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Sample records for probabilistic shock initiation

  1. Augmenting Probabilistic Risk Assesment with Malevolent Initiators

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder

    2011-11-01

    As commonly practiced, the use of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in nuclear power plants only considers accident initiators such as natural hazards, equipment failures, and human error. Malevolent initiators are ignored in PRA, but are considered the domain of physical security, which uses vulnerability assessment based on an officially specified threat (design basis threat). This paper explores the implications of augmenting and extending existing PRA models by considering new and modified scenarios resulting from malevolent initiators. Teaming the augmented PRA models with conventional vulnerability assessments can cost-effectively enhance security of a nuclear power plant. This methodology is useful for operating plants, as well as in the design of new plants. For the methodology, we have proposed an approach that builds on and extends the practice of PRA for nuclear power plants for security-related issues. Rather than only considering 'random' failures, we demonstrated a framework that is able to represent and model malevolent initiating events and associated plant impacts.

  2. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  3. Shock Initiation of Heterogeneous Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Reaugh, J E

    2004-05-10

    The fundamental picture that shock initiation in heterogeneous explosives is caused by the linking of hot spots formed at inhomogeneities was put forward by several researchers in the 1950's and 1960's, and more recently. Our work uses the computer hardware and software developed in the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program of the U.S. Department of Energy to explicitly include heterogeneities at the scale of the explosive grains and to calculate the consequences of realistic although approximate models of explosive behavior. Our simulations are performed with ALE-3D, a three-dimensional, elastic-plastic-hydrodynamic Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler finite-difference program, which includes chemical kinetics and heat transfer, and which is under development at this laboratory. We developed the parameter values for a reactive-flow model to describe the non-ideal detonation behavior of an HMX-based explosive from the results of grain-scale simulations. In doing so, we reduced the number of free parameters that are inferred from comparison with experiment to a single one - the characteristic defect dimension. We also performed simulations of the run to detonation in small volumes of explosive. These simulations illustrate the development of the reaction zone and the acceleration of the shock front as the flame fronts start from hot spots, grow, and interact behind the shock front. In this way, our grain-scale simulations can also connect to continuum experiments directly.

  4. Reflected-shock initiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Ferm, E.N.; Hull, L.M.

    1993-08-01

    In a study of initiations caused by reflected shock from a high-impedance boundary, attempts to establish sufficient conditions for initiative are described. Shock polar analysis is used to discover the ranges of various flow regimes, general shock structures and pressure estimates of states behind the reflected wave. Using this knowledge, wave structure growth rates from hydrocode simulations are estimated and standard-shock initiation criteria are used; experiments are designed in which the initiation from a reflected-shock wave structure appears likely. Two experiments are described in which a reflected-shock wave from a uranium surface initiated PBX 9502. The experimental evidence is in good agreement with the assumptions and results of the analysis.

  5. Initial conditions of radiative shock experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Krauland, C. M.; Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Rutter, E.; Torralva, B.; Holloway, J. P.; Bingham, D.; Goh, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Sorce, A. T.

    2013-05-15

    We performed experiments at the Omega Laser Facility to characterize the initial, laser-driven state of a radiative shock experiment. These experiments aimed to measure the shock breakout time from a thin, laser-irradiated Be disk. The data are then used to inform a range of valid model parameters, such as electron flux limiter and polytropic γ, used when simulating radiative shock experiments using radiation hydrodynamics codes. The characterization experiment and the radiative shock experiment use a laser irradiance of ∼7 × 10{sup 14} W cm{sup −2} to launch a shock in the Be disk. A velocity interferometer and a streaked optical pyrometer were used to infer the amount of time for the shock to move through the Be disk. The experimental results were compared with simulation results from the Hyades code, which can be used to model the initial conditions of a radiative shock system using the CRASH code.

  6. Initial guidelines for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.

    1994-10-01

    In the late 1980s, the methodology for performing probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) was exercised extensively for eastern-U.S. nuclear power plant sites by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under NRC sponsorship. Unfortunately, the seismic-hazard-curve results of these two studies differed substantially for many of the eastern reactor sites, which has motivated all concerned to revisit the approaches taken. This project is that revisitation.

  7. Shock Initiation of Energetic Materials at Different Initial Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Tarver, C M

    2005-01-14

    Shock initiation is one of the most important properties of energetic materials, which must transition to detonation exactly as intended when intentionally shocked and not detonate when accidentally shocked. The development of manganin pressure gauges that are placed inside the explosive charge and record the buildup of pressure upon shock impact has greatly increased the knowledge of these reactive flows. This experimental data, together with similar data from electromagnetic particle velocity gauges, has allowed us to formulate the Ignition and Growth model of shock initiation and detonation in hydrodynamic computer codes for predictions of shock initiation scenarios that cannot be tested experimentally. An important problem in shock initiation of solid explosives is the change in sensitivity that occurs upon heating (or cooling). Experimental manganin pressure gauge records and the corresponding Ignition and Growth model calculations are presented for two solid explosives, LX-17 (92.5 % triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB) with 7.5 % Kel-F binder) and LX-04 (85 % octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazine (HMX) with 15 % Viton binder) at several initial temperatures.

  8. Shock compression and initiation behavior of FEFO

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.L.; Helm, F.H.; von Holtz, E.H.

    1988-11-11

    A series of experiments were carried out on FEFO to determine the non-reactive equation of state and initiation sensitivity to one- dimensional shock loading. The material was found to be extremely insensitive requiring approximately 13.0 GPa to initiate it. Pressure records indicate that the build-up to detonation may occur within the FEFO and not at the impactor-sample interface as is often assumed. In addition, it was found that the compression vs. detonation induction time behavior between FEFO and three nitroalkanes are approximately the same although the shock pressure thresholds are quite different. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Shock-initiation chemistry of nitroarenes

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, L.L.; Brower, K.R.

    1997-11-01

    The authors present evidence that the shock-initiation chemistry of nitroarenes is dominated by the intermolecular hydrogen transfer mechanism discussed previously. The acceleration by pressure, kinetic isotope effect, and product distribution are consistent with the bimolecular transition state kinetic isotope effect, and product distribution are consistent with the bimolecular transition state rather than rate-determining C-N homolysis.GC-MS analysis of samples which were subjected to a shock wave generated by detonation of nitromethane shows that nitrobenzene produces aniline and biphenyl, and o-nitrotoluene forms aniline, toluene, o-toluidine and o-cresol, but not anthranil, benzoxazinone, or cyanocyclopentandiene. In isotopic labeling experiments o-nitrotoluene and TNT show extensive H-D exchange on their methyl groups, and C-N bond rupture is not consistent with the formation of aniline from nitrobenzene or nitrotoluene, nor the formation of o-toluidine from o-nitrotoluene. Recent work incorporating fast TOF mass spectroscopy of samples shocked and quenched by adiabatic expansion shows that the initial chemical reactions in shocked solid nitroaromatic explosives proceed along this path.

  10. Shock initiation of detonation in nitromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, B.; Presles, H. N.; Baudin, G.

    1998-07-01

    The processes involved in the initiation of nitromethane (NM) have been the subject of many experiments and theoretical studies. These studies generally support the classical homogeneous model though some details of the buildup process are still controversial. In order to clarify these points, we have performed plate impact experiments to study the initiation of NM under conditions of steady one dimensional strain, for shock pressures ranging from 8.5 to 12 GPa. A six wavelength optical pyrometer, with 3 ns rise-time and a temperature range of 1500-6000 K, was used to determine the temperature during shock-to-detonation transition. A Fabry-Perot interferometer with a capacitor transducer and piezoelectric pins were also used to analyse the temperature profiles and to determine the sequence of events during the initiation process. According to our experimental results, it seems that, unlike Campbell et al. assumptions, the superdetonation does not start at the plate/NM interface, but at a run distance inside the NM depending on the shock level.

  11. Shock initiation of detonation in nitromethane.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal, Blandine; Presles, Henri-Noel; Baudin, Gerard

    1997-07-01

    The processes involved in the initiation of nitromethane (NM) have been the subject of many experiments and theoretical studies. These studies generally support the classical homogeneous model though some details of the buildup process are still controversial. In order to clarify these points, we have performed plate impact experiments to study the initiation of NM under conditions of steady one dimensionnal strain, for shock pressures ranging from 9 to 12GPa. A six wavelength optical pyrometer, with 3ns rise-time and a temperature range of 1500-6000K, was used to determine the temperature during shock-to-detonation transition. A Fabry-Perot interferometer with a capacitor transducer and piezoelectric pins were also used to analyse the temperature profiles and to determine the sequence of events during the initiation process. The experimental results showed that, unlike Campbell assumptions, the superdetonation does not start at the NM front surface, but at a run distance inside the NM depending on the shock level.

  12. Initial Probabilistic Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Fracture with Grizzly and Raven

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin; Hoffman, William; Sen, Sonat; Rabiti, Cristian; Dickson, Terry; Bass, Richard

    2015-10-01

    The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. The first application of Grizzly has been to study fracture in embrittled reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). Grizzly can be used to model the thermal/mechanical response of an RPV under transient conditions that would be observed in a pressurized thermal shock (PTS) scenario. The global response of the vessel provides boundary conditions for local models of the material in the vicinity of a flaw. Fracture domain integrals are computed to obtain stress intensity factors, which can in turn be used to assess whether a fracture would initiate at a pre-existing flaw. These capabilities have been demonstrated previously. A typical RPV is likely to contain a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. This flaw population is characterized stastistically through probability density functions of the flaw distributions. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation during a transient event. This report documents initial work to perform probabilistic analysis of RPV fracture during a PTS event using a combination of the RAVEN risk analysis code and Grizzly. This work is limited in scope, considering only a single flaw with deterministic geometry, but with uncertainty introduced in the parameters that influence fracture toughness. These results are benchmarked against equivalent models run in the FAVOR code. When fully developed, the RAVEN/Grizzly methodology for modeling probabilistic fracture in RPVs will provide a general capability that can be used to consider a wider variety of vessel and flaw conditions that are difficult to consider with current tools. In addition, this will provide access to advanced probabilistic techniques provided by RAVEN, including adaptive sampling and parallelism, which can dramatically

  13. Shock initiated instabilities in underwater cylindrical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sachin; Matos, Helio; LeBlanc, James M.; Shukla, Arun

    2016-10-01

    An experimental investigation to understand the mechanisms of dynamic buckling instability in cylindrical structures due to underwater explosive loadings is conducted. In particular, the effects of initial hydrostatic pressure coupled with a dynamic pressure pulse on the stability of metallic cylindrical shells are evaluated. The experiments are conducted at varying initial hydrostatic pressures, below the critical buckling pressure, to estimate the threshold after which dynamic buckling will initiate. The transient underwater full-field deformations of the structures during shock wave loading are captured using high-speed stereo photography coupled with modified 3-D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique. Experimental results show that increasing initial hydrostatic pressure decreases the natural vibration frequency of the structure indicating loss in structural stiffness. DIC measurements reveal that the initial structural excitations primarily consist of axisymmetric vibrations due to symmetrical shock wave loading in the experiments. Following their decay after a few longitudinal reverberations, the primary mode of vibration evolves which continues throughout later in time. At the initial hydrostatic pressures below the threshold value, these vibrations are stable in nature. The analytical solutions for the vibration frequency and the transient response of cylindrical shell are discussed in the article by accounting for both (1) the added mass effect of the surrounding water and (2) the effect of initial stress on the shell imposed by the hydrostatic pressure. The analytical solutions match reasonably well with the experimental vibration frequencies. Later, the transient response of a cylindrical shell subjected to a general underwater pressure wave loading is derived which leads to the analytical prediction of dynamic stability.

  14. Investigating short-pulse shock initiation thresholds in HMX-based explosives with reactive mesoscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H.; May, C.; Tarver, C.; Reaugh, J.

    2013-06-01

    Short-pulse loading experiments have demonstrated the probabilistic nature of shock initiation thresholds in a variety of explosives. The intensely loaded region of explosive adjacent to the flyer impact zone, and its potential hot spots, influences the overall sample shock sensitivity. As the size of this region decreases below the representative volume element size, the likelihood of sampling differing hot spot densities in it increases from sample to sample. We hypothesize that this variation in active hot spots contributes to the probabilistic nature of short-pulse shock initiation. We investigate the role of microstructure and explosive reactive properties on shock initiation response with mesoscale simulations of miniature flyer plate experiments. LX-10 (95%wt HMX, 5%wt Viton A) is the model explosive. To investigate the influence of microstructure, we vary void size and spatial position. While void volume fraction and HMX grain size distributions are fixed, assigning random spatial positions to these parameters leads to hot spot density variations over many microstructural realizations. HMX reactivity is also investigated. The influences of microstructure and reactivity parameters are discussed. This study enables the development of predictive shock sensitivity models with basic structure-property information. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded in part by the Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Program.

  15. Shock initiation of 1,3,3-trinitroazetidine (TNAZ)

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, R.L.; Urtiew, P.A.; Tarver, C.M.

    1995-07-19

    The shock sensitivity of the pressed solid explosive 1,3,3-trinitroazetidine (TNAZ) was determined using the embedded manganin pressure gauge technique. At an initial pressure of 1.3 GPa, pressure buildup (exothermic reaction) was observed after ten {mu}s. At 2 GPa, TNAZ reacted rapidly and transitioned to detonation in approximately 13 mm. At 3.6 GPa, detonation occurred in less than 6 mm of shock propagation. Thus, pure TNAZ is more shock sensitive than HMX-based explosives but less shock sensitive than PETN-based explosives. The shocked TNAZ exhibited little reaction directly behind the shock front, followed by an extremely rapid reaction. This reaction caused both a detonation wave and a retonation wave in the partially decomposed TNAZ. An Ignition and Growth reactive model for TNAZ was developed to help understand this complex initiation phenomenon.

  16. INITIAL WASTE PACKAGE PROBABILISTIC CRITICALITY ANALYSIS: UNCANISTERED FUEL (TBV)

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Massari

    1995-10-06

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to provide an assessment of the present waste package design from a criticality risk standpoint, The specific objectives of this initial analysis are to: (1) Establish a process for determining the probability of waste package criticality as a function of time (in terms of a cumulative distribution function, probability distribution function, or expected number of criticalities in a specified time interval) for various waste package concepts; (2) Demonstrate the established process by estimating the probability of criticality as a function of time since emplacement for an intact uncanistered fuel waste package (UCF-WP) configuration; and (3) Identify the dominant sequences leading to waste package criticality for subsequent detailed analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to document and demonstrate the developed process as it has been applied to the UCF-WP. This revision is performed to correct deficiencies in the previous revision and provide further detail on the calculations performed. Due to the current lack of knowledge in a number of areas, every attempt has been made to ensure that the all calculations and assumptions were conservative. This analysis is preliminary in nature, and is intended to be superseded by at least two more versions prior to license application. The information and assumptions used to generate this analysis are unverified and have been globally assigned TBV identifier TBV-059-WPD. Future versions of this analysis will update these results, possibly replacing the global TBV with a small number of TBV's on individual items, with the goal of removing all TBV designations by license application submittal. The final output of this document, the probability of UCF-WP criticality as a function of time, is therefore, also TBV. This document is intended to deal only with the risk of internal criticality with unaltered fuel

  17. The Role of Shear in Shock Initiation of Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cart, E. J.; Lee, R. J.; Gustavson, P. K.; Coffey, C. S.; Sutherland, G. T.

    2004-07-01

    This describes an experiment to test the hypothesis that the energy dissipated due to shear driven plastic deformation provides the hot spots needed for shock initiation of explosives. To develop controlled shear, sinusoidal shock wave fronts were generated and used to initiate PBXN-110 explosive charges. A threshold level was found for nearly flat shock wave fronts that did not initiate the explosive charges yet sinusoidal shock waves of lower amplitude caused initiation in the regions of maximum shear and not in the regions of minimum shear in identical explosive charges. As predicted, initiation occurred as long rows centered over the regions of maximum slope — maximum shear of the corrugated sinusoidal surface. These experiments will be discussed in detail.

  18. Overview of Future of Probabilistic Methods and RMSL Technology and the Probabilistic Methods Education Initiative for the US Army at the SAE G-11 Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.

    2003-01-01

    The SAE G-11 RMSL Division and Probabilistic Methods Committee meeting sponsored by the Picatinny Arsenal during March 1-3, 2004 at Westin Morristown, will report progress on projects for probabilistic assessment of Army system and launch an initiative for probabilistic education. The meeting features several Army and industry Senior executives and Ivy League Professor to provide an industry/government/academia forum to review RMSL technology; reliability and probabilistic technology; reliability-based design methods; software reliability; and maintainability standards. With over 100 members including members with national/international standing, the mission of the G-11s Probabilistic Methods Committee is to enable/facilitate rapid deployment of probabilistic technology to enhance the competitiveness of our industries by better, faster, greener, smarter, affordable and reliable product development.

  19. Shock initiation of a heated ammonium perchlorate-based propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Urtiew, P.A.; Tao, W.C.

    1996-04-01

    Solid propellants are containing ammonium perchlorate (AP), aluminum, and a carboxylterminated polybutadiene binder (CTPB) are known to burn reliably and to be very insensitive to transition to detonation under ambient conditions. In accident scenarios, these propellants may become more shock sensitive when they are subjected to heat and/or multiple impacts. The shock sensitivity of one such propellant, ANB-3066, is determined using embedded manganin pressure gauges at an elevated temperature of 170 C. The measured pressure histories are modeled using the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model of shock initiation and detonation. The experiments clearly show that ANB-3066 is not significant more shock sensitive at 170 C than it is at ambient temperature. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow calculations indicate that less than 20% of the chemical energy of AP and CTPB reactions is released at input shock pressures as high as 21 GPa. The aluminum component does not reach the high temperatures required for it to react. These results indicate that AP-based solid propellants are still extremely resistant to shock to detonation transition even when heated to temperatures close to the thermal decomposition temperature of the propellant formulation. The shock insensitivity of heated AP-based propellants is hypothesized to be due to the melting of the AP component during shock loading and the relatively low temperatures produced by the weakly exothermic decomposition of AP and binder.

  20. Pressurized thermal shock probabilistic fracture mechanics sensitivity analysis for Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Cheverton, R.D.; Bryson, J.W.; Bass, B.R.; Shum, D.K.M.; Keeney, J.A.

    1993-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform a pressurized-thermal-shock (PTS) probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) sensitivity analysis for the Yankee Rowe reactor pressure vessel, for the fluences corresponding to the end of operating cycle 22, using a specific small-break-loss- of-coolant transient as the loading condition. Regions of the vessel with distinguishing features were to be treated individually -- upper axial weld, lower axial weld, circumferential weld, upper plate spot welds, upper plate regions between the spot welds, lower plate spot welds, and the lower plate regions between the spot welds. The fracture analysis methods used in the analysis of through-clad surface flaws were those contained in the established OCA-P computer code, which was developed during the Integrated Pressurized Thermal Shock (IPTS) Program. The NRC request specified that the OCA-P code be enhanced for this study to also calculate the conditional probabilities of failure for subclad flaws and embedded flaws. The results of this sensitivity analysis provide the NRC with (1) data that could be used to assess the relative influence of a number of key input parameters in the Yankee Rowe PTS analysis and (2) data that can be used for readily determining the probability of vessel failure once a more accurate indication of vessel embrittlement becomes available. This report is designated as HSST report No. 117.

  1. Cylindrical converging shock initiation of reactive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Charles M.; Horie, Yasuyuki; Lindsay, Christopher Michael; Butler, George C.; Lambert, David; Welle, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Recent research has been conducted that builds on the Forbes et al. (1997) study of inducing a rapid solid state reaction in a highly porous core using a converging cylindrical shock driven by a high explosive. The high explosive annular charge used in this research to compress the center reactive core was comparable to PBXN-110. Some modifications were made on the physical configuration of the test item for scale-up and ease of production. The reactive materials (I2O5/Al and I2O5/Al/Teflon) were hand mixed and packed to a tap density of about 32 percent. Data provided by a Cordon 114 high speed framing camera and a Photon Doppler Velocimetry instrument provided exit gas expansion, core particle and cylinder wall velocities. Analysis indicates that the case expansion velocity differs according to the core formulation and behaved similar to the baseline high explosive core with the exit gas of the reactive materials producing comparable velocities. Results from CTH hydrocode used to model the test item compares favorably to the experimental results.

  2. Shock Initiation and Equation of State of Ammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, David; Sheffield, Steve; Dattelbaum, Dana; Chellappa, Raja; Velisavljevic, Nenad

    2013-06-01

    Ammonium nitrate (AN) is a widely used fertilizer and mining explosive commonly found in ammonium nitrate-fuel oil. Neat AN is a non-ideal explosive with measured detonation velocities approaching 4 km/s. Previously, we reported a thermodynamically-complete equation of state for AN based on its maximum density, and showed that near-full density AN did not initiate when subjected to shock input conditions up to 22 GPa. In this work, we extend these initial results, by presenting new Hugoniot data for intermediate density neat AN obtained from gas gun-driven plate impact experiments. AN at densities from 1.8 to 1.5 g/cm3 were impacted into LiF windows using a two-stage light gas gun. Dual VISARs were used to measure the interfacial particle velocity wave profile as a function of time following impact. The new Hugoniot data, in addition to updates to thermodynamic parameters derived from structural analysis and vibrational spectroscopy measurements in high pressure diamond anvil cell experiments, are used to refine the unreacted EOS for AN. Furthermore, shock initiation of neat AN was observed as the initial porosity increased (density decreased). Insights into the relationship(s) between initial density and shock initiation sensitivity are also presented, from evidence of shock initiation in the particle velocity profiles obtained for the lower density AN samples.

  3. Hot spot-derived shock initiation phenomena in heterogeneous nitromethane

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Stephen A; Stahl, David B; Dattelbaum, Andrew M

    2009-01-01

    The addition of solid silica particles to gelled nitromethane offers a tractable model system for interrogating the role of impedance mismatches as one type of hot spot 'seed' on the initiation behaviors of explosive formulations. Gas gun-driven plate impact experiments are used to produce well-defined shock inputs into nitromethane-silica mixtures containing size-selected silica beads at 6 wt%. The Pop-plots or relationships between shock input pressure and rundistance (or time)-to-detonation for mixtures containing small (1-4 {micro}m) and large (40 {micro}m) beads are presented. Overall, the addition of beads was found to influence the shock sensitivity of the mixtures, with the smaller beads being more sensitizing than the larger beads, lowering the shock initiation threshold for the same run distance to detonation compared with neat nitromethane. In addition, the use of embedded electromagnetic gauges provides detailed information pertaining to the mechanism of the build-up to detonation and associated reactive flow. Of note, an initiation mechanism characteristic of homogeneous liquid explosives, such as nitromethane, was observed in the nitromethane-40 {micro}m diameter silica samples at high shock input pressures, indicating that the influence of hot spots on the initiation process was minimal under these conditions.

  4. Initial Climate Response to a Termination Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irvine, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The risk of the termination of a deployment of solar radiation management (SRM) geoengineering has been raised as one of the key concerns about these ideas. Early studies demonstrated that a rapid warming of the climate would follow such a termination with global mean temperatures rapidly rising towards the levels that would have been expected in the absence of SRM geoengineering. Further work has noted the contrasting timescale of the adjustment of global mean temperature and sea-level rise, with sea-levels responding much slower and not reaching the same levels as would have been the case in the absence of SRM geoengineering. Whilst these previous studies have shown the basics of the response to a termination of SRM, a detailed analysis of the climate response in the first months or years of a termination has not been investigated. To conduct such an analysis tens of simulations with a termination of SRM are conducted, starting from the end of a G1 simulation with the HadCM3 model. The termination is initiated in Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter to investigate whether the response depends on the season. Analyzing these results I find some novel dynamic responses in the initial months and years following a termination of SRM which have not been seen in previous studies which employed decadal-scale averages. These include: A reduction in the global-scale hydrological cycle's intensity in the first weeks following termination, counter to the longer-term increase; An almost instantaneous adjustment of land-mean precipitation to the equilibrium value; And substantial shifts in the pattern of precipitation in the initial years that are distinct from those seen in the equilibrium response and which are characterized by large increases in terrestrial precipitation and runoff in many regions.

  5. A Statistical Hot Spot Reactive Flow Model for Shock Initiation and Detonation of Solid High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, A L; Tarver, C M

    2002-07-01

    A statistical hot spot reactive flow model for shock initiation and detonation of solid high explosives developed in the ALE3D hydrodynamic computer code is presented. This model is intended to evolve into a physically correct description of the physical and chemical mechanisms that control the onset of shock initiation via hotspot formation, the growth (01 failure to grow) of these hotspots into the surrounding explosive particles, the rapid transition to detonation, and self-sustaining detonation. Mesoscale modeling of the shock compression and temperature dependent chemical decomposition of individual explosive particles are currently yielding accurate predictions of hot spot formation and the subsequent growth (or failure) of these hotspot reactions in the surrounding grains. For two- and three-dimensional simulations of larger scale explosive charges, a statistical hotspot model that averages over thousands of individual hotspot dimensions and temperatures and then allows exothermic chemical reactions to grow (or fail to grow) due to thermal conduction is required. This paper outlines a first approach to constructing a probabilistic hot spot formulation based on the number density of potential hotspot sites. These hotspots can then either ignite or die out if they do not exceed certain ignition criteria, which are based on physical properties of the explosive particles. The growing hot spots spread at burn velocities given by experimentally determined deflagration velocity versus pressure relationships. The mathematics and assumptions involved in formulating the model and practical examples of its usefulness are given.

  6. Microenergetic Shock Initiation Studies on Deposited Films of PETN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappan, Alexander S.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Trott, Wayne M.; Long, Gregory T.; Knepper, Robert; Brundage, Aaron L.; Jones, David A.

    2009-06-01

    Films of the high explosive PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) up to 500-μm thick have been deposited through physical vapor deposition, with the intent of creating well-defined samples for shock-initiation studies. PETN films were characterized with surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and focused ion beam nanotomography. These high-density films were subjected to strong shocks in both the in-plane and out-of-plane orientations. Initiation behavior was monitored with high-speed framing and streak camera photography. Direct initiation with a donor explosive (either RDX with binder, or CL-20 with binder) was possible in both orientations, but with the addition of a thin aluminum buffer plate (in-plane configuration only), initiation proved to be difficult due to the attenuated shock and the high density of the PETN films. Mesoscale models of microenergetic samples were created using the shock physics code CTH and compared with experimental results. The results of these experiments will be discussed in the context of small sample geometry, deposited film morphology, and density.

  7. Microenergetic Shock Initiation Studies on Deposited Films of Petn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappan, Alexander S.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Trott, Wayne M.; Long, Gregory T.; Knepper, Robert; Brundage, Aaron L.; Jones, David A.

    2009-12-01

    Films of the high explosive PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) up to 500-μm thick have been deposited through physical vapor deposition, with the intent of creating well-defined samples for shock-initiation studies. PETN films were characterized with microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and focused ion beam nanotomography. These high-density films were subjected to strong shocks in both the out-of-plane and in-plane orientations. Initiation behavior was monitored with high-speed framing and streak camera photography. Direct initiation with a donor explosive (either RDX with binder, or CL-20 with binder) was possible in both orientations, but with the addition of a thin aluminum buffer plate (in-plane configuration only), initiation proved to be difficult. Initiation was possible with an explosively-driven 0.13-mm thick Kapton flyer and direct observation of initiation behavior was examined using streak camera photography at different flyer velocities. Models of this configuration were created using the shock physics code CTH.

  8. Shock Initiation of Hexanitrostilbene at Ultra-high Shock Pressures and Critical Energy Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mike; Maisey, Matthew

    2011-06-01

    Hexanitrostilbene is a secondary explosive with attractive properties for detonator usage, including thermal stability, good safety properties and easy initiability. It is desirable to characterize the shock initiation of detonator explosives to enable optimization of system parameters. HNS is a suitable explosive for use in electrical and optical slapper detonators, where shock pressures generated by the flyer plates used can exceed 30 GPa. This extreme shock regime can be explored by initiating HNS with a variety of flyer thicknesses, from 3 to 25 microns at velocities of several km/s. Thresholds for optical and electrical slapper detonators were evaluated, and Photonic Doppler Velocimetery used to determine the flyer velocity at threshold. The flyer diameters are in excess of the critical diameter for HNS, allowing a one-dimensional treatment of the initiation. Calculated values for pressure and shock duration are used to evaluate the critical energy criteria Pn τ . The calculated value of n is compared to published values and discussed for similar systems. The James Criterion is used to analyze the initiation, with values of Ec and Σc being determined from experimental data, providing a predictive capability to model other configurations such as different flyer thicknesses and materials.

  9. Shock initiation of hexanitrostilbene at ultra-high shock pressures and critical energy determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, Mike; Maisey, Matthew Peter; Knowles, Sarah

    2012-03-01

    Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) is a secondary explosive with attractive properties for detonator usage, including thermal stability, good safety properties and easy initiability. It is desirable to characterize the shock initiation of detonator explosives to enable optimization of system parameters. HNS is a suitable explosive for use in electrical and optical slapper detonators, where shock pressures generated by the flyer plates used can exceed 30 GPa. This extreme shock regime can be explored by initiating HNS with a variety of flyer thicknesses, from 3 to 25 microns at velocities of several km/s. Thresholds for optical and electrical slapper detonators were evaluated, and Photonic Doppler Velocimetery used to determine the flyer velocity at threshold. The flyer diameters are in excess of the critical diameter for HNS, allowing a one-dimensional treatment of the initiation. Calculated values for pressure and shock duration are used to evaluate the critical energy criteria P2τ. The James Criterion is used to analyse the initiation, with values of EC and ΣC being determined from experimental data, providing a predictive capability to model other configurations such as different flyer thicknesses and materials.

  10. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  11. Non-Shock Initiation Model for Explosive Families: Numerical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, S. N.; Anderson, M. U.; Caipen, T. L.; Grady, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    A damage initiated reaction (DMGIR) computational model is being developed for the CTH shock physics code to predict the response of an explosive to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of reaction in the explosive, and its growth to detonation. The DMGIR model is a complement to the History Variable Reactive Burn (HVRB) model embedded in the current CTH code. Specifically designed experiments are supporting the development, implementation, and validation of the DMGIR numerical approach. PBXN-5 was the initial explosive material used experimentally to develop the DMGIR model. This explosive represents a family of plastically bonded explosives with good mechanical strength and rigid body properties. The model has been extended to cast explosives represented by Composition B.

  12. Extended Run Distance Measurements of Shock Initiation in PBX 9502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Alcon, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    We have completed a series of shock initiation experiments on two lots of PBX 9502 (95 weight % TATB, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder). One PBX 9502 lot contained few fine particles (10 weight % <20 microns) while the second lot contained many fines (38 weight % <20 microns). Large, 71 mm diameter PBX 9502 samples were used and input pressures were 7.5-8.5 GPa, resulting in run distances of 25-35 mm. Buildup to detonation was measured using embedded magnetic particle velocity gauges. An unusual feature of the work was the use of metallic impactors (316 stainless steel) in combination with magnetic gauges. It has previously been assumed that conducting impactors would badly perturb the magnetic gauge measurements. However, we observed only a baseline voltage shift of ≈10% which increased linearly with time. Results include detonation coordinates (x*, t*) vs. initial shock pressure. No lot to lot differences in initiation behavior were observed.

  13. Shock initiation experiments on ratchet grown PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, Richard L; Thompson, Darla G; Olinger, Barton W; Deluca, Racci; Bartram, Brian D; Pierce, Timothy H; Sanchez, Nathaniel J

    2010-01-01

    This study compares the shock initiation behavior of PBX 9502 pressed to less than nominal density (nominal density is 1.890 {+-} 0.005 g/cm{sup 3}) with PBX 9502 pressed to nominal density and then ''ratchet grown'' to low density. PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic bonded explosive consisting of 95 weight % dry-aminated tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) and 5 weight % Kel-F 800 plastic binder. ''Ratchet growth'' - an irreversible increase in specific volume - occurs when an explosive based on TATB is temperature cycled. The design of our study is as follows: PBX 9502, all from the same lot, received the following four treatments. Samples in the first group were pressed to less than nominal density. These were not ratchet grown and used as a baseline. Samples in the second group were pressed to nominal density and then ratchet grown by temperature cycling 30 times between -54 C and +80 C. Samples in the final group were pressed to nominal density and cut into 100 mm by 25.4 mm diameter cylinders. During thermal cycling the cylinders were axially constrained by a 100 psi load. Samples for shock initiation experiments were cut perpendicular (disks) and parallel (slabs) to the axial load. The four sample groups can be summarized with the terms pressed low, ratchet grown/no load, axial load/disks, and axial load/slabs. All samples were shock initiated with nearly identical inputs in plate impact experiments carried out on a gas gun. Wave profiles were measured after propagation through 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm of explosive. Side by side comparison of wave profiles from different samples is used as a measure of relative sensitivity. All reduced density samples were more shock sensitive than nominal density PBX 9502. Differences in shock sensitivity between ratchet grown and pressed to low density PBX 9502 were small, but the low density pressings are slightly more sensitive than the ratchet grown samples.

  14. Anomalous shock initiation of detonation in pentaerythritol tetranitrate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    The anomalous, low-stress, shock initiation of detonation observed in earlier studies of pentaerythritol tetranitrate single crystals was examined in more detail experimentally. Time-resolved particle-velocity histories were obtained for [110], [001] and [100] orientations of single-crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate explosive for shock input stresses of 4{endash}7 GPa using laser interferometry instrumentation. At about 4.2 GPa an elastic-plastic, two-wave structure was noted in [110] and [001] orientations, and a single shock wave for [100] orientation. The two-wave structure provides an explanation for the anomalous shock initiation sensitivity and intermediate velocity transition previously observed in [110] orientation at this stress level. It also explains details of fluorescent emission histories from [110] and [001] crystals previously measured. The orientation-dependent results are consistent with the model of steric hindrance to shear at the molecular level. Fits to the elastic Hugoniot data in [110] and [001] orientations are given as well as a revised fit for the bulk Hugoniot. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Progress in the Development of a Shock Initiation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, Philip M.; Benson, David J.

    2004-07-01

    We used an Eulerian hydrocode to guide the development of an engineering model of shock initiation. The model in its current form has two types of hotspots- one from void collapse, and one from interactions at grain boundaries. The dependence of hotspot and bulk temperatures upon shock strength is estimated using a Gruneisen equation of state for the bulk solid, calibrated against measurements of reaction times for steady state detonation. Arrhenius kinetics are used to predict ignition times associated with hotspot temperatures. The hotspots contribute a small amount of energy to the shock front, thereby causing some shock front acceleration, and also serve to initiate erosive burning. The two erosive burn reactions that result from the two different types of hotspots compete to consume the material. The energy release rate resulting from the competition of these reactions was used as input to a method of characteristics code. This in turn was used to calculate particle velocity — time profiles at various simulated gauge locations. These calculated profiles were compared with experiment.

  16. Hugoniot and Shock Initiation Studies of Isopropyl Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, S. A.; Davis, L. L.; Baer, M. R.; Engelke, Ray; Alcon, R. R.; Renlund, A. M.

    2002-07-01

    Isopropyl nitrate (IPN) is a liquid explosive of rather low energy. We have measured the sound speed and used it in the universal liquid Hugoniot to produce an estimated Hugoniot for this material. Gas-gun-driven, multiple-magnetic-gauge measurements were made to measure a Hugoniot state at 6 GPa; it was in good agreement with the prediction. Two similar experiments were conducted at higher pressure inputs to study the shock-to-detonation transition in IPN; the high inputs required for initiation necessitated the use of a two-stage gun. One experiment with an input of 9.0 GPa into the IPN produced a run to detonation of about 3 mm and the in-situ particle velocity profiles showed the expected homogeneous initiation behavior of a growing wave behind the shock front that overtakes the front and decays to a steady detonation. The reactive wave in the shocked IPN appears to have achieved a steady superdetonation in both of the initiation experiments. This is the first time a steady superdetonation has been measured with in-situ gauges.

  17. Non-Shock Initiation Model for Explosive Families: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. U.; Todd, S. N.; Caipen, T. L.; Jensen, C. B.; Hughs, C. G.

    2009-12-01

    The "DaMaGe-Initiated-Reaction" (DMGIR) computational model has been developed to predict the response of high explosives to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of a reaction in the explosive, and its growth to detonation. Specifically designed experiments were used to study the initiation process of each explosive family with embedded shock sensors and optical diagnostics. The experimental portion of this model development began with a study of PBXN-5 to develop DMGIR model coefficients for the rigid plastic bonded family, followed by studies of the cast, and bulk-moldable explosive families. The experimental results show an initiation mechanism that is related to input energy and material damage, with well defined initiation thresholds for each explosive family. These initiation details will extend the predictive capability of the DMGIR model from the rigid family into the cast and bulk-moldable families.

  18. Non-shock initiation model for explosive families : experimental results.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Mark U.; Jensen, Charles B.; Todd, Steven N.; Hugh, Chance G.; Caipen, Terry L.

    2010-03-01

    The 'DaMaGe-Initiated-Reaction' (DMGIR) computational model has been developed to predict the response of high explosives to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of a reaction in the explosive, and its growth to detonation. Specifically designed experiments were used to study the initiation process of each explosive family with embedded shock sensors and optical diagnostics. The experimental portion of this model development began with a study of PBXN-5 to develop DMGIR model coefficients for the rigid plastic bonded family, followed by studies of the cast, and bulk-moldable explosive families. The experimental results show an initiation mechanism that is related to input energy and material damage, with well defined initiation thresholds for each explosive family. These initiation details will extend the predictive capability of the DMGIR model from the rigid family into the cast and bulk-moldable families.

  19. Probabilistic Threshold Criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Gresshoff, M; Hrousis, C A

    2010-03-09

    The Probabilistic Shock Threshold Criterion (PSTC) Project at LLNL develops phenomenological criteria for estimating safety or performance margin on high explosive (HE) initiation in the shock initiation regime, creating tools for safety assessment and design of initiation systems and HE trains in general. Until recently, there has been little foundation for probabilistic assessment of HE initiation scenarios. This work attempts to use probabilistic information that is available from both historic and ongoing tests to develop a basis for such assessment. Current PSTC approaches start with the functional form of the James Initiation Criterion as a backbone, and generalize to include varying areas of initiation and provide a probabilistic response based on test data for 1.8 g/cc (Ultrafine) 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder). Application of the PSTC methodology is presented investigating the safety and performance of a flying plate detonator and the margin of an Ultrafine TATB booster initiating LX-17.

  20. Cluster Close Separation at the Bow Shock Campaign: Initial Results.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balikhin, M. A.; Sagdeev, R.; Walker, S. N.; Malkov, M.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Doss, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Cluster close separation at the terrestrial bow shock campaign was aimed at probing the terrestrial bow shock front using multi-scale spacecraft separations. The closest separation (< 10 km) was achieved between Cluster 3 and Cluster 4. The separation of two other spacecraft from this pair was in the range 100-1000 km. The data from this Cluster campaign have been used to study the fine structure of the magnetic ramp. It is shown that the magnetic field perturbations observed within the ramp along the shock normal possess spatial scales a few times shorter than the ramp region itself, and are accompanied by variations in the electric field with magnitudes of a few tens mV/m. Using dual spacecraft measurements enables us to show that in the plane of the shock front the characteristic width of these structures corresponds to electron scales. Comparison of the magnetic field profile obtained from Cluster 3 and 4 indicates possibility that the initial stage of the front reformation is observed. However alternative explanations ( kinetic instabilities, corrugation instability) are also discussed.

  1. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Stephen A; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B; Gibson, L. Lee; Bartram, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  2. Shock Initiation of Secondary Explosives by MicroSlapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Ricardo; Campos, Jose; Plaksin, Igor; Ribeiro, Jose

    2001-06-01

    Using the well known Exploding Foil Initiator (EFI) also called slapper detonator the shock to Detonation Wave (DW) transition in a low dense secondary explosive like PETN and RDX is presented in this study. The EFI formed by a capacitor with capacity up to 0.2μF charged until 3kV was used to burst copper bridges with 0.3x0.3mm and 0.4x0.3mm with 5μm of thickness, and to accelerate Kapton flyer plates with 25μm of thickness until 5mm/μs. The process of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) in explosive samples with 5mm of diameter by 10mm of height was characterized by an optical method based on 64 optical fibbers ribbon (250mm of diameter each fibber) connected to a fast electronic streak camera. The obtained results, (x,t) diagrams, with 1ns resolution, show continuously the shock to detonation transition regime and allowed the evaluation of the detonation velocity and the detonation wave front curvature. In that regime DW propagation presents the oscillations in detonation velocity. The results also show the influence of the flyer plate velocity and the initial density of the explosive sample in the process of SDT and front oscillations.

  3. Testing and modeling of PBX-9591 shock initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Kim; Foley, Timothy; Novak, Alan; Dickson, Peter; Parker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing effort to develop a detonation sensitivity test for PBX-9501 that is suitable for studying pristine and damaged HE. The approach involves testing and comparing the sensitivities of HE pressed to various densities and those of pre-damaged samples with similar porosities. The ultimate objectives are to understand the response of pre-damaged HE to shock impacts and to develop practical computational models for use in system analysis codes for HE safety studies. Computer simulation with the CTH shock physics code is used to aid the experimental design and analyze the test results. In the calculations, initiation and growth or failure of detonation are modeled with the empirical HVRB model. The historical LANL SSGT and LSGT were reviewed and it was determined that a new, modified gap test be developed to satisfy the current requirements. In the new test, the donor/spacer/acceptor assembly is placed in a holder that is designed to work with fixtures for pre-damaging the acceptor sample. CTH simulations were made of the gap test with PBX-9501 samples pressed to three different densities. The calculated sensitivities were validated by test observations. The agreement between the computed and experimental critical gap thicknesses, ranging from 9 to 21 mm under various test conditions, is well within 1 mm. These results show that the numerical modeling is a valuable complement to the experimental efforts in studying and understanding shock initiation of PBX-9501.

  4. Shock-driven mixing: Experimental design and initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gavin; Prestridge, Katherine; Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo; Leftwich, Megan

    2012-03-01

    A new Vertical Shock Tube (VST) has been designed to study shock-induced mixing due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) developing on a 3-D multi-mode interface between two gases. These studies characterize how interface contours, gas density difference, and Mach No. affect the ensuing mixing by using simultaneous measurements of velocity/density fields. The VST allows for the formation of a single stably-stratified interface, removing complexities of the dual interface used in prior RMI work. The VST also features a new diaphragmless driver, making feasible larger ensembles of data by reducing intra-shot time, and a larger viewing window allowing new observations of late-time mixing. The initial condition (IC) is formed by a co-flow system, chosen to minimize diffusion at the gas interface. To ensure statistically stationary ICs, a contoured nozzle has been manufactured to form repeatable co-flowing jets that are manipulated by a flapping splitter plate to generate perturbations that span the VST. This talk focuses on the design of the IC flow system and shows initial results characterizing the interface.

