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Sample records for prism-grating coupled surface

  1. Diffraction intensity analysis of a transmission prism grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Guosheng

    2010-11-01

    Because of the inherent structures, most common gratings always produce an unexpected loss of the input signal, which limits the use of gratings in many fields to some extent. Considering that, a design of grating with many periodical micro isosceles prisms is proposed. Based on the scalar diffraction theory, the transmittance is derived from the definition of an optical path when a parallel light passes through a singular prism element. And according to the multi-slit Fraunhofer diffraction, the expression of light intensity distribution for the prism grating on the frequency plane is deduced and analyzed by means of Fourier transform.

  2. Advanced prism-grating-prism imaging spectrograph in online industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaarala, Tapio; Aikio, Mauri; Keraenen, Heimo

    1997-08-01

    Imaging spectrographs have traditionally been utilized in aerial and remote sensing applications. A novel, compact and inexpensive imaging spectrograph developed by VTT Electronics is now available. It contains a multichannel fiber optic sensor head, a dispersive prism-grating-prism (PGP) component and digital CCD matrix camera capable of area integration. In rolled steel manufacturing, a protective oil film is applied on steel to resist corrosion while in transport and storage. The main problems in the oiling machine are film thickness control and jet failures. In this application, the spectrum of fluorescence of an oil film was measured simultaneously with parallel fibers. A relatively simple calibration and analysis procedure was used to calculate the oil film thickness. On-line color control for color reproduction is essential in both consumer and industrial products. The instrument was tested and analyzed for measuring differences in color by multivariate analysis of the spectra and by color space coordinate estimation. In general, a continuous spectrum is not absolute requirement. In these two examples, filter-based measurement would probably cost less thana PGP spectrograph solution. On the other hand, by measuring the spectrum and using an advanced signal processing algorithm one production version will cover all installations in both applications. In practice, only the fiber sensor mechanics need to be modified.

  3. Magnetoelectric coupling at metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Lukas; Yamada, T.K.; Balashov, T.; Takacs, A. F.; Wesselink, R.J.H.; Daene, Markus W; Fechner, M.; Ostanin, S.; Ernst, Arthur; Mertig, I.; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2010-10-01

    Magnetoelectric coupling allows the magnetic state of a material to be changed by an applied electric field. To date, this phenomenon has mainly been observed in insulating materials such as complex multiferroic oxides. Bulk metallic systems do not exhibit magnetoelectric coupling, because applied electric fields are screened by conduction electrons. We demonstrate strong magnetoelectric coupling at the surface of thin iron films using the electric field from a scanning tunnelling microscope, and are able to write, store and read information to areas with sides of a few nanometres. Our work demonstrates that high-density, non-volatile information storage is possible in metals.

  4. Optical emission from coupled surface plasmons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruhlke, R. W.; Holland, W. R.; Hall, D. G.

    1987-01-01

    Surface plasmons on opposite sides of a thin metal film surrounded by identical dielectrics interact to form coupled surface plasmons (CSP's). Corrugation of the metal film permits interaction of the CSP's with the radiation field. This paper reports the observation of optical emission from CSP's excited by the near-field coupling of molecules adjacent to a corrugated thin metal film embedded in photoresist.

  5. Exciton coupling of surface complexes on a nanocrystal surface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiangxing; Ji, Jianwei; Wang, Guan; You, Xiaozeng

    2014-08-25

    Exciton coupling may arise when chromophores are brought into close spatial proximity. Herein the intra-nanocrystal exciton coupling of the surface complexes formed by coordination of 8-hydroxyquinoline to ZnS nanocrystals (NCs) is reported. It is studied by absorption, photoluminescence (PL), PL excitation (PLE), and PL lifetime measurements. The exciton coupling of the surface complexes tunes the PL color and broadens the absorption and PLE windows of the NCs, and thus is a potential strategy for improving the light-harvesting efficiency of NC solar cells and photocatalysts.

  6. Designing coupled free-form surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hicks, R Andrew; Croke, Christopher

    2010-10-01

    The problem of designing optical systems that contain free-form surfaces is a challenging one, even in the case of designing a single surface. Here we present a method for the coupled design of two free-form reflective surfaces that will have a prescribed distortion. On one hand, the method can be described using traditional vectors and matrices, which we do, but it is motivated by viewing the problem in the language of distributions from differential geometry and makes use of the exterior differential systems, which we relegate to an appendix. Example applications are given to the design of a mirror pair that increases the field of view of an observer, a similar mirror pair that also rotates the observer's view, and a pair of mirrors that give the observer a traditional panoramic strip view of the scene.

  7. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  8. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  9. Surface-to-surface transition via electromagnetic coupling of coplanar waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Robert W.; Matolak, David W.

    1987-11-01

    A transition is investigated which couples coplanar waveguide on one substrate surface (a motherboard) to coplanar waveguide on another substrate surface (a semiconductor chip or subarray) placed above the first. No wire bonds are necessary. A full-wave analysis using coupled line theory is presented and verified experimentally. The use of this transition for coupling to millimeter-wave integrated circuits is discussed.

  10. Coupled land surface/hydrologic/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger; Steyaert, Lou; Arritt, Ray; Lahtakia, Mercedes; Smith, Chris; Ziegler, Conrad; Soong, Su Tzai; Avissar, Roni; Wetzel, Peter; Sellers, Piers

    1993-01-01

    The topics covered include the following: prototype land cover characteristics data base for the conterminous United States; surface evapotranspiration effects on cumulus convection and implications for mesoscale models; the use of complex treatment of surface hydrology and thermodynamics within a mesoscale model and some related issues; initialization of soil-water content for regional-scale atmospheric prediction models; impact of surface properties on dryline and MCS evolution; a numerical simulation of heavy precipitation over the complex topography of California; representing mesoscale fluxes induced by landscape discontinuities in global climate models; emphasizing the role of subgrid-scale heterogeneity in surface-air interaction; and problems with modeling and measuring biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of energy, water, and carbon on large scales.

  11. Land-surface atmosphere coupling in an earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vrese, Philipp; Hagemann, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between the atmosphere and the strongly heterogeneous land surface is one of the central scientific topics within Earth system sciences and especially climate research. Many processes, such as vegetation dynamics and the development of spatial patterns in the Subtropics and permafrost regions, take place on scales much below the scale of model resolution. Thus, it is an important scientific challenge to consider the influence of sub-scale heterogeneity on the vertical near-surface fluxes of energy and water. Most climate models do not take into account the actual scale of surface heterogeneities. When coupling a heterogeneous surface to the atmosphere often coupling methods are employed, which include the underlying assumption that the horizontal extent of the individual heterogeneity is so small that the turbulent vertical fluxes stemming from the different surface heterogeneities within one grid-box have mixed horizontally below the lowest model level of the atmosphere. This assumption allows a comparatively simple land-surface-atmosphere coupling with a horizontally homogeneous state of the atmosphere, but it may also be the source of significant errors. In order to access the extent of error introduced we designed an experiment in which the results of three different coupling schemes were compared. The first one is a parameter-aggregation scheme, the second a flux-aggregation scheme based on the assumption of a horizontally homogeneous atmosphere on the lowest atmospheric model level and the third one is a coupling scheme which allows, up to a given height, for the atmosphere to be horizontally heterogeneous within a grid-box. These coupling methods were implemented in the land-surface model JSBACH which was then coupled to the general circulation model ECHAM6, both part of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's earth system model MPI-ESM. In a first step sensitivity studies are being carried out to gain process understanding and to

  12. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frédéric; Beddar, A Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-01

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity. PMID:17022248

  13. Surface preparation and coupling in plastic scintillator dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ayotte, Guylaine; Archambault, Louis; Gingras, Luc; Lacroix, Frederic; Beddar, A. Sam; Beaulieu, Luc

    2006-09-15

    One way to improve the performance of scintillation dosimeters is to increase the light-collection efficiency at the coupling interfaces of the detector system. We performed a detailed study of surface preparation of scintillating fibers and their coupling with clear optical fibers to minimize light loss and increase the amount of light collected. We analyzed fiber-surface polishing with aluminum oxide sheets, coating fibers with magnesium oxide, and the use of eight different coupling agents (air, three optical gels, an optical curing agent, ultraviolet light, cyanoacrylate glue, and acetone). We prepared 10 scintillating fiber and clear optical fiber light guide samples to test different coupling methods. To test the coupling, we first cut both the scintillating fiber and the clear optical fiber. Then, we cleaned and polished both ends of both fibers. Finally, we coupled the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber in either a polyethylene jacket or a V-grooved support depending on the coupling agent used. To produce more light, we used an ultraviolet lamp to stimulate scintillation. A typical series of similar couplings showed a standard deviation in light-collection efficiency of 10%. This can be explained by differences in the surface preparation quality and alignment of the scintillating fiber with the clear optical fiber. Absence of surface polishing reduced the light collection by approximately 40%, and application of magnesium oxide on the proximal end of the scintillating fiber increased the amount of light collected from the optical fiber by approximately 39%. Of the coupling agents, we obtained the best results using one of the optical gels. Because a large amount of the light produced inside a scintillator is usually lost, better light-collection efficiency will result in improved sensitivity.

  14. Radiative decay engineering 3. Surface plasmon-coupled directional emission

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    A new method of fluorescence detection that promises to increase sensitivity by 20- to 1000-fold is described. This method will also decrease the contribution of sample autofluorescence to the detected signal. The method depends on the coupling of excited fluorophores with the surface plasmon resonance present in thin metal films, typically silver and gold. The phenomenon of surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) occurs for fluorophores 20–250 nm from the metal surface, allowing detection of fluorophores over substantial distances beyond the metal–sample interface. SPCE depends on interactions of the excited fluorophore with the metal surface. This interaction is independent of the mode of excitation; that is, it does not require evanescent wave or surface-plasmon excitation. In a sense, SPCE is the inverse process of the surface plasmon resonance absorption of thin metal films. Importantly, SPCE occurs over a narrow angular distribution, converting normally isotropic emission into easily collected directional emission. Up to 50% of the emission from unoriented samples can be collected, much larger than typical fluorescence collection efficiencies near 1% or less. SPCE is due only to fluorophores near the metal surface and may be regarded as emission from the induced surface plasmons. Autofluorescence from more distal parts of the sample is decreased due to decreased coupling. SPCE is highly polarized and autofluorescence can be further decreased by collecting only the polarized component or only the light propagating with the appropriate angle. Examples showing how simple optical configurations can be used in diagnostics, sensing, or biotechnology applications are presented. Surface plasmon-coupled emission is likely to find widespread applications throughout the biosciences. PMID:14690679

  15. Laser coupling effects on structural material under different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guobing; Wei, Chenghua; Wu, Lixiong; Chen, Linzhu; Lin, Xinwei; Zhang, Jianmin; Ma, Zhiliang

    2013-05-01

    The laser coupling effect of material is a fundamental factor to influence laser interaction with matter. The coupling coefficient, which is the material absorptance of the input laser energy, depends on the surface conditions of materials, such as temperature, incident angle, surface airflow, oxidizing environment, and so on. To measure the laser coupling characteristics of materials, two typical online measuring apparatuses were developed in our laboratory. One is based on a conjugated hemi-ellipsoidal reflectometer, which is suitable to measure the laser coupling coefficients of different temperature in vacuum and air environments. The other is based on an integrating sphere and a simple airflow simulator, which can be applied to online measure the laser absorptance of materials subjected to surface airflow. The laser coupling effects on two types of structural materials, which are alloy steels and composite materials, are given in this paper. With the conjugated ellipsoidal reflectometer, the laser coupling effects on a typical alloy steel are investigated in different temperatures under the vacuum and air environment, and the experimental results are analyzed. According the results, metal oxidization plays a key role in the laser coupling enhancement effects. Especially, when the metal is subjected to high power laser irradiation in the high subsonic airflow, metal oxidization which is an exothermic reaction enhances the laser damage effect and the convective heat loss is negligible. Finally, the laser coupling effects on a typical composite material subjected to airflow are studied by using the integrating sphere with an airflow simulator, and the experimental results of laser absorptance during the laser ablation are presented.

  16. Ab-initio modeling of electromechanical coupling at Si surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Sandra; Müller, Stefan; Michl, Anja; Weissmüller, Jörg

    2014-08-21

    The electromechanical coupling at the silicon (100) and (111) surfaces was studied via density functional theory by calculating the response of the ionization potential and the electron affinity to different types of strain. We find a branched strain response of those two quantities with different coupling coefficients for negative and positive strain values. This can be attributed to the reduced crystal symmetry due to anisotropic strain, which partially lifts the degeneracy of the valence and conduction bands. Only the Si(111) electron affinity exhibits a monotonously linear strain response, as the conduction band valleys remain degenerate under strain. The strain response of the surface dipole is linear and seems to be dominated by volume changes. Our results may help to understand the mechanisms behind electromechanical coupling at an atomic level in greater detail and for different electronic and atomic structures.

  17. Enhanced Electron-Phonon Coupling at Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Plummer, Ward E.

    2010-08-04

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) decouples electronic from nuclear motion, providing a focal point for most quantum mechanics textbooks. However, a multitude of important chemical, physical and biological phenomena are driven by violations of this approximation. Vibronic interactions are a necessary ingredient in any process that makes or breaks a covalent bond, for example, conventional catalysis or enzymatically delivered biological reactions. Metastable phenomena associated with defects and dopants in semiconductors, oxides, and glasses entail violation of the BOA. Charge exchange in inorganic polymers, organic slats and biological systems involves charge- induced distortions of the local structure. A classic example is conventional superconductivity, which is driven by the electron-lattice interaction. High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments are yielding new insight into the microscopic origin of electron-phonon coupling (EPC) in anisotropic two-dimensional systems. Our recent surface phonon measurement on the surface of a high-Tc material clearly indicates an important momentum dependent EPC in these materials. In the last few years we have shifted our research focus from solely looking at electron phonon coupling to examining the structure/functionality relationship at the surface of complex transition metal compounds. The investigation on electron phonon coupling has allowed us to move to systems where there is coupling between the lattice, the electrons and the spin.

  18. Geometrically nonlinear continuum thermomechanics with surface energies coupled to diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, A. T.; Javili, A.; Steinmann, P.; Bargmann, S.

    2011-10-01

    Surfaces can have a significant influence on the overall response of a continuum body but are often neglected or accounted for in an ad hoc manner. This work is concerned with a nonlinear continuum thermomechanics formulation which accounts for surface structures and includes the effects of diffusion and viscoelasticity. The formulation is presented within a thermodynamically consistent framework and elucidates the nature of the coupling between the various fields, and the surface and the bulk. Conservation principles are used to determine the form of the constitutive relations and the evolution equations. Restrictions on the jump in the temperature and the chemical potential between the surface and the bulk are not a priori assumptions, rather they arise from the reduced dissipation inequality on the surface and are shown to be satisfiable without imposing the standard assumptions of thermal and chemical slavery. The nature of the constitutive relations is made clear via an example wherein the form of the Helmholtz energy is explicitly given.

  19. Deriving Albedo from Coupled MERIS and MODIS Surface Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal; Jin, Yu-Fang; Lucht, Wolfgang; Strahler, Alan

    2004-01-01

    MERIS Level 2 surface reflectance products are now available to the scientific community. This paper demonstrates the production of MERIS-derived surface albedo and Nadir Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) adjusted reflectances by coupling the MERIS data with MODIS BRDF products. Initial efforts rely on the specification of surface anisotropy as provided by the global MODIS BRDF product for a first guess of the shape of the BRDF and then make use all of the coincidently available, partially atmospherically corrected, cloud cleared, MERIS observations to generate MERIS-derived BRDF and surface albedo quantities for each location. Comparisons between MODIS (aerosol-corrected) and MERIS (not-yet aerosol-corrected) surface values from April and May 2003 are also presented for case studies in Spain and California as well as preliminary comparisons with field data from the Devil's Rock Surfrad/BSRN site.

  20. Coupling surface and mantle dynamics: A novel experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca; Sembroni, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Recent modeling shows that surface processes, such as erosion and deposition, may drive the deformation of the Earth's surface, interfering with deeper crustal and mantle signals. To investigate the coupling between the surface and deep process, we designed a three-dimensional laboratory apparatus, to analyze the role of erosion and sedimentation, triggered by deep mantle instability. The setup is constituted and scaled down to natural gravity field using a thin viscous sheet model, with mantle and lithosphere simulated by Newtonian viscous glucose syrup and silicon putty, respectively. The surface process is simulated assuming a simple erosion law producing the downhill flow of a thin viscous material away from high topography. The deep mantle upwelling is triggered by the rise of a buoyant sphere. The results of these models along with the parametric analysis show how surface processes influence uplift velocity and topography signals.

  1. Strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and Sulforhodamine 101 dye

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and Sulforhodamine 101 dye molecules. Dispersion curves for surface plasmon polaritons on samples with a thin layer of silver covered with Sulforhodamine 101 molecules embedded in SU-8 polymer are obtained experimentally by reflectometry measurements and compared to the dispersion of samples without molecules. Clear Rabi splittings, with energies up to 360 and 190 meV, are observed at the positions of the dye absorption maxima. The split energies are dependent on the number of Sulforhodamine 101 molecules involved in the coupling process. Transfer matrix and coupled oscillator methods are used to model the studied multilayer structures with a great agreement with the experiments. Detection of the scattered radiation after the propagation provides another way to obtain the dispersion relation of the surface plasmon polaritons and, thus, provides insight into dynamics of the surface plasmon polariton/dye interaction, beyond the refrectometry measurements. PACS: 42.50.Hz, 33.80.-b, 78.67.-n PMID:22429311

  2. Extracting surface wave-coupled emission with subsurface dielectric gratings.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Dong; Zhang, Douguo; Chen, Yikai; Zhu, Liangfu; Han, Lu; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2014-08-01

    Conventional surface plasmons (SPs) or Bloch surface waves (BSWs) have a wave vector exceeding that of light in vacuum, and, therefore, the surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) or Bloch surface wave-coupled emission (BSWCE) cannot escape from the corresponding structures. With the aid of a high-refractive-index prism or an oil-immersion objective, the SPCE or BSWCE can be coupled into free space. But the large volumes of the prism and objective are certainly unfavorable for miniaturization of the optical systems or inconvenient for applications such as the optical displays. Here we experimentally demonstrate a new method to extract the SPCE or BSWCE with a subsurface dielectric grating. The experimental results verify that the chip-like substrate with two decorated sides can bring out the directional fluorescence emission in free space. The emitting direction and emitting patterns can be tuned by the period size and dimensionality of the gratings. Our work provides a new strategy to realize free-space directional fluorescence emission at a very low cost and compact configuration, which has potential applications in fluorescence-based sensing, imaging, light-emitting diodes, optical displays, and other near-field optical devices.

  3. Extracting surface wave-coupled emission with subsurface dielectric gratings

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Dong; Zhang, Douguo; Chen, Yikai; Zhu, Liangfu; Han, Lu; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional surface plasmons (SPs) or Bloch surface waves (BSWs) have a wave vector exceeding that of light in vacuum, and, therefore, the surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) or Bloch surface wave-coupled emission (BSWCE) cannot escape from the corresponding structures. With the aid of a high-refractive-index prism or an oil-immersion objective, the SPCE or BSWCE can be coupled into free space. But the large volumes of the prism and objective are certainly unfavorable for miniaturization of the optical systems or inconvenient for applications such as the optical displays. Here we experimentally demonstrate a new method to extract the SPCE or BSWCE with a subsurface dielectric grating. The experimental results verify that the chip-like substrate with two decorated sides can bring out the directional fluorescence emission in free space. The emitting direction and emitting patterns can be tuned by the period size and dimensionality of the gratings. Our work provides a new strategy to realize free-space directional fluorescence emission at a very low cost and compact configuration, which has potential applications in fluorescence-based sensing, imaging, light-emitting diodes, optical displays, and other near-field optical devices. PMID:25078172

  4. Gyral parcellation of cortical surfaces via coupled flow field tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Guo, Lei; Li, Kaiming; Nie, Jingxin; Liu, Tianming

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a novel method for parcellation of the cortical surface of human brain into gyral based regions via coupled flow field tracking. The proposed method consists of two major steps. First, the cortical surface is automatically parcellated into sulcal based regions using several procedures: estimating principal curvatures and principal directions; applying the hidden Markov random field and the Expectation-Maximization (HMRF-EM) framework for sulcal region segmentation based on the maximum principal curvature; diffusing the maximum principal direction field in order to propagate reliable and informative principal directions at gyral crests and sulcal bottoms to other flat cortical regions with noisy principal directions by minimization of an energy function; tracking the flow field towards sulcal bottoms to parcellate the cortical surfaces into sulcal basins. The sulcal parcellation provides a very good initialization for the following steps of gyral parcellation on cortical surfaces. Second, based on the sulcal parcellation results, the cortical surface is further parcellated into gyral based regions using the following procedures: extracting gyral crest segments; dilating gyral crest segments; inverting the principal direction flow field and tracking the flow field towards gyral crests in order to partition the cortical surface into a collection of gyral patches; merging gyral patches to obtain gyral parcellation of the cortical surface. The proposed algorithm pipeline is applied to nine randomly selected cortical surfaces of normal brains and promising results are obtained. The accuracy of the semi-automatic gyral parcellation is comparable to that labeled manually by experts.

  5. Diagnosing coupled watershed processes using a fully-coupled groundwater, land-surface, surface water and mesoscale atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, R. M.; Kollet, S. J.; Chow, F. K.

    2007-12-01

    A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with an integrated overland flow component, a land-surface model and a mesoscale atmospheric model is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes. These processes are influenced by land-surface topography and subsurface heterogeneity. This parallel, integrated model simulates spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. Spatial statistics are used to demonstrate spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating. Additionally, spectral transforms of subsurface arrival times are computed using a transient Lagrangian transport simulation. Macrodispersion is used to mimic the effects of subsurface heterogeneity for a range of Peclet numbers. The slopes of these transforms indicate fractal scaling of this system over a range of timescales. All of these techniques point to importance of realistically representing coupled processes and the need to understand and diagnose these processes in nature. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under contract W-7405-Eng-48. This project was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL

  6. Mining the salivary proteome with grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance imaging and surface plasmon coupled emission microarrays.

    PubMed

    Molony, Ryan D; Rice, James M; Yuk, Jong Seol; Shetty, Vivek; Dey, Dipak; Lawrence, David A; Lynes, Michael A

    2012-08-01

    Biological indicators have numerous and widespread utility in personalized medicine, but the measurement of these indicators also poses many technological and practical challenges. Blood/plasma has typically been used as the sample source with which to measure these indicators, but the invasiveness associated with sample procurement has led to increased interest in saliva as an attractive alternative. However, there are unique issues associated with the measurement of saliva biomarkers. These issues are compounded by the imperfect correlation between saliva and plasma with respect to biomarker profiles. In this manuscript, we address the technical challenges associated with saliva biomarker quantification. We describe a high-content microarray assay that employs both grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance imaging and surface plasmon-coupled emission modalities in a highly sensitive assay with a large dynamic range. This powerful approach provides the tools to map the proteome of saliva, which in turn should greatly enhance the utility of salivary biomarker profiles in personalized medicine.

  7. Coupling TOUGH2 with CLM3: Developing a Coupled Land Surface andSubsurface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson,Gudmundur

    2006-05-19

    An understanding of the hydrologic interactions among atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface is one of the keys to understanding the water cycling system that supports life on earth. The inherent coupled processes and complex feedback structures among subsystems make such interactions difficult to simulate. In this paper, we present a model that simulates the land surface and subsurface hydrologic response to meteorological forcing. This model combines a state-of-the-art land-surface model, the NCAR Community Land Model version 3 (CLM3), with a variably saturated groundwater model, TOUGH2, through an internal interface that includes flux and state variables shared by the two submodels. Specifically, TOUGH2 uses infiltration, evaporation, and root-uptake rates, calculated by CLM3, as source/sink terms in its simulation; CLM3 uses saturation and capillary pressure profiles, calculated by TOUGH2, as state variables in its simulation. This new model, CLMT2, preserves the best aspects of both submodels: the state-of-the-art modeling capability of surface energy and hydrologic processes (including snow, runoff, freezing/melting, evapotranspiration, radiation, and biophysiological processes) from CLM3 and the more realistic physical-process-based modeling capability of subsurface hydrologic processes (including heterogeneity, three-dimensional flow, seamless combining of unsaturated and saturated zone, and water table) from TOUGH2. The preliminary simulation results show that the coupled model greatly improved the predictions of the groundwater table, evapotranspiration, and surface temperature at a real watershed, as evaluated using 18 years of observed data. The new model is also ready to be coupled with an atmospheric simulation model, to form one of the first top of the atmosphere to deep groundwater atmosphere-land-surface-subsurface models.

  8. TE, TM modes photorefractive surface waves and their coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. H.; Shao, W. W.; Li, K.; Liu, X. S.; Xu, J. J.

    2008-03-01

    The nonlinear equations of photorefractive surface waves (PR SWs) with diffusion mechanism are established and calculated numerically for both TE mode and TM mode and their coupling for the first time. The characteristics of TE mode and TM mode are analyzed, such as propagation constants, spatial distribution, penetration depths etc. For relative larger propagation constant, most of the surface wave energy is concentrated on the Ax component of TM mode, and the penetration depth of Ay of TE mode is always larger than that of Ax of TM mode because electro-optical coefficient r13 is always smaller than r33 in general PRC. As a result, the energy of the PR SW is better confined near the surface for TM mode than that for TE mode. When both TE and TM modes PR SWs are present, they will be coupled drastically and the Ax component of TM mode and Ay component of TE mode resonate in the volume of PR medium. As a result, the PR SWs cannot remain decay, and the light energy can not be confined near the surface steadily and the modes are destroyed. The results provide the theoretical instructions and are very significant to generate steady and high density PR SW in practice.

  9. Capacitive-coupled Series Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Ren, Jian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    A novel method to realize stopband within the operating frequency of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is presented. The stopband is introduced by a new kind of capacitive-coupled series spoof SPPs. Two conventional H-shaped unit cells are proposed to construct a new unit cell, and every two new unit cells are separated by a gap with certain distance, which is designed to implement capacitive coupling. The original surface impedance matching is disturbed by the capacitive coupling, leading to the stopband during the transmission of SPPs. The proposed method is verified by both numerical simulations and experiments, and the simulated and measured results have good agreements. It is shown that the proposed structure exhibits a stopband in 9-9.5 GHz while the band-pass feature maintains in 5-9 GHz and 9.5-11 GHz. In the passband, the reflection coefficient is less than -10 dB, and the transmission loss is around 3 dB in the stopband, the reflection coefficient is -2 dB, and the transmission coefficient is less than -30 dB. The compact size, easy fabrication and good band-pass and band-stop features make the proposed structure a promising plasmonic device in SPP communication systems.

  10. Surface Plasmon Coupling of Compositionally Heterogeneous Core-Satellite Nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jun Hee; Zhou, Yong; Blaber, Martin G; Schatz, George C; Yoon, Sangwoon

    2013-05-01

    Understanding plasmon coupling between compositionally heterogeneous nanoparticles in close proximity is intriguing and fundamentally important because of the energy mismatch between the localized surface plasmons of the associated nanoparticles and interactions beyond classical electrodynamics. In this Letter, we explore surface plasmon coupling between silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), assembled in the form of core-satellite structures. A recently developed assembly method allows us to prepare ultrapure core-satellite nanoassemblies in solution, where 50 nm AgNPs are surrounded by 13 nm AuNPs via alkanedithiol linkers. We observe changes in the plasmon coupling between the AgNP core and AuNP satellites as the core-to-satellite gap distance varies from 2.3 to 0.7 nm. Comparison with theoretical studies reveals that the traditional hybridized plasmon modes are abruptly replaced by charge-transfer plasmons at a ∼1 nm gap. Changes with the number of satellites are also discussed.

  11. Capacitive-coupled Series Spoof Surface Plasmon Polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jia Yuan; Ren, Jian; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to realize stopband within the operating frequency of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is presented. The stopband is introduced by a new kind of capacitive-coupled series spoof SPPs. Two conventional H-shaped unit cells are proposed to construct a new unit cell, and every two new unit cells are separated by a gap with certain distance, which is designed to implement capacitive coupling. The original surface impedance matching is disturbed by the capacitive coupling, leading to the stopband during the transmission of SPPs. The proposed method is verified by both numerical simulations and experiments, and the simulated and measured results have good agreements. It is shown that the proposed structure exhibits a stopband in 9–9.5 GHz while the band-pass feature maintains in 5–9 GHz and 9.5–11 GHz. In the passband, the reflection coefficient is less than −10 dB, and the transmission loss is around 3 dB; in the stopband, the reflection coefficient is −2 dB, and the transmission coefficient is less than −30 dB. The compact size, easy fabrication and good band-pass and band-stop features make the proposed structure a promising plasmonic device in SPP communication systems. PMID:27089949

  12. Waveguide-coupled directional Raman radiation for surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Jin-Yang; Wang, Li; Lu, Dan-Feng; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2015-09-01

    Kretschmann-type waveguide structures, including Plasmon Waveguide (PW) and Resonant Mirror (RM), have been applied in interfacial Raman spectroscopy due to the following unique features: (1) unlike the classic surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates made of either gold or silver, both PW and RM can be prepared using a large variety of inexpensive materials; (2) the field enhancement factors using these structures can be theoretically predicted and experimentally controlled, which enables us to manipulate the surface Raman sensitivity with high repeatability; (3) the use of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes for Raman excitation allows us to evaluate the orientation of target molecules immobilized on the waveguide surface; (4) the unwanted impact of noble metals on the Raman fingerprints of target molecules, which is often observed for conventional SERS substrates, can be avoided upon the use of dielectric waveguides. In this paper, guided-mode-coupled directional Raman emission, which is an additional important feature of the waveguide Raman technique, was theoretically investigated based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel equations. The simulation results indicate that the directional Raman emission from a dipole located within the field confinement and penetration depth of a guided mode depends on both the orientation of the dipole and its distance from the waveguide surface. Raman light from the TE-oriented dipoles is launched into the prism coupler at the TE-mode resonance angle and that from the non-TE-oriented dipoles propagates at the TM-mode resonance angle. The intensity of the guided-mode-excited Raman signal propagating at the mode resonance angle is proportional to the fourth power of the mode field (E(4)) at the depth of the dipole from the waveguide surface. This means that the guided-mode-excited and guided-mode-coupled directional Raman spectroscopy has a detection depth that is as

  13. Surface plasmon polaritons mode conversion via a coupled plasmonic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Tian, Hao

    2016-05-01

    A coupled plasmonic system for effective mode conversion between single interface surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) in a metal-dielectric waveguide and gap SPP in a metal-dielectric-metal waveguide is proposed. With the modal analysis, it is shown that the interference of the two plasmonic modes in a metal-dielectric-metal-dielectric coupled structure plays the key role in the mode conversion. With typical parameters, the conversion efficiency is as high as 61% (equivalent to 87% of the output total energy flow) at 1μm wavelength, and 1 dB bandwidth is as broad as 300 nm. The proposed structure can be used to implement an SPP mode convertor, router and beam splitter, which enables the interconnection between two important waveguides in plasmonics. The method presented here is fully-analytical, and is tested against fully-vectorial numerical results.

  14. Analysis of grating-coupled surface-emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakir, S.A.; Salvi, T.C. ); Dente, G.C.

    1989-09-01

    Grating-coupled surface-emitting diodes are modeled and analyzed in terms of radiation power, threshold gain, and saturation effects. We find that the dominant (i.e., the lowest-loss) mode radiates poorly, while a weaker mode has a much higher radiation power and appears dominant if only the radiated power is measured. The weakly radiating mode effectively lowers the device efficiency and broadens the far-field radiation pattern. We also show that an increase in the length of the distributed Bragg reflector sections at the end can double the radiated power and reduce the threshold gain.

  15. Adsorption and Coupling of 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Otero-Irurueta, G.; Martínez, J. I.; Bueno, R.A.; Palomares, F. J.; Salavagione, H. J.; Singh, M. K.; Méndez, J.; Ellis, G. J.; López, M. F.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We have deposited 4-aminophenol on Pt(111) surfaces in ultra-high vacuum and studied the strength of its adsorption through a combination of STM, LEED, XPS and ab initio calculations. Although an ordered (2√3×2√3)R30° phase appears, we have observed that molecule-substrate interaction dominates the adsorption geometry and properties of the system. At RT the high catalytic activity of Pt induces aminophenol to lose the H atom from the hydroxyl group, and a proportion of the molecules lose the complete hydroxyl group. After annealing above 420K, all deposited aminophenol molecules have lost the OH moiety and some hydrogen atoms from the amino groups. At this temperature, short single-molecule oligomer chains can be observed. These chains are the product of a new reaction that proceeds via the coupling of radical species that is favoured by surface diffusion. PMID:27279673

  16. Antigen-specific T cell phenotyping microarrays using Grating Coupled Surface Plasmon Resonance Imaging and Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission

    PubMed Central

    Rice, James M.; Stern, Lawrence J.; Guignon, Ernest F.; Lawrence, David A.; Lynes, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The circulating population of peripheral T lymphocytes obtained from a blood sample can provide a large amount of information about an individual's medical status and history. Recent evidence indicates that the detection and functional characterization of antigen-specific T cell subsets within the circulating population may provide a diagnostic indicator of disease and has the potential to predict an individual's response to therapy. In this report, a microarray detection platform that combines grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance imaging (GCSPRI) and grating-coupled surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) fluorescence detection modalities was used to detect and characterize CD4+ T cells. The microspot regions of interest (ROIs) printed on the array consisted of immobilized antibodies or peptide loaded MHC monomers (p/MHC) as T cell capture ligands mixed with additional antibodies as cytokine capture ligands covalently bound to the surface of a corrugated gold sensor chip. Using optimized parameters, an unlabelled influenza peptide reactive T cell clone could be detected at a frequency of 0.1% in a mixed T cell sample using GCSPRI. Additionally, after cell binding was quantified, differential TH1 cytokine secretion patterns from a T cell clone cultured under TH1 or TH2 inducing conditions was detected using an SPCE fluorescence based assay. Differences in the secretion patterns of 3 cytokines, characteristic of the inducing conditions, indicated that differences were a consequence of the functional status of the captured cells. A dual mode GCSPRI/SPCE assay can provide a rapid, high content T cell screening/characterization tool that is useful for diagnosing disease, evaluating vaccination efficacy, or assessing responses to immunotherapeutics. PMID:22104646

  17. Surface electromagnetic wave coupling efficiencies for several excitation techniques.

    PubMed

    Davarpanah, M; Goben, C A; Begley, D L; Griffith, S L

    1976-12-01

    The excitation efficiencies for coupling surface electromagnetic waves onto aluminum at a microwave frequency (f = 8.445 GHz, lambda = 3.55 cm) were studied experimentally for several different standard microwave techniques as well as two optical techniques (prism and grating) applied to the microwave frequency region and two new techniques (hump and valley). The peak measured efficiencies found were: for the standard rectangular waveguide, 92%; for the horn antenna, 73%; for the right angle prism properly gapped above the metal, 60%; for the hump of 10-wavelength radius of curvature, 35%; for the thin grating strips on polystyrene coated metal, 30%; for the grating bars gapped (1/2) wavelength above the metal, 26%; and, for the valley of 10-wavelength radius, 12%. The measurement of the excitation efficiencies for prism and grating coupling techniques sometimes required that the prism or grating be in the near field of the antenna. In addition to measuring peak efficiencies, the efficiencies were measured as functions of the gap heights, the angular orientations, the different diffraction modes, the shapes, and the materials of the grating bars. The coupling efficiencies for both prism and grating couplers show a strong dependence on gap height above the metal. Dielectric grating bars were found to be inefficient compared to solid or hollow metallic bars, or thin metallic strips. The distance between the target point of the center line of the microwave horn antenna and the corner of the prism was found to be about 1 wavelength for maximum prism coupling efficiency. PMID:20168392

  18. Monolithic phononic crystals with a surface acoustic band gap from surface phonon-polariton coupling.

    PubMed

    Yudistira, D; Boes, A; Djafari-Rouhani, B; Pennec, Y; Yeo, L Y; Mitchell, A; Friend, J R

    2014-11-21

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the existence of complete surface acoustic wave band gaps in surface phonon-polariton phononic crystals, in a completely monolithic structure formed from a two-dimensional honeycomb array of hexagonal shape domain-inverted inclusions in single crystal piezoelectric Z-cut lithium niobate. The band gaps appear at a frequency of about twice the Bragg band gap at the center of the Brillouin zone, formed through phonon-polariton coupling. The structure is mechanically, electromagnetically, and topographically homogeneous, without any physical alteration of the surface, offering an ideal platform for many acoustic wave applications for photonics, phononics, and microfluidics.

  19. Air-ground interface: Surface waves, surface impedance and acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daigle, Gilles; Embleton, Tony

    1990-01-01

    In atmospheric acoustics, the subject of surface waves has been an area of discussion for many years. The existence of an acoustic surface wave is now well established theoretically. The mathematical solution for spherical wave propagation above an impedance boundary includes the possibility of a contribution that possesses all the standard properties for a surface wave. Surface waves exist when the surface is sufficiently porous, relative to its acoustical resistance, that it can influence the airborne particle velocity near the surface and reduce the phase velocity of sound waves in air at the surface. This traps some of the sound energy in the air to remain near the surface as it propagates. Above porous grounds, the existence of surface waves has eluded direct experimental confirmation (pulse experiments have failed to show a separate arrival expected from the reduced phase speed) and indirect evidence for its existence has appeared contradictory. The experimental evidence for the existence of an acoustical surface wave above porous boundaries is reviewed. Recent measurements including pulse experiments are also described. A few years ago the acoustic impedance of a grass-covered surface was measured in the frequency range 30 to 300 Hz. Here, further measurements on the same site are discussed. These measurements include core samples, a shallow refractive survey to determine the seismic velocities, and measurements of the acoustic-to-seismic coupling coefficient.

  20. Asymmetric excitation of surface plasmons by dark mode coupling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Quan; Li, Quan; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Chunmei; Liu, Yongmin; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-01-01

    Control over surface plasmons (SPs) is essential in a variety of cutting-edge applications, such as highly integrated photonic signal processing systems, deep-subwavelength lasing, high-resolution imaging, and ultrasensitive biomedical detection. Recently, asymmetric excitation of SPs has attracted enormous interest. In free space, the analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in metamaterials has been widely investigated to uniquely manipulate the electromagnetic waves. In the near field, we show that the dark mode coupling mechanism of the classical EIT effect enables an exotic and straightforward excitation of SPs in a metasurface system. This leads to not only resonant excitation of asymmetric SPs but also controllable exotic SP focusing by the use of the Huygens-Fresnel principle. Our experimental findings manifest the potential of developing plasmonic metadevices with unique functionalities. PMID:26989777

  1. Asymmetric excitation of surface plasmons by dark mode coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Quan; Li, Quan; Xu, Yuehong; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Chunmei; Liu, Yongmin; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Xixiang; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-02-01

    Control over surface plasmons (SPs) is essential in a variety of cutting-edge applications, such as highly integrated photonic signal processing systems, deep-subwavelength lasing, high-resolution imaging, and ultrasensitive biomedical detection. Recently, asymmetric excitation of SPs has attracted enormous interest. In free space, the analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in metamaterials has been widely investigated to uniquely manipulate the electromagnetic waves. In the near field, we show that the dark mode coupling mechanism of the classical EIT effect enables an exotic and straightforward excitation of SPs in a metasurface system. This leads to not only resonant excitation of asymmetric SPs but also controllable exotic SP focusing by the use of the Huygens-Fresnel principle. Our experimental findings manifest the potential of developing plasmonic metadevices with unique functionalities. PMID:26989777

  2. Efficient butt-coupling of surface plasmons on a silver-air interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Caitlin; Botten, Lindsay C.; Poulton, Christopher G.; McPhedran, Ross C.; de Sterke, C. Martijn

    2015-12-01

    Butt-coupling of light into a surface plasmon is a simple and compact coupling method with a range of potential uses in photonic circuitry. Although butt-coupling has been successfully implemented in many coupling configurations, the coupling effectiveness is not fully understood. Here, we present a semi-analytical study which models the coupling efficiency of an incident beam into a surface plasmon on silver in the presence of loss using an projection method in one dimension. We find that the coupling efficiencies for silver between the wavelengths of 0:38 - 1:6 μm reach 77 - 88% with optimum incident beam parameters.

  3. Surface plasmon resonance applied to G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia; Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Gawrisch, Klaus; Gorshkova, Inna

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are integral membrane proteins that transmit signals from external stimuli to the cell interior via activation of GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) thereby mediating key sensorial, hormonal, metabolic, immunological, and neurotransmission processes. Elucidating their structure and mechanism of interaction with extracellular and intracellular binding partners is of fundamental importance and highly relevant to rational design of new effective drugs. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has become a method of choice for studying biomolecular interactions at interfaces because measurements take place in real-time and do not require labeling of any of the interactants. However, due to the particular challenges imposed by the high hydrophobicity of membrane proteins and the great diversity of receptor-stimulating ligands, the application of this technique to characterize interactions of GPCR is still in the developmental phase. Here we give an overview of the principle of SPR and analyze current approaches for the preparation of the sensor chip surface, capture and stabilization of GPCR, and experimental design to characterize their interaction with ligands, G proteins and specific antibodies. PMID:24466506

  4. Surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence during adsorption of oxygen on magnesium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Hagemann, Ulrich; Nienhaus, Hermann

    2015-12-28

    The dissociative adsorption of oxygen molecules on magnesium surfaces represents a non-adiabatic reaction exhibiting exoelectron emission, chemicurrent generation, and weak chemiluminescence. Using thin film Mg/Ag/p-Si(111) Schottky diodes with 1 nm Mg on a 10-60 nm thick Ag layer as 2π-photodetectors, the chemiluminescence is internally detected with a much larger efficiency than external methods. The chemically induced photoyield shows a maximum for a Ag film thickness of 45 nm. The enhancement is explained by surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence, i.e., surface plasmon polaritons are effectively excited in the Ag layer by the oxidation reaction and decay radiatively leading to the observed photocurrent. Model calculations of the maximum absorption in attenuated total reflection geometry support the interpretation. The study demonstrates the extreme sensitivity and the practical usage of internal detection schemes for investigating surface chemiluminescence.

  5. Hydromechanical Normal Deformation Experiments and Coupling to Fracture Surface Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thörn, J.; Fransson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Civil engineering structures founded in fractured crystalline rock, such as the Fennoscandian Shield (Norway-Sweden-Finland) requires allowance for both stability and/or deformations of the rock mass and groundwater ingress and groundwater pressure changes. Coupling these issues could be the key to solving the challenges that arise from construction of e.g. hydropower dams, road and railroad tunnels, and most certainly the construction of nuclear waste repositories within fractured crystalline rock, all of which are currently planned in Sweden. Excavation related deformation in fractures may cause groundwater leakage even from the most elaborate pre-excavation grouting works. A better understanding on hydraulically (or grouting) induced deformations in the near-field of tunnels, where the stress field is re-distributed due to the opening may both provide a basis for more accurate numerical modelling and grouting or excavation procedures that minimize the damage on the completed grouting fans. Subjects of this study were experiments conducted as measurement of deformations in boreholes close to tunnels due to stepwise injection tests, and laboratory hydromechanical experiments conducted as flow and normal deformation measurements in a permeameter during cycles of up to 2.5 MPa confining pressure, and subsequent surface scanning of the samples for coupling of HM-results to geometric appearance, aperture and contact geometry. When expressed in terms of hydraulic aperture (b) and fracture normal stiffness (kn) the results of both in situ and lab experiments support a previously suggested relationship based on field data where kn is inversely proportional to roughly b2. The relationship was assumed to be valid for low compressive stress across fractures with limited previous deformation. One important data set used to establish the relationship was transmissivity and storage coefficients from hydraulic interference tests previously performed at Äspö Hard Rock

  6. G-Protein Coupled Receptors: Surface Display and Biosensor Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurchie, Edward; Leifert, Wayne

    Signal transduction by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) underpins a multitude of physiological processes. Ligand recognition by the receptor leads to the activation of a generic molecular switch involving heterotrimeric G-proteins and guanine nucleotides. With growing interest and commercial investment in GPCRs in areas such as drug targets, orphan receptors, high-throughput screening of drugs and biosensors, greater attention will focus on assay development to allow for miniaturization, ultrahigh-throughput and, eventually, microarray/biochip assay formats that will require nanotechnology-based approaches. Stable, robust, cell-free signaling assemblies comprising receptor and appropriate molecular switching components will form the basis of future GPCR/G-protein platforms, which should be able to be adapted to such applications as microarrays and biosensors. This chapter focuses on cell-free GPCR assay nanotechnologies and describes some molecular biological approaches for the construction of more sophisticated, surface-immobilized, homogeneous, functional GPCR sensors. The latter points should greatly extend the range of applications to which technologies based on GPCRs could be applied.

  7. Double resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates: an intuitive coupled oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yizhuo; Wang, Dongxing; Zhu, Wenqi; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2011-08-01

    The strong coupling between localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons in a double resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate is described by a classical coupled oscillator model. The effects of the particle density, the particle size and the SiO2 spacer thickness on the coupling strength are experimentally investigated. We demonstrate that by tuning the geometrical parameters of the double resonance substrate, we can readily control the resonance frequencies and tailor the SERS enhancement spectrum. PMID:21934853

  8. Exploring the coupling between surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity in heterogeneous ice nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Yuanfei; Cabriolu, Raffaela; Li, Tianshu

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation has significant influence in a variety of fields ranging from global climate change to intracellular freezing. Although its prevalence can be explained quantitatively by the classical nucleation theory, there is a lack of molecular level understanding of the key factors governing ice nucleation at the interface between water and ice nucleator. Here, by employing advanced molecular simulation, we show that heterogeneous ice nucleation on graphitic surface is controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity. Molecular level analysis shows that the crystalline graphitic surface with an appropriate hydrophilicity templates ice basal plane forming in the contact layer, thus significantly enhances its ice nucleation efficiency. Remarkably, the templating effect is found to transit from within the first contact layer of water to the second as the hydrophilicity increases, yielding an oscillating distinction between the crystalline and amorphous graphitic surfaces in their ice nucleation efficiencies. Our study sheds new light on the long-standing question of what constitutes a good ice nucleator.

  9. A study of the coupling relationship between concrete surface temperature and concrete surface emissivity in natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lin-Ling; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Jia-Ning; Zhao, Hong-Mei; Huang, Qi-Ting

    2014-07-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) has already been recognized as a crucial parameter for the determination of land surface temperature (LST). There is an ill-posed problem for the retrieval of LST and LSE. And laboratory-based emissivity is measured in natural constant conditions, which is limited in the application in thermal remote sensing. To solve the above problems, the coupling of LST and LSE is explored to eliminate temperature effects and improve the accuracy of LES. And then, the estimation accuracy of LST from passive remote sensing images will be improved. For different land surface materials, the coupling of land surface emissivity and land surface temperature is various. This paper focuses on studying concrete surface that is one of the typical man-made materials in urban. First the experiments of measuring concrete surface emissivity and concrete surface temperature in natural conditions are arranged reasonably and the suitable data are selected under ideal atmosphere conductions. Then to improve the determination accuracy of concrete surface emissivity, the algorithm worked on the computer of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroradiometer (FTIR) has been improved by the most adapted temperature and emissivity separation algorithm. Finally the coupling of concrete surface temperature and concrete surface emissivity is analyzed and the coupling model of concrete surface temperature and concrete surface emissivity is established. The results show that there is a highest correlation coefficient between the second derivative of emissivity spectra and concrete surface temperature, and the correlation coefficient is -0.925 1. The best coupling model is the stepwise regression model, whose determination coefficient (R2) is 0.886. The determination coefficient (R2) is 0.905 and the root mean squares error (RMSE) is 0.292 1 in the validation of the model. The coupling model of concrete surface temperature and concrete surface emissivity under natural conditions

  10. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-01

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed. PMID:27119268

  11. Coupling of surface energy with electric potential makes superhydrophobic surfaces corrosion-resistant.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2015-10-14

    We study the correlation of wetting properties and corrosion rates on hydrophobized cast iron. Samples of different surface roughnesses (abraded by sandpaper) are studied without coating and with two types of hydrophobic coatings (stearic acid and a liquid repelling spray). The contact angles and contact angle hysteresis are measured using a goniometer while corrosion rates are measured by a potentiodynamic polarization test. The data show a decrease in corrosion current density and an increase in corrosion potential after superhydrophobization. A similar trend is also found in the recent literature data. We conclude that a decrease in the corrosion rate can be attributed to the changing open circuit potential of a coated surface and increased surface area making the non-homogeneous (Cassie-Baxter) state possible. We interpret these results in light of the idea that the inherent surface energy is coupled with the electric potential in accordance with the Lippmann law of electrowetting and Le Châtelier's principle and, therefore, hydrophobization leads to a decrease in the corrosion potential. This approach can be used for novel anti-corrosive coatings. PMID:26344151

  12. Surface Raman spectroscopy with and without reverse Kretschmann configuration: Effect of evanescent-wave-coupled emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Cheng, Jin; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-06-01

    Evanescent-wave-coupled emission has been used for reverse Kretschmann fluorescence and Raman spectroscopies with high collection efficiency. However, it has a negative effect on the common surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy without the reverse Kretschmann configuration because the coupling of a large fraction of light power into the substrate impairs the Raman signal backscattered in air. A rough core layer can significantly weaken evanescent-wave-coupled emission, which is conducive to enhancing the backscattered Raman signal. In this work, we theoretically investigate the surface-plasmon-coupled emission and its effects on surface Raman spectroscopy.

  13. Surface-plasmon cross coupling in molecular fluorescence near a corrugated thin metal film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruhlke, R. W.; Holland, W. R.; Hall, D. G.

    1968-01-01

    Surface plasmons on opposite sides of a thin metal film can cross couple in the presence of a surface corrugation, or grating. The observation of this cross-coupling phenomenon as a radiative-decay mechanism for molecules near a corrugated thin metal film is reported.

  14. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type divided into two compartments by a membrane is disclosed. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid to produce a positive electric potential. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid to produce a negative potential. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which has been added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the lead deplates from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode acts as a catalyst to increase current density.

  15. Stability analysis and simulations of coupled bulk-surface reaction–diffusion systems

    PubMed Central

    Madzvamuse, Anotida; Chung, Andy H. W.; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we formulate new models for coupled systems of bulk-surface reaction–diffusion equations on stationary volumes. The bulk reaction–diffusion equations are coupled to the surface reaction–diffusion equations through linear Robin-type boundary conditions. We then state and prove the necessary conditions for diffusion-driven instability for the coupled system. Owing to the nature of the coupling between bulk and surface dynamics, we are able to decouple the stability analysis of the bulk and surface dynamics. Under a suitable choice of model parameter values, the bulk reaction–diffusion system can induce patterning on the surface independent of whether the surface reaction–diffusion system produces or not, patterning. On the other hand, the surface reaction–diffusion system cannot generate patterns everywhere in the bulk in the absence of patterning from the bulk reaction–diffusion system. For this case, patterns can be induced only in regions close to the surface membrane. Various numerical experiments are presented to support our theoretical findings. Our most revealing numerical result is that, Robin-type boundary conditions seem to introduce a boundary layer coupling the bulk and surface dynamics. PMID:25792948

  16. Coupling surface and subsurface flows with curved interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Pu; Yotov, Ivan

    2013-11-01

    A mortar multiscale method is developed for the coupled Stokes andDarcy flows with the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition in irregular domains. Conforming Stokes elements and multipoint flux mixed finite elements in Darcy are used to discretize the subdomains on the fine scale. A coarse scale mortar finite element space is used to approximate interface stresses and pressures and impose weakly continuity of velocities and fluxes. Matching conditions on curved interfaces are imposed by mapping the physical grids to reference grids with flat interfaces.

  17. Session on coupled land surface/hydrological/atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pielke, Roger

    1993-01-01

    The current model capabilities in the context of land surface interactions with the atmosphere include only one-dimensional characteristics of vegetation and soil surface heat, moisture, momentum, and selected other trace gas fluxes (e.g., CO2). The influence of spatially coherent fluxes that result from landscape heterogeneity were not included. Valuable representations of several aspects of the landscape pattern currently exist. These include digital elevation data and measures of the leaf area index (i.e., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data). A major deficiency, however, is the lack of an ability to sample spatially representative shallow and (especially) deep soil moisture. Numerous mesoscale modeling and observed studies demonstrated the sensitivity of planetary boundary layer structure and deep convection to the magnitude of the surface moisture flux.

  18. Spin-orbit coupling at surfaces and 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Krasovskii, E E

    2015-12-16

    Spin-orbit interaction gives rise to a splitting of surface states via the Rashba effect, and in topological insulators it leads to the existence of topological surface states. The resulting k(//) momentum separation between states with the opposite spin underlies a wide range of new phenomena at surfaces and interfaces, such as spin transfer, spin accumulation, spin-to-charge current conversion, which are interesting for fundamental science and may become the basis for a breakthrough in the spintronic technology. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to reveal the microscopic structure and mechanisms of spin-orbit driven phenomena with the focus on angle and spin-resolved photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy. PMID:26580290

  19. Spin-orbit coupling at surfaces and 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Krasovskii, E E

    2015-12-16

    Spin-orbit interaction gives rise to a splitting of surface states via the Rashba effect, and in topological insulators it leads to the existence of topological surface states. The resulting k(//) momentum separation between states with the opposite spin underlies a wide range of new phenomena at surfaces and interfaces, such as spin transfer, spin accumulation, spin-to-charge current conversion, which are interesting for fundamental science and may become the basis for a breakthrough in the spintronic technology. The present review summarizes recent theoretical and experimental efforts to reveal the microscopic structure and mechanisms of spin-orbit driven phenomena with the focus on angle and spin-resolved photoemission and scanning tunneling microscopy.

  20. Catalyst surfaces for the chromous/chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giner, J. D.; Cahill, K. J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An electricity producing cell of the reduction-oxidation (REDOX) type is described. The cell is divided into two compartments by a membrane, each compartment containing a solid inert electrode. A ferrous/ferric couple in a chloride solution serves as a cathode fluid which is circulated through one of the compartments to produce a positive electric potential disposed therein. A chromic/chromous couple in a chloride solution serves as an anode fluid which is circulated through the second compartment to produce a negative potential on an electrode disposed therein. The electrode is an electrically conductive, inert material plated with copper, silver or gold. A thin layer of lead plates onto the copper, silver or gold layer when the cell is being charged, the lead ions being available from lead chloride which was added to the anode fluid. If the REDOX cell is then discharged, the current flows between the electrodes causing the lead to deplate from the negative electrode and the metal coating on the electrode will act as a catalyst to cause increased current density.

  1. Surface characterization of hydroxyapatite: potentiometric titrations coupled with solubility measurements.

    PubMed

    Skartsila, Kyriaki; Spanos, Nikos

    2007-04-15

    The acid-base properties of synthetically prepared and well-characterized hydroxyapatite (HAP) in contact with KNO3 solutions were investigated at 25 degrees C, through potentiometric titrations, zeta-potential measurements, and surface complex modeling. Aliquots of suspension were withdrawn every 0.5 pH unit during the titration procedure and analyzed for calcium and phosphate. It was found that, even for rapid titration experiments, a remarkable amount of H+ ions (H+dissol.) is consumed in the bulk solution in reacting with species coming from the dissolution of HAP. These H+ ions must be taken into account in the H+ mass balance, in order for true value for the point of zero charge (pzc=6.5+/-0.2) and consequently true value for the surface charge (sigma0) to be obtained. Besides the conventional potentiometric titration technique, it was found that pzc may be determined much more easily as the intersection point of the suspension titration curve and the blank one modified to include the amount of H+dissol. obtained at one ionic strength. Finally, a surface complexation model was proposed for the development of surface charge. Experimental data were satisfactorily fitted by using the value of 4.2 F m-2 for the capacitance.

  2. On the coupling between a supersonic boundary layer and a flexible surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader; Maestrello, Lucio; Bayliss, Alvin

    1992-01-01

    The coupling between a two-dimensional, supersonic, laminar boundary layer and a flexible surface is studied using direct numerical computations of the Navier-Stokes equations coupled with the plate equation. The flexible surface is forced to vibrate by plane acoustic waves at normal incidence emanated by a sound source located on the side of the flexible surface opposite to the boundary layer. The effect of the source excitation frequency on the surface vibration and boundary layer stability is analyzed. We find that, for frequencies near the fifth natural frequency of the surface or lower, large disturbances are introduced in the boundary layer which may alter its stability characteristics. The interaction between a stable two-dimensional disturbance of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type with the vibrating surface is also studied. We find that the disturbance level is higher over the vrating flexible surface than that obtained when the surface is rig id, which indicates a strong coupling between flow and structure. However, in the absence of the sound source the disturbance level over the rigid and flexible surfaces are identical. This result is due to the high frequency of the TS disturbance which does not couple with the flexible surface.

  3. Interfacial Modification of Silica Surfaces Through gamma-Isocyanatopropyl Triethoxy Silane-Amine Coupling Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel,B.; DeLongchamp, D.; Mahoney, C.; Lucas, L.; Fischer, D.; Lin, E.

    2008-01-01

    The development of robust, cost-effective methods to modify surfaces and interfaces without the specialized synthesis of unique coupling agents could provide readily accessible routes to optimize and tailor interfacial properties. We demonstrate that -isocyanatopropyl triethoxysilane (ISO) provides a convenient route to functionalize silica surfaces through coupling reactions with readily available reagents. ISO coupling agents layers (CALs) can be prepared from toluene with triethylamine (TEA), but the coupling reaction of an amine to the ISO CAL does not proceed. We use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and sessile drop contact angle to demonstrate the isocyanate layer is not degraded under coupling conditions. Access to silanes with chemical functionality is possible with ISO by performing the coupling reaction in solution and then depositing the product onto the surface. Two model CAL surfaces are prepared to demonstrate the ease and robust nature of this procedure. The surfaces prepared using this method are the ISO reacted with octadecylamine to produce a hydrocarbon surface of similar quality to octadecyl trichlorosilane (OTS) CALs and with 9-aminofluorene (AFL), an aromatic amine functionality whose silane is otherwise unavailable commercially.

  4. Representing Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces Coupled by Conical Intersections in their Full Dimensionality Using Coupled Quasi-Diabatic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarkony, David

    2015-03-01

    The construction of fit single state potential energy surfaces (PESs), analytic representations of ab initio electronic energies and energy gradients, is now well established. These single state PESs, which are essential for accurate quantum dynamics and have found wide application in more approximate quasi-classical treatments, have revolutionized adiabatic dynamics. The situation for nonadiabatic processes involving dissociative and large amplitude motion is less sanguine. In these cases, compared to single electronic state dynamics, both the electronic structure data and the representation are more challenging to determine. We describe the recent development and applications of algorithms that enable description of multiple adiabatic electronic potential energy surfaces coupled by conical intersections in their full dimensionality using coupled quasi-diabatic states. These representations are demonstrably quasi-diabatic, provide accurate representations of conical intersection seams and can smooth out the discontinuities in electronic structure energies due to changing active orbital spaces that routinely afflict global multistate representations.

  5. MODFLOW-Based Coupled Surface Water Routing and Groundwater-Flow Simulation.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J D; Langevin, C D; White, J T

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible approach for simulating one- and two-dimensional routing of surface water using a numerical surface water routing (SWR) code implicitly coupled to the groundwater-flow process in MODFLOW. Surface water routing in SWR can be simulated using a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations and/or a simplified level-pool approach. SWR can account for surface water flow controlled by backwater conditions caused by small water-surface gradients or surface water control structures. A number of typical surface water control structures, such as culverts, weirs, and gates, can be represented, and it is possible to implement operational rules to manage surface water stages and streamflow. The nonlinear system of surface water flow equations formulated in SWR is solved by using Newton methods and direct or iterative solvers. SWR was tested by simulating the (1) Lal axisymmetric overland flow, (2) V-catchment, and (3) modified Pinder-Sauer problems. Simulated results for these problems compare well with other published results and indicate that SWR provides accurate results for surface water-only and coupled surface water/groundwater problems. Results for an application of SWR and MODFLOW to the Snapper Creek area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA are also presented and demonstrate the value of coupled surface water and groundwater simulation in managed, low-relief coastal settings.

  6. MODFLOW-based coupled surface water routing and groundwater-flow simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; White, Jeremy T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a flexible approach for simulating one- and two-dimensional routing of surface water using a numerical surface water routing (SWR) code implicitly coupled to the groundwater-flow process in MODFLOW. Surface water routing in SWR can be simulated using a diffusive-wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations and/or a simplified level-pool approach. SWR can account for surface water flow controlled by backwater conditions caused by small water-surface gradients or surface water control structures. A number of typical surface water control structures, such as culverts, weirs, and gates, can be represented, and it is possible to implement operational rules to manage surface water stages and streamflow. The nonlinear system of surface water flow equations formulated in SWR is solved by using Newton methods and direct or iterative solvers. SWR was tested by simulating the (1) Lal axisymmetric overland flow, (2) V-catchment, and (3) modified Pinder-Sauer problems. Simulated results for these problems compare well with other published results and indicate that SWR provides accurate results for surface water-only and coupled surface water/groundwater problems. Results for an application of SWR and MODFLOW to the Snapper Creek area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA are also presented and demonstrate the value of coupled surface water and groundwater simulation in managed, low-relief coastal settings.

  7. Metamaterial-inspired miniaturized microwave edge coupled surface scanning probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiwatcharagoses, Nophadon; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet; Udpa, Lalita

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces a new concept on sub-wavelength resolution imaging and surface scanning using metamaterial based near field sensor array. Multiple split ring resonator structures (SRRs), having different band stop frequencies, are implemented in a microstrip transmission line configuration. A mirror image copy of these resonators is also incorporated on the transmission line to achieve built in frequency references. A smart card is scanned to detect buried antenna and Si chip within the plastic card.

  8. Strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons and β-carotene in nanolayered system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baieva, S.; Ihalainen, J. A.; Toppari, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we experimentally demonstrate the strong coupling between surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) and the S2 state of β-carotene. The SPPs are excited by prism coupling technique on a thin silver film with β-carotene embedded in a polymer layer on top of that. Rabi splittings with energies 80 and 130 meV are observed in the recorded dispersion relations. Both coupled oscillator model and transfer matrix method are used to fit the experimental results. The scattered radiation of the propagating strongly coupled SPP-S2 hybrids is collected and an increase of the low energy splitting to 120 meV is observed compared to the reflectivity data. In addition, we performed molecule excitation by laser and analyzed the emission patterns revealing clear surface plasmon coupled fluorescence of β-carotene. By increasing the concentration of β-carotene we are able to collect also surface plasmon coupled Raman scattering. This study substantially extends the SPP-molecular excitation strong coupling studies to biomolecules, and energy transfer and coupling properties of excited states of carotenoids.

  9. Heterodimerization and Surface Localization of G Protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Minneman, Kenneth P.

    2007-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest human gene families, and are targets for many important therapeutic drugs. Over the last few years, there has been a major paradigm shift in our understanding of how these receptors function. Formerly, GPCRs were thought to exist as monomers that, upon agonist occupation, activated a heterotrimeric G protein to alter the concentrations of specific second messengers. Until recently, this relatively linear cascade has been the standard paradigm for signaling by these molecules. However, it is now clear that this model is not adequate to explain many aspects of GPCR function. We now know that many, if not most, GPCRs form homo- and/or hetero-oligomeric complexes and interact directly with intracellular proteins in addition to G proteins. It now appears that many GPCRs may not function independently, but might more accurately be described as subunits of large multi-protein signaling complexes. These observations raise many important new questions; some of which include: 1) How many functionally and pharmacologically distinct receptor subtypes exist in vivo? 2) Which GPCRs physically associate, and in what stochiometries? 3) What are the roles of individual subunits in binding ligand and activating responses? 4) Are the pharmacological or signaling properties of GPCR heterodimers different from monomers? Since these receptors are the targets for a large number of clinically useful compounds, such information is likely to be of direct therapeutic importance, both in understanding how existing drugs work, but also in discovering novel compounds to treat disease. PMID:17011524

  10. Roles of Surface and Interface Spins in Exchange Coupled Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Manh-Huong

    Exchange bias (EB) in magnetic nanostructures has remained a topic of global interest because of its potential use in spin valves, MRAM circuits, magnetic tunnel junctions, and spintronic devices. The exploration of EB on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to overcoming the superparamagnetic limit and increasing the thermoremanence of magnetic nanoparticles, a critical bottleneck for magnetic data storage applications. Recent advances in chemical synthesis have given us a unique opportunity to explore the EB in a variety of nanoparticle systems ranging from core/shell nanoparticles of Fe/γFe2O3, Co/CoO,and FeO/Fe3O4 to hollow nanoparticles of γFe2O3 and hybrid composite nanoparticles of Au/Fe3O4. Our studies have addressed the following fundamental and important questions: (i) Can one decouple collective contributions of the interface and surface spins to the EB in a core/shell nanoparticle system? (ii) Can the dynamic and static response of the core and shell be identified separately? (iii) Can one tune ``minor loop'' to ``exchange bias'' effects in magnetic hollow nanoparticles by varying the number of surface spins? (iv) Can one decouple collective contributions of the inner and outer surface spins to the EB in a hollow nanoparticle system? (v) Can EB be induced in a magnetic nanoparticle by forming its interface with a non-magnetic metal? Such knowledge is essential to tailor EB in magnetic nanostructures for spintronics applications. In this talk, we will discuss the aforementioned findings in terms of our experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies. The work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award No. DE-FG02-07ER46438.

