result in most useful and efficient tools of a key technology in endoscopic surgery.

  12. ELF/VLF phased array generation via frequency-matched steering of a continuous HF ionospheric heating beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Morris Bernard

    The radio spectrum between 300 Hz and 10 kHz (ELF/VLF) has broad applications to global communication, remote sensing of the ionosphere and magnetosphere, and subterranean prospecting. While lightning is a dominant source of these radio waves, artificial generation of these waves has posed an enduring challenge to scientists and engineers, due to the extremely long wavelengths (30-1000 km) and the lossiness of the Earth's surface at these frequencies. Recently, ELF/VLF waves have been successfully generated by high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) heating of the lower ionosphere (60-100 km altitude), which changes the atmospheric plasma conductivity. In the presence of natural currents such as the auroral electrojet, ON-OFF modulation of this HF energy can impose an ELF/VLF alternating current onto those natural currents. This technique turns the lower atmosphere into a large antenna, which radiates energy downward into the Earth-ionosphere waveguide and upward into the magnetosphere. While this technique remains one of the few means of reliable ELF/VLF wave generation, HF to ELF/VLF conversion efficiencies remain quite low. Utilizing the 3.6 MW HAARP HF heating facility in Alaska, we show that proper utilization of motion of the HF beam can boost the generated ELF/VLF wave power by as much as tenfold. Furthermore, as a result of having effectively created the world's first controllable large-element ELF/VLF phased array, directional launching of this energy becomes possible. We utilize theoretical models of the HF heating and cooling process, and of ELF/VLF wave propagation, to illuminate the observations and identify the physical mechanisms underlying the wave generation, particularly as it relates to motion of the HF beam.

  13. Software for Displaying High-Frequency Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Jason L.

    2003-01-01

    An easy-to-use, intuitive computer program was written to satisfy a need of test operators and data requestors to quickly view and manipulate high-frequency test data recorded at the East and West Test Areas at Marshall Space Flight Center. By enabling rapid analysis, this program makes it possible to reduce times between test runs, thereby potentially reducing the overall cost of test operations. The program can be used to perform quick frequency analysis, using multiple fast- Fourier-transform windowing and amplitude options. The program can generate amplitude-versus-time plots with full zoom capabilities, frequency-component plots at specified time intervals, and waterfall plots (plots of spectral intensity versus frequency at successive small time intervals, showing the changing frequency components over time). There are options for printing of the plots and saving plot data as text files that can be imported into other application programs. The program can perform all of the aforementioned plotting and plot-data-handling functions on a relatively inexpensive computer; other software that performs the same functions requires computers with large amounts of power and memory.

  14. Modeling and simulation of ultrasound fields generated by 2D phased array transducers for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Matrone, G; Quaglia, F; Magenes, G

    2010-01-01

    Modern ultrasound imaging instrumentation for clinical applications allows real-time volumetric scanning of the patients' body. 4D imaging has been made possible thanks to the development of new echographic probes which consist in 2D phased arrays of piezoelectric transducers. In these new devices it is the system electronics which properly drives the matrix elements and focuses the beam in order to obtain a sequence of volumetric images. This paper introduces an ultrasound field simulator based on the Spatial Impulse Response method which is being properly developed to analyze the characteristics of the ultrasound field generated by a 2D phased array of transducers. Thanks to its high configurability by the user, it will represent a very useful tool for electronics designers in developing 4D ultrasound imaging systems components.

  15. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging of closed cracks using global preheating and local cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Koji; Ino, Yoshihiro; Yamanaka, Kazushi

    2015-10-01

    Closed cracks are the main cause of underestimation in ultrasonic inspection, because the ultrasound transmits through the crack. Specifically, the measurement of closed-crack depth in coarse-grained materials, which are highly attenuative due to linear scatterings at the grains, is the most difficult issue. To solve this problem, we have developed a temporary crack opening method, global preheating and local cooling (GPLC), using tensile thermal stress, and a high-selectivity imaging method, load difference phased array (LDPA), based on the subtraction of phased array images between different stresses. To demonstrate our developed method, we formed a closed fatigue crack in coarse-grained stainless steel (SUS316L) specimen. As a result of applying it to the specimen, the high-selectivity imaging performance was successfully demonstrated. This will be useful in improving the measurement accuracy of closed-crack depths in coarse-grained material.

  16. Evaluation of multiplexed PCR and liquid-phase array for identification of respiratory fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Daelynn R; Gu, Zhengming; Walsh, Thomas J; Hayden, Randall T

    2012-10-01

    Invasive fungal infections are the cause of serious morbidity and high mortality in immunocompromised patients. Early laboratory diagnostic options remain limited; however, rapid detection and accurate identification may improve outcome. Herein, multiplexed PCR followed by liquid-phase array was evaluated for detection and identification of common respiratory fungal pathogens, including Aspergillus fumigatus, Rhizopus microsporus, Scedosporium apiospermum and Fusarium solani. The limit of detection ranged 0.1-1 ng of DNA, depending on the fungus being tested. Primer cross-reactivity was seen for some fungi: Aspergillus flavus primers detected Aspergillus oryzae; Scedosporium apiospermum primers detected Paecilomyces lilacinus, and Aspergillus terreus primers detected S. apiospermum. PCR followed by liquid-phase array is potentially useful for the identification of clinically relevant fungal pathogens.

  17. Two-dimensional analytic modeling of acoustic diffraction for ultrasonic beam steering by phased array transducers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiansi; Zhang, Chong; Aleksov, Aleksandar; Salama, Islam; Kar, Aravinda

    2017-04-01

    Phased array ultrasonic transducers enable modulating the focal position of the acoustic waves, and this capability is utilized in many applications, such as medical imaging and non-destructive testing. This type of transducers also provides a mechanism to generate tilted wavefronts in acousto-optic deflectors to deflect laser beams for high precision advanced laser material processing. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented for the diffraction of ultrasonic waves emitted by several phased array transducers into an acousto-optic medium such as TeO2 crystal. A simple analytic expression is obtained for the distribution of the ultrasonic displacement field in the crystal. The model prediction is found to be in good agreement with the results of a numerical model that is based on a non-paraxial multi-Gaussian beam (NMGB) model. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Grating lobes analysis based on blazed grating theory for liquid crystal optical-phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Cui, Guolong; Kong, Lingjiang; Xiao, Feng; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2013-09-01

    The grating lobes of the liquid crystal optical-phased array (LCOPA) based on blazed grating theory is studied. Using the Fraunhofer propagation principle, the analytical expressions of the far-field intensity distribution are derived. Subsequently, we can obtain both the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes. The derived analytical functions that provide an insight into single-slit diffraction and multislit interference effect on the grating lobes are discussed. Utilizing the conventional microwave-phased array technique, the intensities of the grating lobes and the main lobe are almost the same. Different from this, the derived analytical functions demonstrate that the intensities of the grating lobes are less than that of the main lobe. The computer simulations and experiments show that the proposed method can correctly estimate the locations and the intensities of the grating lobes for a LCOPA simultaneously.