  5. Shock-Driven Mixing: Experimental Design and Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gavin; Prestridge, Kathy; Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo; Leftwich, Megan

    2011-06-01

    A new Vertical Shock Tube (VST) has been designed to study shock-induced mixing due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) developing on a 3-D multi-mode interface between two gases. These studies characterize how interface contours, gas density difference, and Mach No. affect the ensuing mixing by using simultaneous measurements of velocity/density fields. The VST allows for the formation of a single stably-stratified interface, removing complexities of the dual interface used in prior RMI work. The VST also features a new diaphragmless driver, making feasible larger ensembles of data by reducing intra-shot time, and a larger viewing window allowing new observations of late-time mixing. The initial condition (IC) is formed by a co-flow system, chosen to minimize diffusion at the gas interface. To ensure statistically stationary ICs, a contoured nozzle has been manufactured to form repeatable co-flowing jets that are manipulated by a flapping splitter plate to generate perturbations that span the VST. This talk focuses on the design of the IC flow system and shows initial results characterizing the interface.

  6. Multiple-shock initiation via statistical crack mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Dienes, J.K.; Kershner, J.D.

    1998-12-31

    Statistical Crack Mechanics (SCRAM) is a theoretical approach to the behavior of brittle materials that accounts for the behavior of an ensemble of microcracks, including their opening, shear, growth, and coalescence. Mechanical parameters are based on measured strain-softening behavior. In applications to explosive and propellant sensitivity it is assumed that closed cracks act as hot spots, and that the heating due to interfacial friction initiates reactions which are modeled as one-dimensional heat flow with an Arrhenius source term, and computed in a subscale grid. Post-ignition behavior of hot spots is treated with the burn model of Ward, Son and Brewster. Numerical calculations using SCRAM-HYDROX are compared with the multiple-shock experiments of Mulford et al. in which the particle velocity in PBX 9501 is measured with embedded wires, and reactions are initiated and quenched.

  7. Stochastic shock response spectrum decomposition method based on probabilistic definitions of temporal peak acceleration, spectral energy, and phase lag distributions of mechanical impact pyrotechnic shock test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Duran, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Most of the times pyrotechnic shock design and test requirements for space systems are provided in Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) without the input time history. Since the SRS does not describe the input or the environment, a decomposition method is used to obtain the source time history. The main objective of this paper is to develop a decomposition method producing input time histories that can satisfy the SRS requirement based on the pyrotechnic shock test data measured from a mechanical impact test apparatus. At the heart of this decomposition method is the statistical representation of the pyrotechnic shock test data measured from the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL) designed Universal Pyrotechnic Shock Simulator (UPSS). Each pyrotechnic shock test data measured at the interface of a test unit has been analyzed to produce the temporal peak acceleration, Root Mean Square (RMS) acceleration, and the phase lag at each band center frequency. Maximum SRS of each filtered time history has been calculated to produce a relationship between the input and the response. Two new definitions are proposed as a result. The Peak Ratio (PR) is defined as the ratio between the maximum SRS and the temporal peak acceleration at each band center frequency. The ratio between the maximum SRS and the RMS acceleration is defined as the Energy Ratio (ER) at each band center frequency. Phase lag is estimated based on the time delay between the temporal peak acceleration at each band center frequency and the peak acceleration at the lowest band center frequency. This stochastic process has been applied to more than one hundred pyrotechnic shock test data to produce probabilistic definitions of the PR, ER, and the phase lag. The SRS is decomposed at each band center frequency using damped sinusoids with the PR and the decays obtained by matching the ER of the damped sinusoids to the ER of the test data. The final step in this stochastic SRS decomposition process is the Monte Carlo (MC

  8. Alternate Methods to Experimentally Investigate Shock Initiation Properties of Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svingala, Forrest; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit; Samuels, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Reactive flow models are desired for many new explosives early in the formulation development stage. Traditionally, these models are parameterized by carefully-controlled 1-D shock experiments, including gas-gun testing with embedded gauges and wedge testing with explosive plane wave lenses (PWL). These experiments are easy to interpret, due to their 1-D nature, but are generally expensive to perform, and cannot be performed at all explosive test facilities. We investigate alternative methods to probe shock-initiation behavior of new explosives using widely-available pentolite gap test donors and simple time-of-arrival type diagnostics. These methods can be performed at a low cost at virtually any explosives testing facility, which allows experimental data to parameterize reactive flow models to be collected much earlier in the development of an explosive formulation. However, the fundamentally 2-D nature of these tests may increase the modeling burden in parameterizing these models, and reduce general applicability. Several variations of the so-called modified gap test were investigated and evaluated for suitability as an alternative to established 1-D gas gun and PWL techniques. At least partial agreement with 1-D test methods was observed for the explosives tested, and future work is planned to scope the applicability and limitations of these experimental techniques.

  9. Impact of precipitation forecast uncertainties and initial soil moisture conditions on a probabilistic flood forecasting chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestro, Francesco; Rebora, Nicola

    2014-11-01

    One of the main difficulties that flood forecasters are faced with is evaluating how errors and uncertainties in forecasted precipitation propagate into streamflow forecast. These errors, must be combined with the effects of different initial soil moisture conditions that generally have a significant impact on the final results of a flood forecast. This is further complicated by the fact that a probabilistic approach is needed, especially when small and medium size basins are considered (the variability of the streamflow scenarios is in fact strongly influenced by the aforementioned factors). Moreover, the ensemble size is a degree of freedom when a precipitation downscaling algorithm is part of the forecast chain. In fact, a change of ensemble size could lead to different final results once the other inputs and parameters are fixed. In this work, a series of synthetic experiments have been designed and implemented to test an operational probabilistic flood forecast system in order to augment the knowledge of how streamflow forecasts can be affected by errors and uncertainties associated with the three aforementioned elements: forecasted rainfall, soil moisture initial conditions, and ensemble size.

  10. Probabilistic assessment of fatigue initiation data on highly crosslinked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes.

    PubMed

    Pascual, F J; Przybilla, C; Gracia-Villa, L; Puértolas, J A; Fernández-Canteli, A

    2012-11-01

    Ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylenes (UHMWPE) showing wear resistance, oxidative stability and good mechanical performance go on being a relevant research area in biomaterials for total joint replacements, where fatigue happens to be a recurrent damage mode that needs to be investigated. While crack propagation lifetime has been extensively studied, fatigue initiation data are scarcely offered in the literature, often due to the higher costs implied in the experimental programs. Moreover, their analysis is not always suitable to obtain reliable guidance. Different deterministic and probabilistic methods, generally resting on empirical bases have been previously used to analyze the fatigue initiation data. In this work, the probabilistic Weibull regression model of Castillo et al., based on both physical and statistical conditions, such as weakest link principle and the necessary compatibility between life-time and stress range distributions, is applied for the first time in the assessment of fatigue results of polymers, particularly to highly crosslinked UHMWPEs (HXLPEs). Accordingly, different published experimental data corresponding to HXLPE stabilized by thermal treatments and with α-tocopherol (vitamin E) are re-analyzed. Additional data are incorporated to assess the influence of notched HXLPE on fatigue performance. New conclusions are drawn from this revision.

  11. Extended run distance measurements of shock initiation in PBX 9502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, Rick; Sheffield, Steve; Alcon, Rick

    2007-06-01

    We have completed a series shock initiation experiments on two lots of PBX 9502 (95 weight % TATB, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder). One PBX 9502 lot contained few fine particles (10 weight % < 20 microns) while the second lot contained many fines (38 weight % < 20 microns). Large, 71 mm diameter PBX 9502 samples were used and input pressures were 7.5 -- 8.5 GPa resulting in run distances to detonation of 25 -- 35 mm. These results extend previous work [J. Appl. Phys. 99, 114907 (2006)] in which we used 43 mm diameter samples, input pressures > 10.5 GPa, and measured run distances < 15 mm. Buildup to detonation was measured using embedded magnetic particle velocity gauges. An unusual feature of the work was the use of metallic impactors (316 stainless steel) in combination with magnetic gauges. It has previously been assumed that conducting impactors would badly perturb the magnetic gauge measurements; however, we observed no ill effects other than a nearly constant baseline shift of 10%. Results include reaction rates at the impact surface and distance to detonation vs. initial pressure. No lot to lot differences in initiation behavior were observed.

  12. MESOSCALE MODELLING OF SHOCK INITIATION IN HMX-BASED EXPLOSIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Mulford, R. N. R.; Swift, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrocode calculations we used to simulate initiation in single- and double-shock experiments on several HMX-based explosives. Variations in the reactive behavior of theee materials reflects the differences between binders in the material, providing information regarding the sensitivity of the explosive to the mechanical properties of the constituents. Materials considered are EDC-37, with a soft binder, PBX-9601, with a relatively malleable binder, and PIBX-9404, with a stiff binder. Bulk reactive behavior of these materials is dominated by the HMX component and should be comparable, while the mechanical response varies. The reactive flow model is temperature-dependent, based on a modified Arrhenius rate. Some unreacted material is allowed to react at a rate given by the state of the hotspot rather than the bulk state of the unreacted explosive, according to a length scale reflecting the hotspot size, and a time scale for thermal equilibration. The Arrhenius rate for HMX is wsumed to be the same for all compositions. The initiation data for different HMX-bwd explosives axe modelled by choosing plausible parameters to describe the reactive and dissipative properties of the binder, and hence the behavior of the hotspots in each formulation.

  13. LOW AMPLITUDE SINGLE AND MULTIPLE SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF LX-04

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Chidester, S; Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-27

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton binder) using single and multiple low amplitude shocks to obtain pressure history data for use in Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling parameterization. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the LX-04 explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between explosive discs. In the single shock experiments, the run distances to detonation at three shock pressures showed agreement with previously published data above 3 GPa. Even longer run distances to detonation were measured using 80 mm long by 145 mm diameter LX-04 charges impacted by low velocity projectiles from a 155 mm diameter gun. The minimum shock pressure required to cause low levels of exothermic reaction were determined for these large LX-04 charge dimensions. Multiple shocks were generated as double shocks by using a flyer plate with two materials and as reflected shocks by placing a high impedance material at the rear of the explosive charge. In both cases, the first shock pressure was not high enough to cause detonation of LX-04, and the second shock pressure, which would have been sufficient to cause detonation if generated by a single shock, failed to cause detonation. Thus LX-04 exhibited shock desensitization over a range of 0.6 to 1.4 GPa. The higher shock pressure LX-04 model was extended to accurately simulate these lower pressure and multiple shock gauge records. The shock desensitization effects observed with multiple shock compressions were partially accounted for in the model by using a critical compression corresponding to a shock pressure of 1.2 GPa. This shock desensitization effect occurs at higher pressures than those of other HMX-based PBX's containing higher HMX percentages.

  14. Biodamage via shock waves initiated by irradiation with ions.

    PubMed

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Yakubovich, Alexander V; Solov'yov, Andrey V

    2013-01-01

    Radiation damage following the ionising radiation of tissue has different scenarios and mechanisms depending on the projectiles or radiation modality. We investigate the radiation damage effects due to shock waves produced by ions. We analyse the strength of the shock wave capable of directly producing DNA strand breaks and, depending on the ion's linear energy transfer, estimate the radius from the ion's path, within which DNA damage by the shock wave mechanism is dominant. At much smaller values of linear energy transfer, the shock waves turn out to be instrumental in propagating reactive species formed close to the ion's path to large distances, successfully competing with diffusion.

  15. Growth rate of a shocked mixing layer with known initial perturbations [Mixing at shocked interfaces with known perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Christopher R.; Cook, Andrew W.; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2013-05-14

    Here we derive a growth-rate model for the Richtmyer–Meshkov mixing layer, given arbitrary but known initial conditions. The initial growth rate is determined by the net mass flux through the centre plane of the perturbed interface immediately after shock passage. The net mass flux is determined by the correlation between the post-shock density and streamwise velocity. The post-shock density field is computed from the known initial perturbations and the shock jump conditions. The streamwise velocity is computed via Biot–Savart integration of the vorticity field. The vorticity deposited by the shock is obtained from the baroclinic torque with an impulsive acceleration. Using the initial growth rate and characteristic perturbation wavelength as scaling factors, the model collapses the growth-rate curves and, in most cases, predicts the peak growth rate over a range of Mach numbers (1.1 ≤Mi≤1.9), Atwood numbers (₋0.73 ≤ A ≤ ₋0.35 and 0.22 ≤ A ≤ 0.73), adiabatic indices (1.40/1.67≤γ12≤1.67/1.09) and narrow-band perturbation spectra. Lastly, the mixing layer at late times exhibits a power-law growth with an average exponent of θ=0.24.

  16. Numerical simulation of shock initiation of Ni/Al multilayered composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sraj, Ihab; Knio, Omar M.; Specht, Paul E.; Thadhani, Naresh N.; Weihs, Timothy P.

    2014-01-14

    The initiation of chemical reaction in cold-rolled Ni/Al multilayered composites by shock compression is investigated numerically. A simplified approach is adopted that exploits the disparity between the reaction and shock loading timescales. The impact of shock compression is modeled using CTH simulations that yield pressure, strain, and temperature distributions within the composites due to the shock propagation. The resulting temperature distribution is then used as initial condition to simulate the evolution of the subsequent shock-induced mixing and chemical reaction. To this end, a reduced reaction model is used that expresses the local atomic mixing and heat release rates in terms of an evolution equation for a dimensionless time scale reflecting the age of the mixed layer. The computations are used to assess the effect of bilayer thickness on the reaction, as well as the impact of shock velocity and orientation with respect to the layering. Computed results indicate that initiation and evolution of the reaction are substantially affected by both the shock velocity and the bilayer thickness. In particular, at low impact velocity, Ni/Al multilayered composites with thick bilayers react completely in 100 ms while at high impact velocity and thin bilayers, reaction time was less than 100 μs. Quantitative trends for the dependence of the reaction time on the shock velocity are also determined, for different bilayer thickness and shock orientation.

  17. Development of transient initiating event frequencies for use in probabilistic risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Mackowiak, D.P.; Gentillon, C.D.; Smith, K.L.

    1985-05-01

    Transient initiating event frequencies are an essential input to the analysis process of a nuclear power plant probabilistic risk assessment. These frequencies describe events causing or requiring scrams. This report documents an effort to validate and update from other sources a computer-based data file developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) describing such events at 52 United States commercial nuclear power plants. Operating information from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on 24 additional plants from their date of commercial operation has been combined with the EPRI data, and the entire data base has been updated to add 1980 through 1983 events for all 76 plants. The validity of the EPRI data and data analysis methodology and the adequacy of the EPRI transient categories are examined. New transient initiating event frequencies are derived from the expanded data base using the EPRI transient categories and data display methods. Upper bounds for these frequencies are also provided. Additional analyses explore changes in the dominant transients, changes in transient outage times and their impact on plant operation, and the effects of power level and scheduled scrams on transient event frequencies. A more rigorous data analysis methodology is developed to encourage further refinement of the transient initiating event frequencies derived herein. Updating the transient event data base resulted in approx.2400 events being added to EPRI's approx.3000-event data file. The resulting frequency estimates were in most cases lower than those reported by EPRI, but no significant order-of-magnitude changes were noted. The average number of transients per year for the combined data base is 8.5 for pressurized water reactors and 7.4 for boiling water reactors.

  18. Shock initiation of the TATB based explosive PBX 9502 heated to ~ 76∘C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, Richard; Gehr, Russell; Bucholtz, Scott; Pacheco, Adam; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Recently we reported on shock initiation of PBX 9502 (95 wt.% tri-amino-trinitro-benzene, 5 wt.% Kel-F800 binder) cooled to -55°C and to 77K Shock waves were generated by gas-gun driven plate impacts and reactive flow in the cooled PBX 9502 was measured with embedded electromagnetic gauges. Here we use similar methods to warm the explosive to ~ 76°C. The explosive sample is heated by warm air flowing through channels in an aluminum sample mounting plate and a copper tubing coil surrounding the sample. Temperature in the sample is monitored using six type-E thermocouples. Results show increased shock sensitivity; time and distance to detonation onset vs. initial shock pressure are shorter than when the sample is initially at ambient temperature. Our results are consistent with those reported by Dallman & Wackerle. Particle velocity wave profiles were also obtained during the shock-to-detonation transition and will be presented.

  19. Quantification of initial-data uncertainty on a shock-accelerated gas cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Tritschler, V. K. Avdonin, A.; Hickel, S.; Hu, X. Y.; Adams, N. A.

    2014-02-15

    We quantify initial-data uncertainties on a shock accelerated heavy-gas cylinder by two-dimensional well-resolved direct numerical simulations. A high-resolution compressible multicomponent flow simulation model is coupled with a polynomial chaos expansion to propagate the initial-data uncertainties to the output quantities of interest. The initial flow configuration follows previous experimental and numerical works of the shock accelerated heavy-gas cylinder. We investigate three main initial-data uncertainties, (i) shock Mach number, (ii) contamination of SF{sub 6} with acetone, and (iii) initial deviations of the heavy-gas region from a perfect cylindrical shape. The impact of initial-data uncertainties on the mixing process is examined. The results suggest that the mixing process is highly sensitive to input variations of shock Mach number and acetone contamination. Additionally, our results indicate that the measured shock Mach number in the experiment of Tomkins et al. [“An experimental investigation of mixing mechanisms in shock-accelerated flow,” J. Fluid. Mech. 611, 131 (2008)] and the estimated contamination of the SF{sub 6} region with acetone [S. K. Shankar, S. Kawai, and S. K. Lele, “Two-dimensional viscous flow simulation of a shock accelerated heavy gas cylinder,” Phys. Fluids 23, 024102 (2011)] exhibit deviations from those that lead to best agreement between our simulations and the experiment in terms of overall flow evolution.

  20. Probabilistic evaluation of initiation time in RC bridge beams with load-induced cracks exposed to de-icing salts

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhaohui; Zhao Yangang; Yu Zhiwu; Ding Faxing

    2011-03-15

    In this study, a reliability-based method for predicting the initiation time of reinforced concrete bridge beams with load-induced cracks exposed to de-icing salts is presented. A practical model for predicting the diffusion coefficient of chloride ingress into load-induced cracked concrete is proposed. Probabilistic information about uncertainties related to the surface chloride content and the threshold chloride concentration has been estimated from a wide review of previous experimental or statistical studies. Probabilistic analysis to estimate the time to corrosion initiation with/without considering the effect of the load-induced cracks on the chloride ingress into concrete has been carried out. Results of the analysis demonstrate the importance of considering the effect of the load-induced cracks for correct prediction of corrosion initiation in RC bridge beams exposed to chlorides.

  1. Numerical analysis of initial stage of thermal shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, V. N.

    2016-07-01

    The paper studies a problem of a thermal shock at the surface of a half-space, which properties are described by elastic-plastic model taking into account dynamic effects, heat inertia, coupling between thermal and mechanical fields. The problem is solved numerically using finite-difference method of S.K. Godunov.

  2. Effect of initial perturbation amplitude on Richtmyer-Meshkov flows induced by strong shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Dell, Z.; Abarzhi, S. I. E-mail: sabarji@andrew.cmu.edu; Stellingwerf, R. F.

    2015-09-15

    We systematically study the effect of the initial perturbation on Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) flows induced by strong shocks in fluids with contrasting densities. Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations are employed. A broad range of shock strengths and density ratios is considered. The amplitude of the initial single mode sinusoidal perturbation of the interface varies from 0% to 100% of its wavelength. The simulations results are compared, wherever possible, with four rigorous theories, and with other experiments and simulations, achieving good quantitative and qualitative agreement. Our study is focused on early time dynamics of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). We analyze the initial growth-rate of RMI immediately after the shock passage, when the perturbation amplitude increases linearly with time. For the first time, to the authors' knowledge, we find that the initial growth-rate of RMI is a non-monotone function of the initial perturbation amplitude, thus restraining the amount of energy that can be deposited by the shock at the interface. The maximum value of the initial growth-rate depends on the shock strength and the density ratio, whereas the corresponding value of the initial perturbation amplitude depends only slightly on the shock strength and density ratio.

  3. Shock initiation of explosives: Temperature spikes and growth spurts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassett, Will P.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2016-08-01

    When energetic materials are subjected to high-velocity impacts, the first steps in the shock-to-detonation transition are the creation, ignition, and growth of hot spots. We used 1-3.2 km s-1 laser-launched flyer plates to impact powdered octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine, a powerful explosive, and monitored hundreds of emission bursts with an apparatus that determined temperature and emissivity at all times. The time-dependent volume fraction of hot spots was determined by measuring the time-dependent emissivity. After the shock, most hot spots extinguished, but the survivors smoldered for hundreds of nanoseconds until their temperatures spiked, causing a hot spot growth spurt. Depending on the impact duration, the growth spurts could be as fast as 300 ns and as slow as 13 μs.

  4. Numerical calculation of shock-induced initiation of detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cort, G. E.; Fu, J. H. M.

    1980-01-01

    Results of numerical calculations of the impact of steel cylinders and spheres on the plastic bonded high explosive PBX 9501 are described. The calculations were carried out by a reactive, multicomponent, two dimensional, Eulerian hydrodynamic computer code, 2DE. The 2DE computer code is a finite difference code that uses the donor acceptor cell method to compute mixed cell fluxes. The parameters in the Forest Fire burn model are developed from experiments where the induced shock approximates a plane wave and are applied, in this case, to a situation where the induced shock is a divergent wave with curvature that depends on the size and shape of the projectile. The calculated results are compared with results from experiments involving instrumented mock and live high explosives, with projectiles of varying size, shapes, and velocities.

  5. An initial probabilistic hazard assessment of oil dispersants approved by the United States National Contingency Plan.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Jason P; Williams, E Spencer; Brooks, Bryan W

    2011-07-01

    Dispersants are commonly applied during oil spill mitigation efforts; however, these industrial chemicals may present risks to aquatic organisms individually and when mixed with oil. Fourteen dispersants are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). Availability of environmental effects information for such agents is limited, and individual components of dispersants are largely proprietary. Probabilistic hazard assessment approaches including Chemical Toxicity Distributions (CTDs) may be useful as an initial step toward prioritizing environmental hazards from the use of dispersants. In the present study, we applied the CTD approach to two acute toxicity datasets: NCP (the contingency plan dataset) and DHOS (a subset of NCP listed dispersants reevaluated subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill). These datasets contained median lethal concentration (LC50) values for dispersants alone and dispersant:oil mixtures, in two standard marine test species, Menidia beryllina and Mysidopsis bahia. These CTDs suggest that dispersants alone are generally less toxic than oil. In contrast, most dispersant:oil mixtures are more toxic than oil alone. For the two datasets (treated separately because of differing methodologies), CTDs would predict 95% of dispersant:oil mixtures to have acute toxicity values above 0.32 and 0.76 mg/L for Mysidopsis and 0.33 mg/L and 1.06 mg/L for Menidia (for DHOS and NCP, respectively). These findings demonstrate the utility of CTDs as a means to evaluate the comparative ecotoxicity of dispersants alone and in mixture with different oil types. The approaches presented here also provide valuable tools for prioritizing prospective and retrospective environmental assessments of oil dispersants. PMID:21425326

  6. An initial probabilistic hazard assessment of oil dispersants approved by the United States National Contingency Plan.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Jason P; Williams, E Spencer; Brooks, Bryan W

    2011-07-01

    Dispersants are commonly applied during oil spill mitigation efforts; however, these industrial chemicals may present risks to aquatic organisms individually and when mixed with oil. Fourteen dispersants are listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP). Availability of environmental effects information for such agents is limited, and individual components of dispersants are largely proprietary. Probabilistic hazard assessment approaches including Chemical Toxicity Distributions (CTDs) may be useful as an initial step toward prioritizing environmental hazards from the use of dispersants. In the present study, we applied the CTD approach to two acute toxicity datasets: NCP (the contingency plan dataset) and DHOS (a subset of NCP listed dispersants reevaluated subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill). These datasets contained median lethal concentration (LC50) values for dispersants alone and dispersant:oil mixtures, in two standard marine test species, Menidia beryllina and Mysidopsis bahia. These CTDs suggest that dispersants alone are generally less toxic than oil. In contrast, most dispersant:oil mixtures are more toxic than oil alone. For the two datasets (treated separately because of differing methodologies), CTDs would predict 95% of dispersant:oil mixtures to have acute toxicity values above 0.32 and 0.76 mg/L for Mysidopsis and 0.33 mg/L and 1.06 mg/L for Menidia (for DHOS and NCP, respectively). These findings demonstrate the utility of CTDs as a means to evaluate the comparative ecotoxicity of dispersants alone and in mixture with different oil types. The approaches presented here also provide valuable tools for prioritizing prospective and retrospective environmental assessments of oil dispersants.

  7. Time-resolved study of laser initiated shock wave propagation in superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Allan; Buelna, Xavier; Popov, Evgeny; Eloranta, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    Intense shock waves in superfluid 4He between 1.7 and 2.1 K are generated by rapidly expanding confined plasma from laser ablation of a metal target immersed in the liquid. The resulting shock fronts in the liquid with initial velocities up to ca. Mach 10 are visualized by time-resolved shadowgraph photography. These high intensity shocks decay within 500 ns into less energetic shock waves traveling at Mach 2, which have their lifetime in the microsecond time scale. Based on the analysis using the classical Rankine-Hugoniot theory, the shock fronts created remain in the solid phase up to 1 μs and the associated thermodynamic state appears outside the previously studied region. The extrapolated initial shock pressure of 0.5 GPa is comparable to typical plasma pressures produced during liquid phase laser ablation. A secondary shock originating from fast heat propagation on the metal surface is also observed and a lower limit estimate for the heat propagation velocity is measured as 7 × 104 m/s. In the long-time limit, the high intensity shocks turn into liquid state waves that propagate near the speed of sound.

  8. Non-Shock Initiation Model for Plastic Bonded Explosive PBXN-5: Theoretical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, S. N.; Vogler, T. J.; Caipen, T. L.; Grady, D. E.

    2007-12-01

    A "damage-initiated reaction" (DMGIR) computational model is presented for prediction of explosive response to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of reaction in the explosive, and the growth to detonation. The DMGIR model was embedded into an existing shock-physics computational code to utilize those existing, predictive capabilities as the basis for these non-shock predictions. The numerical approach is presented, with comparisons of DMGIR predictions to recent experiments utilizing non-shock initiation of the plastic bonded explosive PBXN-5. This model has been developed, and is presently being validated for plastic bonded explosives. Extension of the DMGIR model is planned for cast- and moldable-type explosives.

  9. Shock

    MedlinePlus

    ... several kinds of shock. Hypovolemic shock happens when you lose a lot of blood or fluids. Causes include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, and severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. Septic shock is caused by ...

  10. Shock initiation of an {epsilon}-CL-20-estane formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Simpson, R.L.; Urtiew, P.A.

    1996-05-01

    The shock sensitivity of a pressed solid explosive formulation, LX-19, containing 95.2{percent} by weight epsilon phase 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW) and 4.8{percent} Estane binder, was determined using the wedge test and embedded manganin pressure gauge techniques. This formulation was shown to be slightly more sensitive than LX-14, which contains 95.5{percent} HMX and 4.5{percent} Estane binder. The measured pressure histories for LX-19 were very similar to those obtained using several HMX-inert binder formulations. An Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX-19 was developed which differed from those for HMX-inert binder formulations only by a 25{percent} higher hot spot growth rate. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Shock initiation of an ɛ-CL-20-estane formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, C. M.; Simpson, R. L.; Urtiew, P. A.

    1996-05-01

    The shock sensitivity of a pressed solid explosive formulation, LX-19, containing 95.2% by weight epsilon phase 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW) and 4.8% Estane binder, was determined using the wedge test and embedded manganin pressure gauge techniques. This formulation was shown to be slightly more sensitive than LX-14, which contains 95.5% HMX and 4.5% Estane binder. The measured pressure histories for LX-19 were very similar to those obtained using several HMX-inert binder formulations. An Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for LX-19 was developed which differed from those for HMX-inert binder formulations only by a 25% higher hot spot growth rate.

  12. Shock initiation of an {epsilon}-CL-20-estane formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Simpson, R.L.; Urtiew, P.A.

    1995-07-19

    The shock sensitivity of a pressed solid explosive formulation, LX-19, containing 95.2% by weight epsilon phase 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW) and 4.8% Estane binder, was determined using the wedge test and embedded manganin pressure gauge techniques. This formulation was shown to be slightly more sensitive than LX-14, which contains 95.5% HMX and 4.5% Estane binder. The measured pressure histories for LX-19 were very similar to those obtained using several HMX-inert binder formulations. An Ignition and Growth reactive model for LX-19 was developed which differed from those for HMX-inert binder formulations only by a 25% higher hot spot growth rate.

  13. Single and double shock initiation modelling for high explosive materials in last three decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, T.; Yan, Liu

    2016-08-01

    The explosives materials are normally in an energetically metastable state. These can undergo rapid chemical decomposition only if sufficient energy has first been added to get the process started. Such energy can be provided by shocks. To predict the response of these materials under impacts of shocks of different strengths and durations and at various conditions, mathematical models are used. During the last three decades, a lot of research has been carried out and several shock initiation models have been presented. The models can be divided into continuum based and physics based models. In this study the single and double shock initiation models presented in last three decades have been reviewed and the ranges of their application has been discussed.

  14. Shock Initiated Reactions of Reactive Multiphase Blast Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dennis; Granier, John; Johnson, Richard; Littrell, Donald

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes a new class of reactive multiphase blast explosives (RMBX) and characterization of their blast characteristics. These RMBXs are non-ideal explosive compositions of perfluoropolyether (PFPE), nano aluminum, and a micron-size high-density reactive metal - Tantalum, Zirconium, or Zinc in mass loadings of 66 to 83 percent. Unlike high explosives, these PFPE-metal compositions release energy via a fast self-oxidized combustion wave (rather than a true self-sustaining detonation) that is shock dependent, and can be overdriven to control energy release rate. The term ``reactive multiphase blast'' refers to the post-dispersion blast behavior: multiphase in that there are a gas phase that imparts pressure and a solid (particulate) phase that imparts momentum; and reactive in that the hot metal particles react with atmospheric oxygen and the explosive gas products to give an extended pressure pulse. The RMBX formulations were tested in two spherical core-shell geometries - an RMBX shell exploded by a high explosive core, and an RMBX core imploded by a high explosive shell. The fireball and blast characteristics were compared to a C-4 baseline charge.

  15. Practice Patterns and Outcomes Associated with Choice of Initial Vasopressor Therapy for Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Fawzy, Ashraf; Evans, Stephen R.; Walkey, Allan J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Clinical guidelines recommend norepinephrine as initial vasopressor of choice for septic shock, with dopamine suggested as an alternative vasopressor in patients at low risk for arrhythmias. We sought to determine practice patterns and outcomes associated with vasopressor selection in a large, population-based cohort of patients with septic shock that allows for assessment of outcomes in clinically important subgroups. Design We performed a retrospective cohort study to determine factors associated with choice of dopamine as compared with norepinephrine as initial vasopressor for patients with septic shock. We used propensity score matching to compare risk of hospital mortality based on initial vasopressor. We performed multiple sensitivity analyses using alternative methods to address confounding and hospital-level clustering. We investigated interaction between vasopressor selection and mortality in clinical subgroups based on arrhythmia and cardiovascular risk. Setting Enhanced administrative data (Premier, Inc) from 502 US hospitals during years 2010–2013. Subjects 61,122 patients admitted with septic shock who received dopamine or norepinephrine as initial vasopressor during the first two days of hospitalization. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Norepinephrine (77.6%) was the most frequently used initial vasopressor during septic shock. Dopamine was preferentially selected by cardiologists, in the Southern US, at non-teaching hospitals, for older patients with more cardiovascular comorbidities, and was used less frequently over time. Patients receiving dopamine experienced greater hospital mortality (propensity matched cohort: N=38,788, 25% vs 23.7%; OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02–1.14). Sensitivity analyses showed similar results. Subgroup analyses showed no evidence for effect modification based on arrhythmia risk or underlying cardiovascular disease. Conclusions In a large population-based sample of patients with septic shock in the US

  16. Shock initiation experiments with ignition and growth modeling on low density HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Frank; Vandersall, Kevin S.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Shock initiation experiments on low density (~1.2 and ~1.6 g/cm3) HMX were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between packed layers (~1.2 g/cm3) or sample disks pressed to low density (~1.6 g/cm3). The measured shock sensitivity of the ~1.2 g/cm3 HMX was similar to that previously measured by Sheffield et al. and the ~1.6 g/cm3 HMX was measured to be much less shock sensitive. Ignition and Growth model parameters were utilized that yielded good agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities.

  17. Mesoscale modelling of shock initiation in HMX-based explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Swift, D. C.; Mulford, R. N. R.; Winter, R. E.; Taylor, P.; Salisbury, D. A.; Harris, E. J.

    2002-01-01

    Motivation: predictive capability Want to predict initiation, detonics and performance given: {sm_bullet} Variations in composition {sm_bullet} Variations in morphology {sm_bullet}Different loading conditions Previous work on PBX and ANFO: need physically-based model rather than just mechanical calibrations

  18. Large Area and Short-Pulse Shock Initiation of a Tatb/hmx Mixed Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiji, Wang; Chengwei, Sun; Jun, Chen; Cangli, Liu; Jianheng, Zhao; Fuli, Tan; Ning, Zhang

    2007-12-01

    The large area and short-pulse shock initiation experiments on the plastic bonded mixed explosive of TATB(80%) and HMX(15%) have been performed with an electric gun where a Mylar flyer of 10-19 mm in diameter and 0.05˜0.30 mm in thickness was launched by an electrically exploding metallic bridge foil. The cylindrical explosive specimens (Φ16 mm×8 mm in size) were initiated by the Mylar flyers in thickness of 0.07˜0.20 mm, which induced shock pressure in specimen was of duration ranging from 0.029 to 0.109 μs. The experimental data were treated with the DRM(Delayed Robbins-Monro) procedure and to provide the initiation threshold of flyer velocities at 50% probability are 3.398˜1.713 km/s and that of shock pressure P 13.73˜5.23 GPa, respectively for different pulse durations. The shock initiation criteria of the explosive specimen at 50% and 100% probabilities are yielded. In addition, the 30° wedged sample was tested and the shock to detonation transition (SDT) process emerging on its inclined surface was diagnosed with a device consisting of multiple optical fiber probe, optoelectronic transducer and digital oscilloscope. The POP plot of the explosive has been gained from above SDT data.

  19. An evaluation of the reliability and usefulness of external-initiator PRA (probabilistic risk analysis) methodologies

    SciTech Connect

    Budnitz, R.J.; Lambert, H.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The discipline of probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) has become so mature in recent years that it is now being used routinely to assist decision-making throughout the nuclear industry. This includes decision-making that affects design, construction, operation, maintenance, and regulation. Unfortunately, not all sub-areas within the larger discipline of PRA are equally mature,'' and therefore the many different types of engineering insights from PRA are not all equally reliable. 93 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Shock initiation of 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI)

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P.A.; Tarver, C.M.; Simpson, R.L.

    1995-07-19

    The shock sensitivity of the pressed solid explosive 2,4-dinitroimidazole (2,4-DNI) was determined using the embedded manganin pressure gauge technique. At an initial shock pressure of 2 GPa, several microseconds were required before any exothermic reaction was observed. At 4 GPa, 2,4-DNI reacted more rapidly but did not transition to detonation at the 12 mm deep gauge position. At 6 GPa, detonation occurred in less than 6 mm of shock propagation. Thus, 2,4-DNI is more shock sensitive than TATB-based explosives but is considerably less shock sensitive than HMX-based explosives. An Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for 2,4-DNI based on these gauge records showed that 2,4-DNI exhibits shock initiation characteristics similar to TATB but reacts faster. The chemical structure of 2,4-DNI suggests that it may exhibit thermal decomposition reactions similar to nitroguanine and explosives with similar ring structures, such as ANTA and NTO.

  1. Thermal chemical-mechanical reactive flow model of shock initiation in solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholls, A L., III; Tarver, C M

    1998-08-26

    The three dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic computer code ALE3D with fully coupled thermal-chemical-mechanical material models provides the framework for the development of a physically realistic model of shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives. The processes of hot spot formation during shock compression, subsequent ignition of reaction or failure to react, growth of reaction in individual hot spots, and coalescence of reacting hot spots during the transition to detonation can now be modeled using Arrhenius chemical kinetic rate laws and heat transfer to propagate the reactive flow. This paper discusses the growth rates of reacting hot spots in HMX and TATB and their coalescence during shock to detonation transition. Hot spot deflagration rates are found to be fast enough to consume explosive particles less than 10 mm in diameter during typical shock duration times, but larger particles must fragment and create more reactive surface area in order to be rapidly consumed.

  2. Large Area and Short Pulsed Shock Initiation of A TATB/HMX Mixed Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; Sun, Chengwei; Chen, Jun; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Fuli; Zhang, Ning

    2007-06-01

    The large area and short pulsed shock initiation experiment on a plastic bonded mixed explosive of TATB(80%) and HMX(15%) has been performed with an electric gun where a mylar flyer of 19mm in diameter and 0.05˜0.30mm in thickness is launched by an electrically exploding metallic bridge foil. The cylindrical explosive specimens (φ16mm x 8mm in size) were initiated by the mylar flyers in thickness of 0.07˜0.20mm, which induced shock pressure in specimen was of duration ranging 0.029˜0.109μs. The experimental data were treated with the DRM(Delayed Robbins-Monro) procedure and to provide the threshold of shock pressure P 13.73˜5.23GPa. The shock initiation criterion of the explosive specimen is (P/GPa)^1.451(τ/μs) = 1.2. Meanwhile the criterion in 100% probability in the experiment is (P/GPa)^1.8(τ/μs) = 2.63. In addition, the 30^o wedged specimen was tested and the shock to detonation transition (SDT) process emerging on its inclined surface was diagnosed with a device consisting of multiple optical fiber probe, optoelectronic transducer and digital oscilloscope. The POP plot of the explosive has been gained from above SDT data.

  3. Study of void collapse leading to shock initiation and ignition in heterogeneous energetic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Nirmal Kumar; Koundinyan, Sushilkumar Prabu; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    In heterogeneous energetic materials like PBX, porosity plays an important role in shock initiation and ignition. This is because the collapse of voids leads to the formation of local high temperature regions termed as hot spots under the application of shock loading. The formation of hot spots can take place because of several mechanisms such as plastic deformation of voids, hydrodynamic impact on voids leading to the formation of high speed material jets etc. Once these hot spots are formed, they can lead to reaction and ignition in the explosive material. However, diffusive phenomenon like heat conduction can play an important role in shock initiation because depending on the size and intensity of void collapse hot spots, local ignition conditions can be smeared out. In the current work, void collapse leading to shock initiation and ignition in HMX has been studied using a massively parallel Eulerian code, SCIMITAR3D. The chemical kinetics of HMX decomposition and reaction has been modeled using the Henson-Smilowitz multi-step mechanism. Based on the current framework an ignition criterion has been established for single void collapse analysis for various shock strengths. Furthermore, the effects of void-void interactions have been analyzed demonstrating the important role of the combination of void fraction, reaction chemistry and heat conduction in determining the ignition threshold. This work has been funded from the AFRL-RWPC, Computational Mechanics Branch, Eglin AFB, Program Manager: Dr. Martin Schmidt.

  4. Shock initiated thermal and chemical responses of HMX crystal from ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Song, Huajie; Liu, Yi; Huang, Fenglei

    2014-07-21

    To gain an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal and chemical responses of condensed energetic materials under thermal shock, we developed a thermal shock reactive dynamics (TS-RD) computational protocol using molecular dynamics simulation coupled with ReaxFF force field. β-Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) was selected as a a target explosive due to its wide usage in the military and industry. The results show that a thermal shock initiated by a large temperature gradient between the "hot" region and the "cold" region results in thermal expansion of the particles and induces a thermal-mechanical wave propagating back and forth in the system with an averaged velocity of 3.32 km s(-1). Heat propagating along the direction of thermal shock leads to a temperature increment of the system and thus chemical reaction initiation. Applying a continuum reactive heat conduction model combined with the temperature distribution obtained from the RD simulation, a heat conduction coefficient is derived as 0.80 W m(-1) K(-1). The chemical reaction mechanisms during thermal shock were analyzed, showing that the reaction is triggered by N-NO2 bond breaking followed by HONO elimination and ring fission. The propagation rates of the reaction front and reaction center are obtained to be 0.069 and 0.038 km s(-1), based on the time and spatial distribution of NO2. The pressure effect on the thermal shock was also investigated by employing uniaxial compression before the thermal shock. We find that compression significantly accelerates thermal-mechanical wave propagation and heat conduction, resulting in higher temperature and more excited molecules and thus earlier initiation and faster propagation of chemical reactions. PMID:24899535

  5. Shock initiated thermal and chemical responses of HMX crystal from ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Song, Huajie; Liu, Yi; Huang, Fenglei

    2014-07-21

    To gain an atomistic-level understanding of the thermal and chemical responses of condensed energetic materials under thermal shock, we developed a thermal shock reactive dynamics (TS-RD) computational protocol using molecular dynamics simulation coupled with ReaxFF force field. β-Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) was selected as a a target explosive due to its wide usage in the military and industry. The results show that a thermal shock initiated by a large temperature gradient between the "hot" region and the "cold" region results in thermal expansion of the particles and induces a thermal-mechanical wave propagating back and forth in the system with an averaged velocity of 3.32 km s(-1). Heat propagating along the direction of thermal shock leads to a temperature increment of the system and thus chemical reaction initiation. Applying a continuum reactive heat conduction model combined with the temperature distribution obtained from the RD simulation, a heat conduction coefficient is derived as 0.80 W m(-1) K(-1). The chemical reaction mechanisms during thermal shock were analyzed, showing that the reaction is triggered by N-NO2 bond breaking followed by HONO elimination and ring fission. The propagation rates of the reaction front and reaction center are obtained to be 0.069 and 0.038 km s(-1), based on the time and spatial distribution of NO2. The pressure effect on the thermal shock was also investigated by employing uniaxial compression before the thermal shock. We find that compression significantly accelerates thermal-mechanical wave propagation and heat conduction, resulting in higher temperature and more excited molecules and thus earlier initiation and faster propagation of chemical reactions.

  6. Low pressure shock initiation of porous HMX for two grain size distributions and two densities

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsen, R.L.; Sheffield, S.A.; Alcon, R.R.

    1995-09-01

    Shock initiation measurements have been made on granular HMX (octotetramethylene tetranitrainine) for two particle size distributions and two densities. Samples were pressed to either 65% or 73% of crystal density from fine ({approx} 10 {mu}m grain size) and coarse (broad distribution of grain sizes peaking at {approx} 150 {mu}m) powders. Planar shocks of 0.2--1 GPa were generated by impacting gas gun driven projectiles on plastic targets containing the HMX. Wave profiles were measured at the input and output of the {approx} 3.9 mm thick HMX layer using electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. The initiation behavior for the two particle size distributions was very different. The coarse HMX began initiating at input pressures as low as 0.5 GPa. Transmitted wave profiles showed relatively slow reaction with most of the buildup occurring at the shock front. In contrast, the fine particle HMX did not begin to initiate at pressures below 0.9 GPa. When the fine powder did react, however, it did so much faster than the coarse HMX. These observations are consistent with commonly held ideas about bum rates being correlated to surface area, and initiation thresholds being correlated with the size and temperature of the hot spots created by shock passage. For each size, the higher density pressings were less sensitive than the lower density pressings.