  11. Localized Surface Plasmons Selectively Coupled to Resonant Light in Tubular Microcavities.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yin; Li, Shilong; Böttner, Stefan; Yuan, Feifei; Giudicatti, Silvia; Saei Ghareh Naz, Ehsan; Ma, Libo; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2016-06-24

    Vertical gold nanogaps are created on microtubular cavities to explore the coupling between resonant light supported by the microcavities and surface plasmons localized at the nanogaps. Selective coupling of optical axial modes and localized surface plasmons critically depends on the exact location of the gold nanogap on the microcavities, which is conveniently achieved by rolling up specially designed thin dielectric films into three-dimensional microtube cavities. The coupling phenomenon is explained by a modified quasipotential model based on perturbation theory. Our work reveals the coupling of surface plasmon resonances localized at the nanoscale to optical resonances confined in microtubular cavities at the microscale, implying a promising strategy for the investigation of light-matter interactions. PMID:27391725

  12. High-Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound Used for Three-Dimensional Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    2001-01-01

    To interface with other solids, many surfaces are engineered via methods such as plating, coating, and machining to produce a functional surface ensuring successful end products. In addition, subsurface properties such as hardness, residual stress, deformation, chemical composition, and microstructure are often linked to surface characteristics. Surface topography, therefore, contains the signatures of the surface and possibly links to volumetric properties, and as a result serves as a vital link between surface design, manufacturing, and performance. Hence, surface topography can be used to diagnose, monitor, and control fabrication methods. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the measurement of surface topography is important in developing high-temperature structural materials and for profiling the surface changes of materials during microgravity combustion experiments. A prior study demonstrated that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz could profile surfaces with a 25-m depth resolution and a 400-m lateral resolution over a 1.4-mm depth range. In this work, we address the question of whether higher frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications. To this end, we employed 10- and 25-MHz focused ultrasonic transducers in the water-coupled mode. The surface profile results seen in this investigation for 25-MHz water-coupled ultrasound, in comparison to those for 1-MHz air-coupled ultrasound, represent an 8 times improvement in depth resolution (3 vs. 25 m seen in practice), an improvement of at least 2 times in lateral resolution (180 vs. 400 m calculated and observed in practice), and an improvement in vertical depth range of 4 times (calculated).

  13. Coupling between mantle and surface processes: Insights from analogue modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Ágnes; Sembroni, Andrea; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca

    2014-05-01

    Thermal or density anomalies located beneath the lithosphere are thought to generate dynamic topography. Such a topographic signal compensates the viscous stresses originating from the anomaly driven mantle flow. It has been demonstrated that the erosion modulates the dynamic signal of topography changing the uplift rate by unload. The characteristic time for adjustments of dynamic topography due to surface erosion is likely similar to post-glacial rebound time (10000 - 50000 years). Here we present preliminary results of a new set of analogue models realized to study and quantify the contribution given by erosion to dynamic topography, during a process specifically driven by a positively buoyant deep anomaly. The adopted set up consists of a Plexiglas box (40x40x50 cm3) filled with glucose syrup as analogue upper mantle. A silicon plate positioned on the top of the syrup simulates the lithosphere. On the silicone plate is placed a thin layer of a high viscous glucose syrup which reproduces the upper, erodible layer of the crust. To simulate the positively buoyant anomaly we used an elastic, undeformable silicon ball free to rise by buoyancy in the syrup until the floating silicone plate is hit. The changes in topography have been monitored by using a 3D laser scan, while a side-view camera recorded the position of the rising ball in time. Data have been post-processed with image analysis techniques (e.g., Particle Image Velocimetry) in order to obtain the evolution of topography, uplift rate, erosion patterns of the top layer, bulge width and mantle circulation during the experiment. We ran experiments with and without the shallow, erodible crustal layer in order to quantify the effect of erosion on dynamic topography. Preliminary results showed that both the maximum topography and uplift rate are inversely proportional to the lithospheric thickness. The maximum uplift rate and the deformation of the lithospheric plate occurred just before the arrival of the

  14. Surface modification of an epoxy resin with polyamines via cyanuric chloride coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaubroeck, David; De Baets, Johan; Desmet, Tim; Dubruel, Peter; Schacht, Etienne; Van Vaeck, Luc; Van Calster, André

    2010-08-01

    The presence of polyamine groups on the surface of dielectric resins potentially improves the adhesion with electrochemically deposited metals. In this article, first cyanuric chloride is covalently bound to the surface hydroxyl groups of the epoxy resin. The remaining reactive sites on the coupled cyanuric chloride molecule are then used to anchor polyamines. New data on the triazine coupling is presented. The surface reactions are monitored and characterized by means of ATR-IR, SEM-EDS, XPS and ToF-S-SIMS.

  15. Resonance Frequency Analysis for Surface-Coupled AFM Cantilever in Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Mirman, B; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Shifts in the resonance frequencies of surface-coupled atomic force microscope (AFM) probes are used as the basis for the detection mechanisms in a number of scanning probe microscopy techniques including atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), force modulation microscopy, and resonance enhanced piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). Here, we analyze resonance characteristics for AFM cantilever coupled to surface in liquid environment, and derive approximate expressions for resonant frequencies as a function of vertical and lateral spring constant of the tip-surface junction. This analysis provides a simplified framework for the interpretation of AFAM and PFM data in ambient, liquid, and vacuum environments.

  16. Polymerization or Cyclic Dimerization: Solvent Dependent Homo-Coupling of Terminal Alkynes at HOPG Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuemei; Liao, Lingyan; Wang, Shuai; Hu, Fangyun; Wang, Chen; Zeng, Qingdao

    2014-01-01

    Surface reactivity has become one of the most important issues in surface chemistry over the past few years. In this work, we, for the first time, have investigated the homo-coupling of a special terminal alkyne derivative on the highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) surface. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique, we have found that such coupling reaction seriously depends on the supramolecular assembly of the monomer on the studied substrate, whereas the latter appears an obvious solvent effect. As a result, the reaction in our system undergoes polymerization and cyclic dimerization process in 1-phenyloctane and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, respectively. That is to say, the solvent effect can be extended from the two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular self-assembly to surface chemical reactions, and the selective homo-coupling has been successfully achieved at the solid/liquid interface.

  17. Polymerization or cyclic dimerization: solvent dependent homo-coupling of terminal alkynes at HOPG surface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Liao, Lingyan; Wang, Shuai; Hu, Fangyun; Wang, Chen; Zeng, Qingdao

    2014-01-01

    Surface reactivity has become one of the most important issues in surface chemistry over the past few years. In this work, we, for the first time, have investigated the homo-coupling of a special terminal alkyne derivative on the highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) surface. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique, we have found that such coupling reaction seriously depends on the supramolecular assembly of the monomer on the studied substrate, whereas the latter appears an obvious solvent effect. As a result, the reaction in our system undergoes polymerization and cyclic dimerization process in 1-phenyloctane and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, respectively. That is to say, the solvent effect can be extended from the two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular self-assembly to surface chemical reactions, and the selective homo-coupling has been successfully achieved at the solid/liquid interface.

  18. Polymerization or Cyclic Dimerization: Solvent Dependent Homo-Coupling of Terminal Alkynes at HOPG Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuemei; Liao, Lingyan; Wang, Shuai; Hu, Fangyun; Wang, Chen; Zeng, Qingdao

    2014-01-01

    Surface reactivity has become one of the most important issues in surface chemistry over the past few years. In this work, we, for the first time, have investigated the homo-coupling of a special terminal alkyne derivative on the highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) surface. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) technique, we have found that such coupling reaction seriously depends on the supramolecular assembly of the monomer on the studied substrate, whereas the latter appears an obvious solvent effect. As a result, the reaction in our system undergoes polymerization and cyclic dimerization process in 1-phenyloctane and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, respectively. That is to say, the solvent effect can be extended from the two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular self-assembly to surface chemical reactions, and the selective homo-coupling has been successfully achieved at the solid/liquid interface. PMID:24469357

  19. Fano coupling between Rayleigh anomaly and localized surface plasmon resonance for sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feifei; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-06-15

    Fano coupling between Rayleigh anomaly and localized surface plasmon resonance has been observed in diffractive grating structures consisting of aluminum nanolines deposited on the top surface of photoresist with each nanoline composed of tightly aggregated aluminum nanoparticles. Localized surface plasmon resonance is excited both in the nanoparticles and in the nanolines by differently polarized light. The surface propagation mode excited by the first- and second-order Rayleigh diffraction anomaly is strongly scattered and diffracted by the plasmonic aluminum grating structures, producing light rays in the same direction as the reflected light beam with the same spectral feature as the Rayleigh anomaly. The narrow-band diffracted and scattered light appears as sharp dips in the broad-band reflective optical extinction spectrum of plasmon resonance, which is recognized as a kind of Fano coupling. This kind of coupled mode is utilized successfully in refractive-index-sensor devices with excellent sensitivity.

  20. Strong coupling of surface plasmon resonances to molecules on a gold grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Prince; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Wanare, Harshawardhan

    2016-10-01

    The intense electromagnetic fields generated by a surface plasmon resonance can strongly couple to molecules in the vicinity of the surface, causing significant line shifts. By measuring the angle dependent transmission spectrum through gold gratings with Rhodamine-6G molecules deposited on them, the coupling of the surface plasmon resonance to the molecular levels at different frequencies was determined. The strong coupling within the absorption and fluorescence bands of the molecules leads to anti-crossing of the states of the coupled system evidenced by the transmission minima. In particular, simultaneous existence of two distinct resonances at different wavevectors for a given wavelength over the absorption and fluorescence bands is observed. The multiplicity of the molecular levels and the coupling fields involved in the process is captured in a three-level Λ-system model coherently driven by the enhanced surface plasmon fields. The enhanced surface plasmon fields and the resonant absorption/fluorescent fields form the two arms of the Λ-system with approriate detuning.

  1. Vegetation controls on surface heat flux partitioning, and land-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Ian N.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2015-11-01

    We provide observational evidence that land-atmosphere coupling is underestimated by a conventional metric defined by the correlation between soil moisture and surface evaporative fraction (latent heat flux normalized by the sum of sensible and latent heat flux). Land-atmosphere coupling is 3 times stronger when using leaf area index as a correlate of evaporative fraction instead of soil moisture, in the Southern Great Plains. The role of vegetation was confirmed using adjacent flux measurement sites having identical atmospheric forcing but different vegetation phenology. Transpiration makes the relationship between evaporative fraction and soil moisture nonlinear and gives the appearance of weak coupling when using linear soil moisture metrics. Regions of substantial coupling extend to semiarid and humid continental climates across the United States, in terms of correlations between vegetation metrics and evaporative fraction. The hydrological cycle is more tightly constrained by the land surface than previously inferred from soil moisture.

  2. SHARC: ab Initio Molecular Dynamics with Surface Hopping in the Adiabatic Representation Including Arbitrary Couplings.

    PubMed

    Richter, Martin; Marquetand, Philipp; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Sola, Ignacio; González, Leticia

    2011-05-10

    We present a semiclassical surface-hopping method which is able to treat arbitrary couplings in molecular systems including all degrees of freedom. A reformulation of the standard surface-hopping scheme in terms of a unitary transformation matrix allows for the description of interactions like spin-orbit coupling or transitions induced by laser fields. The accuracy of our method is demonstrated in two systems. The first one, consisting of two model electronic states, validates the semiclassical approach in the presence of an electric field. In the second one, the dynamics in the IBr molecule in the presence of spin-orbit coupling after laser excitation is investigated. Due to an avoided crossing that originates from spin-orbit coupling, IBr dissociates into two channels: I + Br((2)P3/2) and I + Br*((2)P1/2). In both systems, the obtained results are in very good agreement with those calculated from exact quantum dynamical simulations.

  3. A multi-band spoof surface plasmon polariton coupling metasurface based on dispersion engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guoxiang; Shi, Hongyu; Li, Wei; He, Yuchen; Zhang, Anxue; Xu, Zhuo; Wei, Xiaoyong; Xia, Song

    2016-08-01

    We propose a metasurface to achieve multi-band helicity dependent directional spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) coupling for circular polarized light in the microwave range. Our work shows that the coupling frequencies of spoof SPPs on the gradient metasurface are related to the dispersion relations of the metasurface, which indicate the desired coupling frequency can be manipulated by dispersion engineering. The proposed metasurface has counter-directional phase gradients for different helicity incidents and possesses multiple different dispersion relations by carefully designing the geometric parameters of each unit, which leads to the multi-band helicity-controlled directional spoof SPPs coupling. Both the simulation and experiment show that the multi-band helicity-controlled directional spoof SPPs coupling is achieved with a high efficiency.

  4. Strong coupling electrostatics for randomly charged surfaces: antifragility and effective interactions.

    PubMed

    Ghodrat, Malihe; Naji, Ali; Komaie-Moghaddam, Haniyeh; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-05-01

    We study the effective interaction mediated by strongly coupled Coulomb fluids between dielectric surfaces carrying quenched, random monopolar charges with equal mean and variance, both when the Coulomb fluid consists only of mobile multivalent counterions and when it consists of an asymmetric ionic mixture containing multivalent and monovalent (salt) ions in equilibrium with an aqueous bulk reservoir. We analyze the consequences that follow from the interplay between surface charge disorder, dielectric and salt image effects, and the strong electrostatic coupling that results from multivalent counterions on the distribution of these ions and the effective interaction pressure they mediate between the surfaces. In a dielectrically homogeneous system, we show that the multivalent counterions are attracted towards the surfaces with a singular, disorder-induced potential that diverges logarithmically on approach to the surfaces, creating a singular but integrable counterion density profile that exhibits an algebraic divergence at the surfaces with an exponent that depends on the surface charge (disorder) variance. This effect drives the system towards a state of lower thermal 'disorder', one that can be described by a renormalized temperature, exhibiting thus a remarkable antifragility. In the presence of an interfacial dielectric discontinuity, the singular behavior of counterion density at the surfaces is removed but multivalent counterions are still accumulated much more strongly close to randomly charged surfaces as compared with uniformly charged ones. The interaction pressure acting on the surfaces displays in general a highly non-monotonic behavior as a function of the inter-surface separation with a prominent regime of attraction at small to intermediate separations. This attraction is caused directly by the combined effects from charge disorder and strong coupling electrostatics of multivalent counterions, which dominate the surface-surface repulsion due to

  5. Properties Data for Adhesion and Surface Chemistry of Aluminum: Sapphire-Aluminum, Single-Crystal Couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Pohlchuck, Bobby; Whitle, Neville C.; Hector, Louis G., Jr.; Adams, Jim

    1998-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine the adhesion and surface chemistry of single-crystal aluminum in contact with single-crystal sapphire (alumina). Pull-off force (adhesion) measurements were conducted under loads of 0. I to I mN in a vacuum of 10(exp -1) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) at room temperature. An Auger electron spectroscopy analyzer incorporated directly into an adhesion-measuring vacuum system was primarily used to define the chemical nature of the surfaces before and after adhesion measurements. The surfaces were cleaned by argon ion sputtering. With a clean aluminum-clean -sapphire couple the mean value and standard deviation of pull-off forces required to separate the surfaces were 3015 and 298 micro-N, respectively. With a contaminated aluminum-clean sapphire couple these values were 231 and 241 micro-N. The presence of a contaminant film on the aluminum surface reduced adhesion by a factor of 13. Therefore, surfaces cleanliness, particularly aluminum cleanliness, played an important role in the adhesion of the aluminum-sapphire couples. Pressures on the order of 10(exp -8) to 10(exp -9) Pa (approx. 10(exp -10) to 10(exp -11) torr) maintained a clean aluminum surface for only a short time (less then 1 hr) but maintained a clean sapphire surface, once it was achieved, for a much longer time.

  6. Investigation of Surface Flux Feedbacks for Coupled and Uncoupled Atmosphere-Ocean Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, F. R.

    2010-01-01

    Variability in the atmosphere and ocean are linked through coupled processes via the surface exchanges of heat, moisture, and momentum. This coupling can occur predominantly via one-way (ocean forcing atmosphere or atmosphere forcing ocean) or two-way interactions. The dominant type of interaction can vary both regionally and with season. The existence of the coupled variability can act to enhance the persistence of anomalies and therefore may be important to seasonal (and longer) forecasts. The leading components of surface exchange that regulate the damping of the atmospheric and oceanic anomalies most likely also varies regionally and seasonally. This study seeks to elucidate the roles of the various surface flux components using satellite based data sets. Using dynamical relationships expected for one-way forcing regimes, coupled and uncoupled variability is isolated and used in conjunction with composite-type analyses to reveal the nature of these coupling mechanisms and their variation in space and time. Results of this study can be useful in examining the veracity of general circulation model output by understanding how the coupling mechanisms are replicated as found in satellite based observations.

  7. Note concerning non-double-couple source components from slip along surfaces of revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Frohlich, C. )

    1990-05-10

    One suggested explanation for the origin of deviatoric, non-double-couple earthquake sources is that there is slip along curved fault surfaces. Here the author computes the moment tensor components for earthquakes along idealized faults which are surfaces of revolution. The calculations show that when the slip direction is around the axis of revolution, the earthquakes may possess purely double-couple sources, or purely compensated linear vector dipole (CLVD) sources, depending on the geometry of the fault and the slip. However, a surprising result is that the CLVD component is always zero for unidirectional slip along surfaces having a suitable degree of symmetry. Thus slip along a large variety of simple and plausible curved fault geometries produces a purely double-couple source.

  8. Strong Coupling of Rydberg Atoms and Surface Phonon Polaritons on Piezoelectric Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiteng; Chao, Yuanxi; Shaffer, James P

    2016-09-01

    We propose a hybrid quantum system where the strong coupling regime can be achieved between a Rydberg atomic ensemble and propagating surface phonon polaritons on a piezoelectric superlattice. By exploiting the large electric dipole moment and long lifetime of Rydberg atoms as well as tightly confined surface phonon polariton modes, it is possible to achieve a coupling constant far exceeding the relevant decay rates. The frequency of the surface mode can be selected so that it is resonant with a Rydberg transition by engineering the piezoelectric superlattice. We describe a way to observe the Rabi splitting associated with the strong coupling regime under realistic experimental conditions. The system can be viewed as a new type of optomechanical system.

  9. Strong Coupling of Rydberg Atoms and Surface Phonon Polaritons on Piezoelectric Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Jiteng; Chao, Yuanxi; Shaffer, James P.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a hybrid quantum system where the strong coupling regime can be achieved between a Rydberg atomic ensemble and propagating surface phonon polaritons on a piezoelectric superlattice. By exploiting the large electric dipole moment and long lifetime of Rydberg atoms as well as tightly confined surface phonon polariton modes, it is possible to achieve a coupling constant far exceeding the relevant decay rates. The frequency of the surface mode can be selected so that it is resonant with a Rydberg transition by engineering the piezoelectric superlattice. We describe a way to observe the Rabi splitting associated with the strong coupling regime under realistic experimental conditions. The system can be viewed as a new type of optomechanical system.

  10. Strong Coupling of Rydberg Atoms and Surface Phonon Polaritons on Piezoelectric Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jiteng; Chao, Yuanxi; Shaffer, James P

    2016-09-01

    We propose a hybrid quantum system where the strong coupling regime can be achieved between a Rydberg atomic ensemble and propagating surface phonon polaritons on a piezoelectric superlattice. By exploiting the large electric dipole moment and long lifetime of Rydberg atoms as well as tightly confined surface phonon polariton modes, it is possible to achieve a coupling constant far exceeding the relevant decay rates. The frequency of the surface mode can be selected so that it is resonant with a Rydberg transition by engineering the piezoelectric superlattice. We describe a way to observe the Rabi splitting associated with the strong coupling regime under realistic experimental conditions. The system can be viewed as a new type of optomechanical system. PMID:27636473

  11. Applications of time-domain spectroscopy to electron-phonon coupling dynamics at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu

    2014-10-01

    Photochemistry is one of the most important branches in chemistry to promote and control chemical reactions. In particular, there has been growing interest in photoinduced processes at solid surfaces and interfaces with liquids such as water for developing efficient solar energy conversion. For example, photoinduced charge transfer between adsorbates and semiconductor substrates at the surfaces of metal oxides induced by photogenerated holes and electrons is a core process in photovoltaics and photocatalysis. In these photoinduced processes, electron-phonon coupling plays a central role. This paper describes how time-domain spectroscopy is applied to elucidate electron-phonon coupling dynamics at metal and semiconductor surfaces. Because nuclear dynamics induced by electronic excitation through electron-phonon coupling take place in the femtosecond time domain, the pump-and-probe method with ultrashort pulses used in time-domain spectroscopy is a natural choice for elucidating the electron-phonon coupling at metal and semiconductor surfaces. Starting with a phenomenological theory of coherent phonons generated by impulsive electronic excitation, this paper describes a couple of illustrative examples of the applications of linear and nonlinear time-domain spectroscopy to a simple adsorption system, alkali metal on Cu(111), and more complex photocatalyst systems. PMID:25139240

  12. Estimating long-term surface hydrological components by coupling remote sensing observation with surface flux model.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.

    2002-05-02

    A model framework for parameterized subgrid-scale surface fluxes (PASS) has been applied to use satellite data, models, and routine surface observations to infer root-zone available moisture content and evapotranspiration rate with moderate spatial resolution within Walnut River Watershed in Kansas. Biweekly composite normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) data are derived from observations by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites. Local surface observations provide data on downwelling solar irradiance, air temperature, relative humidity, and wind speed. Surface parameters including roughness length, albedo, surface water conductance, and the ratio of soil heat flux to net radiation are estimated; pixel-specific near-surface meteorological conditions such as air temperature, vapor pressure, and wind speed are adjusted according to local surface forcing. The PASS modeling system makes effective use of satellite data and can be run for large areas for which flux data do not exist and surface meteorological data are available from only a limited number of ground stations. The long-term surface hydrological budget is evaluated using radar-derived precipitation estimates, surface meteorological observations, and satellite data. The modeled hydrological components in the Walnut River Watershed compare well with stream gauge data and observed surface fluxes during 1999.

  13. Efficient coupling and transport of a surface plasmon at 780 nm in a gold nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-08-01

    We study plasmonic nanostructures in single-crystal gold with scanning electron and femtosecond photoemission electron microscopies. We design an integrated laser coupling and nanowire waveguide structure by focused ion beam lithography in single-crystal gold flakes. The photoemission results show that the laser field is efficiently coupled into a propagating surface plasmon by a simple hole structure and propagates efficiently in an adjacent nano-bar waveguide. A strong local field is created by the propagating surface plasmon at the nano-bar tip. A similar structure, with a decreased waveguide width and thickness, displayed significantly more intense photoemission indicating enhanced local electric field at the sharper tip.

  14. Efficient Coupling and Transport of a Surface Plasmon at 780 nm in a Gold Nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2015-08-28

    We studied plasmonic nanostructures in single-crystal gold with scanning electron and femtosecond photoemission electron microscopies. We designed an integrated laser coupling and nanowire waveguide structure by focused ion beam lithography in single-crystal gold flakes. The photoemission results show that the laser field is efficiently coupled into a propagating surface plasmon by a simple hole structure and propagates efficiently in an adjacent nano-bar waveguide. A strong local field is created by the propagating surface plasmon at the nano-bar tip. A similar structure, with a decreased waveguide width and thickness, displayed significantly more intense photoemission indicating enhanced local electric field at the sharper tip.

  15. Efficient out-coupling and beaming of Tamm optical states via surface plasmon polariton excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Garcia, M.; Ho, Y.-L. D.; Taverne, M. P. C.; Chen, L.-F.; Rarity, J. G.; Oulton, R.; Murshidy, M. M.; Edwards, A. P.; Adawi, A. M.; Serry, M. Y.

    2014-06-09

    We present evidence of optical Tamm states to surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupling. We experimentally demonstrate that for a Bragg stack with a thin metal layer on the surface, hybrid Tamm-SPP modes may be excited when a grating on the air-metal interface is introduced. Out-coupling via the grating to free space propagation is shown to enhance the transmission as well as the directionality and polarization selection for the transmitted beam. We suggest that this system will be useful on those devices, where a metallic electrical contact as well as beaming and polarization control is needed.

  16. Phononic crystal surface mode coupling and its use in acoustic Doppler velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Ahmet; Salman, Aysevil; Kaya, Olgun Adem; Ulug, Bulent

    2016-02-01

    It is numerically shown that surface modes of two-dimensional phononic crystals, which are Bloch modes bound to the interface between the phononic crystal and the surrounding host, can couple back and forth between the surfaces in a length scale determined by the separation of two surfaces and frequency. Supercell band structure computations through the finite-element method reveal that the surface band of an isolated surface splits into two bands which support either symmetric or antisymmetric hybrid modes. When the surface separation is 3.5 times the lattice constant, a coupling length varying between 30 and 48 periods can be obtained which first increases linearly with frequency and, then, decreases rapidly. In the linear regime, variation of coupling length can be used as a means of measuring speeds of objects on the order of 0.1m/s by incorporating the Doppler shift. Speed sensitivity can be improved by increasing surface separation at the cost of larger device sizes.

  17. Directional surface plasmon-coupled emission: a new method for high sensitivity detection

    PubMed Central

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence emission is nearly isotropic in space. With typical optical components the collection efficiency is 1% or less. In this preliminary report, we describe a novel approach to transforming the normally isotropic emission into directional emission with a collection efficiency near 50%. This can be accomplished for fluorophores located near a semi-transparent silver film on a glass substrate. The emission couples with the surface plasmon resonance on the silver surface and enters the transparent substrate at a sharply defined angle, the surface plasmon angle for the emission wavelength. We estimate that 40–70% of the total emission enters the substrate at the plasmon angle and can thus be directed towards a detector. Background emission from fluorophores distant from the silver does not couple with the plasmon and is not detected. Different emission wavelengths couple at different angles allowing spectral discrimination without additional optics. Surface plasmon-coupled emission represents a new technology which can be used for high detection efficiency with microfluidic and/or surface-bound assay formats. PMID:12893239

  18. Alpha-fetoprotein detection by using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence fiber-optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Chen, Ran-Chou; Li, Ying-Chang; Yu, Chih-Jen; Hsieh, Bao-Yu; Chou, Chien

    2007-11-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) detection by using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence (LSPCF) fiber-optic biosensor is setup and experimentally demonstrated. It is based on gold nanoparticle (GNP) and coupled with localized surface plasmon wave on the surface of GNP. In this experiment, the fluorophores are labeled on anti-AFP which are bound to protein A conjugated GNP. Thus, LSPCF is excited with high efficiency in the near field of localized surface plasmon wave. Therefore, not only the sensitivity of LSPCF biosensor is enhanced but also the specific selectivity of AFP is improved. Experimentally, the ability of real time measurement in the range of AFP concentration from 0.1ng/ml to 100ng/ml was detected. To compare with conventional methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or radioimmunoassay (RIA), the LSPCF fiber-optic biosensor performs higher or comparable detection sensitivity, respectively.

  19. Long-term Simulations of Pluto's Atmosphere and Surface as a Coupled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalucha, Angela M.

    2015-11-01

    Previous work has modeled either Pluto's atmosphere or surface/subsurface as separate entities. In reality, these two regions should be coupled energetically and physically because of the accumulation, sublimation, and transport of volatiles (here, N2). Simulation results over multi-Pluto years are presented from a general circulation model that has both detailed atmospheric and surface/subsurface modules. As the initial model conditions that will ultimately reproduce the observed surface pressures from New Horizons, stellar occultation data, and spectroscopic observations are not known, by trial and error the model is initialized with different surface pressures and amounts of surface ice (collectively known as the volatile inventory). This “brute force” method is now a viable strategy given the ongoing development of the Pluto general circulation model (based on the MIT general circulation model dynamical core; Zalucha & Michaels 2013) and modern supercomputing power. The coupled atmosphere and surface/subsurface model is run until a yearly repeatable frost cycle occurs (if at all). Surface coverage of volatiles and surface pressure will be presented from the various scenarios. Ancillary variables such temperature (of both the atmosphere and surface/subsurface) and wind direction and magnitude will also be shown for cases of particular interest.

  20. Linking Tectonics and Surface Processes through SNAC-CHILD Coupling: Preliminary Results Towards Interoperable Modeling Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, E.; Kelbert, A.; Peckham, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate that code coupling can be an efficient and flexible method for modeling complicated two-way interactions between tectonic and surface processes with SNAC-CHILD coupling as an example. SNAC is a deep earth process model (a geodynamic/tectonics model), built upon a scientific software framework called StGermain and also compatible with a model coupling framework called Pyre. CHILD is a popular surface process model (a landscape evolution model), interfaced to the CSDMS (Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System) modeling framework. We first present proof-of-concept but non-trivial results from a simplistic coupling scheme. We then report progress towards augmenting SNAC with a Basic Model Interface (BMI), a framework-agnostic standard interface developed by CSDMS that uses the CSDMS Standard Names as controlled vocabulary for model communication across domains. Newly interfaced to BMI, SNAC will be easily coupled with CHILD as well as other BMI-compatible models. In broader context, this work will test BMI as a general and easy-to-implement mechanism for sharing models between modeling frameworks and is a part of the NSF-funded EarthCube Building Blocks project, "Earth System Bridge: Spanning Scientific Communities with Interoperable Modeling Frameworks."

  1. A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced grating-coupling phase-interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Sonato, A; Agostini, M; Ruffato, G; Gazzola, E; Liuni, D; Greco, G; Travagliati, M; Cecchini, M; Romanato, F

    2016-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor in which SAW-induced mixing and phase-interrogation grating-coupling SPR are combined in a single lithium niobate lab-on-a-chip is demonstrated. Thiol-polyethylene glycol adsorption and avidin/biotin binding kinetics were monitored by exploiting the high sensitivity of grating-coupling SPR under azimuthal control. A time saturation binding kinetics reduction of 82% and 24% for polyethylene and avidin adsorption was obtained, respectively, due to the fluid mixing enhancement by means of the SAW-generated chaotic advection. These results represent the first implementation of a nanostructured SAW-SPR microfluidic biochip capable of significantly improving the molecule binding kinetics on a single, portable device. In addition, the biochip here proposed is suitable for a great variety of biosensing applications.

  2. A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced grating-coupling phase-interrogation surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor.

    PubMed

    Sonato, A; Agostini, M; Ruffato, G; Gazzola, E; Liuni, D; Greco, G; Travagliati, M; Cecchini, M; Romanato, F

    2016-04-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-enhanced, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) microfluidic biosensor in which SAW-induced mixing and phase-interrogation grating-coupling SPR are combined in a single lithium niobate lab-on-a-chip is demonstrated. Thiol-polyethylene glycol adsorption and avidin/biotin binding kinetics were monitored by exploiting the high sensitivity of grating-coupling SPR under azimuthal control. A time saturation binding kinetics reduction of 82% and 24% for polyethylene and avidin adsorption was obtained, respectively, due to the fluid mixing enhancement by means of the SAW-generated chaotic advection. These results represent the first implementation of a nanostructured SAW-SPR microfluidic biochip capable of significantly improving the molecule binding kinetics on a single, portable device. In addition, the biochip here proposed is suitable for a great variety of biosensing applications. PMID:26932784

  3. Enhanced electron-phonon coupling for a semiconductor charge qubit in a surface phonon cavity.

    PubMed

    Chen, J C H; Sato, Y; Kosaka, R; Hashisaka, M; Muraki, K; Fujisawa, T

    2015-01-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a major decoherence mechanism, which often causes scattering and energy dissipation in semiconductor electronic systems. However, this electron-phonon coupling may be used in a positive way for reaching the strong or ultra-strong coupling regime in an acoustic version of the cavity quantum electrodynamic system. Here we propose and demonstrate a phonon cavity for surface acoustic waves, which is made of periodic metal fingers that constitute Bragg reflectors on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Phonon band gap and cavity phonon modes are identified by frequency, time and spatially resolved measurements of the piezoelectric potential. Tunneling spectroscopy on a double quantum dot indicates the enhancement of phonon assisted transitions in a charge qubit. This encourages studying of acoustic cavity quantum electrodynamics with surface phonons. PMID:26469629

  4. Enhanced electron-phonon coupling for a semiconductor charge qubit in a surface phonon cavity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J. C. H.; Sato, Y.; Kosaka, R.; Hashisaka, M.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Electron-phonon coupling is a major decoherence mechanism, which often causes scattering and energy dissipation in semiconductor electronic systems. However, this electron-phonon coupling may be used in a positive way for reaching the strong or ultra-strong coupling regime in an acoustic version of the cavity quantum electrodynamic system. Here we propose and demonstrate a phonon cavity for surface acoustic waves, which is made of periodic metal fingers that constitute Bragg reflectors on a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Phonon band gap and cavity phonon modes are identified by frequency, time and spatially resolved measurements of the piezoelectric potential. Tunneling spectroscopy on a double quantum dot indicates the enhancement of phonon assisted transitions in a charge qubit. This encourages studying of acoustic cavity quantum electrodynamics with surface phonons. PMID:26469629

  5. Coupling of a dipolar emitter into one-dimensional surface plasmon

    PubMed Central

    Barthes, Julien; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Dereux, Alain; Francs, Gérard Colas des

    2013-01-01

    Quantum plasmonics relies on a new paradigm for light–matter interaction. It benefits from strong confinement of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) that ensures efficient coupling at a deep subwavelength scale, instead of working with a long lifetime cavity polariton that increases the duration of interaction. The large bandwidth and the strong confinement of one dimensional SPP enable controlled manipulation of a nearby quantum emitter. This paves the way to ultrafast nanooptical devices. However, the large SPP bandwidth originates from strong losses so that a clear understanding of the coupling process is needed. In this report, we investigate in details the coupling between a single emitter and a plasmonic nanowire, but also SPP mediated coupling between two emitters. We notably clarify the role of losses in the Purcell factor, unavoidable to achieve nanoscale confinement down to 10−4(λ/n)3. Both the retarded and band-edge quasi-static regimes are discussed. PMID:24061164

  6. Using High Frequency Focused Water-Coupled Ultrasound for 3-D Surface Depression Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. A prior study was performed demonstrating that focused air-coupled ultrasound at 1 MHz was capable of profiling surfaces with 25 micron depth resolution and 400 micron lateral resolution over a 1.4 mm depth range. In this article, the question of whether higher-frequency focused water-coupled ultrasound can improve on these specifications is addressed. 10 and 25 MHz focused ultrasonic transducers were employed in the water-coupled mode. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface were acquired and converted to depth / surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in water (V). Results are compared for the two frequencies used and with those from the 1 MHz air-coupled configuration.

  7. Extension of physical component BFC method for the analysis of free-surface flows coupled with moving boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, D.; Takizawa, A.; Kondo, S.

    A newly developed ``physical component boundary fitted coordinate (PCBFC) method'' is extended for the analysis of free-surface flows coupled with moving boundaries. Extra techniques are employed to deal with the coupling movement of the free surface and moving boundaries. After the validation of the extension by several benchmark problems, the method is successfully applied for the first time to the simulation of overflow-induced vibration of the weir coupled with sloshing of the free-surface liquid.

  8. Tamm plasmon- and surface plasmon-coupled emission from hybrid plasmonic–photonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yikai; Zhang, Douguo; Zhu, Liangfu; Wang, Ruxue; Wang, Pei; Ming, Hai; Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2015-01-01

    Photonic and plasmon-coupled emissions present new opportunities for control on light emission from fluorophores, and have many applications in the physical and biological sciences. The mechanism of and the influencing factors for the coupling between the fluorescent molecules and plasmon and/or photonic modes are active areas of research. In this paper, we describe a hybrid photonic–plasmonic structure that simultaneously contains two plasmon modes: surface plasmons (SPs) and Tamm plasmons (TPs), both of which can modulate fluorescence emission. Experimental results show that both SP-coupled emission (SPCE) and TP-coupled emission (TPCE) can be observed simultaneously with this hybrid structure. Due to the different resonant angles of the TP and SP modes, the TPCE and SPCE can be beamed in different directions and can be separated easily. Back focal plane images of the fluorescence emission show that the relative intensities of the SPCE and TPCE can be changed if the probes are at different locations inside the hybrid structure, which reveals the probe location-dependent different coupling strengths of the fluorescent molecules with SPs and TPs. The different coupling strengths are ascribed to the electric field distribution of the two modes in the structure. Here, we present an understanding of these factors influencing mode coupling with probes, which is vital for structure design for suitable applications in sensing and diagnostics. PMID:26526929

  9. COUPLING

    DOEpatents

    Frisch, E.; Johnson, C.G.

    1962-05-15

    A detachable coupling arrangement is described which provides for varying the length of the handle of a tool used in relatively narrow channels. The arrangement consists of mating the key and keyhole formations in the cooperating handle sections. (AEC)

  10. A Coupled Land Surface-Subsurface Biogeochemical Model for Aqueous and Gaseous Nitrogen Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Maggi, F.; Riley, W.; Pan, L.; Xu, T.; Oldenburg, C.; Miller, N.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years concern has grown over the contribution of nitrogen (N) fertilizers to nitrate (NOB3PB-P) water pollution and atmospheric pollution of nitrous oxide (NB2BO), nitric oxide (NO), and ammonia (NHB3B). Characterizing the amount and species of N losses is therefore essential in developing a strategy to estimate and mitigate N leaching and emission to the atmosphere. Indeed, transformations of nitrogen depend strongly on water content, soil temperature, and nitrogen concentration. Land surface processes therefore have to be taken into account to properly characterize N biogeochemical cycling. However, most current nitrogen biogeochemical models take the land surface as the upper boundary by lumping the complex processes above the surface as known boundary conditions. In this study, an extant subsurface mechanistic N cycle model (TOUGHREACT-N) was coupled with the community land model (CLM). The resulting coupled model extends the modeling capability of TOUGHREACT-N to include the important energy, momentum, and moisture dynamics provided by CLM. The coupled model showed a significant impact of land-surface diurnal forcing on soil temperature and moisture and on nitrogen fluxes. We also discuss field applications of the model and discuss how temporal dynamics of nitrogen fluxes are affected by land surface processes.

  11. Weak coupling expansion of Yang-Mills theory on recursive infinite genus surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Debashis; Imbimbo, Camillo; Kumar, Dushyant

    2014-10-01

    We analyze the partition function of two dimensional Yang-Mills theory on a family of surfaces of infinite genus. These surfaces have a recursive structure, which was used by one of us to compute the partition function that results in a generalized Migdal formula. In this paper we study the `small area' (weak coupling) expansion of the partition function, by exploiting the fact that the generalized Migdal formula is analytic in the (complexification of the) Euler characteristic. The structure of the perturbative part of the weak coupling expansion suggests that the moduli space of flat connections (of the SU(2) and SO(3) theories) on these infinite genus surfaces are well defined, perhaps in an appropriate regularization.

  12. Impact of Soil Moisture Assimilation on Land Surface Model Spinup and Coupled Land-Atmosphere Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santanello, J. A., Jr.; Kumar, S.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Lawston, P.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in satellite monitoring of the terrestrial water cycle have led to a concerted effort to assimilate soil moisture observations from various platforms into offline land surface models (LSMs). One principal but still open question is that of the ability of land data assimilation (LDA) to improve LSM initial conditions for coupled short-term weather prediction. In this study, the impact of assimilating Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) soil moisture retrievals on coupled WRF forecasts is examined during the summers of dry (2006) and wet (2007) surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. LDA is carried out using NASA's Land Information System (LIS) and the Noah LSM using an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) approach. The impacts of LDA on the a) soil moisture and soil temperature initial conditions for WRF, b) land-atmosphere coupling characteristics, and c) ambient weather of the coupled LIS-WRF simulations are then assessed. Results show that impacts of soil moisture LDA during the spinup can significantly modify LSM states and fluxes, depending on regime and season. Results also quantify the impacts of using seasonal versus cumulative CDF matching and coarse vs. fine-scale atmospheric forcing approaches. Downstream impacts on coupled simulations vary according to the strength of the LDA impact at initialization, and significant modification to the soil moisture-flux-PBL-ambient weather process chain are observed. Overall, improvements due to LDA in this study show promise for future soil moisture assimilation applications in weather and climate.

  13. Translation of Land Surface Model Accuracy and Uncertainty into Coupled Land-Atmosphere Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A.; Kumar, Sujay; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Kenneth W.; Zhou, Shuija

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) Interactions playa critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface heat and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty estimation module in NASA's Land Information System (US-OPT/UE), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to a land cover and soil type mapping of the observation sites to the full model domain. The impact of calibrated parameters on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF Simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity, and the potential for combining this approach with satellite remote sensing data are also discussed.

  14. Online Coupling of Flow-Field Flow Fractionation and Single Particle Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry: Characterization of Nanoparticle Surface Coating Thickness and Aggregation State

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface coating thickness and aggregation state have strong influence on the environmental fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials. In this study, flow-field flow fractionation coupled on-line with single particle inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry i...

  15. Surface Water and Energy Budgets for Sub-Saharan Africa in GFDL Coupled Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, D.; Wood, E. F.; Vecchi, G. A.; Jia, L.; Pan, M.

    2015-12-01

    This study compare surface water and energy budget variables from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) FLOR models with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), Princeton University Global Meteorological Forcing Dataset (PGF), and PGF-driven Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model outputs, as well as available observations over the sub-Saharan Africa. The comparison was made for four configurations of the FLOR models that included FLOR phase 1 (FLOR-p1) and phase 2 (FLOR-p2) and two phases of flux adjusted versions (FLOR-FA-p1 and FLOR-FA-p2). Compared to p1, simulated atmospheric states in p2 were nudged to the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis. The seasonal cycle and annual mean of major surface water (precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff, and change of storage) and energy variables (sensible heat, ground heat, latent heat, net solar radiation, net longwave radiation, and skin temperature) over a 34-yr period during 1981-2014 were compared in different regions in sub-Saharan Africa (West Africa, East Africa, and Southern Africa). In addition to evaluating the means in three sub-regions, empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) analyses were conducted to compare both spatial and temporal characteristics of water and energy budget variables from four versions of GFDL FLOR, NCEP CFSR, PGF, and VIC outputs. This presentation will show how well each coupled climate model represented land surface physics and reproduced spatiotemporal characteristics of surface water and energy budget variables. We discuss what caused differences in surface water and energy budgets in land surface components of coupled climate model, climate reanalysis, and reanalysis driven land surface model. The comparisons will reveal whether flux adjustment and nudging would improve depiction of the surface water and energy budgets in coupled climate models.

  16. A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer for determination of the posture of a reflective surface.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Peng-Cheng; Ding, Xue-Mei; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2016-08-01

    A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer capable of determining of the posture of a reflective surface of a measuring mirror is proposed. The newly constructed instrument combines fiber-coupled displacement and angular measurement technologies. The proposed interferometer has advantages of both the fiber-coupled and the spatially beam-separated interferometer. A portable dual-position sensitive detector (PSD)-based unit within this proposed interferometer measures the parallelism of the two source beams to guide the fiber-coupling adjustment. The portable dual PSD-based unit measures not only the pitch and yaw of the retro-reflector but also measures the posture of the reflective surface. The experimental results of displacement calibration show that the deviations between the proposed interferometer and a reference one, Agilent 5530, at two different common beam directions are both less than ±35 nm, thus verifying the effectiveness of the beam parallelism measurement. The experimental results of angular calibration show that deviations of pitch and yaw with the auto-collimator (as a reference) are less than ±2 arc sec, thus proving the proposed interferometer's effectiveness for determination of the posture of a reflective surface. PMID:27587101

  17. Ligand-specific regulation of the extracellular surface of a G-protein-coupled receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bokoch, Michael P.; Zou, Yaozhong; Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; Liu, Corey W.; Nygaard, Rie; Rosenbaum, Daniel M.; Fung, Juan José; Choi, Hee-Jung; Thian, Foon Sun; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Puglisi, Joseph D.; Weis, William I.; Pardo, Leonardo; Prosser, R. Scott; Mueller, Luciano; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2010-01-14

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters. They are the largest group of therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. Recent crystal structures of GPCRs have revealed structural conservation extending from the orthosteric ligand-binding site in the transmembrane core to the cytoplasmic G-protein-coupling domains. In contrast, the extracellular surface (ECS) of GPCRs is remarkably diverse and is therefore an ideal target for the discovery of subtype-selective drugs. However, little is known about the functional role of the ECS in receptor activation, or about conformational coupling of this surface to the native ligand-binding pocket. Here we use NMR spectroscopy to investigate ligand-specific conformational changes around a central structural feature in the ECS of the {beta}{sub 2} adrenergic receptor: a salt bridge linking extracellular loops 2 and 3. Small-molecule drugs that bind within the transmembrane core and exhibit different efficacies towards G-protein activation (agonist, neutral antagonist and inverse agonist) also stabilize distinct conformations of the ECS. We thereby demonstrate conformational coupling between the ECS and the orthosteric binding site, showing that drugs targeting this diverse surface could function as allosteric modulators with high subtype selectivity. Moreover, these studies provide a new insight into the dynamic behaviour of GPCRs not addressable by static, inactive-state crystal structures.

  18. A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer for determination of the posture of a reflective surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Peng-Cheng; Ding, Xue-Mei; Tan, Jiu-Bin

    2016-08-01

    A fiber-coupled displacement measuring interferometer capable of determining of the posture of a reflective surface of a measuring mirror is proposed. The newly constructed instrument combines fiber-coupled displacement and angular measurement technologies. The proposed interferometer has advantages of both the fiber-coupled and the spatially beam-separated interferometer. A portable dual-position sensitive detector (PSD)-based unit within this proposed interferometer measures the parallelism of the two source beams to guide the fiber-coupling adjustment. The portable dual PSD-based unit measures not only the pitch and yaw of the retro-reflector but also measures the posture of the reflective surface. The experimental results of displacement calibration show that the deviations between the proposed interferometer and a reference one, Agilent 5530, at two different common beam directions are both less than ±35 nm, thus verifying the effectiveness of the beam parallelism measurement. The experimental results of angular calibration show that deviations of pitch and yaw with the auto-collimator (as a reference) are less than ±2 arc sec, thus proving the proposed interferometer's effectiveness for determination of the posture of a reflective surface.

  19. Vegetation controls on surface heat flux partitioning, and land-atmosphere coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. N.; Torn, M. S.; Lu, Y.; Kueppers, L. M.; Bagley, J.

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between soil moisture and surface evaporative fraction (latent heat flux normalized by the sum of sensible and latent heat flux) is critical in linking land surface forcing to clouds and precipitation. The evaporative fraction (EF) can influence precipitation directly through precipitation recycling, and indirectly through convective triggering. Several studies have shown that the observed correlation between soil moisture and EF is weaker than the correlation predicted in climate models, suggesting that land-atmosphere coupling is overestimated in models. Here, we present evidence that observed land-atmosphere coupling is underestimated when defined by the correlation between soil moisture and EF. Land-atmosphere coupling is three times stronger when using leaf area index as a correlate of EF instead of soil moisture, in the Southern Great Plains. This stronger coupling results from transpiration of relatively deep soil moisture. Furthermore, transpiration makes the relationship between EF and soil moisture nonlinear, and gives rise to the false appearance of weak coupling when using linear soil moisture metrics. The geographical extent of land-atmosphere coupling is not as small as in previous estimates. Regions of substantial land-atmosphere coupling extend to semi-arid and humid continental climates across the United States, in terms of correlations between vegetation metrics and EF. A comparison of the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) to observations in the Southern Great Plains reveals that the model overestimates correlations between soil moisture and EF, but underestimates correlations between leaf area index and EF by 30%, even when using observed daily leaf area index and meteorological forcing. It appears that the hydrological cycle is more tightly constrained by vegetation in observations than in climate models.

  20. Surface acoustic wave regulated single photon emission from a coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, M.; Kapfinger, S.; Reichert, T.; Finley, J. J.; Wixforth, A.; Kaniber, M.; Krenner, H. J.

    2016-07-01

    A coupled quantum dot-nanocavity system in the weak coupling regime of cavity-quantumelectrodynamics is dynamically tuned in and out of resonance by the coherent elastic field of a fSAW ≃ 800 MHz surface acoustic wave. When the system is brought to resonance by the sound wave, light-matter interaction is strongly increased by the Purcell effect. This leads to a precisely timed single photon emission as confirmed by the second order photon correlation function, g(2). All relevant frequencies of our experiment are faithfully identified in the Fourier transform of g(2), demonstrating high fidelity regulation of the stream of single photons emitted by the system.

  1. An algorithm for simulation of electrochemical systems with surface-bulk coupling strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoni, Matthew; Petzold, Linda

    2010-01-01

    In Buoni and Petzold (2007) [13] we described a new algorithm for simulation of electrochemical systems on two-dimensional irregular, time-dependent domains. Here we show how to extend the algorithm to three dimensions. We demonstrate our three-dimensional algorithm by simulating copper electrodeposition into a via structure. This problem poses challenges for the coupling of the dilute electrolyte (bulk) model to the surface dynamics model, which involves a complex network of reactions. To handle this coupling, we introduce a new and highly effective semi-implicit method.

  2. Polarization-insensitive unidirectional spoof surface plasmon polaritons coupling by gradient metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong-yu, Shi; An-xue, Zhang; Jian-zhong, Chen; Jia-fu, Wang; Song, Xia; Zhuo, Xu

    2016-07-01

    A polarization-insensitive unidirectional spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupler mediated by a gradient metasurface is proposed. The field distributions and average Poynting vector of the coupled spoof SPPs are analyzed. The simulated and experimental results support the theoretical analysis and indicate that the designed gradient metasurface can couple both the parallel-polarized and normally-polarized incident waves to the spoof SPPs propagating in the same direction at about 5 GHz. Project supported by the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2015M580849) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61471292, 61501365, 61471388, 61331005, 41404095, and 41390454).

  3. Simulation of land-atmosphere gaseous exchange using a coupled land surface-biogeochemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Riley, W. J.; Perez, T. J.; Pan, L.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to develop and evaluate biogeochemical models that on the one hand represent vegetation and soil dynamics and on the other hand provide energy and water fluxes in a temporal resolution suitable for biogeochemical processes. In this study, we present a consistent coupling between a common land surface model (CLM3.0) and a recently developed biogeochemical model (TOUGHREACT-N). The model TOUGHREACT-N (TR-N) is one of the few process-based models that simulate green house gases fluxes by using an implicit scheme to solve the diffusion equations governing soil heat and water fluxes. By coupling with CLM3.0, we have significantly improved TR-N by including realistic representations of surface water, energy, and momentum exchanges, through the use of improved formulations for soil evaporation, plant transpiration, vegetation growth, and plant nitrogen uptake embedded in CLM3.0. The coupled CLMTR-N model is a first step for a full coupling of land surface and biogeochemical processes. The model is evaluated with measurements of soil temperature, soil water content, and N2O and N2 gaseous emission data from fallow, corn, and forest sites in Venezuela. The results demonstrate that the CLMTR-N model simulates realistic diurnal variation of soil temperature, soil water content, and N gaseous fluxes. For example, mean differences between predicted and observed midday near-surface soil water content were 8, 11, and 4 % in July, August, and September. The sensitivity of the biogeochemical processes and resulting N emissions to variation in environmental drivers is high, which indicates the need to calculate biogeochemical processes in, at least, two hourly time steps using dynamically updated (rather than daily averaged) soil environmental conditions. The development in CLMTR-N of such a complex representation of processes will allow us to characterize relevant processes and simplifications appropriate for regional to global-scale coupled biogeochemical and

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Coupled Groundwater Processes within a Land Surface Model

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Miller, N L; Kollet, S J

    2004-05-05

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budgets that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, models for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM2.0) and a variably-saturated groundwater model (ParFlow) have been coupled as single model, in single-column and distributed form. An initial set of single column simulations based on data from the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS) and synthetic data demonstrate the temporal dynamics of both of the coupled models. A 15-year single-column simulation using the data from the Usadievskiy catchment in Valdai, Russia demonstrate the coupled model's ability to accurately predict the soil moisture profile and location of the water table, in addition to water and energy balance within the watershed. The distributed coupled model will also be demonstrated using a series of spatially variable subsurface parameter runs, which will be used to investigate upscaling in land-surface models. The coupled model will ultimately be used to assist

  5. Measurements and kinetic modeling of energy coupling in volume and surface nanosecond pulse discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Yin, Zhiyao; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2013-02-01

    Nanosecond pulse discharge plasma imaging, coupled pulse energy measurements, and kinetic modeling are used to analyze the mechanism of energy coupling in high repetition rate, spatially uniform, nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane geometry. Under these conditions, coupled pulse energy scales nearly linearly with pressure (number density), with energy coupled per molecule being nearly constant, in good agreement with the kinetic model predictions. In spite of high-peak reduced electric field reached before breakdown, E/N ˜ 500-700 Td, the reduced electric field in the plasma after breakdown is much lower, E/N ˜ 50-100 Td, predicting that a significant fraction of energy coupled to the air plasma, up to 30-40%, is loaded into nitrogen vibrational mode. A self-similar, local ionization kinetic model predicting energy coupling to the plasma in a surface ionization wave discharge produced by a nanosecond voltage pulse has been developed. The model predicts key discharge parameters such as ionization wave speed and propagation distance, electric field, electron density, plasma layer thickness, and pulse energy coupled to the plasma, demonstrating good qualitative agreement with experimental data and two-dimensional kinetic modeling calculations. The model allows an analytic solution and lends itself to incorporation into existing compressible flow codes, at very little computational cost, for in-depth analysis of the nanosecond discharge plasma flow control mechanism. The use of the model would place the main emphasis on coupling of localized thermal perturbations produced by the discharge with the flow via compression waves and would provide quantitative insight into the flow control mechanism on a long time scale.

  6. Investigation of Surface Flux Feedbacks for Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Pete

    2010-01-01

    The use of "dynamical coupling" rules allows for identifying coupled vs. uncoupled anomalies and one-way interaction. Results of this study are consistent with those of Pena et al. (2003,2004) although using a more recent reanalysis at higher resolution. Find more atmosphere-forcing coupled anomalies in the extratropics and ocean-forcing anomalies in the tropics. The LHF and SWR show the largest magnitude anomalies in the composite analysis. The turbulent flux responses are due to interactions between the differing responses in wind speed and near-surface gradients. The radiative fluxes responses are primarily tied to changes in cloud fraction, as expected, though longwave response can be tied more to changes in the upwelling component.

  7. Couple molecular excitons to surface plasmon polaritons in an organic-dye-doped nanostructured cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Shi, Wen-Bo; Wang, Di; Xu, Yue; Peng, Ru-Wen; Fan, Ren-Hao; Wang, Qian-Jin; Wang, Mu

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate experimentally the hybrid coupling among molecular excitons, surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and Fabry-Perot (FP) mode in a nanostructured cavity, where a J-aggregates doped PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) layer is inserted between a silver grating and a thick silver film. By tuning the thickness of the doped PVA layer, the FP cavity mode efficiently couples with the molecular excitons, forming two nearly dispersion-free modes. The dispersive SPPs interact with these two modes while increasing the incident angle, leading to the formation of three hybrid polariton bands. By retrieving the mixing fractions of the polariton band components from the measured angular reflection spectra, we find all these three bands result from the strong coupling among SPPs, FP mode, and excitons. This work may inspire related studies on hybrid light-matter interactions, and achieve potential applications on multimode polariton lasers and optical spectroscopy.

  8. Mid-infrared surface plasmon polariton chemical sensing on fiber-coupled ITO coated glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, Javier; Ródenas, Airán; Aguiló, Magdalena; Fernandez, Toney; Solis, Javier; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-06-01

    A novel fiber-coupled ITO coated glass slide sensor for performing surface plasmon polariton chemical monitoring in the 3.5 um mid-IR range is reported. Efficient mid-IR fiber coupling is achieved with 3D laser written waveguides, and the coupling of glass waveguide modes to ITO SPPs is driven by the varying phase matching conditions of different aqueous analytes across the anomalous dispersion range determined by their molecular fingerprints. By means of using both a mid-IR fiber supercontinuum source and a diode laser the excitation of SPPs is demonstrated. The efficient optical monitoring of mid-IR SPPs in smart glass could have a broad range of applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  9. Strong coupling of surface plasmon polaritons and ensembles of dye molecules.

    PubMed

    Tumkur, T U; Zhu, G; Noginov, M A

    2016-02-22

    We demonstrate the strong coupling of dye molecules to surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited in the Kretschmann geometry and propagating at the interface of silver and dye-doped polymer. The dispersion curve of such a system, studied in the reflectometry experiments, is split into three branches and demonstrates an avoided crossing - the signature of a strong coupling. We have further studied the excitation spectra of the dye emission and found that the positions of the excitation peaks have a good match with the points in the dispersion curve determined by the reflectometry. At the same time, the analysis of the spectra of the plasmon-mediated spontaneous emission, decoupled to the prism and acquired at multiple collection angles, has resulted in a quite different dispersion curve exhibiting a non-trivial splitting into multiple branches. This suggests that the same plasmonic environment couples differently to absorbing and emitting dye molecules. PMID:26907045

  10. Mid-infrared surface plasmon coupled emitters utilizing intersublevel transitions in InAs quantum dots.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Stephen A.; Chow, Weng Wah; Passmore, Brandon Scott; Ribaudo, Troy; Adams, David; Wasserman, Daniel; Shaner, Eric Arthur

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate mid-infrared electroluminescence from intersublevel transitions in self-assembled InAs quantum dots coupled to surface plasmon modes on metal hole arrays. Subwavelength metal hole arrays with different periodicity are patterned into the top contact of the broadband (9-15 {micro}m) quantum dot material and the measured electroluminescence is compared to devices without a metal hole array. The resulting normally directed emission is narrowed and a splitting in the spectral structure is observed. By applying a coupled quantum electrodynamic model and using reasonable values for quantum dot distributions and plasmon linewidths we are able to reproduce the experimentally measured spectral characteristics of device emission when using strong coupling parameters.

  11. On the Representation of Heterogeneity in Land-Surface-Atmosphere Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vrese, Philipp; Schulz, Jan-Peter; Hagemann, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    A realistic representation of processes that are not resolved by the model grid is one of the key challenges in Earth-system modelling. In particular, the non-linear nature of processes involved makes a representation of the link between the atmosphere and the land surface difficult. This is especially so when the land surface is horizontally strongly heterogeneous. In the majority of present day Earth system models two strategies are pursued to couple the land surface and the atmosphere. In the first approach, surface heterogeneity is not explicitly accounted for, instead effective parameters are used to represent the entirety of the land surface in a model's grid box (parameter-aggregation). In the second approach, subgrid-scale variability at the surface is explicitly represented, but it is assumed that the blending height is located below the lowest atmospheric model level (simple flux-aggregation). Thus, in both approaches the state of the atmosphere is treated as being horizontally homogeneous within a given grid box. Based upon the blending height concept, an approach is proposed that allows for a land-surface-atmosphere coupling in which horizontal heterogeneity is considered not only at the surface, but also within the lowest layers of the atmosphere (the VERTEX scheme). Below the blending height, the scheme refines the turbulent mixing process with respect to atmospheric subgrid fractions, which correspond to different surface features. These subgrid fractions are not treated independently of each other, since an explicit horizontal component is integrated into the turbulent mixing process. The scheme was implemented into the JSBACH model, the land component of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's Earth-system model, when coupled to the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM. The single-column version of the Earth system model is used in two example cases in order to demonstrate how the effects of surface heterogeneity are transferred into the

  12. Coupling of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics with Finite Volume method for free-surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrone, S.; Di Mascio, A.; Le Touzé, D.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for the solution of free surface flows with large front deformation and fragmentation is presented. The algorithm is obtained by coupling a classical Finite Volume (FV) approach, that discretizes the Navier-Stokes equations on a block structured Eulerian grid, with an approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method, implemented in a Lagrangian framework. The coupling procedure is formulated in such a way that each solver is applied in the region where its intrinsic characteristics can be exploited in the most efficient and accurate way: the FV solver is used to resolve the bulk flow and the wall regions, whereas the SPH solver is implemented in the free surface region to capture details of the front evolution. The reported results clearly prove that the combined use of the two solvers is convenient from the point of view of both accuracy and computing time.

  13. Coupled wire model of symmetric Majorana surfaces of topological superconductors II: 32-fold periodic topological orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao; Sahoo, Sharmistha; Teo, Jeffrey

    We mimic the massless surface Majorana's of topological superconductors by coupled wire models in two spatial dimensions, and introduce many-body gapping interactions that preserve time reversal symmetry. Coupling with a Z2 gauge theory, the symmetric gapped surface generically carries a non-trivial GN topological order, where N is the number of Majorana species and GN is some SO(r)1 or SO(3)3 -like topological state. These form a 32-fold periodic class GN ≅GN + 32 , and a Z32 relative tensor product structure GN1⊗bGN2 ≅GN1 +N2 by anyon condensation. We present the anyon structures of these topological states, and understand the topological orders through bulk-boundary correspondence and the Wilson structures on a torus geometry.

  14. Sensitivity of Land Surface Parameters on Thunderstorm Simulation through HRLDAS-WRF Coupling Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Kumar, Krishan; Mohanty, U. C.; Kisore Osuri, Krishna

    2016-07-01

    Land surface characteristics play an important role in large scale, regional and mesoscale atmospheric process. Representation of land surface characteristics can be improved through coupling of mesoscale atmospheric models with land surface models. Mesoscale atmospheric models depend on Land Surface Models (LSM) to provide land surface variables such as fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum for lower boundary layer evolution. Studies have shown that land surface properties such as soil moisture, soil temperature, soil roughness, vegetation cover, have considerable effect on lower boundary layer. Although, the necessity to initialize soil moisture accurately in NWP models is widely acknowledged, monitoring soil moisture at regional and global scale is a very tough task due to high spatial and temporal variability. As a result, the available observation network is unable to provide the required spatial and temporal data for the most part of the globe. Therefore, model for land surface initializations rely on updated land surface properties from LSM. The solution for NWP land-state initialization can be found by combining data assimilation techniques, satellite-derived soil data, and land surface models. Further, it requires an intermediate step to use observed rainfall, satellite derived surface insolation, and meteorological analyses to run an uncoupled (offline) integration of LSM, so that the evolution of modeled soil moisture can be forced by observed forcing conditions. Therefore, for accurate land-state initialization, high resolution land data assimilation system (HRLDAS) is used to provide the essential land surface parameters. Offline-coupling of HRLDAS-WRF has shown much improved results over Delhi, India for four thunder storm events. The evolution of land surface variables particularly soil moisture, soil temperature and surface fluxes have provided more realistic condition. Results have shown that most of domain part became wetter and warmer after

  15. Effect of flux surface curvature on the linear coupling of electron cyclotron waves in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khusainov, T. A.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Shalashov, A. G.

    2012-02-01

    Specific features of the linear interaction of ordinary and extraordinary electromagnetic waves in the electron cyclotron frequency range in a nonuniform plasma confined in a toroidal magnetic trap are considered. Reduced wave equations taking into account the curvature of the cut-off surfaces in toroidal geometry are formulated. Using these equations, the distributions of the wave fields in the coupling region are analyzed. A method for calculating quasi-optical beams passed through the region of linear wave interaction is proposed.