  19. Design and Validation of Rugged Microwave Photonic Network for Phased-Array Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Manisha; Rai, J. K.; Sridhar, N.

    2015-11-01

    Military radar has the requirement of 24 × 7 operation in harsh environments with a high level of safety and integrity built in for equipment and personnel working with it. This article presents an application of a microwave photonic network for phased-array military radar. The design challenge is to realize faithful reproduction of the input microwave signals over extreme temperature and frequency ranges. Environmental testing has been carried out to validate the performance of the proposed microwave photonic network over 2-4 GHz and a temperature range of -20°C to +55°C. The result shows that the photonic network can be successfully utilized for phased-array radar.

  20. Optical techniques to feed and control GaAs MMIC modules for phased array antenna applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Anzic, G.; Kunath, R. R.; Connolly, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    A complex signal distribution system is required to feed and control GaAs monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) for phased array antenna applications above 20 GHz. Each MMIC module will require one or more RF lines, one or more bias voltage lines, and digital lines to provide a minimum of 10 bits of combined phase and gain control information. In a closely spaced array, the routing of these multiple lines presents difficult topology problems as well as a high probability of signal interference. To overcome GaAs MMIC phased array signal distribution problems optical fibers interconnected to monolithically integrated optical components with GaAs MMIC array elements are proposed as a solution. System architecture considerations using optical fibers are described. The analog and digital optical links to respectively feed and control MMIC elements are analyzed. It is concluded that a fiber optic network will reduce weight and complexity, and increase reliability and performance, but higher power will be required.

  1. Performance of a mmWave beamformed phased array system for indoor LOS communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, Kinnan; Xu, Huaping

    2016-11-01

    Millimeter waves (mmWaves) spectrum ranging from 30GHz to 300GHz is emerging as a potential solution to the bandwidth problem faced by the wireless communication now a days. The advancements in the antenna technology has enabled the fabrication of antenna arrays or phased array systems which when used with techniques like spatial multiplexing and beamforming has enabled the use of mmWaves for both indoor and outdoor communication systems by providing gain and selectivity. This has also opened the doors for its potential use in long range and cellular communications. The 60GHz band also know as the oxygen absorption band due to its higher attenuation and unlicensed operation is a good candidate for use in secure and confined communications. In this paper we have investigated the performance of a beamformed phased array system in the mmWave spectrum. The performance is measured for varying the source and noise location and compared for a Linear and Rectangular array.

  2. Feasibility of a multipurpose transceiver module for phased array radar and EW applications using RFIC technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sarawi, Said; Hansen, Hedley; Zhu, Yingbo

    2007-12-01

    Phased array antennas have a large number of civilian and military applications. In this paper we briefly review common approaches to an integrated implementation of radar and electronic warfare digital phase array module and highlight features that are common to both of these applications. Then we discuss how the promising features of the radio frequency integrated circuit (RFIC)-based technology can be utilized in building a transceiver module that meets the requirements of both radar and electronic warfare applications with minimum number of external components. This is achieved by researching the pros and cons of the different receiver architectures and their performance from the targeted applications point of view. Then, we survey current RFIC technologies and highlight the pros and cons of these technologies and how they impact the performance of the discussed receiver architectures.

  3. Combined doppler and phased-array echocardiographic estimation of cardiac output.

    PubMed

    Magnin, P A; Stewart, J A; Myers, S; von Ramm, O; Kisslo, J A

    1981-02-01

    The capability of a pulsed Doppler flowmeter combined with a phased-array imaging system to measure volume flow was tested in vitro and in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. The Doppler-phased-array system (DPA) was used to determine vessel diameter and a superimposed cursor was used to locate the range and angle of the Doppler sample volume. DPA estimates of continuous flow through tubing in a water tank correlated strongly (r = 0.99) with measured flow corresponding to physiologic ranges from 3-12 l/min. For pulsatile flow in a water tank, a correlation of r = 0.86 with measured flow was obtained, whereas DPA estimates of cardiac outputs compared with Fick estimates in the 11 patients produced a correlation of r = 0.83. These data indicate that estimates of cardiac output are possible using the DPA approach.

  4. Application of Ultrasonic Phased Array Technology to the Detection of Defect in Composite Stiffened-structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-Qi; Zhan, Li-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Composite stiffened-structure consists of the skin and stringer has been widely used in aircraft fuselage and wings. The main purpose of the article is to detect the composite material reinforced structure accurately and explore the relationship between defect formation and structural elements or curing process. Based on ultrasonic phased array inspection technology, the regularity of defects in the manufacture of composite materials are obtained, the correlation model between actual defects and nondestructive testing are established. The article find that the forming quality of deltoid area in T-stiffened structure is obviously improved by pre-curing, the defects of hat-stiffened structure are affected by the mandrel. The results show that the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology can be an effectively way for the detection of composite stiffened-structures, which become an important means to control the defects of composite and improve the quality of the product.

  5. Experimental characterization of ultrasonic phased arrays for the nondestructive evaluation of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, L.; Wooh, S.C.

    1999-02-01

    Novel ultrasonic phased arrays were developed and their feasibility was tested for assessing the condition of concrete structures. These sensors are based on low frequency ultrasound technology, which, to date, has been the preferred method for concrete testing. By combining multiple transducer elements in a linear configuration, dynamic phase focusing and steering of the ultrasound beam is possible. An automated testing assembly was used to assess the steering and focusing performance of the array in a cementitious medium. Experimental results demonstrate excellent steerability and accuracy when compared to the numerical simulation presented. The effective steering and focusing behavior in concrete signifies that phased arrays can be used as the primary imaging and scanning device for large scale concrete structures.

  6. Whole-machine calibration approach for phased array radar with self-test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Kai; Yao, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Jin-Chang; Yang, Jian

    2017-06-01

    The performance of the missile-borne phased array radar is greatly influenced by the inter-channel amplitude and phase inconsistencies. In order to ensure its performance, the amplitude and the phase characteristics of radar should be calibrated. Commonly used methods mainly focus on antenna calibration, such as FFT, REV, etc. However, the radar channel also contains T / R components, channels, ADC and messenger. In order to achieve on-based phased array radar amplitude information for rapid machine calibration and compensation, we adopt a high-precision plane scanning test platform for phase amplitude test. A calibration approach for the whole channel system based on the radar frequency source test is proposed. Finally, the advantages and the application prospect of this approach are analysed.