  7. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Short Pulse Duration Shock Initiation Experiments on HNS IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig; Chidester, Steven

    2013-06-01

    Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments on 1.60 g/cm3 density (92% TMD) HNS IV have been reported by Schwarz, Bowden et al., Dudley et al., Goveas et al., Greenaway et al., and others. This flyer threshold velocity for detonation/failure data plus measured unreacted HNS Hugoniot data and detonation cylinder test product expansion data were used as the experimental basis for the development of an Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for the shock initiation of HNS IV. The resulting Ignition and Growth HNS IV model parameters yielded good overall agreement with all of this experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.: Explosive, HNS IV, shock to detonation transition, Ignition and Growth: 82.33.Vx, 82.40.Fp.

  8. Plantar Purpura as the Initial Presentation of Viridians Streptococcal Shock Syndrome Secondary to Streptococcus gordonii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Su, Kuan-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shu-Fang; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Chang, Chin-Wen; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Ben, Ren-Jy; Yeh, Yen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Viridians streptococcal shock syndrome is a subtype of toxic shock syndrome. Frequently, the diagnosis is missed initially because the clinical features are nonspecific. However, it is a rapidly progressive disease, manifested by hypotension, rash, palmar desquamation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome within a short period. The disease course is generally fulminant and rarely presents initially as a purpura over the plantar region. We present a case of a 54-year-old female hospital worker diagnosed with viridians streptococcal shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus gordonii. Despite aggressive antibiotic treatment, fluid hydration, and use of inotropes and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient succumbed to the disease. Early diagnosis of the potentially fatal disease followed by a prompt antibiotic regimen and appropriate use of steroids are cornerstones in the management of this disease to reduce the risk of high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27366188

  9. Effects of initial condition spectral content on shock-driven turbulent mixing.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Grinstein, Fernando F

    2015-07-01

    The mixing of materials due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the ensuing turbulent behavior is of intense interest in a variety of physical systems including inertial confinement fusion, combustion, and the final stages of stellar evolution. Extensive numerical and laboratory studies of shock-driven mixing have demonstrated the rich behavior associated with the onset of turbulence due to the shocks. Here we report on progress in understanding shock-driven mixing at interfaces between fluids of differing densities through three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations using the rage code in the implicit large eddy simulation context. We consider a shock-tube configuration with a band of high density gas (SF(6)) embedded in low density gas (air). Shocks with a Mach number of 1.26 are passed through SF(6) bands, resulting in transition to turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The system is followed as a rarefaction wave and a reflected secondary shock from the back wall pass through the SF(6) band. We apply a variety of initial perturbations to the interfaces between the two fluids in which the physical standard deviation, wave number range, and the spectral slope of the perturbations are held constant, but the number of modes initially present is varied. By thus decreasing the density of initial spectral modes of the interface, we find that we can achieve as much as 25% less total mixing at late times. This has potential direct implications for the treatment of initial conditions applied to material interfaces in both 3D and reduced dimensionality simulation models. PMID:26274276

  10. Effects of Initial Condition Spectral Content on Shock Driven-Turbulent Mixing

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Nicholas James; Grinstein, Fernando F.

    2015-07-15

    The mixing of materials due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the ensuing turbulent behavior is of intense interest in a variety of physical systems including inertial confinement fusion, combustion, and the final stages of stellar evolution. Extensive numerical and laboratory studies of shock-driven mixing have demonstrated the rich behavior associated with the onset of turbulence due to the shocks. Here we report on progress in understanding shock-driven mixing at interfaces between fluids of differing densities through three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations using the RAGE code in the implicit large eddy simulation context. We consider a shock-tube configuration with a band ofmore » high density gas (SF6) embedded in low density gas (air). Shocks with a Mach number of 1.26 are passed through SF6 bands, resulting in transition to turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The system is followed as a rarefaction wave and a reflected secondary shock from the back wall pass through the SF6 band. We apply a variety of initial perturbations to the interfaces between the two fluids in which the physical standard deviation, wave number range, and the spectral slope of the perturbations are held constant, but the number of modes initially present is varied. By thus decreasing the density of initial spectral modes of the interface, we find that we can achieve as much as 25% less total mixing at late times. This has potential direct implications for the treatment of initial conditions applied to material interfaces in both 3D and reduced dimensionality simulation models.« less

  11. Effects of Initial Condition Spectral Content on Shock Driven-Turbulent Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Nicholas James; Grinstein, Fernando F.

    2015-07-15

    The mixing of materials due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and the ensuing turbulent behavior is of intense interest in a variety of physical systems including inertial confinement fusion, combustion, and the final stages of stellar evolution. Extensive numerical and laboratory studies of shock-driven mixing have demonstrated the rich behavior associated with the onset of turbulence due to the shocks. Here we report on progress in understanding shock-driven mixing at interfaces between fluids of differing densities through three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations using the RAGE code in the implicit large eddy simulation context. We consider a shock-tube configuration with a band of high density gas (SF6) embedded in low density gas (air). Shocks with a Mach number of 1.26 are passed through SF6 bands, resulting in transition to turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The system is followed as a rarefaction wave and a reflected secondary shock from the back wall pass through the SF6 band. We apply a variety of initial perturbations to the interfaces between the two fluids in which the physical standard deviation, wave number range, and the spectral slope of the perturbations are held constant, but the number of modes initially present is varied. By thus decreasing the density of initial spectral modes of the interface, we find that we can achieve as much as 25% less total mixing at late times. This has potential direct implications for the treatment of initial conditions applied to material interfaces in both 3D and reduced dimensionality simulation models.

  12. Design and initial operational characteristics of a shock tube-Raman scattering calibration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. W. L.; Kroeger, G. A.; Smith, M. S.

    1983-09-01

    A shock tube system has been designed and constructed to provide a high-temperature, local thermal equilibrium gas sample for the determination of Raman scattering cross sections. The shock tube was designed for operation over the temperature (T) range of 800 < or = T < or = 4000 K and the number density (n) range of 0.2 < or = n < or = 2.1 amagat. The fabricated steel shock tube was 6.98 m long with a 6.35-cm inner diameter; the driven/driver section length ratio was 1.88. The initial demonstration of a laser Raman-shock tube system for high-temperature cross section and calibration measurements was accomplished. The incident Mach number range of 4 to 5 was studied with the driver gas and N2 as the driven species using a seamless shock tube and the same tube which was retrofitted with a stainless steel tube liner. The Raman spectra obtained with the seamless steel tube revealed effects of rust particles which has been scrubbed from the tube wall. Upon insertion of the stainless steel liner, these effects were reduced to small corrections to the Raman signal. Vibrational Raman spectra of shock-heated N2 were acquired using a frequency-doubled ruby laser, spectrometer dispersion, and a single PMT detection channel.

  13. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS PLUS IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING OF DAMAGED LX-04 CHARGES

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX and 15% Viton by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. The LX-04 charges were damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermal damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for a long enough time for the beta to delta phase transition to occur and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while the thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. The pristine LX-04 Ignition and Growth model, modified only by igniting a larger amount of explosive during shock compression based on the damaged charge density, accurately calculated the increased shock sensitivity of the three damaged charges.

  14. Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments plus ignition and growth modeling on Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Chadd M.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax) is still a widely used energetic material whose shock initiation characteristics are necessary to understand. It is now possible to shock initiate Composition B and other secondary explosives at diameters well below their characteristic failure diameters for unconfined self-sustaining detonation. This is done using very high velocity, very thin, small diameter flyer plates accelerated by electric or laser power sources. Recently experimental detonation versus failure to detonate threshold flyer velocity curves for Composition B using several KaptonTM flyer thicknesses and diameters were measured. Flyer plates with diameters of 2 mm successfully detonated Composition B, which has a nominal failure diameter of 4.3 mm. The shock pressures required for these initiations are greater than the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure in self-sustaining Composition B detonation waves. The initiation process is two-dimensional, because both rear and side rarefactions can affect the shocked Composition B reaction rates. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for Composition B is extended to yield accurate simulations of this new threshold velocity data for various flyer thicknesses.

  15. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING OF COMPOSITION B AND C-4

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Forbes, J W

    2006-06-13

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosives Composition B and C-4 were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data for the purpose of determining the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model with proper modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages embedded in the explosive sample. Experimental data provided new information on the shock velocity versus particle velocity relationship for each of the investigated materials in their respective pressure range. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data, and Ignition and Growth modeling calculations resulted in a good fit to the experimental data. These experimental data were used to determine Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameters for these explosives. Identical ignition and growth reaction rate parameters were used for C-4 and Composition B, and the Composition B model also included a third reaction rate to simulate the completion of reaction by the TNT component. The Composition B model was then tested on existing short pulse duration, gap test, and projectile impact shock initiation with good results. This Composition B model can be applied to shock initiation scenarios that have not or cannot be tested experimentally with a high level of confidence in its predictions.

  16. Using laser-driven flyer plates to study the shock initiation of nanoenergetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, W. L.; Williams, R. A.; Dreizin, E. L.; Dlott, D. D.

    2014-05-01

    A tabletop system has been developed to launch aluminium laser-driven flyer plates at speeds of up to 4 km/s. The flyers were used to initiate nanoenergetic reactive materials including aluminium/iron oxide and aluminium/molybdenum oxide thermites produced by arrested reactive milling. The flyer flight and impact was characterized by photon Doppler velocimetry and the initiation process by time-resolved emission spectroscopy. Impact initiation thresholds were determined for 50 μm thick flyer plates producing 10 ns shocks. The intensities, delays and durations of the emission bursts, and the effects of nanostructure and microstructure on them were used to investigate fundamental mechanisms of impact initiation.

  17. Modeling the shock initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Mace, Jonathan; Mas, Eric M; Leininger, Lara; Springer, H Keo

    2008-01-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT).

  18. Time-Resolved Temperature Measurements of Shock Initiation in Heterogeneous Exothermic Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jette, Francois-Xavier; Goroshin, Sam; Higgins, Andrew; Frost, David; Lee, Julian

    2009-06-01

    Because the onset of reaction in shock-initiated exothermic powder compositions is difficult to observe, few dynamic measurements that could provide information about the initiation delay or the reaction mechanism have been reported. A method has been developed to experimentally measure the delay between the time of shock arrival and the time when most of the reactions have taken place using embedded thermocouples. The powder mixtures used in the tests were Ni-Al, Mn-S, Ti-Si, Ti-C and Ti-B. The test samples were placed in planar recovery ampoules containing thermocouples and a strong shock was delivered via the detonation of an explosive charge. A sharp temperature rise was measured, providing a reliable measurement of the time at which an exothermic reaction had occurred in the bulk mixture. The delay time before the temperature rise provided an upper bound of the initiation delay time, as well as information regarding the reaction mechanism. The results for all mixtures tested showed that bulk temperature starts to rise 10's of milliseconds after the mixture was shocked, which indicates that most of the reaction did not take place on the microsecond timescale.

  19. Non-Shock Initiation of the Plastic Bonded Explosive PBXN-5: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappo, K. N.; Todd, S. N.; Anderson, M. U.; Vogler, T. J.

    2007-12-01

    The plastic bonded explosive PBXN-5 was studied under impulsive loading experiments to relate impact-induced mechanical damage to the onset of, and the extent of reaction produced. A small diameter projectile generated shock and release conditions at the impact interface, on the microsecond time scale during the initial portion of the impulsive loading. These shock and release wave interactions generate significant damage, resulting in a porous, powder compaction-type initiation behavior. Experimental measurements show an energy threshold for initiation of reaction which relates to impact-induced kinetic energy. These results are implemented in the model development and validation phases of the damage-induced reaction (DMGIR) model, which is used to simulate impact scenarios of explosives, explosive components, and explosive systems.

  20. Multiphysics Simulations of Hot-Spot Initiation in Shocked Insensitive High-Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, Fady; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.

    2010-11-01

    Solid plastic-bonded high-explosive materials consist of crystals with micron-sized pores embedded. Under mechanical or thermal insults, these voids increase the ease of shock initiation by generating high-temperature regions during their collapse that might lead to ignition. Understanding the mechanisms of hot-spot initiation has significant research interest due to safety, reliability and development of new insensitive munitions. Multi-dimensional high-resolution meso-scale simulations are performed using the multiphysics software, ALE3D, to understand the hot-spot initiation. The Cheetah code is coupled to ALE3D, creating multi-dimensional sparse tables for the HE properties. The reaction rates were obtained from MD Quantum computations. Our current predictions showcase several interesting features regarding hot spot dynamics including the formation of a "secondary" jet. We will discuss the results obtained with hydro-thermo-chemical processes leading to ignition growth for various pore sizes and different shock pressures.

  1. Development of numerical framework to study microstructural effects on shock initiation in heterogeneous energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Martin; Rai, Nirmal; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    Heterogeneous energetic materials like plastic bonded explosives (PBX) have very detailed and non-uniform microstructure. The heterogeneity is mainly because of presence of HMX crystals embedded in a polymer binder matrix. Also, manufacturing defects often creates pores and cracks in the material. Shock interaction with these heterogeneities leads to local heated regions known as hot spots. It is widely accepted that these hot spots are predominantly the cause of triggering reaction and eventually ignition in these energetic materials. There are various physical phenomenon through which hot spot can be created such as pore collapse, inter-granular friction in HMX crystals, shock heating of HMX crystals and binder etc. Hence, microstructural heterogeneity can play a vital role for shock initiation in PBX. In the current work, a general framework has been established for performing mesoscale simulations on heterogeneous energetic material. In order to get an accurate representation of the microstructure, image processing algorithms have been employed on XCMT images of PBX microstructure. The image processing framework has been built up with massively parallel Eulerian code, SCIMITAR3D. Shock simulation on PBX microstructures has been performed and the effect of microstructure geometry has been studied for different shock strengths case. The simulation results have been shown to resolve hot spots created due to various heterogeneities present in the microstructure.

  2. Shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Initial results and comparison with simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Boehly, T. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, R.; Bowers, M. W.; Krauter, K. G.; Datte, P. S.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Michel, P. A.; Thomas, C. A.; Olson, R. E.; Pollaine, S.; Town, R. P. J.; Haan, S.; Callahan, D.; Clark, D.; Edwards, J.; Kline, J. L.; Dixit, S.; Schneider, M. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Widmann, K.; Moody, J. D.; Döppner, T.; Radousky, H. B.; Throop, A.; Kalantar, D.; DiNicola, P.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Hamza, A. V.; Horner, J. B.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Dzenitis, E.; Alger, E.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Moreno, K.; Haynam, C.; LaFortune, K. N.; Widmayer, C.; Shaw, M.; Jancaitis, K.; Parham, T.; Holunga, D. M.; Walters, C. F.; Haid, B.; Mapoles, E. R.; Sater, J.; Gibson, C. R.; Malsbury, T.; Fair, J.; Trummer, D.; Coffee, K. R.; Burr, B.; Berzins, L. V.; Choate, C.; Brereton, S. J.; Azevedo, S.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Eder, D. C.; Masters, N. D.; Fisher, A. C.; Sterne, P. A.; Young, B. K.; Landen, O. L.; Van Wonterghem, B. M.; MacGowan, B. J.; Atherton, J.; Lindl, J. D.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Moses, E.

    2012-04-01

    Capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] are underway with the goal of compressing deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (ρR) to sustain a self-propagating burn wave required for fusion power gain greater than unity. These implosions are driven with a carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the DT fuel on a low adiabat. Initial experiments to measure the strength and relative timing of these shocks have been conducted on NIF in a specially designed surrogate target platform known as the keyhole target. This target geometry and the associated diagnostics are described in detail. The initial data are presented and compared with numerical simulations. As the primary goal of these experiments is to assess and minimize the adiabat in related DT implosions, a methodology is described for quantifying the adiabat from the shock velocity measurements. Results are contrasted between early experiments that exhibited very poor shock timing and subsequent experiments where a modified target geometry demonstrated significant improvement.

  3. Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event

    SciTech Connect

    S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

    2012-06-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

  4. Shock Initiation Experiments Plus Ignition and Growth Modeling of PBXN-112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Frank; Vandersall, Kevin; Tarver, Craig

    2011-06-01

    Shock initiation experiments on the HMX based explosive PBXN-112 (89% HMX, 11% polyaurylmethacrylate by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, to characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and to provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charge with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The shock sensitivity of PBXN-112 is compared to that of other HMX formulations. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded a good fit to the experimental data. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Shock initiation of the TATB-based explosive PBX 9502 cooled to 77 Kelvin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollowell, B. C.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Dattelbaum, D. M.; Bartram, B. D.

    2014-05-01

    We present gas-gun driven plate impact shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX 9502 (95 weight percent triaminotrinitrobenzene, 5 weight percent Kel-F 800 binder) cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature, 77K. PBX 9502 samples were cooled by flowing liquid nitrogen through a sample mounting plate and surrounding coil. Temperatures were monitored using embedded and surface mounted thermocouples. Reactive flow was measured with embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges. Wave profiles from the particle velocity gauges show that, even at 77K, shock initiation in PBX 9502 retains a heterogeneous or "hot-spot" character. The "Pop-plot," or distance to detonation, xD, vs. impact pressure, P, is log10(xD) = 4.9 - 3.3log10(P).

  6. Next generation experiments and models for shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C M

    1999-06-01

    Current phenomenological hydrodynamic reactive flow models, such as Ignition and Growth and Johnson- Tang-Forest, when normalized to embedded gauge and laser velocimetry data, have been very successful in predicting shock initiation and detonation properties of solid explosives in most scenarios. However, since these models use reaction rates based on the compression and pressure of the reacting mixture, they can not easily model situations in which the local temperature, which controls the local reaction rate, changes differently from the local pressure. With the advent of larger, faster, parallel computers, microscopic modeling of the hot spot formation processes and Arrhenius chemical kinetic reaction rates that dominate shock initiation and detonation can now be attempted. Such a modeling effort can not be successful without nanosecond or better time resolved experimental data on these processes. The experimental and modeling approaches required to build the next generation of physically realistic reactive flow models are discussed.

  7. Mesoscale simulations of shock initiation in energetic materials characterized by three-dimensional nanotomography.

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Gregory T.; Brundage, Aaron L.; Wixom, Ryan R.; Tappan, Alexander Smith

    2009-08-01

    Three-dimensional shock simulations of energetic materials have been conducted to improve our understanding of initiation at the mesoscale. Vapor-deposited films of PETN and pressed powders of HNS were characterized with a novel three-dimensional nanotomographic technique. Detailed microstructures were constructed experimentally from a stack of serial electron micrographs obtained by successive milling and imaging in a dual-beam FIB/SEM. These microstructures were digitized and imported into a multidimensional, multimaterial Eulerian shock physics code. The simulations provided insight into the mechanisms of pore collapse in PETN and HNS samples with distinctly different three-dimensional pore morphology and distribution. This modeling effort supports investigations of microscale explosive phenomenology and elucidates mechanisms governing initiation of secondary explosives.

  8. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE TATB BASED EXPLOSIVE RX-03-GO WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Garcia, F; Tarver, C M

    2009-06-23

    Shock initiation experiments on the TATB based explosive RX-03-GO (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Cytop A by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and calculate Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The RX-03-GO formulation utilized is similar to that of LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-f by weight) with the notable differences of a new binder material and TATB that has been dissolved and recrystallized in order to improve the purity and morphology. The shock sensitivity will be compared with that of prior data on LX-17 and other TATB formulations. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  9. A method for ranking the shock initiation sensitivity of explosive powders

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, T.A.

    1992-10-05

    Mound has developed a method to rank the shock initiation sensitivity of compacted secondary or insensitive explosive powders. The method has the advantage of using a relatively inexpensive slapper detonator device and a simple test procedure that allows the sensitivity of a powder to be tested in a very short time and at relatively low cost. This report describes the test, as well as several recent operational and safety improvements.

  10. Ignition and Growth Modeling of Shock Initiation of Different Particle Size Formulations of PBXC03 Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tariq; Liu, Yan; Huang, Fenglei; Duan, Zhuoping

    2016-01-01

    The change in shock sensitivity of explosives having various explosive grain sizes is discussed. Along with other parameters, explosive grain size is one of the key parameters controlling the macroscopic behavior of shocked pressed explosives. Ignition and growth reactive flow modeling is performed for the shock initiation experiments carried out by using the in situ manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge technique to investigate the influences of the octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) particle size on the shock initiation and the subsequent detonation growth process for the three explosive formulations of pressed PBXC03 (87% HMX, 7% 1,3,5-trichloro-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB), 6% Viton by weight). All of the formulation studied had the same density but different explosive grain sizes. A set of ignition and growth parameters was obtained for all three formulations. Only the coefficient G1 of the first growth term in the reaction rate equation was varied with the grain size; all other parameters were kept the same for all formulations. It was found that G1 decreases almost linearly with HMX particle size for PBXC03. However, the equation of state (EOS) for solid explosive had to be adjusted to fit the experimental data. Both experimental and numerical simulation results show that the shock sensitivity of PBXC03 decreases with increasing HMX particle size for the sustained pressure pulses (around 4 GPa) as obtained in the experiment. This result is in accordance with the results reported elsewhere in literature. For future work, a better approach may be to find standard solid Grüneisen EOS and product Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) EOS for each formulation for the best fit to the experimental data.

  11. Vulcanian eruptions: experimental insights into leading shock waves, initial acceleration, and flow evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, A. B.; Chojnicki, K. N.; Phillips, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    Vulcanian eruptions are frequent, small-scale, short-lived explosions that occur as a result of rapid decompression of a volcanic conduit. Results of two relevant experimental studies are presented here. The first examines the initial burst phase and leading shock waves via 1-D shock-tube experiments in which mixtures of air and spherical particles are rapidly decompressed into a low-pressure environment via diaphragm rupture. Maximum gas-particle mixture velocities decrease with increasing particle diameter for a given initial pressure ratio across the diaphragm. Experiments with particles produce weaker and more slowly propagating shocks relative to experiments with air alone. Comparison of experimental data to theoretical and computational solutions leads to two key results: 1) the effective interphase drag coefficient during high- acceleration stages of an eruption is less than values previously used in multiphase models of explosive eruptions; therefore a new formulation is prescribed; and 2) leading shock waves are formed by the gas phase alone, not the solid-gas mixture, with shock wave characteristics reflecting losses due to drag between air and particles; therefore shock wave calculations should consider these losses rather than treat the system as a perfectly-coupled pseudogas. The second set of experiments examines the subsequent propagation of the pyroclastic jet or plume by injecting discrete pulses of pressurized (negatively or positively) buoyant fluids into fresh water. Dimensional analysis, based on two source parameters, total injected momentum and total injected buoyancy, identifies a universal scaling relationship for the initial propagation of short-duration impulsive flows; the non- dimensional, time-varying velocity varies as the square root of the time-varying, non-dimensional ratio of source parameters. The relationship successfully describes the experimental trends over a wide range of initial conditions as well as flow propagation of

  12. SHOCK INITIATION OF COMPOSITION B AND C-4 EXPLOSIVES; EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Urtiew, P A; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Forbes, J W

    2006-08-18

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosives Composition B and C-4 were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data for the purpose of providing the Ignition and Growth reactive flow model with proper modeling parameters. A 100 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges containing manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages embedded in the explosive sample. Experimental data provided new information on the shock velocity--particle velocity relationship for each of the investigated material in their respective pressure range. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data, and Ignition and Growth modeling calculations resulted in a good fit to the experimental data. Identical ignition and growth reaction rate parameters were used for C-4 and Composition B, and the Composition B model also included a third reaction rate to simulate the completion of reaction by the TNT component. This model can be applied to shock initiation scenarios that have not or cannot be tested experimentally with a high level of confidence in its predictions.

  13. Non-Shock Initiation Model for Plastic Bonded Explosive PBXN-5 and Cast Explosive: Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Mark; Todd, Steven; Caipen, Terry; Jensen, Charlie; Hughs, Chance

    2009-06-01

    A damage initiated reaction (DMGIR) computational model is being developed for the CTH shock physics code to predict the response of an explosive to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of reaction in the explosive, and its growth to detonation. The DMGIR model is a complement to the History Variable Reactive Burn (HVRB) model embedded in the current CTH code. Specifically designed experiments are supporting the development, implementation, and validation of the DMGIR numerical approach. PBXN-5 was the initial explosive material used experimentally to develop the DMGIR model. This explosive represents a family of plastically bonded explosives with good mechanical strength and rigid body properties. The model has been extended to cast explosives represented by Composition B. Furthermore, the DMGIR model will extended to predict results of non-shock mechanical insults for moldable plastic explosives such as C4 and PrimaSheet.

  14. Non-Shock Initiation Model for Plastic Bonded Explosive PBXN-5 and Cast Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Steven; Caipen, Terry; Grady, Dennis; Anderson, Mark

    2009-06-01

    A damage initiated reaction (DMGIR) computational model is being developed for the CTH shock physics code to predict the response of an explosive to non-shock mechanical insults. The distinguishing feature of this model is the introduction of a damage variable, which relates the evolution of damage to the initiation of reaction in the explosive, and its growth to detonation. The DMGIR model is a complement to the History Variable Reactive Burn (HVRB) model embedded in the current CTH code. Specifically designed experiments are supporting the development, implementation, and validation of the DMGIR numerical approach. PBXN-5 was the initial explosive material used experimentally to develop the DMGIR model. This explosive represents a family of plastically bonded explosives with good mechanical strength and rigid body properties. The model has been extended to cast explosives represented by Composition B. Furthermore, the DMGIR model will extended to predict results of non-shock mechanical insults for moldable plastic explosives such as C4 and PrimaSheet.

  15. Shock Initiation Experiments with Ignition and Growth Modeling on Low Density Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Garcia, Frank; Tarver, Craig M.

    2015-06-01

    Shock initiation experiments on low density (~1.2 and ~1.5 g/cm3) Composition B were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, characterize the run-distance-to-detonation behavior, and provide a basis for Ignition and Growth reactive flow modeling. A 101 mm diameter gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive charges with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between packed layers (~1.2 g/cm3) confined in Teflon rings or sample disks pressed to low density (~1.5 g/cm3) . The shock sensitivity was found to increase with decreasing density as expected. Ignition and Growth model parameters were derived that yielded reasonable agreement with the experimental data at both initial densities. The shock sensitivity at the tested densities will be compared to prior work published as near full density material. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was funded in part by the Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Program.

  16. Effects of viscosity on shock-induced damping of an initial sinusoidal disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaojuan; Liu, Fusheng; Jing, Fuqian

    2010-05-01

    A lack of reliable data treatment method has been for several decades the bottleneck of viscosity measurement by disturbance amplitude damping method of shock waves. In this work the finite difference method is firstly applied to obtain the numerical solutions for disturbance amplitude damping behavior of sinusoidal shock front in inviscid and viscous flow. When water shocked to 15 GPa is taken as an example, the main results are as follows: (1) For inviscid and lower viscous flows the numerical method gives results in good agreement with the analytic solutions under the condition of small disturbance ( a 0/ λ=0.02); (2) For the flow of viscosity beyond 200 Pa s ( η = κ) the analytic solution is found to overestimate obviously the effects of viscosity. It is attributed to the unreal pre-conditions of analytic solution by Miller and Ahrens; (3) The present numerical method provides an effective tool with more confidence to overcome the bottleneck of data treatment when the effects of higher viscosity in experiments of Sakharov and flyer impact are expected to be analyzed, because it can in principle simulate the development of shock waves in flows with larger disturbance amplitude, higher viscosity, and complicated initial flow.

  17. Examining the effects of microstructure and loading on the shock initiation of HMX with mesoscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. Keo; Tarver, Craig; Bastea, Sorin

    2015-06-01

    We perform reactive mesoscale simulations to study shock initiation in HMX over a range of pore morphologies and sizes, porosities, and loading conditions in order to improve our understanding of structure-performance relationships. These relationships are important because they guide the development of advanced macroscale models incorporating hot spot mechanisms and the optimization of novel energetic material microstructures. Mesoscale simulations are performed using the multiphysics hydrocode, ALE3D. Spherical, elliptical, polygonal, and crack-like pore geometries 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 microns in size and 2, 5, 10, and 14% porosity are explored. Loading conditions are realized with shock pressures of 6, 10, 20, 38, and 50 GPa. A Cheetah-based tabular model, including temperature-dependent heat capacity, is used for the unreacted and the product equation-of-state. Also, in-line Cheetah is used to probe chemical species evolution. The influence of microstructure and shock loading on shock-to-detonation-transition run distance, reaction rate and product gas species evolution are discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work is funded by the Joint DoD-DOE Munitions Program.

  18. Influence of initial conditions on the flow patterns of a shock-accelerated thin fluid layer

    SciTech Connect

    Budzinski, J.M.; Benjamin, R.F. ); Jacobs, J.W. )

    1994-11-01

    Previous observations of three flow patterns generated by shock acceleration of a thin perturbed, fluid layer are now correlated with asymmetries in the initial conditions. Using a different diagnostic (planar laser Rayleigh scattering) than the previous experiments, upstream mushrooms, downstream mushrooms, and sinuous patterns are still observed. For each experiment the initial perturbation amplitude on one side of the layer can either be larger, smaller, or the same as the amplitude on the other side, as observed with two images per experiment, and these differences lead to the formation of the different patterns.

  19. Study of shock initiation in pressed energetic materials using mesoscale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udaykumar, H. S.; Rai, Nirmal; Welle, E. J.; Molek, C. D.

    2015-06-01

    Pressed energetic materials have complicated microstructure and contain various forms of heterogeneities such as voids, micro-cracks, binders, energetic crystals etc. Shock interaction with the heterogeneities leads to the formation of local heated regions known as hot spots. There are different mechanisms which can lead to the formation of hot spots. However, for pressed energetic materials viscoplastic deformation of voids leading to collapse has been considered to be the most important mechanism. The reaction and specifically its growth in the pressed energetic materials depends on the temperature and location of the hot spots. Hence, an accurate representation of the microstructure is desired for mesoscale study of shock initiation. In the present work, shock initiation on pressed HMX has been studied and ignition threshold for two types of HMX materials have been established. The microstructure geometry is accurately represented using image processing algorithms employed on SEM images of both explosives. The image processing framework is incorporated in a massively parallel Eulerian code SCIMITAR3D for the mesoscale simulations. The chemical decomposition of HMX has been modeled using Henson-Smilowitz multi-step mechanism. The ignition threshold obtained for pressed HMX is compared with experimental results. The SEM images used in the current work have been obtained from Ryan Wixom and Barry Ritchey (Sandia National Laboratory).

  20. Large-Scale Reactive Atomistic Simulation of Shock-induced Initiation Processes in Energetic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan

    2013-06-01

    Initiation in energetic materials is fundamentally dependent on the interaction between a host of complex chemical and mechanical processes, occurring on scales ranging from intramolecular vibrations through molecular crystal plasticity up to hydrodynamic phenomena at the mesoscale. A variety of methods (e.g. quantum electronic structure methods (QM), non-reactive classical molecular dynamics (MD), mesoscopic continuum mechanics) exist to study processes occurring on each of these scales in isolation, but cannot describe how these processes interact with each other. In contrast, the ReaxFF reactive force field, implemented in the LAMMPS parallel MD code, allows us to routinely perform multimillion-atom reactive MD simulations of shock-induced initiation in a variety of energetic materials. This is done either by explicitly driving a shock-wave through the structure (NEMD) or by imposing thermodynamic constraints on the collective dynamics of the simulation cell e.g. using the Multiscale Shock Technique (MSST). These MD simulations allow us to directly observe how energy is transferred from the shockwave into other processes, including intramolecular vibrational modes, plastic deformation of the crystal, and hydrodynamic jetting at interfaces. These processes in turn cause thermal excitation of chemical bonds leading to initial chemical reactions, and ultimately to exothermic formation of product species. Results will be presented on the application of this approach to several important energetic materials, including pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO). In both cases, we validate the ReaxFF parameterizations against QM and experimental data. For PETN, we observe initiation occurring via different chemical pathways, depending on the shock direction. For PETN containing spherical voids, we observe enhanced sensitivity due to jetting, void collapse, and hotspot formation, with sensitivity increasing with void size. For ANFO, we

  1. Investigating short-pulse shock initiation in HMX-based explosives with reactive meso-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Reaugh, J. E.; May, C. M.

    2014-05-01

    We performed reactive meso-scale simulations of short-pulse experiments to study the influence of flyer velocity and pore structure on shock initiation of LX-10 (95wt% HMX, 5wt% Viton A). Our calculations show that the reaction evolution fit a power law relationship in time and increases with increasing porosity, decreasing pore size, and increasing flyer velocity. While heterogeneous shock initiation modes, dependent on hot spot mechanisms, are predicted at lower flyer velocities, mixed heterogeneous-homogeneous shock initiation modes, less dependent on hot spots, are predicted at higher velocities. These studies are important because they enable the development of predictive shock initiation models that incorporate complex microstructure and can be used to optimize performance-safety characteristics of explosives.

  2. The phosphorylation state of translation initiation factors is regulated developmentally and following heat shock in wheat.

    PubMed

    Gallie, D R; Le, H; Caldwell, C; Tanguay, R L; Hoang, N X; Browning, K S

    1997-01-10

    Several translation initiation factors in mammals and yeast are regulated by phosphorylation. The phosphorylation state of these factors is subject to alteration during development, environmental stress (heat shock, starvation, or heme deprivation), or viral infection. The phosphorylation state and the effect of changes in phosphorylation of the translation initiation factors of higher plants have not been previously investigated. We have determined the isoelectric states for the wheat translation initiation factors eIF-4A, eIF-4B, eIF-4F, eIF-iso4F, and eIF-2 and the poly(A)-binding protein in the seed, during germination, and following heat shock of wheat seedlings using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Western analysis. We found that the developmentally induced changes in isoelectric state observed during germination or the stress-induced changes were consistent with changes in phosphorylation. Treatment of the phosphorylated forms of the factors with phosphatases confirmed that the nature of the modification was due to phosphorylation. The isoelectric states of eIF-4B, eIF-4F (eIF-4E, p26), eIF-iso4F (eIF-iso4E, p28), and eIF-2alpha (p42) were altered during germination, suggesting that phosphorylation of these factors is developmentally regulated and correlates with the resumption of protein synthesis that occurs during germination. The phosphorylation of eIF-2beta (p38) or poly(A)-binding protein did not change either during germination or following a thermal stress. Only the phosphorylation state of two factors, eIF-4A and eIF-4B, changed following a heat shock, suggesting that plants may differ significantly from animals in the way in which their translational machinery is modified in response to a thermal stress. PMID:8995401

  3. Ignition and growth modeling of short pulse shock initiation experiments on fine particle Hexanitrostilbene (HNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, Craig M.; Chidester, Steven K.

    2014-05-01

    Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) is a booster explosive that is usually initiated using short pulse duration shock waves produced by high velocity impacts with thin flyer plates. HNS is generally used at a density of 1.60 g/cm3 which implies a porosity of 8%. It has been produced in several forms (I - IV, ultrafine, etc.) with various particle surface areas. The threshold flyer velocities for shock induced detonation versus failure to detonate for these different surface area materials vary slightly, but, in this paper, an average Ignition and Growth reactive flow model parameter set was determined using all of the experimental data from several aluminium and KaptonTM flyer plate studies. This data ranged from shock pressures of 4 GPa to above the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) detonation pressure (~20 GPa) and from 1 to 120 nanoseconds in time duration. Good agreement was obtained for the available short pulse duration detonation verses failure to threshold flyer velocity data using the Ignition and Growth model,

  4. Computational Study of 3-D Hot-Spot Initiation in Shocked Insensitive High-Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, F. M.; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.

    2011-06-01

    High explosive shock sensitivity is controlled by a combination of mechanical response, thermal properties, and chemical properties. The interplay of these physical phenomena in realistic condensed energetic materials is currently lacking. A multiscale computational framework is developed investigating hot spot (void) ignition in a single crystal of an insensitive HE, TATB. Atomistic MD simulations are performed to provide the key chemical reactions and these reaction rates are used in 3-D multiphysics simulations. The multiphysics code, ALE3D, is linked to the chemistry software, Cheetah, and a three-way coupled approach is pursued including hydrodynamics, thermal and chemical analyses. A single spherical air bubble is embedded in the insensitive HE and its collapse due to shock initiation is evolved numerically in time; while the ignition processes due chemical reactions are studied. Our current predictions showcase several interesting features regarding hot spot dynamics including the formation of a ``secondary'' jet. Results obtained with hydro-thermo-chemical processes leading to ignition growth will be discussed for various pore sizes and different shock pressures. LLNL-ABS-471438. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Manganin Gauge and Reactive Flow Modeling Study of the Shock Initiation of PBX 9501

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarver, C. M.; Forbes, J. W.; Garcia, F.; Urtiew, P. A.

    2002-07-01

    A series of 101mm diameter gas gun experiments was fired using manganin pressure gauges embedded in the HMX-based explosive PBX 9501 at initial temperatures of 20degC and 50degC. Flyer plate impact velocities were chosen to produce impact pressure levels in PBX 9501 at which the growth of explosive reaction preceding detonation was measured on most of the gauges and detonation pressure profiles were recorded on some of the gauges placed deepest into the explosive targets. All measured pressure histories for initial temperatures of 25degC and 50degC were essentially identical. Measured run distances to detonation at three input shock pressures agreed with previous results. An existing Ignition and Growth reactive flow computer model for shock initiation and detonation of PBX 9501, which was developed based on LANL embedded particle velocity gauge data, was tested on these pressure gauge results. The agreement was excellent, indicating that the embedded pressure and particle velocity gauge techniques yielded consistent results.

  6. Grain-Scale Simulations of Hot-Spot Initiation for Shocked TATB

    SciTech Connect

    Najjar, F; Howard, W; Fried, L

    2009-07-31

    High-explosive (HE) material consists of large-sized grains with micron-sized embedded impurities and pores. Under various mechanical/thermal insults, these pores collapse generating high-temperature regions leading to ignition. A computational study has been performed to investigate the mechanisms of pore collapse and hot spot initiation in TATB crystals, employing the thermohydrodynamics arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian code ALE3D. This initial study includes non-reactive dynamics to isolate the thermal and hydrodynamical effects. Two-dimensional high-resolution large-scale meso-scale simulations have been undertaken. We study an axisymmetric configuration for pore radii ranging from 0.5 to 2{micro}m, with initial shock pressures in the range from 3 to 11 GPa. A Mie-Gruneisen Equation of State (EOS) model is used for TATB, and includes a constant yield strength and shear modulus; while the air in the pore invokes a Livermore Equation of State (LEOS) model. The parameter space is systematically studied by considering various shock strengths, pore diameters and material properties. We find that thermal diffusion from the collapsed pores has an important effect in generating high-temperature hot spots in the TATB.

  7. Individual contributions of friction and impact on non-shock initiation of high explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Paul; Avilucea, Gabe; Bishop, Robert; Sanchez, John

    2007-06-01

    Throughout the years a variety of tests have been designed which provide insight into the sensitivity of high explosives (HE) to non-shock initiation. Various standard tests such as the LANL drop weight impact, LLNL drop hammer, drop tower and skid tests have been developed to measure energetic response of explosives subjected to a combination of friction and oblique impact. In addition, the BAM test (for HE powders on roughened ceramic) and ABL friction test (powders or solids on roughened metal) have been developed for testing HE under frictional loading. In an effort to understand first principles of non-shock initiation, we have designed a series of tests to try to isolate friction and impact during the insult of HE. An initial series of tests have been completed with PETN, HMX, and as-pressed pellets of PBX 9501 (95 wt. percent HMX, 5 wt. percent inert binder), PBX 9502 (95 wt. percent TATB, wt. percent inert binder), Cyclotol (75 wt. percent RDX/25, wt. percent TNT), and Comp B3 (60 wt. percent RDX, 40 wt. percent TNT). The results suggest that some types of high explosives are relatively insensitive to pure impact and pure friction but relatively sensitive to insults involving a combination of impact and friction.

  8. Individual Contributions of Friction and Impact on Non-Shock Initiation of High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, P. D.; Avilucea, G. R.; Bishop, R. L.; Sanchez, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Throughout the years a variety of tests have been designed which provide insight into the sensitivity of high explosives (HE) to non-shock initiation. Various standard tests such as the LANL drop weight impact, LLNL drop hammer, drop tower and skid tests have been developed to measure energetic response of explosives subjected to a combination of friction and oblique impact. In addition, the BAM test (for HE powders on roughened ceramic) and ABL friction test (powders or solids on roughened metal) have been developed for testing HE under frictional loading. In an effort to understand first principles of non-shock initiation, we have designed a series of tests to try to isolate friction and impact during the insult of HE. An initial series of tests have been completed with PETN, HMX, and as-pressed pellets of PBX 9501 (95 wt% HMX, wt% inert binder), PBX 9502 (95 wt% TATB, 5 wt% inert binder), Cyclotol (75 wt% RDX/25, wt% TNT), and Comp B3 (60 wt% RDX, 40 wt% TNT). The results suggest that some types of high explosives are relatively insensitive to pure impact and pure friction but relatively sensitive to insults involving a combination of impact and friction.

  9. Modeling Three-Dimensional Shock Initiation of PBX 9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-08

    A recent SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has provided 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate and study code predictions. These SMIS tests used a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments into a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. This SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because (1) SMIS tests facilitate the investigation of 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) within the context of a considerable suite of diagnostics, and (2) many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. A particular goal of these model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the ALE3D implementation of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth reactive flow model [2] within a fully 3-dimensional regime of SDT. The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations reproduce observed 'Go/No-Go' 3D Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  10. Modeling The Shock Initiation of PBX-9501 in ALE3D

    SciTech Connect

    Leininger, L; Springer, H K; Mace, J; Mas, E

    2008-07-01

    The SMIS (Specific Munitions Impact Scenario) experimental series performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory has determined the 3-dimensional shock initiation behavior of the HMX-based heterogeneous high explosive, PBX 9501. A series of finite element impact calculations have been performed in the ALE3D [1] hydrodynamic code and compared to the SMIS results to validate the code predictions. The SMIS tests use a powder gun to shoot scaled NATO standard fragments at a cylinder of PBX 9501, which has a PMMA case and a steel impact cover. The SMIS real-world shot scenario creates a unique test-bed because many of the fragments arrive at the impact plate off-center and at an angle of impact. The goal of this model validation experiments is to demonstrate the predictive capability of the Tarver-Lee Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model [2] in this fully 3-dimensional regime of Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT). The 3-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamic model in ALE3D applies the Ignition and Growth (I&G) reactive flow model with PBX 9501 parameters derived from historical 1-dimensional experimental data. The model includes the off-center and angle of impact variations seen in the experiments. Qualitatively, the ALE3D I&G calculations accurately reproduce the 'Go/No-Go' threshold of the Shock to Detonation Transition (SDT) reaction in the explosive, as well as the case expansion recorded by a high-speed optical camera. Quantitatively, the calculations show good agreement with the shock time of arrival at internal and external diagnostic pins. This exercise demonstrates the utility of the Ignition and Growth model applied in a predictive fashion for the response of heterogeneous high explosives in the SDT regime.