  16. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  17. Deep-subwavelength magnetic-coupling-dominant interaction among magnetic localized surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic coupling is generally much weaker than electric Coulomb interaction. This also applies to the well-known magnetic "meta-atoms," or split-ring resonators (SRRs) as originally proposed by Pendry et al. [IEEE Trans. Microwave Theory Tech. 47, 2075 (1999), 10.1109/22.798002], in which the associated electric dipole moments usually dictate their interaction. As a result, stereometamaterials, a stack of identical SRRs, were found with electric coupling so strong that the dispersion from merely magnetic coupling was overturned. Recently, other workers have proposed a new concept of magnetic localized surface plasmons, supported on metallic spiral structures (MSSs) at a deep-subwavelength scale. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that a stack of these magnetic "meta-atoms" can have dominant magnetic coupling in both of its two configurations. This allows magnetic-coupling-dominant energy transport along a one-dimensional stack of MSSs, as demonstrated with near-field transmission measurement. Our work not only applies this type of magnetic "meta-atom" into metamaterial construction, but also provides possibilities of magnetic metamaterial design in which the electric interaction no longer takes precedence.

  18. Variability in the coupling between sea surface temperature and wind stress in the global coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuntao; Castelao, Renato M.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoscale ocean-atmosphere interaction between sea surface temperature (SST) and wind stress throughout the global coastal ocean was investigated using 7 years of satellite observations. Coupling coefficients between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl and between downwind SST gradients and wind stress divergence were used to quantify spatial and temporal variability in the strength of the interaction. The use of a consistent data set and standardized methods allow for direct comparisons between coupling coefficients in the different coastal regions. The analysis reveals that strong coupling is observed in many mid-latitude regions throughout the world, especially in regions with strong fronts like Eastern and Western Boundary Currents. Most upwelling regions in Eastern Boundary Currents are characterized by strong seasonal variability in the strength of the coupling, which generally peaks during summer in mid latitudes and during winter at low latitudes. Seasonal variability in coastal regions along Western Boundary Currents is comparatively smaller. Intraseasonal variability is especially important in regions of strong eddy activity (e.g., Western Boundary Currents), being particularly relevant for the coupling between crosswind SST gradients and wind stress curl. Results from the analysis can be used to guide modeling studies, since it allows for the a priori identification of regions in which regional models need to properly represent the ocean-atmosphere interaction to accurately represent local variability.

  19. Improved Hydrological Predictions by the Coupling of Land-Surface-Atmosphere Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. A.; Refsgaard, J.; Jensen, K. H.; Christensen, J. H.; Butts, M. B.; Drews, M.

    2012-12-01

    The study is a part of the Danish HYACINTS project (www.hyacints.dk). A part of the study involves the development of a fully dynamic coupling between the HIRHAM regional climate model (Danish Meteorological Institute) and the MIKE SHE hydrological model (DHI / Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland). A main expectation of the coupled setup is improved hydrological predictions. As climate models generally include only a simplistic hydrological description, the improvements are expected as a result of higher detail and resolution in soil water and water table depths as generated in the hydrological model component. Equally, the hydrological model may benefit from the horizontal redistribution of sensible energy made possible through the climate model. In the preparation of the coupling, the optimal setup of the climate model component is assessed among eight simulations with varying domain sizes and resolutions. Similarly the hydrological model is parameterized by upscaling from autocalibration results performed against field measurements at distinct surfaces within the catchment. The coupled climate model domain is covering an area of 4000x2800 km in 11 km resolution over northern Europe forced by ERA-Interim reanalysis data at the boundaries. The coupled hydrological model catchment is located at the approximate climate model domain center in the Western part of Denmark covering an area of 2500 km2. The effect of the coupling is tested using a 1 year period by running the model in two versions; a fully coupled setup and a traditional passive one-way setup using HIRHAM output as MIKE SHE input. Validation variables include evapotranspiration, sensible heat flux and soil moisture.

  20. Understanding Surface water Ground water Interactions in Arkansas-Red River Basin using Coupled Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, C.; Mohanty, B. P.

    2006-12-01

    Subsurface water exists primarily as groundwater and also in small quantity as soil water in the unsaturated zone. This soil water plays a vital role in the hydrologic cycle by supporting plant growth, regulating the amount of water lost to evapo-transpiration and affecting the surface water groundwater interaction to a certain extent. As such, the interaction between surface water and groundwater is complex and little understood. This study aims at investigating the surface water groundwater interaction in the Arkansas-Red river basin, using a coupled modeling platform. For this purpose, an ecohydrological model (SWAP) has been coupled with the groundwater model (MODFLOW). Inputs to this coupled model are collected from NEXRAD precipitation data at a resolution of ~4 km, meteorological forcings from Oklahoma mesonet and NCDC sites, STATSGO soil property data, LAI (Leaf Area Index) data from MODIS at a resolution of ~1 km, and DEM (Digital Elevation Model). For numerical modeling, a spatial resolution of ~1 km and a temporal resolution of one day is used. The modeled base flow and total groundwater storage change would be tested using ground water table observation data. The modeled ground water storage is further improved using GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) satellite data at a resolution of ~400 km, with the help of appropriate data assimilation technique.

  1. Optical Phased Array Antennas using Coupled Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Carl H.; Rojas, Roberto A.; Nessel, James A.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    High data rate communication links are needed to meet the needs of NASA as well as other organizations to develop space-based optical communication systems. These systems must be robust to high radiation environments, reliable, and operate over a wide temperature range. Highly desirable features include beam steering capability, reconfigurability, low power consumption, and small aperture size. Optical communication links, using coupled vertical cavity surface emitting laser radiating elements are promising candidates for the transmit portion of these communication links. In this talk we describe a mission scenario, and how the antenna requirements are derived from the mission needs. We describe a potential architecture for this type of antenna, and outline the advantages and drawbacks of this approach relative to competing technologies. The technology we are proposing used coupled arrays of 1550 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers for transmission. The feasibility of coupling these arrays together, to form coherent high-power beams that can be modulated at data rates exceeding 1 Gbps, will be explored. We will propose an architecture that enables electronic beam steering, thus mitigating the need for ancillary acquisition, tracking and beam pointing equipment such as needed for current optical communicatin systems. The beam-steering capability we are proposing also opens the possibility of using this technology for inter-satellite communicatin links, and satellite-to-surface links.

  2. Ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) and Superstorm Sandy (2012): Coupled model predictions and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-07-01

    Forecasting hurricane impacts of extreme winds and flooding requires accurate prediction of hurricane structure and storm-induced ocean surface waves days in advance. The waves are complex, especially near landfall when the hurricane winds and water depth varies significantly and the surface waves refract, shoal and dissipate. In this study, we examine the spatial structure, magnitude, and directional spectrum of hurricane-induced ocean waves using a high resolution, fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model and observations. The coupled model predictions of ocean surface waves in Hurricane Ike (2008) over the Gulf of Mexico and Superstorm Sandy (2012) in the northeastern Atlantic and coastal region are evaluated with the NDBC buoy and satellite altimeter observations. Although there are characteristics that are general to ocean waves in both hurricanes as documented in previous studies, wave fields in Ike and Sandy possess unique properties due mostly to the distinct wind fields and coastal bathymetry in the two storms. Several processes are found to significantly modulate hurricane surface waves near landfall. First, the phase speed and group velocities decrease as the waves become shorter and steeper in shallow water, effectively increasing surface roughness and wind stress. Second, the bottom-induced refraction acts to turn the waves toward the coast, increasing the misalignment between the wind and waves. Third, as the hurricane translates over land, the left side of the storm center is characterized by offshore winds over very short fetch, which opposes incoming swell. Landfalling hurricanes produce broader wave spectra overall than that of the open ocean. The front-left quadrant is most complex, where the combination of windsea, swell propagating against the wind, increasing wind-wave stress, and interaction with the coastal topography requires a fully coupled model to meet these challenges in hurricane wave and surge prediction.

  3. Stochastic repercussion of land-surface energy budget noise onto a coupled land-atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, P.; Entekhabi, D.; Schertzer, E.; Polcher, J.

    2009-04-01

    The present study is based on the work first introduced by Lettau (1951): in this paper Lettau analytically studied the response of a linearized land-atmosphere model to a sinusoidal forcing of net radiation at the land-surface. The model has been first improved to obtain the analytical solution of the temperature and heat flux profiles in the soil and in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in response to any daily forcing of incoming radiation at the land-surface. With this model, the profiles of temperature and heat are expressed in terms of temporal Fourier series. Moreover the surface variables (temperature, specific humidity, surface fluxes) are also derived analytically and their diurnal course is expressed as a function of both surface parameters (friction velocity, vegetation height, aerodynamic resistance, stomatal conductance). In this presentation, we further extend the application of this theoretical model to the study of the error in the land-surface energy budget closure. This closure error could result form either modeling or experimental inaccuracies, leading to incorrect energy partitioning at the land-surface. In particular, the response of the coupled land-atmosphere model to the land-surface energy error is investigated. This noise in the energy budget is introduced in the form of a stochastic Brownian Bridge, which is a Brownian Motion conditioned to vanish at 0h and 24h. First the impact of land-surface noise on the partitioning of land-surface energy partitioning is examined. Moreover the influence of the land-surface noise on Land Surface Temperature and air temperature is carefully analyzed, as it is fundamental for the use of data assimilation in conjunction with land-surface models. Finally, the repercussion of the surface noise in the ABL and the soil is analytically found and its temporal and spatial dependency is studied. In particular, the correlation between the land-surface state and the ABL state is further investigated. These

  4. Coupled community cohesion and surface water hydrology determinants of groundwater use sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernald, A.

    2013-12-01

    Water table elevations are dropping in irrigated locations of the western U.S. and the world where use exceeds recharge. Along the Rio Grande, community irrigation systems have been developed that are particularly suited to high interannual precipitation variability. These same systems that efficiently and equitable allocate surface irrigation water seem to also generate feedback loops that balance groundwater recharge with use. To identify drivers of groundwater sustainability, we studied the coupled human and natural system components of surface water - groundwater interactions at distinctive sites along the Rio Grande: vibrant community irrigation systems of northern New Mexico; separately controlled surface and groundwater irrigation systems of southern New Mexico; and groundwater irrigation systems that had entirely lost their historic community surface irrigation systems in northern Chihuahua, Mexico. At the northern New Mexico site we found both the hydrology and the community irrigation system generate positive feedback loops for sustainable groundwater and for return flow to the river that benefits downstream users. In southern New Mexico, positive feedbacks of reduced irrigation district surface deliveries lead to more groundwater pumping that in turn causes less efficient surface delivery, additional pumping and stressed groundwater systems. At the sites in Mexico, lack of community cohesion coupled with decades of groundwater pumping has led to negative feedbacks where additional pumping causes drops in groundwater levels that increase pumping costs and reduce the rate of groundwater declines. In ongoing work, we are using socio-cultural and hydrological data to inform a system dynamics model that will identify groundwater sustainability tipping points in terms of community cohesion and the balance between irrigation water use and groundwater recharge in surface water connected systems.

  5. Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System and its CSDMS Modeling Tool to couple models and data (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syvitski, J. P.; Csdms Scientific; Software Team

    2010-12-01

    CSDMS is the virtual home for a diverse community who foster and promote the modeling of earth surface processes, with emphasis on the movement of fluids, sediment and solutes through landscapes, seascapes and through their sedimentary basins. CSDMS develops, integrates, disseminates & archives software (> 150 models and 3million+ lines of code) that reflects and predicts earth surface processes over a broad range of time and space scales. CSDMS deals with the Earth's surface—the ever-changing, dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere. CSDMS employs state-of-the-art architectures, interface standards and frameworks that make it possible to convert stand-alone models into flexible, "plug-and-play" components that can be assembled into larger applications. The CSDMS model-coupling environment offers language interoperability, structured and unstructured grids, and serves as a migration pathway for surface dynamics modelers towards High-Performance Computing (HPC). The CSDMS Modeling Tool is a key product of the overall project, as it allows earth scientists with relatively modest computer coding experience to use the CSDMS modules for earth surface dynamics research and education. The CMT Tool is platform independent. CMT can easily couple models that have followed the CSDMS protocols for model contribution: 1) Open-source license; 2) Available; 3) Vetted; 4) Open-source language; 5) Refactored for componentization; 6) Metadata & test files; 7) Clean and documented using keywords.

  6. Self-accelerating massive gravity: Superluminality, Cauchy surfaces, and strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motloch, Pavel; Hu, Wayne; Joyce, Austin; Motohashi, Hayato

    2015-08-01

    Self-accelerating solutions in massive gravity provide explicit, calculable examples that exhibit the general interplay between superluminality, the well-posedness of the Cauchy problem, and strong coupling. For three particular classes of vacuum solutions, one of which is new to this work, we construct the conformal diagram for the characteristic surfaces on which isotropic stress-energy perturbations propagate. With one exception, all solutions necessarily possess spacelike characteristics, indicating perturbative superluminality. Foliating the spacetime with these surfaces gives a pathological frame where kinetic terms of the perturbations vanish, confusing the Hamiltonian counting of degrees of freedom. This frame dependence distinguishes the vanishing of kinetic terms from strong coupling of perturbations or an ill-posed Cauchy problem. We give examples where spacelike characteristics do and do not originate from a point where perturbation theory breaks down and where spacelike surfaces do or do not intersect all characteristics in the past light cone of a given observer. The global structure of spacetime also reveals issues that are unique to theories with two metrics: in all three classes of solutions, the Minkowski fiducial space fails to cover the entire de Sitter spacetime allowing worldlines of observers to end in finite proper time at determinant singularities. Characteristics run tangent to these surfaces requiring ad hoc rules to establish continuity across singularities.

  7. Coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator: Model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nascimento, Melke A.; Nagao, Raphael; Eiswirth, Markus; Varela, Hamilton

    2014-12-21

    The co-existence of disparate time scales is pervasive in many systems. In particular for surface reactions, it has been shown that the long-term evolution of the core oscillator is decisively influenced by slow surface changes, such as progressing deactivation. Here we present an in-depth numerical investigation of the coupled slow and fast surface dynamics in an electrocatalytic oscillator. The model consists of four nonlinear coupled ordinary differential equations, investigated over a wide parameter range. Besides the conventional bifurcation analysis, the system was studied by means of high-resolution period and Lyapunov diagrams. It was observed that the bifurcation diagram changes considerably as the irreversible surface poisoning evolves, and the oscillatory region shrinks. The qualitative dynamics changes accordingly and the chaotic oscillations are dramatically suppressed. Nevertheless, periodic cascades are preserved in a confined region of the resistance vs. voltage diagram. Numerical results are compared to experiments published earlier and the latter reinterpreted. Finally, the comprehensive description of the time-evolution in the period and Lyapunov diagrams suggests further experimental studies correlating the evolution of the system's dynamics with changes of the catalyst structure.

  8. On the development of a coupled land surface and groundwater model

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R.M.; Miller, N.L.

    2004-05-04

    Management of surface water quality is often complicated by interactions between surface water and groundwater. Traditional Land-Surface Models (LSM) used for numerical weather prediction, climate projection, and as inputs to water management decision support systems, do not treat the LSM lower boundary in a fully process-based fashion. LSMs have evolved from a leaky bucket to more sophisticated land surface water and energy budget models that typically have a so-called basement term to depict the bottom model layer exchange with deeper aquifers. Nevertheless, the LSM lower boundary is often assumed zero flux or the soil moisture content is set to a constant value; an approach that while mass conservative, ignores processes that can alter surface fluxes, runoff, and water quantity and quality. Conversely, groundwater models (GWM) for saturated and unsaturated water flow, while addressing important features such as subsurface heterogeneity and three-dimensional flow, often have overly simplified upper boundary conditions that ignore soil heating, runoff, snow and root-zone uptake. In the present study, a state-of-the-art LSM (CLM) and a variably-saturated GWM (ParFlow) have been coupled as a single column model. A set of simulations based on synthetic data and data from the Project for Intercomparison of Landsurface Parameterization Schemes (PILPS), version 2(d), 18-year dataset from Valdai, Russia demonstrate the temporal dynamics of this coupled modeling system. Changes in soil moisture and movement of the water table are used as indicators of mass conservation between the LSM and GWM. This study demonstrates the affect of aquifer storage and a dynamic water table on predicted watershed flow. The model's ability to capture certain cold processes such as frozen soil and freeze/thaw processes are discussed. Comparisons of the uncoupled and coupled modes are presented and the differences in simulations of soil moisture and shallow and deeper ground processes are

  9. Land-atmosphere interactions in an high resolution atmospheric simulation coupled with a surface data assimilation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, L.; Castelli, F.; Entekhabi, D.; Caparrini, F.

    2009-09-01

    A valid tool for the retrieving of the turbulent fluxes that characterize the surface energy budget is constituted by the remote sensing of land surface states. In this study sequences of satellite-derived observations (from SEVIRI sensors aboard the Meteosat Second Generation) of Land Surface Temperature have been used as input in a data assimilation scheme in order to retrieve parameters that describe energy balance at the ground surface in the Tuscany region, in central Italy, during summer 2005. A parsimonious 1-D multiscale variational assimilation procedure has been followed, that requires also near surface meteorological observations. A simplified model of the surface energy balance that includes such assimilation scheme has been coupled with the limited area atmospheric model RAMS, in order to improve in the latter the accuracy of the energy budget at the surface. The coupling has been realized replacing the assimilation scheme products, in terms of surface turbulent fluxes and temperature and humidity states during the meteorological simulation. Comparisons between meteorological model results with and without coupling with the assimilation scheme are discussed, both in terms of reconstruction of surface variables and of vertical characterization of the lower atmosphere. In particular, the effects of the coupling on the moisture feedback between surface and atmosphere are considered and estimates of the precipitation recycling ratio are provided. The results of the coupling experiment showed improvements in the reconstruction of the surface states by the atmospheric model and considerable influence on the atmospheric dynamics.

  10. Coupling molecular catalysts with nanostructured surfaces for efficient solar fuel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Tong

    Solar fuel generation via carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is a promising approach to meet the increasing global demand for energy and to minimize the impact of energy consumption on climate change. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable; its activation often requires the use of appropriate catalysts. In particular, molecular catalysts with well-defined structures and tunability have shown excellent activity in photochemical CO2 reduction. These homogenous catalysts, however, suffer from poor stability under photochemical conditions and difficulty in recycling from the reaction media. Heterogenized molecular catalysts, particularly those prepared by coupling molecular catalysts with solid-state surfaces, have attracted more attention in recent years as potential solutions to address the issues associated with molecular catalysts. In this work, solar CO2 reduction is investigated using systems coupling molecular catalysts with robust nanostructured surfaces. In Chapter 2, heterogenization of macrocyclic cobalt(III) and nickel (II) complexes on mesoporous silica surface was achieved by different methods. Direct ligand derivatization significantly lowered the catalytic activity of Co(III) complex, while grafting the Co(III) complex onto silica surface through Si-O-Co linkage resulted in hybrid catalysts with excellent activity in CO2 reduction in the presence of p-terphenyl as a molecular photosensitizer. An interesting loading effect was observed, in which the optimal activity was achieved at a medium Co(III) surface density. Heterogenization of the Ni(II) complex on silica surface has also been implemented, the poor photocatalytic activity of the hybrid catalyst can be attributed to the intrinsic nature of the homogeneous analogue. This study highlighted the importance of appropriate linking strategies in preparing functional heterogenized molecular catalysts. Coupling molecular complexes with light-harvesting surfaces could avoid the use of expensive molecular

  11. Impact of Sea Surface Salinity on Coupled Dynamics for the Tropical Indo Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busalacchi, A. J.; Hackert, E. C.

    2014-12-01

    In this presentation we assess the impact of in situ and satellite sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on seasonal to interannual variability of tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean dynamics as well as on dynamical ENSO forecasts using a Hybrid Coupled Model (HCM) for 1993-2007 (cf., Hackert et al., 2011) and August 2011 until February 2014 (cf., Hackert et al., 2014). The HCM is composed of a primitive equation ocean model coupled with a SVD-based statistical atmospheric model for the tropical Indo-Pacific region. An Ensemble Reduced Order Kalman Filter (EROKF) is used to assimilate observations to constrain dynamics and thermodynamics for initialization of the HCM. Including SSS generally improves NINO3 sea surface temperature anomaly validation. Assimilating SSS gives significant improvement versus just subsurface temperature for all forecast lead times after 5 months. We find that the positive impact of SSS assimilation is brought about by surface freshening in the western Pacific warm pool that leads to increased barrier layer thickness (BLT) and shallower mixed layer depths. Thus, in the west the net effect of assimilating SSS is to increase stability and reduce mixing, which concentrates the wind impact of ENSO coupling. Specifically, the main benefit of SSS assimilation for 1993-2007 comes from improvement to the Spring Predictability Barrier (SPB) period. In the east, the impact of Aquarius satellite SSS is to induce more cooling in the NINO3 region as a result of being relatively more salty than in situ SSS in the eastern Pacific leading to increased mixing and entrainment. This, in turn, sets up an enhanced west to east SST gradient and intensified Bjerknes coupling. For the 2011-2014 period, consensus coupled model forecasts compiled by the IRI tend to erroneously predict NINO3 warming; SSS assimilation corrects this defect. Finally, we plan to update our analysis and report on the dynamical impact of including Aquarius SSS for the most-recent, ongoing 2014

  12. A COUPLED LAND-SURFACE AND DRY DEPOSITION MODEL AND COMPARISON TO FIELD MEASUREMENTS OF SURFACE HEAT, MOISTURE, AND OZONE FLUXES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have developed a coupled land-surface and dry deposition model for realistic treatment of surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and chemical dry deposition within a comprehensive air quality modeling system. A new land-surface model (LSM) with explicit treatment of soil moisture...

  13. Enhancement of effective electromechanical coupling factor by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave device structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Gongbin; Han, Tao; Teshigahara, Akihiko; Iwaki, Takao; Hashimoto, Ken-ya

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a drastic enhancement of the effective coupling factor K\\text{e}2 by mass loading in layered surface acoustic wave (SAW) device structures such as the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure. This phenomenon occurs when the piezoelectric layer exhibits a high acoustic wave velocity. The mass loading decreases the SAW velocity and causes SAW energy confinement close to the top surface where an interdigital transducer is placed. It is shown that this phenomenon is obvious even when an amorphous SiO2 film is deposited on the top surface for temperature compensation. This K\\text{e}2 enhancement was also found in various combinations of electrode, piezoelectric layer, and/or substrate materials. The existence of this phenomenon was verified experimentally using the ScAlN film/Si substrate structure.

  14. Inductively Coupling Plasma (ICP) Treatment of Propylene (PP) Surface and Adhesion Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yenchun; Fu, Yenpei

    2009-12-01

    Study on increasing the roughness of the polymer substrate surface to enhance the adhesion with the copper layer in an inductively coupling plasma (ICP) process was carried out. The microstructure of the polymer substrate surfaces, which were exposed to different kinds of plasma treatment, was identified by scanning electron microscopy(SEM) analysis, peel strength of the copper coating and water surface contact angle. The adhesion of the substrate was largely enhanced by plasma treatment and the copper deposited coating reached a value of 7.68 kgf/m in verifying the adhesion of the copper coating with polymer material. The quality of the line/space 50/50 μm produced in the laboratory was examined by the pressure cooker test and proved to meet the requirement.

  15. Waterless coupling of ultrasound from planar contact transducers to curved and irregular surfaces during non-destructive ultrasonic evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denslow, Kayte; Diaz, Aaron; Jones, Mark; Meyer, Ryan; Cinson, Anthony; Wells, Mondell

    2012-04-01

    The Applied Physics group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA has evaluated a method for waterless/liquidless coupling of ultrasonic energy from planar ultrasonic contact transducers to irregular test surfaces for ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation applications. Dry couplant material placed between a planar transducer face and a curved or uneven steel or plastic surface allows for effective sound energy coupling and preserves the integrity of the planar transducer sound field by serving as an acoustic impedance matching layer, providing good surface area contact between geometrically dissimilar surfaces and conforming to rough and unsmooth surfaces. Sound fields radiating from planar ultrasonic contact transducers coupled to curved and uneven surfaces using the dry coupling method were scanned and mapped using a Pinducer receiver connected to a raster scanner. Transducer sound field coverage at several ultrasonic frequencies and several distances from the transducer contact locations were found to be in good agreement with theoretical beam divergence and sound field coverage predictions for planar transducers coupled to simple, planar surfaces. This method is valuable for applications that do not allow for the use of traditional liquid-based ultrasonic couplants due to the sensitivity of the test materials to liquids and for applications that might otherwise require curved transducers or custom coupling wedges. The selection of dry coupling material is reported along with the results of theoretical sound field predictions, the laboratory testing apparatus and the empirical sound field data.

  16. Waterless Coupling of Ultrasound from Planar Contact Transducers to Curved and Irregular Surfaces during Non-destructive Ultrasonic Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Jones, Anthony M.; Meyer, Ryan M.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Wells, Mondell D.

    2012-04-30

    The Applied Physics group at the Pacific The Applied Physics group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, WA has evaluated a method for waterless/liquidless coupling of ultrasonic energy from planar ultrasonic contact transducers to irregular test surfaces for ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation applications. Dry couplant material placed between a planar transducer face and a curved or uneven steel or plastic surface allows for effective sound energy coupling and preserves the integrity of the planar transducer sound field by serving as an acoustic impedance matching layer, providing good surface area contact between geometrically dissimilar surfaces and conforming to rough and unsmooth surfaces. Sound fields radiating from planar ultrasonic contact transducers coupled to curved and uneven surfaces using the dry coupling method were scanned and mapped using a Pinducer receiver connected to a raster scanner. Transducer sound field coverage at several ultrasonic frequencies and several distances from the transducer contact locations were found to be in good agreement with theoretical beam divergence and sound field coverage predictions for planar transducers coupled to simple, planar surfaces. This method is valuable for applications that do not allow for the use of traditional liquid-based ultrasonic couplants due to the sensitivity of the test materials to liquids and for applications that might otherwise require curved transducers or custom coupling wedges. The selection of dry coupling material is reported along with the results of theoretical sound field predictions, the laboratory testing apparatus and the empirical sound field data.

  17. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis of a Coupled Groundwater-Surface Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Derivation of the exact equations of Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis for a coupled Groundwater-Surface water model is presented here, with reference to the Stream package in MODFLOW-2005. MODFLOW-2005 offers two distinct packages to simulate river boundary conditions in an aquifer model. They are the RIV (RIVer) Package and the STR (STReam) Package. The STR package simulates a coupled Groundwater and Surface Water flow model. As a result of coupling between the Groundwater and the Surface Water flows, the flows to/from the aquifer depend not just on the river stage and aquifer head at that location (as would happen in the RIV package); but on the river stages and aquifer heads at all upstream locations, in the complex network of streams with all its distributaries and diversions. This requires a substantial modification of the adjoint state equations (not required in RIV Package). The necessary equations for the STR Package have now been developed and implemented the MODFLOW-ADJOINT Code. The exact STR Adjoint code has been validated by comparing with the results from the parameter perturbation method, for the case of San Pedro Model (USGS) and Northern Arizona Regional Aquifer Model (USGS). When the RIV package is used for the same models, the sensitivity analysis results are incorrect for some nodes, indicating the advantage of using the exact methods of the STR Package in MODFLOW-Adjoint code. This exact analysis has been used for deriving the capture functions in the management of groundwater, subject to the constraints on the depletion of surface water supplies. Capture maps are used for optimal location of the pumping wells, their rates of withdrawals, and their timing. Because of the immense savings in computational times, with this Adjoint strategy, it is feasible to embed the groundwater management problem in a stochastic framework (probabilistic approach) to address the uncertainties in the groundwater model.

  18. Mid-infrared surface plasmon polariton chemical sensing on fiber-coupled ITO coated glass.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Javier; Ródenas, Airán; Aguiló, Magdalena; Fernandez, Toney; Solis, Javier; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-06-01

    A novel fiber-coupled indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slide sensor for performing surface plasmon polariton chemical monitoring in the ∼3.5  μm mid-infrared (IR) range is reported. Efficient mid-IR fiber coupling is achieved with 3D laser written waveguides, and the coupling of glass waveguide modes to ITO surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is driven by the varying phase matching conditions of different aqueous analytes across the anomalous dispersion range determined by their molecular fingerprints. By means of using both a mid-IR fiber supercontinuum source and a diode laser, the excitation of SPPs is demonstrated. The sensor sensitivity is tested by discriminating CH from OH features of ethanol in water solutions, demonstrating an instrumental ethanol limit of detection of 0.02% in a wide concentration range of at least 0%-50%. The efficient optical monitoring of mid-IR SPPs in smart glass could have a broad range of applications in biological and chemical sensing.

  19. Mid-infrared surface plasmon polariton chemical sensing on fiber-coupled ITO coated glass.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Javier; Ródenas, Airán; Aguiló, Magdalena; Fernandez, Toney; Solis, Javier; Díaz, Francesc

    2016-06-01

    A novel fiber-coupled indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slide sensor for performing surface plasmon polariton chemical monitoring in the ∼3.5  μm mid-infrared (IR) range is reported. Efficient mid-IR fiber coupling is achieved with 3D laser written waveguides, and the coupling of glass waveguide modes to ITO surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is driven by the varying phase matching conditions of different aqueous analytes across the anomalous dispersion range determined by their molecular fingerprints. By means of using both a mid-IR fiber supercontinuum source and a diode laser, the excitation of SPPs is demonstrated. The sensor sensitivity is tested by discriminating CH from OH features of ethanol in water solutions, demonstrating an instrumental ethanol limit of detection of 0.02% in a wide concentration range of at least 0%-50%. The efficient optical monitoring of mid-IR SPPs in smart glass could have a broad range of applications in biological and chemical sensing. PMID:27244397

  20. Coupled atmosphere and land-surface assimilation of surface observations with a single column model and ensemble data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, Dorita; Hacker, Joshua P.; Snyder, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Numerical weather prediction and data assimilation models are composed of coupled atmosphere and land-surface (LS) components. If possible, the assimilation procedure should be coupled so that observed information in one module is used to correct fields in the coupled module. There have been some attempts in this direction using optimal interpolation, nudging and 2/3DVAR data assimilation techniques. Aside from satellite remote sensed observations, reference height in-situ observations of temperature and moisture have been used in these studies. Among other problems, difficulties in coupled atmosphere and LS assimilation arise as a result of the different time scales characteristic of each component and the unsteady correlation between these components under varying flow conditions. Ensemble data-assimilation techniques rely on flow dependent observations-model covariances. Provided that correlations and covariances between land and atmosphere can be adequately simulated and sampled, ensemble data assimilation should enable appropriate assimilation of observations simultaneously into the atmospheric and LS states. Our aim is to explore assimilation of reference height in-situ temperature and moisture observations into the coupled atmosphere-LS modules(simultaneously) in NCAR's WRF-ARW model using the NCAR's DART ensemble data-assimilation system. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed using the single column model (SCM) version of WRF. Numerical experiments during a warm season are centered on an atmospheric and soil column in the South Great Plains. Synthetic observations are derived from "truth" WRF-SCM runs for a given date,initialized and forced using North American Regional Reanalyses (NARR). WRF-SCM atmospheric and LS ensembles are created by mixing the atmospheric and soil NARR profile centered on a given date with that from another day (randomly chosen from the same season) with weights drawn from a logit-normal distribution. Three

  1. 3-D Surface Depression Profiling Using High Frequency Focused Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Don J.; Kautz, Harold E.; Abel, Phillip B.; Whalen, Mike F.; Hendricks, J. Lynne; Bodis, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Surface topography is an important variable in the performance of many industrial components and is normally measured with diamond-tip profilometry over a small area or using optical scattering methods for larger area measurement. This article shows quantitative surface topography profiles as obtained using only high-frequency focused air-coupled ultrasonic pulses. The profiles were obtained using a profiling system developed by NASA Glenn Research Center and Sonix, Inc (via a formal cooperative agreement). (The air transducers are available as off-the-shelf items from several companies.) The method is simple and reproducible because it relies mainly on knowledge and constancy of the sound velocity through the air. The air transducer is scanned across the surface and sends pulses to the sample surface where they are reflected back from the surface along the same path as the incident wave. Time-of-flight images of the sample surface are acquired and converted to depth/surface profile images using the simple relation (d = V*t/2) between distance (d), time-of-flight (t), and the velocity of sound in air (V). The system has the ability to resolve surface depression variations as small as 25 microns, is useable over a 1.4 mm vertical depth range, and can profile large areas only limited by the scan limits of the particular ultrasonic system. (Best-case depth resolution is 0.25 microns which may be achievable with improved isolation from vibration and air currents.) The method using an optimized configuration is reasonably rapid and has all quantitative analysis facilities on-line including 2-D and 3-D visualization capability, extreme value filtering (for faulty data), and leveling capability. Air-coupled surface profilometry is applicable to plate-like and curved samples. In this article, results are shown for several proof-of-concept samples, plastic samples burned in microgravity on the STS-54 space shuttle mission, and a partially-coated cylindrical ceramic

  2. An Analytical Solution of Radiative Transfer in the Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean System with Rough Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Zhonghai; Charlock, Thomas P.; Rutledge, Ken; Knut Stamnes; Wang, Yingjian

    2006-01-01

    Using the efficient discrete-ordinate method, we present an analytical solution for radiative transfer in the coupled atmosphere-ocean system with rough air-water interface. The theoretical formulations of the radiative transfer equation and solution are described. The effects of surface roughness on radiation field in the atmosphere and ocean are studied and compared with measurements. The results show that ocean surface roughness has significant effects on the upwelling radiation in the atmosphere and the downwelling radiation in the ocean. As wind speed increases, the angular domain of sunglint broadens, the surface albedo decreases, and the transmission to ocean increases. The downward radiance field in the upper ocean is highly anisotropic, but this anisotropy decreases rapidly as surface wind increases and as depth in ocean increases. The effects of surface roughness on radiation also depend greatly on both wavelength and angle of incidence (i.e., solar elevation); these effects are significantly smaller throughout the spectrum at high sun. The model-observation discrepancies may indicate that the Cox-Munk surface roughness model is not sufficient for high wind conditions.

  3. Dehydrogenative silane coupling on silicon surfaces via early transition metal catalysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Hui; Buriak, Jillian M

    2006-02-01

    Derivatization of silicon surfaces is an area of intense interest due to the centrality of silicon in the microelectronics industry and because of potential promise for a myriad of other applications. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of Si-Si bond formation directly on the surface to contrast with the more widely studied Si-C and Si-O bond forming reactions. Functionalization of hydride-terminated silicon surfaces with silanes is carried out via early transition metal mediated dehydrogenative silane coupling reactions. Zirconocene and titanocene catalyst systems were evaluated for heterocoupling of a molecular silane, RSiH3, with a surface Si-H group on Si(s). The zirconocene catalysts proved to be much more reactive than the titanium system, and so the former was examined exclusively. The silanes, aromatic or aliphatic, are bonded to the silicon surface through direct Si-Si bonds, although the level of incorporation of the trihydroarylsilanes was substantially higher than that of the aliphatic silanes. The reaction proceeds on nanocrystalline hydride-terminated porous silicon surfaces, as well as flat Si(100)-H(x) and Si(111)-H interfaces. The reactions were studied by a variety of techniques, including FTIR, SIMS, and XPS.

  4. Surface code architecture for donors and dots in silicon with imprecise and nonuniform qubit couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pica, G.; Lovett, B. W.; Bhatt, R. N.; Schenkel, T.; Lyon, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    A scaled quantum computer with donor spins in silicon would benefit from a viable semiconductor framework and a strong inherent decoupling of the qubits from the noisy environment. Coupling neighboring spins via the natural exchange interaction according to current designs requires gate control structures with extremely small length scales. We present a silicon architecture where bismuth donors with long coherence times are coupled to electrons that can shuttle between adjacent quantum dots, thus relaxing the pitch requirements and allowing space between donors for classical control devices. An adiabatic SWAP operation within each donor/dot pair solves the scalability issues intrinsic to exchange-based two-qubit gates, as it does not rely on subnanometer precision in donor placement and is robust against noise in the control fields. We use this SWAP together with well established global microwave Rabi pulses and parallel electron shuttling to construct a surface code that needs minimal, feasible local control.

  5. Gain-coupled distributed feedback laser based on periodic surface anode canals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Jia, Peng; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Li; Chen, Hong; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Xing; Shan, Xiaonan; Ning, Yongqiang; Wang, Lijun

    2015-10-20

    A single-longitude-mode, broad-stripe, gain-coupled, distributed-feedback laser based on periodic surface anode canals (PSACs) is demonstrated. The PSACs, produced by i-line lithography, enhance the contrast of periodic current density in the active layer without introducing effective photon coupling; calculated grating κL is only 0.026. Power of 144.6 mW at 968.8 nm, with spectrum linewidth less than 0.04 nm on every uncoated cleavage facet, is obtained at a current of 1.2 A with a side-mode suppression ratio >29  dB. PMID:26560371

  6. The coupling of mechanical dynamics and induced currents in plates and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weissenburger, D.W.; Bialek, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    Significant mechanical reactions and deflections may be produced when electrical eddy currents induced in a conducting structure by transformer-like electromotive forces interact with background magnetic fields. Additional eddy currents induced by structural motion through the background fields modify both the mechanical and electrical dynamic behavior of the system. The observed effects of these motional eddy currents are sometimes referred to as magnetic damping and magnetic stiffness. This paper addresses the coupled structural deformation and eddy currents in flat plates and simple two-dimensional surfaces in three-space. A coupled system of equations has been formulated using finite element techniques for the mechanical aspects and a mesh network method for the electrical aspects of the problem.

  7. Radiative decay engineering 4. Experimental studies of surface plasmon-coupled directional emission

    PubMed Central

    Gryczynski, Ignacy; Malicka, Joanna; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence is typically isotropic in space and collected with low efficiency. In this paper we describe surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE), which displays unique optical properties and can be collected with an efficiency near 50%. SPCE occurs for fluorophores within about 200 nm of a thin metallic film, in our case a 50-nm-thick silver film on a glass substrate. We show that fluorophore proximity to this film converts the normally isotropic emission into highly directional emission through the glass substrate at a well-defined angle from the normal axis. Depending on the thickness of the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) film on the silver, the coupling efficiency of sulforhodamine 101 in PVA ranged from 30 to 49%. Directional SPCE was observed whether the fluorophore was excited directly or by the evanescent field due to the surface plasmon resonance. The emission is always polarized perpendicular to the plane of incidence, irrespective of the polarization of the incident light. The lifetimes are not substantially changed, indicating a mechanism somewhat different from that observed previously for the effects of silver particles on fluorophores. Remarkably, the directional emission shows intrinsic spectral resolution because the coupling angles depend on wavelength. The distances over which SPCE occurs, 10 to 200 nm, are useful because a large number of fluorophores can be localized within this volume. The emission of more distant fluorophores does not couple into the glass, allowing background suppression from biological samples. SPCE can be expected to become rapidly useful in a variety of analytical and medical sensing applications. PMID:14690680

  8. Relationship of magnetic behavior and surface spin coupling in Hematite nanowires bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. P.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, P. F.; Xu, J. C.; Han, Y. B.; Jin, H. X.; Jin, D. F.; Peng, X. L.; Hong, B.; Li, J.; Yang, Y. T.; Gong, J.; Ge, H. L.; Wang, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    Hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanowires were synthesized using mesoporous SBA-15 silica as the hard templates, and then the well-dispersed α-Fe2O3 nanowires (NWS) were separated from the ordered α-Fe2O3 nanowires bundles (NWBS) by the centrifugation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and surperconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) were used to characterize the microstructure and magnetic properties of the as-prepared samples. All results indicated that the α-Fe2O3 NWS and NWBS with the different interwires distance presented the same diameter for nanowires, which was possible to reveal the exchange interaction between α-Fe2O3 NWBs. Both samples showed ferromagnetism and α-Fe2O3 NWS presented superparamagnetism at high temperature. The magnetic results indicated the surface spin between the neighboring nanowires of α-Fe2O3 NWBs coupled each other. The saturation magnetization of α-Fe2O3 NWBS was lower than that of α-Fe2O3 NWS, while the coercivity and Curie temperature were larger. It was concluded that the surface spin coupling could weaken the surface effect on the magnetic properties for nanostructures.

  9. Surface modification of polypropylene separators in lithium-ion batteries using inductively coupled plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Son, Jinyoung; Kim, Min-Sik; Lee, Hyun Woo; Yu, Jong-Sung; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    We describe herein an improvement in the surface wettability of plasma-treated separators for use in lithium-ion batteries. We treated the separators with an O2/Ar inductively coupled plasma to increase their surface energy. The plasma treatment on the separator and plasma diagnostic experiments were performed in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor. The fraction of Ar in the O2/Ar plasma was changed from 0% to 100%. The plasma diagnostics were performed using optical emission spectroscopy and a double Langmuir probe. To confirm the morphological change of the separator membrane by the plasma treatment, we used the scanning electron microscopy. The surface energy measurements were performed using the drop method. We found that the plasma treatment transformed the separator from a hydrophobic membrane to a hydrophilic one, thereby achieving high separator wettability. After the treatment of the separators with O2/Ar plasma, the batteries exhibited better cycle performance and rate capacity than those employing the untreated ones. PMID:25971067

  10. Non-adiabatic dynamics around a conical intersection with surface-hopping coupled coherent states.

    PubMed

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-21

    A surface-hopping extension of the coupled coherent states-method [D. Shalashilin and M. Child, Chem. Phys. 304, 103-120 (2004)] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both interference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution if convergence with respect to the number of trajectories is achieved and the potential energy surfaces are known globally. The method is tested on a 2D model for a conical intersection [A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 5517 (1996)], where a nuclear wavepacket encircles the point of degeneracy between two potential energy surfaces and interferes with itself. These interference effects are absent in classical trajectory-based molecular dynamics but can be fully incorpo rated if trajectories are replaced by surface hopping coupled coherent states. PMID:27334155

  11. Non-adiabatic dynamics around a conical intersection with surface-hopping coupled coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humeniuk, Alexander; Mitrić, Roland

    2016-06-01

    A surface-hopping extension of the coupled coherent states-method [D. Shalashilin and M. Child, Chem. Phys. 304, 103-120 (2004)] for simulating non-adiabatic dynamics with quantum effects of the nuclei is put forward. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the motion of the nuclei is solved in a moving basis set. The basis set is guided by classical trajectories, which can hop stochastically between different electronic potential energy surfaces. The non-adiabatic transitions are modelled by a modified version of Tully's fewest switches algorithm. The trajectories consist of Gaussians in the phase space of the nuclei (coherent states) combined with amplitudes for an electronic wave function. The time-dependent matrix elements between different coherent states determine the amplitude of each trajectory in the total multistate wave function; the diagonal matrix elements determine the hopping probabilities and gradients. In this way, both interference effects and non-adiabatic transitions can be described in a very compact fashion, leading to the exact solution if convergence with respect to the number of trajectories is achieved and the potential energy surfaces are known globally. The method is tested on a 2D model for a conical intersection [A. Ferretti, J. Chem. Phys. 104, 5517 (1996)], where a nuclear wavepacket encircles the point of degeneracy between two potential energy surfaces and interferes with itself. These interference effects are absent in classical trajectory-based molecular dynamics but can be fully incorpo rated if trajectories are replaced by surface hopping coupled coherent states.

  12. Integrated Coupling of Surface and Subsurface Flow with HYDRUS-2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Anne; Šimůnek, Jirka; Wöhling, Thomas; Schütze, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Describing interactions between surface and subsurface flow processes is important to adequately define water flow in natural systems. Since overland flow generation is highly influenced by rainfall and infiltration, both highly spatially heterogeneous processes, overland flow is unsteady and varies spatially. The prediction of overland flow needs to include an appropriate description of the interactions between the surface and subsurface flow. Coupling surface and subsurface water flow is a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed during the last few years, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. A new approach by Weill et al. (2009) to couple overland flow and subsurface flow based on a generalized Richards equation was implemented into the well-known subsurface flow model HYDRUS-2D (Šimůnek et al., 2011). This approach utilizes the one-dimensional diffusion wave equation to model overland flow. The diffusion wave model is integrated in HYDRUS-2D by replacing the terms of the Richards equation in a pre-defined runoff layer by terms defining the diffusion wave equation. Using this approach, pressure and flux continuity along the interface between both flow domains is provided. This direct coupling approach provides a strong coupling of both systems based on the definition of a single global system matrix to numerically solve the coupled flow problem. The advantage of the direct coupling approach, compared to the loosely coupled approach, is supposed to be a higher robustness, when many convergence problems can be avoided (Takizawa et al., 2014). The HYDRUS-2D implementation was verified using a) different test cases, including a direct comparison with the results of Weill et al. (2009), b) an analytical solution of the kinematic wave equation, and c) the results of a benchmark test of Maxwell et al. (2014), that included several known coupled surface subsurface flow models. Additionally, a sensitivity analysis evaluating the effects

  13. Modelling surface water flood risk using coupled numerical and physical modelling techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, D. L.; Pattison, I.; Yu, D.

    2015-12-01

    Surface water (pluvial) flooding occurs due to intense precipitation events where rainfall cannot infiltrate into the sub-surface or drain via storm water systems. The perceived risk appears to have increased in recent years with pluvial flood events seeming more severe and frequent within the UK. Surface water flood risk currently accounts for one third of all UK flood risk, with approximately two million people living in urban areas being at risk of a 1 in 200 year flood event. Surface water flooding research often focuses upon using 1D, 2D or 1D-2D coupled numerical modelling techniques to understand the extent, depth and severity of actual or hypothetical flood scenarios. Although much research has been conducted using numerical modelling, field data available for model calibration and validation is limited due to the complexities associated with data collection in surface water flood conditions. Ultimately, the data which numerical models are based upon is often erroneous and inconclusive. Physical models offer an alternative and innovative environment to collect data within. A controlled, closed system allows independent variables to be altered individually to investigate cause and effect relationships. Despite this, physical modelling approaches are seldom used in surface water flooding research. Scaled laboratory experiments using a 9m2, two-tiered physical model consisting of: (i) a mist nozzle type rainfall simulator able to simulate a range of rainfall intensities similar to those observed within the United Kingdom, and; (ii) a fully interchangeable, scaled plot surface have been conducted to investigate and quantify the influence of factors such as slope, impermeability, building density/configuration and storm dynamics on overland flow and rainfall-runoff patterns within a range of terrestrial surface conditions. Results obtained within the physical modelling environment will be compared with numerical modelling results using FloodMap (Yu & Lane, 2006

  14. Static spacetimes with Einstein surfaces in 4d Einstein-Maxwell-Higgs theory with general couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunara, Bobby Eka

    2015-04-01

    Static spacetimes of four dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-Higgs theory with general couplings can be thought of as static black holes and static domain walls. In this paper, we study a static spacetime where the two-surface is in general to be Einstein. In particular, if the scalars are frozen everywhere in the spacetime which can be viewed as the critical points of the black hole and the scalar potentials, then the geometries are of a constant scalar curvature which in general are not Einstein describing charged black holes. Whereas, in the case of charged domain walls the scalars are frozen in the asymptotic region describing spaces of constant scalar curvature.

  15. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  16. Reduced coupling of water molecules near the surface of reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Bakulin, Artem A; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S

    2011-11-21

    We report on vibrational dynamics of water near the surface of AOT reverse micelles studied by narrow-band excitation, mid-IR pump-probe spectroscopy. Evidence of OH-stretch frequency splitting into the symmetric and asymmetric modes is clearly observed for the interfacial H(2)O molecules. The polarization memory of interfacial waters is preserved over an exceptionally extended >10 ps timescale which is a factor of 100 longer than in bulk water. These observations point towards negligibly small intermolecular vibrational coupling between the water molecules as well as strongly reduced water rotational mobility within the interfacial water layer. PMID:21959913

  17. Polymer coating on the surface of zirconia nanoparticles by inductively coupled plasma polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei; Guo, Zhigang; Pu, Yikang; Yan, Luting; Si, Wenjie

    2004-08-01

    Polymer coating on the surface of inorganic ceramic nanoparticles is beneficial to decrease agglomeration and improve dispersion in organic solvent in ceramic injection moulding technology. A layer of thin polymer film on zirconia nanoparticles is deposited by inductively coupled ethylene/nitrogen plasma. Transmission electron microscopy photographs indicate the presence of uniform polymer coatings and the thickness of the polymer layer is estimated as several nanometers. The chemical structure of the film is revealed as quasi-polyethylene long hydrocarbon chain by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy examination.

  18. Grating-coupling of surface plasmons onto metallic tips: a nanoconfined light source.

    PubMed

    Ropers, C; Neacsu, C C; Elsaesser, T; Albrecht, M; Raschke, M B; Lienau, C

    2007-09-01

    We describe and demonstrate a new nanometer-scale broadband light source. It is based on the grating-coupled excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the shaft of a sharp conical metal taper with a tip radius of few tens of nanometers. Far-field excitation of linear nanoslit gratings results in the resonant generation of SPPs traveling over more than 10 mum to the tip apex and converging to an intense radiative local light spot. Such nanofabricated tips are expected to find various applications in nanospectroscopy, overcoming problems with background illumination in apertureless microscopy.

  19. Two-color surface-emitting lasers using a semiconductor coupled multilayer cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitada, Takahiro; Ota, Hiroto; Lu, Xiangmeng; Kumagai, Naoto; Isu, Toshiro

    2016-11-01

    Two-color surface-emitting lasers were demonstrated, employing a GaAs/AlGaAs coupled multilayer cavity composed of two cavity layers and three distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) multilayers. InGaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with two different well widths were introduced only in the upper cavity, and sandwiched between p- and n-type DBRs. This current-injection type device exhibited two-color lasing in the near-infrared region under room temperature pulsed conditions. Two-color lasing was achieved when the lower cavity had an optimal thickness relative to the upper cavity thickness and the MQW emission properties.

  20. Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence from nickel thin films: Fixed angle observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenberg, Micah; Aslan, Kadir; Hortle, Elinor; Geddes, Chris D.

    2009-04-01

    Directional surface plasmon coupled chemiluminescence (SPCC) from nickel thin films is demonstrated. Free-space and angular-dependent SPCC emission from blue, green and turquoise chemiluminescent solutions placed onto nickel thin films attached to a hemispherical prism were measured. SPCC emission was found to be highly directional and preferentially p-polarized, in contrast to the unpolarized and isotropic chemiluminescence emission. The largest SPCC emission for all chemiluminescence solutions was observed at a fixed observation angle of 60°, which was also predicted by theoretical Fresnel calculations. It was found that nickel thin films did not have a catalytic effect on chemiluminescence emission.

  1. Growth of metal phthalocyanine on deactivated semiconducting surfaces steered by selective orbital coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Wagner, Sean R.; Feng, Jiagui; Yoon, Mina; Zhang, Pengpeng; Huang, Bing; Park, Changwon

    2015-08-25

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory, we show that the molecular ordering and orientation of metal phthalocyanine molecules on the deactivated Si surface display a strong dependency on the central transition-metal ion, driven by the degree of orbital hybridization at the heterointerface via selective p – d orbital coupling. As a result, this Letter identifies a selective mechanism for modifying the molecule-substrate interaction which impacts the growth behavior of transition-metal-incorporated organic molecules on a technologically relevant substrate for silicon-based devices.

  2. Long-term coupling and feedbacks between surface processes and tectonics during rifting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theunissen, Thomas; Huismans, Ritske S.

    2016-04-01

    Whereas significant efforts have been made to understand the relationship between mountain building and surfaces processes, limited research has been done on the relationship between surface processes and extensional tectonics. Here we present high-resolution 2-D coupled tectonic-surface processes modeling of extensional basin formation. The main aim is to find out how erosion and deposition affect the deformation in extensional systems. We test the combined effects of crustal rheology and varying surface process efficiency (erodibility, sea level) on structural style of rift and passive margin formation. The results show that both erosion of rift flank areas and basin deposition enhance localization of crustal deformation. Frictional-plastic extensional shear zones accumulate more deformation during a longer period of time, and loading of offshore basins can generate crustal ductile flow. In extreme cases sediment deposition delays lithospheric rupture. These mechanisms are enhanced when fluvial erosion, transport and deposition are efficient. We show that removal of mass from rift flanks and sedimentary loading in the basin area provide a first order feedback with tectonic deformation and control on rifted margin tectonic-morphology. However, surface processes do not change the first order mode of rifting, which is largely controlled by crustal rheology. Rift escarpment morphology is function of paleo-topography and sea level. Variation of strain localization in natural rift systems correlates with the observed behavior and suggests similar feedbacks as demonstrated by the forward numerical models.

  3. Aryl diazonium salts: a new class of coupling agents for bonding polymers, biomacromolecules and nanoparticles to surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mahouche-Chergui, Samia; Gam-Derouich, Sarra; Mangeney, Claire; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2011-07-01

    This critical review summarizes existing knowledge on the use of diazonium salts as a new generation of surface modifiers and coupling agents for binding synthetic polymers, biomacromolecules, and nanoparticles to surfaces. Polymer grafts can be directly grown at surfaces through the so-called grafting from approaches based on several polymerization methods but can also be pre-formed in solution and then grafted to surfaces through grafting onto strategies including "click" reactions. Several routes are also described for binding biomacromolecules through aryl layers in view of developing biosensors and protein arrays, while the use of aryl diazonium coupling agents is extended to the attachment of nanoparticles. Patents and industrial applications of the surface chemistry of diazonium compounds are covered. This review stresses the paramount role of aryl diazonium coupling agents in adhesion, surface and materials sciences (114 references). PMID:21479328

  4. In-Situ Organic Compound Analysis of the Meteorite Surface by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Coupled with an Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naraoka, H.; Hashiguchi, M.

    2016-08-01

    It-situ analysis of organic compounds on the meteorite surface was performed by desorption electrospray ionization coupled with high resolution mass spectrometry. Indigenous peaks of meteorite origin were discriminated from the background.

  5. Hafnium dioxide as a dielectric for highly-sensitive waveguide-coupled surface plasmon resonance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Kunal; Sharma, Suresh C.; Hozhabri, Nader

    2016-04-01

    Hafnium dioxide has been recognized as an excellent dielectric for microelectronics. However, its usefulness for the surface plasmon based sensors has not yet been tested. Here we investigate its usefulness for waveguide-coupled bi-metallic surface plasmon resonance sensors. Several Ag/HfO2/Au multilayer structure sensors were fabricated and evaluated by optical measurements and computer simulations. The resulting data establish correlations between the growth parameters and sensor performance. The sensor sensitivity to refractive index of analytes is determined to be S n = /∂ θ SPR ∂ n ≥ 4 7 0 . The sensitivity data are supported by simulations, which also predict 314 nm for the evanescent field decay length in air.

  6. Coupling between bulk- and surface chemistry in suspensions of charged colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinen, M.; Palberg, T.; Löwen, H.

    2014-03-01

    The ionic composition and pair correlations in fluid phases of realistically salt-free charged colloidal sphere suspensions are calculated in the primitive model. We obtain the number densities of all ionic species in suspension, including low-molecular weight microions, and colloidal macroions with acidic surface groups, from a self-consistent solution of a coupled physicochemical set of nonlinear algebraic equations and non-mean-field liquid integral equations. Here, we study suspensions of colloidal spheres with sulfonate or silanol surface groups, suspended in demineralized water that is saturated with carbon dioxide under standard atmosphere. The only input required for our theoretical scheme are the acidic dissociation constants pKa, and effective sphere diameters of all involved ions. Our method allows for an ab initio calculation of colloidal bare and effective charges, at high numerical efficiency.

  7. Strongly coupled partitioned approach for fluid structure interaction in free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea Luigi; Ubertini, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe and validate a methodology for the numerical simulation of the fluid structure interaction in free surface flows. Specifically, this study concentrates on the vertical impact of a rigid body on the water surface, (i.e. on the hull slamming problem). The fluid flow is modeled through the volume of fluid methodology, and the structure dynamics is described by the Newton's second law. An iterative algorithm guarantees the tight coupling between the fluid and solid solvers, allowing the simulations of lightweight (i.e. buoyant) structures. The methodology is validated comparing numerical results to experimental data on the free fall of different rigid wedges. The correspondence between numerical results and independent experimental findings from literature evidences the reliability and the accuracy of the proposed approach.

  8. Inclusion of CO2 fluxes in a coupled mesoscale land surface and atmospheric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uebel, M.; Shrestha, P.; Sulis, M.; Bott, A.

    2012-12-01

    An essential part of numerical weather prediction models is the accurate simulation of the interaction of the land surface with the lower atmosphere. Thus, a detailed knowledge of the land surface characteristics is an inevitable precondition for a successful numerical weather forecast. Here, we present a fully coupled atmospheric model system that comprehensively simulates the exchange processes between the soil, the vegetation and the atmosphere in terms of water, carbon dioxide (CO2), heat and momentum fluxes. The model system couples the Community Land Model (CLM) to the non-hydrostatic weather prediction model COSMO of the German Meteorological Service. Field measurements on the regional scale indicate distinct spatio-temporal heterogeneities of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This variable atmospheric CO2 partial pressure induces a direct response of the stomatal resistance of the plants resulting in a modified plant transpiration. This effect has a noticeable influence on the moisture and heat fluxes at the land surface which in turn may have a strong impact on the time evolution of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL). Since the evapotranspiration of plants is strongly controlled by the atmospheric humidity and CO2 concentration, for a consistent modeling of latent and sensible heat fluxes at the land surface a detailed treatment of the exchange of CO2 between the canopy and the PBL is of particular importance. To account for these effects, as a first step we implemented CO2 in the COSMO model as a passive tracer so that the spatial and temporal variations of the atmospheric CO2 concentration as caused by advective, turbulent and convective processes can now be simulated with reasonable accuracy. In the offline version of CLM photosynthesis and plant transpiration are calculated by utilizing a constant value of the atmospheric CO2 partial pressure. In contrast to this treatment, the coupled model system COSMO-CLM considers the varying atmospheric

  9. Quantum Yield of Single Surface Plasmons Generated by a Quantum Dot Coupled with a Silver Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between surface plasmons (SPs) in metal nanostructures and excitons in quantum emitters (QEs) lead to many interesting phenomena and potential applications that are strongly dependent on the quantum yield of SPs. The difficulty in distinguishing all the possible exciton recombination channels hinders the experimental determination of SP quantum yield. Here, we experimentally measured for the first time the quantum yield of single SPs generated by the exciton-plasmon coupling in a system composed of a single quantum dot and a silver nanowire (NW). By utilizing the SP guiding property of the NW, the decay rates of all the exciton recombination channels, i.e., direct free space radiation channel, SP generation channel, and nonradiative damping channel, are quantitatively obtained. It is determined that the optimum emitter-NW coupling distance for the largest SP quantum yield is about 10 nm, resulting from the different distance-dependent decay rates of the three channels. These results are important for manipulating the coupling between plasmonic nanostructures and QEs and developing on-chip quantum plasmonic devices for potential nanophotonic and quantum information applications.

  10. Photoacoustic spectroscopy of surface adsorbed molecules using a nanostructured coupled resonator array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongkyu; Kim, Seonghwan; Van Neste, C. W.; Lee, Moonchan; Jeon, Sangmin; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A rapid method of obtaining photoacoustic spectroscopic signals for trace amounts of surface adsorbed molecules using a nanostructured coupled resonator array is described. Explosive molecules adsorbed on a nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide cantilever, which has hexagonally ordered nanowells with diameters and well-to-well distances of 35 nm and 100 nm, respectively, are excited using pulsed infrared (IR) light with a frequency matching the common mode resonance frequency of the coupled resonator. The common mode resonance amplitudes of the coupled resonator as a function of illuminating IR wavelength present a photoacoustic IR absorption spectrum representing the chemical signatures of the adsorbed explosive molecules. In addition, the mass of the adsorbed molecules as an orthogonal signal for quantitative analysis is determined by measuring the variation of the localized, individual mode resonance frequency of a cantilever on the array. The limit of detection of the ternary mixture of explosive molecules (1:1:1 of trinitrotoluene (TNT), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN)) is estimated to be ˜100 ng cm-2. These multi-modal signals enable us to perform quantitative and rapid chemical sensing and analysis in ambient conditions.

  11. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2016-01-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has been based on a big-leaf approach, with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Furthermore, to be stable, that is to say, over large time steps and without large iterations, a surface layer model should be capable of implicit coupling to the atmospheric model. Surface models with large time steps, however, have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. Here we outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multi-layer long-wave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare-soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of the canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz (Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique Zoomed model). As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer-term eddy-covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of energy and water fluxes, as well as the vertical gradients of temperature and of sensible heat fluxes.

  12. Nitrate reduction coupled with pyrite oxidation in the surface sediments of a sulfide-rich ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Mizuho; Asano, Ryoki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Hidaka, Shin

    2013-06-01

    studies of denitrification have focused on organic carbon as an electron donor, but reduced sulfur can also support denitrification. Few studies have reported nitrate (NO3-) reduction coupled with pyrite oxidation and its stoichiometry in surface sediments, especially without experimental pyrite addition. In this study, we evaluated NO3- reduction coupled with sulfur oxidation by long-term incubation of surface sediments from a sulfide-rich ecosystem in Akita Prefecture, Japan. The surface sediments were sampled from a mud pool and a riverbed. Fresh sediments and water were incubated under anoxic conditions (and one oxic condition) at 20°C. NO3- addition increased the SO42- concentration and decreased the NO3- concentration. SO42- production (∆SO42-) was strongly and linearly correlated with NO3- consumption (∆NO3-) during the incubation period (R2 = 0.983, P < 0.01, and n = 8), and the slope of the regression (∆NO3-/∆SO42-) and the stoichiometry indicated sulfur-driven NO3- reduction by indigenous autotrophic denitrifying bacteria. Framboidal pyrite and marcasite (both FeS2) were present in the sediments and functioned as the electron donors for autotrophic denitrification. Both ∆NO3- and ∆SO42- were higher in the riverbed sediment than in the mud pool sediment, likely because of the higher amount of easily oxidizable S (pyrite) in the riverbed sediment. Consistently low ammonium (NH4+) concentrations indicated that NO3- reduction by dissimilatory NO3- reduction to NH4+ was small but could not be disregarded. Our results demonstrate that sulfide-rich ecosystems with easily oxidizable metal-bound sulfides such as FeS2 near the ground surface may act as denitrification hot spots.

  13. The coupling between localized surface plasmons and excitons via Purcell effect

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The coupling between localized surface plasmons (LSPs) within silver nanostructures and excitons in a silicon-rich silicon nitride (SiNx) matrix has been demonstrated via the Purcell effect. A simple model is employed for the estimation of the Purcell factor as well as the average position of excitons within a luminescence matrix. The estimated average position of the excitons is located at approximately 40 nm beneath the top surface of the SiNx films. The approaches for further improving the optoelectrical properties of the luminescence matrix are anticipated based on the model we adopted. The optimization of the thickness of the luminescence matrix as well as the size and shape of metal nanostructures may be the alternative approaches. Besides, the application of multilayers with the luminescence matrix inserted between barrier layers (we defined it as confined structures here) may be also an available choice. Our work may provide a deep comprehension on the coupling between LSPs and excitons, which is not limited to a certain luminescence material but with unconfined structures. PMID:23216865

  14. Diffusion on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume: Application to cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor L.; Gao, Fei; Choi, Yung-Sze; Resasco, Diana; Schaff, James C.; Slepchenko, Boris M.

    2007-10-01

    An algorithm is presented for solving a diffusion equation on a curved surface coupled to diffusion in the volume, a problem often arising in cell biology. It applies to pixilated surfaces obtained from experimental images and performs at low computational cost. In the method, the Laplace-Beltrami operator is approximated locally by the Laplacian on the tangential plane and then a finite volume discretization scheme based on a Voronoi decomposition is applied. Convergence studies show that mass conservation built in the discretization scheme and cancellation of sampling error ensure convergence of the solution in space with an order between 1 and 2. The method is applied to a cell-biological problem where a signaling molecule, G-protein Rac, cycles between the cytoplasm and cell membrane thus coupling its diffusion in the membrane to that in the cell interior. Simulations on realistic cell geometry are performed to validate, and determine the accuracy of, a recently proposed simplified quantitative analysis of fluorescence loss in photobleaching. The method is implemented within the Virtual Cell computational framework freely accessible at http://www.vcell.org.

  15. Surface Modification of High Porosity Alumina Scaffold by Silane Coupling Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joughehdoust, Sedigheh; Behnamghader, Aliasghar; Imani, Mohammad; Daliri, Morteza; Jabbari, Esmaeil

    2011-12-01

    Alumina is a bioceramic with improved mechanical properties in comparison to hydroxyapatite. It is also an inert biomaterial in the human body environment of good biocompatible characteristics. Silane coupling agents are capable to form a durable bond between organic and inorganic materials. However, formation of hydroxyl functional groups may enhance coupling of silane molecules on the scaffolds surface and improves the bioactivity of inert alumina. In this research, alumina scaffolds were immersed in H2O2/H2SO4 solution. The hydrated scaffolds were then immersed in different concentrations of γ-Methacryloxy propyl trimethoxy silane (MTMS)/methanol/distilled water solutions. X-ray diffraction pattern was used for evaluation of phase changes. The structural changes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Morphology of the resulting scaffolds was observed by scanning electron microscopy and showed a thin layer of MTMS were formed on the alumina scaffold. The results confirmed the surface modification of alumina scaffolds were performed successfully by MTMS. These scaffolds had properly interconnected porosities with appropriate pore size that can be useful for hard tissues regeneration.