  7. DC electric field induced phase array self-assembly of Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavali, S.; Sachan, R.; Dyck, O.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we report the discovery of phase array self-assembly, a new way to spontaneously make periodic arrangements of metal nanoparticles. An initially random arrangement of gold (Au) or silver (Ag) nanoparticles on SiO2/Si substrates was irradiated with linearly polarized (P) laser light in the presence of a dc electric (E) field applied to the insulating substrate. For E fields parallel to the laser polarization (E \\parallel P), the resulting periodic ordering was single-crystal like with extremely low defect density and covered large macroscopic areas. The E field appears to be modifying the phase between radiation scattered by the individual nanoparticles thus leading to enhanced interference effects. While phase array behavior is widely known in antenna technology, this is the first evidence that it can also aid in nanoscale self-assembly. These results provide a simple way to produce periodic metal nanoparticles over large areas.

  8. Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C L; Trought, W S; von Ramm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1980-05-01

    Abdominal and obstetric applications of a dynamically focused phased array real time ultrasonic system are described. This work was performed utilising both the Thaumascan (two-dimensional, high resolution, actual time, ultrasound, multi-element array scanner) and the first commercial unit based on this system, the Grumman RT-400. Examples of normal and pathological anatomy are presented from over 300 examinations performed to date, including a series of 28 abdominal aortic aneurysms studied with the RT-400. Following electronic alterations in the Thaumascan with resultant improvement in the grey scale, prospective analyses in 86 obstetric and 23 abdominal examinations were undertaken. These studies indicate that fetal, intra-uterine, and abdominal structures can be rapidly and consistently imaged. The value of real time ultrasonic scanning in obstetric and abdominal examinations is illustrated. The principles of dynamically focused phased arrays are described, and the merits and limitations of these systems are discussed.

  9. Ultrasonic Phased Array Tools for Large Area Composite Inspection during Maintenance and Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habermehl, J.; Lamarre, A.; Roach, D.

    2009-03-01

    Aircraft manufacturers, maintenance service providers, and airline operators have recently started to use ultrasonic phased-array technology to ensure the quality of their composite parts during maintenance and manufacturing. Olympus NDT has developed various solutions with its phased-array instruments like the OmniScan PA and the Focus LT to meet the most demanding requirements. These tools combined with composite specific software features provide greater productivity with respect to scanning and defect characterization such as sizing while maintaining a high degree of reliability. This paper summarizes the advantages and the benefits obtained by the use of this technology on samples provided by the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center (AANC) operated by Sandia National Labs.

  10. Initial High-Power-CW-Laser Testing of Liquid-Crystal Optical Phased Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2010-1043 INITIAL HIGH-POWER-CW-LASER TESTING OF LIQUID-CRYSTAL OPTICAL PHASED ARRAYS Bert Whitaker OptiMetrics, Inc...Bert Whitaker (OptiMetrics, Inc.) Scott Harris (Flatiron Research, LLC) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 2003 5e. TASK NUMBER 11 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER...to a Carl Zeiss petrographic microscope. The crossed polarizers in this microscope highlighted the presence of LC material due to its birefringence

  11. Frequency-domain photoacoustic phased array probe for biomedical imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Telenkov, Sergey; Alwi, Rudolf; Mandelis, Andreas; Worthington, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    We report the development of a frequency-domain biomedical photoacoustic imaging system that utilizes a continuous-wave laser source with a custom intensity modulation pattern, ultrasonic phased array for signal detection, and processing coupled with a beam-forming algorithm for reconstruction of photoacoustic correlation images. Sensitivity to optical contrast was demonstrated using tissue-mimicking phantoms and in-vivo tissue samples.

  12. Holographic optical elements (HOEs) for true-time delays aimed at phased-array antenna applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ray T.; Li, Richard L.

    1996-05-01

    True time-delay beam steering in optical domain for phased-array antenna application using multiplexed substrate guided wave propagation is introduced. Limitations of practical true- time-delays are discussed. Aspects on making holographic grating couplers are considered. Finally, experimental results on the generation of 25 GHz broadband microwave signals by optical heterodyne technique and 1-to-30 massive substrate guided wave optical fanout with an uniform fanout intensity distribution are presented.

  13. The IMPACT Common Module - A Low Cost, Reconfigurable Building Block for Next Generation Phased Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-31

    their sub- components, have been application-tailored for a specific need set, volume- based pricing models have not been able to be leveraged to...The IMPACT Common Module – A Low Cost , Reconfigurable Building Block for Next Generation Phased Arrays Ted Hoffmann Rockwell Collins 400 Collins...Timescales (ACT) program. The goal of this program has been to develop a common technology base for Electronically Scanned Array (ESA) systems

  14. Experimental research on beam steering characteristics of liquid crystal optical phased array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Man; Cai, Jun; Xu, Hong; Wang, Xiangru; Wu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Beam steering characteristics of transmission liquid crystal optical phased array(LC-OPA) were measured using ultra precision electronic autocollimator. A continuous beam steering with a constant angular resolution in the order of 20 μrad is obtained experimentally from 0° to 6° based on the method of variable period grating (VPG).Meanwhile, the angular repeatability of less than 4 μrad (RMS) has been achieved.

  15. Improved light extraction from white organic light-emitting devices using a binary random phase array

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Yasuhisa Nishiwaki, Seiji; Hirasawa, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Hashiya, Akira; Wakabayashi, Shin-ichi; Suzuki, Masa-aki; Matsuzaki, Jumpei

    2014-02-10

    We have developed a binary random phase array (BRPA) to improve the light extraction performance of white organic light-emitting devices (WOLEDs). We demonstrated that the scattering of incoming light can be controlled by employing diffraction optics to modify the structural parameters of the BRPA. Applying a BRPA to the substrate of the WOLED leads to enhanced extraction efficiency and suppression of angle-dependent color changes. Our systematic study clarifies the effect of scattering on the light extraction of WOLEDs.

  16. Phased Array Ultrasound: Initial Development of PAUT Inspection of Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairigh, Ryan

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of Phased Array Ultrasound (PAUT) as a non-destructive examination method for Self Reacting Friction Stir Welds (SR-FSW). PAUT is the only NDE method which has been shown to detect detrimental levels of Residual Oxide Defect (ROD), which can result in significant decrease in weld strength. The presentation reviews the PAUT process, and shows the results in comparison with x-ray radiography.