  11. INITIAL WASTE PACKAGE PROBABILISTIC CRITICALITY ANALYSIS: MULTI-PURPOSE CANISTER WITH DISPOSAL CONTAINER (TBV)

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Massari

    1995-10-06

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) to provide an assessment of the present waste package design from a criticality risk standpoint. The specific objectives of this initial analysis are to: (1) Establish a process for determining the probability of waste package criticality as a function of time (in terms of a cumulative distribution function, probability distribution function, or expected number of criticalities in a specified time interval) for various waste package concepts; (2) Demonstrate the established process by estimating the probability of criticality as a function of time since emplacement for an intact multi-purpose canister waste package (MPC-WP) configuration; (3) Identify the dominant sequences leading to waste package criticality for subsequent detailed analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to document and demonstrate the developed process as it has been applied to the MPC-WP. This revision is performed to correct deficiencies in the previous revision and provide further detail on the calculations performed. This analysis is similar to that performed for the uncanistered fuel waste package (UCF-WP, B00000000-01717-2200-00079).

  12. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-01

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data.

  13. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON PBX9501 EXPLOSIVE AT 150?C FOR IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A

    2005-07-19

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% estane, and 2.5% nitroplasticizer by weight) were performed at 150 C to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the PBX9501 explosive with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a good fit to the experimental data. This parameter set will allow accurate code predictions to be calculated for safety scenarios involving PBX9501 explosives at temperatures close to 150 C.

  14. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE HMX BASED EXPLOSIVE LX-10 WITH ASSOCIATED IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A; Chidester, S K

    2007-06-15

    Shock initiation experiments on the HMX based explosives LX-10 (95% HMX, 5% Viton by weight) and LX-07 (90% HMX, 10% Viton by weight) were performed to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive samples with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments and prior experiments on another HMX based explosive LX LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) will be shown, discussed, and compared as a function of the binder content. This parameter set will provide additional information to ensure accurate code predictions for safety scenarios involving HMX explosives with different percent binder content additions.

  15. Study of factors which influence the shock-initiation sensitivity of hexanitrostilbene (HNS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, A. C.

    1981-03-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study factors which influence the shock initiation sensitivity of hexanitrostilbene (HNS). The six factors evaluated were: (1) powder morphology, (2) sample density, (3) test temperature, (4) sample length, (5) diameter of the impacting flyer, and (6) duration of the input stimulus. In addition, the effect of pressure duration, tau, was assessed on the initiation sensitivity of an extrudable explosive (LX-13) and of hexanitroazobenzene (HNAB) for comparison with that of superfine hexanitrostilbene (HNS-SF). The impact stimulus was provided by a polyimide flyer 1.57 mm in diameter propelled by an electrically excited bursting foil. Flyer velocity determined impact pressure, P (3 to 20 GPa), and flyer thickness the shock duration, tau (0.010 to 0.150 ..mu..s), the pulse shape being rectangular. Powder morphology was the most significant factor to influence the initiation sensitivity of HNS; with 0.035-..mu..s pulses the smallest particle-sized HNS had a threshold pressure for initiation which was 50% of that required for the coarser HNS-II. Other factors which lowered the threshold pressure were: lower sample density, elevated test temperature, and larger diameter flyers. HNS-SF showed a shorter growth-to-detonation distance (GTDD) than HNS-I; the GTDD was 0.56 mm at an impact pressure of 7.3 GPa. Pulse duration affected the threshold pressure with each explosive behaving in its own characteristic manner; a P-tau characterization is essential, therefore, for all explosives of interest and should include values of tau which are equivalent to pulse durations expected in service.

  16. Shock initiation studies of low density HMX using electromagnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R.; Graham, R.A.; Anderson, M.U.

    1993-09-01

    Magnetic particle velocity and PVDF stress rate gauges have been used to measure the shock response of low density octotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) (1.24 &/cm{sup 3}). In experiments done at LANL, magnetic particle velocity gauges were located on both sides of the explosive. In nearly identical experiments done at SNL, PVDF stress rate gauges were located at the same positions so both particle velocity and stress histories were obtained for a particular experimental condition. Unreacted Hugoniot data were obtained and an EOS was developed by combining methods used by Hayes, Sheffield and Mitchell (for describing the Hugoniot of HNS at various densities) with Hermann`s P-{alpha} model. Using this technique, it is only necessary to know some thermodynamic constants or the Hugoniot of the initially solid material and the porous material sound speed to obtain accurate unreacted Hugoniots for the porous explosive. Loading and reaction paths were established in the stress-particle velocity plane for some experimental conditions. This information was used to determine a global reaction rate of {approx} 0.13 {mu}s{sup {minus}1} for porous HMX shocked to 0.8 GPa. At low input stresses the transmitted wave profiles had long rise times (up to 1 {mu}s) due to the compaction processes.

  17. A model for calculating the threshold for shock initiation of pyrotechnics and explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Maiden, D.E.

    1987-03-01

    A model is proposed for predicting the shock pressure P and pulse pulse width ..pi.. required to ignite porous reactive mixtures. Essentially, the shock wave collapses the voids, forming high-temperature hot spots that ignite the mixture. The pore temperature is determined by numerical solution of the equations of motion, viscoplastic heating, and heat conduction. The pore radius is determined as a function of the pore size, viscosity, yield stress, and pressure. Temperature-dependent material properties and melting are considered. Ignition occurs when the surface temperature of the pore reaches the critical hot-spot temperature for thermal runaway. Data from flyer-plate impact experiments were analyzed and the pressure pulse at the ignition threshold was determined for 2Al/Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (thermite) and the high explosives TATB, PBX 9404, and PETN. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was performed on the samples and the pore size distribution determined. Theoretical and numerical predictions of the ignition threshold are compared with experiment. Results show that P/sup 2/..pi.. appears to be an initiation property of the material.

  18. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock-induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Sion, Benoit; Chalmel, Frédéric; D Rolland, Antoine; Lemonnier, Loïc; De Clerck, Tatiana; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Derouiche, Sandra; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Mauduit, Claire; Benahmed, Mohamed; Roudbaraki, Morad; Jégou, Bernard; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Testes of most male mammals present the particularity of being externalized from the body and are consequently slightly cooler than core body temperature (4-8°C below). Although, hypothermia of the testis is known to increase germ cells apoptosis, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, including cold sensors, transduction pathways, and apoptosis triggers. In this study, using a functional knockout mouse model of the cold and menthol receptors, dubbed transient receptor potential melastatine 8 (TRPM8) channels, we found that TRPM8 initiated the cold-shock response by differentially modulating cold- and heat-shock proteins. Besides, apoptosis of germ cells increased in proportion to the cooling level in control mice but was independent of temperature in knockout mice. We also observed that the rate of germ cell death correlated positively with the reactive oxygen species level and negatively with the expression of the detoxifying enzymes. This result suggests that the TRPM8 sensor is a key determinant of germ cell fate under hypothermic stimulation.-Borowiec, A.-S., Sion, B., Chalmel, F., Rolland, A. D., Lemonnier, L., De Clerck, T., Bokhobza, A., Derouiche, S., Dewailly, E., Slomianny, C., Mauduit, C., Benahmed, M., Roudbaraki, M., Jégou, B., Prevarskaya, N., Bidaux, G. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock-induced oxidation. PMID:27317670

  19. Laser-driven miniature flyer plates for shock initiation of secondary explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    Miniature flyer plates (<1-mm diameter X <5-micron thick) of aluminum and other materials are accelerated by a 10-ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser to velocities >5 km/s. Velocity profiles are recorded by velocity interferometry (VISAR) techniques and impact planarity by electronic streak photography. Techniques for improving energy coupling from laser to flyer plate will be discussed. Flyer plate performance parameters will be compared with material properties. The P/sup n/t criteria for shock initiation of explosives will be compared for various flyer materials, pressure, and pulse duration. Performance of secondary explosives (PETN, HNS, HMX, various PBX, others) will be reported. These data will detail the experimental effect of t (in P/sup n/t) approaching values of a few nanoseconds. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Computational study of 3-D hot-spot initiation in shocked insensitive high-explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, F. M.; Howard, W. M.; Fried, L. E.; Manaa, M. R.; Nichols, A., III; Levesque, G.

    2012-03-01

    High-explosive (HE) material consists of large-sized grains with micron-sized embedded impurities and pores. Under various mechanical/thermal insults, these pores collapse generating hightemperature regions leading to ignition. A hydrodynamic study has been performed to investigate the mechanisms of pore collapse and hot spot initiation in TATB crystals, employing a multiphysics code, ALE3D, coupled to the chemistry module, Cheetah. This computational study includes reactive dynamics. Two-dimensional high-resolution large-scale meso-scale simulations have been performed. The parameter space is systematically studied by considering various shock strengths, pore diameters and multiple pore configurations. Preliminary 3-D simulations are undertaken to quantify the 3-D dynamics.

  1. Initial observations of low energy charged particles near the earth's bow shock on ISEE-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ipavich, F. M.; Gloeckler, G.; Fan, C. Y.; Fisk, L. A.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Scholer, M.; Ogallagher, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Initial measurements from the ULECA sensor of the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland experiment on ISEE 1 are reported. ULECA is an electrostatic deflection - total energy sensor consisting of a collimator, a deflection analyzer, and an array of solid-state detectors. The position of a given detector, which determines the energy per charge of an incident particle, together with the measured energy, determines the particle's charge state. It is found that a rich variety of phenomena are operative in the transthermal energy regime (about 10 keV/Q to 100 keV/Q) covered by ULECA. Specifically, observations are presented of locally accelerated protons, alpha particles, and heavier ions in the magnetosheath and upstream of earth's bow shock. Preliminary analysis indicates that the behavior of these locally accelerated particles is most similar at the same energy per charge.

  2. Computational prediction of probabilistic ignition threshold of pressed granular octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,2,3,5-tetrazocine (HMX) under shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seokpum; Miller, Christopher; Horie, Yasuyuki; Molek, Christopher; Welle, Eric; Zhou, Min

    2016-09-01

    The probabilistic ignition thresholds of pressed granular octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,2,3,5-tetrazocine explosives with average grain sizes between 70 μm and 220 μm are computationally predicted. The prediction uses material microstructure and basic constituent properties and does not involve curve fitting with respect to or prior knowledge of the attributes being predicted. The specific thresholds predicted are James-type relations between the energy flux and energy fluence for given probabilities of ignition. Statistically similar microstructure sample sets are computationally generated and used based on the features of micrographs of materials used in actual experiments. The predicted thresholds are in general agreement with measurements from shock experiments in terms of trends. In particular, it is found that grain size significantly affects the ignition sensitivity of the materials, with smaller sizes leading to lower energy thresholds required for ignition. For example, 50% ignition threshold of the material with an average grain size of 220 μm is approximately 1.4-1.6 times that of the material with an average grain size of 70 μm in terms of energy fluence. The simulations account for the controlled loading of thin-flyer shock experiments with flyer velocities between 1.5 and 4.0 km/s, constituent elasto-viscoplasticity, fracture, post-fracture contact and friction along interfaces, bulk inelastic heating, interfacial frictional heating, and heat conduction. The constitutive behavior of the materials is described using a finite deformation elasto-viscoplastic formulation and the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. The ignition thresholds are determined via an explicit analysis of the size and temperature states of hotspots in the materials and a hotspot-based ignition criterion. The overall ignition threshold analysis and the microstructure-level hotspot analysis also lead to the definition of a macroscopic ignition parameter (J) and a microscopic

  3. A Theoretical Exploration of the Differences between Prompt and Bow Shock Initiation of Explosives by Shaped Charge Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, Christopher; James, Hugh; Goff, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The use of the CREST reactive burn model in conjunction with results from the open literature demonstrates the differences between prompt and bow shock initiation, even when the diameter of the shaped charge jet is much larger than the failure diameter of the explosive. The burn model shows the need for the bow shock to build in strength before reaching an amplitude where significant reaction is triggered, and hence explains the observed very long runs to detonation required by this mechanism. While the compression of the explosive between the bow shock and the jet provides much greater pressures than those seen in the bow shock, the relative thermodynamic inefficiency of the compression process means that this region contributes little to the direct generation of reaction.

  4. Effectiveness of Initial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on the Newly Diagnosed Lateral or Medial Epicondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Seok; Park, Noh Kyoung; Lee, Chan Woo; Song, Ho Sup; Sohn, Min Kyun; Cho, Kang Hee; Kim, Jung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of initial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for patients newly diagnosed with lateral or medial epicondylitis, compared to local steroid injection. Method An analysis was conducted of twenty-two patients who were newly confirmed as lateral or medial epicondylitis through medical history and physical examination. The ESWT group (n=12) was treated once a week for 3 weeks using low energy (0.06-0.12 mJ/mm2, 2,000 shocks), while the local steroid injection group (n=10) was treated once with triamcinolone 10 mg mixed with 1% lidocaine solution. Nirschl score and 100 point score were assessed before and after the treatments of 1st, 2nd, 4th and 8th week. And Roles and Maudsley score was assessed one and eight weeks after the treatments. Results Both groups showed significant improvement in Nirschl score and 100 point score during the entire period. The local steroid injection group improved more in Nirschl score at the first week and in 100 point score at the first 2 weeks, compared to those of the ESWT group. But the proportion of excellent and good grades of Roles and Maudsley score in the ESWT group increased more than that of local steroid injection group by the final 8th week. Conclusion The ESWT group improved as much as the local steroid injection group as treatment for medial and lateral epicondylitis. Therefore, ESWT can be a useful treatment option in patients for whom local steroid injection is difficult. PMID:23185733

  5. A computational exploration of the differences between prompt and bow shock initiation of explosives by shaped charge jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, Christopher; James, Hugh R.; Goff, Michael J.

    2012-03-01

    The use of the CREST reactive burn model in conjunction with results from the open literature demonstrates the differences between prompt and bow shock initiation where the diameter of the shaped charge jet is much larger than the failure diameter of the explosive. The type of cover plate protecting the explosive can play an important role in determining the bow shock structure. For most scenarios of interest the burn model shows the need for the bow shock to build in strength before reaching an amplitude where significant reaction is triggered, and hence explains the observed very long runs to detonation that are often required by this mechanism. While the compression of the explosive between the bow shock and the jet provides much greater pressures than those seen in the bow shock, the relative thermodynamic inefficiency of the compression process means that this region contributes little to the direct generation of reaction. In contrast prompt shocks exhibit complete explosive burn at an early stage and the occasional long run distance is due to delays in this reaction achieving a diverging detonation.

  6. On the low pressure shock initiation of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine based plastic bonded explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandersall, Kevin S.; Tarver, Craig M.; Garcia, Frank; Chidester, Steven K.

    2010-05-01

    In large explosive and propellant charges, relatively low shock pressures on the order of 1-2 GPa impacting large volumes and lasting tens of microseconds can cause shock initiation of detonation. The pressure buildup process requires several centimeters of shock propagation before shock to detonation transition occurs. In this paper, experimentally measured run distances to detonation for lower input shock pressures are shown to be much longer than predicted by extrapolation of high shock pressure data. Run distance to detonation and embedded manganin gauge pressure histories are measured using large diameter charges of six octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) based plastic bonded explosives (PBX's): PBX 9404; LX-04; LX-07; LX-10; PBX 9501; and EDC37. The embedded gauge records show that the lower shock pressures create fewer and less energetic "hot spot" reaction sites, which consume the surrounding explosive particles at reduced reaction rates and cause longer distances to detonation. The experimental data is analyzed using the ignition and growth reactive flow model of shock initiation in solid explosives. Using minimum values of the degrees of compression required to ignite hot spot reactions, the previously determined high shock pressure ignition and growth model parameters for the six explosives accurately simulate the much longer run distances to detonation and much slower growths of pressure behind the shock fronts measured during the shock initiation of HMX PBX's at several low shock pressures.

  7. Embedded Electromagnetic Gauge Measurements and Modeling of Shock Initiation in the TATB Based Explosives LX-17 and PBX 9502

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Alcon, R. R.; Forbes, J. W.; Tarver, C. M.; Garcia, F.

    2002-07-01

    We have completed a series of shock initiation experiments on PBX 9502 (95 weight % dry aminated TATB explosive, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder) and LX-17 (92.% wet aminated TATB, 7.5 % Kel-F 800). These experiments were performed on the gas/gas two stage gun at Los Alamos. Samples were prepared with ten or eleven embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges to measure the evolution of the wave leading up to a detonation. Additionally, one to three shock tracker gauges were used to track the position of the shock front with time and determine the point where detonation was achieved. Wave profiles indicate little delay between formation of hot-spots in the shock front and release of hot-spot energy. In other words, a great deal of the buildup occurs in the shock front, rather than behind it. Run distances and times to detonation as a function of initial pressure are consistent with published data. The Ignition and Growth model with published parameters for LX-17 replicate the data very well.

  8. Embedded Electromagnetic Gauge Measurements and Modeling of Shock Initiation in the TATB based Explosives PBX 9502 and LX-17

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Alcon, R. R.; Forbes, J. W.; Tarver, C. M.; Garcia, F.

    2001-06-01

    We have completed a series of shock initiation experiments on PBX 9502 (95 weight % dry aminated TATB explosive, 5 weight % Kel-F 800 binder) and LX-17 (92.5 % wet aminated TATB, 7.5 % Kel-F 800). These experiments were performed on the gas/gas two stage gun at Los Alamos. Samples were prepared with 10 - 11 embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges to measure the evolution of the wave leading up to a detonation. Additionally, 1 to 3 shock tracker gauges were used to track the position of the shock front with time and determine the point where detonation was achieved. Wave profiles indicate little delay between formation of hot-spots in the shock front and release of hot-spot energy. In other words, a great deal of the buildup occurs in the shock front, rather than behind it. Run distances and times to detonation as a function of initial pressure are consistent with published data. The Ignition and Growth model with published parameters for LX-17 replicate the data very well.

  9. A simple probabilistic model of initiation of motion of poorly-sorted granular mixtures subjected to a turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rui M. L.; Ferrer-Boix, Carles; Hassan, Marwan

    2015-04-01

    Initiation of sediment motion is a classic problem of sediment and fluid mechanics that has been studied at wide range of scales. By analysis at channel scale one means the investigation of a reach of a stream, sufficiently large to encompass a large number of sediment grains but sufficiently small not to experience important variations in key hydrodynamic variables. At this scale, and for poorly-sorted hydraulically rough granular beds, existing studies show a wide variation of the value of the critical Shields parameter. Such uncertainty constitutes a problem for engineering studies. To go beyond Shields paradigm for the study of incipient motion at channel scale this problem can be can be cast in probabilistic terms. An empirical probability of entrainment, which will naturally account for size-selective transport, can be calculated at the scale of the bed reach, using a) the probability density functions (PDFs) of the flow velocities {{f}u}(u|{{x}n}) over the bed reach, where u is the flow velocity and xn is the location, b) the PDF of the variability of competent velocities for the entrainment of individual particles, {{f}{{up}}}({{u}p}), where up is the competent velocity, and c) the concept of joint probability of entrainment and grain size. One must first divide the mixture in into several classes M and assign a correspondent frequency p_M. For each class, a conditional PDF of the competent velocity {{f}{{up}}}({{u}p}|M) is obtained, from the PDFs of the parameters that intervene in the model for the entrainment of a single particle: [ {{u}p}/√{g(s-1){{di}}}={{Φ }u}( { {{C}k} },{{{φ}k}},ψ,{{u}p/{di}}{{{ν}(w)}} )) ] where { Ck } is a set of shape parameters that characterize the non-sphericity of the grain, { φk} is a set of angles that describe the orientation of particle axes and its positioning relatively to its neighbours, ψ is the skin friction angle of the particles, {{{u}p}{{d}i}}/{{{ν}(w)}} is a particle Reynolds number, di is the sieving

  10. Modification of amino acids at shock pressures of 3 to 30 GPA: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Etta; Horz, Friedrich; Haynes, Gerald; See, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    Since the discovery of amino acids in the Murchison meteorite, much speculation has focused on their origin and subsequent alteration, including the possible role of secondary processes, both terrestrial and extraterrestrial. As collisional processes and associated shock waves seem to have affected the silicate portions of many primitive meteorites, a mixture of powdered Allende (125-150 m grain size) and nine synthetic amino acids (six protein and three nonprotein) were subjected to controlled shock pressures from 3 to 30 GPa to determine the effect of shocks on amino acid survivability. Preliminary characterizations of the recovered shock products are presented.

  11. Effects of damage on non-shock initiation of HMX-based explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, Daniel N; Peterson, Paul D; Kien - Yin, Lee; Chavez, David E; Deluca, Racci; Avilucea, Gabriel; Hagelberg, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Structural damage in energetic materials plays a significant role in the probability of nonshock initiation events. Damage may occur in the form of voids or cracks either within crystals or in binder-rich regions between crystals. These cracks affect whether hotspots generated by impact will quench or propagate under non-shock insult. For this study, we have separately engineered intracrystalline and inter-crystalline cracks in to the HMX-based PBX 9501. Intra-crystalline cracks were created by subjecting HMX to forward and reverse solid-to-solid phase transformations prior to formulation. Inter-crystalline cracks were induced by compressing formulated samples of PBX 9501 at an average strain rate of 0.00285 S{sup -1}. Both sets of pre-damaged explosives were then impact tested using the LANL Type 12 Drop Weight-Impact Machine and their sensitivities compared to nondamaged PBX 9501. Results of these tests clearly show significant differences in sensitivity between damaged and non-damaged PBX 9501.

  12. Early initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy in the management of septic shock: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The use of low-dose steroid therapy in the management of septic shock has been extensively studied. However, the association between the timing of low-dose steroid therapy and the outcome has not been evaluated. Therefore, we evaluated whether early initiation of low-dose steroid therapy is associated with mortality in patients with septic shock. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 178 patients who received low-dose corticosteroid therapy for septic shock between January 2008 and December 2009. Time-dependent Cox regression models were used to adjust for potential confounding factors in the association between the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy and in-hospital mortality. Results The study population consisted of 107 men and 71 women with a median age of 66 (interquartile range, 54 to 71) years. The 28-day mortality was 44% and low-dose corticosteroid therapy was initiated within a median of 8.5 (3.8 to 19.1) hours after onset of septic shock-related hypotension. Median time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was significantly shorter in survivors than in non-survivors (6.5 hours versus 10.4 hours; P = 0.0135). The mortality rates increased significantly with increasing quintiles of time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P = 0.0107 for trend). Other factors associated with 28-day mortality were higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) 3 (P < 0.0001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (P = 0.0007), dose of vasopressor at the time of initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy (P < 0.0001), need for mechanical ventilation (P = 0.0001) and renal replacement therapy (P < 0.0001), while the impaired adrenal reserve did not affect 28-day mortality (81% versus 82%; P = 0.8679). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, the time to initiation of low-dose corticosteroid therapy was still significantly associated with 28-day mortality (adjusted odds

  13. A reactive burn model for shock initiation in a PBX: scaling and separability based on the hot spot concept

    SciTech Connect

    Show, Milton S; Menikoff, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    In the formulation of a reactive burn model for shock initiation, we endeavor to incorporate a number of effects based on the underlying physical concept of hot spot ignition followed by the growth of reaction due to diverging deflagration fronts. The passage of a shock front sets the initial condition for reaction, leading to a fraction of the hot spots that completely burn while others will quench. The form of the rate model is chosen to incorporate approximations based on the physical picture. In particular, the approximations imply scaling relations that are then used to mathematically separate various contributions. That is, the model is modular and refinements can be applied separately without changing the other contributions. For example, the effect of initial temperature, porosity, etc. predominantly enter the characterization of the non-quenching hot spot distribution. A large collection of velocity gauge data is shown to be well represented by the model with a very small number of parameters.

  14. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Stefko, George L.; Riha, David S.; Thacker, Ben H.; Nagpal, Vinod K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2010-01-01

    NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is a general-purpose, probabilistic analysis program that computes probability of failure and probabilistic sensitivity measures of engineered systems. Because NASA/NESSUS uses highly computationally efficient and accurate analysis techniques, probabilistic solutions can be obtained even for extremely large and complex models. Once the probabilistic response is quantified, the results can be used to support risk-informed decisions regarding reliability for safety-critical and one-of-a-kind systems, as well as for maintaining a level of quality while reducing manufacturing costs for larger-quantity products. NASA/NESSUS has been successfully applied to a diverse range of problems in aerospace, gas turbine engines, biomechanics, pipelines, defense, weaponry, and infrastructure. This program combines state-of-the-art probabilistic algorithms with general-purpose structural analysis and lifting methods to compute the probabilistic response and reliability of engineered structures. Uncertainties in load, material properties, geometry, boundary conditions, and initial conditions can be simulated. The structural analysis methods include non-linear finite-element methods, heat-transfer analysis, polymer/ceramic matrix composite analysis, monolithic (conventional metallic) materials life-prediction methodologies, boundary element methods, and user-written subroutines. Several probabilistic algorithms are available such as the advanced mean value method and the adaptive importance sampling method. NASA/NESSUS 6.2c is structured in a modular format with 15 elements.

  15. On the effect of the initial magnetic polarity and of the background wind on the evolution of CME shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chané, E.; Jacobs, C.; van der Holst, B.; Poedts, S.; Kimpe, D.

    2005-03-01

    The shocks and magnetic clouds caused by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) in the solar corona and interplanetary (IP) space play an important role in the study of space weather. In the present paper, numerical simulations of some simple CME models were performed by means of a finite volume, explicit solver to advance the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. The aim is to quantify here both the effect of the background wind model and of the initial polarity on the evolution of the IP CMEs and the corresponding shocks. To simulate the CMEs, a high density-pressure plasma blob is superposed on different steady state solar wind models. The evolution of an initially non-magnetized plasma blob is compared with that of two magnetized ones (with both normal and inverse polarity) and the differences are analysed and quantified. Depending on the launch angle of the CME and the polarity of the initial flux rope, the velocity of the shock front and magnetic cloud is decreased or increased. Also the spread angle of the CME and the evolution path of the CME in the background solar wind is substantially different for the different CME models and the different wind models. A quantitative comparison of these simulations shows that these effects can be quite substantial and can clearly affect the geo-effectiveness and the arrival time of the events.

  16. Initiation of Polymer Bonded Explosive (PBXN-110) by Combined Shock and Shear Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J. L.; Dorgan, R. J.; Nixon, M. E.; Dick, R. D.

    2007-12-01

    Combined shock and shear loading of explosives has been shown to result in detonation of explosives at input pressures less than those required with a nearly planar shock. In this study, the effect of combined shock and shear loading on PBXN-110 is investigated. The explosive sample is loaded by a TNT/Octol plane wave lens or a Pentolite pad in contact with a layer of PMMA followed by a cylindrical wave shaper that has one side angled at 45 degrees. The experiment is repeated for different thicknesses of the PMMA layer in order to vary the input pressure. In addition, the experiment is modeled using the Lagrangian finite element hydrocode EPIC, and the results of the experiments are compared with the numerical simulations.

  17. Initiation of Polymer Bonded Explosive (PBXN-110) by Combined Shock and Shear Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Jennifer; Dorgan, Robert; Nixon, Michael; Dick, Richard

    2007-06-01

    Combined shock and shear loading of explosives has been shown to result in detonation of explosives at input pressures less than those required with a nearly planar shock (Cart, APS-SCCM 2003). In this study, the effect of combined shock and shear loading on PBXN-110 is investigated. The explosive sample is loaded by a TNT/Octol plane wave lens in contact with a layer of PMMA followed by a cylindrical wave shaper that has one one side angled at 45 degrees. The experiment is repeated for different thicknesses of the PMMA layer in order to vary the input pressure. In addition, the experiment is modeled using the Lagrangian finite element hydrocode EPIC, and the results of the experiments are compared with the numerical simulations.

  18. Hot spot initiation and chemical reaction in shocked polymeric bonded explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Zybin, Sergey; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William; Materials; Process Simulation Center, Caltech Team

    2011-06-01

    A polymer bonded explosive (PBX) model based on PBXN-106 is studied via molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using reactive force field (ReaxFF) under shock loading conditions. Hotspot is observed when shock waves pass through the non-planar interface of explosives and elastomers. Adiabatic shear localization is proposed as the main mechanism of hotspot ignition in PBX for high velocity impact. Our simulation also shows that the coupling of shear localization and chemical reactions at hotspot region play important rules at stress relaxtion for explosives. The phenomenon that shock waves are obsorbed by elastomers is also observed in the MD simulations. This research received supports from ARO (W911NF-05-1-0345; W911NF-08-1-0124), ONR (N00014-05-1-0778), and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  19. Temperature-dependent shock initiation of TATB-based high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Dallman, J.C.; Wackerle, J.

    1993-10-01

    The effects of temperature on the shock sensitivity of two TATB formulations PBX 9502 and LX-17 are studied over the temperature range {minus}54{degrees}C to 252{degrees}C. The shock Hugoniot curves over this same temperature range are developed. Thermal expansion properties and porosities are used to help determine the mechanisms of thermal sensitization. Impact sensitivities over the range from ambient to 300{degrees}C are reported. Analyses of these results imply that thermal sensitization is the result of purely chemical kinetics enhancement and intracrystalline hot-spot growth. Additional results on the ambient shock sensitivity of PBX 9502 and LX-17 following thermal cycling to 252{degrees}C and back to ambient is presented.

  20. Observation of dispersive shock waves developing from initial depressions in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trillo, S.; Klein, M.; Clauss, G. F.; Onorato, M.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate surface gravity waves in a shallow water tank, in the limit of long wavelengths. We report the observation of non-stationary dispersive shock waves rapidly expanding over a 90 m flume. They are excited by means of a wave maker that allows us to launch a controlled smooth (single well) depression with respect to the unperturbed surface of the still water, a case that contains no solitons. The dynamics of the shock waves are observed at different levels of nonlinearity equivalent to a different relative smallness of the dispersive effect. The observed undulatory behavior is found to be in good agreement with the dynamics described in terms of a Korteweg-de Vries equation with evolution in space, though in the most nonlinear cases the description turns out to be improved over the quasi linear trailing edge of the shock by modeling the evolution in terms of the integro-differential (nonlocal) Whitham equation.

  1. Elucidation of the dynamics for hot-spot initiation at nonuniform interfaces of highly shocked materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Qi; Zybin, Sergey V.; Goddard, William A., III; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Blanco, Mario; Luo, Sheng-Nian

    2011-12-01

    The fundamental processes in shock-induced instabilities of materials remain obscure, particularly for detonation of energetic materials. We simulated these processes at the atomic scale on a realistic model of a polymer-bonded explosive (3,695,375 atoms/cell) and observed that a hot spot forms at the nonuniform interface, arising from shear relaxation that results in shear along the interface that leads to a large temperature increase that persists long after the shock front has passed the interface. For energetic materials this temperature increase is coupled to chemical reactions that lead to detonation. We show that decreasing the density of the binder eliminates the hot spot.

  2. Shock Initiation Behavior of PBXN-9 Determined by Gas Gun Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N. J.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Hooks, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    The shock to detonation transition was evaluated in the HMX based explosive PBXN-9 by a series of light-gas gun experiments. PBXN-9 consists of 92 wt% HMX, 2wt% Hycar 4054 & 6 wt&percent; dioctyl adipate with a density of 1.75 g/cm3 and 0.8&% voids. The experiments were designed to understand the specifics of wave evolution and the run distance to detonation as a function of input shock pressure. These experiments were conducted on gas guns in order to vary the input shock pressure accurately. The primary diagnostics were embedded magnetic gauges, which are based on Faraday's law of induction, and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The run distance to detonation vs. shock pressure, or "Pop plot," was redefined as log(X) = 2.14-1.82 log (P), which is substantially different than previous data. The Hugoniot was refined as Us = 2.32+2.211 Up. This data will be useful for the development of predictive models for the safety and performance of PBXN-9 along with providing increased understanding of HMX based explosives in varying formulations.

  3. Shock initiation behavior of PBXN-9 determined by gas gun experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Nathaniel; Gustavsen, Richard; Hooks, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    The shock to detonation transition was evaluated in the HMX based explosive PBXN-9 by a series of light-gas gun experiments. PBXN-9 consists of 92 wt% HMX, 2wt% Hycar 4054 & 6 wt% dioctyl adipate with a density of 1.75 g/cm^3 and 0.8% voids. The experiments were designed to understand the specifics of wave evolution and the run distance to detonation as a function of input shock pressure. These experiments were conducted on gas guns in order to vary the input shock pressure accurately. The primary diagnostics are embedded magnetic gauges which are based on Faraday's law of induction along with photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV). The run distance to detonation vs. shock pressure, or ``Pop plot,'' was redefined as log (X*) = 2.14 -- 1.82 log (P), which is substantially different than previous data. The Hugoniot was refined as Us = 2.32 + 2.21 Up. This data will be useful for the development of predictive models for the safety and performance of PBXN-9 in addition to providing an increased understanding of HMX based explosives in varying formulations.

  4. Shock initiation behavior of PBXN-9 determined by gas gun experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Nathaniel J; Gustavsen, Richard L; Hooks, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    The shock to detonation transition was evaluated in the HMX based explosive PBXN-9 by a series of light-gas gun experiments. PBXN-9 consists of 92 wt% HMX, 2wt% Hycar 4054 & 6 wt% dioctyl adipate with a density of 1.75 g/cm{sup 3} and 0.8% voids. The experiments were designed to understand the specifics of wave evolution and the run distance to detonation as a function of input shock pressure. These experiments were conducted on gas guns in order to vary the input shock pressure accurately. The primary diagnostics were embedded magnetic gauges, which are based on Faraday's law of induction, and Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). The run distance to detonation vs. shock pressure, or 'Pop plot,' was redefined as log(X*) = 2.14-1.82 log(P), which is substantially different than previous data. The Hugoniot was refined as U{sub s} = 2.32 + 2.21 U{sub p}. This data will be useful for the development of predictive models for the safety and performance of PBXN-9 along with providing increased understanding of HMX based explosives in varying formulations.

  5. Probabilistic Models to Predict the Growth Initiation Time for Pseudomonas spp. in Processed Meats Formulated with NaCl and NaNO2

    PubMed Central

    Park, Beomyoung; Oh, Mihwa

    2014-01-01

    This study developed probabilistic models to determine the initiation time of growth of Pseudomonas spp. in combinations with NaNO2 and NaCl concentrations during storage at different temperatures. The combination of 8 NaCl concentrations (0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, and 1.75%) and 9 NaNO2 concentrations (0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, 90, 105, and 120 ppm) were prepared in a nutrient broth. The medium was placed in the wells of 96-well microtiter plates, followed by inoculation of a five-strain mixture of Pseudomonas in each well. All microtiter plates were incubated at 4, 7, 10, 12, and 15℃ for 528, 504, 504, 360 and 144 h, respectively. Growth (growth initiation; GI) or no growth was then determined by turbidity every 24 h. These growth response data were analyzed by a logistic regression to produce growth/no growth interface of Pseudomonas spp. and to calculate GI time. NaCl and NaNO2 were significantly effective (p<0.05) on inhibiting Pseudomonas spp. growth when stored at 4-12℃. The developed model showed that at lower NaCl concentration, higher NaNO2 level was required to inhibit Pseudomonas growth at 4-12℃. However, at 15℃, there was no significant effect of NaCl and NaNO2. The model overestimated GI times by 58.2±17.5 to 79.4±11%. These results indicate that the probabilistic models developed in this study should be useful in calculating the GI times of Pseudomonas spp. in combination with NaCl and NaNO2 concentrations, considering the over-prediction percentage. PMID:26761668

  6. The Role of the Membrane-Initiated Heat Shock Response in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Zohar; Weiss, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    The heat shock response (HSR) is a cellular response to diverse environmental and physiological stressors resulting in the induction of genes encoding molecular chaperones, proteases, and other proteins that are essential for protection and recovery from cellular damage. Since different perturbations cause accumulation of misfolded proteins, cells frequently encounter fluctuations in the environment which alter proteostasis. Since tumor cells use their natural adaptive mechanism of coping with stress and misfolded proteins, in recent years, the proteostasis network became a promising target for anti-tumor therapy. The membrane is the first to be affected by heat shock and therefore may be the first one to sense heat shock. The membrane also connects between the extracellular and the intracellular signals. Hence, there is a “cross talk” between the HSR and the membranes since heat shock can induce changes in the fluidity of membranes, leading to membrane lipid remodeling that occurs in several diseases such as cancer. During the last decade, a new possible therapy has emerged in which an external molecule is used that could induce membrane lipid re-organization. Since at the moment there are very few substances that regulate the HSR effectively, an alternative way has been searched to modulate chaperone activities through the plasma membrane. Recently, we suggested that the use of the membrane Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) modulators regulated the HSR in cancer cells. However, the primary targets of the signal transduction pathway are yet un-known. This review provides an overview of the current literature regarding the role of HSR in membrane remodeling in cancer since a deep understanding of the membrane biology in cancer and the membrane heat sensing pathway is essential to design novel efficient therapies. PMID:27200359

  7. A Data-Driven Approach for Determining Time of Initial Movement in Shock Experiments using Photonic Doppler Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Marylesa; Diaz, Abel

    2015-06-01

    Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) is a high-speed, interferometric technique for measuring the beat frequency of a moving surface, from which the calculated velocity profile of the surface can be used to describe the physical changes the material undergoes after high-impact shock. Such a technique may also be used to characterize the performance of small detonators and determine the time at which initial movement was recorded. Hundreds of PDV probes may be deployed at a time on an experiment, and extracting the time at initial movement for each probe becomes an arduous task. In this work, we develop a semi-automated technique for extracting the time at initial movement from a normalized lineout of the power spectrogram near the offset frequency of each multiplexed-PDV probe. We characterize the response bias of this method and compare with the time obtained by hand calculation of the raw voltage data. Results are shown on shock experiments from gas gun setups and explosives-driven flyer plates. This work was done by National Security Technologies, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Measurements of shock initiation in the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene based explosive PBX 9502: Wave forms from embedded gauges and comparison of four different material lots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Alcon, R. R.

    2006-06-01

    We have completed a series of ambient temperature (23+/-2 °C) shock initiation experiments on four lots (batches) of the insensitive high explosive PBX 9502. PBX 9502 consists by weight of 95% dry-aminated tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) and 5% of the plastic binder Kel-F 800, a 3/1 copolymer of chloro-trifluoro-ethylene and vinylidene-fluoride. Two of the four lots were manufactured using the ``virgin'' process. Both of these lots had few fine TATB particles. One virgin lot was stored the majority of its life (>15 yr) as a molding powder and pressed as a 240 mm diameter by 130 mm thick cylinder. The other virgin lot was stored the majority of its life as a hollow hemispherical pressing. Two lots were manufactured using the ``recycle'' process and had many fine TATB particles. One recycled lot was stored the majority of its life as a molding powder, while the other was stored as a pressed charge. Shock initiation experiments were performed using precisely characterized planar shocks generated by impacting an explosive sample with a projectile accelerated in a two-stage gas gun. The evolution of the shock into a detonation was measured using 10 or 11 embedded electromagnetic particle velocity gauges and three ``shock tracker'' gauges. Results include the following: (1) high quality particle velocity wave forms which should be useful for calibrating reactive burn models, (2) no difference in the sustained shock initiation response between lots regardless of material processing or storage history, (3) responses for all lots equivalent to those measured by Dick et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 63, 4881 (1988)], additional Hugoniot and Pop-plot data for PBX 9502, and (5) the short shock response which, when compared to the sustained shock response, shows no extension in the run distance unless the rarefaction overtakes the shock front prior to the distance it would have run towards a detonation as a sustained shock.

  9. [Pain-free piezoelectric extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in gallbladder stones. Initial experiences].

    PubMed

    Ackermann, C; Meyer, B; Rothenbühler, J M; Beglinger, C; Stalder, G A; Harder, F

    1989-05-27

    Efficacy and side effects of lithotripsy of gallbladder stones with a piezoelectric lithotriptor are assessed. 16 treatments were performed in 8 patients (1-3 per patient). Patients required no premedication, analgesia, infusion or monitoring. Gallstone fragmentation was achieved with all treatments. Laboratory findings remained unchanged after treatment, with the exception of one patient with mild pancreatitis. With adjuvant oral bile acid treatment, 6 of the 8 patients were stone-free within 3 days to 3 months. Extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy with piezoelectric shock waves provides painless and efficient gallstone fragmentation. Repeated treatments may speed complete fragment dissolution.

  10. Motivational Modulation of Self-Initiated and Externally Triggered Movement Speed Induced by Threat of Shock: Experimental Evidence for Paradoxical Kinesis in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Louise M.; Griffin, Harry J.; Angeli, Aikaterini; Torkamani, Mariam; Georgiev, Dejan; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Background Paradoxical kinesis has been observed in bradykinetic people with Parkinson’s disease. Paradoxical kinesis occurs in situations where an individual is strongly motivated or influenced by relevant external cues. Our aim was to induce paradoxical kinesis in the laboratory. We tested whether the motivation of avoiding a mild electric shock was sufficient to induce paradoxical kinesis in externally-triggered and self-initiated conditions in people with Parkinson’s disease tested on medication and in age-matched controls. Methods Participants completed a shock avoidance behavioural paradigm in which half of the trials could result in a mild electric shock if the participant did not move fast enough. Half of the trials of each type were self-initiated and half were externally-triggered. The criterion for avoiding shock was a maximum movement time, adjusted according to each participant’s performance on previous trials using a staircase tracking procedure. Results On trials with threat of shock, both patients with Parkinson’s disease and controls had faster movement times compared to no potential shock trials, in both self-initiated and externally-triggered conditions. The magnitude of improvement of movement time from no potential shock to potential shock trials was positively correlated with anxiety ratings. Conclusions When motivated to avoid mild electric shock, patients with Parkinson’s disease, similar to healthy controls, showed significant speeding of movement execution. This was observed in both self-initiated and externally-triggered versions of the task. Nevertheless, in the ET condition the improvement of reaction times induced by motivation to avoid shocks was greater for the PD patients than controls, highlighting the value of external cues for movement initiation in PD patients. The magnitude of improvement from the no potential shock to the potential shock trials was associated with the threat-induced anxiety. This demonstration of

  11. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON PBX 9501 EXPLOSIVE AT PRESSURES BELOW 3 GPa WITH ASSOCIATED IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Chidester, S K; Thompson, D G; Vandersall, K S; Idar, D J; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Urtiew, P A

    2007-06-13

    Shock initiation experiments on the explosive PBX 9501 (95% HMX, 2.5% estane, and 2.5% nitroplasticizer by weight) were performed at pressures below 3 GPa to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. Propellant driven gas guns (101 mm and 155 mm) were utilized to initiate the PBX 9501 explosive with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement with previously published data and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a good fit to the experimental data. This parameter set will allow accurate code predictions to be calculated for safety scenarios in the low-pressure regime (below 3 GPa) involving PBX 9501 explosive.