  16. Understanding Coupled Earth-Surface Processes through Experiments and Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, I.; Kim, W.

    2013-12-01

    Traditionally, both numerical models and experiments have been purposefully designed to ';isolate' singular components or certain processes of a larger mountain to deep-ocean interconnected source-to-sink (S2S) transport system. Controlling factors driven by processes outside of the domain of immediate interest were treated and simplified as input or as boundary conditions. Increasingly, earth surface processes scientists appreciate feedbacks and explore these feedbacks with more dynamically coupled approaches to their experiments and models. Here, we discuss key concepts and recent advances made in coupled modeling and experimental setups. In addition, we emphasize challenges and new frontiers to coupled experiments. Experiments have highlighted the important role of self-organization; river and delta systems do not always need to be forced by external processes to change or develop characteristic morphologies. Similarly modeling f.e. has shown that intricate networks in tidal deltas are stable because of the interplay between river avulsions and the tidal current scouring with both processes being important to develop and maintain the dentritic networks. Both models and experiment have demonstrated that seemingly stable systems can be perturbed slightly and show dramatic responses. Source-to-sink models were developed for both the Fly River System in Papua New Guinea and the Waipaoa River in New Zealand. These models pointed to the importance of upstream-downstream effects and enforced our view of the S2S system as a signal transfer and dampening conveyor belt. Coupled modeling showed that deforestation had extreme effects on sediment fluxes draining from the catchment of the Waipaoa River in New Zealand, and that this increase in sediment production rapidly shifted the locus of offshore deposition. The challenge in designing coupled models and experiments is both technological as well as intellectual. Our community advances to make numerical model coupling more

  17. Further reduction of efficiency droop effect by adding a lower-index dielectric interlayer in a surface plasmon coupled blue light-emitting diode with surface metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chun-Han; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chung-Hui; Yao, Yu-Feng; Shih, Pei-Ying; Chen, Horng-Shyang; Hsieh, Chieh; Kiang, Yean-Woei Yang, C. C.; Kuo, Yang

    2014-09-08

    Further reduction of the efficiency droop effect and further enhancements of internal quantum efficiency (IQE) and output intensity of a surface plasmon coupled, blue-emitting light-emitting diode (LED) by inserting a dielectric interlayer (DI) of a lower refractive index between p-GaN and surface Ag nanoparticles are demonstrated. The insertion of a DI leads to a blue shift of the localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance spectrum and increases the LSP coupling strength at the quantum well emitting wavelength in the blue range. With SiO{sub 2} as the DI, a thinner DI leads to a stronger LSP coupling effect, when compared with the case of a thicker DI. By using GaZnO, which is a dielectric in the optical range and a good conductor under direct-current operation, as the DI, the LSP coupling results in the highest IQE, highest LED output intensity, and weakest droop effect.

  18. Surface models for coupled modelling of runoff and sewer flow in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Ettrich, N; Steiner, K; Thomas, M; Rothe, R

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods fail for the purpose of simulating the complete flow process in urban areas as a consequence of heavy rainfall and as required by the European Standard EN-752 since the bi-directional coupling between sewer and surface is not properly handled. The new methodology, developed in the EUREKA-project RisUrSim, solves this problem by carrying out the runoff on the basis of shallow water equations solved on high-resolution surface grids. Exchange nodes between the sewer and the surface, like inlets and manholes, are located in the computational grid and water leaving the sewer in case of surcharge is further distributed on the surface. Dense topographical information is needed to build a model suitable for hydrodynamic runoff calculations; in urban areas, in addition, many line-shaped elements like houses, curbs, etc. guide the runoff of water and require polygonal input. Airborne data collection methods offer a great chance to economically gather densely sampled input data.

  19. Surface roughening of ground fused silica processed by atmospheric inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qiang; Li, Na; Wang, Jun; Wang, Bo; Li, Guo; Ding, Fei; Jin, Huiliang

    2015-06-01

    Subsurface damage (SSD) is a defect that is inevitably induced during mechanical processes, such as grinding and polishing. This defect dramatically reduces the mechanical strength and the laser damage thresholds of optical elements. Compared with traditional mechanical machining, atmospheric pressure plasma processing (APPP) is a relatively novel technology that induces almost no SSD during the processing of silica-based optical materials. In this paper, a form of APPP, inductively coupled plasma (ICP), is used to process fused silica substrates with fluorocarbon precursor under atmospheric pressure. The surface morphology evolution of ICP-processed substrates was observed and characterized by confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the roughness evolves with the etching depth, and the roughness evolution is a single-peaked curve. This curve results from the opening and the coalescing of surface cracks and fractures. The coalescence procedure of these microstructures was simulated with two common etched pits on a polished fused silica surface. Understanding the roughness evolution of plasma-processed surface might be helpful in optimizing the optical fabrication chain that contains APPP.

  20. Impact of surface coupling grids on tropical cyclone extremes in high-resolution atmospheric simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Zarzycki, Colin M.; Reed, Kevin A.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Craig, Anthony P.; Bates, Susan C.; Rosenbloom, Nan A.

    2016-02-25

    This article discusses the sensitivity of tropical cyclone climatology to surface coupling strategy in high-resolution configurations of the Community Earth System Model. Using two supported model setups, we demonstrate that the choice of grid on which the lowest model level wind stress and surface fluxes are computed may lead to differences in cyclone strength in multi-decadal climate simulations, particularly for the most intense cyclones. Using a deterministic framework, we show that when these surface quantities are calculated on an ocean grid that is coarser than the atmosphere, the computed frictional stress is misaligned with wind vectors in individual atmospheric gridmore » cells. This reduces the effective surface drag, and results in more intense cyclones when compared to a model configuration where the ocean and atmosphere are of equivalent resolution. Our results demonstrate that the choice of computation grid for atmosphere–ocean interactions is non-negligible when considering climate extremes at high horizontal resolution, especially when model components are on highly disparate grids.« less

  1. Integration of Urban Features into a Coupled Groundwater-Surface Water Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskar, A. S.; Welty, C.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the feedbacks between urban development and water availability, we are coupling an integrated hydrologic model with an urban growth model, both of the Baltimore, Maryland, USA region. The urban growth model SLEUTH has been calibrated, validated and run by collaborators at Shippensburg University. We are using ParFlow.CLM as the integrated hydrologic model. This model is applied to the 13,000 sq. km. Baltimore metropolitan area, which spans the Gunpowder and Patapsco watersheds. The model domain includes both Piedmont and Coastal Plain physiographic provinces. We have incorporated characteristics of both the natural hydrogeologic system and the superimposed urban environment. Standard hydrogeologic information such as hydraulic conductivity of fractured bedrock, Coastal Plain sediments, and surficial soils, as well as saprolite thickness, porosity, and specific storage properties have been included. We have also quantified a number of aspects representing urban development, such as residential and municipal well pumping, municipal reservoir use, lawn watering, and water supply pipe leakage estimates. We have represented impervious surface coverage using low surface hydraulic conductivity values. The land surface fluxes in CLM (Common Land Model) use surface land cover and therefore represent reduced evapotranspiration in urban areas. A study of urban and natural watershed inflows and inflows in this region indicated some urban features significantly modify catchment water balances. We are particularly interested in the effects of these urban hydrologic features on groundwater recharge in the Baltimore area. Prior to inclusion of subsurface heterogeneity, we initialized the model by running it hourly from 2000 to 2007. The initialization was generated by a dynamic spin-up process, using the UMBC High Performance Computing Facility. Observed meteorological forcing, such as hourly precipitation and air temperature, are used by the land surface

  2. Coupled surface water and groundwater modeling over the White Volta Basin, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittinger, S. T.; Alo, C. A.; Bitew, M. M.; Yidana, S. M.; Alfa, B.

    2012-12-01

    Sustainable livelihood in the semiarid White Volta Basin in Northern Ghana is dependent on the availability and sustainable development and management of water resources for agricultural activities. Currently, almost all agricultural activities are rain-fed and thus depend on the frequency, spatial, and temporal distribution of rainfall. Recent erratic patterns in the temporal and spatial distribution of rainfall in the basin—largely consistent with the effects of a warming climate—have led to dwindling fortunes in the rain-fed agricultural enterprise. On the other hand, surface water bodies in the forms of rivers and streams are ephemeral and therefore do not serve the immediate irrigation needs of the populations especially in the dry seasons. The conjunctive use of surface and groundwater resources to support local irrigation schemes in the basin has been suggested as a possible buffer against the effects of dwindling rainfall on agriculture in the basin and has the potential of raising the standard of living of the communities dwelling there. Conjunctive surface water/groundwater use involves the balanced application of both groundwater and surface water resources for maximal socio-economic benefit whilst ensuring ecological integrity. However, a detailed assessment of the potentials of the aquifers for commercial development has been constrained by the limited or no understanding of the surface water-groundwater interactions in the basin within the context of climate change/evolving patterns of climate variability and human activities. Here, we present preliminary results from simulations of coupled surface water and groundwater availability and flow over the Volta Basin using an integrated hydrological model.

  3. Strong coupling between Rhodamine 6G and localized surface plasmon resonance of immobile Ag nanoclusters fabricated by direct current sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yingcui; Blinn, Kevin; Li, Xiaxi; Weng, Guojun; Liu, Meilin

    2013-04-01

    We made clean silver nano-clusters (AgNCs) on glass substrates by DC magnetron sputtering of a high purity Ag target in a high vacuum chamber. The AgNCs film shows strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) due to the coupling among Ag nanoparticles in the AgNCs and the coupling between AgNCs. The LSPR indicates strong coupling with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) adsorbed on the AgNC surface, which enhances the R6G absorption intensity and broadens the absorption wavelength range. This result promotes plasmonic nanoparticles to be better used in solar cells.

  4. Surface scanning through a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid for clinical microwave breast imaging exams

    SciTech Connect

    Pallone, Matthew J.; Meaney, Paul M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Microwave tomographic image quality can be improved significantly with prior knowledge of the breast surface geometry. The authors have developed a novel laser scanning system capable of accurately recovering surface renderings of breast-shaped phantoms immersed within a cylindrical tank of coupling fluid which resides completely external to the tank (and the aqueous environment) and overcomes the challenges associated with the optical distortions caused by refraction from the air, tank wall, and liquid bath interfaces. Methods: The scanner utilizes two laser line generators and a small CCD camera mounted concentrically on a rotating gantry about the microwave imaging tank. Various calibration methods were considered for optimizing the accuracy of the scanner in the presence of the optical distortions including traditional ray tracing and image registration approaches. In this paper, the authors describe the construction and operation of the laser scanner, compare the efficacy of several calibration methods-including analytical ray tracing and piecewise linear, polynomial, locally weighted mean, and thin-plate-spline (TPS) image registrations-and report outcomes from preliminary phantom experiments. Results: The results show that errors in calibrating camera angles and position prevented analytical ray tracing from achieving submillimeter accuracy in the surface renderings obtained from our scanner configuration. Conversely, calibration by image registration reliably attained mean surface errors of less than 0.5 mm depending on the geometric complexity of the object scanned. While each of the image registration approaches outperformed the ray tracing strategy, the authors found global polynomial methods produced the best compromise between average surface error and scanner robustness. Conclusions: The laser scanning system provides a fast and accurate method of three dimensional surface capture in the aqueous environment commonly found in microwave breast

  5. Electromagnetic penetration through narrow slots in conducting surfaces and coupling to structures on the shadow side

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, E.K.; Butler, C.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1990-07-01

    Electromagnetic field penetration through a curved narrow slot in a planar conducting surface and coupling to a curved, loaded thin wire on the shadow side are determined in the time domain (TD) and the frequency domain (FD) by integral equation methods. Coupled integral equations are derived and solved numerically for the equivalent magnetic current in the slot and the electric current on the wire, from which the field that penetrates the slotted surface is determined. One employs a piecewise linear approximation of the unknown currents and performs equation enforcement by pulse testing. The resulting TD equations are solved by a scheme incorporating a finite-difference approximation for a second partial time derivative which allows one to solve for the unknown currents at a discrete time instant t + 1 in terms of the known excitation and currents calculated at a discrete time instant t and earlier. The FD equations are solved by the method of moments. A hybrid time-domain integral equation -- finite-difference time-domain solution technique is described whereby one solves for the field which penetrates a slotted cavity-backed surface. One models the fields in the exterior region and in the slot with integral operators and models the fields inside the cavity with a discretized form of Maxwell's equations. Narrow slots following various contours were chemically etched in thin bass sheets and an apparatus was fabricated to measure shadow-side fields, electric current on a thin wire on the shadow side, and, separately, fields inside a rectangular cavity which backed the slotted brass sheet. The experimentation was conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on a frequency-domain test range employing a monocone source over a large ground plane. One observes very good agreement among the experimental and theoretical results.

  6. Simulating carbon exchange using a regional atmospheric model coupled to an advanced land-surface model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ter Maat, H. W.; Hutjes, R. W. A.; Miglietta, F.; Gioli, B.; Bosveld, F. C.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Fritsch, H.

    2010-08-01

    This paper is a case study to investigate what the main controlling factors are that determine atmospheric carbon dioxide content for a region in the centre of The Netherlands. We use the Regional Atmospheric Modelling System (RAMS), coupled with a land surface scheme simulating carbon, heat and momentum fluxes (SWAPS-C), and including also submodels for urban and marine fluxes, which in principle should include the dominant mechanisms and should be able to capture the relevant dynamics of the system. To validate the model, observations are used that were taken during an intensive observational campaign in central Netherlands in summer 2002. These include flux-tower observations and aircraft observations of vertical profiles and spatial fluxes of various variables. The simulations performed with the coupled regional model (RAMS-SWAPS-C) are in good qualitative agreement with the observations. The station validation of the model demonstrates that the incoming shortwave radiation and surface fluxes of water and CO2 are well simulated. The comparison against aircraft data shows that the regional meteorology (i.e. wind, temperature) is captured well by the model. Comparing spatially explicitly simulated fluxes with aircraft observed fluxes we conclude that in general latent heat fluxes are underestimated by the model compared to the observations but that the latter exhibit large variability within all flights. Sensitivity experiments demonstrate the relevance of the urban emissions of carbon dioxide for the carbon balance in this particular region. The same tests also show the relation between uncertainties in surface fluxes and those in atmospheric concentrations.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Coupled Groundwater and Surface Water Interactions in an Urban Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Rihani, J F; Maxwell, R M

    2007-09-26

    balance and hydrology of DCW, a parallel, distributed watershed model that treats flow in groundwater and surface water in a dynamically coupled manner will be used to build a flow model of the watershed. This coupled model forms the basis for modeling and understanding the transport of contaminants through the Dominguez Channel Watershed, which can be used in designing and implementing TMDLs to manage the water quality in this basin. In this report, the coupled surface water-groundwater flow model of DCW will be presented. This flow model was calibrated against a storm that occurred in February 21st, 2004. The model and approach are explained further in the following sections.

  8. Close-coupling wave-packet study of He and Ne sticking on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bret

    1992-11-01

    A fully quantum-mechanical study is made of light particles sticking on a model Cu surface. The full molecule-metal wave function is expanded to include states corresponding to elastic scattering and the creation or annihilation of single phonons. The coupled-channel equations for this system are evolved in time numerically using well-known wave-packet techniques. For light particles and low energies, where only single-phonon interactions are important, this is a rigorous treatment of the dynamics and can serve as a benchmark. Probability distributions for energy transfer are computed from the reduced density matrix. These distributions exhibit resonances which correspond to transitions into the gas-metal bound states. The trapping probability is studied as a function of particle mass, energy, and surface temperature for a flat Cu surface. A comparison is made with the forced oscillator model and other approximate methods which are shown to give poor results for the sticking probability of light particles.

  9. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, Sylva; Bolanz, Ralph M; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Siddique, Jamal A; Komárek, Michael

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3-10), ionic strengths (0.001-0.1M KNO3), sorbate concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6)M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50-500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes.

  10. GGA3 Interacts with a G Protein-Coupled Receptor and Modulates Its Cell Surface Export

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Maoxiang; Davis, Jason E.; Li, Chunman; Gao, Jie; Huang, Wei; Lambert, Nevin A.; Terry, Alvin V.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms governing the anterograde trafficking of nascent G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are poorly understood. Here, we have studied the regulation of cell surface transport of α2-adrenergic receptors (α2-ARs) by GGA3 (Golgi-localized, γ-adaptin ear domain homology, ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3), a multidomain clathrin adaptor protein that sorts cargo proteins at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome/lysosome pathway. By using an inducible system, we demonstrated that GGA3 knockdown significantly inhibited the cell surface expression of newly synthesized α2B-AR without altering overall receptor synthesis and internalization. The receptors were arrested in the TGN. Furthermore, GGA3 knockdown attenuated α2B-AR-mediated signaling, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation and cyclic AMP (cAMP) inhibition. More interestingly, GGA3 physically interacted with α2B-AR, and the interaction sites were identified as the triple Arg motif in the third intracellular loop of the receptor and the acidic motif EDWE in the VHS domain of GGA3. In contrast, α2A-AR did not interact with GGA3 and its cell surface export and signaling were not affected by GGA3 knockdown. These data reveal a novel function of GGA3 in export trafficking of a GPCR that is mediated via a specific interaction with the receptor. PMID:26811329

  11. Adhesion and friction force coupling of gecko setal arrays: implications for structured adhesive surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boxin; Pesika, Noshir; Rosenberg, Kenny; Tian, Yu; Zeng, Hongbo; McGuiggan, Patricia; Autumn, Kellar; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2008-02-19

    The extraordinary climbing ability of geckos is partially attributed to the fine structure of their toe pads, which contain arrays consisting of thousands of micrometer-sized stalks (setae) that are in turn terminated by millions of fingerlike pads (spatulae) having nanoscale dimensions. Using a surface forces apparatus (SFA), we have investigated the dynamic sliding characteristics of setal arrays subjected to various loading, unloading, and shearing conditions at different angles. Setal arrays were glued onto silica substrates and, once installed into the SFA, brought toward a polymeric substrate surface and then sheared. Lateral shearing of the arrays was initiated along both the "gripping" and "releasing" directions of the setae on the foot pads. We find that the anisotropic microstructure of the setal arrays gives rise to quite different adhesive and tribological properties when sliding along these two directions, depending also on the angle that the setae subtend with respect to the surface. Thus, dragging the setal arrays along the gripping direction leads to strong adhesion and friction forces (as required during contact and attachment), whereas when shearing along the releasing direction, both forces fall to almost zero (as desired during rapid detachment). The results and analysis provide new insights into the biomechanics of adhesion and friction forces in animals, the coupling between these two forces, and the specialized structures that allow them to optimize these forces along different directions during movement. Our results also have practical implications and criteria for designing reversible and responsive adhesives and articulated robotic mechanisms.

  12. Chromate adsorption on selected soil minerals: Surface complexation modeling coupled with spectroscopic investigation.

    PubMed

    Veselská, Veronika; Fajgar, Radek; Číhalová, Sylva; Bolanz, Ralph M; Göttlicher, Jörg; Steininger, Ralph; Siddique, Jamal A; Komárek, Michael

    2016-11-15

    This study investigates the mechanisms of Cr(VI) adsorption on natural clay (illite and kaolinite) and synthetic (birnessite and ferrihydrite) minerals, including its speciation changes, and combining quantitative thermodynamically based mechanistic surface complexation models (SCMs) with spectroscopic measurements. Series of adsorption experiments have been performed at different pH values (3-10), ionic strengths (0.001-0.1M KNO3), sorbate concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5), and 10(-6)M Cr(VI)), and sorbate/sorbent ratios (50-500). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the surface complexes, including surface reactions. Adsorption of Cr(VI) is strongly ionic strength dependent. For ferrihydrite at pH <7, a simple diffuse-layer model provides a reasonable prediction of adsorption. For birnessite, bidentate inner-sphere complexes of chromate and dichromate resulted in a better diffuse-layer model fit. For kaolinite, outer-sphere complexation prevails mainly at lower Cr(VI) loadings. Dissolution of solid phases needs to be considered for better SCMs fits. The coupled SCM and spectroscopic approach is thus useful for investigating individual minerals responsible for Cr(VI) retention in soils, and improving the handling and remediation processes. PMID:27450335

  13. Surface Plasmon-Coupled Emission of Rhodamine 110 Aggregates in a Silica Nanolayer.

    PubMed

    Rangełowa-Jankowska, Simeonika; Jankowski, Dawid; Bogdanowicz, Robert; Grobelna, Beata; Bojarski, Piotr

    2012-12-01

    First analysis of strong directional surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) of ground-state formed intermolecular aggregates of Rhodamine 110 (R110) in silica nanofilms deposited on silver nanolayers is reported. Until now, the processes of energy transport and its trapping due to aggregate formation have not been studied in the presence of SPCE. A new approach to multicomponent systems with weakly and strongly fluorescent centers making use of fluorophore-surface plasmon interaction is presented. The analysis is based on comparison of experimental free-space emission spectra (F-SE), experimental SPCE with theoretical surface plasmon resonance spectra (SPR). It is shown that, due to the dispersion of SPCE, the detection of weak aggregate emission is straightforward if only the monomers and aggregates fluorescence spectra are somewhat spectrally shifted. SPCE studies confirmed the formation of weakly fluorescent higher order aggregates of R110 in silica films. The results indicate that the increase of energy transfer from monomers to aggregates is due to fluorophore-plasmon interaction.

  14. A cut finite element method for coupled bulk-surface problems on time-dependent domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansbo, Peter; Larson, Mats G.; Zahedi, Sara

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution we present a new computational method for coupled bulk-surface problems on time-dependent domains. The method is based on a space-time formulation using discontinuous piecewise linear elements in time and continuous piecewise linear elements in space on a fixed background mesh. The domain is represented using a piecewise linear level set function on the background mesh and a cut finite element method is used to discretize the bulk and surface problems. In the cut finite element method the bilinear forms associated with the weak formulation of the problem are directly evaluated on the bulk domain and the surface defined by the level set, essentially using the restrictions of the piecewise linear functions to the computational domain. In addition a stabilization term is added to stabilize convection as well as the resulting algebraic system that is solved in each time step. We show in numerical examples that the resulting method is accurate and stable and results in well conditioned algebraic systems independent of the position of the interface relative to the background mesh.

  15. Surface Structure of Bi(111) from Helium Atom Scattering Measurements. Inelastic Close-Coupling Formalism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic close-coupling (CC) calculations have been used to extract information about the corrugation amplitude and the surface vibrational atomic displacement by fitting to several experimental diffraction patterns. To model the three-dimensional interaction between the He atom and the Bi(111) surface under investigation, a corrugated Morse potential has been assumed. Two different types of calculations are used to obtain theoretical diffraction intensities at three surface temperatures along the two symmetry directions. Type one consists of solving the elastic CC (eCC) and attenuating the corresponding diffraction intensities by a global Debye–Waller (DW) factor. The second one, within a unitary theory, is derived from merely solving the inelastic CC (iCC) equations, where no DW factor is necessary to include. While both methods arrive at similar predictions for the peak-to-peak corrugation value, the variance of the value obtained by the iCC method is much better. Furthermore, the more extensive calculation is better suited to model the temperature induced signal asymmetries and renders the inclusion for a second Debye temperature for the diffraction peaks futile. PMID:26257838

  16. Coupled integral equations for sound propagation above a hard ground surface with trench cuttings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gong Li; Chew, Weng Cho; White, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    A set of coupled integral equations is formulated for the investigation of sound propagation from an infinitesimal harmonic line source above a hard ground surface corrugated with cuttings. Two half-space Green's functions are employed in the formulation. The first one defined for the upper half space is used to reduce the problem size and eliminate the edge effect resulting from the boundary truncation; the other one for the lower half space is to simplify the representation of the Neumann-Dirichlet map. As a result, the unknowns are only distributed over the corrugated part of the surface, which leads to substantial reduction in the size of the final linear system. The computational complexity of the Neumann-Dirichlet map is also reduced. The method is used to analyze the behavior of sound propagation above textured surfaces the impedance of which is expectedly altered. The effects of number and opening of trench cuttings, and the effect of source height are investigated. The conclusions drawn can be used for reference in a practical problem of mitigating gun blast noise. PMID:17004443

  17. Plasmonic Purcell factor and coupling efficiency to surface plasmons. Implications for addressing and controlling optical nanosources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas des Francs, G.; Barthes, J.; Bouhelier, A.; Weeber, J. C.; Dereux, A.; Cuche, A.; Girard, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Purcell factor F p is a key quantity in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) that quantifies the coupling rate between a dipolar emitter and a cavity mode. Its simple form {F}{{p}}\\propto Q/V unravels the possible strategies to enhance and control light–matter interaction. Practically, efficient light–matter interaction is achieved thanks to either (i) high quality factor Q at the basis of cQED or (ii) low modal volume V at the basis of nanophotonics and plasmonics. In the last decade, strong efforts have been done to derive a plasmonic Purcell factor in order to transpose cQED concepts to the nanocale, in a scale-law approach. In this work, we discuss the plasmonic Purcell factor for both delocalized (SPP) and localized (LSP) surface-plasmon-polaritons and briefly summarize the expected applications for nanophotonics. On the basis of the SPP resonance shape (Lorentzian or Fano profile), we derive closed form expression for the coupling rate to delocalized plasmons. The quality factor factor and modal confinement of both SPP and LSP are quantified, demonstrating their strongly subwavelength behavior.

  18. Bioactive glass coupling with natural polyphenols: Surface modification, bioactivity and anti-oxidant ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzola, Martina; Corazzari, Ingrid; Prenesti, Enrico; Bertone, Elisa; Vernè, Enrica; Ferraris, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Polyphenols are actually achieving an increasing interest due to their potential health benefits, such as antioxidant, anticancer, antibacterial and bone stimulation abilities. However their poor bioavailability and stability hamper an effective clinical application as therapeutic principles. The opportunity to couple these biomolecules with synthetic biomaterials, in order to obtain local delivery at the site of interest, improve their bioavailability and stability and combine their properties with the ones of the substrate, is a challenging opportunity for the biomedical research. A silica based bioactive glass, CEL2, has been successfully coupled with gallic acid and natural polyphenols extracted from red grape skins and green tea leaves. The effectiveness of grafting has been verified by means of XPS analyses and the Folin&Ciocalteu tests. In vitro bioactivity has been investigated by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF). Surface modification after functionalization and early stage reactivity in SBF have been studied by means of zeta potential electrokinetic measurements in KCl and SBF. Finally the antioxidant properties of bare and modified bioactive glasses has been investigated by means of the evaluation of free radical scavenging activity by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR)/spin trapping technique after UV photolysis of H2O2 highlighting scavenging activity of the bioactive glass.

  19. Surface binding of polymer coated nanoparticles: Coupling of physical interactions, molecular organization, and chemical state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nap, Rikkert; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-03-01

    A key challenge in nanomedicine is to design carrier system for drug delivery that selectively binds to target cells without binding to healthy cells. A common strategy is to end-functionalize the polymers coating of the delivery device with specific ligands that bind strongly to overexpressed receptors. Such devices are usually unable to discriminate between receptors found on benign and malignant cells. We demonstrate, theoretically, how one can achieve selective binding to target cells by using multiple physical and chemical interactions. We study the effective interactions between a polymer decorated nanosized micelle or solid nanoparticle with model lipid layers. The polymer coating contains a mixture of two polymers, one neutral for protection and the other a polybase with a functional end-group to optimize specific binding and electrostatic interactions with the charged lipid head-groups found on the lipid surface. The strength of the binding for the combined system is much larger than the sum of the independent electrostatic or specific ligand-receptor binding. The search for optimal binding conditions lead to the finding of a non-additive coupling that exists in systems where chemical equilibrium, molecular organization, and physical interactions are coupled together.

  20. Coupling between Buoyancy Forces and Electroconvective Instability near Ion-Selective Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Karatay, Elif; Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Wessling, Matthias; Mani, Ali

    2016-05-13

    Recent investigations have revealed that ion transport from aqueous electrolytes to ion-selective surfaces is subject to electroconvective instability that stems from coupling of hydrodynamics with electrostatic forces. These systems inherently involve fluid density variation set by salinity gradients. However, the coupling between the buoyancy effects and electroconvective instability has not yet been investigated although a wide range of electrochemical systems are naturally prone to these interplaying effects. In this study we thoroughly examine the interplay of gravitational convection and chaotic electroconvection. Our results reveal that buoyant forces can significantly influence the transport rates, otherwise set by electroconvection, when the Rayleigh number Ra of the system exceeds a value Ra∼1000. We show that buoyancy forces can significantly alter the flow patterns in these systems. When the buoyancy acts in the stabilizing direction, it limits the extent of penetration of electroconvection, but without eliminating it. When the buoyancy destabilizes the flow, it alters the electroconvective patterns by introducing upward and downward fingers of respectively light and heavy fluids. PMID:27232024

  1. Plasmonic Purcell factor and coupling efficiency to surface plasmons. Implications for addressing and controlling optical nanosources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas des Francs, G.; Barthes, J.; Bouhelier, A.; Weeber, J. C.; Dereux, A.; Cuche, A.; Girard, C.

    2016-09-01

    The Purcell factor F p is a key quantity in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) that quantifies the coupling rate between a dipolar emitter and a cavity mode. Its simple form {F}{{p}}\\propto Q/V unravels the possible strategies to enhance and control light-matter interaction. Practically, efficient light-matter interaction is achieved thanks to either (i) high quality factor Q at the basis of cQED or (ii) low modal volume V at the basis of nanophotonics and plasmonics. In the last decade, strong efforts have been done to derive a plasmonic Purcell factor in order to transpose cQED concepts to the nanocale, in a scale-law approach. In this work, we discuss the plasmonic Purcell factor for both delocalized (SPP) and localized (LSP) surface-plasmon-polaritons and briefly summarize the expected applications for nanophotonics. On the basis of the SPP resonance shape (Lorentzian or Fano profile), we derive closed form expression for the coupling rate to delocalized plasmons. The quality factor factor and modal confinement of both SPP and LSP are quantified, demonstrating their strongly subwavelength behavior.

  2. Enhanced fluorescence by surface plasmon coupling of Au nanoparticles in an organic electroluminescence diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiki, A.; Uemura, T.; Zettsu, N.; Akai-Kasaya, M.; Saito, A.; Kuwahara, Y.

    2010-01-01

    A significant increase in electroluminescence was achieved through coupling with localized surface plasmons in a single layer of Au nanoparticles. We fabricated a thin-film organic electroluminescence diode, which consists of an indium tin oxide (ITO) anode, a Au nanoparticle array, a Cu phthalocyanine hole transport layer, a tris(8-hydroxylquinolianato) aluminum (III) electron transport layer, a LiF electron injection layer, and an Al cathode. The device structure, with size-controlled Au particles embedded on ITO, can be used to realize the optimum distance for exciton-plasmon interactions by simply adjusting the thickness of the hole transport layer. We observed a 20-fold increase in the molecular fluorescence compared with that of a conventional diode structure.

  3. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    McAnally, Michael O; McMahon, Jeffrey M; Van Duyne, Richard P; Schatz, George C

    2016-09-01

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gpu|(2)ImχR(ω)gst (2)/ImχR(ω), where |gpu|(2) is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering. PMID:27608988

  4. InP/ZnS nanocrystals: coupling NMR and XPS for fine surface and interface description.

    PubMed

    Virieux, Héloïse; Le Troedec, Marianne; Cros-Gagneux, Arnaud; Ojo, Wilfried-Solo; Delpech, Fabien; Nayral, Céline; Martinez, Hervé; Chaudret, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Advanced (1)H, (13)C, and (31)P solution- and solid-state NMR studies combined with XPS were used to probe, at the molecular scale, the composition (of the core, the shell, and the interface) and the surface chemistry of InP/ZnS core/shell quantum dots prepared via a non-coordinating solvent strategy. The interface between the mismatched InP and ZnS phases is composed of an amorphous mixed oxide phase incorporating InPO(x) (with x = 3 and predominantly 4), In(2)O(3), and InO(y)(OH)(3-2y) (y = 0, 1). Thanks to the analysis of the underlying reaction mechanisms, we demonstrate that the oxidation of the upper part of the InP core is the consequence of oxidative conditions brought by decarboxylative coupling reactions (ketonization). These reactions occur during both the core preparation and the coating process, but according to different mechanisms. PMID:23131073

  5. Covalent Coupling of Nanoparticles with Low-Density Functional Ligands to Surfaces via Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Rianasari, Ina; de Jong, Michel P.; Huskens, Jurriaan; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition (“click” reaction) to couple gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) functionalized with low densities of functional ligands. The ligand coverage on the citrate-stabilized Au NPs was adjusted by the ligand:Au surface atom ratio, while maintaining the colloidal stability of the Au NPs in aqueous solution. A procedure was developed to determine the driving forces governing the selectivity and reactivity of citrate-stabilized and ligand-functionalized Au NPs on patterned self-assembled monolayers. We observed selective and remarkably stable chemical bonding of the Au NPs to the complimentarily functionalized substrate areas, even when estimating that only 1–2 chemical bonds are formed between the particles and the substrate. PMID:23434666

  6. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F(2P) + HCl and F(2P) + H2 reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  7. Coupling between Surface Plasmon Resonance and electric current in Au stripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Miguel Angel; Serrano, Aida; de La Venta, Jose

    2009-03-01

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is the most outstanding feature of noble metal films. SPR consists on a collective oscillation of the conduction electrons when excited optically in the appropriate geometrical and energy conditions. The electrical current passing trough the metal film involves also the movement of conduction electrons. Thus, coupling effects are expected between SPR and electrical resistivity. A modification of the SPR when a electrical current passes through the film, could allow the modulation of an optical signal by a electrical one. Similarly, when the film is illuminated at the SPR conditions, the oscillation of the conduction electrons and local heating can induce an enhancement of the electric resistivity that can be used to translate an optical signal into a electric one. Those effects could be useful in the development of new fast optoelectronic transducers. We present here results on Au stripes illuminated to induce the SPR while electric currents flow with different orientation with respect to the light polarization

  8. Nanoplasmonic biosensor: coupling electrochemistry to localized surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy on nanocup arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Diming; Lu, Yanli; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Qian; Yao, Yao; Wang, Ping; Chen, Bilian; Cheng, Qiaoyuan; Liu, Gang Logan; Liu, Qingjun

    2015-05-15

    The nanoscale Lycurgus cup arrays were hybrid structures of nanocups and nanoparticles with ultrasensitivity to refractive index change. In this study, an electrochemical localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor was developed by coupling electrochemistry to LSPR spectroscopy measurement on the nanoscale cup arrays (nanoCA). Based on the combination of electrochemistry and LSPR measurement, the electrochemical LSPR on nanoCA was observed with significant resonance wavelength shifts in electrochemical modulation. The synchronous implementation of cyclic voltammetry and optical transmission spectrum can be used to obtain multiply sensing information and investigate the enhancement for LSPR from electrochemical scanning. The electrochemical enhanced LSPR was utilized as biosensor to detect biomolecules. The electrochemical LSPR biosensor with synchronous electrochemical and optical implement showed higher sensitivity than that of conventional optical LSPR measurement. Detecting with multi-transducer parameters and high sensitivity, the electrochemical LSPR provided a promising approach for chemical and biological detection.

  9. Coupled wave equations theory of surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAnally, Michael O.; McMahon, Jeffrey M.; Van Duyne, Richard P.; Schatz, George C.

    2016-09-01

    We present a coupled wave semiclassical theory to describe plasmonic enhancement effects in surface-enhanced femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering (SE-FSRS). A key result is that the plasmon enhanced fields which drive the vibrational equation of motion for each normal mode results in dispersive lineshapes in the SE-FSRS spectrum. This result, which reproduces experimental lineshapes, demonstrates that plasmon-enhanced stimulated Raman methods provide unique sensitivity to a plasmonic response. Our derived SE-FSRS theory shows a plasmonic enhancement of |gp u|2I m {" separators="χR(ω ) gst 2 }/I m {" separators="χR(ω ) }, where |gpu|2 is the absolute square of the plasmonic enhancement from the Raman pump, χR(ω) is the Raman susceptibility, and gst is the plasmonic enhancement of the Stokes field in SE-FSRS. We conclude with a discussion on potential future experimental and theoretical directions for the field of plasmonically enhanced coherent Raman scattering.

  10. A finite-element visualization of quantum reactive scattering. II. Nonadiabaticity on coupled potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Warehime, Mick; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.

    2015-01-21

    This is the second in a series of papers detailing a MATLAB based implementation of the finite element method applied to collinear triatomic reactions. Here, we extend our previous work to reactions on coupled potential energy surfaces. The divergence of the probability current density field associated with the two electronically adiabatic states allows us to visualize in a novel way where and how nonadiabaticity occurs. A two-dimensional investigation gives additional insight into nonadiabaticity beyond standard one-dimensional models. We study the F({sup 2}P) + HCl and F({sup 2}P) + H{sub 2} reactions as model applications. Our publicly available code (http://www2.chem.umd.edu/groups/alexander/FEM) is general and easy to use.

  11. Measuring binding kinetics of biomolecular interactions using a localized surface plasmon couple fluorescence fiber optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ying-Feng; Hsieh, Jo-Ping; Su, Li-Chen; Li, Ying-Chang; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Chou, Chien

    2010-08-01

    In this study, we describe a novel method for analyzing protein-protein binding kinetics at ultra-low concentration (1 pg/mL) using a localized surface plasmon coupled fluorescence fiber-optic biosensor (LSPCF-FOB). The association and dissociation rate constants, ka and kd, respectively, for the binding kinetics of the mouse IgG/ anti-mouse IgG interaction have been calculated to be ka = (5.9928+/-3.1540)x106 M-1s-1 and kd = (1.0587+/-0.5572)x10-3 s-1. The theoretical basis of this analytical approach is a rapid-mixing model integrated with a two-compartment model; has been experimentally verified in this study as well. The LSPCF-FOB provides a potentially alternative option for characterizing the interaction of biomolecules at ultra-low concentrations.

  12. Development of a Cryosphere Land Surface Model with Coupled Snow and Frozen Soil Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Sun, L.; Yang, K.; Tian, L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a land surface model with coupled snow and frozen soil physics has been developed by improving the formulations of snow and frozen soil for a hydrologically-improved land surface model (HydroSiB2). First, an energy-balance based 3-layer snow model has been incorporated into the HydroSiB2 (hereafter HydroSiB2-S) for an improved description of internal processes of snow pack. Second, a universal and simplified soil model has been coupled with HydroSiB2-S to enable the calculation of soil water freezing and thawing (hereafter HydroSiB2-SF). In order to avoid the instability caused by the uncertainty in estimating water phase changes, enthalpy is adopted as a prognostic variable instead of snow/soil temperature in the energy balance equation of the snow/frozen soil module. The newly developed models were then rigorously evaluated at two typical sites over Tibetan Plateau (one snowy and the other non-snowy, with both underlying frozen soil). At the snowy site in northeast TP (DY in the upper Hei River), HydroSiB2-SF demonstrated significant improvements over HydroSiB2-F (that is the model same as HydroSiB2-SF but using the original single-layer snow module of HydroSiB2), showing the importance of snow internal processes described by 3-layer snow parameterization. At the non-snowy site in southwest TP (Ngari, extremely dry), HydroSiB2-SF gave reasonable simulations of soil water phase changes while HydroSiB2-S did not, indicating the crucial role of frozen soil module in depicting the soil thermal and water dynamics. Finally, HydroSiB2-SF was proved capable of simulating upward moisture fluxes towards freezing front from the unfrozen soil layers below in winter.

  13. Optimization of a catchment-scale coupled surface-subsurface hydrological model using pilot points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danapour, Mehrdis; Stisen, Simon; Lajer Højberg, Anker

    2016-04-01

    Transient coupled surface-subsurface models are usually complex and contain a large amount of spatio-temporal information. In the traditional calibration approach, model parameters are adjusted against only few spatially aggregated observations of discharge or individual point observations of groundwater head. However, this approach doesn't enable an assessment of spatially explicit predictive model capabilities at the intermediate scale relevant for many applications. The overall objectives of this project is to develop a new model calibration and evaluation framework by combining distributed model parameterization and regularization with new types of objective functions focusing on optimizing spatial patterns rather than individual points or catchment scale features. Inclusion of detailed observed spatial patterns of hydraulic head gradients or relevant information obtained from remote sensing data in the calibration process could allow for a better representation of spatial variability of hydraulic properties. Pilot Points as an alternative to classical parameterization approaches, introduce great flexibility when calibrating heterogeneous systems without neglecting expert knowledge (Doherty, 2003). A highly parameterized optimization of complex distributed hydrological models at catchment scale is challenging due to the computational burden that comes with it. In this study the physically-based coupled surface-subsurface model MIKE SHE is calibrated for the 8,500 km2 area of central Jylland (Denmark) that is characterized by heterogeneous geology and considerable groundwater flow across topographical catchment boundaries. The calibration of the distributed conductivity fields is carried out with a pilot point-based approach, implemented using the PEST parameter estimation tool. To reduce the high number of calibration parameters, PEST's advanced singular value decomposition combined with regularization was utilized and a reduction of the model's complexity was

  14. Quantifying the surface-subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, P.W.; Gall, M.P.; Silver, M.W.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2008-02-25

    A central question addressed by the VERTIGO (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size-partitioning of Net Primary Production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, F{sub v}/F{sub m} (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size-partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2 x export flux at 150 m (E{sub 150}). At K2, export was 111 mg C m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8 x E{sub 150}) and 33 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4 x E{sub 150}) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E{sub 150}. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 to 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence

  15. Controlled Dissolution of Surface Layers for Elemental Analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lorge, Susan Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Determining the composition of thin layers is increasingly important for a variety of industrial materials such as adhesives, coatings and microelectronics. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) are some of the techniques that are currently employed for the direct analysis of the sample surface. Although these techniques do not suffer from the contamination problems that often plague sample dissolution studies, they do require matrix matched standards for quantification. Often, these standards are not readily available. Despite the costs of clean hoods, Teflon pipette tips and bottles, and pure acids, partial sample dissolution is the primary method used in the semiconductor industry to quantify surface impurities. Specifically, vapor phase decomposition (VPD) coupled to ICP-MS or total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) provides elemental information from the top most surface layers at detection sensitivities in the 107-1010atoms/cm2 range. The ability to quantify with standard solutions is a main advantage of these techniques. Li and Houk applied a VPD-like technique to steel. The signal ratio of trace element to matrix element was used for quantification. Although controlled dissolution concentrations determined for some of the dissolved elements agreed with the certified values, concentrations determined for refractory elements (Ti, Nb and Ta) were too low. LA-ICP-MS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements indicated that carbide grains distributed throughout the matrix were high in these refractory elements. These elements dissolved at a slower rate than the matrix element, Fe. If the analyte element is not removed at a rate similar to the matrix element a true

  16. Quantifying the surface subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Philip W.; Gall, Mark P.; Silver, Mary W.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.; Bishop, James L. K. B.

    2008-07-01

    A central question addressed by the VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size partitioning of net primary production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, Fv/ Fm (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m -2 d -1 at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2×export flux at 150 m ( E150). At K2, export was 111 mg C m -2 d -1 (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8× E150) and 33 mg POC m -2 d -1 (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4× E150) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E150. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 and 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence to what extent sinking particles are further broken down in the

  17. Use of fiber optic coupled FT-IR in detection of explosives on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Pacheco-Londono, Leonardo C.; De la Torre-Quintana, Luis F.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.; Chamberlain, R. Thomas; Lareau, Richard T.

    2004-09-01

    Explosives detection is a very important task for National Security. The formidable task includes development of new probes and methods for detection of concealed explosives which is of utmost priority to Homeland Security and other security enforcing federal agencies. Here we report on the detection of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) on metallic surfaces using a Fiber Optic Coupled FTIR method. FT-IR spectroscopy is well suited to be used outside the confinement of the sample compartment, provided the excitation source and the reflected light can be transported to the interferometer. Fiber optic cables that transmit in the Mid-IR range have made this possible by allowing the development of a range of spectroscopic probes for in situ analysis. In our study we used a specially designed sampling probe that operates at the grazing-angle to detect and to quantify μg/cm2 levels of explosives on stainless steel. Calibration curves were prepared using stainless steel plates, 3 inches wide x 6 inches long. The samples were deposited on the surface using a smearing method. To carry out the experiments, TATP was synthesized in the laboratory. For the calibration curves TATP was dissolved in dichloromethane. The standard solutions (20) μL were transferred on the plates resulting in surface mass concentrations of TATP that ranged from 8 to 150 μg/cm2. The data was analyzed using Chemometrics routines and Discriminant Analysis algorithms. In particular, multivariate Partial Least Squares (PLS) was used to determine the most significant peak for the analysis. In other experiments done with stainless steel plates coated with 150 μg/cm2 TATP, spectra were recorded every 27 seconds. For this concentration TATP sublimates to surface concentrations below detection in 800 s.

  18. Theoretical study of surface plasmons coupling in transition metallic alloy 2D binary grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhibi, Abdelhak; Khemiri, Mehdi; Oumezzine, Mohamed

    2016-05-01

    The excitation of a surface plasmon polariton (SPP) wave on a metal-air interface by a 2D diffraction grating is numerically investigated. The grating consists of homogeneous alloys of two metals of a formula AxB1-x, or three metals of a formula AxByCz, where A, B and C could be silver (Ag), copper (Cu), gold (Au) or aluminum (Al). It is observed that all the alloys of two metals present a very small change of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) irrespective of composition x. Moreover, the addition of 25% of Al to two metals alloy is insufficient to change the SPR curves. The influence of the different grating parameters is discussed in details using rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) method. Furthermore, the SPR is highly dependent on grating periods (dx and dy) and the height of the grating h. The results reveal that dx= dy= 700 nm, h=40 nm and duty cycle w=0.5 are the optimal parameters for exciting SPP.

  19. Coupling Solar Energy into Reactions: Materials Design for Surface Plasmon-Mediated Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Li, Yu; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-08-26

    Enabled by surface plasmons, noble metal nanostructures can interact with and harvest incident light. As such, they may serve as unique media to generate heat, supply energetic electrons, and provide strong local electromagnetic fields for chemical reactions through different mechanisms. This solar-to-chemical pathway provides a new approach to solar energy utilization, alternative to conventional semiconductor-based photocatalysis. To provide readers with a clear picture of this newly recognized process, this review presents coupling solar energy into chemical reactions through plasmonic nanostructures. It starts with a brief introduction of surface plasmons in metallic nanostructures, followed by a demonstration of tuning plasmonic features by tailoring their physical parameters. Owing to their tunable plasmonic properties, metallic materials offer a platform to trigger and drive chemical reactions at the nanoscale, as systematically overviewed in this article. The design rules for plasmonic materials for catalytic applications are further outlined based on existing examples. At the end of this article, the challenges and opportunities for further development of plasmonic-mediated catalysis toward energy and environmental applications are discussed.

  20. Probing Protein Surface with a Solvent Mimetic Carbene Coupled to Detection by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Gabriela E.; Mundo, Mariana R.; Craig, Patricio O.; Delfino, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Much knowledge into protein folding, ligand binding, and complex formation can be derived from the examination of the nature and size of the accessible surface area (SASA) of the polypeptide chain, a key parameter in protein science not directly measurable in an experimental fashion. To this end, an ideal chemical approach should aim at exerting solvent mimicry and achieving minimal selectivity to probe the protein surface regardless of its chemical nature. The choice of the photoreagent diazirine to fulfill these goals arises from its size comparable to water and from being a convenient source of the extremely reactive methylene carbene (:CH2). The ensuing methylation depends primarily on the solvent accessibility of the polypeptide chain, turning it into a valuable signal to address experimentally the measurement of SASA in proteins. The superb sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometry techniques allows us to derive a quantitative signal proportional to the extent of modification (EM) of the sample. Thus, diazirine labeling coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection can shed light on conformational features of the native as well as non-native states, not easily addressable by other methods. Enzymatic fragmentation of the polypeptide chain at the level of small peptides allows us to locate the covalent tag along the amino acid sequence, therefore enabling the construction of a map of solvent accessibility. Moreover, by subsequent MS/MS analysis of peptides, we demonstrate here the feasibility of attaining amino acid resolution in defining the target sites.

  1. Theoretical Study of Plasmon-Enhanced Surface Catalytic Coupling Reactions of Aromatic Amines and Nitro Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liu-Bin; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Yi-Fan; Williams, Christopher T; Wu, De-Yin; Ren, Bin; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2014-04-01

    Taking advantage of the unique capacity of surface plasmon resonance, plasmon-enhanced heterogeneous catalysis has recently come into focus as a promising technique for high performance light-energy conversion. This work performs a theoretical study on the reaction mechanism for conversions of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) and p-nitrothiophenol (PNTP) to aromatic azo species, p,p'-dimercaptoazobenzene (DMAB). In the absence of O2 or H2, the plasmon-driven photocatalysis mechanism (hot electron-hole reactions) is the major reaction channel. In the presence of O2 or H2, the plasmon-assisted surface catalysis mechanism (activated oxygen/hydrogen reactions) is the major reaction channel. The present results show that the coupling reactions of PATP and PNTP strongly depend on the solution pH, the irradiation wavelength, the irradiation power, and the nature of metal substrates as well as the surrounding atmosphere. The present study has drawn a fundamental physical picture for understanding plasmon-enhanced heterogeneous catalysis.

  2. Using a Coupled Surface water/ Groundwater Model to Study Heat as a Tracer in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Hatch, C. E.; Letcher, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    Heat as a tracer has proven to be an effective method for quantifying groundwater - surface water interactions. However, there remains a lack of controlled, experimental data to assess fundamental aspects of heat transport in porous media. There may be a disconnect between field and model-based studies, because: 1) model results have yet to be tested against data from controlled laboratory experiments, and 2) there are often too many variables in field studies to be thoroughly modeled without simplification. This study is comprised of a three-dimensional transient numerical model of heat flow through a porous media coupled with steady state fluid flow using COMSOL Multiphysics. Pressure and temperature outputs are compared to data measured in a laboratory flume. The 3D model enables exploration of the effects of oblique flow paths through a stream bed and/or banks with a (stream) surface water upper boundary on diurnal temperature records. By imposing known flow or temperature gradients in any direction, we can analyze the effects of these diverse gradients on the veracity of current heat as a tracer methods (which assume unidirectional flow) as well as develop valid error statistics for these methods in the presence of non-vertical flow.

  3. Evaluation of Irrigation Physics in a Land Surface Modeling Framework and Impacts on Coupled Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawston, P.; Santanello, J. A., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture controls water and energy fluxes from the land surface to the planetary boundary layer and determines plant stress and productivity. Therefore, developing a realistic representation of irrigation is critical to understanding land-atmosphere interactions in agricultural areas. Irrigation parameterizations are becoming more common in land surface models and are growing in sophistication, but there is difficulty in assessing the realism of these schemes, due to limited observations (e.g., soil moisture, evapotranspiration, etc.) and unknown timing of human practices and real world application. This study addresses some of these issues by using a high-resolution soil moisture observational product and detailed field-scale irrigation data to evaluate the following: 1) the realism of irrigation amounts and timing simulated by the sprinkler irrigation algorithm in NASA's Land Information System (LIS), 2) the irrigation water's impact on soil moisture and fluxes, and 3) the effects of realistic irrigation-induced soil moisture changes on land-atmosphere energy exchanges as simulated by the NASA-Unified WRF (NU-WRF) coupled to LIS.

  4. Investigating the Uplift of Southern Africa Using Coupled Thermo-mechanical and Surface Processes Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beucher, R.; Huismans, R. S.; Brown, R. W.; Robin, C.

    2014-12-01

    The topography of southern and eastern Africa (referred to as the African Superswell by Nyblade and Robinson, 1994) is anomalously high (> 900m) relative to central and west Africa, and also to other continents. The southern tip of Africa is surrounded by passive margins and mid ocean ridges as a result of continental rifting (early Jurassic in the east, late Jurassic in the west) and Gondwana break up. Recent studies have also identified the Earth's largest low seismic velocity anomaly in the mid-lower mantle beneath southern Africa and catalysed interest in the role the interactions between surface and deep processes play in generating large scale topography. Understanding how the relief evolved since rifting onset is fundamental to advancing knowledge about the coupling between deep tectonics and dynamic topography. Such a large scale topographic feature may also have important impact on atmosphere circulation and precipitations patterns. The complexity of such a system requires an integrated approach looking at interactions between tectonics and surface processes on a range of spatial and temporal scales. We use high-resolution numerical experiments coupling a 2D upper-mantle-scale thermo-mechanical model with a plan-form 2D surface processes model (SPM) to investigate the factors controlling the style of deformation. The experiments consist in simple extension models involving lithosphere with variable thickness (normal-like lithosphere to thick cratonic-like lithosphere) and explore the effects of rheological and compositional variability of the layer components of the crust and the lithosphere. Tomography and geochemistry evidences suggest a possible counterflow in the lower lithosphere in parts of the African western margins. We discuss the effect of a gravitationally driven lithospheric counterflow of depleted lower lithosphere (compositionally less dense than sublithospheric mantle) on the rift geometry and the effect of the isostatic responses in terms

  5. Impact of Agricultural Practice on Regional Climate in a CoupledLand Surface Mesoscale Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, H.S.; Riley, W.J.; Torn, M.S.; He, Y.

    2004-07-01

    The land surface has been shown to form strong feedbacks with climate due to linkages between atmospheric conditions and terrestrial ecosystem exchanges of energy, momentum, water, and trace gases. Although often ignored in modeling studies, land management itself may form significant feedbacks. Because crops are harvested earlier under drier conditions, regional air temperature, precipitation, and soil moisture, for example, affect harvest timing, particularly of rain-fed crops. This removal of vegetation alters the land surface characteristics and may, in turn, affect regional climate. We applied a coupled climate(MM5) and land-surface (LSM1) model to examine the effects of early and late winter wheat harvest on regional climate in the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility in the Southern Great Plains, where winter wheat accounts for 20 percent of the land area. Within the winter wheat region, simulated 2 m air temperature was 1.3 C warmer in the Early Harvest scenario at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Soils in the harvested area were drier and warmer in the top 10 cm and wetter in the 10-20 cm layer. Midday soils were 2.5 C warmer in the harvested area at mid-day averaged over the two weeks following harvest. Harvest also dramatically altered latent and sensible heat fluxes. Although differences between scenarios diminished once both scenarios were harvested, the short-term impacts of land management on climate were comparable to those from land cover change demonstrated in other studies.

  6. Exploring Rotation-Vibration Coupling in Highly Fluxional Molecules Using Surface Hopping Diffusion Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Andrew S.; McCoy, Anne B.

    2012-06-01

    Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) has widely been shown to be a powerful technique for studying ro-vibrational states of highly fluxional molecules and clusters. An extension of DMC to multiple potential energy surfaces (PESs) based on the Tully surface hopping approach has previously been developed by our group. Here, we report an application of this approach to the calculation of rotationally excited states of systems with pronounced rotation-vibration coupling and large-amplitude, zero-point vibrational motion. More specifically, for a chosen value of J, each walker in the DMC ensemble is expanded in a symmetric top basis. The expansion coefficients are updated each time-step based on the action of the rigid-rotor asymmetric top Hamiltonian. This Hamiltonian is constructed using the inverse moment of inertia tensor evaluated in the Eckart frame at the walker's position in configuration space. Each walker is then localized onto a single, K-dependent effective PES, and the effective potential energy associated with the walker's position on that surface determines the evolution of its weight in the DMC ensemble. Preliminary results of the application of this methodology to model systems such as H_3^+ and H_2D^+ will be discussed as well as its prospect for accurately evaluating ro-vibrational states of systems like CH_5^+. Finally, a comparison of this technique with our previously developed fixed-node DMC approach for the evaluation of ro-vibrational energies and wave functions will be presented. J. C. Tully, J. Chem. Phys. 93, 1061 (1990). A.B. McCoy, Chem. Phys. Lett. 321, 71 (2000). A. S. Petit, B. A. Wellen, and A. B. McCoy, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 074101 (2012).

  7. Effect of adatom deposition on surface magnetism and exchange coupling parameter in (0001) SmCo{sub 5} slabs

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Chandrasekaran, S.; Murugan, P.; Saravanan, P.; Kamat, S. V.

    2015-04-07

    First principles calculations are performed on 3d-transition metal atom deposited (0001) surface of SmCo{sub 5} to understand the magnetic properties and the improvement of Curie temperature (T{sub c}). Various atomic sites are examined to identify the energetically feasible adsorption of adatom and it is found that the void site of Co-rich (0001) SmCo{sub 5} surface is the most favourable one to deposit. The surface magnetic moments of various adatom deposited SmCo{sub 5} surfaces are larger than the clean surface except for Cu and Zn. Eventually, the surface exchange coupling of clean and adatom deposited surface is found to increase for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu deposited surfaces and this improvement results in the increase in T{sub c} of SmCo{sub 5} slab.

  8. Forest Succession and Climate Change: Coupling Land-Surface Processes and Ecological Dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Philippe

    Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that humans are in the process of inadvertently modifying the Earth's climate by increasing the atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gases. The present man-induced climatic change, often referred to as the "greenhouse effect", is different from natural changes because of its unprecedented pace and our incomplete knowledge of its consequences. As some scientists put it, humanity is performing on itself a "global experiment" which may entail a number of surprises. The potential changes in the behavior of atmosphere/biosphere interactions are of particular importance. Such changes could affect atmospheric dynamics, the local and regional hydrology, the global biogeochemistry, and, therefore, human societies. In the present thesis, five distinct aspects of climate/vegetation interactions are examined. First, the climatically and physiologically mediated impacts of increases in the concentration of carbon dioxide on the evaporation from agricultural crops, grassland, and forests are investigated using the Penman-Monteith combination equation. Second, the degree of coupling between the vegetation and the atmosphere, as defined by Jarvis and McNaughton, is reexamined taking radiative losses from the vegetation to the atmosphere into account. Third, the effects of changes in the mean vs. the variance of climatic variables are investigated using a modified version of the forest dynamics model developed by Pastor and Post, LINK-AGES. Fourth, using the same model, changes in the production of non -methane hydrocarbons are estimated as climate and/or vegetation change. Finally, the main part of the thesis focuses on the response of forests to climatic changes using a model treating the physics of energy and water exchange in detail. Because the Energy, water, and momentum eXchange, and Ecological dynamics model (EXE), couples the land-surface processes and the ecological dynamics of forests of

  9. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  10. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  11. Resonant characteristics and sensitivity dependency on the contact surface in QCM-micropillar-based system of coupled resonator sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashan, M. A. M.; Kalavally, V.; Lee, H. W.; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2016-05-01

    We report the characteristics and sensitivity dependence over the contact surface in coupled resonating sensors (CRSs) made of high aspect ratio resonant micropillars attached to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). Through experiments and simulation, we observed that when the pillars of resonant heights were placed in maximum displacement regions the resonance frequency of the QCM increased following the coupled resonance characteristics, as the pillar offered elastic loading to the QCM surface. However, the same pillars when placed in relatively lower displacement regions, in spite of their resonant dimension, offered inertial loading and resulted in a decrease in QCM resonance frequency, as the displacement amplitude was insufficient to couple the vibrations from the QCM to the pillars. Accordingly, we discovered that the coupled resonance characteristics not only depend on the resonant structure dimensions but also on the contact regions in the acoustic device. Further analysis revealed that acoustic pressure at the contact surface also influences the resonance frequency characteristics and sensitivity of the CRS. To demonstrate the significance of the present finding for sensing applications, humidity sensing is considered as the example measurand. When a sensing medium made of resonant SU-8 pillars was placed in a maximum displacement region on a QCM surface, the sensitivity increased by 14 times in comparison to a resonant sensing medium placed in a lower displacement region of a QCM surface.

  12. The SURFEXv7.2 land and ocean surface platform for coupled or offline simulation of Earth surface variables and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, V.; Le Moigne, P.; Martin, E.; Faroux, S.; Alias, A.; Alkama, R.; Belamari, S.; Barbu, A.; Boone, A.; Bouyssel, F.; Brousseau, P.; Brun, E.; Calvet, J.-C.; Carrer, D.; Decharme, B.; Delire, C.; Donier, S.; Essaouini, K.; Gibelin, A.-L.; Giordani, H.; Habets, F.; Jidane, M.; Kerdraon, G.; Kourzeneva, E.; Lafaysse, M.; Lafont, S.; Lebeaupin Brossier, C.; Lemonsu, A.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; Marguinaud, P.; Mokhtari, M.; Morin, S.; Pigeon, G.; Salgado, R.; Seity, Y.; Taillefer, F.; Tanguy, G.; Tulet, P.; Vincendon, B.; Vionnet, V.; Voldoire, A.

    2012-11-01

    SURFEX is a new externalized land and ocean surface platform that describes the surface fluxes and the evolution of four types of surface: nature, town, inland water and ocean. It can be run either coupled or in offline mode. It is mostly based on pre-existing, well validated scientific models. It can be used in offline mode (from point scale to global runs) or fully coupled with an atmospheric model. SURFEX is able to simulate fluxes of carbon dioxide, chemical species, continental aerosols, sea salt and snow particles. It also includes a data assimilation module. The main principles of the organization of the surface are described first. Then, a survey is made of the scientific module (including the coupling strategy). Finally the main applications of the code are summarized. The current applications are extremely diverse, ranging from surface monitoring and hydrology to numerical weather prediction and global climate simulations. The validation work undertaken shows that replacing the pre-existing surface models by SURFEX in these applications is usually associated with improved skill, as the numerous scientific developments contained in this community code are used to good advantage.

  13. Binding and dissociation kinetics using fractals: an analysis of electrostatic effects and randomly coupled and oriented coupled receptors on biosensor surfaces.

    PubMed

    Butala, Harshala D; Sadana, Ajit

    2004-03-15

    A fractal analysis is used to analyze the influence of: (a) electrostatic interactions on binding and dissociation rate coefficients for antibodies HH8, HH10, and HH26 in solution to hen egg-white lysozyme (HEL) immobilized on a sensor chip surface [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 2946]; and (b) the binding and dissociation of recombinant Fab in solution to random NHS-coupled Cys-HEL and oriented thiol-coupled Cys-HEL immobilized on a sensor chip surface [Methods 20 (2000) 310]. Single- and dual-fractal models were employed to fit the data. Values of the binding and the dissociation rate coefficient(s) and the fractal dimensions were obtained from a regression analysis provided by Corel Quattro Pro 8.0 (Corel Corporation Limited, Ottawa, Canada. 1997). The binding rate coefficients are quite sensitive to the degree of heterogeneity on the sensor chip surface. It is of interest to compare the results obtained by the fractal analysis with that of the original analysis [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 2946]. For example, as one goes from the binding of 21 nM HH10/HEL to the binding of 640 nM HH10/HEL(K97A), Sinha et al. [Biophys. J. 83 (2002) 29461 indicate that the enhancement of diffusional encounter rates may be due to 'electrostatic steering' (a long-range interaction). Our analysis indicates that there is an increase in the value of the fractal dimension, Df1 by a factor of 1.12 from a value of 2.133-2.385. This increase in the degree of heterogeneity on the surface leads to an increase in the binding rate coefficient, k1 by a factor of 1.59 from 12.92 to 20.57. The fractal analysis of binding and dissociation of recombinant Fab in solution to random NHS-coupled Cys-HEL and oriented thiol-coupled Cys-HEL immobilized on a sensor chip [Methods 20 (2000) 310] surface are consistent with the degree of heterogeneity present on the sensor chip surface for the random and the oriented case. As expected, the random case will exhibit a higher degree of heterogeneity than the oriented case

  14. A multi-layer land surface energy budget model for implicit coupling with global atmospheric simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, J.; Polcher, J.; Peylin, P.; Ottlé, C.; Chen, Y.; van Gorsel, E.; Haverd, V.; McGrath, M. J.; Naudts, K.; Otto, J.; Valade, A.; Luyssaert, S.