  17. Microwave monolithic integrated circuit development for future spaceborne phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzic, G.; Kascak, T. J.; Downey, A. N.; Liu, D. C.; Connolly, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The development of fully monolithic gallium arsenide (GaAs) receive and transmit modules suitable for phased array antenna applications in the 30/20 gigahertz bands is presented. Specifications and various design approaches to achieve the design goals are described. Initial design and performance of submodules and associated active and passive components are presented. A tradeoff study summary is presented highlighting the advantages of distributed amplifier approach compared to the conventional single power source designs.

  18. Doppler Compensation for Airborne Non-Side-Looking Phased-Array Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Doppler Compensation for Airborne Non-Side- Looking Phased-Array Radar Yunhan Dong National Security...processing (STAP) algorithms developed for the radar operating in the side-looking mode cannot in general be directly applied to radar operating in non...Array Radar Executive Summary Australian Defence Force (ADF) has been equipped with the Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning and Control (AEW

  19. Measured Sensitivity of the First Mark II Phased Array Feed on an ASKAP Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chippendale, A. P.; Brown, A. J.; Beresford, R. J.; Hampson, G. A.; Macleod, A.; Shaw, R. D.; Brothers, M. L.; Cantrall, C.; Forsyth, A. R.; Hay, S. G.; Leach, M.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the measured sensitivity of CSIRO's first Mk. II phased array feed (PAF) on an ASKAP antenna. The Mk. II achieves a minimum system-temperature-over-efficiency T_{sys}/η of 78 K at 1.23 GHz and is 95 K or better from 835 MHz to 1.8 GHz. This PAF was designed for the Australian SKA Pathfinder telescope to demonstrate fast astronomical surveys with a wide field of view for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).

  20. The Application of Phased Array Ultrasonic Techniques for Inspection of Railway Axles from Their End Face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaptsis, D.; Cooper, I.; Boyle, K.; Nicholson, P. I.

    2011-06-01

    As part of the development of a non destructive testing (NDT) system combining complementary inspection techniques, an inspection system based on phased array ultrasonic testing (PAUT) for detection of transverse cracking in solid railway axles is being developed. This paper presents the initial study, which includes the PAUT experimental setup and the initial results obtained after testing the system on railway axle blocks. The inspection of solid axles from their axle end face is investigated.

  1. Cardiac imaging using a phased array ultrasound system. I. System design.

    PubMed

    vonRamm, O T; Thurstone, F L

    1976-02-01

    A new two-dimensional, real-time, high resolution ultrasound imaging system is described. This system uses a linear array of ultrasound transducers to generate tomographic images of the heart in a circular sector format. Phased array techniques allow rapid steering of the ultrasound beam so that images are produced at the rate of 20 per second, or more, while maintaining a resolution of 2-4 mm throughout the field of view.

  2. Equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction sizing with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic phased array transducers can be used to extend traditional time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) crack sizing, resulting in more quantitative information about the crack being obtained. Traditional TOFD yields a single length parameter, while the equivalent flaw time-of-flight diffraction crack sizing method (EFTOFD) described here uses data from multiple look-angles to fit an equivalent degenerate ellipsoid to the crack. The size and orientation of the equivalent flaw can be used to estimate the actual crack size.

  3. Comparison of steering angle and bandwidth for various phased array antenna concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonjour, Romain; Singleton, Matthew; Leuchtmann, Pascal; Leuthold, Juerg

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we compare different integratable ultra-fast tunable true-time delay concepts with respect to their performances in a phased array system. The performances of the schemes are assessed with respect to the supported range, i.e. the range within which beam steering for a given fractional bandwidth can be achieved with a gain flatness better than 3 dB. We also compare the array gain as of function of steering angle and fractional bandwidth.

  4. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M

    2016-09-07

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  5. System-Level Integrated Circuit (SLIC) Technology Development for Phased Array Antenna Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windyka, John A.; Zablocki, Ed G.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the efforts and progress in developing a 'system-level' integrated circuit, or SLIC, for application in advanced phased array antenna systems. The SLIC combines radio-frequency (RF) microelectronics, digital and analog support circuitry, and photonic interfaces into a single micro-hybrid assembly. Together, these technologies provide not only the amplitude and phase control necessary for electronic beam steering in the phased array, but also add thermally-compensated automatic gain control, health and status feedback, bias regulation, and reduced interconnect complexity. All circuitry is integrated into a compact, multilayer structure configured for use as a two-by-four element phased array module, operating at 20 Gigahertz, using a Microwave High-Density Interconnect (MHDI) process. The resultant hardware is constructed without conventional wirebonds, maintains tight inter-element spacing, and leads toward low-cost mass production. The measured performances and development issues associated with both the two-by-four element module and the constituent elements are presented. Additionally, a section of the report describes alternative architectures and applications supported by the SLIC electronics. Test results show excellent yield and performance of RF circuitry and full automatic gain control for multiple, independent channels. Digital control function, while suffering from lower manufacturing yield, also proved successful.

  6. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy.

  7. Detecting failed elements on phased array ultrasound transducers using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, Scott; Pye, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Aims Imaging faults with ultrasound transducers are common. Failed elements on linear and curvilinear array transducers can usually be detected with a simple image uniformity or ‘paperclip’ test. However, this method is less effective for phased array transducers, commonly used in cardiac imaging. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of failed elements could be detected through measurement of the resolution integral (R) using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom. Methods A 128-element paediatric phased array transducer was studied. Failed elements were simulated using layered polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as an attenuator and measurements of resolution integral were carried out for several widths of attenuator. Results All widths of attenuator greater than 0.5 mm resulted in a significant reduction in resolution integral and low contrast penetration measurements compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Conclusions Measurements of resolution integral and low contrast penetration both have the potential to be used as straightforward and inexpensive tests to detect failed elements on phased array transducers. Particularly encouraging is the result for low contrast penetration as this is a quick and simple measurement to make and can be performed with many different test objects, thus enabling ‘in-the-field’ checks. PMID:27482276

  8. Detecting failed elements on phased array ultrasound transducers using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Dan; Inglis, Scott; Pye, Stephen D

    2016-05-01

    Imaging faults with ultrasound transducers are common. Failed elements on linear and curvilinear array transducers can usually be detected with a simple image uniformity or 'paperclip' test. However, this method is less effective for phased array transducers, commonly used in cardiac imaging. The aim of this study was to assess whether the presence of failed elements could be detected through measurement of the resolution integral (R) using the Edinburgh Pipe Phantom. A 128-element paediatric phased array transducer was studied. Failed elements were simulated using layered polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tape as an attenuator and measurements of resolution integral were carried out for several widths of attenuator. All widths of attenuator greater than 0.5 mm resulted in a significant reduction in resolution integral and low contrast penetration measurements compared to baseline (p < 0.05). Measurements of resolution integral and low contrast penetration both have the potential to be used as straightforward and inexpensive tests to detect failed elements on phased array transducers. Particularly encouraging is the result for low contrast penetration as this is a quick and simple measurement to make and can be performed with many different test objects, thus enabling 'in-the-field' checks.