  12. Effect of alcohol addition on shock-initiated formation of soot from benzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael; Yuan, Tony

    1988-01-01

    Soot formation in benzene-methanol and benzene-ethanol argon-diluted mixtures was studied behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the attenuation of an He-Ne laser beam. The experiments were performed at temperatures 1580-2250 K, pressures 2.0-3.0 bar, and total carbon atom concentrations (2.0-2.7) x 10 to the 17th atoms/cu cm. The results obtained indicate that the addition of alcohol suppresses the formation of soot from benzene at all temperatures, and that the reduction in soot yields is increased with the amount of alcohol added. The analysis of the results indicates that the suppression effect is probably due to the oxidation of soot and soot precursors by OH and the removal of hydrogen atoms by alcohol and water molecules.

  13. Using probabilistic terrorism risk modeling for regulatory benefit-cost analysis: application to the Western hemisphere travel initiative in the land environment.

    PubMed

    Willis, Henry H; LaTourrette, Tom

    2008-04-01

    This article presents a framework for using probabilistic terrorism risk modeling in regulatory analysis. We demonstrate the framework with an example application involving a regulation under consideration, the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative for the Land Environment, (WHTI-L). First, we estimate annualized loss from terrorist attacks with the Risk Management Solutions (RMS) Probabilistic Terrorism Model. We then estimate the critical risk reduction, which is the risk-reducing effectiveness of WHTI-L needed for its benefit, in terms of reduced terrorism loss in the United States, to exceed its cost. Our analysis indicates that the critical risk reduction depends strongly not only on uncertainties in the terrorism risk level, but also on uncertainty in the cost of regulation and how casualties are monetized. For a terrorism risk level based on the RMS standard risk estimate, the baseline regulatory cost estimate for WHTI-L, and a range of casualty cost estimates based on the willingness-to-pay approach, our estimate for the expected annualized loss from terrorism ranges from $2.7 billion to $5.2 billion. For this range in annualized loss, the critical risk reduction for WHTI-L ranges from 7% to 13%. Basing results on a lower risk level that results in halving the annualized terrorism loss would double the critical risk reduction (14-26%), and basing the results on a higher risk level that results in a doubling of the annualized terrorism loss would cut the critical risk reduction in half (3.5-6.6%). Ideally, decisions about terrorism security regulations and policies would be informed by true benefit-cost analyses in which the estimated benefits are compared to costs. Such analyses for terrorism security efforts face substantial impediments stemming from the great uncertainty in the terrorist threat and the very low recurrence interval for large attacks. Several approaches can be used to estimate how a terrorism security program or regulation reduces the

  14. Shock initiation sensitivity and Hugoniot-based equation of state of Composition-B obtained using in situ electromagnetic gauging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, L.; Dattelbaum, Dana; Bartram, Brian; Sheffield, Stephen; Gustavsen, Richard; Handley, Caroline; Shock and Detonation Physics Team; Explosives Modelling Team

    2013-06-01

    Composition-B (Comp-B) is a solid cast explosive comprised of 59.5 wt% cyclotrimethylene-trinitramine (RDX), 39.5 wt% 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), and 1 wt% wax. Its initial density depends on formulation method and as a result, the detonation properties of Comp-B have generally been studied at densities of 1.69 g/cm3 and 1.72 g/cm3. The shock initiation sensitivity (Pop-plot) of Comp-B has been reported previously; obtained using both explosively-driven wedge tests and embedded manganin gauge techniques. We describe the results of a series of gas-gun-driven plate-impact initiation experiments on Comp-B (ρ0 = 1.72 g/cm3) using embedded electromagnetic gauges to obtain in situ particle velocity wave profiles at 10 Lagrangian positions in each experiment. From the wave profiles, an unreacted Hugoniot locus, the run-distance-to-detonation, and initiation waveforms are obtained in each experiment. The results indicate that Comp-B at ρ0 = 1.72 g/cm3 is more sensitive than reported previously. Comparisons are made of the new Hugoniot states with an earlier Hugoniot-based EOS. Measurements of the detonation wave profile using photonic Doppler velocimetry are also presented and discussed in the context of ZND detonation theory.

  15. Overview of Probabilistic Methods for SAE G-11 Meeting for Reliability and Uncertainty Quantification for DoD TACOM Initiative with SAE G-11 Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.

    2003-01-01

    The SAE G-11 RMSL Division and Probabilistic Methods Committee meeting during October 6-8 at the Best Western Sterling Inn, Sterling Heights (Detroit), Michigan is co-sponsored by US Army Tank-automotive & Armaments Command (TACOM). The meeting will provide an industry/government/academia forum to review RMSL technology; reliability and probabilistic technology; reliability-based design methods; software reliability; and maintainability standards. With over 100 members including members with national/international standing, the mission of the G-11's Probabilistic Methods Committee is to "enable/facilitate rapid deployment of probabilistic technology to enhance the competitiveness of our industries by better, faster, greener, smarter, affordable and reliable product development."

  16. (U) Analysis of shock-initiated PBX-9501 through porous CeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenburg, David A.; Dattelbaum, Dana Mcgraw; Dennis-Koller, Darcie

    2015-07-24

    The attenuation properties of an impact initiated PBX-9501 explosive through several thicknesses of CeO2 powder is investigated. The CeO2 is at an initial porous density of 4.0 g/cm3 , roughly 55 % of theoretical maximum density. Measurements of the input (into the powder) and propagated (through the powder) wave profiles are measured using optical velocimetry. Results show a reduction of the average wave speed, CX, and peak steady-state material velocity, uP , with increasing powder thickness from 1.5 - 5.0 mm.

  17. Specificity of the initial collapse in the folding of the cold shock protein.

    PubMed

    Magg, Christine; Kubelka, Jan; Holtermann, Georg; Haas, Elisha; Schmid, Franz X

    2006-07-28

    The two-state folding reaction of the cold shock protein from Bacillus caldolyticus (Bc-Csp) is preceded by a rapid chain collapse. A fast shortening of intra-protein distances was revealed by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements with protein variants that carried individual pairs of donor and acceptor chromophores at various positions along the polypeptide chain. Here we investigated the specificity of this rapid compaction. Energy transfer experiments that probed the stretching of strand beta2 and the close approach between the strands beta1 and beta2 revealed that the beta1-beta2 hairpin is barely formed in the collapsed form, although it is native-like in the folding transition state of Bc-Csp. The time course of the collapse could not be resolved by pressure or temperature jump experiments, indicating that the collapsed and extended forms are not separated by an energy barrier. The co-solute (NH4)2SO4 stabilizes both native Bc-Csp and the collapsed form, which suggests that the large hydrated SO4(2-) ions are excluded from the surface of the collapsed form in a similar fashion as they are excluded from folded Bc-Csp. Ethylene glycol increases the stability of proteins because it is excluded preferentially from the backbone, which is accessible in the unfolded state. The collapsed form of Bc-Csp resembles the unfolded form in its interaction with ethylene glycol, suggesting that in the collapsed form the backbone is still accessible to water and small molecules. Our results thus rule out that the collapsed form is a folding intermediate with native-like chain topology. It is better described as a mixture of compact conformations that belong to the unfolded state ensemble. However, some of its structural elements are reminiscent of the native protein.

  18. Shock-induced initiation and energy release behavior of polymer bonded explosive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Cai, Xuanming; Hypervelocity Impact Research Center Team

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, an initially sealed vented test chamber and a test projectile with a recessed hole were designed to complete the experiments. As the initiation takes place on the interior, great amounts of thermo-chemical energy gases were vented through a hole formed by the penetration process. The gas pressure inside the chamber was used to evaluate the energy release behavior of polymer bonded explosive materials. The impact pressure of the projectile was measured by the PVDF sensors. Based on the earlier work that the constitutive equation of polymer bonded explosive materials was established, the impact pressure of the projectile was obtained through the numerical simulation. The experimental results reveal that the impact pressure is significant to the energy release behavior, and in some extent the gas pressure improves with the velocity of the projectile. The impact pressure obtained by the experiments is comparing with which obtained through the numerical simulation, and the results of the comparing is that the value of them are closely relative. The experimental results also indicate that the constitutive equation of polymer bonded explosive materials used in the numerical simulation can correctly describe the mechanical behavior of PBX materials.

  19. Toward a Role of Light Absorption in Initiation Chemistry of Shocked HMX single Crystals and Crystalline High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaksin, Igor; Rodrigues, L.

    2013-06-01

    Question which mechanism is driving radiation-induced reactions, thermal or athermal becomes a subject of conflicting discussions. Major challenge of this work is to identify at micro- (sub-granular), meso- (grain level) and macro-scale roles of these two mechanisms in triggering initiation chemistry in HMX-based HEs. Four acceptor-patterns were tested at 20 GPa input pressure: single HMX crystal-in-water, HMX/water-slurry, PBX(HMX/HTPB) & inert PBX-simulant (HMX-particles replaced by crystalline sucrose). Scenario of reaction onset-localizations-dissipation was spatially resolved using Multi-Channel Optical Analyzer MCOA-UC (96 channels, 100um-spatial accuracy, 0.2ns-timeresolution, 450-850 nm-spectral range) through real-time panoramic recording emitted reaction light and shock field in standard optic monitor. Experiments reveal a dual nature of initiation chemistry: athermal and thermal. Single-crystal tests disclose origination of photo-induced reactions downstream of emitting reaction spot due to intensified radiation absorption in surface micro-defects. Polycrystalline samples reveal cyclic reproducibility of radiation-induced thermal precursors in which radiation absorption causes thermal expansion/phase-changes of HMX-grains resulting in oscillating detonation. Work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under the ONR and ONR Global Grants N00014-12-1-0477 and N62909-12-1-7131 with Drs. Cliff Bedford and Shawn Thorne Program Managers.

  20. Responsibility of a Filament Eruption for the Initiation of a Flare, CME, and Blast Wave, and its Possible Transformation into a Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechnev, V. V.; Uralov, A. M.; Kuzmenko, I. V.; Kochanov, A. A.; Chertok, I. M.; Kalashnikov, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Multi-instrument observations of two filament eruptions on 24 February and 11 May 2011 suggest the following updated scenario for eruptive flare, coronal mass ejection (CME), and shock wave evolution. An initial destabilization of a filament results in stretching out of the magnetic threads belonging to its body that are rooted in the photosphere along the inversion line. Their reconnection leads to i) heating of parts of the filament or its environment, ii) an initial development of the flare cusp, arcade, and ribbons, iii) an increasing similarity of the filament to a curved flux rope, and iv) to its acceleration. Then the pre-eruption arcade enveloping the filament becomes involved in reconnection according to the standard model and continues to form the flare arcade and ribbons. The poloidal magnetic flux in the curved rope developing from the filament progressively increases and forces its toroidal expansion. This flux rope impulsively expands and produces a magnetohydrodynamical disturbance, which rapidly steepens into a shock. The shock passes through the arcade that expands above the filament and then freely propagates for some time ahead of the CME like a decelerating blast wave. If the CME is slow, then the shock eventually decays. Otherwise, the frontal part of the shock changes into the bow-shock regime. This was observed for the first time in the 24 February 2011 event. When reconnection ceases, the flux rope relaxes and constitutes the CME core-cavity system. The expanding arcade develops into the CME frontal structure. We also found that reconnection in the current sheet of a remote streamer forced by the shock passage results in a running flare-like process within the streamer responsible for a type II burst. The development of dimming and various associated phenomena are discussed.

  1. Probabilistic simple splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Heng, Fong Wan; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2014-06-01

    A splicing system, one of the early theoretical models for DNA computing was introduced by Head in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings of DNA molecules at the specific recognition sites and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string, and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string, thus yielding the new strings. For a specific type of splicing systems, namely the simple splicing systems, the recognition sites are the same for both strings of DNA molecules. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions have been considered for splicing systems in order to increase their computational power. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic simple splicing systems are investigated. We prove that probabilistic simple splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the splicing languages generated.

  2. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. IV. A PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO INFERRING THE HIGH-MASS STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION AND OTHER POWER-LAW FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Clifton Johnson, L.; Beerman, Lori C.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Hogg, David W.; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel T.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Gouliermis, Dimitrios; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Lang, Dustin; Bell, Eric F.; Gordon, Karl D.; Kalirai, Jason S.; Skillman, Evan D.

    2013-01-10

    We present a probabilistic approach for inferring the parameters of the present-day power-law stellar mass function (MF) of a resolved young star cluster. This technique (1) fully exploits the information content of a given data set; (2) can account for observational uncertainties in a straightforward way; (3) assigns meaningful uncertainties to the inferred parameters; (4) avoids the pitfalls associated with binning data; and (5) can be applied to virtually any resolved young cluster, laying the groundwork for a systematic study of the high-mass stellar MF (M {approx}> 1 M {sub Sun }). Using simulated clusters and Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the probability distribution functions, we show that estimates of the MF slope, {alpha}, are unbiased and that the uncertainty, {Delta}{alpha}, depends primarily on the number of observed stars and on the range of stellar masses they span, assuming that the uncertainties on individual masses and the completeness are both well characterized. Using idealized mock data, we compute the theoretical precision, i.e., lower limits, on {alpha}, and provide an analytic approximation for {Delta}{alpha} as a function of the observed number of stars and mass range. Comparison with literature studies shows that {approx}3/4 of quoted uncertainties are smaller than the theoretical lower limit. By correcting these uncertainties to the theoretical lower limits, we find that the literature studies yield ({alpha}) = 2.46, with a 1{sigma} dispersion of 0.35 dex. We verify that it is impossible for a power-law MF to obtain meaningful constraints on the upper mass limit of the initial mass function, beyond the lower bound of the most massive star actually observed. We show that avoiding substantial biases in the MF slope requires (1) including the MF as a prior when deriving individual stellar mass estimates, (2) modeling the uncertainties in the individual stellar masses, and (3) fully characterizing and then explicitly modeling the

  3. Influence of Small Change of Porosity on Shock Initiation of an HMX/TATB/Viton Explosive and Ignition and Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Hussain, Tariq; Huang, Fenglei; Duan, Zhuoping

    2016-07-01

    All solid explosives in practical use are more or less porous. Although it is known that the change in porosity affects the shock sensitivity of solid explosives, the effect of small changes in porosity on the sensitivity needs to be determined for safe and efficient use of explosive materials. In this study, the influence of a small change in porosity on shock initiation and the subsequent detonation growth process of a plastic-bonded explosive PBXC03, composed of 87% cyclotetramethylene-tetranitramine (HMX), 7% triaminotrinitrobenzene (TATB), and 6% Viton by weight, are investigated by shock to detonation transition experiments. Two explosive formulations of PBXC03 having the same initial grain sizes pressed to 98 and 99% of theoretical mass density (1.873 g/cm3) respectively are tested using the in situ manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge technique. Numerical modeling of the experiments is performed using an ignition and growth reactive flow model. Reasonable agreement with the experimental results is obtained by increasing the growth term coefficient in the Lee-Tarver ignition and growth model with porosity. Combining the experimental and simulation results shows that the shock sensitivity increases with porosity for PBXC03 having the same explosive initial grain sizes for the pressures (about 3.1 GPa) applied in the experiments.

  4. A critical role for heat shock transcription factor in establishing a nucleosome-free region over the TATA-initiation site of the yeast HSP82 heat shock gene.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, D S; Adams, C C; Lee, S; Stentz, B

    1993-01-01

    Heat shock genes are poised for rapid transcriptional activation in response to environmental stress. A universal structural characteristic of such genes is the presence of a nucleosome-free, DNase I hypersensitive promoter region. Here we investigate the structural and functional effects of mutating HSE1, the preferred heat shock factor (HSF) binding site upstream of the yeast HSP82 gene. In situ deletion or substitution of this sequence reduces both basal and induced transcription by at least two orders of magnitude. Moreover, such mutations lead to a dramatic transition in chromatin structure: the DNase I hypersensitive region is replaced by two stable, sequence-positioned nucleosomes. One of these is centered over the mutated heat shock element, while the other--as revealed by DNase I genomic footprinting--is precisely positioned in a rotational sense over the TATA-initiation site. Overexpression of yeast HSF strongly suppresses the null phenotype of the induced hsp82-delta HSE1 gene and re-establishes DNase I hypersensitivity over its promoter. Such suppression is mediated through sequence disposed immediately upstream of HSE1 and containing two low affinity heat shock elements. These data imply a critical role for HSF in displacing stably positioned nucleosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and suggest that HSF transcriptionally activates HSP82 at least partly through its ability to alleviate nucleosome repression of the core promoter. Images PMID:8404861

  5. Shock initiation of the tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene based explosive PBX 9502 cooled to -55 bold">°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsen, Richard L.; Gehr, Russell J.; Bucholtz, Scott M.; Alcon, Robert R.; Bartram, Brian D.

    2012-10-01

    We report a series of shock initiation experiments on PBX 9502 cooled to -55 °C. PBX 9502 consists of 95% dry aminated tri-amino-tri-nitro-benzene (TATB) and 5% poly-chloro-trifluoro-ethylene5 (Kel-F 800) binder. PBX 9502 samples were shock initiated by projectile impact from a two stage gas gun. Buildup to detonation was measured with 10 or more particle velocity gauges embedded at different depths in the sample. Three shock wave trackers measured the position of the shock front with time. Particle velocity vs. time wave-profiles and coordinates for onset of detonation were obtained as a function of the impact stress or pressure. PBX 9502 sample temperatures were monitored using type-E thermocouples, two inside the sample and two on the sample surface. Additional thermocouples were mounted on other parts of the cooling apparatus. Wave profiles from embedded gauges are qualitatively similar to those observed at 23 °C. However, at -55 °C, PBX 9502 is much less sensitive than at 23 °C. For example, at an inpact stress of 15.4 GPa, the distance to detonation at -55 °C is 7.8 mm. At 23 °C, the distance is 4.3 mm.

  6. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives. PMID:27307079

  7. Hot spot formation and chemical reaction initiation in shocked HMX crystals with nanovoids: a large-scale reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tingting; Lou, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yangeng; Song, Huajie; Huang, Fenglei

    2016-07-14

    We report million-atom reactive molecular dynamic simulations of shock initiation of β-cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (β-HMX) single crystals containing nanometer-scale spherical voids. Shock induced void collapse and subsequent hot spot formation as well as chemical reaction initiation are observed which depend on the void size and impact strength. For an impact velocity of 1 km s(-1) and a void radius of 4 nm, the void collapse process includes three stages; the dominant mechanism is the convergence of upstream molecules toward the centerline and the downstream surface of the void forming flowing molecules. Hot spot formation also undergoes three stages, and the principal mechanism is kinetic energy transforming to thermal energy due to the collision of flowing molecules on the downstream surface. The high temperature of the hot spot initiates a local chemical reaction, and the breakage of the N-NO2 bond plays the key role in the initial reaction mechanism. The impact strength and void size have noticeable effects on the shock dynamical process, resulting in a variation of the predominant mechanisms leading to void collapse and hot spot formation. Larger voids or stronger shocks result in more intense hot spots and, thus, more violent chemical reactions, promoting more reaction channels and generating more reaction products in a shorter duration. The reaction products are mainly concentrated in the developed hot spot, indicating that the chemical reactivity of the hmx crystal is greatly enhanced by void collapse. The detailed information derived from this study can aid a thorough understanding of the role of void collapse in hot spot formation and the chemical reaction initiation of explosives.

  8. Human resting extracellular heat shock protein 72 concentration decreases during the initial adaptation to exercise in a hot, humid environment

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Helen C.; Ferguson, Richard A.; Nimmo, Myra A.

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein (Hsp) 72 is a cytosolic protein that also is present in the circulation. Extracellular Hsp72 (eHsp72) is inducible by exercise and is suggested to act as a danger signal to the immune system. The adaptive response of eHsp72 to repeated exercise-heat exposures in humans remains to be determined. An intracellular animal study found a reduced Hsp72 response, with no change in resting levels, during heat stress after a single day of passive heat acclimation. The current study therefore tested whether adaptations in human eHsp72 levels would similarly occur 24 hours after a single exercise-heat exposure. Seven males completed cycle exercise (42.5% V̇O2peak for 2 hours) in a hot, humid environment (38°C, 60% relative humidity) on each of 2 consecutive days. Blood samples were obtained from an antecubital vein before exercise and 0 hours and 22 hours postexercise for the analysis of eHsp72. Exercise-heat stress resulted in enhanced eHsp72, with a similar absolute increase found on both days (day 1: 1.26 ng/mL [0.80 ng/mL]; day 2: 1.29 ng/mL [1.60 ng/mL]). Resting eHsp72 decreased from rest on day 1 to day 2's 22-hour postexercise sample (P < 0.05). It is suggested that the reduction in resting eHsp72 after 2 consecutive exercise-heat exposures is possibly due to an enhanced removal from the circulation, for either immunoregulatory functions, or for improved cellular stress tolerance in this initial, most stressful period of acclimation. PMID:16817318

  9. Reactive atomistic simulations of shock-induced initiation processes in mixtures of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Aidan P.; Shan, Tzu-Ray

    2014-05-01

    Ammonium nitrate mixed with fuel oil (ANFO) is a commonly used blasting agent. In this paper we investigated the shock properties of pure ammonium nitrate (AN) and two different mixtures of ammonium nitrate and n-dodecane by characterizing their Hugoniot states. We simulated shock compression of pure AN and ANFO mixtures using the Multi-scale Shock Technique, and observed differences in chemical reaction. We also performed a large-scale explicit sub-threshold shock of AN crystal with a 10 nm void filled with 4.4 wt% of n-dodecane. We observed the formation of hotspots and enhanced reactivity at the interface region between AN and n-dodecane molecules.

  10. Unsteady triple-shock configurations and vortex contact structures initiated by the interaction of an energy source with a shock layer in gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarova, O. A.; Gvozdeva, L. G.

    2016-08-01

    The effect of physical and chemical properties of the gaseous medium on the formation of triple Mach configurations and vortex contact structures and on the stagnation pressure and drag force dynamics has been studied for supersonic flows with external energy sources. For the ratio of specific heats that varies in a range of 1.1-1.4, a significant (up to 51.8%) difference has been obtained for the angles of triple-shock configurations in flows at Mach 4 past a cylindrically blunted plate. When studying the dynamics of the decreases in the stagnation pressure and drag force, it has been revealed that these effects are amplified and the vortex mechanism of drag reduction starts to prevail as the adiabatic index decreases.

  11. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock–induced oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Borowiec, Anne-Sophie; Sion, Benoit; Chalmel, Frédéric; D. Rolland, Antoine; Lemonnier, Loïc; De Clerck, Tatiana; Bokhobza, Alexandre; Derouiche, Sandra; Dewailly, Etienne; Slomianny, Christian; Mauduit, Claire; Benahmed, Mohamed; Roudbaraki, Morad; Jégou, Bernard; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Bidaux, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Testes of most male mammals present the particularity of being externalized from the body and are consequently slightly cooler than core body temperature (4–8°C below). Although, hypothermia of the testis is known to increase germ cells apoptosis, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms, including cold sensors, transduction pathways, and apoptosis triggers. In this study, using a functional knockout mouse model of the cold and menthol receptors, dubbed transient receptor potential melastatine 8 (TRPM8) channels, we found that TRPM8 initiated the cold-shock response by differentially modulating cold- and heat-shock proteins. Besides, apoptosis of germ cells increased in proportion to the cooling level in control mice but was independent of temperature in knockout mice. We also observed that the rate of germ cell death correlated positively with the reactive oxygen species level and negatively with the expression of the detoxifying enzymes. This result suggests that the TRPM8 sensor is a key determinant of germ cell fate under hypothermic stimulation.—Borowiec, A.-S., Sion, B., Chalmel, F., Rolland, A. D., Lemonnier, L., De Clerck, T., Bokhobza, A., Derouiche, S., Dewailly, E., Slomianny, C., Mauduit, C., Benahmed, M., Roudbaraki, M., Jégou, B., Prevarskaya, N., Bidaux, G. Cold/menthol TRPM8 receptors initiate the cold-shock response and protect germ cells from cold-shock–induced oxidation. PMID:27317670

  12. Shock initiation and detonation study on high concentration H2O2/H2O solutions using in-situ magnetic gauges

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, Stephen A; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Stahl, David B; Gibson, L Lee; Bartram, Brian D; Engelke, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; homogeneous shock initiation behavior has been observed in the experiments where reaction is observed. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these experiments, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot points, times-to-detonation points that indicate low sensitivity (an input of 13.5 GPa produces detonation in 1 {micro}s compared to 9.5 GPa for neat nitromethane), and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions of over 6.6 km/s.

  13. Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    PubMed Central

    Agapie, Alexandru; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case—connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders—the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  14. Probabilistic models for reactive behaviour in heterogeneous condensed phase media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, M. R.; Gartling, D. K.; DesJardin, P. E.

    2012-02-01

    This work presents statistically-based models to describe reactive behaviour in heterogeneous energetic materials. Mesoscale effects are incorporated in continuum-level reactive flow descriptions using probability density functions (pdfs) that are associated with thermodynamic and mechanical states. A generalised approach is presented that includes multimaterial behaviour by treating the volume fraction as a random kinematic variable. Model simplifications are then sought to reduce the complexity of the description without compromising the statistical approach. Reactive behaviour is first considered for non-deformable media having a random temperature field as an initial state. A pdf transport relationship is derived and an approximate moment approach is incorporated in finite element analysis to model an example application whereby a heated fragment impacts a reactive heterogeneous material which leads to a delayed cook-off event. Modelling is then extended to include deformation effects associated with shock loading of a heterogeneous medium whereby random variables of strain, strain-rate and temperature are considered. A demonstrative mesoscale simulation of a non-ideal explosive is discussed that illustrates the joint statistical nature of the strain and temperature fields during shock loading to motivate the probabilistic approach. This modelling is derived in a Lagrangian framework that can be incorporated in continuum-level shock physics analysis. Future work will consider particle-based methods for a numerical implementation of this modelling approach.

  15. Initial studies on the administration of C1-esterase inhibitor to patients with septic shock or with a vascular leak syndrome induced by interleukin-2 therapy.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E; Ogilvie, A C; Eisele, B; Jansen, P M; Wagstaff, J; Thijs, L G

    1994-01-01

    Activation of the complement and contact systems occur in patients with septic shock and is associated with a poor outcome. Activation of both systems is regulated by a common inhibitor, C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). Functional levels of C1-Inh are normal or slightly decreased in septic patients although this inhibitor is an acute phase protein. Moreover, an increased turn-over of C1-Inh in sepsis likely occurs since levels of proteolytically inactivated ("modified") C1-Inh are increased in this syndrome. One may therefore postulate that in sepsis there is a relative deficiency of C1-Inh. Here we will summarize our preliminary studies in 11 patients with septic shock, who received high doses of C1-Inh for up to 5 days. Activation of complement and contact systems also occurs in "a human model for septic shock" i.e., the vascular leak syndrome (VLS) induced by immunotherapy with the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2). The similarity between VLS and sepsis is not only reflected by similar patterns of complement and contact activation, but also by comparable hemodynamic and biochemical changes, and by the involvement of a number of other inflammatory mediators, such as the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis and of neutrophils. Here we will also summarize our initial studies of the effect of C1-Inh administration to 6 patients with the VLS induced by IL-2. Our results indicate that high doses of C1-Inh can be safely administered to patients with septic shock or with the VLS, and may attenuate complement and contact activation in these conditions. Whether this therapy may reduce mortality and or morbidity of either syndrome has to be established by double-blind controlled studies.

  16. Interleukin 12 levels during the initial phase of septic shock with purpura in children: relation to severity of disease.

    PubMed

    Hazelzet, J A; Kornelisse, R F; van der Pouw Kraan, T C; Joosten, K F; van der Voort, E; van Mierlo, G; Suur, M H; Hop, W C; de Groot, R; Hack, C E

    1997-09-01

    Plasma levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12), a cytokine consisting of two different polypeptide subunits (p40 and p35), were measured together with interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and other cytokines in 46 children with septic shock and purpura. The median (range) plasma IL-12 p40 level on admission was 457 (244-2677) pg/ml in non-survivors vs 189 (< 40-521) pg/ml in survivors (P = < 0.001). IL-12 p70 levels were elevated in only nine patients. IL-12 p40 plasma levels were positively correlated with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and PRISM-score, whereas they were negatively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP), whole blood cell (WBC) and serum glucose levels. Twelve (29%) of the patients had detectable levels of IFN-gamma. Thus, circulating levels of IL-12 p40 and to a lesser extent those of IL-12 p70, are elevated in children with septic shock and purpura, and correlate with severity of disease and outcome.

  17. SHOCK INITIATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE LLM-105 EXPLOSIVE RX-55-AA AT 25?C AND 150?C WITH IGNITION AND GROWTH MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M; Urtiew, P A

    2007-06-15

    Shock initiation experiments on the LLM-105 based explosive RX-55-AA (95% LLM-105, 5% Viton by weight) were performed at 25 C and 150 C to obtain in-situ pressure gauge data, run-distance-to-detonation thresholds, and Ignition and Growth modeling parameters. A 101 mm diameter propellant driven gas gun was utilized to initiate the explosive sample with manganin piezoresistive pressure gauge packages placed between sample slices. The run-distance-to-detonation points on the Pop-plot for these experiments showed agreement at 25 C with previously published data on a similar LLM-105 based formulation RX-55-AB as well as a slight sensitivity increase at elevated temperature (150 C) as expected. Ignition and Growth modeling parameters were obtained with a reasonable fit to the experimental data.

  18. Learning Probabilistic Logic Models from Probabilistic Examples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianzhong; Muggleton, Stephen; Santos, José

    2008-10-01

    We revisit an application developed originally using abductive Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) for modeling inhibition in metabolic networks. The example data was derived from studies of the effects of toxins on rats using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) time-trace analysis of their biofluids together with background knowledge representing a subset of the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). We now apply two Probabilistic ILP (PILP) approaches - abductive Stochastic Logic Programs (SLPs) and PRogramming In Statistical modeling (PRISM) to the application. Both approaches support abductive learning and probability predictions. Abductive SLPs are a PILP framework that provides possible worlds semantics to SLPs through abduction. Instead of learning logic models from non-probabilistic examples as done in ILP, the PILP approach applied in this paper is based on a general technique for introducing probability labels within a standard scientific experimental setting involving control and treated data. Our results demonstrate that the PILP approach provides a way of learning probabilistic logic models from probabilistic examples, and the PILP models learned from probabilistic examples lead to a significant decrease in error accompanied by improved insight from the learned results compared with the PILP models learned from non-probabilistic examples.

  19. Does an infrasonic acoustic shock wave resonance of the manganese 3+ loaded/copper depleted prion protein initiate the pathogenesis of TSE?

    PubMed

    Purdey, Mark

    2003-06-01

    Intensive exposures to natural and artificial sources of infrasonic acoustic shock (tectonic disturbances, supersonic aeroplanes, etc.) have been observed in ecosystems supporting mammalian populations that are blighted by clusters of traditional and new variant strains of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE). But TSEs will only emerge in those 'infrasound-rich' environments which are simultaneously influenced by eco-factors that induce a high manganese (Mn)/low copper (Cu)-zinc (Zn) ratio in brains of local mammalian populations. Since cellular prion protein (PrPc) is a cupro-protein expressed throughout the circadian mediated pathways of the body, it is proposed that PrP's Cu component performs a role in the conduction and distribution of endogenous electromagnetic energy; energy that has been transduced from incoming ultraviolet, acoustic, geomagnetic radiations. TSE pathogenesis is initiated once Mn substitutes at the vacant Cu domain on PrPc and forms a nonpathogenic, protease resistant, 'sleeping' prion. A second stage of pathogenesis comes into play once a low frequency wave of infrasonic shock metamorphoses the piezoelectric atomic structure of the Mn 3+ component of the prion, thereby 'priming' the sleeping prion into its fully fledged, pathogenic TSE isoform - where the paramagnetic status of the Mn 3+ atom is transformed into a stable ferrimagnetic lattice work, due to the strong electron-phonon coupling resulting from the dynamic 'Jahn-Teller' type distortions of the oxygen octahedra specific to the trivalent Mn species. The so called 'infectivity' of the prion is a misnomer and should be correctly defined as the contagious field inducing capacity of the ferrimagnetic Mn 3+ component of the prion; which remains pathogenic at all temperatures below the 'curie point'. A progressive domino-like 'metal to ligand to metal' ferrimagnetic corruption of the conduits of electromagnetic superexchange is initiated. The TSE diseased brain can be likened to

  20. A comparative study of chemical kinetics models for HMX in mesoscale simulations of shock initiation due to void collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Nirmal; Schweigert, Igor; Udaykumar, H. S.

    2015-06-01

    The development of chemical kinetics schemes for use in modeling the reactive mechanics of energetic materials such as HMX has been an active area of research. Decomposition, deflagration and detonation models need to predict time to ignition and locations of onset of chemical reaction in energetic materials when used in meso- and macro-scale simulations. Modeling the chemical processes and development of appropriate kinetic law is challenging work because of lack of experimental data. However, significant work has been done in this area. Multistep kinetic models by Tarver and Tran, Henson and Smilowitz have provided plausible chemical kinetic rate laws for HMX. These models vary in the way they model the details of the decomposition process. Hence, a comparative study of different models will provide an understanding of the uncertainties involved in predicting ignition in HMX. In the current work, hot-spot ignition due to void collapse in shock compressed HMX has been analyzed using several reaction rate models, including the Tarver-Tran 4-equation model, the Henson-Smilowitz 7-equation model, and a new rate model that combines the condensed-phase decomposition rates measured by Brill et al and the detailed mechanism of nitramine flame chemistry due to Yetter et al. The chemical models have been incorporated in a massively parallel Eulerian code SCIMITAR3D. The variations in the predicted thresholds due to differences in the rate models will be discussed.

  1. Initial synthesis and characterization of an immobilized heat shock protein 90 column for online determination of binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Marszałł, Michał P.; Moaddel, Ruin; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.

    2008-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90α (Hsp90α) was immobilized on aminopropyl silica via the N-terminus to create the Hsp90α(NT)-column or C-terminus to create the Hsp90α(CT)-column. Binding to the exposed C-terminus on the Hsp90α(NT)-column was characterized using frontal chromatography and C-terminus ligands coumermycin A1(CA1) and novobiocin (NOVO). The calculated Kd values were 220 ± 110 nM (CA1) and 100 ± 20 nM (NOVO). Non-linear chromatography was used to determine the association and dissociation rate constants associated with the NOVO-Hsp90α complex, 22.2 (±8.8) μM−1 sec−1 and 2.7 (±0.6) sec−1, respectively. Binding to the exposed N-terminus on the Hsp90α(CT)-column was characterized using frontal chromatography. The Kd values of N-terminus ligands geldanamycin (GM) (90 ± 50 nM) 17-(Allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) (210 ± 50 nM) and radicicol (RAD) (20 ± 9 nM) were consistent with previously reported values. The effect of the immobilization on ATPase activity was investigated through the determination of IC50 values for inhibition of ATPase activity on the Hsp90α(CT)-column. The IC50 for GM was 2.80 ± 0.18 μM and the relative IC50 values were 17-AAG > GM > RAD, in agreement with previously reported values and indicating that immobilization had not affected ATPase activity or sensitivity to inhibition. PMID:18047824

  2. Super-equilibrium increase of chemical reaction rate in the detonation front and other effects in the detonation wave initiated by a shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulikov, S. V.

    2013-11-01

    In the present work the problem of detonation wave formation in a shock tube was considered in one-dimensional formulation. The Monte Carlo non-stationary method of statistical simulation (MCNMSS), also known as DSMC, was used for simulation. The method automatically takes into account all details of mass and heat transfer. At an initial moment, the low-pressure channel (LPC) of the shock tube was filled with gas A while the high-pressure chamber (HPC) was filled with gas C. The cross-sections of the HPC and LPC, as well as the temperatures of gases A and C were equal to each other. At the beginning of the simulation the ratio of pressures in the HPC and LPC was equal to 100. It was assumed that chemical reactions ( and ) took place. The ratio of molecular masses of gases and was taken as 20:20:1. Different reaction thresholds were considered. For the case of a low reaction threshold, the velocity of the resulting detonation wave was found to be higher than the Chapman-Jouguet velocity. A region with constant values of flow parameters inside product was observed. An increase of the reaction threshold led to disappearance of this region and gave rise to something similar to an expansion wave, with peaks of flow parameters at the leading part of the detonation wave. The values of these peaks were found to be constant in time. The velocity of the detonation wave became appreciably lower than the Chapman-Jouguet velocity. Further increase of the reaction threshold led to disappearance of detonation. The reactions and turned out to be very important for initiation of detonation.

  3. Initial stage of motion in the Lavrent'ev-Ishlinskii problem on longitudinal shock on a rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, N. F.; Belyaev, A. K.; Tovstik, P. E.; Tovstik, T. P.

    2015-11-01

    The transverse motion of a thin rod under a sudden application of a prolonged longitudinal load at the initial stage of motion is considered. The introduction of self-similar variables makes it possible to propose a description of the transverse motion weakly dependent on the longitudinal deformation. Both single dents and periodic systems of dents are considered.

  4. Probabilistic record linkage.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Adrian; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Blom, Ashley W; Steele, Fiona

    2016-06-01

    Studies involving the use of probabilistic record linkage are becoming increasingly common. However, the methods underpinning probabilistic record linkage are not widely taught or understood, and therefore these studies can appear to be a 'black box' research tool. In this article, we aim to describe the process of probabilistic record linkage through a simple exemplar. We first introduce the concept of deterministic linkage and contrast this with probabilistic linkage. We illustrate each step of the process using a simple exemplar and describe the data structure required to perform a probabilistic linkage. We describe the process of calculating and interpreting matched weights and how to convert matched weights into posterior probabilities of a match using Bayes theorem. We conclude this article with a brief discussion of some of the computational demands of record linkage, how you might assess the quality of your linkage algorithm, and how epidemiologists can maximize the value of their record-linked research using robust record linkage methods. PMID:26686842

  5. Radiative Shock Waves In Emerging Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, R. Paul; Doss, F.; Visco, A.

    2011-05-01

    In laboratory experiments we produce radiative shock waves having dense, thin shells. These shocks are similar to shocks emerging from optically thick environments in astrophysics in that they are strongly radiative with optically thick shocked layers and optically thin or intermediate downstream layers through which radiation readily escapes. Examples include shocks breaking out of a Type II supernova (SN) and the radiative reverse shock during the early phases of the SN remnant produced by a red supergiant star. We produce these shocks by driving a low-Z plasma piston (Be) at > 100 km/s into Xe gas at 1.1 atm. pressure. The shocked Xe collapses to > 20 times its initial density. Measurements of structure by radiography and temperature by several methods confirm that the shock wave is strongly radiative. We observe small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces. We describe a variation of the Vishniac instability theory of decelerating shocks and an analysis of associated scaling relations to account for the growth of these perturbations, identify how they scale to astrophysical systems such as SN 1993J, and consider possible future experiments. Collaborators in this work have included H.F. Robey, J.P. Hughes, C.C. Kuranz, C.M. Huntington, S.H. Glenzer, T. Doeppner, D.H. Froula, M.J. Grosskopf, and D.C. Marion ________________________________ * Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  6. Perception of Speech Reflects Optimal Use of Probabilistic Speech Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayards, Meghan; Tanenhaus, Michael K.; Aslin, Richard N.; Jacobs, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Listeners are exquisitely sensitive to fine-grained acoustic detail within phonetic categories for sounds and words. Here we show that this sensitivity is optimal given the probabilistic nature of speech cues. We manipulated the probability distribution of one probabilistic cue, voice onset time (VOT), which differentiates word initial labial…

  7. Cardiogenic shock

    MedlinePlus

    Shock - cardiogenic ... electrical system of the heart (heart block) Cardiogenic shock occurs when the heart is unable to pump ... orthostatic hypotension) Weak (thready) pulse To diagnose cardiogenic shock, a catheter (tube) may be placed in the ...

  8. Structure in Radiating Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, Forrest

    2010-11-01

    The basic radiative shock experiment is a shock launched into a gas of high-atomic-number material at high velocities, which fulfills the conditions for radiative losses to collapse the post-shock material to over 20 times the initial gas density. This has been accomplished using the OMEGA Laser Facility by illuminating a Be ablator for 1 ns with a total of 4 kJ, launching the requisite shock, faster than 100 km/sec, into a polyimide shock tube filled with Xe. The experiments have lateral dimensions of 600 μm and axial dimensions of 2-3 mm, and are diagnosed by x-ray backlighting. Repeatable structure beyond the one-dimensional picture of a shock as a planar discontinuity was discovered in the experimental data. One form this took was that of radial boundary effects near the tube walls, extended approximately seventy microns into the system. The cause of this effect - low density wall material which is heated by radiation transport ahead of the shock, launching a new converging shock ahead of the main shock - is apparently unique to high-energy-density experiments. Another form of structure is the appearance of small-scale perturbations in the post-shock layer, modulating the shock and material interfaces and creating regions of enhanced and diminished aerial density within the layer. The authors have applied an instability theory, a variation of the Vishniac instability of decelerating shocks, to describe the growth of these perturbations. We have also applied Bayesian statistical methods to better understand the uncertainties associated with measuring shocked layer thickness in the presence of tilt. Collaborators: R. P. Drake, H. F. Robey, C. C. Kuranz, C. M. Huntington, M. J. Grosskopf, D. C. Marion.

  9. Comparison of Dawn and Dusk Precipitating Electron Energy Populations Shortly After the Initial Shock for the January 10th, 1997 Magnetic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J.; Germany, G.; Swift, W.; Parks, G.; Brittnacher, M.; Elsen, R.

    1997-01-01

    The observed precipitating electron energy between 0130 UT and 0400 UT of January 10 th, 1997, indicates that there is a more energetic precipitating electron population that appears in the auroral oval at 1800-2200 UT at 030) UT. This increase in energy occurs after the initial shock of the magnetic cloud reaches the Earth (0114 UT) and after faint but dynamic polar cap precipitation has been cleared out. The more energetic population is observed to remain rather constant in MLT through the onset of auroral activity (0330 UT) and to the end of the Polar spacecraft apogee pass. Data from the Ultraviolet Imager LBH long and LBH short images are used to quantify the average energy of the precipitating auroral electrons. The Wind spacecraft located about 100 RE upstream monitored the IMF and plasma parameters during the passing of the cloud. The affects of oblique angle viewing are included in the analysis. Suggestions as to the source of this hot electron population will be presented.

  10. Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry: shock dynamics and relation to the Guderley singularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, H. G.; Schwendeman, D. W.