    2014-12-01

    In Earth system modelling, a description of the energy budget of the vegetated surface layer is fundamental as it determines the meteorological conditions in the planetary boundary layer and as such contributes to the atmospheric conditions and its circulation. The energy budget in most Earth system models has long been based on a "big-leaf approach", with averaging schemes that represent in-canopy processes. Such models have difficulties in reproducing consistently the energy balance in field observations. We here outline a newly developed numerical model for energy budget simulation, as a component of the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems - CANopy). This new model implements techniques from single-site canopy models in a practical way. It includes representation of in-canopy transport, a multilayer longwave radiation budget, height-specific calculation of aerodynamic and stomatal conductance, and interaction with the bare soil flux within the canopy space. Significantly, it avoids iterations over the height of tha canopy and so maintains implicit coupling to the atmospheric model LMDz. As a first test, the model is evaluated against data from both an intensive measurement campaign and longer term eddy covariance measurements for the intensively studied Eucalyptus stand at Tumbarumba, Australia. The model performs well in replicating both diurnal and annual cycles of fluxes, as well as the gradients of sensible heat fluxes. However, the model overestimates sensible heat flux against an underestimate of the radiation budget. Improved performance is expected through the implementation of a more detailed calculation of stand albedo and a more up-to-date stomatal conductance calculation.

  15. A regional coupled surface water/groundwater model of the Okavango Delta, Botswana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Peter; Gumbricht, Thomas; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang

    2006-04-01

    In the endorheic Okavango River system in southern Africa a balance between human and environmental water demands has to be achieved. The runoff generated in the humid tropical highlands of Angola flows through arid Namibia and Botswana before forming a large inland delta and eventually being consumed by evapotranspiration. With an approximate size of about 30,000 km2, the Okavango Delta is the world's largest site protected under the convention on wetlands of international importance, signed in 1971 in Ramsar, Iran. The extended wetlands of the Okavango Delta, which sustain a rich ecology, spectacular wildlife, and a first-class tourism infrastructure, depend on the combined effect of the highly seasonal runoff in the Okavango River and variable local climate. The annual fluctuations in the inflow are transformed into vast areas of seasonally inundated floodplains. Water abstraction and reservoir building in the upstream countries are expected to reduce and/or redistribute the available flows for the Okavango Delta ecosystem. To study the impacts of upstream and local interventions, a large-scale (1 km2 grid), coupled surface water/groundwater model has been developed. It is composed of a surface water flow component based on the diffusive wave approximation of the Saint-Venant equations, a groundwater component, and a relatively simple vadose zone component for calculating the net water exchange between land and atmosphere. The numerical scheme is based on the groundwater simulation software MODFLOW-96. Since the primary model output is the spatiotemporal distribution of flooded areas and since hydrologic data on the large and inaccessible floodplains and tributaries are sparse and unreliable, the model was not calibrated with point hydrographs but with a time series of flooding patterns derived from satellite imagery (NOAA advanced very high resolution radiometer). Scenarios were designed to study major upstream and local interventions and their expected impacts

  16. The coupling between flame surface dynamics and species mass conservation in premixed turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trouve, A.; Veynante, D.; Bray, K. N. C.; Mantel, T.

    1994-01-01

    Current flamelot models based on a description of the flame surface dynamics require the closure of two inter-related equations: a transport equation for the mean reaction progress variable, (tilde)c, and a transport equation for the flame surface density, Sigma. The coupling between these two equations is investigated using direct numerical simulations (DNS) with emphasis on the correlation between the turbulent fluxes of (tilde)c, bar(pu''c''), and Sigma, (u'')(sub S)Sigma. Two different DNS databases are used in the present work: a database developed at CTR by A. Trouve and a database developed by C. J. Rutland using a different code. Both databases correspond to statistically one-dimensional premixed flames in isotropic turbulent flow. The run parameters, however, are significantly different, and the two databases correspond to different combustion regimes. It is found that in all simulated flames, the correlation between bar(pu''c'') and (u'')(sub S)Sigma is always strong. The sign, however, of the turbulent flux of (tilde)c or Sigma with respect to the mean gradients, delta(tilde)c/delta(x) or delta(Sigma)/delta(x), is case-dependent. The CTR database is found to exhibit gradient turbulent transport of (tilde)c and Sigma, whereas the Rutland DNS features counter-gradient diffusion. The two databases are analyzed and compared using various tools (a local analysis of the flow field near the flame, a classical analysis of the conservation equation for (tilde)(u''c''), and a thin flame theoretical analysis). A mechanism is then proposed to explain the discrepancies between the two databases and a preliminary simple criterion is derived to predict the occurrence of gradient/counter-gradient turbulent diffusion.

  17. Enhanced light out-coupling from surface plasmonic loss minimized transparent organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Bum; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Sei-Yong; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2013-09-01

    We report extremely high light out-coupling efficiency from a transparent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) integrated with microstructures on both sides of the device.[1] The OLED having a metal free structure offers dramatically reduced surface plasmonic loss and absorption loss. To extract the confined light inside the device, a high refractive index light extraction pattern was directly fabricated on the top side transparent conducting oxide electrode using a simple evaporation method, and a micro lens array sheet was simultaneously attached on the bottom side of the glass substrate. As a result, the external quantum efficiency of the device increased from 18.2% to 47.3% by using the microstructures, and was additionally enhanced to 62.9% by attaching an index-matched hemisphere lens instead of the micro lens array on the glass side in order to reduce additional light guiding loss inside of the device. These values showed very good agreement with the simulation performed by a combination of the dipole model and a 3-dimensional geometrical simulation.

  18. Reaction surface approach to multimode vibronic coupling problems: General framework and application to furan

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, E. V.; Reddy, V. Sivaranjana; Köppel, H.; Gatti, F.

    2013-12-21

    A new general framework for treating the dynamics on intersecting multidimensional potential energy surfaces is presented. It rests on a sub-division of the nuclear coordinates into different classes, one of primary importance with large-amplitude displacements during the process of interest and another one with smaller displacements, thus permitting a more approximate description. The latter are treated within the well-known linear + quadratic vibronic coupling scheme, where, however, the expansion “coefficients” are general functions of the “primary” coordinates. This may be augmented by an effective-mode approach for further degrees of freedom acting as an environment for the dynamics of the original modes. Following the general considerations, the approach is applied to the nonadiabatic photodynamics of furan and is shown to allow for an eight-dimensional quantum treatment, of higher dimension than was possible so far. The influence of the various degrees of freedom on the dynamics and lifetime of furan due to nonadiabatic ring-opening is discussed.

  19. Monte Carlo Simulations of Coupled Diffusion and Surface Reactions during the Aqueous Corrosion of Borosilicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75-x) mol% SiO2 (12.5+x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5+x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditions at a surface-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick’s 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.

  20. Confined surface plasmon sensors based on strongly coupled disk-in-volcano arrays.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Wang, Limin; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yu, Ye; Zhang, Gang

    2015-02-14

    Disk-in-volcano arrays are reported to greatly enhance the sensing performance due to strong coupling in the nanogaps between the nanovolcanos and nanodisks. The designed structure, which is composed of a nanovolcano array film and a disk in each cavity, is fabricated by a simple and efficient colloidal lithography method. By tuning structural parameters, the disk-in-volcano arrays show greatly enhanced resonances in the nanogaps formed by the disks and the inner wall of the volcanos. Therefore they respond to the surrounding environment with a sensitivity as high as 977 nm per RIU and with excellent linear dependence on the refraction index. Moreover, through mastering the fabrication process, biological sensing can be easily confined to the cavities of the nanovolcanos. The local responsivity has the advantages of maximum surface plasmon energy density in the nanogaps, reducing the sensing background and saving expensive reagents. The disk-in-volcano arrays also possess great potential in applications of optical and electrical trapping and single-molecule analysis, because they enable establishment of electric fields across the gaps.

  1. Confined surface plasmon sensors based on strongly coupled disk-in-volcano arrays.

    PubMed

    Ai, Bin; Wang, Limin; Möhwald, Helmuth; Yu, Ye; Zhang, Gang

    2015-02-14

    Disk-in-volcano arrays are reported to greatly enhance the sensing performance due to strong coupling in the nanogaps between the nanovolcanos and nanodisks. The designed structure, which is composed of a nanovolcano array film and a disk in each cavity, is fabricated by a simple and efficient colloidal lithography method. By tuning structural parameters, the disk-in-volcano arrays show greatly enhanced resonances in the nanogaps formed by the disks and the inner wall of the volcanos. Therefore they respond to the surrounding environment with a sensitivity as high as 977 nm per RIU and with excellent linear dependence on the refraction index. Moreover, through mastering the fabrication process, biological sensing can be easily confined to the cavities of the nanovolcanos. The local responsivity has the advantages of maximum surface plasmon energy density in the nanogaps, reducing the sensing background and saving expensive reagents. The disk-in-volcano arrays also possess great potential in applications of optical and electrical trapping and single-molecule analysis, because they enable establishment of electric fields across the gaps. PMID:25384425

  2. Eigenvalue Problems for Vibrating Structures Coupled with Quiescent Fluids with Free Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AMABILI, M.

    2000-03-01

    Vibrations of plates, shells and plate-shell systems coupled with sloshing, quiescent and inviscid fluid have been advantageously studied by inserting the sloshing condition into the eigenvalue problem. Here a formulation of this particular eigenvalue problem for symmetric matrices is obtained. In fact, in the previous studies, this technique has given eigenvalue problems for non-symmetric matrices for which the problem of the existence of complex eigenvalues arises. The present analysis deals with compressible and incompressible fluids and the discretization of the system is obtained by using the Rayleigh-Ritz method. The Rayleigh quotient of the system is manipulated to obtain expressions suitable for symmetric formulations of the eigenvalue problem. In particular, the Rayleigh quotient is transformed into a simpler expression where the potential energies of the compressible fluid and free surface waves do not appear. The method is applied to a vertical, simply supported, circular cylindrical shell partially filled by an incompressible sloshing liquid. A case with large interaction between sloshing and bulging modes is considered and interesting phenomena are observed.

  3. Reflections Over Coupled Surfaces by Means of a High Resolution Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geva, Meital; Ram, Omri; Sadot, Oren; Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Isreal Team

    2015-11-01

    The reflection patterns over two coupled cylindrical surfaces are studied using a high spatial and high temporal resolution experimental setup. This fully automated setup enabled the repetition of experiments many times while retaining extremely high repeatability. For the investigated moderate shock strengths, the repeatability was less than 0.01 in the Mach number. Each experiment produced a single image with a pixel size of 0.03 mm. All images were later sequentially merged generating a detailed description of a single reflection process. Unlike previous studies in which analysis was subject to human inconsistency, an automatic image processing procedure was used to locate the triple point in each image. The high resolution enabled the experimental detection of the early stages of Mach-reflection as were never demonstrated before. The experimental results were compared with numerical computation and a suitable uncertainty analysis was performed. The reflection over the first model enabled the transitions between MR -->RR -->MR. These successive transitions have proven the existence of a non-stationary hysteresis shock-wave reflection phenomenon. The reflection over the second model enabled the monitoring of the RR -->MR transition and the evolution of a newly three-shock configuration established on the Mach stem of the original reflection (MRMR). It was found that the MRMR -->MRRR transition angles could be adjusted to match those obtained over a single cylinder.

  4. Relativistic state-specific multireference coupled cluster theory description for bond-breaking energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Chaudhuri, Rajat K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip

    2016-09-01

    A four-component (4c) relativistic state specific multireference coupled cluster (4c-SSMRCC) method has been developed and applied to compute the ground state spectroscopic constants of Ag2, Cu2, Au2, and I2. The reference functions used in these calculations are obtained using computationally inexpensive improved virtual orbital-complete active space configuration interaction scheme. Rigorous size-extensivity and insensitivity towards the intruder state problem make our method an interesting choice for the calculation of the dissociation energy surface. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first implementation of the SSMRCC within the relativistic framework. The overall agreement of our results, employing the smallest model space, with both theoretical and experimental reference values indicates that the 4c-SSMRCC method can be fruitfully used to describe electronic structures and associated properties of systems containing heavy elements. We observe a relativistic bond stabilization for the coinage metal dimers while the I-I bond is weakened by the relativistic effects.

  5. The groundwater land-surface atmosphere connection: Soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Chow, Fotini Katopodes; Kollet, Stefan J.

    2007-12-01

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can simulate spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-h period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land-surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  6. The groundwater-land-surface-atmosphere connection: soil moisture effects on the atmospheric boundary layer in fully-coupled simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R M; Chow, F K; Kollet, S J

    2007-02-02

    This study combines a variably-saturated groundwater flow model and a mesoscale atmospheric model to examine the effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on atmospheric boundary layer processes. This parallel, integrated model can represent spatial variations in land-surface forcing driven by three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric and subsurface components. The development of atmospheric flow is studied in a series of idealized test cases with different initial soil moisture distributions generated by an offline spin-up procedure or interpolated from a coarse-resolution dataset. These test cases are performed with both the fully-coupled model (which includes 3D groundwater flow and surface water routing) and the uncoupled atmospheric model. The effects of the different soil moisture initializations and lateral subsurface and surface water flow are seen in the differences in atmospheric evolution over a 36-hour period. The fully-coupled model maintains a realistic topographically-driven soil moisture distribution, while the uncoupled atmospheric model does not. Furthermore, the coupled model shows spatial and temporal correlations between surface and lower atmospheric variables and water table depth. These correlations are particularly strong during times when the land surface temperatures trigger shifts in wind behavior, such as during early morning surface heating.

  7. Decomposition of the scattering amplitude into shadow and surface components with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Melo, German; David, Jorge; Restrepo, Albeiro

    2008-09-15

    We propose a decomposition of the scattering amplitude into shadow and surface components for proton scattering against calcium isotopes as targets at 21 MeV. We account for spin-orbit coupling effects for the optical potential in the nonrelativistic limit. Our calculations show very good agreement with experimental trends.

  8. Recent Advances in Modeling of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and Land Surface in the Coupled WRF-CMAQ Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in the land surface model (LSM) and planetary boundary layer (PBL) components of the WRF-CMAQ coupled meteorology and air quality modeling system are described. The aim of these modifications was primarily to improve the modeling of ground level concentrations of trace c...

  9. Reproduction of 20th century inter- to multi-decadel surface temperature variablilty in radiatively forced coupled climate models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 simulations of surface temperature were evaluated over the period 1902-1999 to assess their ability to reproduce historical temperature variability at 211 global locations. Model performance was evaluated using the running Mann Whitney-Z method, a technique th...

  10. The role of soil moisture in land surface-atmosphere coupling: climate model sensitivity experiments over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Charles; Turner, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    It is generally acknowledged that anthropogenic land use changes, such as a shift from forested land into irrigated agriculture, may have an impact on regional climate and, in particular, rainfall patterns in both time and space. India provides an excellent example of a country in which widespread land use change has occurred during the last century, as the country tries to meet its growing demand for food. Of primary concern for agriculture is the Indian summer monsoon (ISM), which displays considerable seasonal and subseasonal variability. Although it is evident that changing rainfall variability will have a direct impact on land surface processes (such as soil moisture variability), the reverse impact is less well understood. However, the role of soil moisture in the coupling between the land surface and atmosphere needs to be properly explored before any potential impact of changing soil moisture variability on ISM rainfall can be understood. This paper attempts to address this issue, by conducting a number of sensitivity experiments using a state-of-the-art climate model from the UK Meteorological Office Hadley Centre: HadGEM2. Several experiments are undertaken, with the only difference between them being the extent to which soil moisture is coupled to the atmosphere. Firstly, the land surface is fully coupled to the atmosphere, globally (as in standard model configurations); secondly, the land surface is entirely uncoupled from the atmosphere, again globally, with soil moisture values being prescribed on a daily basis; thirdly, the land surface is uncoupled from the atmosphere over India but fully coupled elsewhere; and lastly, vice versa (i.e. the land surface is coupled to the atmosphere over India but uncoupled elsewhere). Early results from this study suggest certain 'hotspot' regions where the impact of soil moisture coupling/uncoupling may be important, and many of these regions coincide with previous studies. Focusing on the third experiment, i

  11. A coupled road dust and surface moisture model to predict non-exhaust road traffic induced particle emissions (NORTRIP). Part 2: Surface moisture and salt impact modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denby, B. R.; Sundvor, I.; Johansson, C.; Pirjola, L.; Ketzel, M.; Norman, M.; Kupiainen, K.; Gustafsson, M.; Blomqvist, G.; Kauhaniemi, M.; Omstedt, G.

    2013-12-01

    Non-exhaust traffic induced emissions are a major source of airborne particulate matter in most European countries. This is particularly important in Nordic and Alpine countries where winter time road traction maintenance occurs, e.g. salting and sanding, and where studded tyres are used. Though the total mass generated by wear sources is a key factor in non-exhaust emissions, these emissions are also strongly controlled by surface moisture conditions. In this paper, Part 2, the road surface moisture sub-model of a coupled road dust and surface moisture model (NORTRIP) is described. We present a description of the road surface moisture part of the model and apply the coupled model to seven sites in Stockholm, Oslo, Helsinki and Copenhagen over 18 separate periods, ranging from 3.5 to 24 months. At two sites surface moisture measurements are available and the moisture sub-model is compared directly to these observations. The model predicts the frequency of wet roads well at both sites, with an average fractional bias of -2.6%. The model is found to correctly predict the hourly surface state, wet or dry, 85% of the time. From the 18 periods modelled using the coupled model an average absolute fractional bias of 15% for PM10 concentrations was found. Similarly the model predicts the 90'th daily mean percentiles of PM10 with an average absolute bias of 19% and an average correlation (R2) of 0.49. When surface moisture is not included in the modelling then this average correlation is reduced to 0.16, demonstrating the importance of the surface moisture conditions. Tests have been carried out to assess the sensitivity of the model to model parameters and input data. The model provides a useful tool for air quality management and for improving our understanding of non-exhaust traffic emissions.

  12. Coupled resonances allow studying the aging of adhesive contacts between a QCM surface and single, micrometer-sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peschel, Astrid; Langhoff, Arne; Johannsmann, Diethelm

    2015-12-01

    Interparticle contacts and contacts between particles and surfaces are known to change over time. The contact area, the contact stiffness, and the contact strength usually increase as the contact ages. Contact aging is mostly driven by capillary forces, but also by plastic deformation. Making use of acoustic resonators, we have studied the stiffness of contacts between the surface of a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and individual, micrometer-sized particles adsorbed to the resonator surface. Studying single particles avoids ensemble-averaging. Central to the analysis is the coupled resonance, occurring when a surface-attached particle together with the link forms a resonator of its own. If the frequency of this second resonator comes close to one of the crystal’s overtones, plots of shifts in resonance bandwidth versus overtone order display a resonance curve. This secondary resonance is caused by the coupling between the particle’s resonance and the main resonance. One can read the frequency of the coupled resonance from this plot. Similarly, resonance curves are observed in plots of frequency and bandwidth versus time, if the contact stiffness varies smoothly with time. Because the coupled resonance is a characteristic feature, it is easily identified even in cases where frequency shifts of some other origin are superimposed onto the data. For the cases studied here, the links stiffened while they dried. Interestingly, the efficiency of coupling between the particle resonance and the main resonance decreased at the same time. This can be explained with an increase in the link’s bending stiffness. The analysis highlights that a QCM experiment amounts to vibrational spectroscopy on surface-attached particles. Among the application examples is the adsorption and drying of a lycopodium spore. Clearly, the technique is also applicable to problems of bioadhesion.

  13. NOAH-GECROS: A coupled land surface - crop growth model for simulating water and energy exchange between croplands and atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingwersen, J.; Streck, T.

    2011-12-01

    The current NOAH land surface model (LSM) describes the vegetation dynamics of croplands in a prescribed and generalized way leading under some conditions to a biased energy partitioning of net radiation and disabling the feedback of atmospheric conditions on land surface properties (LS) in coupled weather and climate simulations. The aim of the present study was to couple the NOAH LSM with the generic crop growth model (CGM) GECROS for improving the description of vegetation dynamics over croplands. We tested two different coupling approaches. In the first approach ("data hand-over"- coupling), the two self-contained models simply exchange data between each time step. GECROS hands over data on plant phenology. NOAH delivers the amount of plant available water in the rooting zone and computes the surface exchange fluxes. In the second approach ("cut and merge"- coupling) we cut from the NOAH code the empirical Jarvis scheme for computing canopy transpiration and merged the remaining code with the GECROS CGM. In this way, we introduced a Penman-Monteith approach, in which the stomatal resistance is a function of photosynthesis, for computing canopy transpiration. The coupled model runs were benchmarked against an uncoupled NOAH simulation based on a field-specific parameterization. All simulations were compared with "sensible heat flux"- corrected eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements, which were collected over a winter wheat stand in Southwest Germany during the vegetation period in 2009. The "cut and merge"- coupling significantly outperformed the field-specific uncoupled NOAH simulation. While, for example, the root mean square error (RMSE) of the latent heat (LE) fluxes of the uncoupled NOAH simulation was on average 73.0 W m-2, the RMSE of the coupled LS-CGM was 16.2 W m-2. The simulation of the sensible heat flux was improved in a similar magnitude. The "data hand-over" approach also slightly improved the simulation (RMSE of LE fluxes = 54.3 W m-2) but showed

  14. Space Weather Simulators Developed at NICT : the Solar Surface-Solar Wind Coupling Model and the Next Generation Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den, Mitsue; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Tanaka, Takashi; Ishii, Mamoru; Kubo, Yuki; Kubota, Yasubumi; Washimi, Haruichi

    We report two global MHD simulators developed at NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology): one is for the solar surface-solar wind coupling system and the other is for the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system. One important feature of our simulation model is the 3-D grid system, which has no polar singularity despite of a spherical grid configuration. By this grid system, fine grids can be allocated near the inner boundary which represents the sun or the earth. Some complicated magnetic structures on the solar surface is closely related with the solar disturbances, and in the same way the ionospheric aurora is closely related with the the magnetospheric reconfiguration processes. In views of these situation, it is very crucial for both models to achieve the simultaneous implementations for the fine grid structure on the inner boundary and the wide range grids in global configuration. For the solar surface-solar wind coupling system, the observed magnetic field data are input at the inner boundary, and the solar wind structure can be updated at every day by optimizing the simulation code. For the magnetospheric model, we are developing "the next generation" realtime MHD simulation system. The model is developed by NICT and co-workers, and the extreme phenomena such as the magnetopause crossing are simulated successfully. For the magnetic disturbance event, the westward traveling surge, the most characteristic feature of the substorm, is reproduced quite realistically. In this paper, we describe those two space weather simulator systems and represent several numerical results obtained by using these models.

  15. Reflection and transmission at the boundary surface of modified couple stress thermoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Kumar, K.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper the reflection and transmission at a plane interface in modified couple stress generalized thermoelastic solid half spaces in the context of Loard-Shulman (LS) and Green-Lindsay (GL) theories in welded contact are investigated. Amplitude ratios of various reflected and transmitted waves are obtained due to incidence of a set of coupled longitudinal waves and coupled transverse waves. It is found that the amplitude ratios of various reflected and transmitted waves are functions of the angle of incidence, frequency and are affected by the couple stress properties of the media. Some special cases are deduced from the present formulation.

  16. Coupled Molecular Switching Processes in Ordered Mono- and Multilayers of Stimulus-Responsive Rotaxanes on Gold Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces provide the structural basis for function as, for example, encountered in nature in the membrane-embedded photosystem or in technology in solar cells. Synthetic functional multilayers of molecules cooperating in a coupled manner can be fabricated on surfaces through layer-by-layer self-assembly. Ordered arrays of stimulus-responsive rotaxanes undergoing well-controlled axle shuttling are excellent candidates for coupled mechanical motion. Such stimulus-responsive surfaces may help integrate synthetic molecular machines in larger systems exhibiting even macroscopic effects or generating mechanical work from chemical energy through cooperative action. The present work demonstrates the successful deposition of ordered mono- and multilayers of chemically switchable rotaxanes on gold surfaces. Rotaxane mono- and multilayers are shown to reversibly switch in a coupled manner between two ordered states as revealed by linear dichroism effects in angle-resolved NEXAFS spectra. Such a concerted switching process is observed only when the surfaces are well packed, while less densely packed surfaces lacking lateral order do not exhibit such effects. PMID:25782057

  17. Grating-coupled Otto configuration for hybridized surface phonon polariton excitation for local refractive index sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Zheng, Gaige; Shen, Hong; Lei, Dang Yuan; Somekh, Michael G

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate numerically through rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) that replacing the prism in the Otto configuration with gratings enables us to excite and control different modes and field patterns of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) through the incident wavelength and height of the Otto spacing layer. This modified Otto configuration provides us the following multiple modes, namely, SPhP mode, Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity resonance, dielectric waveguide grating resonance (DWGR) and hybridized between different combinations of the above mentioned modes. We show that this modified grating-coupled Otto configuration has a highly confined field pattern within the structure, making it more sensitive to local refractive index changes on the SiC surface. The hybridized surface phonon polariton modes also provide a stronger field enhancement compared to conventional pure mode excitation. PMID:27557229

  18. Grating-coupled Otto configuration for hybridized surface phonon polariton excitation for local refractive index sensitivity enhancement.

    PubMed

    Pechprasarn, Suejit; Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Zheng, Gaige; Shen, Hong; Lei, Dang Yuan; Somekh, Michael G

    2016-08-22

    We demonstrate numerically through rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) that replacing the prism in the Otto configuration with gratings enables us to excite and control different modes and field patterns of surface phonon polaritons (SPhPs) through the incident wavelength and height of the Otto spacing layer. This modified Otto configuration provides us the following multiple modes, namely, SPhP mode, Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity resonance, dielectric waveguide grating resonance (DWGR) and hybridized between different combinations of the above mentioned modes. We show that this modified grating-coupled Otto configuration has a highly confined field pattern within the structure, making it more sensitive to local refractive index changes on the SiC surface. The hybridized surface phonon polariton modes also provide a stronger field enhancement compared to conventional pure mode excitation.

  19. Thermo-mechanically coupled subduction with a free surface using ASPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraters, Menno; Glerum, Anne; Thieulot, Cedric; Spakman, Wim

    2014-05-01

    ASPECT (Kronbichler et al., 2012), short for Advanced Solver for Problems in Earth's ConvecTion, is a new Finite Element code which was originally designed for thermally driven (mantle) convection and is built on state of the art numerical methods (adaptive mesh refinement, linear and nonlinear solver, stabilization of transport dominated processes and a high scalability on multiple processors). Here we present an application of ASPECT to modeling of fully thermo-mechanically coupled subduction. Our subduction model contains three different compositions: a crustal composition on top of both the subducting slab and the overriding plate, a mantle composition and a sticky air composition, which allows for simulating a free surface for modeling topography build-up. We implemented a visco-plastic rheology using frictional plasticity and a composite viscosity defined by diffusion and dislocation creep. The lithospheric mantle has the same composition as the mantle but has a higher viscosity because of a lower temperature. The temperature field is implemented in ASPECT as follows: a linear temperature gradient for the lithosphere and an adiabatic geotherm for the sublithospheric mantle. Initial slab temperature is defined using the analytical solution of McKenzie (1970). The plates can be pushed from the sides of the model, and it is possible to define an additional independent mantle in/out flow through the boundaries. We will show a preliminary set of models, highlighting the codes capabilities, such as the Adaptive Mesh Refinement, topography development and the influence of mantle flow on the subduction evolution. Kronbichler, M., Heister, T., and Bangerth, W. (2012), High accuracy mantle convection simulation through modern numerical methods, Geophysical Journal International,191, 12-29, doi:10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05609. McKenzie, D.P. (1970), Temperature and potential temperature beneath island arcs, Teconophysics, 10, 357-366, doi:10.1016/0040-1951(70)90115-0.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of coupled diffusion and surface reactions during the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-09-19

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, in this paper three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75 - x) mol% SiO2 (12.5 + x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5 + x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditionsmore » at a surface-area-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick's 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Finally, models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.« less

  1. PACT - a bottom pressure based, compact deep-ocean tsunameter with acoustic surface coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macrander, A.; Gouretski, V.; Boebel, O.

    2009-04-01

    The German-Indonsian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) processes a multitude of information to comprehensively and accurately evaluate the possible risks inherent to seismic events around Indonesia. Within just a few minutes, measurements of the vibration and horizontal movements off the coastal regions of Indonesia provide a clear picture of the location and intensity of a seaquake. However, not every seaquake causes a tsunami, nor is every tsunami caused by a seaquake. To avoid nerve-wrecking and costly false alarms and to protect against tsunamis caused by landslides, the oceanic sea-level must be measured directly. This goal is pursued in the GITEWS work package "ocean instrumentation", aiming at a a highest reliability and redundancy by developing a set of independent instruments, which measure the sea-level both offshore in the deep ocean and at the coast on the islands off Indonesia. Deep ocean sea-level changes less than a centimetre can be detected by pressure gauges deployed at the sea floor. Based on some of the concepts developed as part of the US DART system, a bottom pressure based, acoustically coupled tsunami detector (PACT) was developed under the auspices of the AWI in collaboration with two German SME and with support of University of Bremen and University of Rhode Island. The PACT system records ocean bottom pressure, performs on-board tsunami detection and acoustically relays the data to the surface buoy. However, employing computational powers and communication technologies of the new millennium, PACT integrates the entire sea-floor package (pressure gauge, data logger and analyzer, acoustic modem, acoustic release and relocation aids) into a single unit, i.e. a standard benthos sphere. PACT thereby reduces costs, minimizes the deployment efforts, while maximizing reliability and maintenance intervals. Several PACT systems are scheduled for their first deployment off Indonesia during 2009. In this presentation, the technical specifications

  2. Monte Carlo simulations of coupled diffusion and surface reactions during the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Pierce, Eric M.; Ryan, Joseph V.

    2014-09-19

    Borosilicate nuclear waste glasses develop complex altered layers as a result of coupled processes such as hydrolysis of network species, condensation of Si species, and diffusion. However, diffusion has often been overlooked in Monte Carlo models of the aqueous corrosion of borosilicate glasses. Therefore, in this paper three different models for dissolved Si diffusion in the altered layer were implemented in a Monte Carlo model and evaluated for glasses in the compositional range (75 - x) mol% SiO2 (12.5 + x/2) mol% B2O3 and (12.5 + x/2) mol% Na2O, where 0 ≤ x ≤ 20%, and corroded in static conditions at a surface-area-to-volume ratio of 1000 m-1. The three models considered instantaneous homogenization (M1), linear concentration gradients (M2), and concentration profiles determined by solving Fick's 2nd law using a finite difference method (M3). Model M3 revealed that concentration profiles in the altered layer are not linear and show changes in shape and magnitude as corrosion progresses, unlike those assumed in model M2. Furthermore, model M3 showed that, for borosilicate glasses with a high forward dissolution rate compared to the diffusion rate, the gradual polymerization and densification of the altered layer is significantly delayed compared to models M1 and M2. Finally, models M1 and M2 were found to be appropriate models only for glasses with high release rates such as simple borosilicate glasses with low ZrO2 content.

  3. Impact of Calibrated Land Surface Model Parameters on the Accuracy and Uncertainty of Land-Atmosphere Coupling in WRF Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Harrison, Ken; Zhou, Shujia

    2012-01-01

    Land-atmosphere (L-A) interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture budgets, as well as controlling feedbacks with clouds and precipitation that lead to the persistence of dry and wet regimes. Recent efforts to quantify the strength of L-A coupling in prediction models have produced diagnostics that integrate across both the land and PBL components of the system. In this study, we examine the impact of improved specification of land surface states, anomalies, and fluxes on coupled WRF forecasts during the summers of extreme dry (2006) and wet (2007) land surface conditions in the U.S. Southern Great Plains. The improved land initialization and surface flux parameterizations are obtained through the use of a new optimization and uncertainty estimation module in NASA's Land Information System (LIS-OPT/UE), whereby parameter sets are calibrated in the Noah land surface model and classified according to a land cover and soil type mapping of the observation sites to the full model domain. The impact of calibrated parameters on the a) spinup of the land surface used as initial conditions, and b) heat and moisture states and fluxes of the coupled WRF simulations are then assessed in terms of ambient weather and land-atmosphere coupling along with measures of uncertainty propagation into the forecasts. In addition, the sensitivity of this approach to the period of calibration (dry, wet, average) is investigated. Finally, tradeoffs of computational tractability and scientific validity, and the potential for combining this approach with satellite remote sensing data are also discussed.

  4. STM probe on the surface electronic states of spin-orbit coupled materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenwen

    Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is the interaction of an electron's intrinsic angular momentum (spin) with its orbital momentum. The strength of this interaction is proportional to Z4 where Z is the atomic number, so generally it is stronger in atoms with higher atomic number, such as bismuth (Z=83) and iridium (Z=77). In materials composed of such heavy elements, the prominent SOC can be sufficient to modify the band structure of the system and lead to distinct phase of matter. In recent years, SOC has been demonstrated to play a critical role in determining the unusual properties of a variety of compounds. SOC associated materials with exotic electronic states have also provided a fertile platform for studying emergent phenomena as well as new physics. As a consequence, the research on these interesting materials with any insight into understanding the microscopic origin of their unique properties and complex phases is of great importance. In this context, we implement scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and spectroscopy (STS) to explore the surface states (SS) of the two major categories of SOC involved materials, Bi-based topological insulators (TI) and Ir-based transition metal oxides (TMO). As a powerful tool in surface science which has achieved great success in wide variety of material fields, STM/STS is ideal to study the local density of states of the subject material with nanometer length scales and is able to offer detailed information about the surface electronic structure. In the first part of this thesis, we report on the electronic band structures of three-dimensional TIs Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se 3. Topological insulators are distinct quantum states of matter that have been intensely studied nowadays. Although they behave like ordinary insulators in showing fully gapped bulk bands, they host a topologically protected surface state consisting of two-dimensional massless Dirac fermions which exhibits metallic behavior. Indeed, this unique gapless surface state is a

  5. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110m wide and 50m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  6. Evaluation of a numerical simulation model for a system coupling atmospheric gas, surface water and unsaturated or saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira; Hirose, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among the atmosphere, surface water and groundwater, including, for example, saltwater intrusion along coasts. We previously developed a numerical simulation method for simulating a coupled atmospheric gas, surface water, and groundwater system (called the ASG method) that employs a saturation equation for flow in a porous medium; this equation allows both the void fraction of water in the surface system and water saturation in the porous medium to be solved simultaneously. It remained necessary, however, to evaluate how global pressure, including gas pressure, water pressure, and capillary pressure, should be specified at the boundary between the surface and the porous medium. Therefore, in this study, we derived a new equation for global pressure and integrated it into the ASG method. We then simulated water saturation in a porous medium and the void fraction of water in a surface system by the ASG method and reproduced fairly well the results of two column experiments. Next, we simulated water saturation in a porous medium (sand) with a bank, by using both the ASG method and a modified Picard (MP) method. We found only a slight difference in water saturation between the ASG and MP simulations. This result confirmed that the derived equation for global pressure was valid for a porous medium, and that the global pressure value could thus be used with the saturation equation for porous media. Finally, we used the ASG method to simulate a system coupling atmosphere, surface water, and a porous medium (110 m wide and 50 m high) with a trapezoidal bank. The ASG method was able to simulate the complex flow of fluids in this system and the interaction between the porous medium and the surface water or the atmosphere.

  7. Coupled Soil Water and Heat Transport Near the Land Surface in Arid and Semiarid Regions - Multi-Domain Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Binayak; Yang, Zhenlei

    2016-04-01

    Understanding and simulating coupled water and heat transfer appropriately in the shallow subsurface is of vital significance for accurate prediction of soil evaporation that would improve the coupling between land surface and atmosphere, which consequently could enhance the reliability of weather as well as climate forecast. The theory of Philip and de Vries (1957), accounting for water vapor diffusion only, was considered physically incomplete and consequently extended and improved by several researchers by explicitly taking water vapor convection, dispersion or air flow into account. It is generally believed that the soil moisture is usually low in the near surface layer under highly transient field conditions, particularly in arid and semiarid regions, and that accurate characterization of water vapor transport is critical when modeling simultaneous water and heat transport in the shallow field soils. The first objective of this study is thus mainly to test existing coupled water and heat transport theories and to develop reasonable and simplified numerical models using field experimental data collected under semi-arid and arid hydro-climatic conditions. In addition, more complex multi-domain models are developed for ubiquitous heterogeneous terrestrial surfaces such as horizontal textural contrasts or structured heterogeneity including macropores (fractures, cracks, root channels, etc.). This would make coupled water and heat transfer models applicable in such non-homogeneous soils more meaningful and enhance the skill of land-atmosphere interaction models at a larger context.

  8. Cross-surface interface element for coupling built-up structural subdomains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davila, C. G.; Ransom, J. B.; Aminpour, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    A new finite element for coupling built-up shell substructures is presented. The present work extends the hybrid variational formulation of the interface element developed by Aminpour and Ransom to permit coupling between two intersecting substructures. Designed for the assembly of independently built-up finite element models, this technique provides a level of modeling flexibility previously unavailable.

  9. Modelling the effects of tides and storm surges on coastal aquifers using a coupled surface-subsurface approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Coastal aquifers are complex hydrologic systems because many physical processes interact: (i) variably saturated flow, (ii) spatial-temporal fluid density variations, (iii) tidal fluctuations, (iv) storm surges overtopping dykes, and (v) surface runoff of storm water. The HydroGeoSphere model is used to numerically simulate coastal flow dynamics, assuming a fully coupled surface-subsurface approach, accounting for all processes listed above. The diffusive wave approximation of the St. Venant equation is used to describe surface flow. Surface flow and salt transport are fully coupled with subsurficial variably saturated, variable-density flow and salt transport through mathematical terms that represent exchange of fluid mass and solute mass, respectively. Tides and storm surges induce a time-variant head that is applied to nodes of the surface domain. The approach is applied to real cases of tide and storm surge events. Tide simulation results confirm the existence of a recirculating zone, forming beneath the upper part of the intertidal zone. By monitoring the exchange fluid flux rates through the beach, it was found that the major inflow to the aquifer takes place at the upper part of the intertidal zone, which explains the formation of the recirculating zone. The recirculating zone is forming particularly during rising tide. Results from a storm surge simulation show that plume fingers develop below the flooded land surface. Natural remediation by seaward flowing freshwater is relatively slow, such that reducing the salt concentration in the aquifer down to drinking water standards takes up to 10 years. PMID:23603354

  10. Analytical evaluation of a surface integral expressing the coupling between interior and exterior volumes in a FE-IE approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuffada, C.; Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.

    1993-01-01

    Recently an approach which combines the finite element technique and an integral equation to determine the fields scattered by inhomogeneous bodies of complicated shape has been proposed. Basically, a mathematical surface which encloses the scatterers is introduced, thus dividing the space into an interior and an exterior volume, in which the finite element technique and an integral equation for EM scattering, respectively, are applied. The integral equation is set up for the tangential components of the fields at the surface, while the interior volume the unknowns are the total fields. Continuity of the tangential fields at the boundary, as required by Maxwell's equations, is imposed, thus coupling the two methods to obtain a consistent solution. The coupling term is expressed by a surface integral formed by the dot product of a FE basis function and an IE testing function, or viceversa. By choosing the boundary to be a surface of revolution and by making a convenient selection of IE basis (testing) functions, it is possible to evaluate the integrals analytically on surfaces such as curved triangles, curved quadrilaterals and curved pentagons. We will illustrate the salient steps involved in setting up and carrying out these integrals and discuss what class of basis (testing) functions and analytic surfaces of revolution they are applicable to. Analytic calculations offer the advantage of better accuracy than purely numerical ones, and, when combined with them, often shed light on issues of numerical convergence and limiting values. Furthermore, they may reduce computation time and storage requirements.

  11. Modelling the effects of tides and storm surges on coastal aquifers using a coupled surface-subsurface approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Coastal aquifers are complex hydrologic systems because many physical processes interact: (i) variably saturated flow, (ii) spatial-temporal fluid density variations, (iii) tidal fluctuations, (iv) storm surges overtopping dykes, and (v) surface runoff of storm water. The HydroGeoSphere model is used to numerically simulate coastal flow dynamics, assuming a fully coupled surface-subsurface approach, accounting for all processes listed above. The diffusive wave approximation of the St. Venant equation is used to describe surface flow. Surface flow and salt transport are fully coupled with subsurficial variably saturated, variable-density flow and salt transport through mathematical terms that represent exchange of fluid mass and solute mass, respectively. Tides and storm surges induce a time-variant head that is applied to nodes of the surface domain. The approach is applied to real cases of tide and storm surge events. Tide simulation results confirm the existence of a recirculating zone, forming beneath the upper part of the intertidal zone. By monitoring the exchange fluid flux rates through the beach, it was found that the major inflow to the aquifer takes place at the upper part of the intertidal zone, which explains the formation of the recirculating zone. The recirculating zone is forming particularly during rising tide. Results from a storm surge simulation show that plume fingers develop below the flooded land surface. Natural remediation by seaward flowing freshwater is relatively slow, such that reducing the salt concentration in the aquifer down to drinking water standards takes up to 10 years.

  12. Strong Coupling of the Cyclotron Motion of Surface Electrons on Liquid Helium to a Microwave Cavity.

    PubMed

    Abdurakhimov, L V; Yamashiro, R; Badrutdinov, A O; Konstantinov, D

    2016-07-29

    The strong coupling regime is observed in a system of two-dimensional electrons whose cyclotron motion is coupled to an electromagnetic mode in a Fabry-Perot cavity resonator. Rabi splitting of eigenfrequencies of the coupled motion is observed both in the cavity reflection spectrum and ac current of the electrons, the latter probed by measuring their bolometric photoresponse. Despite the fact that similar observations of Rabi splitting in many-particle systems have been described as a quantum-mechanical effect, we show that the observed splitting can be explained completely by a model based on classical electrodynamics.

  13. Strong Coupling of the Cyclotron Motion of Surface Electrons on Liquid Helium to a Microwave Cavity.

    PubMed

    Abdurakhimov, L V; Yamashiro, R; Badrutdinov, A O; Konstantinov, D

    2016-07-29

    The strong coupling regime is observed in a system of two-dimensional electrons whose cyclotron motion is coupled to an electromagnetic mode in a Fabry-Perot cavity resonator. Rabi splitting of eigenfrequencies of the coupled motion is observed both in the cavity reflection spectrum and ac current of the electrons, the latter probed by measuring their bolometric photoresponse. Despite the fact that similar observations of Rabi splitting in many-particle systems have been described as a quantum-mechanical effect, we show that the observed splitting can be explained completely by a model based on classical electrodynamics. PMID:27517786

  14. Strong Coupling of the Cyclotron Motion of Surface Electrons on Liquid Helium to a Microwave Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurakhimov, L. V.; Yamashiro, R.; Badrutdinov, A. O.; Konstantinov, D.

    2016-07-01

    The strong coupling regime is observed in a system of two-dimensional electrons whose cyclotron motion is coupled to an electromagnetic mode in a Fabry-Perot cavity resonator. Rabi splitting of eigenfrequencies of the coupled motion is observed both in the cavity reflection spectrum and ac current of the electrons, the latter probed by measuring their bolometric photoresponse. Despite the fact that similar observations of Rabi splitting in many-particle systems have been described as a quantum-mechanical effect, we show that the observed splitting can be explained completely by a model based on classical electrodynamics.

  15. Simulation of snow microwave radiance observations using a coupled land surface- radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toure, A. M.; Rodell, M.; Hoar, T. J.; Kwon, Y.; Yang, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Beaudoing, H.

    2013-12-01

    Radiance assimilation (RA) has been used in operational numerical weather forecasting for generating realistic initial and boundary conditions for the last two decades. Previous studies have shown that the same approach can be used to characterize seasonal snow. Since the penetration depth of microwaves depends essentially on snow physical properties, studies have also shown that for RA to be successful, it is crucial that the land surface model (LSM) represents with great fidelity snow physical properties such as the effective grain size, the temperature, the stratigraphy, the densification and the melt/refreeze processes. The Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), the land model component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM), describes the physical, chemical, biological, and hydrological processes by which terrestrial ecosystems interact with climate across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Sub-grid heterogeneity of the CLM4 is represented by fractional coverage of glacier, lake, wetland, urban, and vegetation land cover types. The vegetation portion is further divided into mosaic of plant functional types (pfts) each with its own leaf and stem area index and canopy height. Processes such as snow accumulation, depletion, densification, metamorphism, percolation, and refreezing of water are represented by a state-of-the-art multi-layer (up to five layers) snow model. Each snow layer is characterized by its thickness, ice mass, liquid water content, temperature, and effective grain radius. The model is considered to be one of the most sophisticated snow models ever within a general circulation model. One of the main challenges in simulating the radiance observed by a radiometer on-board a satellite is the spatial heterogeneity of the land within the footprint of the radiometer. Since CLM4 has the capability to represent the sub-grid heterogeneity, it is perfect candidate for a model operator for simulating the observed brightness temperature (Tb). The

  16. One-dimensional counterion gas between charged surfaces: Exact results compared with weak- and strong-coupling analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dean, David S.; Horgan, Ron R.; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate exactly the statistical integral for an inhomogeneous one-dimensional (1D) counterion-only Coulomb gas between two charged boundaries and from this compute the effective interaction, or disjoining pressure, between the bounding surfaces. Our exact results are compared to the limiting cases of weak and strong couplings which are the same for 1D and three-dimensional (3D) systems. For systems with a large number of counterions it is found that the weak-coupling (mean-field) approximation for the disjoining pressure works perfectly and that fluctuations around the mean-field in 1D are much smaller than in 3D. In the case of few counterions it works less well and strong-coupling approximation performs much better as it takes into account properly the discreteness of the counterion charges. PMID:19275406

  17. Spatial modulation of light transmission through a single microcavity by coupling of photosynthetic complex excitations to surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Itai; Cohen, Moshik; Heifler, Omri; Lilach, Yigal; Zalevsky, Zeev; Mujica, Vladimiro; Richter, Shachar

    2015-06-01

    Molecule-plasmon interactions have been shown to have a definite role in light propagation through optical microcavities due to strong coupling between molecular excitations and surface plasmons. This coupling can lead to macroscopic extended coherent states exhibiting increment in temporal and spatial coherency and a large Rabi splitting. Here, we demonstrate spatial modulation of light transmission through a single microcavity patterned on a free-standing Au film, strongly coupled to one of the most efficient energy transfer photosynthetic proteins in nature, photosystem I. Here we observe a clear correlation between the appearance of spatial modulation of light and molecular photon absorption, accompanied by a 13-fold enhancement in light transmission and the emergence of a distinct electromagnetic standing wave pattern in the cavity. This study provides the path for engineering various types of bio-photonic devices based on the vast diversity of biological molecules in nature.

  18. Quantitative control of poly(ethylene oxide) surface antifouling and biodetection through azimuthally enhanced grating coupled-surface plasmon resonance sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonato, Agnese; Silvestri, Davide; Ruffato, Gianluca; Zacco, Gabriele; Romanato, Filippo; Morpurgo, Margherita

    2013-12-01

    Grating Coupled-Surface Plasmon reflectivity measurements carried out under azimuth and polarization control (GC-SPR φ ≠ 0°) were used to optimize the process of gold surface dressing with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) derivatives of different molecular weight, with the final goal to maximize the discrimination between specific and non-specific binding events occurring at the surface. The kinetics of surface deposition of thiol-ending PEOs (0.3, 2 and 5 kDa), introduced as antifouling layers, was monitored. Non-specific binding events upon immersion of the surfaces into buffers containing either 0.1% bovine serum albumin or 1% Goat Serum, were evaluated as a function of polymer size and density. A biorecognition event between avidin and biotin was then monitored in both buffers at selected low and high polymer surface densities and the contribution of analyte and fouling elements to the signal was precisely quantified. The 0.3 kDa PEO film was unable to protect the surface from non-specific interactions at any tested density. On the other hand, the 2 and 5 kDa polymers at their highest surface densities guaranteed full protection from non-specific interactions from both buffers. These densities were reached upon a long deposition time (24-30 h). The results pave the way toward the application of this platform for the detection of low concentration and small dimension analytes, for which both non-fouling and high instrumental sensitivity are fundamental requirements.

  19. Analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission for efficient collection of Fluorescence/Raman light from surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Lu, Dan-Feng; Gao, Ran; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical method based on the optical reciprocity theorem combined with the Fresnel theory has been developed for the analysis of waveguide-coupled directional emission technique, which is useful for the surface Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy. The Kretschmann-type waveguide with a molecular dipole located above or inside the core layer serves as the simulation model. The two-dimensional (2D) pattern of power density for the waveguide-coupled emission from the molecular dipole was calculated using the theoretical method. According to the results, with a given waveguide the 2D pattern of power density is highly dependent on both the orientation and position of the dipole. The maximum fraction of power occupied by the waveguide-coupled emission is 87% with the plasmon waveguide and 95% with the resonant mirror. Compared with the dipole emission in free space, the waveguide-coupled directional emission possesses easy collection, which is benefit for the detection of weak Fluorescence and Raman signals. From this point, the theoretical method used here is helpful for design and optimization of Kretschmann-type waveguide structures for high-sensitivity surface monitoring by Fluorescence/Raman spectroscopy.

  20. Achieving an ultra-narrow multiband light absorption meta-surface via coupling with an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhengqi; Liu, Guiqiang; Liu, Xiaoshan; Huang, Shan; Wang, Yan; Pan, Pingping; Liu, Mulin

    2015-06-12

    Resonant plasmonic and metamaterial absorbers are of particular interest for applications in a wide variety of nanotechnologies including thermophotovoltaics, photothermal therapy, hot-electron collection and biosensing. However, it is rather challenging to realize ultra-narrow absorbers using plasmonic materials due to large optical losses in metals that inevitably decrease the quality of optical resonators. Here, we theoretically report methods to achieve an ultra-narrow light absorption meta-surface by using photonic modes of the optical cavities, which strongly couple with the plasmon resonances of the metallic nanostructures. Multispectral light absorption with absorption amplitude exceeding 99% and a bandwidth approaching 10 nm is achieved at the optical frequencies. Moreover, by introducing a thick dielectric coupling cavity, the number of absorption bands can be strongly increased and the bandwidth can even be narrowed to less than 5 nm due to the resonant spectrum splitting enabled by strong coupling between the plasmon resonances and the optical cavity modes. Designing such optical cavity-coupled meta-surface structures is a promising route for achieving ultra-narrow multiband absorbers, which can be used in absorption filters, narrow-band multispectral thermal emitters and thermophotovoltaics.

  1. Improved representations of coupled soil-canopy processes in the CABLE land surface model (Subversion revision 3432)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverd, Vanessa; Cuntz, Matthias; Nieradzik, Lars P.; Harman, Ian N.

    2016-09-01

    CABLE is a global land surface model, which has been used extensively in offline and coupled simulations. While CABLE performs well in comparison with other land surface models, results are impacted by decoupling of transpiration and photosynthesis fluxes under drying soil conditions, often leading to implausibly high water use efficiencies. Here, we present a solution to this problem, ensuring that modelled transpiration is always consistent with modelled photosynthesis, while introducing a parsimonious single-parameter drought response function which is coupled to root water uptake. We further improve CABLE's simulation of coupled soil-canopy processes by introducing an alternative hydrology model with a physically accurate representation of coupled energy and water fluxes at the soil-air interface, including a more realistic formulation of transfer under atmospherically stable conditions within the canopy and in the presence of leaf litter. The effects of these model developments are assessed using data from 18 stations from the global eddy covariance FLUXNET database, selected to span a large climatic range. Marked improvements are demonstrated, with root mean squared errors for monthly latent heat fluxes and water use efficiencies being reduced by 40 %. Results highlight the important roles of deep soil moisture in mediating drought response and litter in dampening soil evaporation.

  2. Plasmonic Coupling via Au@stimuli-responsive polymer Hybrid Core@shell Nanoparticles Monitored by Surface Plasmon Resonance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Chung, Kyungwha; Kim, Dong Ha

    2013-03-01

    Noble metal nanostructures with responsive polymers can be used to probe unique plasmonic properties associated with swelling-shrinking transitions in polymer chains triggered by a specific external stimulus. The phase transition causes changes in the refractive index in the vicinity of the particle surface and induces concurrent changes in the characteristic inter-particle distance. We designed a plasmonic-coupling-based sensing device consisting of Au nanoparticles separated from the Au substrate in Kretschmann configuration SPR spectroscopy through a thermo-responsive polymer linker layer. Concretely, Au NPs having stimuli-responsive polymer chains tethered to the Au surface were first fabricated through SI-ATRP. The optical properties of these stimuli-responsive devices were investigated by both in-situ and static SPR analysis. Also, we demonstrate that bimetallic nanostructures containing another type of metal NP at the stimuli-responsive polymer periphery exhibit a controlled optical sensing property based on LSPR coupling phenomenon.

  3. High performance dual-mode surface plasmon coupled emission imaging apparatus integrating Kretschmann and reverse Kretschmann configurations for flexible measurements.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei-Peng; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Liu, Qian; Weng, Yu-Hua; Xie, Kai-Xin; Lin, Guo-Chun; Li, Yao-Qun

    2016-01-01

    A Kretschmann (KR) and reverse Kretschmann (RK) dual-mode surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE) imaging apparatus based on prism coupling was built up. Highly directional and polarized fluorescence images for both RK and KR configurations were obtained. Besides, surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence and free space imaging can also be measured conveniently from this apparatus. Combining the high sensitivity of KR mode and the simplicity of RK mode, the multifunctional imaging system is flexible to provide different configurations for imaging applications. Compared to the free space imaging, SPCE imaging provides enhanced fluorescence, especially large enhancement up to about 50 fold in KR configuration. Additionally, the degree of evanescent field enhancement effect was easily estimated experimentally using the apparatus to compare the different imaging configurations. We believed that the dual-mode SPCE imaging apparatus will be useful in fundamental study of plasmon-controlled fluorescence and be a powerful tool for optical imaging, especially for microarray and biological applications.

  4. Tunable Dirac-point resonance induced by a STM-coupled Anderson impurity on a topological insulator surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Wang, Rui-Qiang; Luo, Wei; Sheng, L.; Wang, B. G.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction effect between the surface states of a topological insulator (TI) and a STM-coupled Anderson impurity is studied by using equations of motion of the Green’s functions. Remarkably, we show that when a coupling between the Anderson impurity and the STM tip is included, the tunneling resonance and the Kondo peak can be tuned to be exactly at the Dirac point, by adjusting the impurity level and Fermi energy, such that the local density of states at the Dirac point is significantly enhanced. This is in contrast to the case of a STM-decoupled Anderson impurity, where both resonances are always fully suppressed at the Dirac point. Our finding suggests a pathway to experimentally control the fundamental properties of the electrons on a TI surface.

  5. Evaluating the blue-shift behaviors of the surface plasmon coupling of an embedded light emitter with a surface Ag nanoparticle by adding a dielectric interlayer or coating.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yang; Chang, Wen-Yen; Lin, Chun-Han; Yang, C C; Kiang, Yean-Woei

    2015-11-30

    The surface plasmon (SP) coupling behaviors of an embedded light emitter or radiating dipole in GaN with a surface Ag nanoparticle (NP) in four structures of different added dielectric geometries, including an extended dielectric interlayer (DI) and a DI of a finite width between the Ag NP and GaN, a dielectric coating on the Ag NP, and no dielectric addition, are numerically compared. Either an added DI or dielectric coating can lead to the blue shift of localized surface plasmon (LSP) dipole resonance peak or the spectral peak of radiated power enhancement ratio with respect to that of the structure without dielectric addition. A smaller dielectric refractive-index or a larger dielectric thickness results in a larger blue-shift range. Under the condition of the same dielectric refractive-index and thickness, the structure of a DI with a finite width leads to the largest blue-shift range, followed by the structure of an extended DI and then the structure of a dielectric coating. In a practical application, for a given emission wavelength of a blue-emitting quantum well, the emission enhancement effect through SP coupling depends on the LSP resonance strength at this wavelength. Our study also shows that although the LSP resonance peak can be blue-shifted by reducing the size of a surface Ag NP, its SP coupling strength is dramatically reduced. Adding a DI or dielectric coating is a more practical approach for shifting the major LSP resonance mode of a surface Ag NP from the green into blue range.

  6. Analytic free-form lens design in 3D: coupling three ray sets using two lens surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duerr, Fabian; Benítez, Pablo; Miñano, Juan C; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2012-05-01

    The two-dimensional analytic optics design method presented in a previous paper [Opt. Express 20, 5576-5585 (2012)] is extended in this work to the three-dimensional case, enabling the coupling of three ray sets with two free-form lens surfaces. Fermat's principle is used to deduce additional sets of functional differential equations which make it possible to calculate the lens surfaces. Ray tracing simulations demonstrate the excellent imaging performance of the resulting free-form lenses described by more than 100 coefficients. PMID:22565708

  7. Surface Structure and Property Coupling of Sr3(Ru1-xMnx)2 O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Durand, Corentin; Li, An-Ping; Zhang, Jiandi; Jin, Rongying; Plummer, Ward

    2014-03-01

    The double-layered Ruthenate Sr3Ru2O7 exhibits interesting behavior under the influence of pressure, while partial substitution of Mn for Ru generates a dramatic response in the physical properties. Even more striking is the structure-property relationship observed at the surface. Combining LEED I - V , with STM/STS and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), we document a very unique surface phase diagram. The octahedra are tilted at the surface (not in the bulk) for low Mn doping, and the surface stabilizes and enhances the octahedra rotation, present in the bulk for Mn doping less that ~ 20%. The structure-property relationship at the surface is consistent with calculations of a tilt/rotation phase diagram (PRB 64, 020509 (2001)). Tilt distortion at the surface favors an insulating AFM ordered phase and when tilt is removed by doping of Mn the surface becomes conducting. Supported by NSF

  8. Controlled surface modification of Ti-40Nb implant alloy by electrochemically assisted inductively coupled RF plasma oxidation.

    PubMed

    Göttlicher, Markus; Rohnke, Marcus; Helth, Arne; Leichtweiß, Thomas; Gemming, Thomas; Gebert, Annett; Eckert, Jürgen; Janek, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    Low temperature metal oxidation induced by plasma in the absence of liquid electrolytes can be useful for the surface preparation of orthopedic devices since residues from these may be harmful and need to be removed before implantation. In this study the oxidation of Ti-40Nb for biomedical application was achieved by employing an inductively coupled radio frequency oxygen plasma. The correlation between the growth mode of the surface oxide and the electric conductivity ratio of the plasma and the oxide phase were studied by varying the sample temperature, oxygen gas pressure and additional bias potential. The plasma treated samples were characterised by confocal laser microscopy, SEM, EBSD, XPS, TEM and ToF-SIMS. The surface energy was determined by contact angle measurements using the Owens-Wendt-Rabel-Kaelble method. Well adhering oxide layers consisting of TiO2 and Nb2O5 with thicknesses between 50 and 150 nm were obtained. Surface roughness values and microstructure indicate that the growth mode of the oxide can be well controlled by the sample temperature and oxygen gas pressure. At temperatures above 450°C a migration of Ti ions towards the surface controls the growth process. A bias potential higher than +50 V causes rough and defective surfaces with high surface energies. PMID:23891813

  9. Low-energy effective theory of Fermi surface coupled with U(1) gauge field in 2+1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Sik

    2009-10-01

    We study the low-energy effective theory for a non-Fermi-liquid state in 2+1 dimensions, where a transverse U(1) gauge field is coupled with a patch of Fermi surface with N flavors of fermion in the large N limit. In the low-energy limit, quantum corrections are classified according to the genus of the two-dimensional surface on which Feynman diagrams can be drawn without a crossing in a double line representation and all planar diagrams are important in the leading order. The emerging theory has the similar structure to the four-dimensional SU(N) gauge theory in the large N limit. Because of strong quantum fluctuations caused by the abundant low-energy excitations near the Fermi surface, low-energy fermions remain strongly coupled even in the large N limit. As a result, there are infinitely many quantum corrections that contribute to the leading frequency dependence of the Green’s function of fermion on the Fermi surface. On the contrary, the boson self-energy is not modified beyond the one-loop level and the theory is stable in the large N limit. The nonperturbative nature of the theory also shows up in correlation functions of gauge-invariant operators.

  10. Coupling dry deposition to vegetation phenology in the Community Earth System Model: Implications for the simulation of surface O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val Martin, M.; Heald, C. L.; Arnold, S. R.

    2014-04-01

    Dry deposition is an important removal process controlling surface ozone. We examine the representation of this ozone loss mechanism in the Community Earth System Model. We first correct the dry deposition parameterization by coupling the leaf and stomatal vegetation resistances to the leaf area index, an omission which has adversely impacted over a decade of ozone simulations using both the Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) and Community Atmospheric Model-Chem (CAM-Chem) global models. We show that this correction increases O3 dry deposition velocities over vegetated regions and improves the simulated seasonality in this loss process. This enhanced removal reduces the previously reported bias in summertime surface O3 simulated over eastern U.S. and Europe. We further optimize the parameterization by scaling down the stomatal resistance used in the Community Land Model to observed values. This in turn further improves the simulation of dry deposition velocity of O3, particularly over broadleaf forested regions. The summertime surface O3 bias is reduced from 30 ppb to 14 ppb over eastern U.S. and 13 ppb to 5 ppb over Europe from the standard to the optimized scheme, respectively. O3 deposition processes must therefore be accurately coupled to vegetation phenology within 3-D atmospheric models, as a first step toward improving surface O3 and simulating O3 responses to future and past vegetation changes.

  11. A novel laser-based approach for cleaning contaminated metallic surfaces coupled with rapid residue analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Robert V.; Roberts, Lauren; DeLucia, Frank C.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.; Whitehouse, Andrew I.

    2013-05-01

    We are developing a novel approach for cleaning and confirming contaminated metallic surfaces that is based on laser ablation to clean the surfaces followed closely in time and space by laser analysis of the degree of cleanliness. Laser-based surface cleaning is a well-established technology and is commercially available (e.g., Adapt-Laser). The new development involves the integration of a LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) surface analytical capability to analyze the surface before and right after the laser cleaning step for the presence or absence of unwanted residues. This all-laser approach is being applied to surfaces of steel vessels that have been used for the containment and destruction of chemical munitions. Various processes used for the destruction of chemical munitions result in the creation of oxidized steel surfaces containing residues (e.g., arsenic, mercury) that need to be removed to acceptable levels. In many instances inorganic molecular contaminants become integrated into oxide layers, necessitating complete removal of the oxide layer to achieve ideal levels of surface cleanliness. The focus of this study is on oxidized steel surfaces exposed to thermally decomposed Lewisite, and thus laden with arsenic. We demonstrate here that a commercially-available cleaning laser sufficiently removes the oxide coating and the targeted contaminants from the affected steel surface. Additionally, we demonstrate that LIBS is useful for the identification of arsenic and mercury on steel surfaces before and after laser cleaning, with arsenic being specifically tracked and analyzed at levels less than 1 microgram per square centimeter surface loading. Recent progress and future directions are presented and discussed.

  12. Grey-body surface radiation coupled with conduction and convection for general geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelman, Michael; Jamnia, Mohammad-Ali

    1991-11-01

    This paper presents a numerical technique for the simulation of the effects of grey-diffuse surface radiation on the temperature field of fluid flows using FIDAP, a general purpose incompressible, viscous fluid code. The radiating surface relationships assume a non-participating medium, constant surface temperature and heat fluxes at the discretized elemental level. The technique involves the decoupling of energy and radiation exchange equations. A concept of macrosurfaces, each containing a number of radiating boundary surfaces, is introduced. These boundary macroelements then carry the information from the radiating boundary into the fluid regime. A number of simulations illustrating the algorithm are presented.

  13. Direct surface analysis coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals heterogeneous composition of the cuticle of Hibiscus trionum petals.

    PubMed

    Giorio, Chiara; Moyroud, Edwige; Glover, Beverley J; Skelton, Paul C; Kalberer, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Plant cuticle, which is the outermost layer covering the aerial parts of all plants including petals and leaves, can present a wide range of patterns that, combined with cell shape, can generate unique physical, mechanical, or optical properties. For example, arrays of regularly spaced nanoridges have been found on the dark (anthocyanin-rich) portion at the base of the petals of Hibiscus trionum. Those ridges act as a diffraction grating, producing an iridescent effect. Because the surface of the distal white region of the petals is smooth and noniridescent, a selective chemical characterization of the surface of the petals on different portions (i.e., ridged vs smooth) is needed to understand whether distinct cuticular patterns correlate with distinct chemical compositions of the cuticle. In the present study, a rapid screening method has been developed for the direct surface analysis of Hibiscus trionum petals using liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry. The optimized method was used to characterize a wide range of plant metabolites and cuticle monomers on the upper (adaxial) surface of the petals on both the white/smooth and anthocyanic/ridged regions, and on the lower (abaxial) surface, which is entirely smooth. The main components detected on the surface of the petals are low-molecular-weight organic acids, sugars, and flavonoids. The ridged portion on the upper surface of the petal is enriched in long-chain fatty acids, which are constituents of the wax fraction of the cuticle. These compounds were not detected on the white/smooth region of the upper petal surface or on the smooth lower surface. PMID:26335385

  14. Land-atmosphere CO2 exchange simulated by a land surface process model coupled to an atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonan, Gordon B.