  9. Development of a Twin Crystal Membrane Coupled Conformable Phased Array for the Inspection of Austenitic Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J.; Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2011-06-01

    The inspection of welded austenitic stainless steel components can be challenging. Austenitic welds contain an anisotropic, inhomogeneous grain structure which causes attenuation, scattering and beam bending. The inspection of components where the weld cap has not been removed is even more difficult due to the irregularity of the surface geometry. A twin crystal membrane coupled device has now been produced containing two linear phased arrays positioned adjacent to one another within the same housing. The arrays are angled relative to one another so that the transducer provides a pseudo-focusing effect at a depth corresponding to the beam crossing point. This type of design is used to improve the signal to noise ratio of the defect response in comparison to simple linear phased array transducer designs and to remove an internal noise signal found in linear phased array devices. Experimental results obtained from the through weld inspection of an austenitic stainless steel component with an undressed weld cap using the twin crystal membrane device are presented. These results demonstrate that small lack of side wall fusion defects can be reliably detected in large complex structures.

  10. Development of a twin crystal membrane coupled conformable phased array for the inspection of austenitic welds

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, J.; Long, R.; Cawley, P.

    2011-06-23

    The inspection of welded austenitic stainless steel components can be challenging. Austenitic welds contain an anisotropic, inhomogeneous grain structure which causes attenuation, scattering and beam bending. The inspection of components where the weld cap has not been removed is even more difficult due to the irregularity of the surface geometry. A twin crystal membrane coupled device has now been produced containing two linear phased arrays positioned adjacent to one another within the same housing. The arrays are angled relative to one another so that the transducer provides a pseudo-focusing effect at a depth corresponding to the beam crossing point. This type of design is used to improve the signal to noise ratio of the defect response in comparison to simple linear phased array transducer designs and to remove an internal noise signal found in linear phased array devices. Experimental results obtained from the through weld inspection of an austenitic stainless steel component with an undressed weld cap using the twin crystal membrane device are presented. These results demonstrate that small lack of side wall fusion defects can be reliably detected in large complex structures.

  11. Image-guided ultrasound phased arrays are a disruptive technology for non-invasive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hynynen, Kullervo; Jones, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a non-invasive way of depositing acoustic energy deep into the body, which can be harnessed for a broad spectrum of therapeutic purposes, including tissue ablation, the targeting of therapeutic agents, and stem cell delivery. Phased array transducers enable electronic control over the beam geometry and direction, and can be tailored to provide optimal energy deposition patterns for a given therapeutic application. Their use in combination with modern medical imaging for therapy guidance allows precise targeting, online monitoring, and post-treatment evaluation of the ultrasound-mediated bioeffects. In the past there have been some technical obstacles hindering the construction of large aperture, high-power, densely-populated phased arrays and, as a result, they have not been fully exploited for therapy delivery to date. However, recent research has made the construction of such arrays feasible, and it is expected that their continued development will both greatly improve the safety and efficacy of existing ultrasound therapies as well as enable treatments that are not currently possible with existing technology. This review will summarize the basic principles, current statures, and future potential of image-guided ultrasound phased arrays for therapy. PMID:27494561

  12. A semiflexible 64-channel receive-only phased array for pediatric body MRI at 3T.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Grafendorfer, Thomas; Cheng, Joseph Y; Ning, Peigang; Rainey, Bob; Giancola, Mark; Ortman, Sarah; Robb, Fraser J; Calderon, Paul D; Hargreaves, Brian A; Lustig, Michael; Scott, Greig C; Pauly, John M; Vasanawala, Shreyas S

    2016-09-01

    To design, construct, and validate a semiflexible 64-channel receive-only phased array for pediatric body MRI at 3T. A 64-channel receive-only phased array was developed and constructed. The designed flexible coil can easily conform to different patient sizes with nonoverlapping coil elements in the transverse plane. It can cover a field of view of up to 44 × 28 cm(2) and removes the need for coil repositioning for body MRI patients with multiple clinical concerns. The 64-channel coil was compared with a 32-channel standard coil for signal-to-noise ratio and parallel imaging performances on different phantoms. With IRB approval and informed consent/assent, the designed coil was validated on 21 consecutive pediatric patients. The pediatric coil provided higher signal-to-noise ratio than the standard coil on different phantoms, with the averaged signal-to-noise ratio gain at least 23% over a depth of 7 cm along the cross-section of phantoms. It also achieved better parallel imaging performance under moderate acceleration factors. Good image quality (average score 4.6 out of 5) was achieved using the developed pediatric coil in the clinical studies. A 64-channel semiflexible receive-only phased array has been developed and validated to facilitate high quality pediatric body MRI at 3T. Magn Reson Med 76:1015-1021, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Phased-Array Method for the Ut-Inspection of French Rail Repairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brédif, P.; Plu, J.; Pouligny, P.; Poidevin, C.

    2008-02-01

    The SNCF (French National Railways) is repairing rails that have suffered surface damage. Gas inclusions present in repairs may induce cracking, which could affect the rail integrity. This paper presents a NDT phased-array method developed to detect and characterize small gas inclusions in the bulk of the repair. The method is based on the implementation of a contact phased-array transducer associated with a specific processing. The transducer is articulated to conform as much as possible to the nominal rail section. The use of a phased-array probe allows limitation of mechanical displacements to only one axis (along the longitudinal plane of the rail). Inspection in the plane perpendicular to the axis of the rail is performed through electronic commutation and beam steering. The data analysis is done using CIVA-Software. A processing based on ultrasonic field computation was developed. The method was experimentally assessed on real repairs in laboratory conditions. Experiments proved the capability of the method to detect, locate and categorize gas inclusions according to several ranges of size.

  14. K-Band Phased Array Developed for Low- Earth-Orbit Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anzic, Godfrey

    1999-01-01

    Future rapid deployment of low- and medium-Earth-orbit satellite constellations that will offer various narrow- to wide-band wireless communications services will require phased-array antennas that feature wide-angle and superagile electronic steering of one or more antenna beams. Antennas, which employ monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), are perfectly suited for this application. Under a cooperative agreement, an MMIC-based, K-band phased-array antenna is being developed with 50/50 cost sharing by the NASA Lewis Research Center and Raytheon Systems Company. The transmitting array, which will operate at 19 gigahertz (GHz), is a state-of-the-art design that features dual, independent, electronically steerable beam operation ( 42 ), a stand-alone thermal management, and a high-density tile architecture. This array can transmit 622 megabits per second (Mbps) in each beam from Earth orbit to small Earth terminals. The weight of the total array package is expected to be less than 8 lb. The tile integration technology (flip chip MMIC tile) chosen for this project represents a major advancement in phased-array engineering and holds much promise for reducing manufacturing costs.