    2001-07-01

    Oblique shock reflection from an axis of symmetry is studied using Whitham's theory of geometrical shock dynamics, and the results are compared with previous numerical simulations of the phenomenon by Hornung (2000). The shock shapes (for strong and weak shocks), and the location of the shock-shock (for strong shocks), are in good agreement with the numerical results, though the detail of the shock reflection structure is, of course, not resolved by shock dynamics. A guess at a mathematical form of the shock shape based on an analogy with the Guderley singularity in cylindrical shock implosion, in the form of a generalized hyperbola, fits the shock shape very well. The smooth variation of the exponent in this equation with initial shock angle from the Guderley value at zero to 0.5 at 90° supports the analogy. Finally, steady-flow shock reflection from a symmetry axis is related to the self-similar flow.

  11. Probabilistic record linkage

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Adrian; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Blom, Ashley W; Steele, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Studies involving the use of probabilistic record linkage are becoming increasingly common. However, the methods underpinning probabilistic record linkage are not widely taught or understood, and therefore these studies can appear to be a ‘black box’ research tool. In this article, we aim to describe the process of probabilistic record linkage through a simple exemplar. We first introduce the concept of deterministic linkage and contrast this with probabilistic linkage. We illustrate each step of the process using a simple exemplar and describe the data structure required to perform a probabilistic linkage. We describe the process of calculating and interpreting matched weights and how to convert matched weights into posterior probabilities of a match using Bayes theorem. We conclude this article with a brief discussion of some of the computational demands of record linkage, how you might assess the quality of your linkage algorithm, and how epidemiologists can maximize the value of their record-linked research using robust record linkage methods. PMID:26686842

  12. Probabilistic microcell prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Kyoo

    2002-06-01

    A microcell is a cell with 1-km or less radius which is suitable for heavily urbanized area such as a metropolitan city. This paper deals with the microcell prediction model of propagation loss which uses probabilistic techniques. The RSL (Receive Signal Level) is the factor which can evaluate the performance of a microcell and the LOS (Line-Of-Sight) component and the blockage loss directly effect on the RSL. We are combining the probabilistic method to get these performance factors. The mathematical methods include the CLT (Central Limit Theorem) and the SPC (Statistical Process Control) to get the parameters of the distribution. This probabilistic solution gives us better measuring of performance factors. In addition, it gives the probabilistic optimization of strategies such as the number of cells, cell location, capacity of cells, range of cells and so on. Specially, the probabilistic optimization techniques by itself can be applied to real-world problems such as computer-networking, human resources and manufacturing process.

  13. Probabilistic Composite Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    1997-01-01

    Probabilistic composite design is described in terms of a computational simulation. This simulation tracks probabilistically the composite design evolution from constituent materials, fabrication process, through composite mechanics and structural components. Comparisons with experimental data are provided to illustrate selection of probabilistic design allowables, test methods/specimen guidelines, and identification of in situ versus pristine strength, For example, results show that: in situ fiber tensile strength is 90% of its pristine strength; flat-wise long-tapered specimens are most suitable for setting ply tensile strength allowables: a composite radome can be designed with a reliability of 0.999999; and laminate fatigue exhibits wide-spread scatter at 90% cyclic-stress to static-strength ratios.

  14. Formalizing Probabilistic Safety Claims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Hagen, George E.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    A safety claim for a system is a statement that the system, which is subject to hazardous conditions, satisfies a given set of properties. Following work by John Rushby and Bev Littlewood, this paper presents a mathematical framework that can be used to state and formally prove probabilistic safety claims. It also enables hazardous conditions, their uncertainties, and their interactions to be integrated into the safety claim. This framework provides a formal description of the probabilistic composition of an arbitrary number of hazardous conditions and their effects on system behavior. An example is given of a probabilistic safety claim for a conflict detection algorithm for aircraft in a 2D airspace. The motivation for developing this mathematical framework is that it can be used in an automated theorem prover to formally verify safety claims.

  15. Probabilistic composite analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Murthy, P. L. N.

    1991-01-01

    Formal procedures are described which are used to computationally simulate the probabilistic behavior of composite structures. The computational simulation starts with the uncertainties associated with all aspects of a composite structure (constituents, fabrication, assembling, etc.) and encompasses all aspects of composite behavior (micromechanics, macromechanics, combined stress failure, laminate theory, structural response, and tailoring) optimization. Typical cases are included to illustrate the formal procedure for computational simulation. The collective results of the sample cases demonstrate that uncertainties in composite behavior and structural response can be probabilistically quantified.

  16. Shock-wave behavior in explosive monocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Dick, J.J.

    1994-09-09

    The shock response of explosive monocrystals is strongly anisotropic. Shock initiation sensitivity depends strongly on crystal orientation in PETN. This can be understood in terms of steric hindrance to shear during the shock-induced deformation of the molecular crystal. This initiation mechanism appears to be tribochemical rather than thermal.

  17. Shock wave interaction with turbulence: Pseudospectral simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1986-12-30

    Shock waves amplify pre-existing turbulence. Shock tube and shock wave boundary layer interaction experiments provide qualitative confirmation. However, shock pressure, temperature, and rapid transit complicate direct measurement. Computational simulations supplement the experimental data base and help isolate the mechanisms responsible. Simulations and experiments, particularly under reflected shock wave conditions, significantly influence material mixing. In these pseudospectral Navier-Stokes simulations the shock wave is treated as either a moving (tracked or fitted) domain boundary. The simulations assist development of code mix models. Shock Mach number and pre-existing turbulence intensity initially emerge as key parameters. 20 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tzonelih; Luo, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    This work proposes a probabilistic authenticated quantum dialogue (PAQD) based on Bell states with the following notable features. (1) In our proposed scheme, the dialogue is encoded in a probabilistic way, i.e., the same messages can be encoded into different quantum states, whereas in the state-of-the-art authenticated quantum dialogue (AQD), the dialogue is encoded in a deterministic way; (2) the pre-shared secret key between two communicants can be reused without any security loophole; (3) each dialogue in the proposed PAQD can be exchanged within only one-step quantum communication and one-step classical communication. However, in the state-of-the-art AQD protocols, both communicants have to run a QKD protocol for each dialogue and each dialogue requires multiple quantum as well as classical communicational steps; (4) nevertheless, the proposed scheme can resist the man-in-the-middle attack, the modification attack, and even other well-known attacks.

  19. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orren, L. H.; Ziman, G. M.; Jones, S. C.; Lee, T. K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model was used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents was analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance were examined.

  20. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orren, L. H.; Ziman, G. M.; Jones, S. C.; Lee, T. K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-01-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model was used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents was analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance were examined.

  1. Geothermal probabilistic cost study

    SciTech Connect

    Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

    1981-08-01

    A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

  2. Probabilistic river forecast methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Karen Suzanne

    1997-09-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) operates deterministic conceptual models to predict the hydrologic response of a river basin to precipitation. The output from these models are forecasted hydrographs (time series of the future river stage) at certain locations along a river. In order for the forecasts to be useful for optimal decision making, the uncertainty associated with them must be quantified. A methodology is developed for this purpose that (i) can be implemented with any deterministic hydrologic model, (ii) receives a probabilistic forecast of precipitation as input, (iii) quantifies all sources of uncertainty, (iv) operates in real-time and within computing constraints, and (v) produces probability distributions of future river stages. The Bayesian theory which supports the methodology involves transformation of a distribution of future precipitation into one of future river stage, and statistical characterization of the uncertainty in the hydrologic model. This is accomplished by decomposing total uncertainty into that associated with future precipitation and that associated with the hydrologic transformations. These are processed independently and then integrated into a predictive distribution which constitutes a probabilistic river stage forecast. A variety of models are presented for implementation of the methodology. In the most general model, a probability of exceedance associated with a given future hydrograph specified. In the simplest model, a probability of exceedance associated with a given future river stage is specified. In conjunction with the Ohio River Forecast Center of the NWS, the simplest model is used to demonstrate the feasibility of producing probabilistic river stage forecasts for a river basin located in headwaters. Previous efforts to quantify uncertainty in river forecasting have only considered selected sources of uncertainty, been specific to a particular hydrologic model, or have not obtained an entire probability

  3. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thio, H. K.; Ichinose, G. A.; Somerville, P. G.; Polet, J.

    2006-12-01

    The recent tsunami disaster caused by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake has focused our attention to the hazard posed by large earthquakes that occur under water, in particular subduction zone earthquakes, and the tsunamis that they generate. Even though these kinds of events are rare, the very large loss of life and material destruction caused by this earthquake warrant a significant effort towards the mitigation of the tsunami hazard. For ground motion hazard, Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) has become a standard practice in the evaluation and mitigation of seismic hazard to populations in particular with respect to structures, infrastructure and lifelines. Its ability to condense the complexities and variability of seismic activity into a manageable set of parameters greatly facilitates the design of effective seismic resistant buildings but also the planning of infrastructure projects. Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (PTHA) achieves the same goal for hazards posed by tsunami. There are great advantages of implementing such a method to evaluate the total risk (seismic and tsunami) to coastal communities. The method that we have developed is based on the traditional PSHA and therefore completely consistent with standard seismic practice. Because of the strong dependence of tsunami wave heights on bathymetry, we use a full waveform tsunami waveform computation in lieu of attenuation relations that are common in PSHA. By pre-computing and storing the tsunami waveforms at points along the coast generated for sets of subfaults that comprise larger earthquake faults, we can efficiently synthesize tsunami waveforms for any slip distribution on those faults by summing the individual subfault tsunami waveforms (weighted by their slip). This efficiency make it feasible to use Green's function summation in lieu of attenuation relations to provide very accurate estimates of tsunami height for probabilistic calculations, where one typically computes

  4. Echocardiography in shock management.

    PubMed

    McLean, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock. PMID:27543137

  5. Imploding conical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, R. T.; Skews, B. W.; Rubidge, S.; Snow, J.

    2013-07-01

    The behaviour of conical shock waves imploding axisymmetrically was first studied numerically by Hornung (J Fluid Mech 409:1-12, 2000) and this prompted a limited experimental investigation into these complex flow patterns by Skews et al. (Shock Waves 11:323-326, 2002). Modification of the simulation boundary conditions, resulting in the loss of self-similarity, was necessary to image the flow experimentally. The current tests examine the temporal evolution of these flows utilising a converging conical gap of fixed width fed by a shock wave impinging at its entrance, supported by CFD simulations. The effects of gap thickness, angle and incident shock strength were investigated. The wave initially diffracts around the outer lip of the gap shedding a vortex which, for strong incident shock cases, can contain embedded shocks. The converging shock at exit reflects on the axis of symmetry with the reflected wave propagating outwards resulting in a triple point developing on the incident wave together with the associated shear layer. This axisymmetric shear layer rolls up into a mushroom-shaped toroidal vortex ring and forward-facing jet. For strong shocks, this deforms the Mach disk to the extent of forming a second triple point with the primary shock exhibiting a double bulge. Separate features resembling the Richtmeyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities were noted in some tests. Aside from the incident wave curvature, the reflection patterns demonstrated correspond well with the V- and DV-types identified by Hornung although type S was not clearly seen, possibly due to the occlusion of the reflection region by the outer diffraction vortex at these early times. Some additional computational work explicitly exploring the limits of the parameter space for such systems has demonstrated the existence of a possible further reflection type, called vN-type, which is similar to the von Neumann reflection for plane waves. It is recommended that the parameter space be

  6. [Cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Houegnifioh, Komlanvi Kafui; Gfeller, Etienne; Garcia, Wenceslao; Ribordy, Vincent

    2014-08-13

    Cardiogenic shock, especially when it complicates a myocardial infarction, is still associated with high mortality rate. Emergency department or first care physicians are often the first providers to assess the cardiogenic shock patient, and plays thereby a key role in achieving a timely diagnosis and treatment. This review will detail the actual physiopathology understanding of the cardiogenic shock, its diagnosis and management focusing on the care within the emergency department.

  7. Probabilistic Failure Assessment For Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Nicholas; Ebbeler, Donald; Newlin, Laura; Sutharshana, Sravan; Creager, Matthew

    1995-01-01

    Probabilistic Failure Assessment for Fatigue (PFAFAT) package of software utilizing probabilistic failure-assessment (PFA) methodology to model high- and low-cycle-fatigue modes of failure of structural components. Consists of nine programs. Three programs perform probabilistic fatigue analysis by means of Monte Carlo simulation. Other six used for generating random processes, characterizing fatigue-life data pertaining to materials, and processing outputs of computational simulations. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  8. TIMING OF SHOCK WAVES

    DOEpatents

    Tuck, J.L.

    1955-03-01

    This patent relates to means for ascertaining the instant of arrival of a shock wave in an exploslve charge and apparatus utilizing this means to coordinate the timing of two operations involving a short lnterval of time. A pair of spaced electrodes are inserted along the line of an explosive train with a voltage applied there-across which is insufficient to cause discharge. When it is desired to initiate operation of a device at the time the explosive shock wave reaches a particular point on the explosive line, the device having an inherent time delay, the electrodes are located ahead of the point such that the ionization of the area between the electrodes caused by the traveling explosive shock wave sends a signal to initiate operation of the device to cause it to operate at the proper time. The operated device may be photographic equipment consisting of an x-ray illuminating tube.

  9. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) is to evaluate the hazard of seismic ground motion at a site by considering all possible earthquakes in the area, estimating the associated shaking at the site, and calculating the probabilities of these occurrences. The Panel on Seismic Hazard Analysis is charged with assessment of the capabilities, limitations, and future trends of PSHA in the context of alternatives. The report identifies and discusses key issues of PSHA and is addressed to decision makers with a modest scientific and technical background and to the scientific and technical community. 37 refs., 19 figs.

  10. Probabilistic Safety Assessment of Tehran Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Hadi; Nematollahi, Mohammad Reza; Sepanloo, Kamran

    2004-07-01

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) application is found to be a practical tool for research reactor safety due to intense involvement of human interactions in an experimental facility. In this paper the application of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment to the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) is presented. The level 1 PSA application involved: Familiarization with the plant, selection of accident initiators, mitigating functions and system definitions, event tree constructions and quantification, fault tree constructions and quantification, human reliability, component failure data base development and dependent failure analysis. Each of the steps of the analysis given above is discussed with highlights from the selected results. Quantification of the constructed models is done using SAPHIRE software. This Study shows that the obtained core damage frequency for Tehran Research Reactor (8.368 E-6 per year) well meets the IAEA criterion for existing nuclear power plants (1E-4). But safety improvement suggestions are offered to decrease the most probable accidents. (authors)

  11. The Supernova Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethe, Hans A.

    1995-08-01

    Vigorous convection is the key to the supernova mechanism. An analytic theory is presented which parallels the computations of Herant et al. Energy is delivered by neutrinos to the convecting medium. The most important quantity is p1r3, where P1 is the density outside the shock. This can be obtained from the computations of Wilson et al., since it is not affected by the convection behind the shock. It is closely related to Mdot, the rate at which matter falls in toward the center. The outgoing shock is dominated by the Hugoniot equation; the shock cannot move out until its energy is of the order of 1 foe (= 1051 ergs). Once it moves, its velocity and energy are calculated as functions of its radius. Nucleosynthesis gives an appreciable contribution to the energy. A substantial fraction of the energy is initially stored as nuclear dissociation energy, and then released as the shock moves out. This energy cannot at present be calculated from first principles, but it can be deduced from the observed energy of SN 1987A of 1.4±0.4 foe. From the result it is shown that about one-half of the infalling material goes into the shock and one-half accretes to the neutron star.

  12. Quantum probabilistic logic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Radhakrishnan

    2015-05-01

    We describe a quantum mechanics based logic programming language that supports Horn clauses, random variables, and covariance matrices to express and solve problems in probabilistic logic. The Horn clauses of the language wrap random variables, including infinite valued, to express probability distributions and statistical correlations, a powerful feature to capture relationship between distributions that are not independent. The expressive power of the language is based on a mechanism to implement statistical ensembles and to solve the underlying SAT instances using quantum mechanical machinery. We exploit the fact that classical random variables have quantum decompositions to build the Horn clauses. We establish the semantics of the language in a rigorous fashion by considering an existing probabilistic logic language called PRISM with classical probability measures defined on the Herbrand base and extending it to the quantum context. In the classical case H-interpretations form the sample space and probability measures defined on them lead to consistent definition of probabilities for well formed formulae. In the quantum counterpart, we define probability amplitudes on Hinterpretations facilitating the model generations and verifications via quantum mechanical superpositions and entanglements. We cast the well formed formulae of the language as quantum mechanical observables thus providing an elegant interpretation for their probabilities. We discuss several examples to combine statistical ensembles and predicates of first order logic to reason with situations involving uncertainty.

  13. Topics in Probabilistic Judgment Aggregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Guanchun

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is a compilation of several studies that are united by their relevance to probabilistic judgment aggregation. In the face of complex and uncertain events, panels of judges are frequently consulted to provide probabilistic forecasts, and aggregation of such estimates in groups often yield better results than could have been made…

  14. Passage Retrieval: A Probabilistic Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melucci, Massimo

    1998-01-01

    Presents a probabilistic technique to retrieve passages from texts having a large size or heterogeneous semantic content. Results of experiments comparing the probabilistic technique to one based on a text segmentation algorithm revealed that the passage size affects passage retrieval performance; text organization and query generality may have an…

  15. Cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Shah, Palak; Cowger, Jennifer A

    2014-07-01

    Cardiogenic shock is the most common cause of in-hospital mortality for patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction. Mortality exceeds 50% and management is focused on a rapid diagnosis of cardiogenic shock, restoration of coronary blood flow through early revascularization, complication management, and maintenance of end-organ homeostasis. Besides revascularization, inotropes and vasodilators are potent medical therapies to assist the failing heart. Pulmonary arterial catheters are an important adjunctive tool to assess patient hemodynamics, but their use should be limited to select patients in cardiogenic shock.

  16. Probabilistic retinal vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chang-Hua; Agam, Gady

    2007-03-01

    Optic fundus assessment is widely used for diagnosing vascular and non-vascular pathology. Inspection of the retinal vasculature may reveal hypertension, diabetes, arteriosclerosis, cardiovascular disease and stroke. Due to various imaging conditions retinal images may be degraded. Consequently, the enhancement of such images and vessels in them is an important task with direct clinical applications. We propose a novel technique for vessel enhancement in retinal images that is capable of enhancing vessel junctions in addition to linear vessel segments. This is an extension of vessel filters we have previously developed for vessel enhancement in thoracic CT scans. The proposed approach is based on probabilistic models which can discern vessels and junctions. Evaluation shows the proposed filter is better than several known techniques and is comparable to the state of the art when evaluated on a standard dataset. A ridge-based vessel tracking process is applied on the enhanced image to demonstrate the effectiveness of the enhancement filter.

  17. Probabilistic Fiber Composite Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. The variables in which uncertainties are accounted for include constituent and void volume ratios, constituent elastic properties and strengths, and fiber misalignment. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material property variations induced by random changes expected at the material micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predictor and response variables in the study. These computational procedures make possible a formal description of anticipated random processes at the intra-ply level, and the related effects of these on composite properties.

  18. Probabilistic Mesomechanical Fatigue Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryon, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    A probabilistic mesomechanical fatigue life model is proposed to link the microstructural material heterogeneities to the statistical scatter in the macrostructural response. The macrostructure is modeled as an ensemble of microelements. Cracks nucleation within the microelements and grow from the microelements to final fracture. Variations of the microelement properties are defined using statistical parameters. A micromechanical slip band decohesion model is used to determine the crack nucleation life and size. A crack tip opening displacement model is used to determine the small crack growth life and size. Paris law is used to determine the long crack growth life. The models are combined in a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the statistical distribution of total fatigue life for the macrostructure. The modeled response is compared to trends in experimental observations from the literature.

  19. Novel probabilistic neuroclassifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Jiang; Serpen, Gursel

    2003-09-01

    A novel probabilistic potential function neural network classifier algorithm to deal with classes which are multi-modally distributed and formed from sets of disjoint pattern clusters is proposed in this paper. The proposed classifier has a number of desirable properties which distinguish it from other neural network classifiers. A complete description of the algorithm in terms of its architecture and the pseudocode is presented. Simulation analysis of the newly proposed neuro-classifier algorithm on a set of benchmark problems is presented. Benchmark problems tested include IRIS, Sonar, Vowel Recognition, Two-Spiral, Wisconsin Breast Cancer, Cleveland Heart Disease and Thyroid Gland Disease. Simulation results indicate that the proposed neuro-classifier performs consistently better for a subset of problems for which other neural classifiers perform relatively poorly.

  20. Incorporating psychological influences in probabilistic cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kujawski, Edouard; Alvaro, Mariana; Edwards, William

    2004-01-08

    Today's typical probabilistic cost analysis assumes an ''ideal'' project that is devoid of the human and organizational considerations that heavily influence the success and cost of real-world projects. In the real world ''Money Allocated Is Money Spent'' (MAIMS principle); cost underruns are rarely available to protect against cost overruns while task overruns are passed on to the total project cost. Realistic cost estimates therefore require a modified probabilistic cost analysis that simultaneously models the cost management strategy including budget allocation. Psychological influences such as overconfidence in assessing uncertainties and dependencies among cost elements and risks are other important considerations that are generally not addressed. It should then be no surprise that actual project costs often exceed the initial estimates and are delivered late and/or with a reduced scope. This paper presents a practical probabilistic cost analysis model that incorporates recent findings in human behavior and judgment under uncertainty, dependencies among cost elements, the MAIMS principle, and project management practices. Uncertain cost elements are elicited from experts using the direct fractile assessment method and fitted with three-parameter Weibull distributions. The full correlation matrix is specified in terms of two parameters that characterize correlations among cost elements in the same and in different subsystems. The analysis is readily implemented using standard Monte Carlo simulation tools such as {at}Risk and Crystal Ball{reg_sign}. The analysis of a representative design and engineering project substantiates that today's typical probabilistic cost analysis is likely to severely underestimate project cost for probability of success values of importance to contractors and procuring activities. The proposed approach provides a framework for developing a viable cost management strategy for allocating baseline budgets and contingencies. Given the

  1. Probabilistic brains: knowns and unknowns

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Alexandre; Beck, Jeffrey M; Ma, Wei Ji; Latham, Peter E

    2015-01-01

    There is strong behavioral and physiological evidence that the brain both represents probability distributions and performs probabilistic inference. Computational neuroscientists have started to shed light on how these probabilistic representations and computations might be implemented in neural circuits. One particularly appealing aspect of these theories is their generality: they can be used to model a wide range of tasks, from sensory processing to high-level cognition. To date, however, these theories have only been applied to very simple tasks. Here we discuss the challenges that will emerge as researchers start focusing their efforts on real-life computations, with a focus on probabilistic learning, structural learning and approximate inference. PMID:23955561

  2. Probabilistic Design of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2006-01-01

    A formal procedure for the probabilistic design evaluation of a composite structure is described. The uncertainties in all aspects of a composite structure (constituent material properties, fabrication variables, structural geometry, and service environments, etc.), which result in the uncertain behavior in the composite structural responses, are included in the evaluation. The probabilistic evaluation consists of: (1) design criteria, (2) modeling of composite structures and uncertainties, (3) simulation methods, and (4) the decision-making process. A sample case is presented to illustrate the formal procedure and to demonstrate that composite structural designs can be probabilistically evaluated with accuracy and efficiency.

  3. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  4. Probabilistic Open Set Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Lalit Prithviraj

    Real-world tasks in computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning often touch upon the open set recognition problem: multi-class recognition with incomplete knowledge of the world and many unknown inputs. An obvious way to approach such problems is to develop a recognition system that thresholds probabilities to reject unknown classes. Traditional rejection techniques are not about the unknown; they are about the uncertain boundary and rejection around that boundary. Thus traditional techniques only represent the "known unknowns". However, a proper open set recognition algorithm is needed to reduce the risk from the "unknown unknowns". This dissertation examines this concept and finds existing probabilistic multi-class recognition approaches are ineffective for true open set recognition. We hypothesize the cause is due to weak adhoc assumptions combined with closed-world assumptions made by existing calibration techniques. Intuitively, if we could accurately model just the positive data for any known class without overfitting, we could reject the large set of unknown classes even under this assumption of incomplete class knowledge. For this, we formulate the problem as one of modeling positive training data by invoking statistical extreme value theory (EVT) near the decision boundary of positive data with respect to negative data. We provide a new algorithm called the PI-SVM for estimating the unnormalized posterior probability of class inclusion. This dissertation also introduces a new open set recognition model called Compact Abating Probability (CAP), where the probability of class membership decreases in value (abates) as points move from known data toward open space. We show that CAP models improve open set recognition for multiple algorithms. Leveraging the CAP formulation, we go on to describe the novel Weibull-calibrated SVM (W-SVM) algorithm, which combines the useful properties of statistical EVT for score calibration with one-class and binary

  5. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, William B.; Graham, Robert A.; Morosin, Bruno

    1988-01-01

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active.

  6. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1987-04-20

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolyte rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  7. Shock-activated electrochemical power supplies

    DOEpatents

    Benedick, W.B.; Graham, R.A.; Morosin, B.

    1988-11-08

    A shock-activated electrochemical power supply is provided which is initiated extremely rapidly and which has a long shelf life. Electrochemical power supplies of this invention are initiated much faster than conventional thermal batteries. Power supplies of this invention comprise an inactive electrolyte and means for generating a high-pressure shock wave such that the shock wave is propagated through the electrolytes rendering the electrolyte electrochemically active. 2 figs.

  8. Probabilistic Risk Assessment: A Bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Probabilistic risk analysis is an integration of failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA), fault tree analysis and other techniques to assess the potential for failure and to find ways to reduce risk. This bibliography references 160 documents in the NASA STI Database that contain the major concepts, probabilistic risk assessment, risk and probability theory, in the basic index or major subject terms, An abstract is included with most citations, followed by the applicable subject terms.

  9. Probabilistic theories with purification

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, Giulio; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo

    2010-06-15

    We investigate general probabilistic theories in which every mixed state has a purification, unique up to reversible channels on the purifying system. We show that the purification principle is equivalent to the existence of a reversible realization of every physical process, that is, to the fact that every physical process can be regarded as arising from a reversible interaction of the system with an environment, which is eventually discarded. From the purification principle we also construct an isomorphism between transformations and bipartite states that possesses all structural properties of the Choi-Jamiolkowski isomorphism in quantum theory. Such an isomorphism allows one to prove most of the basic features of quantum theory, like, e.g., existence of pure bipartite states giving perfect correlations in independent experiments, no information without disturbance, no joint discrimination of all pure states, no cloning, teleportation, no programming, no bit commitment, complementarity between correctable channels and deletion channels, characterization of entanglement-breaking channels as measure-and-prepare channels, and others, without resorting to the mathematical framework of Hilbert spaces.

  10. Finite Mach number spherical shock wave, application to shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-08-01

    A converging and diverging spherical shock wave with a finite initial Mach number Ms0 is described by using a perturbative approach over a small parameter Ms-2. The zeroth order solution is the Guderley's self-similar solution. The first order correction to this solution accounts for the effects of the shock strength. Whereas it was constant in the Guderley's asymptotic solution, the amplification factor of the finite amplitude shock Λ(t)∝dUs/dRs now varies in time. The coefficients present in its series form are iteratively calculated so that the solution does not undergo any singular behavior apart from the position of the shock. The analytical form of the corrected solution in the vicinity of singular points provides a better physical understanding of the finite shock Mach number effects. The correction affects mainly the flow density and the pressure after the shock rebound. In application to the shock ignition scheme, it is shown that the ignition criterion is modified by more than 20% if the fuel pressure prior to the final shock is taken into account. A good agreement is obtained with hydrodynamic simulations using a Lagrangian code.

  11. Finite Mach number spherical shock wave, application to shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Vallet, A.; Ribeyre, X.; Tikhonchuk, V.

    2013-08-15

    A converging and diverging spherical shock wave with a finite initial Mach number M{sub s0} is described by using a perturbative approach over a small parameter M{sub s}{sup −2}. The zeroth order solution is the Guderley's self-similar solution. The first order correction to this solution accounts for the effects of the shock strength. Whereas it was constant in the Guderley's asymptotic solution, the amplification factor of the finite amplitude shock Λ(t)∝dU{sub s}/dR{sub s} now varies in time. The coefficients present in its series form are iteratively calculated so that the solution does not undergo any singular behavior apart from the position of the shock. The analytical form of the corrected solution in the vicinity of singular points provides a better physical understanding of the finite shock Mach number effects. The correction affects mainly the flow density and the pressure after the shock rebound. In application to the shock ignition scheme, it is shown that the ignition criterion is modified by more than 20% if the fuel pressure prior to the final shock is taken into account. A good agreement is obtained with hydrodynamic simulations using a Lagrangian code.

  12. [Obstructive shock].

    PubMed

    Pich, H; Heller, A R

    2015-05-01

    An acute obstruction of blood flow in central vessels of the systemic or pulmonary circulation causes the clinical symptoms of shock accompanied by disturbances of consciousness, centralization, oliguria, hypotension and tachycardia. In the case of an acute pulmonary embolism an intravascular occlusion results in an acute increase of the right ventricular afterload. In the case of a tension pneumothorax, an obstruction of the blood vessels supplying the heart is caused by an increase in extravascular pressure. From a hemodynamic viewpoint circulatory shock caused by obstruction is closely followed by cardiac deterioration; however, etiological and therapeutic options necessitate demarcation of cardiac from non-cardiac obstructive causes. The high dynamics of this potentially life-threatening condition is a hallmark of all types of obstructive shock. This requires an expeditious and purposeful diagnosis and a rapid and well-aimed therapy. PMID:25994928

  13. Ensemble postprocessing for probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentzien, S.; Friederichs, P.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation is one of the most difficult weather variables to predict in hydrometeorological applications. In order to assess the uncertainty inherent in deterministic numerical weather prediction (NWP), meteorological services around the globe develop ensemble prediction systems (EPS) based on high-resolution NWP systems. With non-hydrostatic model dynamics and without parameterization of deep moist convection, high-resolution NWP models are able to describe convective processes in more detail and provide more realistic mesoscale structures. However, precipitation forecasts are still affected by displacement errors, systematic biases and fast error growth on small scales. Probabilistic guidance can be achieved from an ensemble setup which accounts for model error and uncertainty of initial and boundary conditions. The German Meteorological Service (Deutscher Wetterdienst, DWD) provides such an ensemble system based on the German-focused limited-area model COSMO-DE. With a horizontal grid-spacing of 2.8 km, COSMO-DE is the convection-permitting high-resolution part of the operational model chain at DWD. The COSMO-DE-EPS consists of 20 realizations of COSMO-DE, driven by initial and boundary conditions derived from 4 global models and 5 perturbations of model physics. Ensemble systems like COSMO-DE-EPS are often limited with respect to ensemble size due to the immense computational costs. As a consequence, they can be biased and exhibit insufficient ensemble spread, and probabilistic forecasts may be not well calibrated. In this study, probabilistic quantitative precipitation forecasts are derived from COSMO-DE-EPS and evaluated at more than 1000 rain gauges located all over Germany. COSMO-DE-EPS is a frequently updated ensemble system, initialized 8 times a day. We use the time-lagged approach to inexpensively increase ensemble spread, which results in more reliable forecasts especially for extreme precipitation events. Moreover, we will show that statistical

  14. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-15

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=√(μ{sub 0}/p{sub 0}) I/(2 π) where I is the current, μ{sub 0} is the permeability, and p{sub 0} is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The

  15. Converging cylindrical shocks in ideal magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Mostert, W.; Wheatley, V.; Samtaney, R.

    2014-09-01

    We consider a cylindrically symmetrical shock converging onto an axis within the framework of ideal, compressible-gas non-dissipative magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). In cylindrical polar co-ordinates we restrict attention to either constant axial magnetic field or to the azimuthal but singular magnetic field produced by a line current on the axis. Under the constraint of zero normal magnetic field and zero tangential fluid speed at the shock, a set of restricted shock-jump conditions are obtained as functions of the shock Mach number, defined as the ratio of the local shock speed to the unique magnetohydrodynamic wave speed ahead of the shock, and also of a parameter measuring the local strength of the magnetic field. For the line current case, two approaches are explored and the results compared in detail. The first is geometrical shock-dynamics where the restricted shock-jump conditions are applied directly to the equation on the characteristic entering the shock from behind. This gives an ordinary-differential equation for the shock Mach number as a function of radius which is integrated numerically to provide profiles of the shock implosion. Also, analytic, asymptotic results are obtained for the shock trajectory at small radius. The second approach is direct numerical solution of the radially symmetric MHD equations using a shock-capturing method. For the axial magnetic field case the shock implosion is of the Guderley power-law type with exponent that is not affected by the presence of a finite magnetic field. For the axial current case, however, the presence of a tangential magnetic field ahead of the shock with strength inversely proportional to radius introduces a length scale R=sqrt{μ _0/p_0} I/(2 π ) where I is the current, μ0 is the permeability, and p0 is the pressure ahead of the shock. For shocks initiated at r ≫ R, shock convergence is first accompanied by shock strengthening as for the strictly gas-dynamic implosion. The diverging magnetic field

  16. Cardiogenic Shock.

    PubMed

    Moskovitz, Joshua B; Levy, Zachary D; Slesinger, Todd L

    2015-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome. Although early reperfusion strategies are essential to the management of these critically ill patients, additional treatment plans are often needed to stabilize and treat the patient before reperfusion may be possible. This article discusses pharmacologic and surgical interventions, their indications and contraindications, management strategies, and treatment algorithms.

  17. CULTURE SHOCK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEINSTEIN, GERALD; AND OTHERS

    IN A PANEL, GEORGE BRAGLE AND NATHAN GOULD STRESS TEACHER PREPARATION TO COPE WITH THE THREATENING IMPACT OF CULTURE OR REALITY SHOCK. THEY RECOMMEND MODIFYING THE ATTITUDES OF TEACHERS BY ALTERING THEIR PERCEPTIONS, PROVIDING THEM WITH DIRECT EXPERIENCE WITH THE SOCIOCULTURAL MILIEU OF GHETTO SCHOOLS, AND REQUIRING THEM TO TAKE COURSES IN THE…

  18. PROBABILISTIC INFORMATION INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    J. BOOKER; M. MEYER; ET AL

    2001-02-01

    The Statistical Sciences Group at Los Alamos has successfully developed a structured, probabilistic, quantitative approach for the evaluation of system performance based on multiple information sources, called Information Integration Technology (IIT). The technology integrates diverse types and sources of data and information (both quantitative and qualitative), and their associated uncertainties, to develop distributions for performance metrics, such as reliability. Applications include predicting complex system performance, where test data are lacking or expensive to obtain, through the integration of expert judgment, historical data, computer/simulation model predictions, and any relevant test/experimental data. The technology is particularly well suited for tracking estimated system performance for systems under change (e.g. development, aging), and can be used at any time during product development, including concept and early design phases, prior to prototyping, testing, or production, and before costly design decisions are made. Techniques from various disciplines (e.g., state-of-the-art expert elicitation, statistical and reliability analysis, design engineering, physics modeling, and knowledge management) are merged and modified to develop formal methods for the data/information integration. The power of this technology, known as PREDICT (Performance and Reliability Evaluation with Diverse Information Combination and Tracking), won a 1999 R and D 100 Award (Meyer, Booker, Bement, Kerscher, 1999). Specifically the PREDICT application is a formal, multidisciplinary process for estimating the performance of a product when test data are sparse or nonexistent. The acronym indicates the purpose of the methodology: to evaluate the performance or reliability of a product/system by combining all available (often diverse) sources of information and then tracking that performance as the product undergoes changes.

  19. Probabilistic quantum teleportation in the presence of noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes, Raphael; Rigolin, Gustavo

    2016-06-01

    We extend the research program initiated in [Phys. Rev. A 92, 012338 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevA.92.012338] from noisy deterministic teleportation protocols to noisy probabilistic (conditional) protocols. Our main goal now is to study how we can increase the fidelity of the teleported state in the presence of noise by working with probabilistic protocols. We work with several scenarios involving the most common types of noise in realistic implementations of quantum communication tasks and find many cases where adding more noise to the probabilistic protocol increases considerably the fidelity of the teleported state, without decreasing the probability of a successful run of the protocol. Also, there are cases where the entanglement of the channel connecting Alice and Bob leading to the greatest fidelity is not maximal. Moreover, there exist cases where the optimal fidelity for the probabilistic protocols are greater than the maximal fidelity (2 /3 ) achievable by using only classical resources, while the optimal ones for the deterministic protocols under the same conditions lie below this limit. This result clearly illustrates that in some cases we can only get a truly quantum teleportation if we use probabilistic instead of deterministic protocols.

  20. Vagueness as Probabilistic Linguistic Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassiter, Daniel

    Consideration of the metalinguistic effects of utterances involving vague terms has led Barker [1] to treat vagueness using a modified Stalnakerian model of assertion. I present a sorites-like puzzle for factual beliefs in the standard Stalnakerian model [28] and show that it can be resolved by enriching the model to make use of probabilistic belief spaces. An analogous problem arises for metalinguistic information in Barker's model, and I suggest that a similar enrichment is needed here as well. The result is a probabilistic theory of linguistic representation that retains a classical metalanguage but avoids the undesirable divorce between meaning and use inherent in the epistemic theory [34]. I also show that the probabilistic approach provides a plausible account of the sorites paradox and higher-order vagueness and that it fares well empirically and conceptually in comparison to leading competitors.

  1. Probabilistic reasoning in data analysis.

    PubMed

    Sirovich, Lawrence

    2011-09-20

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a student assignment for a lecture on probabilistic reasoning in the analysis of biological data. General probabilistic frameworks are introduced, and a number of standard probability distributions are described using simple intuitive ideas. Particular attention is focused on random arrivals that are independent of prior history (Markovian events), with an emphasis on waiting times, Poisson processes, and Poisson probability distributions. The use of these various probability distributions is applied to biomedical problems, including several classic experimental studies.

  2. Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Steve; Engelke, Ray; Manner, Virginia; Chellappa, Raja; Yoo, Choong - Shik

    2011-01-20

    The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

  3. Chondrule destruction in nebular shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Thompson, Christopher

    2014-12-10

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized silicate spherules ubiquitous in primitive meteorites, but whose origin remains mysterious. One of the main proposed mechanisms for producing them is melting of solids in shock waves in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. However, evidence is mounting that chondrule-forming regions were enriched in solids well above solar abundances. Given the high velocities involved in shock models, destructive collisions would be expected between differently sized grains after passage of the shock front as a result of differential drag. We investigate the probability and outcome of collisions of particles behind a one-dimensional shock using analytic methods as well as a full integration of the coupled mass, momentum, energy, and radiation equations. Destruction of protochondrules seems unavoidable for solid/gas ratios ε ≳ 0.1, and possibly even for solar abundances because of 'sandblasting' by finer dust. A flow with ε ≳ 10 requires much smaller shock velocities (∼2 versus 8 km s{sup –1}) in order to achieve chondrule-melting temperatures, and radiation trapping allows slow cooling of the shocked fragments. Initial destruction would still be extensive; although re-assembly of millimeter-sized particles would naturally occur by grain sticking afterward, the compositional heterogeneity of chondrules may be difficult to reproduce. We finally note that solids passing through small-scale bow shocks around few kilometer-sized planetesimals might experience partial melting and yet escape fragmentation.

  4. Some characteristics of probabilistic one-sided splicing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvarajoo, Mathuri; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza; Turaev, Sherzod

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical model for DNA computing using the recombination behavior of DNA molecules known as asplicing system has been introduced in 1987. Splicing systems are based on the splicing operation which, informally, cuts two strings at the specific places and attaches the prefix of the first string to the suffix of the second string and the prefix of the second string to the suffix of the first string yielding the new strings. It is known that splicing systems with finite sets of axioms and splicing rules only generate regular languages. Hence, different types of restrictions for splicing systems have been considered to increase the computational power of the languages generated. Recently, probabilistic splicing systems have been introduced where the probabilities are initially associated with the axioms, and the probabilities of the generated strings are computed from the probabilities of the initial strings. In this paper, some properties of probabilistic one-sided splicing systems, which are special types of probabilistic splicing systems, are investigated. We prove that probabilistic one-sided splicing systems can also increase the computational power of the languages generated.

  5. On the generation of dispersive shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Peter D.

    2016-10-01

    We review various methods for the analysis of initial-value problems for integrable dispersive equations in the weak-dispersion or semiclassical regime. Some methods are sufficiently powerful to rigorously explain the generation of modulated wavetrains, so-called dispersive shock waves, as the result of shock formation in a limiting dispersionless system. They also provide a detailed description of the solution near caustic curves that delimit dispersive shock waves, revealing fascinating universal wave patterns.

  6. Undercuts by Laser Shock Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielage, Hanna; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-05-01

    In laser shock forming TEA-CO2-laser induced shock waves are used to form metal foils, such as aluminum or copper. The process utilizes an initiated plasma shock wave on the target surface, which leads to a forming of the foil. A challenge in forming technologies is the manufacturing of undercuts. By conventional forming methods these special forms are not feasible. In this article, it is presented that undercuts in the micro range can be produced by laser shock deep drawing. Different drawing die diameters, drawing die depths and the material aluminum in the thicknesses 20 and 50 μm were investigated. It will be presented that smaller die diameters facilitate undercuts compared to bigger die diameters. The phenomena can be explained by Barlow's formula. Furthermore, it is shown which maximum undercut depth at different die diameters can be reached. To this end, cross-sections of the different parameter combinations are displayed.

  7. Shocks in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2016-09-01

    We point out a surprising consequence of the usually assumed initial conditions for cosmological perturbations. Namely, a spectrum of Gaussian, linear, adiabatic, scalar, growing mode perturbations not only creates acoustic oscillations of the kind observed on very large scales today, it also leads to the production of shocks in the radiation fluid of the very early Universe. Shocks cause departures from local thermal equilibrium as well as create vorticity and gravitational waves. For a scale-invariant spectrum and standard model physics, shocks form for temperatures 1 GeV shock formation and the consequent gravitational wave emission provide a signal detectable by current and planned gravitational wave experiments, allowing them to strongly constrain conditions present in the primordial Universe as early as 10-30 sec after the big bang.

  8. Undercuts by Laser Shock Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Wielage, Hanna; Vollertsen, Frank

    2011-05-04

    In laser shock forming TEA-CO{sub 2}-laser induced shock waves are used to form metal foils, such as aluminum or copper. The process utilizes an initiated plasma shock wave on the target surface, which leads to a forming of the foil. A challenge in forming technologies is the manufacturing of undercuts. By conventional forming methods these special forms are not feasible. In this article, it is presented that undercuts in the micro range can be produced by laser shock deep drawing. Different drawing die diameters, drawing die depths and the material aluminum in the thicknesses 20 and 50 {mu}m were investigated. It will be presented that smaller die diameters facilitate undercuts compared to bigger die diameters. The phenomena can be explained by Barlow's formula. Furthermore, it is shown which maximum undercut depth at different die diameters can be reached. To this end, cross-sections of the different parameter combinations are displayed.

  9. Generalization in probabilistic RAM nets.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, T G; Guan, Y; Taylor, J G; Gorse, D

    1993-01-01

    The probabilistic RAM (pRAM) is a hardware-realizable neural device which is stochastic in operation and highly nonlinear. Even small nets of pRAMs offer high levels of functionality. The means by which a pRAM network generalizes when trained in noise is shown and the results of this behavior are described.