    1995-02-01

    CO2 uptake during plant photosynthesis and CO2 loss during plant and microbial respiration were added to a land surface process model to simulate the diurnal and annual cycles of biosphere-atmosphere CO2 exchange. The model was coupled to a modified version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model version 2 (CCM2), and the coupled model was run for 5 years. The geographic patterns of annual net primary production are qualitatively similar to other models. When compared by vegetation type, annual production and annual microbial respiration are consistent with other models, except for needleleaf evergreen tree vegetation, where production is too high, and semidesert vegetation, where production and microbial respiration are too low. The seasonality of the net CO2 flux agrees with other models in the southern hemisphere and the tropics. The diurnal range is large for photosynthesis and lower for plant and microbial respiration, which agrees with qualitative expectations. The simulation of the central United States is poor due to temperature and precipitation biases in the coupled model. Despite these deficiencies the current approach is a promising means to include terrestrial CO2 fluxes in a climate system model that simulates atmospheric CO2 concentrations, because it alleviates important parameterization discrepancies between standard biogeochemical models and the land surface models typically used in general circulation models, and because the model resolves the diurnal range of CO2 exchange, which can be large (15 - 45 micromol CO2 sq m/s).

  15. Orbital dependent Rashba splitting and electron-phonon coupling of 2D Bi phase on Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiani, Pierluigi; Lisi, Simone; Betti, Maria Grazia; Ibrahimi, Amina Taleb; Bertran, François; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Chiodo, Letizia

    2013-11-14

    A monolayer of bismuth deposited on the Cu(100) surface forms a highly ordered c(2×2) reconstructed phase. The low energy single particle excitations of the c(2×2) Bi/Cu(100) present Bi-induced states with a parabolic dispersion in the energy region close to the Fermi level, as observed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The electronic state dispersion, the charge density localization, and the spin-orbit coupling have been investigated combining photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory, unraveling a two-dimensional Bi phase with charge density well localized at the interface. The Bi-induced states present a Rashba splitting, when the charge density is strongly localized in the Bi plane. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of the spectral density close to the Fermi level has been evaluated. Dispersive electronic states offer a large number of decay channels for transitions coupled to phonons and the strength of the electron-phonon coupling for the Bi/Cu(100) system is shown to be stronger than for Bi surfaces and to depend on the electronic state symmetry and localization.

  16. The impacts of precipitating cloud radiative effects on ocean surface evaporation, precipitation, and ocean salinity in coupled GCM simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-L. F.; Wang, Yi-Hui; Lee, Tong; Waliser, Duane; Lee, Wei-Liang; Yu, Jia-Yuh; Chen, Yi-Chun; Fetzer, Eric; Hasson, Audrey

    2016-08-01

    The coupled global climate model (GCM) fidelity in representing upper ocean salinity including near sea surface bulk salinity (SSS) is evaluated in this study, with a focus on the Pacific Ocean. The systematic biases in ocean surface evaporation (E) minus precipitation (P) and SSS are found to be fairly similar in the twentieth century simulations of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Phase 3 (CMIP3) and Phase 5 (CMIP5) relative to the observations. One of the potential causes of the CMIP model biases is the missing representation of the radiative effects of precipitating hydrometeors (i.e., snow) in most CMIP models. To examine the radiative effect of cloud snow on SSS, sensitivity experiments with and without such effect are conducted by the National Center for Atmospheric Research-coupled Community Earth System Model (CESM). This study investigates the difference in SSS between sensitivity experiments and its relationship with atmospheric circulation, E - P and air-sea heat fluxes. It is found that the exclusion of the cloud snow radiative effect in CESM produces weaker Pacific trade winds, resulting in enhanced precipitation, reduced evaporation, and a reduction of the upper ocean salinity in the tropical and subtropical Pacific. The latter results in an improved comparison with climatological upper ocean bulk salinity. The introduction of cloud snow also altered the budget terms that maintain the time-mean salinity in the mixed layer.

  17. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  18. Factors affecting projected Arctic surface shortwave heating and albedo change in coupled climate models

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Marika M.; Landrum, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We use a large ensemble of simulations from the Community Earth System Model to quantify simulated changes in the twentieth and twenty-first century Arctic surface shortwave heating associated with changing incoming solar radiation and changing ice conditions. For increases in shortwave absorption associated with albedo reductions, the relative influence of changing sea ice surface properties and changing sea ice areal coverage is assessed. Changes in the surface sea ice properties are associated with an earlier melt season onset, a longer snow-free season and enhanced surface ponding. Because many of these changes occur during peak solar insolation, they have a considerable influence on Arctic surface shortwave heating that is comparable to the influence of ice area loss in the early twenty-first century. As ice area loss continues through the twenty-first century, it overwhelms the influence of changes in the sea ice surface state, and is responsible for a majority of the net shortwave increases by the mid-twenty-first century. A comparison with the Arctic surface albedo and shortwave heating in CMIP5 models indicates a large spread in projected twenty-first century change. This is in part related to different ice loss rates among the models and different representations of the late twentieth century ice albedo and associated sea ice surface state. PMID:26032318

  19. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  20. Effects of surface treatment with coupling agents of PVDF-HFP fibers on the improvement of the adhesion characteristics on PDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, O. M.; See, S. J.; Kim, S. S.; Hwang, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Surface treatment of polyvinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVDF-HFP) fibers was conducted with coupling agents such as epoxy silane, amino silane, and titanate to improve the adhesion characteristics of PVDF-HFP fibers and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The adhesion strength was largest when 4 wt% amino silane was used for surface treatment, showing a 250% improvement compared to the untreated case. Surface roughening and shrinking of the PVDF-HFP fibers were observed after surface treatment, but no chemical bonding occurred between the PVDF-HFP fibers and the coupling agents. It was thus concluded that the improvement of the adhesion characteristics of the PVDF-HFP fibers and PDMS was caused by the physical bonding between them due to the surface treatment with coupling agents. In addition, for the surface roughening mechanism, amino silane infiltration into the PVDF-HFP fibers during the surface treatment, followed by extraction during the drying process, was suggested.

  1. Enhanced chiral response from the Fabry–Perot cavity coupled meta-surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ze-Jian; Hu, De-Jiao; Gao, Fu-Hua; Hou, Yi-Dong

    2016-08-01

    The circular dichroism (CD) signal of a two-dimensional (2D) chiral meta-surface is usually weak, where the difference between the transmitted (or reflected) right and left circular polarization is barely small. We present a general method to enhance the reflective CD spectrum, by adding a layer of reflective film behind the meta-surface. The light passes through the chiral meta-surface and propagates towards the reflector, where it is reflected back and further interacts with the chiral meta-surface. The light is reflected back and forth between these two layers, forming a Fabry–Perot type resonance, which interacts with the localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR) mode and greatly enhances the CD signal of the light wave leaving the meta-surface. We numerically calculate the CD enhancing effect of an L-shaped chiral meta-surface on a gold film in the visible range. Compared with the single layer meta-surface, the L-shaped chiral meta-surface has a CD maximum that is dramatically increased to 1. The analysis of reflection efficiency reveals that our design can be used to realize a reflective circular polarizer. Corresponding mode analysis shows that the huge CD originates from the hybrid mode comprised of FP mode and LSPR. Our results provide a general approach to enhancing the CD signal of a chiral meta-surface and can be used in areas like biosensing, circular polarizer, integrated photonics, etc. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61377054).

  2. Enhanced chiral response from the Fabry-Perot cavity coupled meta-surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ze-Jian; Hu, De-Jiao; Gao, Fu-Hua; Hou, Yi-Dong

    2016-08-01

    The circular dichroism (CD) signal of a two-dimensional (2D) chiral meta-surface is usually weak, where the difference between the transmitted (or reflected) right and left circular polarization is barely small. We present a general method to enhance the reflective CD spectrum, by adding a layer of reflective film behind the meta-surface. The light passes through the chiral meta-surface and propagates towards the reflector, where it is reflected back and further interacts with the chiral meta-surface. The light is reflected back and forth between these two layers, forming a Fabry-Perot type resonance, which interacts with the localized surface plasmonic resonance (LSPR) mode and greatly enhances the CD signal of the light wave leaving the meta-surface. We numerically calculate the CD enhancing effect of an L-shaped chiral meta-surface on a gold film in the visible range. Compared with the single layer meta-surface, the L-shaped chiral meta-surface has a CD maximum that is dramatically increased to 1. The analysis of reflection efficiency reveals that our design can be used to realize a reflective circular polarizer. Corresponding mode analysis shows that the huge CD originates from the hybrid mode comprised of FP mode and LSPR. Our results provide a general approach to enhancing the CD signal of a chiral meta-surface and can be used in areas like biosensing, circular polarizer, integrated photonics, etc. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61377054).

  3. Electronic and magnetic coupling between rare-earth adatoms and the Fe(001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, C. ); Rochow, R. ); Braicovich, L. ); Jungblut, R. ); Kachel, T. ); Tillmann, D.; Kisker, E. )

    1990-02-15

    The spin-dependent electronic structure of monolayer coverages of rare-earth metals on Fe(001) has been studied by spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. The highly spin-polarized photoemission from the localized 4{ital f} levels of Gd, Tb, and Dy on Fe(001) reveals the antiparallel coupling between these heavy rare earths and the Fe spin moment. Exchange-split final-state multiplet terms of the 4{ital f} spectra of the heavy rare earths are explicitly distinguished by direct observation of opposite polarization. For 1 monolayer of the light rare-earth Nd on Fe(001) the rare-earth magnetic moment couples parallel to the Fe magnetic moment.

  4. Coupling Light from a High-Q Microsphere Resonator Using a UV-induced Surface Grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilchenko, V. S.; Starodubov, D. S.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Maleki, L.; Feinberg, J.

    2000-01-01

    High-Q microspheres with whispering-gallery modes have very narrow resonances that can be used for fiber-optic filters, ultra-compact narrow-linewidth lasers and optical/microwave oscillators. Whispering-gallery modes were previously excited in microspheres using evanescent optical fields. The necessary phase synchronism was obtained by adjusting the incident angle of input light beam (prism coupler) or adjustment of the waveguide propagation constant (fiber taper coupler). For many applications, however, bulky near-field couplers are undesirable. They compromise the symmetry and generate stray fields. Also, the control of coupling is crucial for the performance of microsphere resonators: in analogy with radio frequency circuits, the loading Q-factor should be less than the intrinsic Q-factor, Q(sub L) less than or equal to Q(sub O). Ideally one should combine a stable coupling element and a resonator into a single microsphere component.

  5. An emerging reactor technology for chemical synthesis: surface acoustic wave-assisted closed-vessel Suzuki coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ketav; Friend, James; Yeo, Leslie; Perlmutter, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of an energy-efficient surface acoustic wave (SAW) device for driving closed-vessel SAW-assisted (CVSAW), ligand-free Suzuki couplings in aqueous media. The reactions were carried out on a mmolar scale with low to ultra-low catalyst loadings. The reactions were driven by heating resulting from the penetration of acoustic energy derived from RF Raleigh waves generated by a piezoelectric chip via a renewable fluid coupling layer. The yields were uniformly high and the reactions could be executed without added ligand and in water. In terms of energy density this new technology was determined to be roughly as efficient as microwaves and superior to ultrasound.

  6. 29 GHz directly modulated 980 nm vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers with bow-tie shape transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    A concept for the bandwidth enhancement of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) using a transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is proposed, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. A bow-tie shaped oxide aperture forms the transverse-coupled cavity resulting in optical feedback to boost the modulation speed. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs is 9-10 GHz, the 3 dB-bandwidth of the TCC VCSEL is increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. The maximum bandwidth is currently limited by the photo-detector used in the experiment. Clear 36 Gbps eye opening was attained with an extinction ratio of 4 dB.

  7. Sensitivity enhancement of a grating-based surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) biosensor chip using gold thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuk, Jong Seol; Guignon, Ernest F.; Lynes, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to enhance the sensitivity of a grating-based surface plasmon-coupled emission (SPCE) sensor by increasing the thickness of the metal film used in this system. The calculated optical properties of grating-based SPR spectra were significantly affected by both grating depth and by gold thickness. Higher angular sensitivity could be achieved at short wavelengths and under in situ measurement (analysis under aqueous condition). We confirmed the predicated enhancements of SPCE response using Alexa Fluor 647-labeled anti-mouse IgG immobilized on the SPCE sensor chips. Grating-coupled SPCE sensor chips can be used as a useful tool for high contents analysis of chemical and biomolecular interactions.

  8. Electro-Focusing Liquid Extractive Surface Analysis (EF-LESA) Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the chemical composition of surfaces by liquid sampling devices interfaced to mass spectrometry is attractive as the sample stream can be continuously monitored at good sensitivity and selectivity. A sampling probe has been constructed that takes discrete liquid samples (typically <100 nL) of a surface. It incorporates an electrostatic lens system, comprising three electrodes, to which static and pulsed voltages are applied to form a conical “liquid tip”, employed to dissolve analytes at a surface. A prototype system demonstrates spatial resolution of 0.093 mm2. Time of contact between the liquid tip and the surface is controlled to standardize extraction. Calibration graphs of different analyte concentrations on a stainless surface have been measured, together with the probe’s reproducibility, carryover, and recovery. A leucine enkephalin-coated surface demonstrated good linearity (R2 = 0.9936), with a recovery of 90% and a limit of detection of 38 fmol per single spot sampled. The probe is compact and can be fitted into automated sample analysis equipment having potential for rapid analysis of surfaces at a good spatial resolution. PMID:24597530

  9. The Peierls stress for coupled dislocation partials near a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gars, Benoit; Markenscoff, Xanthippi

    2012-04-01

    The effect of a free surface on the Peierls stress of a perfect dislocation, as well as on one of two dislocation partials under a free surface, has been accounted for by considering the Lubarda-Markenscoff variable-core dislocation model (VCM). The VCM dislocation smears the Burgers vector, while producing on the slip plane the Peierls-Nabarro sinusoidal relation between the stress and the slip discontinuity with a variable width. Here the core radius is allowed to depend on the distance to the free surface and the other partial. The Peierls stress is computed as a configurational force by accounting for all the energies and the image stresses to satisfy the traction-free boundary conditions. The results are applied to aluminum and copper and comparisons are made with atomistic calculations in the literature that show that the partials merge as they approach the free surface.

  10. Mercapto-based coupling agent for improved thermophotovoltaic device back surface reflector adhesion and reflectance

    DOEpatents

    Wernsman, Bernard; Fiedor, Joseph N.; Irr, Lawrence G.; Palmisiano, Marc N.

    2016-10-04

    A back surface reflector (BSR) is described. The BSR includes a reflecting layer, a substrate and an adhesion layer between the reflecting layer and the substrate. The adhesion layer includes 3-mercaptopropyl (trimethoxy) silane (a.k.a. Merc).

  11. All-Weather Sounding of Moisture and Temperature From Microwave Sensors Using a Coupled Surface/Atmosphere Inversion Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boukabara, S. A.; Garrett, K.

    2014-12-01

    A one-dimensional variational retrieval system has been developed, capable of producing temperature and water vapor profiles in clear, cloudy and precipitating conditions. The algorithm, known as the Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MiRS), is currently running operationally at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS), and is applied to a variety of data from the AMSU-A/MHS sensors on board the NOAA-18, NOAA-19, and MetOp-A/B polar satellite platforms, as well as SSMI/S on board both DMSP F-16 and F18, and from the NPP ATMS sensor. MiRS inverts microwave brightness temperatures into atmospheric temperature and water vapor profiles, along with hydrometeors and surface parameters, simultaneously. This atmosphere/surface coupled inversion allows for more accurate retrievals in the lower tropospheric layers by accounting for the surface emissivity impact on the measurements. It also allows the inversion of the soundings in all-weather conditions thanks to the incorporation of the hydrometeors parameters in the inverted state vector as well as to the inclusion of the emissivity in the same state vector, which is accounted for dynamically for the highly variable surface conditions found under precipitating atmospheres. The inversion is constrained in precipitating conditions by the inclusion of covariances for hydrometeors, to take advantage of the natural correlations that exist between temperature and water vapor with liquid and ice cloud along with rain water. In this study, we present a full assessment of temperature and water vapor retrieval performances in all-weather conditions and over all surface types (ocean, sea-ice, land, and snow) using matchups with radiosonde as well as Numerical Weather Prediction and other satellite retrieval algorithms as references. An emphasis is placed on retrievals in cloudy and precipitating atmospheres, including extreme weather events

  12. Understanding the coupled surface energy flux-valley wind system using observations in an alpine valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, M. H.; Pardyjak, E.; Brutsaert, W. H.; Mage, R.; Parlange, M. B.

    2010-12-01

    Buoyancy-driven diurnal valley winds depend on relative partitioning of incoming solar radiation into the sensible and latent heat fluxes. Evaporation and transpiration at the surface contribute to the latent heat flux, while heating of the air near the surface results from the sensible heat flux. Thus if more moisture is available at the surface, (e.g. as soil moisture or dew) then more energy will be partitioned into the latent heat flux, and less will be available for the sensible heat flux. Presented here is an analysis of observations from surface weather stations placed throughout the La Fouly catchment (~20 km^2) in southern Switzerland during the summers of 2009 and 2010. The stations were equipped with sensors to measure atmospheric and land surface variables including: incoming solar radiation, 2 m air temperature, skin temperature, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, precipitation, soil moisture, and soil temperature. Scaling analysis is used to show how the balance between sensible and latent heat fluxes influences the buoyancy-driven valley winds. A preliminary analysis indicates that increased surface soil moisture tends to decrease the strength of slope winds both during the day and at night, while decreased soil moisture has the opposite effect. While this type of relation has been previously investigated through numerical simulations of valley or slope flows, it has not (to the authors' knowledge), been previously observed in the field.

  13. Characterization and preosteoblastic behavior of hydroxyapatite-deposited nanotube surface of titanium prepared by anodization coupled with alternative immersion method.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying-Xin; Du, Juan; Zhao, Jing-Mei; Si, Mi-Si; Mo, Jia-Ji; Lai, Hong-Chang

    2012-11-01

    The modification on the titanium (Ti) implant surface is an effective method to improve the bioactivity of Ti. In this study, a hydroxyapatite (HA)-deposited nanotubular Ti surface was prepared by anodization coupled with an alternative immersion method (AIM). Surface physicochemical characteristics including morphology, microstructure, composition, roughness were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Preosteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) behavior on the HA-deposited nanotube surface, including cell morphology, proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin secretion, and mineralization, were also investigated. The untreated nanotube surface and bare Ti were used as controls. The results showed that synthetic HA crystals could be efficiently grown on/inside the nanotubes after AIM treatment in saturated Ca(OH)(2) and 0.02M (NH(4))(2) HPO(4). The amount of synthetic HA on nanotube layer was dependent on the number of dipping cycles. Significant increases in ALP activity and osteocalcin production on day 7 and 14 and calcium deposition on day 21 (P < 0.05) were observed for HA-deposited nanotubular Ti surface when compared with untreated nanotube layer and bare Ti. However, the cell proliferation rate on HA-deposited nanotube surfaces was slowed down significantly (P < 0.05). All these results indicated that this HA-deposited nanotube surface might have the potential benefit to enhance implant osseointegration. The synthetic HA TiO(2) nanotube loading might be a highly promising path to improve the bioactivity of Ti-based implants.

  14. Spin splitting of s and p states in single atoms and magnetic coupling in dimers on a surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, H J; Ho, W; Persson, M

    2004-05-01

    Electronic states of magnetic atoms (Mn, Fe, and Co) and artificially assembled dimers (Mn2, Fe2, and Co2) on a NiAl(110) surface were probed by scanning tunneling spectroscopy at 17 K. Resonance peaks characteristic of each adsorbed species were observed in the unoccupied density of states. Comparison of the measured spectra with calculations by density functional theory revealed spin splitting in the unoccupied states with s and p characters for the single magnetic adatoms and addimers. The magnitude of the resonance splitting for the adatoms increased with the calculated values of magnetic moments. The resonance structures for the addimers exhibited signatures of their internal magnetic coupling.

  15. Sub-gigahertz beam switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahama, M.; Gu, X.; Sakaguchi, T.; Matsutani, A.; Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A.; Koyama, F.

    2015-08-01

    We report a high-speed electrical beam switching of vertical cavity surface emitting laser with a transverse coupled cavity. A high speed (sub-gigahertz) and large deflection angle (>30°) beam switching is demonstrated by employing the transverse mode switching. The angular switching speed of 900 MHz is achieved with narrow beam divergence of below 4° and extinction ratio of 8 dB. We also measured the near- and far-field patterns to clarify the origin of the beam switching. We present a simple one-dimensional Bragg reflector waveguide model, which well predicts the beam switching characteristic.

  16. Intensified charge coupled device-based fiber-optic monitor for rapid remote surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Alarie, J.P.; Stokes, D.L.; Sutherland, W.S.; Edwards, A.C.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1992-11-01

    This paper describes the development of an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD)-based fiber-optic monitor for remote Raman and surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) sensing. Both Raman and SERS data were obtained with the use of a fiber-optic probe design incorporating 20-m optical fibers carrying the Raman signal. Spectra were obtained in 5 milliseconds for Raman and 9 ms for SERS. The proposed system could be used for a highly sensitive portable Raman system for rapid and remote chemical sensing. 28 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Asymmetric coupling and dispersion of surface-plasmon-polariton waves on a periodically patterned anisotropic metal film

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Jhuma; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2015-01-07

    The morphology of a columnar thin film (CTF) of silver renders it an effectively biaxially anisotropic continuum. CTFs of silver deposited on one-dimensional gratings of photoresist showed strong blazing action and asymmetrically coupled optical radiation to surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves propagating only along one direction supported by either the CTF/photoresist or the CTF/air interfaces. Homogenization of the CTFs using the Bruggeman formalism revealed them to display hyperbolic dispersion, and the dispersion of SPP waves was adequately described thereby.

  18. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-01-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW. PMID:27485470

  19. A process to control light in a micro resonator through a coupling modulation by surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guofang; Li, Yuan; Hu, Chunguang; Lei, Lihua; Guo, Yanchuan

    2016-08-01

    A novel process to control light through the coupling modulation by surface acoustic wave (SAW) is presented in an optical micro resonator. An optical waveguide modulator of a racetrack resonator on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology is took as an example to explore the mechanism. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is developed to simulate the acousto-optical (AO) modulator using the mechanism. An analytical method is presented to verify our proposal. The results show that the process can work well as an optical modulator by SAW.

  20. Sub-gigahertz beam switching of vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with transverse coupled cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahama, M.; Gu, X.; Sakaguchi, T.; Matsutani, A.; Ahmed, M.; Bakry, A.; Koyama, F.

    2015-08-17

    We report a high-speed electrical beam switching of vertical cavity surface emitting laser with a transverse coupled cavity. A high speed (sub-gigahertz) and large deflection angle (>30°) beam switching is demonstrated by employing the transverse mode switching. The angular switching speed of 900 MHz is achieved with narrow beam divergence of below 4° and extinction ratio of 8 dB. We also measured the near- and far-field patterns to clarify the origin of the beam switching. We present a simple one-dimensional Bragg reflector waveguide model, which well predicts the beam switching characteristic.

  1. A coupled surface-water and ground-water flow model (MODBRANCH) for simulation of stream-aquifer interaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, Eric D.; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water flow models traditionally have been developed separately, with interaction between subsurface flow and streamflow either not simulated at all or accounted for by simple formulations. In areas with dynamic and hydraulically well-connected ground-water and surface-water systems, stream-aquifer interaction should be simulated using deterministic responses of both systems coupled at the stream-aquifer interface. Accordingly, a new coupled ground-water and surface-water model was developed by combining the U.S. Geological Survey models MODFLOW and BRANCH; the interfacing code is referred to as MODBRANCH. MODFLOW is the widely used modular three-dimensional, finite-difference ground-water model, and BRANCH is a one-dimensional numerical model commonly used to simulate unsteady flow in open- channel networks. MODFLOW was originally written with the River package, which calculates leakage between the aquifer and stream, assuming that the stream's stage remains constant during one model stress period. A simple streamflow routing model has been added to MODFLOW, but is limited to steady flow in rectangular, prismatic channels. To overcome these limitations, the BRANCH model, which simulates unsteady, nonuniform flow by solving the St. Venant equations, was restructured and incorporated into MODFLOW. Terms that describe leakage between stream and aquifer as a function of streambed conductance and differences in aquifer and stream stage were added to the continuity equation in BRANCH. Thus, leakage between the aquifer and stream can be calculated separately in each model, or leakages calculated in BRANCH can be used in MODFLOW. Total mass in the coupled models is accounted for and conserved. The BRANCH model calculates new stream stages for each time interval in a transient simulation based on upstream boundary conditions, stream properties, and initial estimates of aquifer heads. Next, aquifer heads are calculated in MODFLOW based on stream

  2. An improved thin-layer chromatography/mass spectrometry coupling using a surface sampling probe electrospray ion trap system

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Michael J; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2004-01-01

    A combined surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer was used for the direct read out of unmodified reversed-phase C18 thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates. The operation of the surface sampling electrospray ionization interface in positive and negative ionization modes was demonstrated through the direct analysis of TLC plates on which a commercial test mix comprised of four dye compounds viz., rhodamine B, fluorescein, naphthol blue black, and fast green FCF, and an extract of the caffeine-containing plant Ilex vomitoria, were spotted and developed. Acquisition of full-scan mass spectra and automated collection of MS/MS product ion spectra while scanning a development lane along the surface of a TLC plate demonstrated the advantages of using an ion trap in this combination. Details of the sampling system, benefits of analyzing a developed lane in both positive ion and negative ion modes, levels of detection while surface scanning, surface scan speed effects, and the utility of three-dimensional data display, are also discussed.

  3. Comparison of two complex land surface schemes coupled to the National Center for Atmospheric Research general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peylin, Philippe; Polcher, Jan; Bonan, Gordon; Williamson, David L.; Laval, Katia

    1997-08-01

    Two climate simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research general circulation model (version CCM2) coupled either to the Biosphere Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) or to Sechiba land surface scheme are compared. Both parameterizations of surface-atmosphere exchanges may be considered as complex but represent the soil hydrology and the role of vegetation in very different ways. The global impact of the change in land surface scheme on the simulated climate appears to be small. Changes are smaller than those obtained when comparing either one of these schemes to the fixed hydrology used in the standard CCM2. Nevertheless, at the regional scale, changing the land-surface scheme can have a large impact on the local climate. As one example, wre detail how circulation patterns are modified above the Tibetan plateau during the monsoon season. Elsewhere, mainly over land, changes can also be important. In the tropics, during the dry season, Sechiba produces warmer surface temperatures than does BATS. This warming arises from differences in the soil hydrology, both storage capacity and the dynamics of soil water transport. Over the Tundra biotype, the formulation of the transpiration induces significant differences in the energy balance.

  4. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Dong H.

    2015-01-01

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2)Q] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H2 reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface.

  5. An accurate potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction by the coupled-cluster method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Sun, Zhigang; Zhang, Dong H

    2015-01-14

    A three dimensional potential energy surface for the F + H2 → HF + H reaction has been computed by the spin unrestricted coupled cluster method with singles, doubles, triples, and perturbative quadruples [UCCSDT(2)Q] using the augmented correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the fluorine atom and the correlation-consistent polarised valence quadruple zeta basis set for the hydrogen atom. All the calculations are based on the restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock orbitals, together with the frozen core approximations, and the UCCSD(T)/complete basis set (CBS) correction term was included. The global potential energy surface was calculated by fitting the sampled ab initio points without any scaling factor for the correlation energy part using a neutral network function method. Extensive dynamics calculations have been carried out on the potential energy surface. The reaction rate constants, integral cross sections, product rotational states distribution, and forward and backward scattering as a function of collision energy of the F + HD → HF + D, F + HD → DF + H, and F + H2 reaction, were calculated by the time-independent quantum dynamics scattering theory using the new surface. The satisfactory agreement with the reported experimental observations previously demonstrates the accuracy of the new potential energy surface.

  6. How important is mode-coupling in global surface wave tomography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikesell, Dylan; Nolet, Guust; Voronin, Sergey; Ritsema, Jeroen; Van Heijst, Hendrik-Jan

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the influence of mode coupling for fundamental mode Rayleigh waves with periods between 64 and 174s, we analysed 3,505,902 phase measurements obtained along minor arc trajectories as well as 2,163,474 phases along major arcs. This is a selection of five frequency bands from the data set of Van Heijst and Woodhouse, extended with more recent earthquakes, that served to define upper mantle S velocity in model S40RTS. Since accurate estimation of the misfits (as represented by χ2) is essential, we used the method of Voronin et al. (GJI 199:276, 2014) to obtain objective estimates of the standard errors in this data set. We adapted Voronin's method slightly to avoid that systematic errors along clusters of raypaths can be accommodated by source corrections. This was done by simultaneously analysing multiple clusters of raypaths originating from the same group of earthquakes but traveling in different directions. For the minor arc data, phase errors at the one sigma level range from 0.26 rad at a period of 174s to 0.89 rad at 64s. For the major arcs, these errors are roughly twice as high (0.40 and 2.09 rad, respectively). In the subsequent inversion we removed any outliers that could not be fitted at the 3 sigma level in an almost undamped inversion. Using these error estimates and the theory of finite-frequency tomography to include the effects of scattering, we solved for models with χ2 = N (the number of data) both including and excluding the effect of mode coupling between Love and Rayleigh waves. We shall present some dramatic differences between the two models, notably near ocean-continent boundaries (e.g. California) where mode conversions are likely to be largest. But a sharpening of other features, such as cratons and high-velocity blobs in the oceanic domain, is also observed when mode coupling is taken into account. An investigation of the influence of coupling on azimuthal anisotropy is still under way at the time of writing of this

  7. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave–current coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave–current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave–current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave–current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave–wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  8. Surface modification of apatite-wollastonite glass ceramic by synthetic coupling agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Qin; Zhou, Da-Li; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Jia-Bei

    2014-06-01

    In this study, lysine was introduced into the surface of apatite—wollastonite glass ceramic (AW-GC) to improve its cytocompatibility by two steps reaction procedure. Firstly, lysine connected to N-β-(aminoethyl)-γ-aminopropyl trimethoxy silane (A-1120) by covalent binding of amide group. Secondly, the lysine-functionalized A-1120 was deposited on the surface of AW-GC through a silanization reaction involving a covalent attachment. FTIR spectra indicated that lysine had been immobilized onto the surface of AW-GC successfully. Bioactivity of the surface modified AW-GC was investigated by simulated body fluid (SBF), and the in vitro cytocompatibility was evaluated by coculturing with human osteosarcoma cell MG63. The results showed that the process of hydroxyapatite layer formed on the modified material was similar to AW-GC while the mode of hydroxyapatite deposition was changed. The growth of MG63 cells showed that modifying the AW-GC surface with lysine enhances the cell adhesion and proliferation.

  9. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface I: Wave-current coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; William, Perrie; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-06-01

    To study the electromagnetic backscattering from a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface, a fractal sea surface wave-current model is derived, based on the mechanism of wave-current interactions. The numerical results show the effect of the ocean current on the wave. Wave amplitude decreases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height increase, spectrum intensity decreases and shifts towards lower frequencies when the current occurs parallel to the direction of the ocean wave. By comparison, wave amplitude increases, wavelength and kurtosis of wave height decrease, spectrum intensity increases and shifts towards higher frequencies if the current is in the opposite direction to the direction of ocean wave. The wave-current interaction effect of the ocean current is much stronger than that of the nonlinear wave-wave interaction. The kurtosis of the nonlinear fractal ocean surface is larger than that of linear fractal ocean surface. The effect of the current on skewness of the probability distribution function is negligible. Therefore, the ocean wave spectrum is notably changed by the surface current and the change should be detectable in the electromagnetic backscattering signal. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Development Program of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD), Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service.

  10. Use of rigorous vector coupled-wave theory for designing and tolerancing surface-relief diffractive components for magneto-optical heads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggans, Charles W.; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    1991-01-01

    A rigorous coupled wave model is presented, experimentally validated, and used for tolerancing surface relief diffractive elements. Applications of the model in the design and tolerancing of components for magneto optical (M-O) data storage heads are investigated.

  11. Absorption-induced scattering and surface plasmon out-coupling from absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces.

    PubMed

    Petoukhoff, Christopher E; O'Carroll, Deirdre M

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between absorbers and plasmonic metasurfaces can give rise to unique optical properties not present for either of the individual materials and can influence the performance of a host of optical sensing and thin-film optoelectronic applications. Here we identify three distinct mode types of absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces: localized and propagating surface plasmons and a previously unidentified optical mode type called absorption-induced scattering. The extinction of the latter mode type can be tuned by controlling the morphology of the absorber coating and the spectral overlap of the absorber with the plasmonic modes. Furthermore, we show that surface plasmons are backscattered when the crystallinity of the absorber is low but are absorbed for more crystalline absorber coatings. This work furthers our understanding of light-matter interactions between absorbers and surface plasmons to enable practical optoelectronic applications of metasurfaces.

  12. Direct coupling of photonic modes and surface plasmon polaritons observed in 2-photon PEEM.

    PubMed

    Word, Robert C; Fitzgerald, Joseph P S; Könenkamp, Rolf

    2013-12-16

    We report the direct microscopic observation of optical energy transfer from guided photonic modes in an indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film to surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) at the surfaces of a single crystalline gold platelet. The photonic and SPP modes appear as an interference pattern in the photoelectron emission yield across the surface of the specimen. We explore the momentum match between the photonic and SPP modes in terms of simple waveguide theory and the three-layer slab model for bound SPP modes of thin metal films. We show that because the gold is thin (30-40 nm), two SPP modes exist and that momentum of the spatially confined asymmetric field mode coincides with the dominant mode of the ITO waveguide. The results demonstrate that photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM) can be an important tool for the observation of photonic to SPP interactions in the study of integrated photonic circuits. PMID:24514628

  13. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqiu; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2015-01-01

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110mAg from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent experimental efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. The nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  14. Absorption-induced scattering and surface plasmon out-coupling from absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Petoukhoff, Christopher E.; O'Carroll, Deirdre M.

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between absorbers and plasmonic metasurfaces can give rise to unique optical properties not present for either of the individual materials and can influence the performance of a host of optical sensing and thin-film optoelectronic applications. Here we identify three distinct mode types of absorber-coated plasmonic metasurfaces: localized and propagating surface plasmons and a previously unidentified optical mode type called absorption-induced scattering. The extinction of the latter mode type can be tuned by controlling the morphology of the absorber coating and the spectral overlap of the absorber with the plasmonic modes. Furthermore, we show that surface plasmons are backscattered when the crystallinity of the absorber is low but are absorbed for more crystalline absorber coatings. This work furthers our understanding of light–matter interactions between absorbers and surface plasmons to enable practical optoelectronic applications of metasurfaces. PMID:26271900

  15. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    SciTech Connect

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermal exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.

  16. Effect of exposure environment on surface decomposition of SiC-silver ion implantation diffusion couples

    DOE PAGES

    Gerczak, Tyler J.; Zheng, Guiqui; Field, Kevin G.; Allen, Todd R.

    2014-10-05

    SiC is a promising material for nuclear applications and is a critical component in the construction of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel. A primary issue with TRISO fuel operation is the observed release of 110m Ag from intact fuel particles. The release of Ag has prompted research efforts to directly measure the transport mechanism of Ag in bulk SiC. Recent research efforts have focused primarily on Ag ion implantation designs. The effect of the thermal exposure system on the ion implantation surface has been investigated. Results indicate the utilization of a mated sample geometry and the establishment of a static thermalmore » exposure environment is critical to maintaining an intact surface for diffusion analysis. In conclusion, the nature of the implantation surface and its potential role in Ag diffusion analysis are discussed.« less

  17. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peter Q; Luxmoore, Isaac J; Mikhailov, Sergey A; Savostianova, Nadja A; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R

    2015-11-20

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light-matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ∼60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light-matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation.

  18. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light–matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ∼60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light–matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation. PMID:26584781

  19. Hexagonal Ag nanoarrays induced enhancement of blue light emission from amorphous oxidized silicon nitride via localized surface plasmon coupling.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongyuan; Ni, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wenping; Jiang, Xiaofan; Yang, Huafeng; Yu, Jie; Wang, Wen; Xu, Ling; Xu, Jun; Chen, Kunji; Feng, Duan

    2014-11-17

    A significant enhancement of blue light emission from amorphous oxidized silicon nitride (a-SiNx:O) films is achieved by introduction of ordered and size-controllable arrays of Ag nanoparticles between the silicon substrate and a-SiNx:O films. Using hexagonal arrays of Ag nanoparticles fabricated by nanosphere lithography, the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) resonance can effectively increase the internal quantum efficiency from 3.9% to 13.3%. Theoretical calculation confirms that the electromagnetic field-intensity enhancement is through the dipole surface plasma coupling with the excitons of a-SiNx:O films, which demonstrates a-SiNx:O films with enhanced blue emission are promising for silicon-based light-emitting applications by patterned Ag arrays.

  20. Observation of Rabi splitting from surface plasmon coupled conduction state transitions in electrically excited InAs quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Passmore, Brandon S; Adams, David C; Ribaudo, Troy; Wasserman, Dan; Lyon, Stephen; Davids, Paul; Chow, Weng W; Shaner, Eric A

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate strong coupling between a surface plasmon and intersublevel transitions in self-assembled InAs quantum dots. The surface plasmon mode exists at the interface between the semiconductor emitter structure and a periodic array of holes perforating a metallic Pd/Ge/Au film that also serves as the top electrical contact for the emitters. Spectrally narrowed quantum-dot electroluminescence was observed for devices with varying subwavelength hole spacing. Devices designed for 9, 10, and 11 μm wavelength emission also exhibit a significant spectral splitting. The association of the splitting with quantum-dot Rabi oscillation is consistent with results from a calculation of spontaneous emission from an interacting plasmonic field and quantum-dot ensemble. The fact that this Rabi oscillation can be observed in an incoherently excited, highly inhomogeneously broadened system demonstrates the utility of intersublevel transitions in quantum dots for investigations of coherent transient and quantum coherence phenomena.

  1. Equilibrium long-ranged charge correlations at the surface of a conductor coupled to electromagnetic radiation. II.

    PubMed

    Jancovici, Bernard; Samaj, Ladislav

    2009-02-01

    Results of a previous paper with the same title are retrieved by a different method. A one-component plasma is bounded by a plane surface. The plasma is fully coupled to the electromagnetic field, therefore, the charge correlations are retarded. The quantum correlation function of the surface charge densities, at times different by t , at asymptotical large distances R, at inverse temperature beta , decays as -1(8pi{2}betaR{3}) , a surprisingly simple result: The decay is independent of Planck's constant variant Planck's over 2pi , the time difference t , and the velocity of light c. The present paper is based on the analysis of the collective vibration modes of the system.

  2. Electro-optic polymer film light modulator model based on grating-coupled long-range surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Kai; Chen, Meng-Ting

    2010-11-01

    An electro-optic (EO) polymer film light modulator based on grating-coupled long-range surface plasmon resonance is proposed and numerically investigated. Near the resonance condition, the incident light can be absorbed to excite the surface plasmon on both sides of a thin metal layer, sandwiched between a cladding layer and the EO polymer. The reflected light intensity is highly sensitive to the refractive index of the EO polymer. For the structure with optimal thickness, the modulator is able to vary the reflectance from 0 to 0.6 by applying 10.61 V across a 5 µm thick EO polymer film with a linear electro-optic coefficient of 200 pm V - 1.

  3. Spin coupling between cold atoms and the thermal fluctuations of a metal surface.

    PubMed

    Jones, M P A; Vale, C J; Sahagun, D; Hall, B V; Hinds, E A

    2003-08-22

    We describe an experiment in which Bose-Einstein condensates and cold atom clouds are held by a microscopic magnetic trap near a room-temperature metal wire 500 microm in diameter. The lifetime for atoms to remain in the microtrap is measured over a range of distances down to 27 microm from the surface of the metal. We observe the loss of atoms from the microtrap due to spin flips. These are induced by radio-frequency thermal fluctuations of the magnetic field near the surface, as predicted but not previously observed.

  4. Atomic-scale identification of Pd leaching in nanoparticle catalyzed C–C coupling: Effects of particle surface disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Beverly D.; Bedford, Nicholas M.; Seifert, Soenke; Koerner, Hilmar; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Knecht, Marc R.

    2015-07-23

    C–C coupling reactions are of great importance in the synthesis of numerous organic compounds, where Pd nanoparticle catalyzed systems represent new materials to efficiently drive these reactions. Despite their pervasive utility, the catalytic mechanism of these particle-based reactions remains highly contested. Herein we present evidence of an atom leaching mechanism for Stille coupling under aqueous conditions using peptide-capped Pd nanoparticles. EXAFS analysis revealed Pd coordination changes in the nanoparticle consistent with Pd atom abstraction, where sizing analysis by SAXS confirmed particle size changes associated with a leaching process. It is likely that recently discovered highly disordered surface Pd atoms are the favored catalytic active sites and are leached during oxidative addition, resulting in smaller particles. Thus, probing the mechanism of nanoparticle-driven C–C coupling reactions through structural analyses provides fundamental information concerning these active sites and their reactivity at the atomic-scale, which can be used to improve catalytic performance to meet important sustainability goals.

  5. Atomic-scale identification of Pd leaching in nanoparticle catalyzed C–C coupling: Effects of particle surface disorder

    DOE PAGES

    Briggs, Beverly D.; Bedford, Nicholas M.; Seifert, Soenke; Koerner, Hilmar; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Heinz, Hendrik; Naik, Rajesh R.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Knecht, Marc R.

    2015-07-23

    C–C coupling reactions are of great importance in the synthesis of numerous organic compounds, where Pd nanoparticle catalyzed systems represent new materials to efficiently drive these reactions. Despite their pervasive utility, the catalytic mechanism of these particle-based reactions remains highly contested. Herein we present evidence of an atom leaching mechanism for Stille coupling under aqueous conditions using peptide-capped Pd nanoparticles. EXAFS analysis revealed Pd coordination changes in the nanoparticle consistent with Pd atom abstraction, where sizing analysis by SAXS confirmed particle size changes associated with a leaching process. It is likely that recently discovered highly disordered surface Pd atoms aremore » the favored catalytic active sites and are leached during oxidative addition, resulting in smaller particles. Thus, probing the mechanism of nanoparticle-driven C–C coupling reactions through structural analyses provides fundamental information concerning these active sites and their reactivity at the atomic-scale, which can be used to improve catalytic performance to meet important sustainability goals.« less

  6. Surface plasmon coupled metal enhanced spectral and charge transport properties of poly(3,3'''-dialkylquarterthiophene) Langmuir Schaefer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Rajiv K.; Yadav, Swatantra K.; Upadhyay, Chandan; Prakash, Rajiv; Mishra, Hirdyesh

    2015-03-01

    The coupling of organic molecule excitons with metal nano-structure surface plasmons can improve the performance of optoelectronic devices. This paper presents the effect of localized silver metal surface plasmons on spectral as well as charge transport properties of ordered molecular Langmuir Schaefer (LS) films of a fluorescent conducting multifunctional organic polymer: poly (3,3'''-dialkylquarterthiophene) [PQT-12]. The stability and thickness of the PQT-12 LS film were studied by the pressure vs. area isotherm curve. Atomic force microscopy images indicate the formation of a smooth ordered polymer thin LS film of PQT-12 over silver nanostructure island films [SNIF] (~40 to 50 nm in size). Raman, electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral measurements of the PQT-12 LS film, near SNIF i.e. the near field, show a plasmon coupled enhancement of ~13 fold in the intensity of Raman bands along with a two-fold enhancement in the absorption band (531 nm) and a six-fold enhancement in the fluorescence band (665 nm) coupled with a decrease in fluorescence decay time with improved photostability as compared to an identical control sample containing no SNIF i.e. the far field condition. These results indicate the formation of a plasmon coupled unified fluorophore system due to adsorption of the PQT-12 LS film over SNIF. The effect of plasmonic coupling is also studied by applying an electric field in sandwiched structures of Al/PQT-12 LS/SNIF/ITO with respect to Al/PQT-12 LS/ITO. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement in the current density (J-V plot) of the PQT-12 LS film is observed in the presence of SNIF, which further increases, on illuminating the film by green laser light [532 nm], while the fluorescence intensity and decay time decrease. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements of SNIF also show a red shift in 3d3/2 and 3d5/2 transitions of silver in the PQT-12 coated LS film, which indicates partial charge transfer from the PQT-12 polymer backbone

  7. The linkage between stratospheric water vapor and surface temperature in an observation-constrained coupled general circulation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Read, William G.; Anderson, John

    2016-06-01

    We assess the interactions between stratospheric water vapor (SWV) and surface temperature during the past two decades using satellite observations and the Community Earth System Model (CESM). From 1992 to 2013, to first order, the observed SWV exhibited three distinct piece-wise trends: a steady increase from 1992 to 2000, an abrupt drop from 2000 to 2004, and a gradual recovery after 2004, while the global-mean surface temperature experienced a strong increase until 2000 and a warming hiatus after 2000. The atmosphere-only CESM shows that the seasonal variation of tropical-mean (30°S-30°N) SWV is anticorrelated with that of the tropical-mean sea surface temperature (SST), while the correlation between the tropical SWV and SST anomalies on the interannual time scale is rather weak. By nudging the modeled SWV to prescribed profiles in coupled atmosphere-slab ocean experiments, we investigate the impact of SWV variations on surface temperature change. We find that a uniform 1 ppmv (0.5 ppmv) SWV increase (decrease) leads to an equilibrium global mean surface warming (cooling) of 0.12 ± 0.05 °C (-0.07 ± 0.05 °C). Sensitivity experiments show that the equilibrium response of global mean surface temperature to SWV perturbations over the extratropics is larger than that over the tropics. The observed sudden drop of SWV from 2000 to 2004 produces a global mean surface cooling of about -0.048 ± 0.041 °C, which suggests that a persistent change in SWV would make an imprint on long-term variations of global-mean surface temperature. A constant linear increase in SWV based on the satellite-observed rate of SWV change yields a global mean surface warming of 0.03 ± 0.01 °C/decade over a 50-year period, which accounts for about 19 % of the observed surface temperature increase prior to the warming hiatus. In the same experiment, trend analyses during different periods reveal a multi-year adjustment of surface temperature before the response to SWV forcing becomes

  8. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry as an alternative to cloud point extraction based methods for rapid quantification of silver ions and surface coated silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K; Linder, Sean W

    2016-01-15

    Speciation and accurate quantification of ionic silver and metallic silver nanoparticles are critical to investigate silver toxicity and to determine the shelf-life of products that contain nano silver under various storage conditions. We developed a rapid method for quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The addition of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (tiopronin) to the background electrolyte was used to facilitate the chromatographic separation of ionic silver and maintain the oxidation state of silver. The obtained limits of detection were 0.05 μg kg(-1) of silver nanoparticles and 0.03 μg kg(-1) of ionic silver. Nanoparticles of varied sizes (10-110 nm) with different surface coating, including citrate acid, lipoic acid, polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were successfully analyzed. Particularly good recoveries (>93%) were obtained for both ionic silver and silver nanoparticle in the presence of excess amount of BSA. The method was further tested with six commercially available dietary supplements which varied in concentration and matrix components. The summed values of silver ions and silver nanoparticles correlated well with the total silver concentration determined by ICPMS after acid digestion. This method can serve as an alternative to cloud point extraction technique when the extraction efficiency for protein coated nanoparticles is low.

  9. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry as an alternative to cloud point extraction based methods for rapid quantification of silver ions and surface coated silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Linder, Sean W.

    2016-01-01

    Speciation and accurate quantification of ionic silver and metallic silver nanoparticles are critical to investigate silver toxicity and to determine the shelf-life of products that contain nano silver under various storage conditions. We developed a rapid method for quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The addition of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (tiopronin) to the background electrolyte was used to facilitate the chromatographic separation of ionic silver and maintain the oxidation state of silver. The obtained limits of detection were 0.05 μg kg−1 of silver nanoparticles and 0.03 μg kg−1 of ionic silver. Nanoparticles of varied sizes (10–110 nm) with different surface coating, including citrate acid, lipoic acid, polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were successfully analyzed. Particularly good recoveries (>93%) were obtained for both ionic silver and silver nanoparticle in the presence of excess amount of BSA. The method was further tested with six commercially available dietary supplements which varied in concentration and matrix components. The summed values of silver ions and silver nanoparticles correlated well with the total silver concentration determined by ICPMS after acid digestion. This method can serve as an alternative to cloud point extraction technique when the extraction efficiency for protein coated nanoparticles is low. PMID:26724893

  10. Capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry as an alternative to cloud point extraction based methods for rapid quantification of silver ions and surface coated silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Qu, Haiou; Mudalige, Thilak K; Linder, Sean W

    2016-01-15

    Speciation and accurate quantification of ionic silver and metallic silver nanoparticles are critical to investigate silver toxicity and to determine the shelf-life of products that contain nano silver under various storage conditions. We developed a rapid method for quantification of silver ions and silver nanoparticles using capillary electrophoresis (CE) interfaced with inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The addition of 2-mercaptopropionylglycine (tiopronin) to the background electrolyte was used to facilitate the chromatographic separation of ionic silver and maintain the oxidation state of silver. The obtained limits of detection were 0.05 μg kg(-1) of silver nanoparticles and 0.03 μg kg(-1) of ionic silver. Nanoparticles of varied sizes (10-110 nm) with different surface coating, including citrate acid, lipoic acid, polyvinylpyrrolidone and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were successfully analyzed. Particularly good recoveries (>93%) were obtained for both ionic silver and silver nanoparticle in the presence of excess amount of BSA. The method was further tested with six commercially available dietary supplements which varied in concentration and matrix components. The summed values of silver ions and silver nanoparticles correlated well with the total silver concentration determined by ICPMS after acid digestion. This method can serve as an alternative to cloud point extraction technique when the extraction efficiency for protein coated nanoparticles is low. PMID:26724893

  11. Coupling of surface temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations during the Palaeozoic era.

    PubMed

    Came, Rosemarie E; Eiler, John M; Veizer, Ján; Azmy, Karem; Brand, Uwe; Weidman, Christopher R

    2007-09-13

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations seem to have been several times modern levels during much of the Palaeozoic era (543-248 million years ago), but decreased during the Carboniferous period to concentrations similar to that of today. Given that carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas, it has been proposed that surface temperatures were significantly higher during the earlier portions of the Palaeozoic era. A reconstruction of tropical sea surface temperatures based on the delta18O of carbonate fossils indicates, however, that the magnitude of temperature variability throughout this period was small, suggesting that global climate may be independent of variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Here we present estimates of sea surface temperatures that were obtained from fossil brachiopod and mollusc shells using the 'carbonate clumped isotope' method-an approach that, unlike the delta18O method, does not require independent estimates of the isotopic composition of the Palaeozoic ocean. Our results indicate that tropical sea surface temperatures were significantly higher than today during the Early Silurian period (443-423 Myr ago), when carbon dioxide concentrations are thought to have been relatively high, and were broadly similar to today during the Late Carboniferous period (314-300 Myr ago), when carbon dioxide concentrations are thought to have been similar to the present-day value. Our results are consistent with the proposal that increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations drive or amplify increased global temperatures.

  12. Coupled Iron-Phosphorus Cycling in Surface Seawater Mediated by Photoreduction of Fe-rich Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Ruttenberg, K. C.

    2002-12-01

    Nutrient concentrations are exceedingly low in the oligotrophic waters of the open ocean. One source of the micronutrient iron (Fe) to these regions is deposition of continentally-derived dust. Photolytic reduction of Fe is believed to be a key process in rendering bioavailable the Fe present in dust particles delivered to surface seawater. Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides, in general, have a strong affinity for sorption of phosphate, and Fe-oxyhydroxides present in dust derived from continental soils can be highly enriched in phosphate. Therefore, solubilization of Fe(III) phases via photoreduction may liberate phosphate to surface seawater. Because biological productivity in oligotrophic regions of the open ocean can be limited by phosphate as well as by iron, this process could be an important avenue for providing two essential, limiting nutrients to support primary productivity in these regions. Alternatively, if Fe-rich dust delivered to surface waters has unsaturated surface sorption sites, dust may actively scavenge phosphate from surface waters, pushing the system further toward phosphate limitation. Depending upon the balance between these two processes, continentally derived dust may either partially alleviate or enhance phosphate limitation in oligotrophic waters. We will present results of experiments designed to determine whether phosphate-containing Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides, subjected to photoreduction, release phosphate to seawater. In a series of incubation experiments, synthetic iron minerals (ferrihydrite, goethite) and natural dust samples (Saharan dust, Chinese loess) are suspended in artificial seawater and exposed to sunlight in the presence/absence of citrate. We observe an increase in both dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(Total) during daylight hours, which we attribute to the photoreduction process. Fe concentrations are at least 5 times higher in the presence of citrate, consistent with other studies exploring the effect of organic ligands on the Fe

  13. Pattern Selection in Plants: Coupling Chemical Dynamics to Surface Growth in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, David M.; Harrison, Lionel G.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims A study is made by computation of the interplay between the pattern formation of growth catalysts on a plant surface and the expansion of the surface to generate organismal shape. Consideration is made of the localization of morphogenetically active regions, and the occurrence within them of symmetry-breaking processes such as branching from an initially dome-shaped tip or meristem. Representation of a changing and growing three-dimensional shape is necessary, as two-dimensional work cannot distinguish, for example, formation of an annulus from dichotomous branching. Methods For the formation of patterns of chemical concentrations, the Brusselator reaction-diffusion model is used, applied on a hemispherical shell and generating patterns that initiate as surface spherical harmonics. The initial shape is hemispherical, represented as a mesh of triangles. These are combined into finite elements, each made up of all the triangles surrounding each node. Chemical pattern is converted into shape change by moving nodes outwards according to the concentration of growth catalyst at each, to relieve misfits caused by area increase of the finite element. New triangles are added to restore the refinement of the mesh in rapidly growing regions. Key Results The postulated mechanism successfully generates: tip growth (or stalk extension by an apical meristem) to ten times original hemisphere height; tip flattening and resumption of apical advance; and dichotomous branching and higher-order branching to make whorled structures. Control of the branching plane in successive dichotomous branchings is tackled with partial success and clarification of the issues. Conclusions The representation of a growing plant surface in computations by an expanding mesh that has no artefacts constraining changes of shape and symmetry has been achieved. It is shown that one type of pattern-forming mechanism, Turing-type reaction-diffusion, acting within a surface to pattern a

  14. On-Demand Coupling of Electrically Generated Excitons with Surface Plasmons via Voltage-Controlled Emission Zone Position

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The ability to confine and manipulate light below the diffraction limit is a major goal of future multifunctional optoelectronic/plasmonic systems. Here, we demonstrate the design and realization of a tunable and localized electrical source of excitons coupled to surface plasmons based on a polymer light-emitting field-effect transistor (LEFET). Gold nanorods that are integrated into the channel support localized surface plasmons and serve as nanoantennas for enhanced electroluminescence. By precise spatial control of the near-infrared emission zone in the LEFET via the applied voltages the near-field coupling between electrically generated excitons and the nanorods can be turned on or off as visualized by a change of electroluminescence intensity. Numerical calculations and spectroscopic measurements corroborate significant local electroluminescence enhancement due to the high local density of photonic states in the vicinity of the gold nanorods. Importantly, the integration of plasmonic nanostructures hardly influences the electrical performance of the LEFETs, thus, highlighting their mutual compatibility in novel active plasmonic devices. PMID:26878028

  15. Incorporating 3-D Subsurface Hydrologic Processes within the Community Land Surface Model (CLM): Coupling PFLOTRAN and CLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Mills, R. T.; Hoffman, F. M.; Thornton, P. E.; Lichtner, P. C.; Hammond, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown a positive soil moisture-rainfall feedback through observational data, as well as, modeling studies. Spatial variability of topography, soils, and vegetation play a significant role in determining the response of land surface states (soil moisture) and fluxes (runoff, evapotranspirtiaon); but their explicit accounting within Land Surface Models (LSMs) is computa- tionally expensive. Additionally, anthropogenic climate change is altering the hydrologic cycle at global and regional scales. Characterizing the sensitivity of groundwater recharge is critical for understanding the effects of climate change on water resources. In order to explicitly represent lateral redistribution of soil moisture and unified treatment of the unsaturated-saturated zone in the subsurface within the CLM, we propose coupling PFLOTRAN and CLM. PFLOTRAN is a parallel multiphase-multicomponent subsurface reactive flow and transport code for modeling subsurface processes and has been devel- oped under a DOE SciDAC-2 project. PFLOTRAN is written in Fortran 90 using a modular, object-oriented approach. PFLOTRAN utilizes fully implicit time-stepping and is built on top of the Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc). The PFLOTRAN model is capable of simulating fluid flow through porous media with fluid phases of air, water, and supercritical CO2. PFLOTRAN has been successfully employed on up to 131,072 cores on Jaguar, the massively parallel Cray XT4/XT5 at ORNL, for problems composed of up to 2 billion degrees of freedom. In this work, we will present a strategy of coupling the two models, CLM and PFLOTRAN, along with a few preliminary results obtained from the coupled model.

  16. Scratching beneath the surface while coupling atmosphere, ocean and waves: Analysis of a dense water formation event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniel, Sandro; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bonaldo, Davide; Falcieri, Francesco M.; Miglietta, Mario Marcello; Ricchi, Antonio; Sclavo, Mauro

    2016-05-01

    Cold Air Outbreaks (CAOs) over shallow seas may lead to dense water formation episodes, enhancing water, heat, nutrient and sediment exchanges across the continental margin, with associated seabed reshaping. During winter 2012, a CAO episode characterised by exceptional intensity stroke the northern Adriatic Sea, one of the most effective cool engines driving the Mediterranean circulation, providing a paramount opportunity for an integrated investigation of dense shelf water dynamics. In the present study, we describe this event using a fully coupled modeling approach exploring the effects of mutual interactions among atmosphere, ocean currents and sea surface waves, usually not completely accounted for, in the resulting dense water formation. Whilst atmospheric fields appear to be marginally affected by coupled dynamics in the present case, implications for sea surface elevation and circulation are far from negligible. Measurements collected in the northern Adriatic Sea showed that a physically consistent description of energy exchanges between ocean and atmosphere provides an improved estimate of heat fluxes and of air and sea temperatures. In addition, the explicit inclusion of wave action within the modeling system further enhances the modulation of air-sea exchanges and the propagation of its effect along the water column, resulting in a different intensity of northern Adriatic gyres and in different water fluxes flowing through the formation basin. Through these main controls on the water volume involved in the densification process and on the intensity of momentum input and cooling, a coupled modeling strategy accounting for atmosphere-waves-currents interactions can turn out to be crucial for improving the quantification of thermohaline properties and energy content, newly formed dense water mass, and provide a better description of its migration pathways and rates of off-shelf descent.

  17. Synthesis of nano-hydroxyapatite and its rapid mediated surface functionalization by silane coupling agent.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Sarish; Khan, Kishwar; Mujahid, Mohammad; Nosheen, Shaneela

    2016-01-01

    In this work, hydroxyapatite (HA) nanorods were synthesized by simple one step wet precipitation method followed by their rapid surface functionalization via aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) to give modified (HA-APTS) product. Functionalized hydroxyapatite (HA-APTS) holds amino groups on their surface that can be further functionalized with other bioactive molecules. The extent of functionalization of HA was studied under three different processing conditions; at room temperature, at 80 °C and under microwave condition (600 W). Three different temperatures have been use for the purpose of comparison between the functionalized products so that we can judge that whether there is any effect of temperature on the final products. In the last we conclude that temperature has no effect. So microwave condition is best to carried out the functionalization in just 5 min. PMID:26478359

  18. Coupled heat and vapor transport: The thermostat effect of a freely evaporating land surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Schepers, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Analytical solutions of the 2-D heat and vapor transport equations for a surface moisture jump are often based on a constant streamwise temperature (Tws) assumption over the wet vegetated surface. By analyzing 90 thermal infrared images taken over center-pivot irrigated areas in Nebraska, it has been demonstrated for the first time that such an assumption is realistic. Average temperature difference between the perimeter and core of the irrigated full or half circles stayed between -0.11 and 0.09°C (standard deviation of 0.25-0.41°C). It was further demonstrated that wet-bulb temperatures (a proxy of Tws) remain near constant during drying of the environment when net radiation and wind conditions stay largely unchanged, enabling estimation of Tws at any stage of drying, thus improving evaporation estimates of the Priestley-Taylor equation in arid and semiarid environments.

  19. Equilibrium long-ranged charge correlations at the surface of a conductor coupled to electromagnetic radiation.

    PubMed

    Samaj, Ladislav; Jancovici, Bernard

    2008-11-01

    This study is related to the fluctuation theory of electromagnetic fields, charges, and currents. The three-dimensional system under consideration is a semi-infinite conductor, modeled by the jellium, in vacuum. In previous theoretical studies it was found that the correlation functions of the surface charge density on the conductor decay as the inverse cube of the distance at asymptotically large distances. The prefactor to this asymptotic decay was obtained in the classical limit and in the quantum case without retardation effects. To describe the retarded regime, we study a more general problem of the semi-infinite jellium in thermal equilibrium with the radiated electromagnetic field. By using Rytov's fluctuational electrodynamics we show that, for both static and time-dependent surface charge correlation functions, the inclusion of retardation effects causes the quantum prefactor to take its universal static classical form, for any temperature.

  20. Enhancing surface plasmon polariton propagation lengths via coupling to asymmetric waveguide structures.

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J. M.; Gray, S. K.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2008-03-01

    We determine and analyze the properties of regenerated surface plasmon polaritons (R-SPPs) in an asymmetric waveguide structure [T.-W. Lee and S. K. Gray, Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 141105 (2005)]. Both finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations and frequency-domain modal analysis are employed. The FDTD results, which explicitly include excitation via attenuated total reflection, show an oscillatory dependence of the R-SPP propagation length L{sub x} as a function of core layer thickness d, with maxima corresponding to 30-fold propagation enhancements. For fixed incident light wavelength and angle, a variety of thicknesses can therefore be used to excite very long propagating SPPs. Modal analysis shows that the oscillations are due to tuning d through the opening of new transverse magnetic waveguide modes. In addition to increased propagation lengths, surface confinement is not significantly deteriorated and large intensity enhancements in the propagation region can also be achieved.

  1. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  2. An ultrafast nanotip electron gun triggered by grating-coupled surface plasmons

    SciTech Connect

    Schröder, Benjamin; Sivis, Murat; Bormann, Reiner; Schäfer, Sascha; Ropers, Claus

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate multiphoton photoelectron emission from gold nanotips induced by nanofocusing surface plasmons, resonantly excited on the tip shaft by a grating coupler. The tip is integrated into an electron gun assembly, which facilitates control over the spatial emission sites and allows us to disentangle direct grating emission from plasmon-triggered apex emission. The nanoscale source size of this electron gun concept enables highly coherent electron pulses with applications in ultrafast electron imaging and diffraction.

  3. Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

    2004-03-29

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration is being considered as a way to offset fossil-fuel-related CO{sub 2} emissions to reduce the rate of increase of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The accumulation of vast quantities of injected carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic sequestration sites may entail health and environmental risks from potential leakage and seepage of CO{sub 2} into the near-surface environment. We are developing and applying a coupled subsurface and atmospheric surface-layer modeling capability built within the framework of the integral finite difference reservoir simulator TOUGH2. The overall purpose of modeling studies is to predict CO{sub 2} concentration distributions under a variety of seepage scenarios and geologic, hydrologic, and atmospheric conditions. These concentration distributions will provide the basis for determining above-ground and near-surface instrumentation needs for carbon sequestration monitoring and verification, as well as for assessing health, safety, and environmental risks. A key feature of CO{sub 2} is its large density ({rho} = 1.8 kg m{sup -3}) relative to air ({rho} = 1.2 kg m{sup -3}), a property that may allow small leaks to cause concentrations in air above the occupational exposure limit of 4 percent in low-lying and enclosed areas such as valleys and basements where dilution rates are low. The approach we take to coupled modeling involves development of T2CA, a TOUGH2 module for modeling the multicomponent transport of water, brine, CO{sub 2}, gas tracer, and air in the subsurface. For the atmospheric surface-layer advection and dispersion, we use a logarithmic vertical velocity profile to specify constant time-averaged ambient winds, and atmospheric dispersion approaches to model mixing due to eddies and turbulence. Initial simulations with the coupled model suggest that atmospheric dispersion quickly dilutes diffuse CO{sub 2} seepage fluxes to negligible concentrations, and that rainfall

  4. Surface Dependent Electron and Negative Ion Density in Inductively Coupled Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Hamilton, T.W.; Hebner, G.A.; Jarecki, R.L.; Nichols, C.A.