  15. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    1990-01-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  16. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  17. Design of an optically controlled Ka-band GaAs MMIC phased-array antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunath, Richard R.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Claspy, Paul C.; Richard, Mark A.

    1990-06-01

    Phased array antennas long were investigated to support the agile, multibeam radiating apertures with rapid reconfigurability needs of radar and communications. With the development of the Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC), phased array antennas having the stated characteristics are becoming realizable. However, at K-band frequencies (20 to 40 GHz) and higher, the problem of controlling the MMICs using conventional techniques either severely limits the array size or becomes insurmountable due to the close spacing of the radiating elements necessary to achieve the desired antenna performance. Investigations were made that indicate using fiber optics as a transmission line for control information for the MMICs provides a potential solution. By adding an optical interface circuit to pre-existing MMIC designs, it is possible to take advantage of the small size, lightweight, mechanical flexibility and RFI/EMI resistant characteristics of fiber optics to distribute MMIC control signals. The architecture, circuit development, testing and integration of optically controlled K-band MMIC phased array antennas are described.

  18. Fast-pressure field calculations applied to large spherical ultrasound phased arrays designed for thermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaozheng; Wu, Liyong; McGough, Robert J.

    2005-04-01

    Large spherical ultrasound phased arrays are ideal for simulation studies of thermal therapy devices designed for noninvasive breast cancer treatments. In a spherical array, circular sources packed in a dense hexagonal arrangement facilitate the most efficient use of the available aperture. Circular sources are also preferred for simulations of large phased arrays because pressure fields are computed more rapidly for circular pistons than for any other transducer geometry. The computation time is further reduced for circular transducers with grid sectoring. With this approach, the grid of computed pressures is divided into several regions, and then grid sectoring applies more abscissas in regions where the pressure integral converges slowly and fewer abscissas where the integral converges rapidly. As a result, the peak value of the numerical error is roughly the same in each sector, so the maximum numerical error in the computed field is maintained while the computation time is significantly reduced. The grid sectoring approach is extended to three dimensions (3D) for pressure field calculations with spherical arrays. In 3D calculations, the sectors are represented by cones, and the intersections between the computational grid and these cones define the boundaries required for grid sectoring. When these cone structures are applied to spherical phased arrays, 3D grid sectoring calculations rapidly compute the pressure fields so that the time required for array design and evaluation is substantially reduced.

  19. The OSU self-phased array for propagation measurements using the 11.7 GHz CTS beacon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobold, D. M.; Hodge, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    A self phased array was developed for propagation measurements on an earth-space path. The 11.7 GHz CTS beacon was used as the signal source. The self phased array was used to measure angle of arrival as well as attenuation and scintillation statistics. The performance of the array is described, and sample data are presented. The tracking capability of the self phased array was also studied. This technique permits fully electronic, nonmechanical satellite tracking, thus simplifying unmanned operation and eliminating severe weather tracking constraints.

  20. Using Silver Nano-Particle Ink in Electrode Fabrication of High Frequency Copolymer Ultrasonic Transducers: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Decharat, Adit; Wagle, Sanat; Jacobsen, Svein; Melandsø, Frank

    2015-01-01

    High frequency polymer-based ultrasonic transducers are produced with electrodes thicknesses typical for printed electrodes obtained from silver (Ag) nano-particle inks. An analytical three-port network is used to study the acoustic effects imposed by a thick electrode in a typical layered transducer configuration. Results from the network model are compared to experimental findings for the implemented transducer configuration, to obtain a better understanding of acoustical effects caused by the additional printed mass loading. The proposed investigation might be supportive of identification of suitable electrode-depositing methods. It is also believed to be useful as a feasibility study for printed Ag-based electrodes in high frequency transducers, which may reduce both the cost and production complexity of these devices. PMID:25903552

  1. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Vian, Alain; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Bonnet, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio) optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber) and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc.) are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor), and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight) after low power (i.e., nonthermal) HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism. PMID:26981524

  2. A High Frequency Model of Cascade Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    1998-01-01

    Closed form asymptotic expressions for computing high frequency noise generated by an annular cascade in an infinite duct containing a uniform flow are presented. There are two new elements in this work. First, the annular duct mode representation does not rely on the often-used Bessel function expansion resulting in simpler expressions for both the radial eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the duct. In particular, the new representation provides an explicit approximate formula for the radial eigenvalues obviating the need for solutions of the transcendental annular duct eigenvalue equation. Also, the radial eigenfunctions are represented in terms of exponentials eliminating the numerical problems associated with generating the Bessel functions on a computer. The second new element is the construction of an unsteady response model for an annular cascade. The new construction satisfies the boundary conditions on both the cascade and duct walls simultaneously adding a new level of realism to the noise calculations. Preliminary results which demonstrate the effectiveness of the new elements are presented. A discussion of the utility of the asymptotic formulas for calculating cascade discrete tone as well as broadband noise is also included.

  3. Extremely high-frequency therapy in oncology.

    PubMed

    Teppone, Mikhail; Avakyan, Romen

    2010-11-01

    This article represents a review of the literature, mainly from Russian sources, dealing with the therapeutic application of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation in the millimeter band applied to experimental and clinical oncology. At the early stage of these studies, efficacy and safety of millimeter electromagnetic radiation (extremely high frequency [EHF]) was proved for various types of malignant tumors. The majority of the further studies demonstrated the high efficacy and safety of millimeter wave radiation in treating patients suffering from both benign and malignant tumors. Developments led to treatment on skin melanoma, cancer of the ear-nose-throat, bowel and breast cancer, cancer of the uterus, lung, and stomach, solid tumors, as well as lymphoma. The main indications for this therapy are (1) preparation prior to radical treatment; (2) prevention and treatment of side-effects and complications from chemotherapy and radiotherapy; (3) prevention of metastases, relapses, and dissemination of the tumor; (4) treatment of the paraneoplastic syndrome; and (5) palliative therapy of incurable patients. In spite of the fact that not all mechanisms underlying effects of EHF therapy are known as yet, this therapeutic modality has been shown to have great potential in clinical oncology from studies performed in Eastern Europe and Russia.