  10. Probabilistic assessment of composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael E.; Abumeri, Galib H.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    A general computational simulation methodology for an integrated probabilistic assessment of composite structures is discussed and demonstrated using aircraft fuselage (stiffened composite cylindrical shell) structures with rectangular cutouts. The computational simulation was performed for the probabilistic assessment of the structural behavior including buckling loads, vibration frequencies, global displacements, and local stresses. The scatter in the structural response is simulated based on the inherent uncertainties in the primitive (independent random) variables at the fiber matrix constituent, ply, laminate, and structural scales that describe the composite structures. The effect of uncertainties due to fabrication process variables such as fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio, ply orientation, and ply thickness is also included. The methodology has been embedded in the computer code IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). In addition to the simulated scatter, the IPACS code also calculates the sensitivity of the composite structural behavior to all the primitive variables that influence the structural behavior. This information is useful for assessing reliability and providing guidance for improvement. The results from the probabilistic assessment for the composite structure with rectangular cutouts indicate that the uncertainty in the longitudinal ply stress is mainly caused by the uncertainty in the laminate thickness, and the large overlap of the scatter in the first four buckling loads implies that the buckling mode shape for a specific buckling load can be either of the four modes.

  11. Research on probabilistic information processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, W.

    1973-01-01

    The work accomplished on probabilistic information processing (PIP) is reported. The research proposals and decision analysis are discussed along with the results of research on MSC setting, multiattribute utilities, and Bayesian research. Abstracts of reports concerning the PIP research are included.

  12. Enhanced probabilistic microcell prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Song-Kyoo

    2005-06-01

    A microcell is a cell with 1-km or less radius which is suitable not only for heavily urbanized area such as a metropolitan city but also for in-building area such as offices and shopping malls. This paper deals with the microcell prediction model of propagation loss focused on in-buildng solution that is analyzed by probabilistic techniques. The RSL (Receive Signal Level) is the factor which can evaluate the performance of a microcell and the LOS (Line-Of-Sight) component and the blockage loss directly effect on the RSL. Combination of the probabilistic method is applied to get these performance factors. The mathematical methods include the CLT (Central Limit Theorem) and the SSQC (Six-Sigma Quality Control) to get the parameters of the distribution. This probabilistic solution gives us compact measuring of performance factors. In addition, it gives the probabilistic optimization of strategies such as the number of cells, cell location, capacity of cells, range of cells and so on. In addition, the optimal strategies for antenna allocation for a building can be obtained by using this model.

  13. Designing Probabilistic Tasks for Kindergartners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoumpourdi, Chrysanthi; Kafoussi, Sonia; Tatsis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Recent research suggests that children could be engaged in probability tasks at an early age and task characteristics seem to play an important role in the way children perceive an activity. To this direction in the present article we investigate the role of some basic characteristics of probabilistic tasks in their design and implementation. In…

  14. Potential change in flaw geometry of an initially shallow finite-length surface flaw during a pressurized-thermal-shock transient

    SciTech Connect

    Shum, D.K.; Bryson, J.W.; Merkle, J.G.

    1993-09-01

    This study presents preliminary estimates on whether an shallow, axially oriented, inner-surface finite-length flaw in a PWR-RPV would tend to elongate in the axial direction and/or deepen into the wall of the vessel during a postulated PTS transient. Analysis results obtained based on the assumptions of (1) linear-elastic material response, and (2) cladding with same toughness as the base metal, indicate that a nearly semicircular flaw would likely propagate in the axial direction followed by propagation into the wall of the vessel. Note that these results correspond to initiation within the lower-shelf fracture toughness temperature range, and that their general validity within the lower-transition temperature range remains to be determined. The sensitivity of the numerical results aid conclusions to the following analysis assumptions are evaluated: (1) reference flaw geometry along the entire crack front and especially within the cladding region; (2) linear-elastic vs elastic-plastic description of material response; and (3) base-material-only vs bimaterial cladding-base vessel-model assumption. The sensitivity evaluation indicates that the analysis results are very sensitive to the above assumptions.

  15. [Definition of shock types].

    PubMed

    Adams, H A; Baumann, G; Gänsslen, A; Janssens, U; Knoefel, W; Koch, T; Marx, G; Müller-Werdan, U; Pape, H C; Prange, W; Roesner, D; Standl, T; Teske, W; Werner, G; Zander, R

    2001-11-01

    Definitions of shock types. Hypovolaemic shock is a state of insufficient perfusion of vital organs with consecutive imbalance of oxygen supply and demand due to an intravascular volume deficiency with critically impaired cardiac preload. Subtypes are haemorrhagic shock, hypovolaemic shock in the narrow sense, traumatic-haemorrhagic shock and traumatic-hypovolaemic shock. Cardiac shock is caused by a primary critical cardiac pump failure with consecutive inadequate oxygen supply of the organism. Anaphylactic shock is an acute failure of blood volume distribution (distributive shock) and caused by IgE-dependent, type-I-allergic, classical hypersensibility, or a physically, chemically, or osmotically induced IgE-independent anaphylactoid hypersensibility. The septic shock is a sepsis-induced distribution failure of the circulating blood volume in the sense of a distributive shock. The neurogenic shock is a distributive shock induced by generalized and extensive vasodilatation with consecutive hypovolaemia due to an imbalance of sympathetic and parasympathetic regulation of vascular smooth muscles. PMID:11753724

  16. Curved shock theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mölder, S.

    2016-07-01

    Curved shock theory (CST) is introduced, developed and applied to relate pressure gradients, streamline curvatures, vorticity and shock curvatures in flows with planar or axial symmetry. Explicit expressions are given, in an influence coefficient format, that relate post-shock pressure gradient, streamline curvature and vorticity to pre-shock gradients and shock curvature in steady flow. The effect of pre-shock flow divergence/convergence, on vorticity generation, is related to the transverse shock curvature. A novel derivation for the post-shock vorticity is presented that includes the effects of pre-shock flow non-uniformities. CST applicability to unsteady flows is discussed.

  17. A probabilistic Hu-Washizu variational principle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Belytschko, T.; Besterfield, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    A Probabilistic Hu-Washizu Variational Principle (PHWVP) for the Probabilistic Finite Element Method (PFEM) is presented. This formulation is developed for both linear and nonlinear elasticity. The PHWVP allows incorporation of the probabilistic distributions for the constitutive law, compatibility condition, equilibrium, domain and boundary conditions into the PFEM. Thus, a complete probabilistic analysis can be performed where all aspects of the problem are treated as random variables and/or fields. The Hu-Washizu variational formulation is available in many conventional finite element codes thereby enabling the straightforward inclusion of the probabilistic features into present codes.

  18. Localized shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Daniel A.; Stanford, Douglas; Susskind, Leonard

    2015-03-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, , where W x ( t) = e - iHt W x e iHt . Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in t. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  19. Overview of the Integrated Pressurized Thermal-Shock (IPTS) study

    SciTech Connect

    Cheverton, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    By the early 1980s, (PTS)-related, deterministic, vessel-integrity studies sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) indicated a potential for failure of some PWR vessels before design end of life, in the event of a postulated severe PTS transient. In response, the NRC established screening criteria, in the form of limiting values of the reference nil-ductility transition temperature (RT{sub NDT}), and initiated the development of a probabilistic methodology for evaluating vessel integrity. This latter effort, referred to as the Integrated Pressurized Thermal-Shock (IPTS) Program, included development of techniques for postulating PTS transients, estimating their frequencies, and calculating the probability of vessel failure for a specific transient. Summing the products of frequency of transient and conditional probability of failure for each of the many postulated transients provide a calculated value of the frequency of failure. The IPTS Program also included the application of the IPTS methodology to three US PWR plants (Oconee-1, Calvert Cliffs-1, and HBRobinson-2) and the specification of a maximum permissible value of the calculated frequency of vessel failure. Another important purpose of the IPTS study was to determine, through application of the IPTS methodology, which design and operating features, parameters, and PTS transients were dominant in affecting the calculated frequency of failure. The scope of the IPTS Program included the development of a probabilistic fracture-mechanics capability, modification of the TRAC and RELAP5 thermal/hydraulic codes, and development of the methodology for estimating the uncertainty in the calculated frequency of vessel failure.

  20. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Gaseous Argon Shock Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Morris, John; Sheffield, Stephen; Burkett, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The lack of published Argon gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Argon Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes never before reached. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 200-500 psi (0.025 - 0.056 g/cc) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/ μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Argon gas initially pressurized to 200-500 psi through Pagosa numerical hydrodynamic simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian hydrocode capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Argon gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, but note unanticipated differences in the ionization front temperatures.

  1. Weak and strong probabilistic solutions for a stochastic quasilinear parabolic equation with nonstandard growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Z. I.; Sango, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate a class of stochastic quasilinear parabolic initial boundary value problems with nonstandard growth in the functional setting of generalized Sobolev spaces. The deterministic version of the equation was first introduced and studied by Samokhin in [45] as a generalized model for polytropic filtration. We establish an existence result of weak probabilistic solutions when the forcing terms do not satisfy Lipschitz conditions. Under the Lipschitz property of the forcing terms, we obtain the uniqueness of weak probabilistic solutions. Combining the uniqueness and the famous Yamada-Watanabe result, we prove the existence of a unique strong probabilistic solution of the problem.

  2. Shock tubes and waves; Proceedings of the Thirteenth International Symposium, Niagara Falls, NY, July 6-9, 1981

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treanor, C. E.; Hall, J. G.

    1982-10-01

    The present conference on shock tubes and waves considers shock tube drivers, luminous shock tubes, shock tube temperature and pressure measurement, shock front distortion in real gases, nonlinear standing waves, transonic flow shock wave turbulent boundary interactions, wall roughness effects on reflected shock bifurcation, argon thermal conductivity, pattern generation in gaseous detonations, cylindrical resonators, shock tunnel-produced high gain lasers, fluid dynamic aspects of laser-metal interaction, and the ionization of argon gas behind reflected shock waves. Also discussed are the ionization relaxation of shock-heated plasmas and gases, discharge flow/shock tube studies of singlet oxygen, rotational and vibrational relaxation, chemiluminescence thermal and shock wave decomposition of hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen azide, shock wave structure in gas-particle mixtures at low Mach numbers, binary nucleation in a Ludwieg tube, shock liquefaction experiments, pipeline explosions, the shock wave ignition of pulverized coal, and shock-initiated methane combustion.

  3. Shock Prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The electrician pictured is installing a General Electric Ground Fault Interrupter (GFI), a device which provides protection against electrical shock in the home or in industrial facilities. Shocks due to defective wiring in home appliances or other electrical equipment can cause severe burns, even death. As a result, the National Electrical Code now requires GFIs in all new homes constructed. This particular type of GFI employs a sensing element which derives from technology acquired in space projects by SCI Systems, Inc., Huntsville, Alabama, producer of sensors for GE and other manufacturers of GFI equipment. The sensor is based on the company's experience in developing miniaturized circuitry for space telemetry and other spacecraft electrical systems; this experience enabled SCI to package interruptor circuitry in the extremely limited space available and to produce sensory devices at practicable cost. The tiny sensor measures the strength of the electrical current and detects current differentials that indicate a fault in the functioning of an electrical system. The sensing element then triggers a signal to a disconnect mechanism in the GFI, which cuts off the current in the faulty circuit.

  4. Probabilistic Flash Flood Forecasting using Stormscale Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J.; Gourley, J. J.; Kain, J. S.; Clark, A.; Novak, D.; Hong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Flash flooding is one of the most costly and deadly natural hazards in the US and across the globe. The loss of life and property from flash floods could be mitigated with better guidance from hydrological models, but these models have limitations. For example, they are commonly initialized using rainfall estimates derived from weather radars, but the time interval between observations of heavy rainfall and a flash flood can be on the order of minutes, particularly for small basins in urban settings. Increasing the lead time for these events is critical for protecting life and property. Therefore, this study advances the use of quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) from a stormscale NWP ensemble system into a distributed hydrological model setting to yield basin-specific, probabilistic flash flood forecasts (PFFFs). Rainfall error characteristics of the individual members are first diagnosed and quantified in terms of structure, amplitude, and location (SAL; Wernli et al., 2008). Amplitude and structure errors are readily correctable due to their diurnal nature, and the fine scales represented by the CAPS QPF members are consistent with radar-observed rainfall, mainly showing larger errors with afternoon convection. To account for the spatial uncertainty of the QPFs, we use an elliptic smoother, as in Marsh et al. (2012), to produce probabilistic QPFs (PQPFs). The elliptic smoother takes into consideration underdispersion, which is notoriously associated with stormscale ensembles, and thus, is good for targeting the approximate regions that may receive heavy rainfall. However, stormscale details contained in individual members are still needed to yield reasonable flash flood simulations. Therefore, on a case study basis, QPFs from individual members are then run through the hydrological model with their predicted structure and corrected amplitudes, but the locations of individual rainfall elements are perturbed within the PQPF elliptical regions using Monte

  5. Corotating shock structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogilvie, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of observed interplanetary shocks leads to the conclusion that a corotating forward shock has not been unambiguously identified at 1 AU. A reverse shock identified in September 1967 is a likely candidate for a corotating structure.

  6. What Is Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiogenic Shock? Cardiogenic (kar-dee-oh-JE-nik) shock is ... treated right away. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...

  7. Probabilistic Fracture Analysis of Functionally Graded Materials--Part I: Uncertainty and Probabilistic Analysis Method

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Junho; Nguyen, Tam H.; Paulino, Glaucio H.

    2008-02-15

    Probabilistic fracture analysis is performed for predicting uncertain fracture responses of Functionally Graded Material (FGM) structures. The uncertainties in material properties including Young's modulus and fracture toughness are considered. The limit state function for a crack initiation event is defined in terms of the J-integral for FGMs. The First-Order-Reliability-Method (FORM) is used in conjunction with a finite element code that computes the J-integral with high accuracy. A two-step probabilistic analysis procedure is proposed to investigate the effects of the uncertainties in the spatial distribution of Young's modulus on the probability of crack initiation in FGMs. First, we investigate the effects of the uncertainties in the shape of the spatial distribution by considering the slope and the location of the inflection point of a spatial distribution profile as random quantities. Second, we investigate the effects of the spatial fluctuations of Young's modulus by making use of a discretized random field. The companion paper (Part II) implements this method into a finite element fracture analysis code and presents numerical examples.

  8. SHOCK-EXCITED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Creveling, R.

    1957-12-17

    S> A shock-excited quartz crystal oscillator is described. The circuit was specifically designed for application in micro-time measuring work to provide an oscillator which immediately goes into oscillation upon receipt of a trigger pulse and abruptly ceases oscillation when a second pulse is received. To achieve the instant action, the crystal has a prestressing voltage applied across it. A monostable multivibrator receives the on and off trigger pulses and discharges a pulse through the crystal to initiate or terminate oscillation instantly.

  9. Probabilistic Assessment of Fracture Progression in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Minnetyan, Levon; Mauget, Bertrand; Huang, Dade; Addi, Frank

    1999-01-01

    This report describes methods and corresponding computer codes that are used to evaluate progressive damage and fracture and to perform probabilistic assessment in built-up composite structures. Structural response is assessed probabilistically, during progressive fracture. The effects of design variable uncertainties on structural fracture progression are quantified. The fast probability integrator (FPI) is used to assess the response scatter in the composite structure at damage initiation. The sensitivity of the damage response to design variables is computed. The methods are general purpose and are applicable to stitched and unstitched composites in all types of structures and fracture processes starting from damage initiation to unstable propagation and to global structure collapse. The methods are demonstrated for a polymer matrix composite stiffened panel subjected to pressure. The results indicated that composite constituent properties, fabrication parameters, and respective uncertainties have a significant effect on structural durability and reliability. Design implications with regard to damage progression, damage tolerance, and reliability of composite structures are examined.

  10. Developing Probabilistic Safety Performance Margins for Unknown and Underappreciated Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Allan; Dezfuli, Homayoon; Everett, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Probabilistic safety requirements currently formulated or proposed for space systems, nuclear reactor systems, nuclear weapon systems, and other types of systems that have a low-probability potential for high-consequence accidents depend on showing that the probability of such accidents is below a specified safety threshold or goal. Verification of compliance depends heavily upon synthetic modeling techniques such as PRA. To determine whether or not a system meets its probabilistic requirements, it is necessary to consider whether there are significant risks that are not fully considered in the PRA either because they are not known at the time or because their importance is not fully understood. The ultimate objective is to establish a reasonable margin to account for the difference between known risks and actual risks in attempting to validate compliance with a probabilistic safety threshold or goal. In this paper, we examine data accumulated over the past 60 years from the space program, from nuclear reactor experience, from aircraft systems, and from human reliability experience to formulate guidelines for estimating probabilistic margins to account for risks that are initially unknown or underappreciated. The formulation includes a review of the safety literature to identify the principal causes of such risks.

  11. Environmental probabilistic quantitative assessment methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, four petroleum resource assessment methodologies are presented as possible pollution assessment methodologies, even though petroleum as a resource is desirable, whereas pollution is undesirable. A methodology is defined in this paper to consist of a probability model and a probabilistic method, where the method is used to solve the model. The following four basic types of probability models are considered: 1) direct assessment, 2) accumulation size, 3) volumetric yield, and 4) reservoir engineering. Three of the four petroleum resource assessment methodologies were written as microcomputer systems, viz. TRIAGG for direct assessment, APRAS for accumulation size, and FASPU for reservoir engineering. A fourth microcomputer system termed PROBDIST supports the three assessment systems. The three assessment systems have different probability models but the same type of probabilistic method. The type of advantages of the analytic method are in computational speed and flexibility, making it ideal for a microcomputer. -from Author

  12. Shock wave control using liquid curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colvert, Brendan; Tao, Xingtian; Eliasson, Veronica

    2014-11-01

    The effectiveness of a planar wall of liquid as a blast mitigation device is examined using a shock tube and a custom-designed and -built shock test chamber. Experimental data collection methods being used include high-speed schlieren photography and high-frequency pressure sensors. During the relevant shock interaction time periods, the liquid-gas interface is examined to determine its effect on shock waves. The characteristic quantities that reflect these effects include reflected-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted-to-incident shock strength ratio, transmitted and reflected impulse, and peak pressure reduction. These parameters are examined for correlations to incident wave speed, liquid mass, liquid density, and liquid viscosity. Initial results have been obtained that show a correlation between fluid mass and peak pressure reduction. More experiments are being performed to further explore this relationship as well as examine the effects of altering the other parameters such as liquid-gas interface geometry and using dilatant fluids.

  13. Probabilistic Simulation for Nanocomposite Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Coroneos, Rula M.

    2007-01-01

    A unique probabilistic theory is described to predict the properties of nanocomposites. The simulation is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to simulate uniaxial strengths properties of a mononanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. These results show smooth distributions.

  14. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Yan, Feng-Li; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning. In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  15. Shock waves and nucleosynthesis in type II supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aufderheide, M. B.; Baron, E.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    1991-01-01

    In the study of nucleosynthesis in type II SN, shock waves are initiated artificially, since collapse calculations do not, as yet, give self-consistent shock waves strong enough to produce the SN explosion. The two initiation methods currently used by light-curve modelers are studied, with a focus on the peak temperatures and the nucleosynthetic yields in each method. The various parameters involved in artificially initiating a shock wave and the effects of varying these parameters are discussed.

  16. Distribution functions of probabilistic automata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatan, F.

    2001-01-01

    Each probabilistic automaton M over an alphabet A defines a probability measure Prob sub(M) on the set of all finite and infinite words over A. We can identify a k letter alphabet A with the set {0, 1,..., k-1}, and, hence, we can consider every finite or infinite word w over A as a radix k expansion of a real number X(w) in the interval [0, 1]. This makes X(w) a random variable and the distribution function of M is defined as usual: F(x) := Prob sub(M) { w: X(w) < x }. Utilizing the fixed-point semantics (denotational semantics), extended to probabilistic computations, we investigate the distribution functions of probabilistic automata in detail. Automata with continuous distribution functions are characterized. By a new, and much more easier method, it is shown that the distribution function F(x) is an analytic function if it is a polynomial. Finally, answering a question posed by D. Knuth and A. Yao, we show that a polynomial distribution function F(x) on [0, 1] can be generated by a prob abilistic automaton iff all the roots of F'(x) = 0 in this interval, if any, are rational numbers. For this, we define two dynamical systems on the set of polynomial distributions and study attracting fixed points of random composition of these two systems.

  17. Is this septic shock? A rare case of distributive shock.

    PubMed

    Val-Flores, Luis Silva; Fior, Alberto; Santos, Ana; Reis, Luís; Bento, Luís

    2014-01-01

    The authors report a rare case of shock in a patient without significant clinical history, admitted to the intensive care unit for suspected septic shock. The patient was initially treated with fluid therapy without improvement. A hypothesis of systemic capillary leak syndrome was postulated following the confirmation of severe hypoalbuminemia, hypotension, and hemoconcentration--a combination of three symptoms typical of the disease. The authors discussed the differential diagnosis and also conducted a review of the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:25607273

  18. Probabilistic Computational Methods in Structural Failure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejsa, Martin; Kralik, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    Probabilistic methods are used in engineering where a computational model contains random variables. Each random variable in the probabilistic calculations contains uncertainties. Typical sources of uncertainties are properties of the material and production and/or assembly inaccuracies in the geometry or the environment where the structure should be located. The paper is focused on methods for the calculations of failure probabilities in structural failure and reliability analysis with special attention on newly developed probabilistic method: Direct Optimized Probabilistic Calculation (DOProC), which is highly efficient in terms of calculation time and the accuracy of the solution. The novelty of the proposed method lies in an optimized numerical integration that does not require any simulation technique. The algorithm has been implemented in mentioned software applications, and has been used several times in probabilistic tasks and probabilistic reliability assessments.

  19. Probabilistic Aeroelastic Analysis of Turbomachinery Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, T. S. R.; Mital, S. K.; Stefko, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    A probabilistic approach is described for aeroelastic analysis of turbomachinery blade rows. Blade rows with subsonic flow and blade rows with supersonic flow with subsonic leading edge are considered. To demonstrate the probabilistic approach, the flutter frequency, damping and forced response of a blade row representing a compressor geometry is considered. The analysis accounts for uncertainties in structural and aerodynamic design variables. The results are presented in the form of probabilistic density function (PDF) and sensitivity factors. For subsonic flow cascade, comparisons are also made with different probabilistic distributions, probabilistic methods, and Monte-Carlo simulation. The approach shows that the probabilistic approach provides a more realistic and systematic way to assess the effect of uncertainties in design variables on the aeroelastic instabilities and response.

  20. Probabilistic models of language processing and acquisition.

    PubMed

    Chater, Nick; Manning, Christopher D

    2006-07-01

    Probabilistic methods are providing new explanatory approaches to fundamental cognitive science questions of how humans structure, process and acquire language. This review examines probabilistic models defined over traditional symbolic structures. Language comprehension and production involve probabilistic inference in such models; and acquisition involves choosing the best model, given innate constraints and linguistic and other input. Probabilistic models can account for the learning and processing of language, while maintaining the sophistication of symbolic models. A recent burgeoning of theoretical developments and online corpus creation has enabled large models to be tested, revealing probabilistic constraints in processing, undermining acquisition arguments based on a perceived poverty of the stimulus, and suggesting fruitful links with probabilistic theories of categorization and ambiguity resolution in perception.

  1. Potential impact of enhanced fracture-toughness data on pressurized-thermal-shock analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Theiss, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program is involved with the generation of enhanced'' fracture-initiation toughness and fracture-arrest toughness data of prototypic nuclear reactor vessel steels. These two sets of data are enhanced because they have distinguishing characteristics that could potentially impact PWR pressure vessel integrity assessments for the pressurized-thermal shock (PTS) loading condition which is a major plant-life extension issue to be confronted in the 1990's. Currently, the HSST Program is planning experiments to verify and quantify, for A533B steel, the distinguishing characteristic of elevated initiation-fracture toughness for shallow flaws which has been observed for other steels. Deterministic and probabilistic fracture-mechanics analyses were performed to examine the influence of the enhanced initiation and arrest fracture-toughness data on the cleavage fracture response of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel subjected to PTS loading. The results of the analyses indicated that application of the enhanced K{sub Ia} data does reduce the conditional probability of failure P(F{vert bar}E); however, it does not appear to have the potential to significantly impact the results of PTS analyses. The application of enhanced fracture-initiation-toughness data for shallow flaws also reduces P(F{vert bar}E), but it does appear to have a potential for significantly affecting the results of PTS analyses. The effect of including Type I warm prestress in probabilistic fracture-mechanics analyses is beneficial. The benefit is transient dependent and, in some cases, can be quite significant. 19 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Coherent Raman Studies of Shocked Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, Shawn; Brown, Kathryn; Dang, Nhan; Bolme, Cynthia; Moore, David

    2013-06-01

    Transient vibrational spectroscopies offer the potential to directly observe time dependent shock induced chemical reaction kinetics. We report recent experiments that couple a hybrid picosecond/femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) diagnostic with our tabletop ultrafast laser driven shock platform. Initial results on liquids shocked to 20 GPa suggest that sub-picosecond dephasing at high pressure and temperature may limit the application of this nonresonant background free version of CARS. Initial results using interferometric CARS to increase sensitivity and overcome these limitations will be presented.

  3. Probabilistic properties of the Curve Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowska, Agnieszka; Banasik, Kazimierz; Kohnova, Silvia; Karabova, Beata

    2013-04-01

    The determination of the Curve Number (CN) is fundamental for the hydrological rainfall-runoff SCS-CN method which assesses the runoff volume in small catchments. The CN depends on geomorphologic and physiographic properties of the catchment and traditionally it is assumed to be constant for each catchment. Many practitioners and researchers observe, however, that the parameter is characterized by a variability. This sometimes causes inconsistency in the river discharge prediction using the SCS-CN model. Hence probabilistic and statistical methods are advisable to investigate the CN as a random variable and to complement and improve the deterministic model. The results that will be presented contain determination of the probabilistic properties of the CNs for various Slovakian and Polish catchments using statistical methods. The detailed study concerns the description of empirical distributions (characteristics, QQ-plots and coefficients of goodness of fit, histograms), testing of the statistical hypotheses about some theoretical distributions (Kolmogorov-Smirnow, Anderson-Darling, Cramer-von Mises, χ2, Shapiro-Wilk), construction of confidence intervals and comparisons among catchments. The relationship between confidence intervals and the ARC soil classification will also be performed. The comparison between the border values of the confidence intervals and the ARC I and ARC III conditions is crucial for further modeling. The study of the response of the catchment to the stormy rainfall depth when the variability of the CN arises is also of special interest. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The investigation described in the contribution has been initiated by first Author research visit to Technical University of Bratislava in 2012 within a STSM of the COST Action ES0901. Data used here have been provided by research project no. N N305 396238 founded by PL-Ministry of Science and Higher Education. The support provided by the organizations is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. Particle Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, Masaru; Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru

    2015-04-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles. One of the most plausible acceleration mechanisms is the first order Fermi acceleration in which non-thermal particles statistically gain energy while scattered by MHD turbulence both upstream and downstream of a shock. Indeed, X-ray emission from energetic particles accelerated at supernova remnant shocks is often observed [e.g., Uchiyama et al., 2007]. Most of the previous studies on shock acceleration assume the presence of a single shock. In space, however, two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. For instance, it is observed that a CME (coronal mass ejection) driven shock collides with the earth's bow shock [Hietala et al., 2011], or interplanetary shocks pass through the heliospheric termination shock [Lu et al., 1999]. Colliding shocks are observed also in high power laser experiments [Morita et al., 2013]. It is expected that shock-shock interactions efficiently produce high energy particles. A previous work using hybrid simulation [Cargill et al., 1986] reports efficient ion acceleration when supercritical two shocks collide. In the hybrid simulation, however, the electron dynamics cannot be resolved so that electron acceleration cannot be discussed in principle. Here, we perform one-dimensional full Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to examine colliding two symmetric oblique shocks and the associated electron acceleration. In particular, the following three points are discussed in detail. 1. Energetic electrons are observed upstream of the two shocks before their collision. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). 2. The reflected electrons excite large amplitude upstream waves. Electron beam cyclotron instability [Hasegawa, 1975] and electron fire hose instability [Li et al., 2000] appear to occur. 3. The large amplitude waves can scatters energetic electrons in

  5. Probabilistic cloning of three nonorthogonal states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Rui, Pinshu; Yang, Qun; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Ziyun

    2015-04-01

    We study the probabilistic cloning of three nonorthogonal states with equal success probabilities. For simplicity, we assume that the three states belong to a special set. Analytical form of the maximal success probability for probabilistic cloning is calculated. With the maximal success probability, we deduce the explicit form of probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the case of cloning, we get the unambiguous form of the unitary operation. It is demonstrated that the upper bound for probabilistic quantum cloning machine in (Qiu in J Phys A 35:6931, 2002) can be reached only if the three states are equidistant.

  6. Probabilistic Planning with Imperfect Sensing Actions Using Hybrid Probabilistic Logic Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Emad

    Effective planning in uncertain environment is important to agents and multi-agents systems. In this paper, we introduce a new logic based approach to probabilistic contingent planning (probabilistic planning with imperfect sensing actions), by relating probabilistic contingent planning to normal hybrid probabilistic logic programs with probabilistic answer set semantics [24]. We show that any probabilistic contingent planning problem can be encoded as a normal hybrid probabilistic logic program. We formally prove the correctness of our approach. Moreover, we show that the complexity of finding a probabilistic contingent plan in our approach is NP-complete. In addition, we show that any probabilistic contingent planning problem, \\cal PP, can be encoded as a classical normal logic program with answer set semantics, whose answer sets corresponds to valid trajectories in \\cal PP. We show that probabilistic contingent planning problems can be encoded as SAT problems. We present a new high level probabilistic action description language that allows the representation of sensing actions with probabilistic outcomes.

  7. Numerical simulations of shocks encountering clumpy regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alūzas, R.; Pittard, J. M.; Hartquist, T. W.; Falle, S. A. E. G.; Langton, R.

    2012-09-01

    We present numerical simulations of the adiabatic interaction of a shock with a clumpy region containing many individual clouds. Our work incorporates a sub-grid turbulence model which for the first time makes this investigation feasible. We vary the Mach number of the shock, the density contrast of the clouds and the ratio of total cloud mass to intercloud mass within the clumpy region. Cloud material becomes incorporated into the flow. This 'mass loading' reduces the Mach number of the shock and leads to the formation of a dense shell. In cases in which the mass loading is sufficient the flow slows enough that the shock degenerates into a wave. The interaction evolves through up to four stages: initially the shock decelerates; then its speed is nearly constant; next the shock accelerates as it leaves the clumpy region; finally, it moves at a constant speed close to its initial speed. Turbulence is generated in the post-shock flow as the shock sweeps through the clumpy region. Clouds exposed to turbulence can be destroyed more rapidly than a similar cloud in an 'isolated' environment. The lifetime of a downstream cloud decreases with increasing cloud-to-intercloud mass ratio. We briefly discuss the significance of these results for starburst superwinds and galaxy evolution.

  8. Shock experiments on maskelynite-bearing anorthosite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, P.; Grieve, R. A. F.

    1984-01-01

    A series of shock recovery experiments over 9.9-60.4 GPa have been carried out on naturally shocked anorthosite from the Mistastin impact structure in Labrador consisting primarily of diaplectic plagioclase glass or maskelynite, An(50), and pyroxene. Petrographic observations of the experimental products indicate that the component minerals and diaplectic glasses generally retained their initial character throughout, the only exception being the increase in fracturing which occurred in the 9.9 GPa shot. Reshocking at pressures higher than the initial shock tends to lower the refractive index of maskelynite. The increase in refractive index of maskelynite reshocked to pressures lower than the initial pressure is interpreted as due to shock densification of the diaplectic glass above the Hugoniot elastic limit and below the mixed phase regime. The data suggest that the low-high-low density transition of maskelynite occurs about 8 GPa below that of the crystal of corresponding composition.

  9. Probabilistic Simulation for Nanocomposite Fracture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2010-01-01

    A unique probabilistic theory is described to predict the uniaxial strengths and fracture properties of nanocomposites. The simulation is based on composite micromechanics with progressive substructuring down to a nanoscale slice of a nanofiber where all the governing equations are formulated. These equations have been programmed in a computer code. That computer code is used to simulate uniaxial strengths and fracture of a nanofiber laminate. The results are presented graphically and discussed with respect to their practical significance. These results show smooth distributions from low probability to high.

  10. Probabilistic risk assessment: Number 219

    SciTech Connect

    Bari, R.A.

    1985-11-13

    This report describes a methodology for analyzing the safety of nuclear power plants. A historical overview of plants in the US is provided, and past, present, and future nuclear safety and risk assessment are discussed. A primer on nuclear power plants is provided with a discussion of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) and their operation and containment. Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), utilizing both event-tree and fault-tree analysis, is discussed as a tool in reactor safety, decision making, and communications. (FI)

  11. Probabilistic analysis of cascade failure dynamics in complex network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ding-Xue; Zhao, Dan; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Yonghong; Chi, Ming; Zheng, Gui-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The impact of initial load and tolerance parameter distribution on cascade failure is investigated. By using mean field theory, a probabilistic cascade failure model is established. Based on the model, the damage caused by certain attack size can be predicted, and the critical attack size is derived by the condition of cascade failure end, which ensures no collapse. The critical attack size is larger than the case of constant tolerance parameter for network of random distribution. Comparing three typical distributions, simulation results indicate that the network whose initial load and tolerance parameter both follow Weibull distribution performs better than others.

  12. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    SciTech Connect

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-30

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may be interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.

  13. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    DOE PAGES

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-30

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may bemore » interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.« less

  14. Transient shocks beyond the heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermo, R. L.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2015-09-01

    The heliopause is a rich, dynamic surface affected by the time-dependent solar wind. Stream interactions due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs), corotating interaction regions (CIRs), and other transient phenomena are known to merge producing global merged interaction regions (GMIRs). Numerical simulations of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM) show that GMIRs, as well other time-dependent structures in the solar wind, may produce compression/rarefaction waves and shocks in the LISM behind the heliopause. These shocks may initiate wave activity observed by the Voyager spacecraft. The magnetometer onboard Voyager 1 indeed observed a few structures that may be interpreted as shocks. We present numerical simulations of such shocks in the year of 2000, when both Voyager spacecraft were in the supersonic solar wind region, and in 2012, when Voyager 1 observed traveling shocks. In the former case, Voyager observations themselves provide time- dependent boundary conditions in the solar wind. In the latter case, we use OMNI data at 1 AU to analyze the plasma and magnetic field behavior after Voyager 1 crossed the heliospheric boundary. Numerical results are compared with spacecraft observations.

  15. Survival of carbon grains in shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seab, C. Gregory

    1990-01-01

    Supernova shocks play a significant part in the life of an interstellar grain. In a typical 10 to the 9th power year lifetime, a grain will be hit by an average of 10 shocks of 100 km s(sup -1) or greater velocity, and even more shocks of lower velocity. Evaluation of the results of this frequent shock processing is complicated by a number of uncertainties, but seems to give about 10 percent destruction of silicate grains and about half that for graphite grains. Because of the frequency of shocking, the mineralogy and sizes of the grain population is predominately determined by shock processing effects, and not by the initial grain nucleation and growth environment. One consequence of the significant role played by interstellar shocks is that a certain fraction (up to 5 percent) of the carbon should be transformed into the diamond phase. Diamond transformation is observed in the laboratory at threshold shock pressures easily obtainable in grain-grain collisions in supernova shocks. Yields for transforming graphite, amorphous carbon, glassy carbon, and other nearly pure carbon solids into diamond are quite high. Impurities up to at least the 10 percent level (for oxygen) are tolerated in the process. The typical size diamond expected from shock transformation agrees well with the observed sizes in the Lewis et al. findings in meteoritic material. Isotropic anomalies already contained in the grain are likely to be retained through the conversion process, while others may be implanted by the shock if the grain is close to the supernova. The meteoritic diamonds are likely to be the results of transformation of carbon grains in grain-grain collisions in supernova shock waves.

  16. Development of Probabilistic Structural Analysis Integrated with Manufacturing Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, Shantaram S.; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    An effort has been initiated to integrate manufacturing process simulations with probabilistic structural analyses in order to capture the important impacts of manufacturing uncertainties on component stress levels and life. Two physics-based manufacturing process models (one for powdered metal forging and the other for annular deformation resistance welding) have been linked to the NESSUS structural analysis code. This paper describes the methodology developed to perform this integration including several examples. Although this effort is still underway, particularly for full integration of a probabilistic analysis, the progress to date has been encouraging and a software interface that implements the methodology has been developed. The purpose of this paper is to report this preliminary development.

  17. Use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment in Shuttle Decision Making Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Roger L.; Hamlin, Teri, L.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to assist in the decision making for the shuttle design and operation. Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is a comprehensive, structured, and disciplined approach to identifying and analyzing risk in complex systems and/or processes that seeks answers to three basic questions: (i.e., what can go wrong? what is the likelihood of these occurring? and what are the consequences that could result if these occur?) The purpose of the Shuttle PRA (SPRA) is to provide a useful risk management tool for the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) to identify strengths and possible weaknesses in the Shuttle design and operation. SPRA was initially developed to support upgrade decisions, but has evolved into a tool that supports Flight Readiness Reviews (FRR) and near real-time flight decisions. Examples of the use of PRA for the shuttle are reviewed.

  18. Software for Probabilistic Risk Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry; Madsen, Soren; Chapin, Elaine; Rodriguez, Ernesto

    2004-01-01

    A computer program implements a methodology, denoted probabilistic risk reduction, that is intended to aid in planning the development of complex software and/or hardware systems. This methodology integrates two complementary prior methodologies: (1) that of probabilistic risk assessment and (2) a risk-based planning methodology, implemented in a prior computer program known as Defect Detection and Prevention (DDP), in which multiple requirements and the beneficial effects of risk-mitigation actions are taken into account. The present methodology and the software are able to accommodate both process knowledge (notably of the efficacy of development practices) and product knowledge (notably of the logical structure of a system, the development of which one seeks to plan). Estimates of the costs and benefits of a planned development can be derived. Functional and non-functional aspects of software can be taken into account, and trades made among them. It becomes possible to optimize the planning process in the sense that it becomes possible to select the best suite of process steps and design choices to maximize the expectation of success while remaining within budget.

  19. Probabilistic analysis of tsunami hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, E.L.; Parsons, T.

    2006-01-01

    Determining the likelihood of a disaster is a key component of any comprehensive hazard assessment. This is particularly true for tsunamis, even though most tsunami hazard assessments have in the past relied on scenario or deterministic type models. We discuss probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA) from the standpoint of integrating computational methods with empirical analysis of past tsunami runup. PTHA is derived from probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), with the main difference being that PTHA must account for far-field sources. The computational methods rely on numerical tsunami propagation models rather than empirical attenuation relationships as in PSHA in determining ground motions. Because a number of source parameters affect local tsunami runup height, PTHA can become complex and computationally intensive. Empirical analysis can function in one of two ways, depending on the length and completeness of the tsunami catalog. For site-specific studies where there is sufficient tsunami runup data available, hazard curves can primarily be derived from empirical analysis, with computational methods used to highlight deficiencies in the tsunami catalog. For region-wide analyses and sites where there are little to no tsunami data, a computationally based method such as Monte Carlo simulation is the primary method to establish tsunami hazards. Two case studies that describe how computational and empirical methods can be integrated are presented for Acapulco, Mexico (site-specific) and the U.S. Pacific Northwest coastline (region-wide analysis).

  20. Is Probabilistic Evidence a Source of Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Ori; Turri, John

    2015-01-01

    We report a series of experiments examining whether people ascribe knowledge for true beliefs based on probabilistic evidence. Participants were less likely to ascribe knowledge for beliefs based on probabilistic evidence than for beliefs based on perceptual evidence (Experiments 1 and 2A) or testimony providing causal information (Experiment 2B).…

  1. Probabilistic Cue Combination: Less Is More

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurovsky, Daniel; Boyer, Ty W.; Smith, Linda B.; Yu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Learning about the structure of the world requires learning probabilistic relationships: rules in which cues do not predict outcomes with certainty. However, in some cases, the ability to track probabilistic relationships is a handicap, leading adults to perform non-normatively in prediction tasks. For example, in the "dilution effect,"…

  2. Error Discounting in Probabilistic Category Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Stewart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Little, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    The assumption in some current theories of probabilistic categorization is that people gradually attenuate their learning in response to unavoidable error. However, existing evidence for this error discounting is sparse and open to alternative interpretations. We report 2 probabilistic-categorization experiments in which we investigated error…

  3. Pyrotechnic shock at the orbiter/external tank forward attachment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, W. F.; Grissom, D. S.; Rhodes, L. R.

    1980-01-01

    During the initial certification test of the forward structural attachment of the space shuttle orbiter to the external tank, pyrotechnic shock from actuation of the separation device resulted in structural failure of the thermal protection tiles surrounding the attachment. Because of the high shock associated with the separation bolt, the development of alternative low shock separation designs was initiated. Two concepts that incorporate a 5.08 centimeter frangible nut as the release device were developed and tested.

  4. Shock desensitizing of solid explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William C

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shock wave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in testing these ideas.

  5. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, Jean; Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.; Fenton, Flavio H.

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one-dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 106 simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation.

  6. Shock-induced termination of reentrant cardiac arrhythmias: Comparing monophasic and biphasic shock protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Bragard, Jean Simic, Ana; Elorza, Jorge; Grigoriev, Roman O.; Fenton, Flavio H.; Cherry, Elizabeth M.; Gilmour, Robert F.; Otani, Niels F.

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we compare quantitatively the efficiency of three different protocols commonly used in commercial defibrillators. These are based on monophasic and both symmetric and asymmetric biphasic shocks. A numerical one–dimensional model of cardiac tissue using the bidomain formulation is used in order to test the different protocols. In particular, we performed a total of 4.8 × 10{sup 6} simulations by varying shock waveform, shock energy, initial conditions, and heterogeneity in internal electrical conductivity. Whenever the shock successfully removed the reentrant dynamics in the tissue, we classified the mechanism. The analysis of the numerical data shows that biphasic shocks are significantly more efficient (by about 25%) than the corresponding monophasic ones. We determine that the increase in efficiency of the biphasic shocks can be explained by the higher proportion of newly excited tissue through the mechanism of direct activation.

  7. Is probabilistic evidence a source of knowledge?

    PubMed

    Friedman, Ori; Turri, John

    2015-07-01

    We report a series of experiments examining whether people ascribe knowledge for true beliefs based on probabilistic evidence. Participants were less likely to ascribe knowledge for beliefs based on probabilistic evidence than for beliefs based on perceptual evidence (Experiments 1 and 2A) or testimony providing causal information (Experiment 2B). Denial of knowledge for beliefs based on probabilistic evidence did not arise because participants viewed such beliefs as unjustified, nor because such beliefs leave open the possibility of error. These findings rule out traditional philosophical accounts for why probabilistic evidence does not produce knowledge. The experiments instead suggest that people deny knowledge because they distrust drawing conclusions about an individual based on reasoning about the population to which it belongs, a tendency previously identified by "judgment and decision making" researchers. Consistent with this, participants were more willing to ascribe knowledge for beliefs based on probabilistic evidence that is specific to a particular case (Experiments 3A and 3B).