    1999-01-18

    Electron and negative ion density have been measured in a modfied Applied Materials DPS metal etch chamber using gas mixtures of BCl{sub 3}, Cl{sub 2} and Ar. Measurements were performed for four dflerent substrate types to examine the influence of surface material on the bulk plasma properties; aluminurq alumina, photoresist and 50 percent patterned aluminum / photoresist. Electron densities in the Cl{sub 2} / BCl{sub 3} mixtures varied from 0.25 to 4 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}. Photodetachment measurements of the negative ion density indicate that the negative ion density was smaller than the electron density and that the electron to negative ion density ratio varied between 1 and 6. The presence of photoresist had a dominant intluence on the electron and negative ion density compared to alumina and aluminum surfaces. In most cases, the electron density above wafers covered with photoresist was a factor of two lower while the negative ion density was a factor of two higher than the aluminum or alumina surfaces.

  5. Coupling between diffusion and orientation of pentacene molecules on an organic surface.

    PubMed

    Rotter, Paul; Lechner, Barbara A J; Morherr, Antonia; Chisnall, David M; Ward, David J; Jardine, Andrew P; Ellis, John; Allison, William; Eckhardt, Bruno; Witte, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The realization of efficient organic electronic devices requires the controlled preparation of molecular thin films and heterostructures. As top-down structuring methods such as lithography cannot be applied to van der Waals bound materials, surface diffusion becomes a structure-determining factor that requires microscopic understanding. Scanning probe techniques provide atomic resolution, but are limited to observations of slow movements, and therefore constrained to low temperatures. In contrast, the helium-3 spin-echo (HeSE) technique achieves spatial and time resolution on the nm and ps scale, respectively, thus enabling measurements at elevated temperatures. Here we use HeSE to unveil the intricate motion of pentacene admolecules diffusing on a chemisorbed monolayer of pentacene on Cu(110) that serves as a stable, well-ordered organic model surface. We find that pentacene moves along rails parallel and perpendicular to the surface molecules. The experimental data are explained by admolecule rotation that enables a switching between diffusion directions, which extends our molecular level understanding of diffusion in complex organic systems.

  6. Coupling between diffusion and orientation of pentacene molecules on an organic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, Paul; Lechner, Barbara A. J.; Morherr, Antonia; Chisnall, David M.; Ward, David J.; Jardine, Andrew P.; Ellis, John; Allison, William; Eckhardt, Bruno; Witte, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The realization of efficient organic electronic devices requires the controlled preparation of molecular thin films and heterostructures. As top-down structuring methods such as lithography cannot be applied to van der Waals bound materials, surface diffusion becomes a structure-determining factor that requires microscopic understanding. Scanning probe techniques provide atomic resolution, but are limited to observations of slow movements, and therefore constrained to low temperatures. In contrast, the helium-3 spin-echo (HeSE) technique achieves spatial and time resolution on the nm and ps scale, respectively, thus enabling measurements at elevated temperatures. Here we use HeSE to unveil the intricate motion of pentacene admolecules diffusing on a chemisorbed monolayer of pentacene on Cu(110) that serves as a stable, well-ordered organic model surface. We find that pentacene moves along rails parallel and perpendicular to the surface molecules. The experimental data are explained by admolecule rotation that enables a switching between diffusion directions, which extends our molecular level understanding of diffusion in complex organic systems.

  7. Sea Surface Temperature Coupling to Madden-Julian Oscillations over the Indonesian Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, A. M.; Gordon, A. L.; Pujiana, K.

    2014-12-01

    The intraseasonal SST characteristics within the Indonesian Seas and their responses to the Madden-Julian Oscillations [MJO] are examined through analyses of observed and reanalysis datasets. Intraseasonal variation accounts for about 30% of SST variability, with the strongest signature is observed in Banda and Timor seas. The MJO signature in SST is evident in the form of energy peak at 35-45 days, amplification during the Northwest Monsoon (boreal winter), and eastward propagation. SST responds to sea-air heat flux associated with MJO with net heat flux into the ocean (atmosphere) characterizing the suppressed (active) phase of MJO. The influence of MJO on Banda Sea SST is greatest during La Niña periods, which are favorable for deeper thermocline conditions, which diminish the role of ocean processes driving vertical heat transfer between subsurface and surface layers. Diminished influence of ocean processes results in dominance of surface heat fluxes associated with MJO in governing intraseasonal SST variability. During El Niño, the role of ocean processes is favorable to mediate heat transfer between lower and upper layer of the ocean surface as thermocline is shallower. The ocean component heat fluxes then compete with MJO forced heat fluxes in governing SST variability as indicated by less pronounced eastward propagation.

  8. Kinetics of surface dissolution: A coupled thermodynamics-climatic approach for Titan and the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornet, Thomas; Cordier, Daniel; Le Bahers, Tangui; Bourgeois, Olivier; Fleurant, Cyril; Le Mouélic, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    Titan, Saturn's major icy moon, like the Earth, possesses large bodies of present liquids on its surface under the form of seas, lakes and rivers, and likely of past liquids in currently empty topographic depressions. Titan's seas and lacustrine depressions strongly differ in shape, which likely suggests a difference in terms of geological formation processes. On the one hand, the seas have dendritic contours, are several hundreds of kilometers in width, and seem to develop in areas with significant reliefs and fluvial networks. On the other hand, lacustrine depressions, be they filled currently or not, are typically isolated, have rounded or lobate contours and seem to grow by coalescence. Their sizes vary from a few kilometers to a few tens of kilometers in diameter, and they seem to develop in relatively flat areas without visible connection with fluvial networks. The depths of the seas and lacustrine depressions have been evaluated to several hundreds of meters for the seas (recent estimates from the Cassini RADAR altimeter echoes analysis over Ligeia Mare indicates a depth of about 170 m), when they are a few hundred/tens of meters for the lacustrine depressions. Given the above morphological settings, several formation mechanisms have been proposed for Titan's lacustrine depressions, the most likely one being associated with the dissolution of the surface, such as what is seen in karstic or karsto-evaporitic areas on Earth. However, due to Titan's surface physical properties (T=90-95 K) and composition, the materials that would be involved in such dissolution processes are exotic. In karstic terrains on Earth, the solvent is water and the solutes are rock minerals (e.g., calcite, dolomite, gypsum, anhydrite and halite). On Titan, the solvent is mainly composed of liquid hydrocarbons (methane and/or ethane) and the solutes are probably made of solid hydrocarbons (acetylene, benzene, butane,...), nitriles (hydrogen cyanide, cyanogen,...), tholins and ices

  9. [Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopic Studies on the Coupling Effect of Multilayer Au@SiO2 Film].

    PubMed

    Hu, Di-jun; Zhang, Xue-jiao; Xu, Min-min; Yao, Jian-lin; Gu, Ren-ao

    2015-05-01

    The SiO2 shell with the thickness of 4 nm was attached onto high surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) active Au core nanoparticles to obtain Au@SiO2 core shell nanoparticles by the hydrolysis of sodium silicate solution with the boiling water bath. The inert shell of SiO2 isolated the direct interaction of Au nanoparticles and probe molecules. The stable, compact and uniform monolayer nanoparticles film was self assembled at water/oil interface, and one to six monolayers film was transferred to Si wafer as SERS substrates through layer by layer technique. The relationship between the SERS activities and layers of the monolayer nanoparticles film on Si surface was investigated. The SERS mapping was developed to determine the layers of the Au@SiO2 film. The coupling effect among the Au@SiO2 films was explored by changing the adsorption location of the probe on the multilayer films. The result revealed that the monolayer film was a favourable candidate with high-quality performances for the SERS application. The SERS signal was distributed on the surface with high uniformity at the same monolayer film, and it was enhanced in the intensity with the increase in film layers. It reached the maximun intensity as the film was over five layers. It indicated that the SERS signal was contributed mainly by the first five monolayers. The probe molecules were immobilized onto the first monolayer nanoparticles film, and the SERS signal from the probe approached to the maximum as the second monolayer covered the probe modified first nanoparticles film. It was dominated by the coupling effect ("hot spots") of the adjacent layers. The SERS signal decreased in intensity when the third layer was transferred onto the second layer, and it disappeared after the fouth layer was covered, mainly duo to the shield of the nanoparticles film to the incident laser and Raman signal. The preliminary results provided guidance for fabricating optimal SERS substrates. PMID:26415440

  10. Quantifying variable erosion rates to understand the coupling of surface processes in the Teton Range, Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranel, Lisa M.; Spotila, James A.; Binnie, Steven A.; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.

    2015-01-01

    Short-term geomorphic processes (fluvial, glacial, and hillslope erosion) and long-term exhumation control transient alpine landscapes. Long-term measurements of exhumation are not sufficient to capture the processes driving transient responses associated with short-term climatic oscillations, because of high variability of individual processes across space and time. This study compares the efficacy of different erosional agents to assess the importance of variability in tectonically active landscapes responding to fluctuations in Quaternary climate. We focus on the Teton Range, where erosional mechanisms include hillslope, glacial, and fluvial processes. Erosion rates were quantified using sediment accumulation and cosmogenic dating (bedrock and stream sediments). Results show that rates of erosion are highly variable, with average short-term rockfall rates (0.8 mm/y) occurring faster than either apparent basin-averaged (0.2 mm/y) and long-term ridge erosion rates (0.02 mm/y). Examining erosion rates separately also demonstrates the coupling between glacial, fluvial, and hillslope processes. Apparent basin-averaged erosion rates amalgamate valley wall and ridge erosion with stream and glacial rates. Climate oscillations drive the short-term response of a single erosional process (e.g., rockfalls or other mass wasting) that may enhance or limit the erosional efficiency of other processes (glacial or fluvial). While the Teton landscape may approach long-term equilibrium, stochastic processes and rapid response to short-term climate change actively perpetuate the transient ruggedness of the topography.

  11. Pore-Scale Process Coupling and Effective Surface Reaction Rates in Heterogeneous Subsurface Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chongxuan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Zachara, John M.

    2015-09-01

    This manuscript provides a review of pore-scale researches in literature including experimental and numerical approaches, and scale-dependent behavior of geochemical and biogeochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media. A mathematical equation that can be used to predict the scale-dependent behavior of geochemical reaction rates in heterogeneous porous media has been derived. The derived effective rate expression explicitly links the effective reaction rate constant to the intrinsic rate constant, and to the pore-scale variations in reactant concentrations in porous media. Molecular simulations to calculate the intrinsic rate constants were provided. A few examples of pore-scale simulations were used to demonstrate the application of the equation to calculate effective rate constants in heterogeneous materials. The results indicate that the deviation of effective rate constant from the intrinsic rate in heterogeneous porous media is caused by the pore-scale distributions of reactants and their correlation, which are affected by the pore-scale coupling of reactions and transport.

  12. Electroelastic coupling between membrane surface fluctuations and membrane-embedded charges: Continuum multidielectric treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Miloshevsky, Gennady V. Hassanein, Ahmed; Partenskii, Michael B. Jordan, Peter C.

    2010-06-21

    The coupling of electric fields and charges with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations affects membrane electroporation, ionic conductance, and voltage gating. A modified continuum model is introduced to study charge interaction with membrane-water interfacial fluctuations in multidielectric environments. By surrounding a point charge with a low dielectric sphere, the linear Poisson–Boltzmann equation is directly solved by calculating the reaction field potential via a method that eliminates singularity contributions. This allows treatment of charges located at dielectric boundaries. Two complementary mechanisms governing charge-fluctuation interactions are considered: (1) electroelastic deformation (EED), treating the membrane as an elastic slab (smectic bilayer model), and (2) electrohydrophobic solvation (EHS), accounting for water penetration into the membrane’s hydrophobic core. EED often leads to large membrane thickness perturbations, far larger than those consistent with elastic model descriptions [M. B. Partenskii, G. V. Miloshevsky, and P. C. Jordan, Isr. J. Chem. 47, 385 (2007)]. We argue that a switch from EED to EHS can be energetically advantageous at intermediate perturbation amplitudes. Both perturbation mechanisms are simulated by introducing adjustable shapes optimized by the kinetic Monte Carlo reaction path following approach [G. V. Miloshevsky and P. C. Jordan, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 214901 (2005)]. The resulting energy profiles agree with those of recent atomistic molecular dynamics studies on translating a charged residue across a lipid bilayer [S. Dorairaj and T. W. Allen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 4943 (2007)].

  13. Ultrasensitive detection of deltamethrin by immune magnetic nanoparticles separation coupled with surface plasmon resonance sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xia; Li, Lei; Liu, You-Qian; Shi, Xing-Bo; Li, Wen-Jin; Yang, Yang; Mao, Lu-Gang

    2014-09-15

    Small molecules or analytes present in trace level are difficult to be detected directly using conventional surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor, due to its small changes in the refractive index induced by the binding of these analytes on the sensor surface. In this paper, a new approach that combines SPR sensor technology with Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) assays is developed for directly detecting of deltamethrin in soybean. The Fe3O4 MNPs conjugated with antibodies specific to antigen serves as both labels for enhancing refractive index change due to the capture of target analyte, and "vehicles" for the rapid delivery of analyte from a sample solution to the sensor surface. Meanwhile, SPR direct detection format without Fe3O4 MNPs and gas chromatography (GC) analysis were conducted for detection of deltamethrin in soybean to demonstrate the amplification effect of Fe3O4 MNPs. A good linear relationship was obtained between SPR responses and deltamethrin concentrations over a range of 0.01-1 ng/mL with the lowest measurable concentration of 0.01 ng/mL. The results reveal that the detection sensitivity for deltamethrin was improved by 4 orders of magnitude compared with SPR direct detection format. The recovery of 95.5-119.8% was obtained in soybean. The excellent selectivity of the present biosensor is also confirmed by two kinds of pesticides (fenvalerate and atrazine) as controls. This magnetic separation and amplification strategy has great potential for detection of other small analytes in trace level concentration, with high selectivity and sensitivity by altering the target-analyte-capture agent labeled to the carboxyl-coated Fe3O4 MNPs.

  14. Validation of a Coupled Source Surface to MHD Model System at ACE and Ulysses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detman, T.; Fry, C. D.; Smith, Z.; Dryer, M.; Intriligator, D.

    2005-05-01

    The Potential Field Source Surface model [Wang and Sheeley, 1988] combined with the Current Sheet modification [Schatten, 1971] is now in routine operation at the NWS Space Environment Center of NOAA. We use the sequence of source surface current sheet (SSCS) maps so produced. We developed a set of relatively simple empirical relationships to translate the SSCS map parameters into time-dependent MHD model lower boundary conditions at 0.1 AU. This system provides the 3D time-dependent slowly evolving background solar wind conditions in the inner heliosphere. To this system we add shock initiation perturbations to the lower boundary condition based on observed solar flares, CMEs and Type II solar radio bursts. The necessary shock descriptive parameters are generated in near real-time from these data. We compare simulated results with ACE solar wind observations. We have retrospectively adjusted the shock initiation parameters to maximize agreement with ACE observations, and extended the MHD model outer boundary to 10 AU. We will show results and comparisons of model results with Ulysses observations during the 2003 Halloween epoch. This work was partially funded by a NASA Living With a Star (LWS) TR&T grant through NOAA Work Order No.W-10,118 (ZS and TRD) and NASA Grant NAG-12527 (CDF and MD), by University Partnering for Operational Support program (UPOS) sponsored jointly by the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army (CDF and MD), and by Carmel Research Center (DI).

  15. Grating-coupled surface plasmon resonance gas sensing based on titania anatase nanoporous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazzola, Enrico; Cittadini, Michela; Brigo, Laura; Brusatin, Giovanna; Guglielmi, Massimo; Romanato, Filippo; Martucci, Alessandro

    2015-08-01

    Nanoporous TiO2 anatase film has been investigated as sensitive layer in Surface Plasmon Resonance sensors for the detection of hydrogen and Volatile Organic Compounds, specifically methanol and isopropanol. The sensors consist of a TiO2 nanoporous matrix deposited above a metallic plasmonic grating, which can support propagating Surface Plasmon Polaritons. The spectral position of the plasmonic resonance dip in the reflectance spectra was monitored and correlated to the interaction with the target gases. Reversible blue-shifts of the resonance frequency, up to more than 2 THz, were recorded in response to the exposure to 10000 ppm of H2 in N2 at 300°C. This shift cannot be explained by the mere refractive index variation due to the target gas filling the pores, that is negligible. Reversible red-shifts were instead recorded in response to the exposure to 3000 ppm of methanol or isopropanol at room temperature, of magnitudes up to 14 THz and 9 THz, respectively. In contrast, if the only sensing mechanism was the mere pores filling, the shifts should have been larger during the isopropanol detection. We therefore suggest that other mechanisms intervene in the analyte/matrix interaction, capable to produce an injection of electrons into the sensitive matrix, which in turn induces a decrease of the refractive index.

  16. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C.-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2008-05-15

    To better understand the role of groundwater-level changes on rock-slope deformation and damage, a carbonate rock slope (30 m x 30 m x 15 m) was extensively instrumented for mesoscale hydraulic and mechanical measurements during water-level changes. The slope is naturally drained by a spring that can be artificially closed or opened by a water gate. In this study, a 2-hour slope-dewatering experiment was analyzed. Changes in fluid pressure and deformation were simultaneously monitored, both at discontinuities and in the intact rock, using short-base extensometers and pressure gauges as well as tiltmeters fixed at the slope surface. Field data were analyzed with different coupled hydromechanical (HM) codes (ROCMAS, FLAC{sup 3D}, and UDEC). Field data indicate that in the faults, a 40 kPa pressure fall occurs in 2 minutes and induces a 0.5 to 31 x 10{sup -6} m normal closure. Pressure fall is slower in the bedding-planes, lasting 120 minutes with no normal deformation. No pressure change or deformation is observed in the intact rock. The slope surface displays a complex tilt towards the interior of the slope, with magnitudes ranging from 0.6 to 15 x 10{sup -6} rad. Close agreement with model for both slope surface and internal measurements is obtained when a high variability in slope-element properties is introduced into the models, with normal stiffnesses of k{sub n{_}faults} = 10{sup -3} x k{sub n{_}bedding-planes} and permeabilities of k{sub h{_}faults} = 10{sup 3} x k{sub h{_}bedding-planes}. A nonlinear correlation between hydraulic and mechanical discontinuity properties is proposed and related to discontinuity damage. A parametric study shows that 90% of slope deformation depends on HM effects in a few highly permeable and highly deformable discontinuities located in the basal, saturated part of the slope while the remaining 10% are related to elasto-plastic deformations in the low-permeability discontinuities induced by complex stress/strain transfers from

  17. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-07

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  18. Coupling of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions to transport in a fluid for heterogeneous catalytic reactor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, C.; Jansen, A. P. J.

    2013-02-01

    We have developed a method to couple kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of surface reactions at a molecular scale to transport equations at a macroscopic scale. This method is applicable to steady state reactors. We use a finite difference upwinding scheme and a gap-tooth scheme to efficiently use a limited amount of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. In general the stochastic kinetic Monte Carlo results do not obey mass conservation so that unphysical accumulation of mass could occur in the reactor. We have developed a method to perform mass balance corrections that is based on a stoichiometry matrix and a least-squares problem that is reduced to a non-singular set of linear equations that is applicable to any surface catalyzed reaction. The implementation of these methods is validated by comparing numerical results of a reactor simulation with a unimolecular reaction to an analytical solution. Furthermore, the method is applied to two reaction mechanisms. The first is the ZGB model for CO oxidation in which inevitable poisoning of the catalyst limits the performance of the reactor. The second is a model for the oxidation of NO on a Pt(111) surface, which becomes active due to lateral interaction at high coverages of oxygen. This reaction model is based on ab initio density functional theory calculations from literature.

  19. Determination of platinum surface contamination in veterinary and human oncology centres using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Janssens, T; Brouwers, E E M; de Vos, J P; de Vries, N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the surface contamination with platinum-containing antineoplastic drugs in veterinary and human oncology centres. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to measure platinum levels in surface samples. In veterinary and human oncology centres, 46.3 and 68.9% of the sampled surfaces demonstrated platinum contamination, respectively. Highest platinum levels were found in the preparation rooms (44.6 pg cm(-2)) in veterinary centres, while maximal levels in human centres were found in oncology patient-only toilets (725 pg cm(-2)). Transference of platinum by workers outside areas where antineoplastic drugs were handled was observed in veterinary and human oncology centres. In conclusion, only low levels of platinum contamination attributable to carboplatin were found in the sampled veterinary oncology centres. However, dispersion of platinum outside areas where antineoplastic drugs were handled was detected in veterinary and human oncology centres. Consequently, not only personnel, but also others may be exposed to platinum.

  20. Vibration of bioliquid-filled microtubules embedded in cytoplasm including surface effects using modified couple stress theory.

    PubMed

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A; Abdollahian, M; Jalaei, M H

    2015-02-21

    This paper aims to investigate vibrational behavior of bioliquid-filled microtubules (MTs) embedded in cytoplasm considering surface effects. The interactions between the MT, considered as an orthotropic beam within the framework of Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) and Timoshenko beam (TB) models, and its surrounding elastic media are simulated by Pasternak foundation model. The modified couple stress theory (MCST) is applied so as to consider the small scale effects while motion equations are derived using energy method and Hamilto's principle for both EBB and TB models. Finally, an analytical method is employed to obtain the frequency of a bioliquid-filled MT, and therefore frequency-response curves are plotted to investigate the influences of small scale parameter, mass density of bioliquid, surface layer and surrounding elastic medium graphically. The results indicate that bioliquid and surface layers play a key role on the frequency of MTs and that the frequency of MTs is decreased with increasing of the mass density of the bioliquid. Vibration analysis of MTs is being considered as a vital problem since MTs look like the nervous system of the biological cells and transmit vibrational signals. It should be noted that the results of this work are hoped to be of use in advanced medical applications especially in the forthcoming use of MTs in transporters for bio-nanosensors.

  1. Dispersion characteristics of transverse surface waves in piezoelectric coupled solid media with hard metal interlayer.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zheng-Hua; Jin, Feng; Hirose, Sohichi

    2011-12-01

    The propagation of transverse surface waves in a piezoelectric layer/metal substrate system with one or multiple hard metal interlayer(s) is investigated analytically. The general dispersion equations for the existence of the waves are obtained in a simple mathematic form for class 6mm piezoelectric materials. The presence of a hard metal interlayer can not only get rid of the undesired mode appearing in the case without an interlayer but shorten the existence range of the phase velocity within which a nonleaky but dispersive mode exists. The effects of the hard interlayer on the phase velocity can be used to manipulate the behavior of the waves and has implications in acoustic wave devices.

  2. Deep GaN etching by inductively coupled plasma and induced surface defects

    SciTech Connect

    Ladroue, J.; Meritan, A.; Boufnichel, M.; Lefaucheux, P.; Ranson, P.; Dussart, R.

    2010-09-15

    GaN etching was studied in Cl{sub 2}/Ar plasmas as a function of process parameters. In addition, for a better understanding of the etching mechanisms, Langmuir probe measurements and optical emission spectroscopy were carried out. Etch rate was found to depend strongly on bias power. After optimization, an etch rate greater than 1000 nm/min was achieved. A second part of this work is dedicated to the etched surface defects. An original method to estimate GaN dislocation density and to localize nanopipes in the material is presented. Columnar defects could also appear with impurities in the etching reactor. The authors also present a possible formation mechanism of those columnar defects.

  3. Surface-enhanced Raman and optical scattering in coupled plasmonic nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Li-Lin; Hulse, John

    2013-08-01

    Optical excitation of small Au nanoparticle (NP) clusters of appropriate wavelength is known to generate intense electromagnetic fields localized uniquely at NP junction sites within the nanoclusters. These intense and localized field hot-sites can induce intense surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of molecules residing at the junction hot-sites. In this paper, we present a series of electromagnetic simulations, experimental SERS and extinction data obtained from small self-assembled Au NP clusters coated to saturation with a Raman reporter molecule. Our experimental data show that the SERS enhancement factor remains relatively constant despite the heterogeneity of the nanocluster and this is supported by the simulation results. Furthermore, our simulation results show significant variations in the localized electric field intensities of the junction hot-sites in different nanocluster geometries. This explains the observation that increasing the number of hot-sites does not necessarily result in a higher SERS enhancement factor.

  4. Development of a 3D Soil-Plant-Atmosphere Continuum (SPAC) coupled to a Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Riley, W. J.; Lorenzetti, D.; Tang, J.

    2015-12-01

    Exchange of water between the atmosphere and biosphere via evapotranspiration (ET) influences global hydrological, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. Isotopic analysis has shown that evapotranspiration over the continents is largely dominated by transpiration. Water is taken up from soil by plant roots, transported through the plant's vascular system, and evaporated from the leaves. Yet current Land Surface Models (LSMs) integrated into Earth System Models (ESMs) treat plant roots as passive components. These models distribute the ET sink vertically over the soil column, neglect the vertical pressure distribution along the plant vascular system, and assume that leaves can directly access water from any soil layer within the root zone. Numerous studies have suggested that increased warming due to climate change will lead drought and heat-induced tree mortality. A more mechanistic treatment of water dynamics in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum (SPAC) is essential for investigating the fate of ecosystems under a warmer climate. In this work, we describe a 3D SPAC model that can be coupled to a LSM. The SPAC model uses the variably saturated Richards equations to simulate water transport. The model uses individual governing equations and constitutive relationships for the various SPAC components (i.e., soil, root, and xylem). Finite volume spatial discretization and backward Euler temporal discretization is used to solve the SPAC model. The Portable, Extensible Toolkit for Scientific Computation (PETSc) is used to numerically integrate the discretized system of equations. Furthermore, PETSc's multi-physics coupling capability (DMComposite) is used to solve the tightly coupled system of equations of the SPAC model. Numerical results are presented for multiple test problems.

  5. Coupled carbon-nitrogen land surface modelling for UK agricultural landscapes using JULES and JULES-ECOSSE-FUN (JEF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comyn-Platt, Edward; Clark, Douglas; Blyth, Eleanor

    2016-04-01

    The UK is required to provide accurate estimates of the UK greenhouse gas (GHG; CO2, CH4 and N2O) emissions for the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change). Process based land surface models (LSMs), such as the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES), attempt to provide such estimates based on environmental (e.g. land use and soil type) and meteorological conditions. The standard release of JULES focusses on the water and carbon cycles, however, it has long been suggested that a coupled carbon-nitrogen scheme could enhance simulations. This is of particular importance when estimating agricultural emission inventories where the carbon cycle is effectively managed via the human application of nitrogen based fertilizers. JULES-ECOSSE-FUN (JEF) links JULES with the Estimation of Carbon in Organic Soils - Sequestration and Emission (ECOSSE) model and the Fixation and Uptake of Nitrogen (FUN) model as a means of simulating C:N coupling. This work presents simulations from the standard release of JULES and the most recent incarnation of the JEF coupled system at the point and field scale. Various configurations of JULES and JEF were calibrated and fine-tuned based on comparisons with observations from three UK field campaigns (Crichton, Harwood Forest and Brattleby) specifically chosen to represent the managed vegetation types that cover the UK. The campaigns included flux tower and chamber measurements of CO2, CH4 and N2O amongst other meteorological parameters and records of land management such as application of fertilizer and harvest date at the agricultural sites. Based on the results of these comparisons, JULES and/or JEF will be used to provide simulations on the regional and national scales in order to provide improved estimates of the total UK emission inventory.

  6. High performance AlScN thin film based surface acoustic wave devices with large electromechanical coupling coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wenbo; He, Xingli; Ye, Zhi E-mail: jl2@bolton.ac.uk; Wang, Xiaozhi; Mayrhofer, Patrick M.; Gillinger, Manuel; Bittner, Achim; Schmid, Ulrich

    2014-09-29

    AlN and AlScN thin films with 27% scandium (Sc) were synthesized by DC magnetron sputtering deposition and used to fabricate surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices. Compared with AlN-based devices, the AlScN SAW devices exhibit much better transmission properties. Scandium doping results in electromechanical coupling coefficient, K{sup 2}, in the range of 2.0% ∼ 2.2% for a wide normalized thickness range, more than a 300% increase compared to that of AlN-based SAW devices, thus demonstrating the potential applications of AlScN in high frequency resonators, sensors, and high efficiency energy harvesting devices. The coupling coefficients of the present AlScN based SAW devices are much higher than that of the theoretical calculation based on some assumptions for AlScN piezoelectric material properties, implying there is a need for in-depth investigations on the material properties of AlScN.

  7. Coupled-wave analysis for photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers on air holes with arbitrary sidewalls.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chao; Liang, Yong; Sakai, Kyosuke; Iwahashi, Seita; Noda, Susumu

    2011-11-21

    The coupled-wave theory (CWT) is extended to a photonic crystal structure with arbitrary sidewalls, and a simple, fast, and effective model for the quantitatively analysis of the radiative characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) photonic-crystal surface-emitting lasers (PC-SELs) has been developed. For illustrating complicated coupling effects accurately, sufficient numbers of waves are included in the formulation, by considering their vertical field profiles. The radiation of band-edge modes is analyzed for two in-plane air-hole geometries, in the case of two types of sidewalls: i.e. "tapered case" and "tilted case." The results of CWT analysis agree well with the results of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical simulation. From the analytical solutions of the CWT, the symmetry properties of the band-edge modes are investigated. In-plane asymmetry of the air holes is crucial for achieving high output power because it causes partial constructive interference. Asymmetric air holes and tilted sidewalls help in inducing in-plane asymmetries. By breaking the symmetries with respect to the two orthogonal symmetric axes of the band-edge modes, the two factors can be tuned independently, so that the radiation power is enhanced while preserving the mode selectivity performance. Finally, top-down reactive ion etching (RIE) approach is suggested for the fabrication of such a structure. PMID:22109495

  8. Magnetic immunoassay for cancer biomarker detection based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zhen; Wang, Chongwen; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Donggen; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-10-15

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Capture antibody-coated silver shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag MNPs) were utilized as the CEA enrichment platform and the SERRS signal amplification substrate. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were coated with a thin silver shell to be in resonance with the resonant Raman dye diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC) and the excitation wavelength at 785nm. The silver-coated AuNRs (Au@Ag NRs) were then modified with detection antibody as the SERRS tags. Sandwich immune complexes formed in the presence of the target biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and this formation induced the plasmonic coupling between the Au@Ag NRs and Fe3O4@Ag MNPs. The SERRS signal of DTTC molecules located in the coupled plasmonic nanostructures was significantly enhanced. As a result, the proposed SERRS sensor was able to detect CEA with a low limit of detection of 4.75fg/mL and a wide dynamic linear range from 10fg/mL to 100ng/mL. The sensor provides a novel SERRS strategy for trace analyte detection and has a potential for clinical applications. PMID:27149164

  9. Magnetic immunoassay for cancer biomarker detection based on surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering from coupled plasmonic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Rong, Zhen; Wang, Chongwen; Wang, Junfeng; Wang, Donggen; Xiao, Rui; Wang, Shengqi

    2016-10-15

    A surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) sensor was developed for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Capture antibody-coated silver shell magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@Ag MNPs) were utilized as the CEA enrichment platform and the SERRS signal amplification substrate. Gold nanorods (AuNRs) were coated with a thin silver shell to be in resonance with the resonant Raman dye diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTC) and the excitation wavelength at 785nm. The silver-coated AuNRs (Au@Ag NRs) were then modified with detection antibody as the SERRS tags. Sandwich immune complexes formed in the presence of the target biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and this formation induced the plasmonic coupling between the Au@Ag NRs and Fe3O4@Ag MNPs. The SERRS signal of DTTC molecules located in the coupled plasmonic nanostructures was significantly enhanced. As a result, the proposed SERRS sensor was able to detect CEA with a low limit of detection of 4.75fg/mL and a wide dynamic linear range from 10fg/mL to 100ng/mL. The sensor provides a novel SERRS strategy for trace analyte detection and has a potential for clinical applications.

  10. Coupled flow-structure-biochemistry simulations of dynamic systems of blood cells using an adaptive surface tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoskins, M. H.; Kunz, R. F.; Bistline, J. E.; Dong, C.

    2009-07-01

    A method for the computation of low-Reynolds number dynamic blood cell systems is presented. The specific system of interest here is interaction between cancer cells and white blood cells in an experimental flow system. Fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, six-degree-of-freedom motion control, and surface biochemistry analysis components are coupled in the context of adaptive octree-based grid generation. Analytical and numerical verification of the quasi-steady assumption for the fluid mechanics is presented. The capabilities of the technique are demonstrated by presenting several three-dimensional cell system simulations, including the collision/interaction between a cancer cell and an endothelium adherent polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) cell in a shear flow.

  11. Coupled Flow-Structure-Biochemistry Simulations of Dynamic Systems of Blood Cells Using an Adaptive Surface Tracking Method

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, M.H.; Kunz, R.F.; Bistline, J.E.; Dong, C.

    2009-01-01

    A method for the computation of low Reynolds number dynamic blood cell systems is presented. The specific system of interest here is interaction between cancer cells and white blood cells in an experimental flow system. Fluid dynamics, structural mechanics, six-degree-of freedom motion control and surface biochemistry analysis components are coupled in the context of adaptive octree-based grid generation. Analytical and numerical verification of the quasi-steady assumption for the fluid mechanics is presented. The capabilities of the technique are demonstrated by presenting several three-dimensional cell system simulations, including the collision/interaction between a cancer cell and an endothelium adherent polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) cell in a shear flow. PMID:20160939

  12. Giant photoluminescence enhancement in SiC nanocrystals by resonant semiconductor exciton-metal surface plasmon coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Dejian; Dong, Zhenggao; Fan, Jiyang

    2013-01-01

    We report giant fluorescence enhancement in SiC nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in a sodium dodecyl sulfonate dielectric medium by proximately contacted Ag nanoparticles. The enhancement in integrated fluorescence intensity reaches an astonishing 176-fold under 360 nm excitation (53.3-fold enhancement in emission maximum intensity). Finite-element simulation indicates that the strong resonant coupling between the excited SiC NCs and localized surface plasmons of the Ag nanoparticles plays a dominant role in determining fluorescence enhancement. In contrast, the absorption enhancement caused by light concentration around the Ag nanoparticles makes only a slight contribution to the overall enhancement. Our result opens the possibility of applications of these highly enhanced fluorescent SiC NCs in diverse areas such as sensing, optoelectronics and life sciences.

  13. Giant photoluminescence enhancement in SiC nanocrystals by resonant semiconductor exciton-metal surface plasmon coupling.

    PubMed

    Dai, Dejian; Dong, Zhenggao; Fan, Jiyang

    2013-01-18

    We report giant fluorescence enhancement in SiC nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in a sodium dodecyl sulfonate dielectric medium by proximately contacted Ag nanoparticles. The enhancement in integrated fluorescence intensity reaches an astonishing 176-fold under 360 nm excitation (53.3-fold enhancement in emission maximum intensity). Finite-element simulation indicates that the strong resonant coupling between the excited SiC NCs and localized surface plasmons of the Ag nanoparticles plays a dominant role in determining fluorescence enhancement. In contrast, the absorption enhancement caused by light concentration around the Ag nanoparticles makes only a slight contribution to the overall enhancement. Our result opens the possibility of applications of these highly enhanced fluorescent SiC NCs in diverse areas such as sensing, optoelectronics and life sciences. PMID:23238520

  14. A proposal and a theoretical analysis of an enhanced surface plasmon coupled emission structure for single molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Shiekh Zia; Tanvir, Mukhlasur Rahman; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman

    2016-05-01

    We propose a structure that can be used for enhanced single molecule detection using surface plasmon coupled emission (SPCE). In the proposed structure, instead of a single metal layer on the glass prism of a typical SPCE structure for fluorescence microscopy, a metal-dielectric-metal structure is used. We theoretically show that the proposed structure significantly decreases the excitation volume of the fluorescently labeled sample, and simultaneously increases the peak SPCE intensity and SPCE power. Therefore, the signal-to-noise ratio and sensitivity of an SPCE based fluorescence microscopy system can be significantly increased using the proposed structure, which will be helpful for enhanced single molecule detection, especially, in a less pure biological sample.

  15. Determination of a localized surface plasmon resonance mode of Cu7S4 nanodisks by plasmon coupling.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Sakamoto, M; Sato, R; Teranishi, T

    2015-01-01

    Plasmon properties such as peak position, extinction cross-section and local electric field intensity are strongly dependent on excited, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes. In non-spherical copper chalcogenide nanoparticles, assignment of the LSPR peaks to the corresponding oscillation modes has been controversial and requires experimental verification. We determined the in-plane LSPR mode of roxbyite Cu7S4 nanodisks from the plasmon coupling effect of nanodisks in solution. Compared with individual Cu7S4 nanodisks, self-assembled Cu7S4 nanodisk arrays in chloroform exhibited a blue-shifted LSPR peak with weaker optical density. This strongly suggests that the singular LSPR peak in the near-infrared region mainly originates from the in-plane oscillation mode. In addition, we demonstrate that the same LSPR peak can be readily tuned by controlling the number of disks in the array. PMID:25927080

  16. Enhanced near-field radiative heat transfer between a nanosphere and a hyperbolic metamaterial mediated by coupled surface phonon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Jiang, Yongyuan; Liu, Linhua

    2015-06-01

    We study the near-field radiative heat transfer between a silicon carbide (SiC) nanosphere and a SiC-SiO2 multi-layered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) by means of fluctuational electrodynamics. Results show that the absorbed mean power at the volume resonant frequency of the SiC nanosphere is one order of magnitude stronger than that of bulk SiC medium. This enhancement of near-field radiative heat transfer is mediated by the coupled surface phonon polaritons at the forbidden region of the Bloch mode. Moreover, the forbidden region of the Bloch mode is tuned by the geometry structure of the multi-layered HMM and overlapped with the volume resonant frequency of the SiC nanosphere, thus generating stronger absorption.

  17. Replicating the 1970s' Weddell Polynya using a coupled ocean-sea ice model with reanalysis surface flux fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, Woo Geun; Lee, Sang-Ki; Gordon, Arnold L.; Liu, Yanyun; Cho, Chang-Bong; Park, Jong Jin

    2015-07-01

    The 1970s' Weddell Polynya is simulated in the framework of a coupled ocean-sea ice model forced by reanalysis surface flux fields. A rapid emergence of strongly negative wind stress curl over the Weddell Sea intensifies the cyclonic Weddell gyre and thus causes the relatively warm and salty Weddell Deep Water (WDW) to upwell, generating an open-ocean polynya by melting sea ice or hindering its formation. Once the polynya occurs in the austral winter, the underlying water column is destabilized due to the combined effect of the high-salinity WDW, a massive cooling at the air-sea interface, and the ensuing brine rejection from newly forming ice, thus inducing open-ocean deep convection. Further analysis shows that the buildup of a large heat reservoir at depth by the mid-1970s was a necessary condition to establish the Weddell Polynya of the 1970s.

  18. Characterizing the free and surface-coupled vibrations of heated-tip atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killgore, Jason P.; Tung, Ryan C.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-08-01

    Combining heated-tip atomic force microscopy (HT-AFM) with quantitative methods for determining surface mechanical properties, such as contact resonance force microscopy, creates an avenue for nanoscale thermomechanical property characterization. For nanomechanical methods that employ an atomic force microscope cantilever’s vibrational modes, it is essential to understand how the vibrations of the U-shaped HT-AFM cantilever differ from those of a more traditional rectangular lever, for which analytical techniques are better developed. Here we show, with a combination of finite element analysis (FEA) and experiments, that the HT-AFM cantilever exhibits many more readily-excited vibrational modes over typical AFM frequencies compared to a rectangular cantilever. The arms of U-shaped HT-AFM cantilevers exhibit two distinct forms of flexural vibrations that differ depending on whether the two arms are vibrating in-phase or out-of-phase with one another. The in-phase vibrations are qualitatively similar to flexural vibrations in rectangular cantilevers and generally show larger sensitivity to surface stiffness changes than the out-of-phase vibrations. Vibration types can be identified from their frequency and by considering vibration amplitudes in the horizontal and vertical channels of the AFM at different laser spot positions on the cantilever. For identifying contact resonance vibrational modes, we also consider the sensitivity of the resonant frequencies to a change in applied force and hence to tip-sample contact stiffness. Finally, we assess how existing analytical models can be used to accurately predict contact stiffness from contact-resonance HT-AFM results. A simple two-parameter Euler-Bernoulli beam model provided good agreement with FEA for in-phase modes up to a contact stiffness 500 times the cantilever spring constant. By providing insight into cantilever vibrations and exploring the potential of current analysis techniques, our results lay the

  19. Speciation of gadolinium in surface water samples and plants by hydrophilic interaction chromatography hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Uwe; Lingott, Jana; Richter, Silke; Jakubowski, Norbert; Panne, Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was optimized for speciation analysis of gadolinium-based contrast agents in environmental samples, in particular surface river waters and plants. Surface water samples from the Teltow channel, near Berlin, were investigated over a distance of 5 km downstream from the influx of a wastewater treatment plant. The total concentration of gadolinium increased significantly from 50 to 990 ng L(-1) due to the influx of the contrast agents. After complete mixing with the river water, the concentration remained constant over a distance of at least 4 km. Two main substances [Dotarem(®) (Gd-DOTA) and Gadovist(®) (Gd-BT-DO3A)] have been identified in the river water using standards. A gadolinium-based contrast agent, possibly Gd-DOTA (Dotarem(®)), was also detected in water plant samples taken from the Teltow channel. Therefore, uptake of contrast agents [Gadovist(®) (Gd-BTDO3A), Magnevist(®) (Gd-DTPA), Omniscan(®) (Gd-DTPA-BMA), Dotarem(®) (Gd-DOTA), and Multihance(®) (Gd-BOPTA)] by plants was investigated in a model experiment using Lepidium sativum (cress plants). HILIC-ICP-MS was used for identification of different contrast agents, and a first approach for quantification using aqueous standard solutions was tested. For speciation analysis, all investigated contrast agents could be extracted from the plant tissues with a recovery of about 54 % for Multihance(®) (Gd-BOPTA) up to 106 % for Gadovist(®) (Gd-BT-DO3A). These experiments demonstrate that all contrast agents investigated are transported from the roots to the leaves where the highest content was measured.

  20. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Ganshin, A; Oda, T; Saito, M; Maksyutov, S; Valsala, V; Andres, Robert Joseph; Fischer, R; Lowry, D; Lukyanov, A; Matsueda, H; Nisbet, E; Rigby, M; Sawa, Y; Toumi, R; Tsuboi, K; Varlagin, A; Zhuravlev, R

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA), comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution), which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a) using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b) using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and highresolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to sources of

  1. Influence of Surface Material on the BCl Density in Inductively Coupled Discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Hamilton, T.W.; Hebner, G.A.

    1999-03-15

    The relative density of BCl radicals has been measured in a modified Applied Materials DPS metal etch chamber using laser-induced fluorescence. In plasmas containing mixtures of BCl{sub 3} with Cl{sub 2}, Ar and/or N{sub 2}, the relative BCl density was measured as a function of source and bias power, pressure, flow rate, BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} ratio and argon addition. To determine the influence of surface materials on the bulk plasma properties, the relative BCl density was measured using four different substrate types; aluminum, alumina, photoresist, and photoresist-patterned aluminum. In most cases, the relative BCl density was highest above photoresist-coated wafers and lowest above blanket aluminum wafers. The BCl density increased with increasing source power and the ratio of BCl{sub 3} to Cl{sub 2}, while the addition of N{sub 2} to a BCl{sub 3}/Cl{sub 2} plasma resulted in a decrease in BCl density. The BCl density was relatively insensitive to changes in the other plasma parameters.

  2. Evaluation of a fully coupled large-eddy simulation-land surface model and its diagnosis of land-atmosphere feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Margulis, Steven A.

    2010-06-01

    Daytime land-atmosphere interactions are the result of two-way coupled processes where the land states strongly affect the overlying atmospheric properties and vice versa. This study presents a numerical framework integrating a radiative parameterization, a large-eddy simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), and a force-restore land surface model to investigate these coupled processes and the impact of local-scale atmospheric feedbacks on surface fluxes and states. Using field measurements collected during the Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment 2002, a 12 h daytime diurnal cycle simulation is performed to evaluate the coupled model performance. The estimates of surface fluxes, near-surface micrometeorological air properties, surface temperature, and vertical profiles of boundary layer characteristics are compared to the measurements collected by meteorological towers, satellites, and radiosondes. Good agreement is obtained in comparisons between model outputs and observations at both footprint- and domain-averaged scales indicating that such a coupled model can reasonably represent the coupled land-ABL system. Using the verified model baseline, simulated results for cases with different degrees of coupling show that the estimates of surface fluxes and near-surface states are mainly dominated by the feedback of air temperature and wind speed, respectively. The feedback of each air property on surface fluxes and states for different vegetation cover can be either positive or negative, with the feedbacks via air temperature and wind speed playing opposite roles in the estimation of sensible heat flux. Thus, the total feedback of multiple air properties increases if all individual impacts are of the same sign; otherwise, the impacts partially cancel each other. Results indicate that the impact of ignoring atmospheric feedbacks (i.e., the local-scale spatial variability of near-surface air properties due to coupled interactions) results in a clear

  3. Investigation of surface-plasmon coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well with Ag nanostructures coated on GaN surface

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yi; Liu, Bin E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Zhang, Rong E-mail: rzhang@nju.edu.cn; Xie, Zili; Zhuang, Zhe; Dai, JiangPing; Tao, Tao; Zhi, Ting; Zhang, Guogang; Chen, Peng; Ren, Fangfang; Zhao, Hong; Zheng, Youdou

    2015-04-21

    Surface-plasmon (SP) coupled red light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structure is fabricated and investigated. The centre wavelength of 5-period InGaN/GaN MQW structure is about 620 nm. The intensity of photoluminescence (PL) for InGaN QW with naked Ag nano-structures (NS) is only slightly increased due to the oxidation of Ag NS as compared to that for the InGaN QW. However, InGaN QW with Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure can evidently enhance the emission efficiency due to the elimination of surface oxide layer of Ag NS. With increasing the laser excitation power, the PL intensity is enhanced by 25%–53% as compared to that for the SiO{sub 2} coating InGaN QW. The steady-state electric field distribution obtained by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method is different for both structures. The proportion of the field distributed in the Ag NS for the GaN/Ag NS/SiO{sub 2} structure is smaller as compared to that for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure. As a result, the energy loss of localized SP modes for the GaN/naked Ag NS structure will be larger due to the absorption of Ag layer.

  4. Surface wave effects on water temperature in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on water temperature distribution and heat exchange at regional scale (the Baltic Sea). Four scenarios—including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination these forcings—were simulated to test the impact of different terms on simulated temperature distribution. The scenario simulations were compared to a control simulation, which included a constant wave-breaking coefficient, but otherwise was without any wave effects. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwelling's. Overall, when all three wave effects were accounted for, did the estimates of temperature improve compared to control simulation. During the summer, the wave-induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea, a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations in summer months. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data, e.g. the control simulation was too cold compared to measurements. The warming is related to sea-state dependent energy flux. This implies that a spatio-temporally varying wave-breaking coefficient is necessary, because it depends on actual sea state. Wave-induced cooling is mostly observed in near-coastal areas and is the result of intensified upwelling in the scenario, when Stokes-Coriolis forcing is accounted for. Accounting for sea-state dependent momentum flux results in modified heat exchange at the water-air boundary which consequently leads to warming of surface water compared to control simulation.

  5. Particle and microorganism removal in floating plastic media coupled with microfiltration membrane for surface water treatment.

    PubMed

    Chiemchaisri, C; Chiemchaisri, W; Kornboonraksa, T; Dumrongsukit, C; Threedeach, S; Ngo, H H; Vigneswaran, S

    2005-01-01

    Floating plastic media followed by hollow fiber microfiltration membrane was applied for surface water treatment. The performance of the system in terms of particle and microorganisms was investigated. The floating filter was examined at different filtration rates of 5, 10 and 15 m3/m2 x h. Treated water was then fed into a microfiltration unit where different filtration rates were examined at 0.6, 1.0 and 1.4 m3/m2 x d. It was found that polyaluminum chloride was the best coagulant for the removal of particle, algae and coliform bacteria. Average turbidity in treated water from the floating plastic media filter was 3.3, 12.2 and 15.5 NTU for raw water of 80 NTU and 12.9, 11.7 and 31.2 NTU for raw water of 160 NTU after 6 hours at the filtration rates of 5, 10 and 15 m3/m2 x h, respectively. The microfiltration unit could further reduce the turbidity to 0.2-0.5 NTU with low transmembrane pressure development of 0.3-3.7 kPa. Microfiltration membrane could retain most of algae and coliform bacteria remaining in the effluent from the pretreatment unit. It was found that at higher turbidity, algae and coliform bacteria removal efficiencies were achieved at lower filtration rate of the system of 5 m3/m2 x h whereas a higher filtration rate of 15 m3/m2 x h yielded better coliphage removal.

  6. Assessing the hydrologic impacts of drainage systems in Iowa using a physically based, coupled surface water/groundwater model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, O.; Franz, K. J.; Simpkins, W. W.; Morrison, A.; Helmers, M. J.; Cruse, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent large magnitude floods in Iowa have created a need for better understanding of the impacts of artificial drainage, especially tile drainage, on streamflow hydrology. This study aims to characterize the field to watershed behavior of a typical drained system in Iowa as well as represent all flow partitioning mechanisms present in these landscapes. The quantification of spatial and temporal heterogeneous water fluxes will be addressed through the application of a physically based, coupled surface water/ groundwater model. HydroGeoSphere simultaneously solves the flow and transport equations in surface, tile drain and groundwater flow pathways and the exchange fluxes between these continua. The model includes 2D overland flow, 3D groundwater flow components combined with 1D tile flow. The study area is the South Fork watershed located in north-central Iowa. Approximately 80% of the watershed is tile drained and stream discharge is highly dominated by drain flow. While previous studies have mainly focused on the subsurface drainage, we target an expanded scope to include the alterations that have been made to the surface drainage network through stream channelization and construction of ditches. By including the assessment of surface intake impacts, flow capacity of the subsurface drainage conveyance systems, and intensity of infield drainage systems, we seek to explore a thorough understanding of the effects of artificial drainage on variations in volume, rate and frequency of surface and subsurface flows as a function of the spatial scale (ranging from field to watershed extent) under a range of climatic events. Furthermore, by examining pre- and post-alteration scenarios, we will describe how land use changes have altered the hydrologic behavior of South Fork watershed. In order to enhance calibration and validation of the model, (in addition to existing data) selected field monitoring is planned. Hydraulic head distributions and nested discharge data (tile

  7. Overland flow from plant patches: Coupled effects of preferential infiltration, surface roughness and depression storage at the semiarid Patagonian Monte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, María J.; Ares, Jorge O.

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to characterize and quantify the overland flow generated from the plant patch areas of spotted vegetation toward the immediate surrounding bare ground including the coupled effects of preferential infiltration, surface roughness and depression storage. To this aim a series of overland flow plot experiments were designed in areas of the Patagonian Monte where evidence of patch-to-soil overland flow was observed. The experiments produced data on the plot micro-topography and physical properties of the soil, root density and the frictional parameters of the overland flow as well as the extent of the areas of water depression storage. The obtained data were used to calibrate a spatial-explicit (CREST) hydrological model of the flows and pathways generated by stemflow and throughfall during characteristic storms in the area. Good agreement between the model estimates and the measured data was found. This work provides physically-based metrics of runoff redistribution from the plant patch areas toward the immediate surrounding bare soil areas, including the effect of plant roots and depression storage as influenced by various shapes of the plant patch slopes. It is concluded that water transport can result from stemflow and throughfall at the patch areas during typical rainfall events at the semiarid Patagonian Monte. Implications of this phenomenon in the surface distribution of water, nutrients and seeds may feasibly follow.

  8. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5more » eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.« less

  9. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥ 0.5 eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.

  10. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5 eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.

  11. Cold-Spraying Coupled to Nano-Pulsed Nd-YaG Laser Surface Pre-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoulis, D. K.; Guetta, S.; Irissou, E.; Guipont, V.; Berger, M. H.; Jeandin, M.; Legoux, J.-G.; Moreau, C.; Costil, S.; Boustie, M.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ogawa, K.

    2010-09-01

    The effect of Al2017 substrate pre-treatment using pulsed laser ablation on adhesion strength of cold-sprayed Al coating is examined. A high energy pulsed laser beam was coupled with a cold-spray gun to result in laser ablation of the substrate surface a few milliseconds prior to the deposition. The influence of the laser fluence and repetition rate on substrate surface morphology and physico-chemical properties are investigated. Coating-substrate interfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of thin foils which were prepared using focused ion beam (FIB). Adhesion strength was evaluated by means of finite element method (FEM) of LAser Shock Adhesion Tests (LASAT). The results are compared to samples prepared on as received substrate, and pre-treated by two conventional methods, namely polishing and grit-blasting. It is shown that the coating-substrate interface is significantly improved when pulsed laser ablation is performed at optimized parameters. No oxide layer was found at the coating-substrate interface on laser ablated sample while two oxide layers were found on the as-received sample indicating that particle impingement transformed the native alumina layer in an amorphous Al oxide phase. The observations allow concluding that bonding of cold spray Al particles on Al2017 substrate requires either the removal of the native oxide layer or its transformation in an amorphous Al oxide phase.

  12. Endothelial Cell-Surface Gp60 Activates Vesicle Formation and Trafficking via Gi-Coupled Src Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Minshall, Richard D.; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Vogel, Stephen M.; Niles, Walter D.; Gilchrist, Annette; Hamm, Heidi E.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the albumin-docking protein gp60, which is localized in caveolae, couples to the heterotrimeric GTP binding protein Gi, and thereby activates plasmalemmal vesicle formation and the directed migration of vesicles in endothelial cells (ECs). We used the water-soluble styryl pyridinium dye N-(3-triethylaminopropyl)-4-(p-dibutylaminostyryl) pyridinium dibromide (FM 1-43) to quantify vesicle trafficking by confocal and digital fluorescence microscopy. FM 1-43 and fluorescently labeled anti-gp60 antibody (Ab) were colocalized in endocytic vesicles within 5 min of gp60 activation. Vesicles migrated to the basolateral surface where they released FM 1-43, the fluid phase styryl probe. FM 1-43 fluorescence disappeared from the basolateral EC surface without the loss of anti-gp60 Ab fluorescence. Activation of cell-surface gp60 by cross-linking (using anti-gp60 Ab and secondary Ab) in EC grown on microporous filters increased transendothelial 125I-albumin permeability without altering liquid permeability (hydraulic conductivity), thus, indicating the dissociation of hydraulic conductivity from the albumin permeability pathway. The findings that the sterol-binding agent, filipin, prevented gp60-activated vesicle formation and that caveolin-1 and gp60 were colocalized in vesicles suggest the caveolar origin of endocytic vesicles. Pertussis toxin pretreatment and expression of the dominant negative construct encoding an 11–amino acid Gαi carboxyl-terminal peptide inhibited endothelial 125I-albumin endocytosis and vesicle formation induced by gp60 activation. Expression of dominant negative Src (dn-Src) and overexpression of wild-type caveolin-1 also prevented gp60-activated endocytosis. Caveolin-1 overexpression resulted in the sequestration of Gαi with the caveolin-1, whereas dn-Src inhibited Gαi binding to caveolin-1. Thus, vesicle formation induced by gp60 and migration of vesicles to the basolateral membrane requires the interaction of gp60

  13. Photoluminescence Mechanism of DNA-Templated Silver Nanoclusters: Coupling between Surface Plasmon and Emitter and Sensing of Lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaorong; Hu, Ruoxin; Gao, Zhidan; Shao, Na

    2015-06-01

    DNA-templated silver nanoclusters (DNA-AgNCs) have now been thrust into the limelight with their superior optical properties and potential biological applications. However, the origin of photoluminescence from DNA-AgNCs still remains unclear. In this work, DNA-AgNCs were synthesized and the photoluminescence properties as well as the biosensing applications of the designed DNA-AgNCs were investigated. The photoluminescence properties of the DNA-AgNCs were studied under three regions of excitation wavelength based on the UV-visible absorption spectra. It was deemed that the photoluminescence originated from coupling between the surface plasmon and the emitter in AgNCs when they were excited by visible light above 500 nm, and thus the emission wavelength varied with changing the excitation wavelength. The photoluminescence of the red-emitting-only AgNCs was the intrinsic fluorescence when excited from 200 to 400 nm, which was only related to the emitter; but for two components of blue- and red-emitting AgNCs, the emission wavelength varied with the excitation wavelength ranging from 300 to 360 nm, and the photoluminescence was a coupling between the surface plasmon and the emitter. The photoluminescence was only related to the surface plasmon when the AgNCs were excited from 400 to 500 nm. Four DNA probes were designed and each contained two parts: one part was the template used to synthesize AgNCs and it was same to all, and the other part was the lysozyme binding DNA (LBD) used to bind lysozyme and two kinds of LBD were studied. It was deemed that the difference in DNA bases, sequence, and secondary structure caused the synthesized DNA-AgNCs to be different in photoluminescence properties and sensing ability to lysozyme, and the sensing mechanism based on photoluminescence enhancement was also presented. This work explored the origin of photoluminescence and the sensing ability of DNA-AgNCs, and is hoped to make a better understanding of this kind of

  14. Defect detection in slab surface: a novel dual Charge-coupled Device imaging-based fuzzy connectedness strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liming; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Dengfu; Udupa, Jayaram K; Wang, Huiqian; Zeng, Yuebin

    2014-11-01

    To provide an accurate surface defects inspection system and make the automation of robust image segmentation method a reality in routine production line, a general approach is presented for continuous casting slab (CC-slab) surface defects extraction and delineation. The applicability of the system is not tied to CC-slab exclusively. We combined the line array CCD (Charge-coupled Device) traditional scanning imaging (LS-imaging) and area array CCD laser three-dimensional (3D) scanning imaging (AL-imaging) strategies in designing the system. Its aim is to suppress the respective imaging system's limitations. In the system, the images acquired from the two CCD sensors are carefully aligned in space and in time by maximum mutual information-based full-fledged registration schema. Subsequently, the image information is fused from these two subsystems such as the unbroken 2D information in LS-imaging and 3D depressed information in AL-imaging. Finally, on the basis of the established dual scanning imaging system the region of interest (ROI) localization by seed specification was designed, and the delineation for ROI by iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm was utilized to get a precise inspection result. Our method takes into account the complementary advantages in the two common machine vision (MV) systems and it performs competitively with the state-of-the-art as seen from the comparison of experimental results. For the first time, a joint imaging scanning strategy is proposed for CC-slab surface defect inspection that allows a feasible way of powerful ROI delineation strategies to be applied to the MV inspection field. Multi-ROI delineation by using IRFC in this research field may further improve the results. PMID:25430141

  15. Coupled Monitoring and Inverse Modeling to Investigate Surface - Subsurface Hydrological and Thermal Dynamics in the Arctic Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, A. P.; Dafflon, B.; Hubbard, S. S.; Bisht, G.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Wu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative characterization of the soil surface-subsurface hydrological and thermal processes is essential as they are primary factors that control the biogeochemical processes, ecological landscapes and greenhouse gas fluxes. In the Artic region, the surface-subsurface hydrological and thermal regimes co-interact and are both largely influenced by soil texture and soil organic content. In this study, we present a coupled inversion scheme that jointly inverts hydrological, thermal and geophysical data to estimate the vertical profiles of clay, sand and organic contents. Within this inversion scheme, the Community Land Model (CLM4.5) serves as a forward model to simulate the land-surface energy balance and subsurface hydrological-thermal processes. Soil electrical conductivity (from electrical resistivity tomography), temperature and water content are linked together via petrophysical and geophysical models. Particularly, the inversion scheme accounts for the influences of the soil organic and mineral content on both of the hydrological-thermal dynamics and the petrophysical relationship. We applied the inversion scheme to the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) intensive site in Barrow, AK, which is characterized by polygonal-shaped arctic tundra. The monitoring system autonomously provides a suite of above-ground measurements (e.g., precipitation, air temperature, wind speed, short-long wave radiation, canopy greenness and eddy covariance) as well as below-ground measurements (soil moisture, soil temperature, thaw layer thickness, snow thickness and soil electrical conductivity), which complement other periodic, manually collected measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the model can well reproduce the spatiotemporal dynamics of the soil temperature, and therefore, accurately predict the active layer thickness. The hydrological and thermal dynamics are closely linked to the polygon types and polygon features. The results also enable the

  16. Improve the Strength of PLA/HA Composite Through the Use of Surface Initiated Polymerization and Phosphonic Acid Coupling Agent

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C.; Frukhtbeyn, Stanislav A.; Ting, Andy Hai; Dong, Quanxiao; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Bioresorbable composite made from degradable polymers, e.g., polylactide (PLA), and bioactive calcium phosphates, e.g., hydroxyapatite (HA), are clinically desirable for bone fixation, repair and tissue engineering because they do not need to be removed by surgery after the bone heals. However, preparation of PLA/HA composite from non-modified HA usually results in mechanical strength reductions due to a weak interface between PLA and HA. In this study, a calcium-phosphate/phosphonate hybrid shell was developed to introduce a greater amount of reactive hydroxyl groups onto the HA particles. Then, PLA was successfully grafted on HA by surface-initiated polymerization through the non-ionic surface hydroxyl groups. Thermogravimetric analysis indiated that the amount of grafted PLA on HA can be up to 7 %, which is about 50 % greater than that from the literature. PLA grafted HA shows significantly different pH dependent ζ-potential and particle size profiles from those of uncoated HA. By combining the phosphonic acid coupling agent and surface initiated polymerization, PLA could directly link to HA through covalent bond so that the interfacial interaction in the PLA/HA composite can be significantly improved. The diametral tensile strength of PLA/HA composite prepared from PLA-grafted HA was found to be over twice that of the composite prepared from the non-modified HA. Moreover, the tensile strength of the improved composite was 23 % higher than that of PLA alone. By varying additional variables, this approach has the potential to produce bioresorbable composites with improved mechanical properties that are in the range of natural bones, and can have wide applications for bone fixation and repair in load-bearing areas. PMID:22399838

  17. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration under complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N. B.

    2010-07-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial scales. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at varying temporal and spatial scales under complex terrain. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can fully account for the dynamic impacts of complex terrain and changing land cover in concert with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement) over time. Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  18. A coupled remote sensing and the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA) to estimate actual evapotranspiration over heterogeneous terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z. Q.; Liu, C. S.; Gao, W.; Chang, N.-B.

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) may be used as an ecological indicator to address the ecosystem complexity. The accurate measurement of ET is of great significance for studying environmental sustainability, global climate changes, and biodiversity. Remote sensing technologies are capable of monitoring both energy and water fluxes on the surface of the Earth. With this advancement, existing models, such as SEBAL, S_SEBI and SEBS, enable us to estimate the regional ET with limited temporal and spatial coverage in the study areas. This paper extends the existing modeling efforts with the inclusion of new components for ET estimation at different temporal and spatial scales under heterogeneous terrain with varying elevations, slopes and aspects. Following a coupled remote sensing and surface energy balance approach, this study emphasizes the structure and function of the Surface Energy Balance with Topography Algorithm (SEBTA). With the aid of the elevation and landscape information, such as slope and aspect parameters derived from the digital elevation model (DEM), and the vegetation cover derived from satellite images, the SEBTA can account for the dynamic impacts of heterogeneous terrain and changing land cover with some varying kinetic parameters (i.e., roughness and zero-plane displacement). Besides, the dry and wet pixels can be recognized automatically and dynamically in image processing thereby making the SEBTA more sensitive to derive the sensible heat flux for ET estimation. To prove the application potential, the SEBTA was carried out to present the robust estimates of 24 h solar radiation over time, which leads to the smooth simulation of the ET over seasons in northern China where the regional climate and vegetation cover in different seasons compound the ET calculations. The SEBTA was validated by the measured data at the ground level. During validation, it shows that the consistency index reached 0.92 and the correlation coefficient was 0.87.