  4. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  5. A high frequency electromagnetic impedance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha; Becker, Alex

    2003-01-15

    Non-invasive, high resolution geophysical mapping of the shallow subsurface is necessary for delineation of buried hazardous wastes, detecting unexploded ordinance, verifying and monitoring of containment or moisture contents, and other environmental applications. Electromagnetic (EM) techniques can be used for this purpose since electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity are representative of the subsurface media. Measurements in the EM frequency band between 1 and 100 MHz are very important for such applications, because the induction number of many targets is small and the ability to determine the subsurface distribution of both electrical properties is required. Earlier workers were successful in developing systems for detecting anomalous areas, but quantitative interpretation of the data was difficult. Accurate measurements are necessary, but difficult to achieve for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface. We are developing a broadband non-invasive method for accurately mapping the electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity of the shallow subsurface using an EM impedance approach similar to the MT exploration technique. Electric and magnetic sensors were tested to ensure that stray EM scattering is minimized and the quality of the data collected with the high-frequency impedance (HFI) system is good enough to allow high-resolution, multi-dimensional imaging of hidden targets. Additional efforts are being made to modify and further develop existing sensors and transmitters to improve the imaging capability and data acquisition efficiency.

  6. High-frequency plasma-heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brambilla, Marco; Lallia, Pascal

    1978-01-01

    An array of adjacent wave guides feed high-frequency energy into a vacuum chamber in which a toroidal plasma is confined by a magnetic field, the wave guide array being located between two toroidal current windings. Waves are excited in the wave guide at a frequency substantially equal to the lower frequency hybrid wave of the plasma and a substantially equal phase shift is provided from one guide to the next between the waves therein. For plasmas of low peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TE.sub.01 mode and the output electric field is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. For exciting waves in plasmas of high peripheral density gradient, the guides are excited in the TM.sub.01 mode and the magnetic field at the wave guide outlets is parallel to the direction of the toroidal magnetic field. The wave excited at the outlet of the wave guide array is a progressive wave propagating in the direction opposite to that of the toroidal current and is, therefore, not absorbed by so-called "runaway" electrons.

  7. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-03-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  8. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  9. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    PubMed

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date.

  10. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma-ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997.6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma-ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 deg of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 deg of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma-ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  11. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997-6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 degrees of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 degrees of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  12. High-Frequency Observations of Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, A. P.; Marchenko-Jorstad, S. G.; Mattox, J. R.; Wehrle, A. E.; Aller, M. F.

    2000-01-01

    We report on the results of high-frequency VLBA observations of 42 gamma ray bright blazars monitored at 22 and 43 GHz between 1993.9 and 1997-6. In 1997 the observations included polarization-sensitive imaging. The cores of gamma ray blazars are only weakly polarized, with EVPAs (electric-vector position angles) usually within 40 degrees of the local direction of the jet. The EVPAs of the jet components are usually within 20 degrees of the local jet direction. The apparent speeds of the gamma ray bright blazars are considerably faster than in the general population of bright compact radio sources. Two X-ray flares (observed with RXTE) of the quasar PKS 1510-089 appear to be related to radio flares, but with the radio leading the X-ray variations by about 2 weeks. This can be explained either by synchrotron self-Compton emission in a component whose variations are limited by light travel time or by the Mirror Compton model.

  13. [Genetic algorithm application to multi-focus patterns of 256-element phased array for focused ultrasound surgery].

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Wan, Mingxi; Lu, Mingzhu

    2008-10-01

    The genetic optimal algorithm and sound field calculation approach for the spherical-section phased array are presented in this paper. The in-house manufactured 256-element phased array focused ultrasound surgery system is briefly described. The on-axis single focus and off-axis single focus are simulated along with the axis-symmetric six-focus patter and the axis-asymmetric four-focus pattern using a 256-element phased array and the genetic optimal algorithm and sound field calculation approach. The experimental results of the described 256-element phased array focused ultrasound surgery system acting on organic glass and phantom are also analyzed. The results of the simulations and experiments confirm the applicability of the genetic algorithm and field calculation approaches in accurately steering three dimensional foci and focus.

  14. Development of phased array techniques to improve characterization of defect located in a component of complex geometry.

    PubMed

    Mahaut, Steve; Roy, Olivier; Beroni, Claude; Rotter, Bernhard

    2002-05-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of complex geometry components has to cope with different problems: limited access of the area assumed to be insonified, beam misorientation and distortions, loss of sensitivity. Those harmful effects can lead to inspection performance degradations, especially in terms of defect detection and characterization. Phased array techniques may be used to overcome such difficulties, as they can provide an optimal mastering of the ultrasonic beam radiated through the inspected component. This paper presents some applications of phased array inspections carried out by the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the French Company of Electricity (EDF) in the framework of R&D studies. Inspections of components with varying profile (of planar and cylindrical parts, misalignment and local depression), and containing artificial reflectors have been carried out with pulse echo immersion techniques, using standard and phased arrays transducers. Optimal delay laws have been applied to preserve the beam characteristics in spite of the varying profile geometry encountered as the phased array transducer was moved over the component. Those delay laws allow to efficiently compensate the beam distortions generated by the profile geometry. They were computed using a specific model and compared to experimental delays obtained using through transmission tests. Experimental and simulation results showed that the defect detection and characterization performances were greatly enhanced using phased array techniques. In the presented examples, with standard transducers, defects located below the irregular parts of the specimen were partially detected, in accurately located or even missed, whereas phased array inspections enabled to detect and locate all of these defects.

  15. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  16. High Frequency QRS ECG Accurately Detects Cardiomyopathy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Arenare, Brian; Poulin, Gregory; Moser, Daniel R.; Delgado, Reynolds

    2005-01-01

    High frequency (HF, 150-250 Hz) analysis over the entire QRS interval of the ECG is more sensitive than conventional ECG for detecting myocardial ischemia. However, the accuracy of HF QRS ECG for detecting cardiomyopathy is unknown. We obtained simultaneous resting conventional and HF QRS 12-lead ECGs in 66 patients with cardiomyopathy (EF = 23.2 plus or minus 6.l%, mean plus or minus SD) and in 66 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using PC-based ECG software recently developed at NASA. The single most accurate ECG parameter for detecting cardiomyopathy was an HF QRS morphological score that takes into consideration the total number and severity of reduced amplitude zones (RAZs) present plus the clustering of RAZs together in contiguous leads. This RAZ score had an area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) of 0.91, and was 88% sensitive, 82% specific and 85% accurate for identifying cardiomyopathy at optimum score cut-off of 140 points. Although conventional ECG parameters such as the QRS and QTc intervals were also significantly longer in patients than controls (P less than 0.001, BBBs excluded), these conventional parameters were less accurate (area under the ROC = 0.77 and 0.77, respectively) than HF QRS morphological parameters for identifying underlying cardiomyopathy. The total amplitude of the HF QRS complexes, as measured by summed root mean square voltages (RMSVs), also differed between patients and controls (33.8 plus or minus 11.5 vs. 41.5 plus or minus 13.6 mV, respectively, P less than 0.003), but this parameter was even less accurate in distinguishing the two groups (area under ROC = 0.67) than the HF QRS morphologic and conventional ECG parameters. Diagnostic accuracy was optimal (86%) when the RAZ score from the HF QRS ECG and the QTc interval from the conventional ECG were used simultaneously with cut-offs of greater than or equal to 40 points and greater than or equal to 445 ms, respectively. In conclusion 12-lead HF QRS ECG employing

  17. Development of a pseudo phased array technique using EMATs for DM weld testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, Adam C.; Fisher, Jay L.; Shiokawa, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Toshiaki; Horikoshi, Ryoichi; Ido, Nobukazu

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in piping with cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) has been an area ongoing research for many years given its prevalence in the petrochemical and nuclear industries. A typical inspection strategy for pipe welds is to use an ultrasonic phased array system to scan the weld from a sensor located on the outer surface of the pipe. These inspection systems generally refract either longitudinal or shear vertical (SV) waves at varying angles to inspect the weld radially. In DM welds, however, the welding process can produce a columnar grain structure in the CASS material in a specific orientation. This columnar grain structure can skew ultrasonic waves away from their intended path, especially for SV and longitudinal wave modes. Studies have shown that inspection using the shear horizontal (SH) wave mode significantly reduces the effect of skewing. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) are known to be effective for producing SH waves in field settings. This paper presents an inspection strategy that seeks to reproduce the scanning and imaging capabilities of a commercial phase array system using EMATs. A custom-built EMAT was used to collect data at multiple propagation angles, and a processing strategy known as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) was used to combine the data to produce an image. Results are shown using this pseudo phased array technique to inspect samples with a DM weld and artificial defects, demonstrating the potential of this approach in a laboratory setting. Recommendations for future work to transition the technique to the field are also provided.

  18. Development of a pseudo phased array technique using EMATs for DM weld testing

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, Adam C. Fisher, Jay L.; Shiokawa, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Toshiaki; Horikoshi, Ryoichi; Ido, Nobukazu

    2015-03-31

    Ultrasonic inspection of dissimilar metal (DM) welds in piping with cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) has been an area ongoing research for many years given its prevalence in the petrochemical and nuclear industries. A typical inspection strategy for pipe welds is to use an ultrasonic phased array system to scan the weld from a sensor located on the outer surface of the pipe. These inspection systems generally refract either longitudinal or shear vertical (SV) waves at varying angles to inspect the weld radially. In DM welds, however, the welding process can produce a columnar grain structure in the CASS material in a specific orientation. This columnar grain structure can skew ultrasonic waves away from their intended path, especially for SV and longitudinal wave modes. Studies have shown that inspection using the shear horizontal (SH) wave mode significantly reduces the effect of skewing. Electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) are known to be effective for producing SH waves in field settings. This paper presents an inspection strategy that seeks to reproduce the scanning and imaging capabilities of a commercial phase array system using EMATs. A custom-built EMAT was used to collect data at multiple propagation angles, and a processing strategy known as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) was used to combine the data to produce an image. Results are shown using this pseudo phased array technique to inspect samples with a DM weld and artificial defects, demonstrating the potential of this approach in a laboratory setting. Recommendations for future work to transition the technique to the field are also provided.

  19. Jet-Surface Interaction Test: Phased Array Noise Source Localization Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podboy, Gary G.

    2012-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect that a planar surface located near a jet flow has on the noise radiated to the far-field. Two different configurations were tested: 1) a shielding configuration in which the surface was located between the jet and the far-field microphones, and 2) a reflecting configuration in which the surface was mounted on the opposite side of the jet, and thus the jet noise was free to reflect off the surface toward the microphones. Both conventional far-field microphone and phased array noise source localization measurements were obtained. This paper discusses phased array results, while a companion paper discusses far-field results. The phased array data show that the axial distribution of noise sources in a jet can vary greatly depending on the jet operating condition and suggests that it would first be necessary to know or be able to predict this distribution in order to be able to predict the amount of noise reduction to expect from a given shielding configuration. The data obtained on both subsonic and supersonic jets show that the noise sources associated with a given frequency of noise tend to move downstream, and therefore, would become more difficult to shield, as jet Mach number increases. The noise source localization data obtained on cold, shock-containing jets suggests that the constructive interference of sound waves that produces noise at a given frequency within a broadband shock noise hump comes primarily from a small number of shocks, rather than from all the shocks at the same time. The reflecting configuration data illustrates that the law of reflection must be satisfied in order for jet noise to reflect off of a surface to an observer, and depending on the relative locations of the jet, the surface, and the observer, only some of the jet noise sources may satisfy this requirement.

  20. Phased-array cancellation of nonlinear FWM in coherent OFDM dispersive multi-span links.

    PubMed

    Nazarathy, Moshe; Khurgin, Jacob; Weidenfeld, Rakefet; Meiman, Yehuda; Cho, Pak; Noe, Reinhold; Shpantzer, Isaac; Karagodsky, Vadim

    2008-09-29

    We develop an analytic model of Coherent Optical Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) propagation and detection over multi-span long-haul fiber links, comprehensively and rigorously analyzing the impairments due the combined effects of FWM, Dispersion and ASE noise. Consistent with prior work of Innoe and Schadt in the WDM context, our new closed-form expressions for the total FWM received power fluctuations in the wake of dispersive phase mismatch in OFDM transmission, indicate that the FWM contributions of the multitude of spans build-up on a phased-array basis. For particular ultra-long haul link designs, the effectiveness of dispersion in reducing FWM is far greater than previously assumed in OFDM system analysis. The key is having the dominant FWM intermodulation products due to the multiple spans, destructively interfere, mutually cancelling their FWM intermodulation products, analogous to operating at the null of a phased-array antenna system. By applying the new analysis tools, this mode of effectively mitigating the FWM impairment, is shown under specific dispersion and spectral management conditions, to substantially suppress the FWM power fluctuations. Accounting for the phased-array concept and applying the compact OFDM design formulas developed here, we analyzed system performance of a 40 Gbps coherent OFDM system, over standard G.652 fiber, with cyclic prefix based electronic dispersion compensation but no optical compensation along the link. The transmission range for 10-3 target BER is almost tripled from 2560 km to 6960 km, relative to a reference system performing optical dispersion compensation in every span (ideally accounting for FWM and ASE noise and the cyclic prefix overhead, but excluding additional impairments).