  19. Defect detection in slab surface: a novel dual Charge-coupled Device imaging-based fuzzy connectedness strategy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liming; Ouyang, Qi; Chen, Dengfu; Udupa, Jayaram K; Wang, Huiqian; Zeng, Yuebin

    2014-11-01

    To provide an accurate surface defects inspection system and make the automation of robust image segmentation method a reality in routine production line, a general approach is presented for continuous casting slab (CC-slab) surface defects extraction and delineation. The applicability of the system is not tied to CC-slab exclusively. We combined the line array CCD (Charge-coupled Device) traditional scanning imaging (LS-imaging) and area array CCD laser three-dimensional (3D) scanning imaging (AL-imaging) strategies in designing the system. Its aim is to suppress the respective imaging system's limitations. In the system, the images acquired from the two CCD sensors are carefully aligned in space and in time by maximum mutual information-based full-fledged registration schema. Subsequently, the image information is fused from these two subsystems such as the unbroken 2D information in LS-imaging and 3D depressed information in AL-imaging. Finally, on the basis of the established dual scanning imaging system the region of interest (ROI) localization by seed specification was designed, and the delineation for ROI by iterative relative fuzzy connectedness (IRFC) algorithm was utilized to get a precise inspection result. Our method takes into account the complementary advantages in the two common machine vision (MV) systems and it performs competitively with the state-of-the-art as seen from the comparison of experimental results. For the first time, a joint imaging scanning strategy is proposed for CC-slab surface defect inspection that allows a feasible way of powerful ROI delineation strategies to be applied to the MV inspection field. Multi-ROI delineation by using IRFC in this research field may further improve the results.

  20. Influence of surface water/groundwater interactions on stream and wetland water quality: analytical solutions for coupled contaminant transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melek Kazezyilmaz-Alhan, Cevza

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are located in transitional zones between uplands and downstream flooded systems and surface water/groundwater interactions are frequently observed especially in riparian wetlands where the water level fluctuates frequently during the rainy season. Moreover, surface water/groundwater interactions also influence the characteristics of contaminant transport in pools and riffles, and in meandering type of streams. Therefore, it is important to investigate and solve these processes accurately to improve the prediction of downstream water quality. Although there are many experimental and numerical studies available in the literature which discuss and model the surface water/ground water interactions in streams and wetlands, very few analytical solutions have been conducted. Analytical solutions are helpful tools for verification of numerical solutions and they provide fast and accurate results for practical problems. Furthermore, they provide an understanding to the influence of each parameter in hydrological and contaminant transport models for streams and wetlands. In order to contribute to the research in understanding the behavior of water quality in streams and wetlands, analytical solutions are developed for the coupled contaminant transport equations of several transient storage and wetland models. Among these models are the wetland model WETland Solute TrANsport Dynamics (WETSAND) developed by Kazezyilmaz-Alhan et al. (2007), the transient storage models developed by Bencala and Walters (1983), and Kazezyilmaz-Alhan and Medina (2006). WETSAND is a general comprehensive wetland model, which has both surface flow and solute transport components. In this wetland model, water quality components are solved by advection-dispersion-reaction equations which incorporate surface water/groundwater interactions by including the incoming/outgoing mass due to the groundwater recharge/discharge. The transient storage model developed by Bencala and Walters (1983

  1. On the representation of coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces using quasi-diabatic Hamiltonians: A distributed origins expansion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolei; Yarkony, David R.

    2012-05-01

    In two previous papers we have introduced a method to generate coupled quasi-diabatic Hamiltonians (Hd) that are capable of representing adiabatic energies, energy gradients, and derivative couplings over a wide range of geometries including seams of conical intersection. In this work, two new synergistic features are introduced. Firstly, the functional form of Hd is generalized. Rather than requiring there to be a low energy point of high symmetry to serve as the unique origin, functions centered on points distributed in nuclear coordinate space are used in the polynomials that comprise the matrix elements in Hd. The use of functions with distributed origins, allows reproduction of the ab initio data with lower order expansions, and offers the possibility of describing multichannel dissociation. The fitting algorithm is combined with a three-step procedure in which the domain of Hd is extended from a core set of nuclear configurations to a region of nuclear coordinate space appropriate for nuclear dynamics, with a prescribed accuracy. This significant extension of the domain of definition compared to our original work, which is facilitated by the distributed origin approach, is achieved largely through the use of surface hopping trajectories. The 1,21A states of NH3, which provide an archetypical example of nonadiabatic dynamics, are used to demonstrate the utility of this approach. The representation describes 21 points on the 11A-21A seam of conical intersection and their local topography flawlessly and on the entire domain, the electronic structure data is represented to an accuracy of 77.00 (46.90) cm-1, as measured by the root mean square (mean unsigned) error for energies lower than 50 000 cm-1. This error is a factor of 10 lower than that of the most accurate representation of high quality ab initio data, on a comparable domain, previously reported for this system.

  2. Couplings between the seasonal cycles of surface thermodynamics and radiative fluxes in the semi-arid Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, F.; Kergoat, L.; Mougin, E.; Timouk, F.; Bock, O.; Hiernaux, P.

    2009-04-01

    the total incoming radiation is limited to shorter time scales in Summer over this Central Sahelian location. However, observations also reveal astonishing radiative signatures of the monsoon on the surface incoming radiative flux. The incoming longwave flux does not reach its maximum during the monsoon season when the atmosphere is the most cloudy and humid, but earlier, prior to the onset of rainfall, as the dry and warmer atmosphere suddenly becomes moist. This feature points to the significance of the atmospheric cooling during the monsoon season and of the aerosol amounts in Spring. It also reveals that prior to the rainfall onset, the monsoon flow plays a major role on the diurnal cycle of the low-level temperature, due to its radiative properties. Conversely, the incoming solar radiation at the surface increases slightly from late Spring to the core monsoon season even though the atmosphere becomes moister and cloudier; this again involves the high aerosol optical thickness prevailing in late Spring and early Summer against a weaker shortwave forcing by monsoon clouds. The climatological combination of thermodynamic and radiative variations taking place during the monsoon eventually leads to a positive correlation between the equivalent potential temperature and Rnet. This correlation is, in turn, broadly consistent with an overall positive soil moisture rainfall feedback at this scale. Beyond these Sahelian-specific features, and in agreement with some previous studies, strong links are found between the atmospheric humidity and the net longwave flux, LWnet at the surface all year long, even across the much lower humidity ranges encountered in this region. They point to, and locally quantify the major control of water vapour and water-related processes on the surface-atmosphere thermal coupling as measured by LWnet. Namely, they are found to be more tightly coupled (LWnet closer to 0) when the atmosphere is moister and cloudier. Observational results such as

  3. Model Selection Coupled with a Particle Tracking Proxy Using Surface Deformation Data for Monitoring CO2 Plume Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, B.; Nwachukwu, A.; Srinivasan, S.; Wheeler, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    This study formulates a framework of a model selection that refines geological models for monitoring CO2 plume migration. Special emphasis is placed on CO2 injection, and the particular techniques that are used for this study including model selection, particle tracking proxies, and partial coupling of flow and geomechanics. The proposed process starts with generating a large initial ensemble of reservoir models that reflect a prior uncertainty in reservoir description, including all plausible geologic scenarios. These models are presumed to be conditioned to available static data. In the absence of production or injection data, all prior reservoir models are regarded as equiprobable. Thus, the model selection algorithm is applied to select a few representative reservoir models that are more consistent with observed dynamic responses. A quick assessment of the models must then be performed to evaluate their dynamic characteristics and flow connectivity. This approach develops a particle tracking proxy and a finite element method solver for solving the flow equation and the stress problem, respectively. The shape of CO2 plume is estimated using a particle-tracking proxy that serves as a fast approximation of finite-difference simulation models. Sequentially, a finite element method solver is coupled with the proxy for analyzing geomechanical effects resulting from CO2 injection. A method is then implemented to group the models into clusters based on similarities in the estimated responses. The posterior model set is chosen as the cluster that produces the minimum deviation from the observed field data. The efficacy of non-dominated sorting based on Pareto-optimality is also tested in the current model selection framework. The proposed scheme is demonstrated on a carbon sequestration project in Algeria. Coupling surface deformation data with well injection data enhances the efficiency of tracking the CO2 plume. Therefore, this algorithm provides a probabilistic

  4. A comparison of surface air temperature variability in three 1000-Yr. coupled ocean-atmosphere model integrations

    SciTech Connect

    Stouffer, R.J.; Hegerl, G.; Tett, S.

    2000-02-01

    This study compares the variability of surface air temperature in three long coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model integrations. It is shown that the annual mean climatology of the surface air temperatures (SAT) in all three models is realistic and the linear trends over the 1,000-yr integrations are small over most areas of the globe. Second, although there are notable differences among the models, the models' SAT variability is fairly realistic on annual to decadal timescales, both in terms of the geographical distribution and of the global mean values. A notable exception is the poor simulation of observed tropical Pacific variability. In the HadCM2 model, the tropical variability is overestimated, while in the GFDL and HAM3L models, it is underestimated. Also, the ENSO-related spectral peak in the globally averaged observed SAT differs from that in any of the models. The relatively low resolution required to integrate models for long time periods inhibits the successful simulation of the variability in this region. On timescales longer than a few decades, the largest variance in the models is generally located near sea ice margins in high latitudes, which are also regions of deep oceanic convection and variability related to variations in the thermohaline circulation. However, the exact geographical location of these maxima varies from model to model. The preferred patterns of interdecadal variability that are common to all three coupled models can be isolated by computing empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of all model data simultaneously using the common EOF technique. A comparison of the variance each model associated with these common EOF patterns shows that the models generally agree on the most prominent patterns of variability. However, the amplitudes of the dominant models of variability differ to some extent between the models and between the models and observations. For example, two of the models have a mode with relatively large

  5. The coupling of surface charge and boundary slip at the solid-liquid interface and their combined effect on fluid drag: A review.

    PubMed

    Jing, Dalei; Bhushan, Bharat

    2015-09-15

    Fluid drag of micro/nano fluidic systems has inspired wide scientific interest. Surface charge and boundary slip at the solid-liquid interface are believed to affect fluid drag. This review summarizes the recent studies on the coupling of surface charge and slip, and their combined effect on fluid drag at micro/nano scale. The effect of pH on surface charge of borosilicate glass and silica surfaces in deionized (DI) water and saline solution is discussed using a method based on colloidal probe atomic force microscopy (AFM). The boundary slip of various oil-solid interfaces are discussed for samples with different degrees of oleophobicity prepared by nanoparticle-binder system. By changing the pH of solution or applying an electric field, effect of surface charge on slip of a smooth hydrophobic octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) in DI water and saline solution is studied. A theoretical model incorporating the coupling relationship between surface charge and slip is used to discuss the combined effect of surface charge-induced electric double layer (EDL) and slip on fluid drag of pressure-driven flow in a one-dimensional parallel-plates microchannel. A theoretical method is used to reduce the fluid drag. The studies show that the increasing magnitude of surface charge density leads to a decrease in slip length. The surface charge results in a larger fluid drag, and the coupling of surface charge and slip can further increase the fluid drag. Surface charge-induced EDLs with asymmetric zeta potentials can effectively reduce the fluid drag.

  6. Influence of Idealized Heterogeneity on Wet and Dry Planetary Boundary Layers Coupled to the Land Surface. 1; Instantaneous Fields and Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor); Patton, Edward G.; Sullivan, Peter P.; Moeng, Chin-Hoh

    2003-01-01

    This is the first in a two-part series of manuscripts describing numerical experiments on the influence of 2-30 km striplike heterogeneity on wet and dry boundary layers coupled to the land surface. The strip-like heterogeneity is shown to dramatically alter the structure of the free-convective boundary layer by inducing significant organized circulations that modify turbulent statistics. The coupling with the land-surface modifies the circulations compared to previous studies using fixed surface forcing. Total boundary layer turbulence kinetic energy increases significantly for surface heterogeneity at scales between Lambda/z(sub i) = 4 and 9, however entrainment rates for all cases are largely unaffected by the strip-like heterogeneity.

  7. Near-stream soil water groundwater coupling in the headwaters of the Afon Hafren, Wales: Implications for surface water quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haria, Atul H.; Shand, Paul

    2006-12-01

    SummaryHard-rock acid headwater catchments typically exhibit a rapid streamflow response and concomitant rapid mobilisation of soil-derived solutes, such as aluminium, into the aquatic environment during storm events. The rapid stream responses are paradoxically associated with pre-event water dominating the storm hydrograph, however the sources and mechanisms by which 'old' water enters the stream channel and interacts with the soil horizons are still poorly understood. To investigate these processes a detailed and novel field study was established in the riparian zone and lower hillslopes of the Hafren catchment at Plynlimon, mid-Wales. This study showed that shallow bedrock groundwaters discharge into the stream channel. Pressure wave propagation in response to recharge further upslope caused a rapid displacement of shallow groundwaters up into the soils in the near-stream hillslope. A lateral fast flow horizon transported water down slope as interflow at the soil-bedrock interface such that the upper soil horizons remained largely unsaturated. Only where there was a discontinuity in the lateral fast flow horizon was water forced up as an ephemeral spring discharge at the soil surface. At this site, the major zone of soil water-groundwater coupling was in a narrow (20-25 m) strip next to the stream channel. The zone of soil water-groundwater interaction next to the stream channel is likely to depend on the nature of the lateral flow pathways and the hillslope characteristic. This study has shown the importance of the near-stream environment as a locus for soil waters that are bedrock groundwater derived; these groundwaters dominate processes in the deepest soil horizons from where soil components such as aluminium are sourced. Understanding these physical processes is fundamental for understanding upland catchment functioning and has important implications for solute transport modelling and for the sustainable management of surface water systems and stream

  8. Plasmon-enhanced electron-phonon coupling in Dirac surface states of the thin-film topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Glinka, Yuri D.; Babakiray, Sercan; Lederman, David

    2015-10-07

    Raman measurements of a Fano-type surface phonon mode associated with Dirac surface states (SS) in Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} topological insulator thin films allowed an unambiguous determination of the electron-phonon coupling strength in Dirac SS as a function of film thickness ranging from 2 to 40 nm. A non-monotonic enhancement of the electron-phonon coupling strength with maximum for the 8–10 nm thick films was observed. The non-monotonicity is suggested to originate from plasmon-phonon coupling which enhances electron-phonon coupling when free carrier density in Dirac SS increases with decreasing film thickness and becomes suppressed for thinnest films when anharmonic coupling between in-plane and out-of-plane phonon modes occurs. The observed about four-fold enhancement of electron-phonon coupling in Dirac SS of the 8–10 nm thick Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} films with respect to the bulk samples may provide new insights into the origin of superconductivity in this-type materials and their applications.

  9. Direct observation of nonlinear coupling in wave turbulence at the surface of water and relevance of approximate resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    The theoretical framework of Weak Turbulence describes the statistical properties of a large collection of nonlinear waves. For a weakly nonlinear wave field, energy is assumed to be transferred only trough resonant interaction. This enables the computation of analytical solutions of the stationary statistical states (Zakhaorv spectrum). Some similarities with hydrodynamical turbulence appear : an energy cascade is present from the injection scale to the dissipation at small scales. The theory has been applied to numerous systems many of them being of geophysical or astrophysical nature (water surface waves, internal waves, inertial waves, solar winds) as well as superfluid turbulence, lasers, nonlinear optics in fibers or vibrated elastic plates. For water surface waves, experimental laboratory measurements often fail to reproduce quantitatively theoretical predictions. Gravity waves and capillary waves are often treated separately because of their different nature. For capillary waves, energy is supposed to be transferred trough 3-waves interactions, whereas for gravity waves the coupling involves 4 waves (because of the curvature of the dispersion relation which does not allow triadic solutions). In the laboratory, the range of exited wavelength are usually not strongly separated from the crossover between capillary and gravity waves (which occur near 13 Hz) due to size or measurement limitations. Near this crossover, the dispersion relation is significantly affected and this impacts most likely the theoretical predictions. To investigate how this special point may act on the phenomenology, we report laboratory experiments on gravity-capillary waves focused on the crossover (Aubourg,Mordant-PRL,2015). The setup consists in a 70 ∗ 40 cm2 vessel where waves are generated by horizontal vibration. A Fourier Transform Profilometry technique is used that is fully resolved in time and space and thus permits to compute the full space-time spectrum. The presence of an

  10. Band edge emission enhancement by quadrupole surface plasmon-exciton coupling using direct-contact Ag/ZnO nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yashu; He, Xu; Li, Jing; Yin, Jun; Li, Kongyi; Yue, Chuang; Wu, Zhiming; Wu, Suntao; Kang, Junyong

    2013-01-21

    Periodic Ag nanoball (NB) arrays on ZnO hollow nanosphere (HNS) supporting structures were fabricated in a large area by a laser irradiation method. The optimized laser power and spherical supporting structure of ZnO with a certain size and separation were employed to aggregate a sputtering-deposited Ag nano-film into an ordered, large-area, and two dimensional Ag NB array. A significant band edge (BE) emission enhancement of ZnO HNSs was achieved on this Ag NB/ZnO HNS hybrid structure and the mechanism was revealed by further experimental and theoretical analyses. With successfully fabricating the direct-contact structure of a Ag NB on the top of each ZnO HNS, the highly localized quadrupole mode surface plasmon resonance (SPR), realized on the metal NBs in the ultraviolet region, can effectively improve the BE emission of ZnO through strong coupling with the excitons of ZnO. Compared with the dipole mode SPR, the quadrupole mode SPR is insensitive to the metal nanoparticle's size and has a resonance frequency in the BE region of the wide band gap materials, hence, it can be potentially applied in related optoelectronic devices. PMID:23196786

  11. Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic chains on the surface of bulk spin-orbit coupled s-wave superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hui, Hoi-Yin; Brydon, P M R; Sau, Jay D; Tewari, S; Das Sarma, S

    2015-01-01

    Majorana fermion (MF) excitations in solid state system have non-Abelian statistics which is essential for topological quantum computation. Previous proposals to realize MF, however, generally requires fine-tuning of parameters. Here we explore a platform which avoids the fine-tuning problem, namely a ferromagnetic chain deposited on the surface of a spin-orbit coupled s-wave superconductor. We show that it generically supports zero-energy topological MF excitations near the two ends of the chain with minimal fine-tuning. Depending on the strength of the ferromagnetic moment in the chain, the number of MFs at each end, n, can be either one or two, and should be revealed by a robust zero-bias peak (ZBP) of height 2 ne(2)/h in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements which would show strong (weak) signals at the ends (middle) of the chain. The role of an approximate chiral symmetry which gives an integer topological invariant to the system is discussed. PMID:25743763

  12. Majorana fermions in ferromagnetic chains on the surface of bulk spin-orbit coupled s-wave superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Hoi-Yin; Brydon, P. M. R.; Sau, Jay D.; Tewari, S.; Sarma, S. Das

    2015-01-01

    Majorana fermion (MF) excitations in solid state system have non-Abelian statistics which is essential for topological quantum computation. Previous proposals to realize MF, however, generally requires fine-tuning of parameters. Here we explore a platform which avoids the fine-tuning problem, namely a ferromagnetic chain deposited on the surface of a spin-orbit coupled s-wave superconductor. We show that it generically supports zero-energy topological MF excitations near the two ends of the chain with minimal fine-tuning. Depending on the strength of the ferromagnetic moment in the chain, the number of MFs at each end, n, can be either one or two, and should be revealed by a robust zero-bias peak (ZBP) of height 2 ne2/h in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements which would show strong (weak) signals at the ends (middle) of the chain. The role of an approximate chiral symmetry which gives an integer topological invariant to the system is discussed. PMID:25743763

  13. Evaluating the influence of process parameters on soluble microbial products formation using response surface methodology coupled with grey relational analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Luo, Hong-Wei; Fang, Fang; Li, Wen-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Soluble microbial products (SMPs) present a major part of residual chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluents from biological wastewater treatment systems, and the SMP formation is greatly influenced by a variety of process parameters. In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) coupled with grey relational analysis (GRA) method was used to evaluate the effects of substrate concentration, temperature, NH(4)(+)-N concentration and aeration rate on the SMP production in batch activated sludge reactors. Carbohydrates were found to be the major component of SMP, and the influential priorities of these factors were: temperature>substrate concentration > aeration rate > NH(4)(+)-N concentration. On the basis of the RSM results, the interactive effects of these factors on the SMP formation were evaluated, and the optimal operating conditions for a minimum SMP production in such a batch activated sludge system also were identified. These results provide useful information about how to control the SMP formation of activated sludge and ensure the bioreactor high-quality effluent. PMID:20832838

  14. Interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, surface anisotropy energy, and spin pumping at spin orbit coupled Ir/Co interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-Hui; Jung, Jinyong; Cho, Jaehun; Han, Dong-Soo; Yin, Yuxiang; Kim, June-Seo; Swagten, Henk J. M.; You, Chun-Yeol

    2016-04-01

    The interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (iDMI), surface anisotropy energy, and spin pumping at the Ir/Co interface are experimentally investigated by performing Brillouin light scattering. Contrary to previous reports, we suggest that the sign of the iDMI at the Ir/Co interface is the same as in the case of the Pt/Co interface. We also find that the magnitude of the iDMI energy density is relatively smaller than in the case of the Pt/Co interface, despite the large strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) of Ir. The saturation magnetization and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) energy are significantly improved due to a strong SOC. Our findings suggest that an SOC in an Ir/Co system behaves in different ways for iDMI and PMA. Finally, we determine the spin pumping effect at the Ir/Co interface, and it increases the Gilbert damping constant from 0.012 to 0.024 for 1.5 nm-thick Co.

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone based on azo coupling and surface-enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sui, Huimin; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wang, Xiaolei; Cheng, Weina; Su, Hongyang; Wang, Xu; Sun, Xiaoying; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-08-15

    Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) has been used to establish a rapid and quantitative assay based on the diazotization coupling reaction for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). Ultrahigh sensitivity of this approach originates from two factors: changing TRH to an azo compound and the SERRS effect with the addition of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at 532 nm excitation wavelength. The lowest detectable concentration of TRH was found to be as low as 1 pg mL(-1), which is 10-fold lower than the lowest normal reference value in human serum reported in previous literature. The quantitative measurements in human serum based on this method were conducted, and the results showed its feasibility for detection in complex biological samples. In comparison with conventional TRH identification and quantification methodologies, radioimmunoassay (RIA) and subsequent various hyphenated techniques, the main advantages of this study are simplicity, rapidness (2 minutes), time effectiveness, no additional steps required to further characterize the immunogenic material, highest sensitivity (57.1 fg), high selectivity, practicality and reliability. Thus, this work puts forward a research tool that may be applied to the determination of TRH in practical assays. PMID:27338554

  16. Enhanced styrene recovery from waste polystyrene pyrolysis using response surface methodology coupled with Box-Behnken design.

    PubMed

    Mo, Yu; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Zhonghui; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2014-04-01

    A work applied response surface methodology coupled with Box-Behnken design (RSM-BBD) has been developed to enhance styrene recovery from waste polystyrene (WPS) through pyrolysis. The relationship between styrene yield and three selected operating parameters (i.e., temperature, heating rate, and carrier gas flow rate) was investigated. A second order polynomial equation was successfully built to describe the process and predict styrene yield under the study conditions. The factors identified as statistically significant to styrene production were: temperature, with a quadratic effect; heating rate, with a linear effect; carrier gas flow rate, with a quadratic effect; interaction between temperature and carrier gas flow rate; and interaction between heating rate and carrier gas flow rate. The optimum conditions for the current system were determined to be at a temperature range of 470-505°C, a heating rate of 40°C/min, and a carrier gas flow rate range of 115-140mL/min. Under such conditions, 64.52% WPS was recovered as styrene, which was 12% more than the highest reported yield for reactors of similar size. It is concluded that RSM-BBD is an effective approach for yield optimization of styrene recovery from WPS pyrolysis.

  17. Dissociative electron attachment to the H2O molecule II: nucleardynamics on coupled electronic surfaces within the local complexpotential model

    SciTech Connect

    Haxton, Daniel J.; Rescigno, Thomas N.; McCurdy, C. William

    2006-12-21

    We report the results of a first-principles study of dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to H{sub 2}O. The cross sections were obtained from nuclear dynamics calculations carried out in full dimensionality within the local complex potential model by using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method. The calculations employ our previously obtained global, complex-valued, potential energy surfaces for the three ({sup 2}B{sub 1}, {sup 2}A{sub 1}, and {sup 2}B{sub 2}) electronic Feshbach resonances involved in this process. These three metastable states of H{sub 2}O{sup -} undergo several degeneracies, and we incorporate both the Renner-Teller coupling between the {sup 2}B{sub 1} and {sup 2}A{sub 1} states, as well as the conical intersection between the {sup 2}A{sub 1} and {sup 2}B{sub 2} states, into our treatment. The nuclear dynamics are inherently multi-dimensional and involve branching between different final product arrangements as well as extensive excitation of the diatomic fragment. Our results successfully mirror the qualitative features of the major fragment channels observed, but are less successful in reproducing the available results for some of the minor channels. We comment on the applicability of the local complex potential model to such a complicated resonant system.

  18. First-order exchange coefficient coupling for simulating surface water-groundwater interactions: Parameter sensitivity and consistency with a physics-based approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ebel, B.A.; Mirus, B.B.; Heppner, C.S.; VanderKwaak, J.E.; Loague, K.

    2009-01-01

    Distributed hydrologic models capable of simulating fully-coupled surface water and groundwater flow are increasingly used to examine problems in the hydrologic sciences. Several techniques are currently available to couple the surface and subsurface; the two most frequently employed approaches are first-order exchange coefficients (a.k.a., the surface conductance method) and enforced continuity of pressure and flux at the surface-subsurface boundary condition. The effort reported here examines the parameter sensitivity of simulated hydrologic response for the first-order exchange coefficients at a well-characterized field site using the fully coupled Integrated Hydrology Model (InHM). This investigation demonstrates that the first-order exchange coefficients can be selected such that the simulated hydrologic response is insensitive to the parameter choice, while simulation time is considerably reduced. Alternatively, the ability to choose a first-order exchange coefficient that intentionally decouples the surface and subsurface facilitates concept-development simulations to examine real-world situations where the surface-subsurface exchange is impaired. While the parameters comprising the first-order exchange coefficient cannot be directly estimated or measured, the insensitivity of the simulated flow system to these parameters (when chosen appropriately) combined with the ability to mimic actual physical processes suggests that the first-order exchange coefficient approach can be consistent with a physics-based framework. Copyright ?? 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Insights into the effects of surface properties of oxides on the catalytic activity of Pd for C-C coupling reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sai; Li, Jing; Gao, Wei; Qu, Yongquan

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the interaction between Pd nanocatalysts and metal oxide supports for heterogeneous C-C coupling reactions is still ambiguous since many factors influence the catalytic behavior of Pd nanocatalysts. Herein, three porous nanorods of CeO2 with controllable surface properties were employed as supports for Pd nanocatalysts with similar dispersion, which avoided the impact of other factors including surface area, morphology and accessible active sites. It provides an ideal approach to probe synergetic catalytic behavior of metal nanoparticles on supports. The results obtained by studying three C-C coupling reactions (Ullman, Suzuki and Heck) indicate a strong correlation between the surface properties of supports and the catalytic activity of Pd nanocatalysts: supports with a strong basicity and a high concentration of oxygen vacancies result in a rich electron density of Pd and accelerate the first step of oxidative addition reaction for C-C coupling. The infrared spectroscopic study on ν[CO] of CO-treated catalysts and XPS analysis of the Pd(3d) core level provide strong evidence supporting the interaction of Pd/supports for C-C coupling reactions.Understanding the interaction between Pd nanocatalysts and metal oxide supports for heterogeneous C-C coupling reactions is still ambiguous since many factors influence the catalytic behavior of Pd nanocatalysts. Herein, three porous nanorods of CeO2 with controllable surface properties were employed as supports for Pd nanocatalysts with similar dispersion, which avoided the impact of other factors including surface area, morphology and accessible active sites. It provides an ideal approach to probe synergetic catalytic behavior of metal nanoparticles on supports. The results obtained by studying three C-C coupling reactions (Ullman, Suzuki and Heck) indicate a strong correlation between the surface properties of supports and the catalytic activity of Pd nanocatalysts: supports with a strong basicity and a

  20. A dynamically-coupled groundwater, land surface and regional climate model to predict seasonal watershed flow and groundwater response, FINAL LDRD REPORT.

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, R; Kollet, S; Chow, F; Granvold, P; Duan, Q

    2007-02-23

    This final report is organized in four sections. Section 1 is the project summary (below), Section 2 is a submitted manuscript that describes the offline, or spinup simulations in detail, Section 3 is also a submitted manuscript that describes the online, or fully-coupled simulations in detail and Section 3, which is report that describes work done via a subcontract with UC Berkeley. The goal of this project was to develop and apply a coupled regional climate, land-surface, groundwater flow model as a means to further understand important mass and energy couplings between regional climate, the land surface, and groundwater. The project involved coupling three distinct submodels that are traditionally used independently with abstracted and potentially oversimplified (inter-model) boundary conditions. This coupled model lead to (1) an improved understanding of the sensitivity and importance of coupled physical processes from the subsurface to the atmosphere; (2) a new tool for predicting hydrologic conditions (rainfall, temperature, snowfall, snowmelt, runoff, infiltration and groundwater flow) at the watershed scale over a range of timeframes; (3) a simulation of hydrologic response of a characteristic watershed that will provide insight into the certainty of hydrologic forecasting, dominance and sensitivity of groundwater dynamics on land-surface fluxes; and (4) a more realistic model representation of weather predictions, precipitation and temperature, at the regional scale. Regional climate models are typically used for the simulation of weather, precipitation and temperature behavior over 10-1000 km domains for weather or climate prediction purposes, and are typically driven by boundary conditions derived from global climate models (GCMs), observations or both. The land or ocean surface typically represents a bottom boundary condition of these models, where important mass (water) and energy fluxes are approximated. The viability and influence of these

  1. Surface plasmon coupled emission studies on engineered thin film hybrids of nano α-Al2O3 on silver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulpur, Pradyumna; Lingam, Kiran; Chunduri, Avinash; Rattan, Tanu Mimani; Rao, Apparao M.; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2014-01-01

    We report the first time engineering and fabrication of a novel thin film hybrid of nano α-alumina doped in a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix along with rhodamine b (Rh.B) on a silver thin film. Silver films of 50 nm thickness on glass slides were fabricated by thermal evaporation. Nano α-alumina was synthesized through the combustion route and characterized by XRD. The α-alumina was dispersed in the PVA-Rh.B matrix by tip sonication. The resultant solution was spin coated on the Ag thin film at 3000 rpm to generate an overcoat of ˜30 nm. We have designed and constructed an opto-mechanical setup for performing the SPCE studies. Excitation with a 532 nm continuous laser, led to the coupling of the energy of Rh.B emission to the surface plasmon modes of silver. The emission @ 580 nm was recorded using an Ocean Optics{copyright, serif} fiber optic spectrometer. Calculation of the ratio of signal intensity between the directional SPCE and isotropic fluorescence gives us the factor of signal enhancements which SPCE offers. We report an '8 fold' signal enhancement attributed to SPCE arising from the metal oxide doped thin film hybrid. We observed only a '5 fold' signal enhancement in the case of a thin film hybrid without α-alumina. The emission was also 92% P-polarized which is in coherence with the theory of SPCE. The greater degree of signal enhancement observed in the α-alumina doped thin film substrate can be attributed to the surface roughness which alumina offers to silver, which along with the porous nature of alumina enables a greater degree of adsorption of Rh.B which results in a higher emission intensity. Computational modeling was also performed, based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) calculations to provide theoretical background to observed experimental data. The α-alumina thin film hybrid can be extended as an economical sensing platform towards the high sensitive detection of analytes.

  2. Simulating Quaternary African Environments and the Green Sahara through dynamic coupling of Land Surface and Atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, Aidan; Singarayer, Joy; Valdes, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Paleoclimate records from Late Quaternary Africa imply rapid and spatially complex shifts between wet and dry conditions. There is abundant evidence that during numerous incursions in the past the extent of deserts, lakes and rivers is not static. In this work we use an asynchronously coupled atmosphere and vegetation model to investigate our current ability to model Quaternary Africa. We iterate the vegetation scheme BIOME with the Hadley Centre model and explore the changing relationship between African vegetation and climate over the last deglaciation. During the last deglaciation large amplitude perturbations of the African climate occurred, linked to orbitally forced changes in monsoon strength. Beginning and ending abruptly 7000 and 4000 years BP, a widespread greening of the Sahara is recorded in numerous paleoclimate archives. This greening represents the largest anomaly in the atmosphere-biosphere system in the last 12,000 years. Atmospheric models alone have failed to reproduce the extent of humidity change. Work by Claussen (1994) and Claussen and Gayler (1997) made large leaps forward by incorporating a dynamic vegetation model into simulations of the African Quaternary. Their work suggests that under some conditions multiple equilibria may exist in the atmosphere-biosphere system, providing a mechanism for rapid change. In this work we apply a similar method to an extensive suite of time slices from the last glacial maximum to the present. We investigate how the role of surface feedbacks in the climate system change through time by employing the Hadley Centre's atmosphere-only model HadAM3 with the BIOME model of Prentice et al (1992) and consider surface hydrology feedbacks using the surface water scheme HYDRA (Coe 1998). Equilibrium time slices across the deglacation are run for pre-industrial, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 kyr B.P. climates. Simulations are started with standard vegetation distributions and repeated with rainforest and desert

  3. Enhanced heat transfer through filler-polymer interface by surface-coupling agent in heat-dissipation material: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kouichi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kitsunezuka, Masashi; Shinma, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    Developing a composite material of polymers and micrometer-sized fillers with higher heat conductance is crucial to realize modular packaging of electronic components at higher densities. Enhancement mechanisms of the heat conductance of the polymer-filler interfaces by adding the surface-coupling agent in such a polymer composite material are investigated through the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A simulation system is composed of α-alumina as the filler, bisphenol-A epoxy molecules as the polymers, and model molecules for the surface-coupling agent. The inter-atomic potential between the α-alumina and surface-coupling molecule, which is essential in the present MD simulation, is constructed to reproduce the calculated energies with the electronic density-functional theory. Through the non-equilibrium MD simulation runs, we find that the thermal resistance at the interface decreases significantly by increasing either number or lengths of the surface-coupling molecules and that the effective thermal conductivity of the system approaches to the theoretical value corresponding to zero thermal-resistance at the interface. Detailed analyses about the atomic configurations and local temperatures around the interface are performed to identify heat-transfer routes through the interface.

  4. Enhanced heat transfer through filler-polymer interface by surface-coupling agent in heat-dissipation material: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kouichi; Ogata, Shuji; Kobayashi, Ryo; Tamura, Tomoyuki; Kitsunezuka, Masashi; Shinma, Atsushi

    2013-11-21

    Developing a composite material of polymers and micrometer-sized fillers with higher heat conductance is crucial to realize modular packaging of electronic components at higher densities. Enhancement mechanisms of the heat conductance of the polymer-filler interfaces by adding the surface-coupling agent in such a polymer composite material are investigated through the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. A simulation system is composed of α-alumina as the filler, bisphenol-A epoxy molecules as the polymers, and model molecules for the surface-coupling agent. The inter-atomic potential between the α-alumina and surface-coupling molecule, which is essential in the present MD simulation, is constructed to reproduce the calculated energies with the electronic density-functional theory. Through the non-equilibrium MD simulation runs, we find that the thermal resistance at the interface decreases significantly by increasing either number or lengths of the surface-coupling molecules and that the effective thermal conductivity of the system approaches to the theoretical value corresponding to zero thermal-resistance at the interface. Detailed analyses about the atomic configurations and local temperatures around the interface are performed to identify heat-transfer routes through the interface.

  5. Mobility of major and trace elements in a coupled groundwater-surface water system: Merced River, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, R. A.; Domagalski, J. L.; Hering, J. G.

    2004-12-01

    Trace element transport in coupled surface water/groundwater systems is controlled not only by advective flow, but also by redox reactions that affect the partitioning of various elements between mobile and immobile phases. These processes have been examined in the context of a field project conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. The Merced River flows out of Yosemite National Park and the Sierra Nevada foothills and into California's Central Valley, where it joins the San Joaquin River. Our field site is approximately twenty river kilometers from the confluence with the San Joaquin River. This deep alluvial plain has minimal topography. Agricultural development characterizes the land surrounding this reach of river; consequently, the hydrology is heavily influenced by irrigation. Riverbed groundwater samples were collected from ten wells aligned in two transects across the river located approximately 100 m apart. The wells were sampled from depths of 0.5 m, 1 m, and 3 m below the sediment-water interface. Groundwater flowpath samples were taken from wells positioned on a path perpendicular to the river and located 100 m, 500 m, and 1000 m from the river. The saturated groundwater system exists from 7 to 40 m below the surface and is confined below by a clay layer. Each well location samples from 3-5 depths in this surface aquifer. Samples were collected in December 2003, March-April, June-July, and October 2004. This served to provide an evenly-spaced sampling frequency over the course of a year, and also to allow observation of trends coinciding with the onset of winter, the spring runoff, and early and late summer irrigation. An initial survey of the elements in the riverbed samples was conducted using Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Elements for further study were selected based on variability in this survey, either with respect to depth or location, as well as to

  6. On the dynamic instability of nanowire-fabricated electromechanical actuators in the Casimir regime: Coupled effects of surface energy and size dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, Maryam; Mardaneh, Mohamadreza; Koochi, Ali; Rezaei, Morteza; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2016-02-01

    Herein, the dynamic pull-in instability of cantilever nanoactuator fabricated from conductive cylindrical nanowire with circular cross-section is studied under the presence of Casimir force. The Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity in combination with the couple stress theory is employed to incorporate the coupled effects of surface energy and size phenomenon. Using Green-Lagrange strain, the higher order surface stress components are incorporated in the governing equation. The Dirichlet mode is considered and an asymptotic solution, based on the path integral approach, is applied to consider the effect of the Casimir attraction. Furthermore, the influence of structural damping is considered in the model. The nonlinear governing equation is solved using analytical reduced order method (ROM). The effects of various parameters on the dynamic pull-in parameters, phase planes and stability threshold of the actuator are demonstrated.

  7. Residence Times and Pathway Analysis Using a Coupled Three-Dimensional Variably Saturated Groundwater Flow and Land Surface Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollet, S. J.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2007-12-01

    The analysis of residence times and pathways of solutes in the subsurface is important in the characterization of biogeochemical processes and contaminant transport. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have shown power law (fractal) residence time distributions because of the fractal character of the topography. The theoretical studies focused on a steady-state analysis of the flow field utilizing an undulating water table boundary condition that follows the topography. However, processes of the vadose zone including root water uptake and evaporation have been neglected until this work. In this study, the three-dimensional variably saturated groundwater flow model ParFlow, coupled to a land surface model, is used to study the influence of processes of the vadose zone on pathways and residence time distributions. A small catchment is simulated incorporating topography; land and soil cover information; and one year of realistic atmospheric forcing. Transient Lagrangian transport simulations of a conservative tracer are performed, also including dispersion (i.e. heterogeneity), to develop spectral transforms of the arrival time distributions. The resulting power spectra show power law behavior over a wide range of scales. While the spectral scaling exponent (SSP) decreases with increasing heterogeneity, the influence of the vadose zone appears to cause an increase in the SSP. Additionally, the effect of explicit representation of subsurface heterogeneity and spatial model resolution on the scaling behavior is studied. This work was conducted under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under contract W-7405-Eng-48. This project was funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program at LLNL.

  8. Simulations of Snow Redistribution in Marmot Creek with a Coupled Multiscale Atmospheric-Land Surface-Blowing Snow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, E. H.; Pomeroy, J. W.; Pietroniro, A.

    2009-12-01

    The hydrology of mountainous cold regions is significantly influenced by the development of the seasonal snowcover. However snow is often transported, sublimated and redistributed by wind before it can form a snowpack. Physical based hydrological models are well accepted methods to simulate snow processes. But even these sophisticated tools have a limited application with the lack of high (spatial and temporal) resolution forcing data. Economic and practical limitations normally make it impossible to have a sufficient spatial density of hydrometeorological observation stations to run snow redistribution models at high elevations. Therefore, a different method must be adopted in order to provide the forcing wind speeds, wind direction precipitation, temperature and humidity fields required. The objective of this study is to develop a multiscale modeling system capable of dynamically downscaling boundary layer atmospheric processes from the global model (~15 km) to the hydrological model spatial scale (~500 m). The methodology consists of coupling the atmospheric models: Global Environmental Multiscale Limited Area Model (GEM-LAM), the Mesoscale Compressible Community (MC2) model and the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface scheme with the hydrological model: Cold Regions Hydrological Model (CRHM). Each model is run at the scale for which it is most appropriate; GEM-LAM and ISBA at large scales (15 km), MC2 and CRHM at smaller scales (500 m). The atmospheric models are used on a non-interactive nesting configuration, where the variables chosen to validate the simulations correspond to the forcing data of CRHM set up for blowing snow simulations. Temperature, precipitation, relative humidity and the wind direction and speed were modelled and measured from eight hydrometeorological stations located in open environments from valley bottom to mountain ridgetop in Marmot Creek Research Basin (50° 57’ N, 115° 10’ W) in the Rocky

  9. Metabolically Coupled Replicator Systems: Overview of an RNA-world model concept of prebiotic evolution on mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Czárán, Tamás; Könnyű, Balázs; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-09-21

    Metabolically Coupled Replicator Systems (MCRS) are a family of models implementing a simple, physico-chemically and ecologically feasible scenario for the first steps of chemical evolution towards life. Evolution in an abiotically produced RNA-population sets in as soon as any one of the RNA molecules become autocatalytic by engaging in template directed self-replication from activated monomers, and starts increasing exponentially. Competition for the finite external supply of monomers ignites selection favouring RNA molecules with catalytic activity helping self-replication by any possible means. One way of providing such autocatalytic help is to become a replicase ribozyme. An additional way is through increasing monomer supply by contributing to monomer synthesis from external resources, i.e., by evolving metabolic enzyme activity. Retroevolution may build up an increasingly autotrophic, cooperating community of metabolic ribozymes running an increasingly complicated and ever more efficient metabolism. Maintaining such a cooperating community of metabolic replicators raises two serious ecological problems: one is keeping the system coexistent in spite of the different replicabilities of the cooperating replicators; the other is constraining parasitism, i.e., keeping "cheaters" in check. Surface-bound MCRS provide an automatic solution to both problems: coexistence and parasite resistance are the consequences of assuming the local nature of metabolic interactions. In this review we present an overview of results published in previous articles, showing that these effects are, indeed, robust in different MCRS implementations, by considering different environmental setups and realistic chemical details in a few different models. We argue that the MCRS model framework naturally offers a suitable starting point for the future modelling of membrane evolution and extending the theory to cover the emergence of the first protocell in a self-consistent manner. The

  10. Real-time global flood estimation using satellite-based precipitation and a coupled land surface and routing model

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-03-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50°N–50°S at relatively high spatial (~12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is ~0.9 and the false alarm ratio is ~0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30°S–30°N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. Finally, there were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  11. Real-Time Global Flood Estimation Using Satellite-Based Precipitation and a Coupled Land Surface and Routing Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Huan; Adler, Robert F.; Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Li, Hongyi; Wang, JianJian

    2014-01-01

    A widely used land surface model, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model, is coupled with a newly developed hierarchical dominant river tracing-based runoff-routing model to form the Dominant river tracing-Routing Integrated with VIC Environment (DRIVE) model, which serves as the new core of the real-time Global Flood Monitoring System (GFMS). The GFMS uses real-time satellite-based precipitation to derive flood monitoring parameters for the latitude band 50 deg. N - 50 deg. S at relatively high spatial (approximately 12 km) and temporal (3 hourly) resolution. Examples of model results for recent flood events are computed using the real-time GFMS (http://flood.umd.edu). To evaluate the accuracy of the new GFMS, the DRIVE model is run retrospectively for 15 years using both research-quality and real-time satellite precipitation products. Evaluation results are slightly better for the research-quality input and significantly better for longer duration events (3 day events versus 1 day events). Basins with fewer dams tend to provide lower false alarm ratios. For events longer than three days in areas with few dams, the probability of detection is approximately 0.9 and the false alarm ratio is approximately 0.6. In general, these statistical results are better than those of the previous system. Streamflow was evaluated at 1121 river gauges across the quasi-global domain. Validation using real-time precipitation across the tropics (30 deg. S - 30 deg. N) gives positive daily Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients for 107 out of 375 (28%) stations with a mean of 0.19 and 51% of the same gauges at monthly scale with a mean of 0.33. There were poorer results in higher latitudes, probably due to larger errors in the satellite precipitation input.

  12. Intercomparison of methods of coupling between convection and large‐scale circulation: 1. Comparison over uniform surface conditions

    PubMed Central

    Plant, R. S.; Woolnough, S. J.; Sessions, S.; Herman, M. J.; Sobel, A.; Wang, S.; Kim, D.; Cheng, A.; Bellon, G.; Peyrille, P.; Ferry, F.; Siebesma, P.; van Ulft, L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As part of an international intercomparison project, a set of single‐column models (SCMs) and cloud‐resolving models (CRMs) are run under the weak‐temperature gradient (WTG) method and the damped gravity wave (DGW) method. For each model, the implementation of the WTG or DGW method involves a simulated column which is coupled to a reference state defined with profiles obtained from the same model in radiative‐convective equilibrium. The simulated column has the same surface conditions as the reference state and is initialized with profiles from the reference state. We performed systematic comparison of the behavior of different models under a consistent implementation of the WTG method and the DGW method and systematic comparison of the WTG and DGW methods in models with different physics and numerics. CRMs and SCMs produce a variety of behaviors under both WTG and DGW methods. Some of the models reproduce the reference state while others sustain a large‐scale circulation which results in either substantially lower or higher precipitation compared to the value of the reference state. CRMs show a fairly linear relationship between precipitation and circulation strength. SCMs display a wider range of behaviors than CRMs. Some SCMs under the WTG method produce zero precipitation. Within an individual SCM, a DGW simulation and a corresponding WTG simulation can produce different signed circulation. When initialized with a dry troposphere, DGW simulations always result in a precipitating equilibrium state. The greatest sensitivities to the initial moisture conditions occur for multiple stable equilibria in some WTG simulations, corresponding to either a dry equilibrium state when initialized as dry or a precipitating equilibrium state when initialized as moist. Multiple equilibria are seen in more WTG simulations for higher SST. In some models, the existence of multiple equilibria is sensitive to some parameters in the WTG calculations. PMID:27642500

  13. Intercomparison of methods of coupling between convection and large-scale circulation. 1. Comparison over uniform surface conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Daleu, C. L.; Plant, R. S.; Woolnough, S. J.; Sessions, S.; Herman, M. J.; Sobel, A.; Wang, S.; Kim, D.; Cheng, A.; Bellon, G.; Peyrille, P.; Ferry, F.; Siebesma, P.; van Ulft, L.

    2015-10-24

    Here, as part of an international intercomparison project, a set of single-column models (SCMs) and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are run under the weak-temperature gradient (WTG) method and the damped gravity wave (DGW) method. For each model, the implementation of the WTG or DGW method involves a simulated column which is coupled to a reference state defined with profiles obtained from the same model in radiative-convective equilibrium. The simulated column has the same surface conditions as the reference state and is initialized with profiles from the reference state. We performed systematic comparison of the behavior of different models under a consistent implementation of the WTG method and the DGW method and systematic comparison of the WTG and DGW methods in models with different physics and numerics. CRMs and SCMs produce a variety of behaviors under both WTG and DGW methods. Some of the models reproduce the reference state while others sustain a large-scale circulation which results in either substantially lower or higher precipitation compared to the value of the reference state. CRMs show a fairly linear relationship between precipitation and circulation strength. SCMs display a wider range of behaviors than CRMs. Some SCMs under the WTG method produce zero precipitation. Within an individual SCM, a DGW simulation and a corresponding WTG simulation can produce different signed circulation. When initialized with a dry troposphere, DGW simulations always result in a precipitating equilibrium state. The greatest sensitivities to the initial moisture conditions occur for multiple stable equilibria in some WTG simulations, corresponding to either a dry equilibrium state when initialized as dry or a precipitating equilibrium state when initialized as moist. Multiple equilibria are seen in more WTG simulations for higher SST. In some models, the existence of multiple equilibria is sensitive to some parameters in the WTG calculations.

  14. Metabolically Coupled Replicator Systems: Overview of an RNA-world model concept of prebiotic evolution on mineral surfaces.

    PubMed

    Czárán, Tamás; Könnyű, Balázs; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-09-21

    Metabolically Coupled Replicator Systems (MCRS) are a family of models implementing a simple, physico-chemically and ecologically feasible scenario for the first steps of chemical evolution towards life. Evolution in an abiotically produced RNA-population sets in as soon as any one of the RNA molecules become autocatalytic by engaging in template directed self-replication from activated monomers, and starts increasing exponentially. Competition for the finite external supply of monomers ignites selection favouring RNA molecules with catalytic activity helping self-replication by any possible means. One way of providing such autocatalytic help is to become a replicase ribozyme. An additional way is through increasing monomer supply by contributing to monomer synthesis from external resources, i.e., by evolving metabolic enzyme activity. Retroevolution may build up an increasingly autotrophic, cooperating community of metabolic ribozymes running an increasingly complicated and ever more efficient metabolism. Maintaining such a cooperating community of metabolic replicators raises two serious ecological problems: one is keeping the system coexistent in spite of the different replicabilities of the cooperating replicators; the other is constraining parasitism, i.e., keeping "cheaters" in check. Surface-bound MCRS provide an automatic solution to both problems: coexistence and parasite resistance are the consequences of assuming the local nature of metabolic interactions. In this review we present an overview of results published in previous articles, showing that these effects are, indeed, robust in different MCRS implementations, by considering different environmental setups and realistic chemical details in a few different models. We argue that the MCRS model framework naturally offers a suitable starting point for the future modelling of membrane evolution and extending the theory to cover the emergence of the first protocell in a self-consistent manner. The

  15. Intercomparison of methods of coupling between convection and large‐scale circulation: 1. Comparison over uniform surface conditions

    PubMed Central

    Plant, R. S.; Woolnough, S. J.; Sessions, S.; Herman, M. J.; Sobel, A.; Wang, S.; Kim, D.; Cheng, A.; Bellon, G.; Peyrille, P.; Ferry, F.; Siebesma, P.; van Ulft, L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As part of an international intercomparison project, a set of single‐column models (SCMs) and cloud‐resolving models (CRMs) are run under the weak‐temperature gradient (WTG) method and the damped gravity wave (DGW) method. For each model, the implementation of the WTG or DGW method involves a simulated column which is coupled to a reference state defined with profiles obtained from the same model in radiative‐convective equilibrium. The simulated column has the same surface conditions as the reference state and is initialized with profiles from the reference state. We performed systematic comparison of the behavior of different models under a consistent implementation of the WTG method and the DGW method and systematic comparison of the WTG and DGW methods in models with different physics and numerics. CRMs and SCMs produce a variety of behaviors under both WTG and DGW methods. Some of the models reproduce the reference state while others sustain a large‐scale circulation which results in either substantially lower or higher precipitation compared to the value of the reference state. CRMs show a fairly linear relationship between precipitation and circulation strength. SCMs display a wider range of behaviors than CRMs. Some SCMs under the WTG method produce zero precipitation. Within an individual SCM, a DGW simulation and a corresponding WTG simulation can produce different signed circulation. When initialized with a dry troposphere, DGW simulations always result in a precipitating equilibrium state. The greatest sensitivities to the initial moisture conditions occur for multiple stable equilibria in some WTG simulations, corresponding to either a dry equilibrium state when initialized as dry or a precipitating equilibrium state when initialized as moist. Multiple equilibria are seen in more WTG simulations for higher SST. In some models, the existence of multiple equilibria is sensitive to some parameters in the WTG calculations.

  16. Intercomparison of methods of coupling between convection and large-scale circulation. 1. Comparison over uniform surface conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Daleu, C. L.; Plant, R. S.; Woolnough, S. J.; Sessions, S.; Herman, M. J.; Sobel, A.; Wang, S.; Kim, D.; Cheng, A.; Bellon, G.; et al

    2015-10-24

    Here, as part of an international intercomparison project, a set of single-column models (SCMs) and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are run under the weak-temperature gradient (WTG) method and the damped gravity wave (DGW) method. For each model, the implementation of the WTG or DGW method involves a simulated column which is coupled to a reference state defined with profiles obtained from the same model in radiative-convective equilibrium. The simulated column has the same surface conditions as the reference state and is initialized with profiles from the reference state. We performed systematic comparison of the behavior of different models under a consistentmore » implementation of the WTG method and the DGW method and systematic comparison of the WTG and DGW methods in models with different physics and numerics. CRMs and SCMs produce a variety of behaviors under both WTG and DGW methods. Some of the models reproduce the reference state while others sustain a large-scale circulation which results in either substantially lower or higher precipitation compared to the value of the reference state. CRMs show a fairly linear relationship between precipitation and circulation strength. SCMs display a wider range of behaviors than CRMs. Some SCMs under the WTG method produce zero precipitation. Within an individual SCM, a DGW simulation and a corresponding WTG simulation can produce different signed circulation. When initialized with a dry troposphere, DGW simulations always result in a precipitating equilibrium state. The greatest sensitivities to the initial moisture conditions occur for multiple stable equilibria in some WTG simulations, corresponding to either a dry equilibrium state when initialized as dry or a precipitating equilibrium state when initialized as moist. Multiple equilibria are seen in more WTG simulations for higher SST. In some models, the existence of multiple equilibria is sensitive to some parameters in the WTG calculations.« less

  17. Tropical Indian Ocean surface salinity bias in Climate Forecasting System coupled models and the role of upper ocean processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parekh, Anant; Chowdary, Jasti S.; Sayantani, Ojha; Fousiya, T. S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study sea surface salinity (SSS) biases and seasonal tendency over the Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) in the coupled models [Climate Forecasting System version 1 (CFSv1) and version 2 (CFSv2)] are examined with respect to observations. Both CFSv1 and CFSv2 overestimate SSS over the TIO throughout the year. CFSv1 displays improper SSS seasonal cycle over the Bay of Bengal (BoB), which is due to weaker model precipitation and improper river runoff especially during summer and fall. Over the southeastern Arabian Sea (AS) weak horizontal advection associated with East Indian coastal current during winter limits the formation of spring fresh water pool. On the other hand, weaker Somali jet during summer results for reduced positive salt tendency in the central and eastern AS. Strong positive precipitation bias in CFSv1 over the region off Somalia during winter, weaker vertical mixing and absence of horizontal salt advection lead to unrealistic barrier layer during winter and spring. The weaker stratification and improper spatial distribution of barrier layer thickness (BLT) in CFSv1 indicate that not only horizontal flux distribution but also vertical salt distribution displays large discrepancies. Absence of fall Wyrtki jet and winter equatorial currents in this model limit the advection of horizontal salt flux to the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. The associated weaker stratification in eastern equatorial Indian Ocean can lead to deeper mixed layer and negative Sea Surface Temperature (SST) bias, which in turn favor positive Indian Ocean Dipole bias in CFSv1. It is important to note that improper spatial distribution of barrier layer and stratification can alter the air-sea interaction and precipitation in the models. On the other hand CFSv2 could produce the seasonal evolution and spatial distribution of SSS, BLT and stratification better than CFSv1. However CFSv2 displays positive bias in evaporation over the whole domain and negative bias in

  18. Energy balance closure methods of eddy covariance data tested by a coupled land surface - crop growth model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingwersen, J.; Högy, P.; Fangmeier, A.; Streck, T.

    2012-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) flux data are used worldwide to test and parameterize land surface and crop growth models. A hitherto unsolved problem is, however, that the energy balance of EC flux data is typically not closed, so that, at least in modeling studies, the measured fluxes must be corrected. Typical gaps range between 20% and 30%. Gaps are usually most frequently filled up on the assumption that the missing turbulent fluxes have the same Bowen ratio as the measured ones (Twine et al., 2000). There is, however, an ongoing debate about the validity of this assumption (Foken, 2008, Ingwersen et al., 2011). Recent studies suggest that the gap should rather be assigned to sensible heat flux (H-correction). The fill-up procedure may heavily affect model calibration (Ingwersen et al. 2011). The aim of the present study was to test the fill-up procedures against independently modeled turbulent flux data. For the comparison, we used EC flux data measured from 2009 to 2011 at four winter wheat stands in Kraichgau, Southwest Germany. In addition, we regularly measured plant data such as BBCH development stage, leaf area index, plant height, and the biomass of straw and grain. The average energy balance closure of the EC flux data was between 70% and 85%. The energy gap was filled up either by the Bowen ratio method or the H-correction. Latent and sensible heat fluxes were simulated using our new coupled land surface - crop growth model (NOAH-GECROS). The crop growth model GECROS simulates photosynthesis with the well-known Farquhar approach. The Farquhar model was mainly parameterized in the 1980s, based on leaf chamber measurements. The NOAH-GECROS model was calibrated against the observed plant data, but not the EC flux data. In other words, the modeled latent heat fluxes are independent from the measured and corrected EC flux data. The simulated latent and sensible heat fluxes matched the H-corrected EC fluxes very well, but totally mismatched the Bowen-ratio corrected

  19. Self-Induced Surface Texturing of AL2O3 by Means of Inductively Coupled Plasma Reactive Ion Etching in CL2 Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batoni, Paolo; Stokes, Edward B.; Shah, Trushant K.; Hodge, Michael D.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2007-06-01

    In this work we investigate a pseudo-random surface texturing technique of sapphire by means of inductively coupled plasma reacting ion etching in chlorine chemistry, for which no sophisticated lithographic process is required. Such a surface texturing technique, which we believe offers indicative promise for enhanced light extraction in deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes has allowed us to texture sapphire samples having a surface larger than 1 cm2 with controlled structures. Fabrication parameters have been characterized, and textured Al2O3 surfaces having submicron features, and nano-scale periodicity have been obtained. Performance, and characterization of our textured Al2O3 surfaces is the hinge of addition work in progress.

  20. Progress Towards Coupled Simulation of Surface/Subsurface Hydrologic Processes and Terrestrial Ecosystem Dynamics Using the Community Models PFLOTRAN and CLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, R. T.; Bisht, G.; Karra, S.; Hoffman, F. M.; Hammond, G. E.; Kumar, J.; Painter, S.; Thornton, P. E.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2012-12-01

    Accurately simulating regional water cycle dynamics is challenging because of strong soil moisture-rainfall feedbacks and large uncertainties associated with vegetation and energy interactions. Earth system models of today cannot accurately capture such interactions, because current-generation land surface models (LSMs) 1) do not explicitly represent the fine-scale spatial variability of topography, soils, and vegetation that play a significant role in determining the response of hydrologic states (soil moisture) and fluxes (interception, infiltration, runoff, evapotranspiration) and 2) over-simplify or completely omit some key physical processes, such as lateral flow of water and heat, surface-subsurface interactions, realistic groundwater-vadose zone interactions, and freeze-thaw dynamics. Capturing such processes is critically important for predicting regional precipitation, vegetation productivity, and the disposition of carbon stored in potentially vulnerable permafrost under scenarios of climate change. Towards this end, we have added coupled surface water-groundwater interactions to the the open-source, massively parallel flow and reactive transport model PFLOTRAN, and have been developing a framework for coupling PFLOTRAN with the Community Land Model (CLM). PFLOTRAN is an open-source (LGPL-licensed) code -- with a growing community of users -- developed for simulation of multiscale, multiphase, multicomponent subsurface flow and reactive transport problems on machines ranging from laptops to leadership-class supercomputers. It has been applied in studies of contaminant fate and transport, geologic CO2 sequestration, and geothermal energy production, among others, and has been run using up to 262,144 processor cores on Jaguar, the Cray XK6 supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We have recently added a surface flow component in PFLOTRAN that is integrated with the subsurface. The underlying solver framework employed allows significant flexibility

  1. Production of a two-years meteorological dataset with a coupling framework between a Limited Area Atmospheric Model and a sequential Land Surface Temperature Assimilation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Lorenzo; Castelli, Fabio; Entekhabi, Dara; Caparrini, Francesca

    2010-05-01

    The representation of the surface phenomena like the turbulent exchange of heat between the land and the atmosphere is a traditional weakness in the atmospheric models. These phenomena have been often neglected or poorly represented in the past, especially in the Global Circulation Models. The modern generation models (in particular Limited Area Models) present, on the opposite, much more accurate modelizations that require very complex parametrization, difficult or impossible to retrieve with sufficient accuracy. In this work remote sensed maps of Land Surface Temperature retrieved by MSG-SEVIRI sensor have been used in a 1D variational assimilation scheme in order to produce optimal estimates of the surface energy budget in terms of sensible and latent heat fluxes patterns. This assimilation scheme, ACHAB, has then been coupled with the limited area atmospheric model RAMS replacing the surface module of the latter, LEAF-3, with the assimilation run products. A two years long meteorological dataset (March 1st, 2005 - December 31st, 2006) was produced on the Italian territory using this coupling framework. A control run was used in order to evaluate performances of the atmospheric model also in absence of the LST assimilation. Evaluations of the results of the coupling framework by comparison with both observations of the ground sensors network and the atmospheric soundings available in the study period are presented.

  2. Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Jianbing Dong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Xiuting; Yin, Zhanmin

    2014-03-15

    Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

  3. Preparation of anti-adhesion surfaces on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds using a coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jianbing; Dong, Xiaojuan; Wei, Xiuting; Yin, Zhanmin

    2014-03-01

    Hard anti-adhesion surfaces, with low roughness and wear resistance, on aluminium substrates of rubber plastic moulds were fabricated via a new coupling method of liquid plasma and electrochemical machining. With the aid of liquid plasma thermal polishing and electrochemical anodic dissolution, micro/nano-scale binary structures were prepared as the base of the anti-adhesion surfaces. The anti-adhesion behaviours of the resulting aluminium surfaces were analysed by a surface roughness measuring instrument, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), a Fourier-transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), an optical contact angle meter, a digital Vickers micro-hardness (Hv) tester, and electronic universal testing. The results show that, after the liquid plasma and electrochemical machining, micro/nano-scale binary structures composed of micro-scale pits and nano-scale elongated boss structures were present on the sample surfaces. As a result, the anti-adhesion surfaces fabricated by the above coupling method have good anti-adhesion properties, better wear resistance and lower roughness.

  4. Study on the electromechanical coupling coefficient of Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves in semi-infinite piezoelectrics/non-piezoelectrics superlattices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Zhang, Yinhong; Lin, Shuyu; Fu, Zhiqiang

    2014-02-01

    The electromechanical coupling coefficient of Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves in semi-infinite piezoelectrics/non-piezoelectrics superlattices is investigated by the transfer matrix method. Research results show the high electromechanical coupling coefficient can be obtained in these systems. The optimization design of it is also discussed fully. It is significantly influenced by electrical boundary conditions on interfaces, thickness ratios of piezoelectric and non-piezoelectric layers, and material parameters (such as velocities of pure longitudinal and transversal bulk waves in non-piezoelectric layers). In order to obtain higher electromechanical coupling coefficient, shorted interfaces, non-piezoelectric materials with large velocities of longitudinal and transversal bulk waves, and proper thickness ratios should be chosen.

  5. Evaluation of a coupled model for numerical simulation of a multiphase flow system in a porous medium and a surface fluid.

    PubMed

    Hibi, Yoshihiko; Tomigashi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations that couple flow in a surface fluid with that in a porous medium are useful for examining problems of pollution that involve interactions among atmosphere, water, and groundwater, including saltwater intrusion along coasts. Coupled numerical simulations of such problems must consider both vertical flow between the surface fluid and the porous medium and complicated boundary conditions at their interface. In this study, a numerical simulation method coupling Navier-Stokes equations for surface fluid flow and Darcy equations for flow in a porous medium was developed. Then, the basic ability of the coupled model to reproduce (1) the drawdown of a surface fluid observed in square-pillar experiments, using pillars filled with only fluid or with fluid and a porous medium and (2) the migration of saltwater (salt concentration 0.5%) in the porous medium using the pillar filled with fluid and a porous medium was evaluated. Simulations that assumed slippery walls reproduced well the results with drawdowns of 10-30 cm when the pillars were filled with packed sand, gas, and water. Moreover, in the simulation of saltwater infiltration by the method developed in this study, velocity was precisely reproduced because the experimental salt concentration in the porous medium after saltwater infiltration was similar to that obtained in the simulation. Furthermore, conditions across the boundary between the porous medium and the surface fluid were satisfied in these numerical simulations of square-pillar experiments in which vertical flow predominated. Similarly, the velocity obtained by the simulation for a system coupling flow in surface fluid with that in a porous medium when horizontal flow predominated satisfied the condit