  8. Probabilistic seismic demand analysis of nonlinear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shome, Nilesh

    Recent earthquakes in California have initiated improvement in current design philosophy and at present the civil engineering community is working towards development of performance-based earthquake engineering of structures. The objective of this study is to develop efficient, but accurate procedures for probabilistic analysis of nonlinear seismic behavior of structures. The proposed procedures help the near-term development of seismic-building assessments which require an estimation of seismic demand at a given intensity level. We also develop procedures to estimate the probability of exceedance of any specified nonlinear response level due to future ground motions at a specific site. This is referred as Probabilistic Seismic Demand Analysis (PSDA). The latter procedure prepares the way for the next stage development of seismic assessment that consider the uncertainties in nonlinear response and capacity. The proposed procedures require structure-specific nonlinear analyses for a relatively small set of recorded accelerograms and (site-specific or USGS-map-like) seismic hazard analyses. We have addressed some of the important issues of nonlinear seismic demand analysis, which are selection of records for structural analysis, the number of records to be used, scaling of records, etc. Initially these issues are studied through nonlinear analysis of structures for a number of magnitude-distance bins of records. Subsequently we introduce regression analysis of response results against spectral acceleration, magnitude, duration, etc., which helps to resolve these issues more systematically. We illustrate the demand-hazard calculations through two major example problems: a 5story and a 20-story SMRF building. Several simple, but quite accurate closed-form solutions have also been proposed to expedite the demand-hazard calculations. We find that vector-valued (e.g., 2-D) PSDA estimates demand hazard more accurately. This procedure, however, requires information about 2

  9. Characterization of Shocked Beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Cady, Carl M; Adams, Chris D; Hull, Lawrence M; Gray III, George T; Prime, Michael B; Addessio, Francis L; Wynn, Thomas A; Brown, Eric N

    2012-08-24

    accelerate the material. Preliminary analysis of the results appears to indicate that, if fractured by the initial shock loading, the S200F Be remains sufficiently intact to support a shear stress following partial release and subsequent shock re-loading of the material. Additional 'arrested' drive shots were designed and tested to minimize the reflected tensile pulse in the sample. These tests were done to both validate the model and to put large shock induced compressive loads into the beryllium sample.

  10. Shock waves and shock tubes; Proceedings of the Fifteenth International Symposium, Berkeley, CA, July 28-August 2, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bershader, D. (Editor); Hanson, R. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A detailed survey is presented of shock tube experiments, theoretical developments, and applications being carried out worldwide. The discussions explore shock tube physics and the related chemical, physical and biological science and technology. Extensive attention is devoted to shock wave phenomena in dusty gases and other multiphase and heterogeneous systems, including chemically reactive mixtures. Consideration is given to techniques for measuring, visualizing and theoretically modeling flowfield, shock wave and rarefaction wave characteristics. Numerical modeling is explored in terms of the application of computational fluid dynamics techniques to describing flowfields in shock tubes. Shock interactions and propagation, in both solids, fluids, gases and mixed media are investigated, along with the behavior of shocks in condensed matter. Finally, chemical reactions that are initiated as the result of passage of a shock wave are discussed, together with methods of controlling the evolution of laminar separated flows at concave corners on advanced reentry vehicles.

  11. Shock finding on a moving mesh - I. Shock statistics in non-radiative cosmological simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaal, Kevin; Springel, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Cosmological shock waves play an important role in hierarchical structure formation by dissipating and thermalizing kinetic energy of gas flows, thereby heating the Universe. Furthermore, identifying shocks in hydrodynamical simulations and measuring their Mach number accurately are critical for calculating the production of non-thermal particle components through diffusive shock acceleration. However, shocks are often significantly broadened in numerical simulations, making it challenging to implement an accurate shock finder. We here introduce a refined methodology for detecting shocks in the moving-mesh code AREPO, and show that results for shock statistics can be sensitive to implementation details. We put special emphasis on filtering against spurious shock detections due to tangential discontinuities and contacts. Both of them are omnipresent in cosmological simulations, for example in the form of shear-induced Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities and cold fronts. As an initial application of our new implementation, we analyse shock statistics in non-radiative cosmological simulations of dark matter and baryons. We find that the bulk of energy dissipation at redshift zero occurs in shocks with Mach numbers around M≈ 2.7. Furthermore, almost 40 per cent of the thermalization is contributed by shocks in the warm hot intergalactic medium, whereas ≈60 per cent occurs in clusters, groups, and smaller haloes. Compared to previous studies, these findings revise the characterization of the most important shocks towards higher Mach numbers and lower density structures. Our results also suggest that regions with densities above and below δb = 100 should be roughly equally important for the energetics of cosmic ray acceleration through large-scale structure shocks.

  12. Shock Properties of AION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazamias, James; Fiske, S. J.; Bless, Stephan

    2001-06-01

    Transparent materials have many applications for impact protection. The modeling of transparent ceramics relies heavily on a description of failure of these materials under compressive loads, generally derived from experience with opaque ceramics. However, the microstructural properties that are responsible for transparency also imply that sites for stress concentrations are much reduced when a medium is transparent. Recently there has been increasing interest in aluminum oxynitride (AlON, transparent alumina) which possesses isotropic optical and mechanic properties. We performed a series of plate impact experiments on the material. We observed an HEL of 11.0 to 11.4 GPa. We also observed a change in spall strength from 1.7 to .15 GPa as the initial shock was increased from 4.8 to 10.0 GPa.

  13. Formulation of probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail using the reference ratio method.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Jan B; Andreetta, Christian; Boomsma, Wouter; Bottaro, Sandro; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Frellsen, Jes; Mardia, Kanti V; Tian, Pengfei; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method to formulate probabilistic models of protein structure in atomic detail, for a given amino acid sequence, based on Bayesian principles, while retaining a close link to physics. We start from two previously developed probabilistic models of protein structure on a local length scale, which concern the dihedral angles in main chain and side chains, respectively. Conceptually, this constitutes a probabilistic and continuous alternative to the use of discrete fragment and rotamer libraries. The local model is combined with a nonlocal model that involves a small number of energy terms according to a physical force field, and some information on the overall secondary structure content. In this initial study we focus on the formulation of the joint model and the evaluation of the use of an energy vector as a descriptor of a protein's nonlocal structure; hence, we derive the parameters of the nonlocal model from the native structure without loss of generality. The local and nonlocal models are combined using the reference ratio method, which is a well-justified probabilistic construction. For evaluation, we use the resulting joint models to predict the structure of four proteins. The results indicate that the proposed method and the probabilistic models show considerable promise for probabilistic protein structure prediction and related applications.

  14. Miniature shock tube for laser driven shocks.

    PubMed

    Busquet, Michel; Barroso, Patrice; Melse, Thierry; Bauduin, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    We describe in this paper the design of a miniature shock tube (smaller than 1 cm(3)) that can be placed in a vacuum vessel and allows transverse optical probing and longitudinal backside extreme ultraviolet emission spectroscopy in the 100-500 A range. Typical application is the study of laser launched radiative shocks, in the framework of what is called "laboratory astrophysics."

  15. Shock & Anaphylactic Shock. Learning Activity Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hime, Kirsten

    This learning activity package on shock and anaphylactic shock is one of a series of 12 titles developed for use in health occupations education programs. Materials in the package include objectives, a list of materials needed, information sheets, reviews (self evaluations) of portions of the content, and answers to reviews. These topics are…

  16. Understanding the Shock in "Culture Shock."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnell, Jim

    "Culture shock" is the expression generally associated with the frustrations that occur when persons have difficulty functioning in a different culture or when persons are exposed to individuals from another culture. Culture shock typically occurs in a 4-stage process that can unfold over varying lengths of time: the honeymoon, crisis, resolution,…

  17. Shock-induced arrhythmogenesis in the myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trayanova, Natalia; Eason, James

    2002-09-01

    The focus of this article is the investigation of the electrical behavior of the normal myocardium following the delivery of high-strength defibrillation shocks. To achieve its goal, the study employs a complex three-dimensional defibrillation model of a slice of the canine heart characterized with realistic geometry and fiber architecture. Defibrillation shocks of various strengths and electrode configurations are delivered to the model preparation in which a sustained ventricular tachycardia is induced. Instead of analyzing the post-shock electrical events as progressions of transmembrane potential maps, the study examines the evolution of the postshock phase singularities (PSs) which represent the organizing centers of reentry. The simulation results demonstrate that the shock induces numerous PSs the majority of which vanish before the reentrant wavefronts associated with them complete half of a single rotation. Failed shocks are characterized with one or more PSs that survive the initial period of PS annihilation to establish a new postshock arrhythmia. The increase in shock strength results in an overall decrease of the number of PSs that survive over 200 ms after the end of the shock; however, the exact behavior of the PSs is strongly dependent on the shock electrode configuration.

  18. Weak shock wave reflection from concave surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Sebastien; Skews, Beric

    2013-07-01

    The reflection of very weak shock waves from concave curved surfaces has not been well documented in the past, and recent studies have shown the possible existence of a variation in the accepted reflection configuration evolution as a shock wave encounters an increasing gradient on the reflecting surface. The current study set out to investigate this anomaly using high-resolution photography. Shock tube tests were done on various concave circular and parabolic geometries, all with zero initial ramp angle. Although the results have limitations due to the achievable image resolution, the results indicate that for very weak Mach numbers, M S < 1.1, there may be a region in which the reflection configuration resembles that of a regular reflection, unlike for the stronger shock wave case. This region exists after the triple point of the Mach reflection meets the reflecting surface and prior to the formation of the additional shock structures that represent a transitioned regular reflection. The Mach and transitioned regular reflections at 1.03 < M s < 1.05 also exhibit no signs of a visible shear layer, or a clear discontinuity at the triple point, and are thus also apparently different in the weak shock regime than what has been described for stronger shocks, similar to what has been shown for weak shocks reflecting off a plane wedge.

  19. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Vinci, T.; Boireau, L.; Koenig, M.; Bouquet, S.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Osaki, N.; Herpe, G.; Falize, E.; Loupias, B.; Atzeni, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the radiative shock from both theoretical and numerical points of view. It is based on the whole experimental results obtained at Laboratoire d'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI, École Polytechnique). Radiative shocks are high-Mach number shocks with a strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. These shocks are involved in various astrophysical systems: stellar accretion shocks, pulsating stars, interaction between supernovae and the interstellar medium. In laboratory, these radiative shocks are generated using high power lasers. New diagnostics have been implemented to study the geometrical shape of the shock and the front shock density. Data were obtained varying initial conditions for different laser intensities and temperature. The modeling of these phenomena is mainly performed through numerical simulations (1D and 2D) and analytical studies. We exhibit results obtained from several radiative hydrodynamics codes. As a result, it is possible to discuss about the influence of the geometry and physical parameters introduced in the 1D and 2D models.

  20. Understanding cardiogenic shock: a nursing approach to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Warise, Lita

    2015-01-01

    Shock is a common complication associated with cardiac hospitalization post-myocardial infarction. Although shock is considered a physiologic response rather than a disease state, the lack of adequate pumping function leads to decreased tissue perfusion and initiation of the general shock response. Regardless of the etiology, the effects of shock are the same. Shock is essentially a widespread impairment of cellular metabolism, specifically, resulting from anaerobic metabolism related to inadequate tissue oxygenation leading to tissue dysfunction and necrosis. The purpose of this article is based on an actual clinical case study, precipitating factors, pathophysiology, common medical diagnosis and therapy, and nursing implications. PMID:25650490

  1. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  2. Toxic shock syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... of toxic shock syndrome involved women who used tampons during their periods (menstruation). However, today less than half of cases are linked to tampon use. Toxic shock syndrome can also occur with ...

  3. Probabilistic cloning of equidistant states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Roa, Luis; Delgado, A.

    2010-08-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of equidistant states. These states are such that the inner product between them is a complex constant or its conjugate. Thereby, it is possible to study their cloning in a simple way. In particular, we are interested in the behavior of the cloning probability as a function of the phase of the overlap among the involved states. We show that for certain families of equidistant states Duan and Guo's cloning machine leads to cloning probabilities lower than the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability of equidistant states. We propose an alternative cloning machine whose cloning probability is higher than or equal to the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability for any family of equidistant states. Both machines achieve the same probability for equidistant states whose inner product is a positive real number.

  4. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Program (FATIG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalopoulos, Constantine

    2012-01-01

    FATIG computes fatigue damage/fatigue life using the stress rms (root mean square) value, the total number of cycles, and S-N curve parameters. The damage is computed by the following methods: (a) traditional method using Miner s rule with stress cycles determined from a Rayleigh distribution up to 3*sigma; and (b) classical fatigue damage formula involving the Gamma function, which is derived from the integral version of Miner's rule. The integration is carried out over all stress amplitudes. This software solves the problem of probabilistic fatigue damage using the integral form of the Palmgren-Miner rule. The software computes fatigue life using an approach involving all stress amplitudes, up to N*sigma, as specified by the user. It can be used in the design of structural components subjected to random dynamic loading, or by any stress analyst with minimal training for fatigue life estimates of structural components.

  5. Introducing a probabilistic Budyko framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, P.; Gudmundsson, L.; Orlowsky, B.; Seneviratne, S. I.

    2015-04-01

    Water availability is of importance for a wide range of ecological, climatological, and socioeconomic applications. Over land, the partitioning of precipitation into evapotranspiration and runoff essentially determines the availability of water. At mean annual catchment scales, the widely used Budyko framework provides a simple, deterministic, first-order relationship to estimate this partitioning as a function of the prevailing climatic conditions. Here we extend the framework by introducing a method to specify probabilistic estimates of water availability that account for the nonlinearity of the underlying phase space. The new framework allows to evaluate the predictability of water availability that is related to varying catchment characteristics and conditional on the underlying climatic conditions. Corresponding results support the practical experience of low predictability of river runoff in transitional climates.

  6. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    S. S. Lutz; W. D. Turley; P. M. Rightley; L. E. Primas

    2001-06-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  7. Gated IR Images of Shocked Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Stephen S.; Turley, W. Dale; Rightley, Paul M.; Primas, Lori E.

    2002-07-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several surfaces were modeled using CTH, a 2- or 3-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  8. Gated IR images of shocked surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, S. S.; Turley, W. D.; Rightley, P. M.; Primas, L. E.

    2001-01-01

    Gated infrared (IR) images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin. Metal coupons machined with steps and flats were mounted directly to the high explosive. The explosive was point-initiated and 500-ns to 1-microsecond-wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb camera (SBF-134). Spatial distributions of surface radiance were extracted from the images of the shocked samples and found to be non-single-valued. Several geometries were modeled using CTH, a two-dimensional Eulerian hydrocode.

  9. Biomass shock pretreatment

    DOEpatents

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  10. Development of probabilistic multimedia multipathway computer codes.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; LePoire, D.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Arnish, J.; Kamboj, S.; Biwer, B. M.; Cheng, J.-J.; Zielen, A. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Mo, T.; Abu-Eid, R.; Thaggard, M.; Sallo, A., III.; Peterson, H., Jr.; Williams, W. A.; Environmental Assessment; NRC; EM

    2002-01-01

    The deterministic multimedia dose/risk assessment codes RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD have been widely used for many years for evaluation of sites contaminated with residual radioactive materials. The RESRAD code applies to the cleanup of sites (soils) and the RESRAD-BUILD code applies to the cleanup of buildings and structures. This work describes the procedure used to enhance the deterministic RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD codes for probabilistic dose analysis. A six-step procedure was used in developing default parameter distributions and the probabilistic analysis modules. These six steps include (1) listing and categorizing parameters; (2) ranking parameters; (3) developing parameter distributions; (4) testing parameter distributions for probabilistic analysis; (5) developing probabilistic software modules; and (6) testing probabilistic modules and integrated codes. The procedures used can be applied to the development of other multimedia probabilistic codes. The probabilistic versions of RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD codes provide tools for studying the uncertainty in dose assessment caused by uncertain input parameters. The parameter distribution data collected in this work can also be applied to other multimedia assessment tasks and multimedia computer codes.

  11. Probabilistic Structural Evaluation of Uncertainties in Radiator Sandwich Panel Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuguoglu, Latife; Ludwiczak, Damian

    2006-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) Space System is part of the NASA's Prometheus Program. As part of the JIMO engineering team at NASA Glenn Research Center, the structural design of the JIMO Heat Rejection Subsystem (HRS) is evaluated. An initial goal of this study was to perform sensitivity analyses to determine the relative importance of the input variables on the structural responses of the radiator panel. The desire was to let the sensitivity analysis information identify the important parameters. The probabilistic analysis methods illustrated here support this objective. The probabilistic structural performance evaluation of a HRS radiator sandwich panel was performed. The radiator panel structural performance was assessed in the presence of uncertainties in the loading, fabrication process variables, and material properties. The stress and displacement contours of the deterministic structural analysis at mean probability was performed and results presented. It is followed by a probabilistic evaluation to determine the effect of the primitive variables on the radiator panel structural performance. Based on uncertainties in material properties, structural geometry and loading, the results of the displacement and stress analysis are used as an input file for the probabilistic analysis of the panel. The sensitivity of the structural responses, such as maximum displacement and maximum tensile and compressive stresses of the facesheet in x and y directions and maximum VonMises stresses of the tube, to the loading and design variables is determined under the boundary condition where all edges of the radiator panel are pinned. Based on this study, design critical material and geometric parameters of the considered sandwich panel are identified.

  12. Development of Probabilistic Methods to Assess Meteotsunami Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geist, E. L.; Ten Brink, U. S.

    2014-12-01

    A probabilistic method to assess the hazard from meteotsunamis is developed from both probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis (PTHA) and probabilistic storm-surge forecasting. Meteotsunamis are unusual sea level events, generated when the speed of an atmospheric pressure or wind disturbance is comparable to the phase speed of long waves in the ocean. A general aggregation equation, similar to that used in PTHA, incorporates different meteotsunami sources. A historical record of 116 pressure disturbances recorded between 2000 and 2013 by the U.S. Automated Surface Observing Stations (ASOS) along the U.S. East Coast is used to establish a continuous analytic distribution of each source parameter as well as the overall Poisson rate of occurrence. Initially, atmospheric parameters are considered independently such that the joint probability distribution is given by the product of each marginal distribution. The probabilistic equations are implemented using a Monte Carlo scheme, where a synthetic catalog of pressure disturbances is compiled by sampling the parameter distributions. For each entry in the catalog, ocean wave amplitudes are computed using a finite-difference hydrodynamic model that solves for the linearized long-wave equations. Aggregation of the results from the Monte Carlo scheme results in a meteotsunami hazard curve that plots the annualized rate of exceedance with respect to maximum event amplitude for a particular location along the coast. Results from using 20 synthetic catalogs of 116 events each, resampled from the parent parameter distributions, yield mean and quantile hazard curves. An example is presented for four Mid-Atlantic sites using ASOS data in which only atmospheric pressure disturbances from squall lines and derechos are considered. Results indicate that site-to-site variations among meteotsunami hazard curves are related to the geometry and width of the adjacent continental shelf. The new hazard analysis of meteotsunamis is important for

  13. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cardiogenic Shock? Immediate Causes Cardiogenic shock occurs if the heart suddenly can't pump ... to the body. The most common cause of cardiogenic shock is damage to the heart muscle from a ...

  14. Shock, Post-Shock Annealing, and Post-Annealing Shock in Ureilites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    The thermal and shock histories of ureilites can be divided into four periods: 1) formation, 2) initial shock, 3) post-shock annealing, and 4) post-annealing shock. Period 1 occurred approx.4.55 Ga ago when ureilites formed by melting chondritic material. Impact events during period 2 caused silicate darkening, undulose to mosaic extinction in olivines, and the formation of diamond, lonsdaleite, and chaoite from indigenous carbonaceous material. Alkali-rich fine-grained silicates may have been introduced by impact injection into ureilites during this period. About 57% of the ureilites were unchanged after period 2. During period 3 events, impact-induced annealing caused previously mosaicized olivine grains to become aggregates of small unstrained crystals. Some ureilites experienced reduction as FeO at the edges of olivine grains reacted with C from the matrix. Annealing may also be responsible for coarsening of graphite in a few ureilites, forming euhedral-appearing, idioblastic crystals. Orthopyroxene in Meteorite Hills (MET) 78008 may have formed from pigeonite by annealing during this period. The Rb-Sr internal isochron age of approx.4.0 Ga for MET 78008 probably dates the annealing event. At this late date, impacts are the only viable heat source. About 36% of ureilites experienced period 3 events, but remained unchanged afterwards. During period 4, approx.7% of the ureilites were shocked again, as is evident in the polymict breccia, Elephant Moraine (EET) 83309. This rock contains annealed mosaicized olivine aggregates composed of small individual olivine crystals that exhibit undulose extinction. Ureilites may have formed by impact-melting chondritic material on a primitive body with heterogeneous O isotopes. Plagioclase was preferentially lost from the system due to its low impedance to shock compression. Brief melting and rapid burial minimized the escape of planetary-type noble gases from the ureilitic melts. Incomplete separation of metal from silicates

  15. Probabilistic population projections with migration uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Azose, Jonathan J.; Ševčíková, Hana; Raftery, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    We produce probabilistic projections of population for all countries based on probabilistic projections of fertility, mortality, and migration. We compare our projections to those from the United Nations’ Probabilistic Population Projections, which uses similar methods for fertility and mortality but deterministic migration projections. We find that uncertainty in migration projection is a substantial contributor to uncertainty in population projections for many countries. Prediction intervals for the populations of Northern America and Europe are over 70% wider, whereas prediction intervals for the populations of Africa, Asia, and the world as a whole are nearly unchanged. Out-of-sample validation shows that the model is reasonably well calibrated. PMID:27217571

  16. Probabilistic cognition in two indigenous Mayan groups.

    PubMed

    Fontanari, Laura; Gonzalez, Michel; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Girotto, Vittorio

    2014-12-01

    Is there a sense of chance shared by all individuals, regardless of their schooling or culture? To test whether the ability to make correct probabilistic evaluations depends on educational and cultural guidance, we investigated probabilistic cognition in preliterate and prenumerate Kaqchikel and K'iche', two indigenous Mayan groups, living in remote areas of Guatemala. Although the tested individuals had no formal education, they performed correctly in tasks in which they had to consider prior and posterior information, proportions and combinations of possibilities. Their performance was indistinguishable from that of Mayan school children and Western controls. Our results provide evidence for the universal nature of probabilistic cognition.

  17. Probabilistic machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-05-28

    How can a machine learn from experience? Probabilistic modelling provides a framework for understanding what learning is, and has therefore emerged as one of the principal theoretical and practical approaches for designing machines that learn from data acquired through experience. The probabilistic framework, which describes how to represent and manipulate uncertainty about models and predictions, has a central role in scientific data analysis, machine learning, robotics, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. This Review provides an introduction to this framework, and discusses some of the state-of-the-art advances in the field, namely, probabilistic programming, Bayesian optimization, data compression and automatic model discovery.

  18. Probabilistic machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-05-28

    How can a machine learn from experience? Probabilistic modelling provides a framework for understanding what learning is, and has therefore emerged as one of the principal theoretical and practical approaches for designing machines that learn from data acquired through experience. The probabilistic framework, which describes how to represent and manipulate uncertainty about models and predictions, has a central role in scientific data analysis, machine learning, robotics, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. This Review provides an introduction to this framework, and discusses some of the state-of-the-art advances in the field, namely, probabilistic programming, Bayesian optimization, data compression and automatic model discovery. PMID:26017444

  19. Probabilistic machine learning and artificial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    2015-05-01

    How can a machine learn from experience? Probabilistic modelling provides a framework for understanding what learning is, and has therefore emerged as one of the principal theoretical and practical approaches for designing machines that learn from data acquired through experience. The probabilistic framework, which describes how to represent and manipulate uncertainty about models and predictions, has a central role in scientific data analysis, machine learning, robotics, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. This Review provides an introduction to this framework, and discusses some of the state-of-the-art advances in the field, namely, probabilistic programming, Bayesian optimization, data compression and automatic model discovery.

  20. Probabilistic cognition in two indigenous Mayan groups

    PubMed Central

    Fontanari, Laura; Gonzalez, Michel; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Girotto, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Is there a sense of chance shared by all individuals, regardless of their schooling or culture? To test whether the ability to make correct probabilistic evaluations depends on educational and cultural guidance, we investigated probabilistic cognition in preliterate and prenumerate Kaqchikel and K’iche’, two indigenous Mayan groups, living in remote areas of Guatemala. Although the tested individuals had no formal education, they performed correctly in tasks in which they had to consider prior and posterior information, proportions and combinations of possibilities. Their performance was indistinguishable from that of Mayan school children and Western controls. Our results provide evidence for the universal nature of probabilistic cognition. PMID:25368160

  1. Second sound shock waves and critical velocities in liquid helium 2. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. N.

    1979-01-01

    Large amplitude second-sound shock waves were generated and the experimental results compared to the theory of nonlinear second-sound. The structure and thickness of second-sound shock fronts are calculated and compared to experimental data. Theoretically it is shown that at T = 1.88 K, where the nonlinear wave steepening vanishes, the thickness of a very weak shock must diverge. In a region near this temperature, a finite-amplitude shock pulse evolves into an unusual double-shock configuration consisting of a front steepened, temperature raising shock followed by a temperature lowering shock. Double-shocks are experimentally verified. It is experimentally shown that very large second-sound shock waves initiate a breakdown in the superfluidity of helium 2, which is dramatically displayed as a limit to the maximum attainable shock strength. The value of the maximum shock-induced relative velocity represents a significant lower bound to the intrinsic critical velocity of helium 2.

  2. Electron Dynamics in Perpendicular Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschietti, L.; Roth, I.

    2003-12-01

    A full particle electromagnetic code in the Darwin approximation is used to investigate the dynamics of the electrons in a fast magnetosonic shock. We assume a perpendicular geometry where x points into the shock and the electromagnetic field structure is E=(Ex,E_y,0) and B=(0,0,Bz). The 1D3V code has open boundaries with upstream and downstream particles traversing the left and right boundaries, respectively, while the shock structure remains in the simulation box. Two shock strengths are considered, including a near critical shock with alfvenic Mach number Ma ˜ 2 and a supercritical shock with Ma ˜ 3--4. The simulation is initiated by loading the particles according to profiles modeled from conservation laws (Rankine-Hugoniot). Particles and fields are then left to evolve and, once the ion dynamics develops, a self-consistent shock structure forms. Importantly, due to the partial decoupling of ions and electrons which occurs in the magnetic ramp, the electrostatic field Ex builds up a large spike whose role is to slow down the ions. In the supercritical case a significant fraction of ions are reflected and accumulate in the foot, which leads to the process of cyclical shock reformation. We record the trajectories of selected electrons in order to analyse their behavior in the cross field structure of the ramp. We specially look for a possible ``superadiabatic heating'', a process described by previous authors [Balikhin and Gedalin (1994); Ball and Galloway (1998)]. The latter is expected to occur for extreme cases where the gradient of the electrostatic potential, which reflects the ions, is so strong that the electrons are accelerated across a large fraction of the ramp during one cyclotron gyration. The required potential difference across the ramp δ φ * depends upon its half width Δ , namely eδ φ*/mve^2≈(0.2/βe)~(Δ /λe; )2(r+1)2. Here, λ e is the electron inertia length c/ω pe and r is the compression ratio. Our study improves upon the above

  3. Probabilistic and Non-probabilistic Synthetic Reliability Model for Space Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Dongpao; Hu, Xiao; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    As an alternative to reliability analysis, the non-probabilistic model is an effective supplement when the interval information exists. We describe the uncertain parameters of the structures with interval variables, and establish a non-probabilistic reliability model of structures. Then, we analyze the relation between the typical interference mode and the reliability according to the structure stress-strength interference model, and propose a new measure of structure non-probabilistic reliability. Furthermore we describe other uncertain parameters with random variables when probabilistic information also exists. For the complex structures including both random variables and interval variables, we propose a probabilistic and non-probabilistic synthetic reliability model. The illustrative example shows that the presented model is feasible for structure reliability analysis and design.

  4. Investigation of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability under re-shock conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinov, E.; Sadot, O.; Formoza, A.; Malamud, G.; Elbaz, Y.; Levin, L. A.; Ben-Dor, G.; Shvarts, D.

    2008-12-01

    A systematic study has been made of the growth of the turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) after a re-shock in the framework of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability where the initial shock is from the light fluid to the heavy one. The growth rate of the TMZ after the re-shock was found to be independent of its amplitude during the re-shock and to depend directly on the strength of the re-shock.

  5. Impact on mortality of the timing of renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in septic shock: the IDEAL-ICU study (initiation of dialysis early versus delayed in the intensive care unit): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the most dreaded complications of septic shock is acute kidney injury. It occurs in around 50% of patients, with a mortality rate of about 60% at 3 months. There is no consensus on the optimal time to initiate renal replacement therapy. Retrospective and observational studies suggest that early implementation of renal replacement therapy could improve the prognosis for these patients. Methods/design This protocol summarizes the rationale and design of a randomized, controlled, multicenter trial investigating the effect of early versus delayed renal replacement therapy in patients with severe acute kidney injury in early septic shock. In total, 864 critically ill adults with septic shock and evidence of acute kidney injury, defined as the failure stage of the RIFLE classification, will be enrolled. The primary outcome is mortality at 90 days. Secondary outcomes include safety, number of days free of mechanical ventilation, number of days free of renal replacement therapy, intensive care length of stay, in-hospital length of stay, quality of life as evaluated by the EQ-5D and renal replacement therapy dependence at hospital discharge. The primary analysis will be intention to treat. Recruitment started in March 2012 and will be completed by March 2015. Discussion This protocol for a randomized controlled study investigating the impact of the timing of renal replacement therapy initiation should provide an answer to a key question for the management of patients with acute kidney injury in the context of septic shock, for whom the mortality rate remains close to 60% despite improved understanding of physiopathology and recent therapeutic advances. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01682590, registered on 10 September 2012. PMID:24998258

  6. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing circuit and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P. (Inventor); Gingrich, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A quantum circuit performing quantum computation in a quantum computer. A chosen transformation of an initial n-qubit state is probabilistically obtained. The circuit comprises a unitary quantum operator obtained from a non-unitary quantum operator, operating on an n-qubit state and an ancilla state. When operation on the ancilla state provides a success condition, computation is stopped. When operation on the ancilla state provides a failure condition, computation is performed again on the ancilla state and the n-qubit state obtained in the previous computation, until a success condition is obtained.

  7. A probabilistic model for the establishment of neuron polarity.

    PubMed

    Khanin, K; Khanin, R

    2001-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to present a simple probabilistic model for the early stage of neuron growth: the specification on an axon out of several initially similar neurites. The model is a Markov process with competition between the growing neurites, wherein longer objects have more chances to grow, and parameter alpha determines the intensity of the competition. For alpha > 1 the model provides results which are qualitatively similar to the experimental ones, i.e. selection of one rapidly elongating axon out of several neurites while other less successful neurites stop growing at some random time. Rigorous mathematical proofs are given.

  8. COMMUNICATING PROBABILISTIC RISK OUTCOMES TO RISK MANAGERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasingly, risk assessors are moving away from simple deterministic assessments to probabilistic approaches that explicitly incorporate ecological variability, measurement imprecision, and lack of knowledge (collectively termed "uncertainty"). While the new methods provide an...

  9. Probabilistic micromechanics for high-temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, J. N.

    1993-01-01

    The three-year program of research had the following technical objectives: the development of probabilistic methods for micromechanics-based constitutive and failure models, application of the probabilistic methodology in the evaluation of various composite materials and simulation of expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties, and influence of the uncertainties in composite properties on the structural response. The first year of research was devoted to the development of probabilistic methodology for micromechanics models. The second year of research focused on the evaluation of the Chamis-Hopkins constitutive model and Aboudi constitutive model using the methodology developed in the first year of research. The third year of research was devoted to the development of probabilistic finite element analysis procedures for laminated composite plate and shell structures.

  10. Do probabilistic forecasts lead to better decisions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, M. H.; van Andel, S. J.; Pappenberger, F.

    2013-06-01

    The last decade has seen growing research in producing probabilistic hydro-meteorological forecasts and increasing their reliability. This followed the promise that, supplied with information about uncertainty, people would take better risk-based decisions. In recent years, therefore, research and operational developments have also started focusing attention on ways of communicating the probabilistic forecasts to decision-makers. Communicating probabilistic forecasts includes preparing tools and products for visualisation, but also requires understanding how decision-makers perceive and use uncertainty information in real time. At the EGU General Assembly 2012, we conducted a laboratory-style experiment in which several cases of flood forecasts and a choice of actions to take were presented as part of a game to participants, who acted as decision-makers. Answers were collected and analysed. In this paper, we present the results of this exercise and discuss if we indeed make better decisions on the basis of probabilistic forecasts.

  11. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, Robert M.; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for designing quantum circuits that perform non-unitary quantum computations on n-qubit states probabilistically, and give analytic expressions for the success probability and fidelity.

  12. PROBABILISTIC MODELING FOR ADVANCED HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human exposures to environmental pollutants widely vary depending on the emission patterns that result in microenvironmental pollutant concentrations, as well as behavioral factors that determine the extent of an individual's contact with these pollutants. Probabilistic human exp...

  13. Probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Bergou, J.; Delgado, A.

    2010-12-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of three symmetric states. These states are defined by a single complex quantity, the inner product among them. We show that three different probabilistic cloning machines are necessary to optimally clone all possible families of three symmetric states. We also show that the optimal cloning probability of generating M copies out of one original can be cast as the quotient between the success probability of unambiguously discriminating one and M copies of symmetric states.

  14. Probabilistic structural analysis for nuclear thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of probabilistic structural analysis for nuclear thermal propulsion are presented. The objective of the study was to develop a methodology to certify Space Nuclear Propulsion System (SNPS) Nozzle with assured reliability. Topics covered include: advantage of probabilistic structural analysis; space nuclear propulsion system nozzle uncertainties in the random variables; SNPS nozzle natural frequency; and sensitivity of primitive variable uncertainties SNPS nozzle natural frequency and shell stress.

  15. Dehydration of potassium alum induced by shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimura, H.; Imasu, Y.; Matsumoto, H.

    2014-05-01

    Potassium alum (KAl(SO4)2·12H2O) powder filled into a copper container were shock loaded up to 6.3 GPa by flyer plate impact. Recovered samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XRD and Raman results of samples shocked at 4.4 GPa and below indicated that there was no sign of phase transition. In contrast, the XRD pattern of the sample shocked at 6.3 GPa was clearly different from the initial sample. Unlike previous results obtained from hydrostatic pressure experiments, an irreversible phase transition to an amorphous phase occurred under shock compression at 6.3 GPa. The morphology of the sample surface indicated the ejection of water vapor caused by shock loading. The amorphization may be attributed to the vaporization of water molecules caused by shock pressure and shock-induced heat.

  16. Cardiogenic Shock: Failure of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Utilization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong Sern

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a highly lethal condition. Conventional therapy including revascularization and mechanical circulatory support aims to improve cardiac output and oxygen delivery, but increasing basic and clinical observations indicate wider circulatory and cellular abnormalities, particularly at the advanced stages of shock. Progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. Cardiogenic shock is initially characterized by a failure to maintain global oxygen delivery; however, progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, derangement of the regulation of regional blood flow, microcirculatory abnormalities, and cellular dysoxia. These abnormalities are analogous to septic shock and may not be reversed by increase in oxygen delivery, even to supranormal levels. Earlier mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock may limit the development of microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. PMID:27509355

  17. Mean free path effects in the shock-implosion problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsworthy, M. J.; Pullin, D. I.

    2009-02-01

    The effects of finite Knudsen number in the problem of a cylindrically imploding shock wave in a monatomic gas are investigated. Numerical solutions of the flow field are obtained with initial conditions in the ranges 1.25≤M0≤5 and 0.005≤Kn0≤0.1 using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Results show that as Kn0 decreases and M0 increases, the maximum implosion temperature scales increasingly well with the similarity exponent predicted in the Guderley solution for an imploding strong shock in the Euler limit. When the radius of curvature is large, the cylindrical shock thickness is found to be almost identical to the thickness of a planar shock for a given shock Mach number. For small radii of curvature, the cylindrical shock was found to be thicker than the corresponding planar shock.

  18. Prediction of the shock arrival time with SEP observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, G.; Zhang, M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2009-09-01

    Real-time prediction of the arrival times at Earth of shocks is very important for space weather research. Recently, various models for shock propagation are used to forecast the shock arriving times (SATs) with information of initial coronal shock and flare from near real-time radio and X-ray data. In this paper, we add the use of solar energetic particles (SEP) observation to improve the shock arrival time (SAT) prediction. High-energy SEPs originating from flares move to the Earth much faster than the shocks related to the same flares. We develop an SAT prediction model by combining a well-known shock propagation model, STOA, and the analysis of SEPs detected at Earth. We demonstrate that the SAT predictions are improved by the new model with the help of 38-53 keV electron SEP observations. In particular, the correct prediction to false alarm ratio is improved significantly.

  19. Cardiogenic Shock: Failure of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Utilization.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hoong Sern

    2016-08-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a highly lethal condition. Conventional therapy including revascularization and mechanical circulatory support aims to improve cardiac output and oxygen delivery, but increasing basic and clinical observations indicate wider circulatory and cellular abnormalities, particularly at the advanced stages of shock. Progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities. Cardiogenic shock is initially characterized by a failure to maintain global oxygen delivery; however, progressive cardiogenic shock is associated with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, derangement of the regulation of regional blood flow, microcirculatory abnormalities, and cellular dysoxia. These abnormalities are analogous to septic shock and may not be reversed by increase in oxygen delivery, even to supranormal levels. Earlier mechanical circulatory support in cardiogenic shock may limit the development of microcirculatory and cellular abnormalities.

  20. Analysis of self-similar problems of imploding shock waves by the method of characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.

    1983-05-01

    The asymptotic self-similar form of cylindrically or spherically imploding shock waves is extracted by numerically solving non-self-similar problems. The shock wave is generated by a contracting piston with finite initial velocity. For the initial shock motion, a perturbation method is used to determine the starting condition for the numerical calculation. Propagation of the shock wave and flow field properties are obtained and the transition of the non-self-similar motion of the shock wave into the self-similar one is presented. Good agreement between self-similar exponents determined from the variation of the shock strength and those calculated by Guderley is obtained.

  1. Probabilistic Choice, Reversibility, Loops, and Miracles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddart, Bill; Bell, Pete

    We consider an addition of probabilistic choice to Abrial's Generalised Substitution Language (GSL) in a form that accommodates the backtracking interpretation of non-deterministic choice. Our formulation is introduced as an extension of the Prospective Values formalism we have developed to describe the results from a backtracking search. Significant features are that probabilistic choice is governed by feasibility, and non-termination is strict. The former property allows us to use probabilistic choice to generate search heuristics. In this paper we are particularly interested in iteration. By demonstrating sub-conjunctivity and monotonicity properties of expectations we give the basis for a fixed point semantics of iterative constructs, and we consider the practical proof treatment of probabilistic loops. We discuss loop invariants, loops with probabilistic behaviour, and probabilistic termination in the context of a formalism in which a small probability of non-termination can dominate our calculations, proposing a method of limits to avoid this problem. The formal programming constructs described have been implemented in a reversible virtual machine (RVM).

  2. Mixing at shocked interfaces with known perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew; Weber, Chris; Bonazza, Riccardo; Cabot, Bill

    2012-11-01

    We derive a growth-rate model for the Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing layer, given arbitrary but known initial conditions. The initial growth rate is determined by the net mass flux through the center plane of the perturbed interface immediately after shock passage. The net mass flux is determined by the correlation between the post-shock density and streamwise velocity. The post-shock density field is computed from the known initial perturbations and the shock jump conditions. The streamwise velocity is computed via Biot-Savart integration of the vorticity field. The vorticity deposited by the shock is obtained from the baroclinic torque with an impulsive acceleration. Using the initial growth rate and characteristic perturbation wavelength as scaling factors, the model collapses growth rates over a broad range of Mach numbers, Atwood numbers and perturbation types. The mixing layer at late times exhibits a power-law growth with an average exponent of theta=0.23. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Additional support was provided to the University of Wisconsin by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG52-06NA26196.

  3. Shock desensitizing of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, William C

    2010-01-01

    Solid explosive can be desensitized by a shockwave too weak to initiate it promptly, and desensitized explosive does not react although its chemical composition is almost unchanged. A strong second shock does not cause reaction until it overtakes the first shock. The first shock, if it is strong enough, accelerates very slowly at first, and then more rapidly as detonation approaches. These facts suggest that there are two competing reactions. One is the usual explosive goes to products with the release of energy, and the other is explosive goes to dead explosive with no chemical change and no energy release. The first reaction rate is very sensitive to the local state, and the second is only weakly so. At low pressure very little energy is released and the change to dead explosive dominates. At high pressure, quite the other way, most of the explosive goes to products. Numerous experiments in both the initiation and the full detonation regimes are discussed and compared in support of these ideas.

  4. Finite Time Shock Acceleration at Interplanetary Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Channok, C.; Ruffolo, D.; Desai, M. I.; Mason, G. M.

    2004-05-01

    Observations of energetic ion acceleration at interplanetary shocks sometimes indicate a spectral rollover at ˜ 0.1 to 1 MeV nucl-1. This rollover is not well explained by finite shock width or thickness effects. At the same time, a typical timescale of diffusive shock acceleration is several days, implying that the process of shock acceleration at an interplanetary shock near Earth usually gives only a mild increase in energy to an existing seed particle population. This is consistent with a recent analysis of ACE observations that argues for a seed population at substantially higher energies than the solar wind. Therefore an explanation of typical spectra of interplanetary shock-accelerated ions requires a theory of finite-time shock acceleration, which for long times (or an unusually fast acceleration timescale) tends to the steady-state result of a power-law spectrum. We present analytic and numerical models of finite-time shock acceleration. For a given injection momentum p0, after a very short time there is only a small boost in momentum, at intermediate times the spectrum is a power law with a hump and steep cutoff at a critical momentum, and at longer times the critical momentum increases and the spectrum approaches the steady-state power law. The composition dependence of the critical momentum is different from that obtained for other cutoff mechanisms. The results are compared with observed spectra. Work in Thailand was supported by the Commission for Higher Education, the Rachadapisek Sompoj Fund of Chulalongkorn University, and the Thailand Research Fund. Work at the University of Maryland was supported by NASA contract NAS5-30927 and NASA grant PC 251428.

  5. Symbolic representation of probabilistic worlds.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Jacob

    2012-04-01

    Symbolic representation of environmental variables is a ubiquitous and often debated component of cognitive science. Yet notwithstanding centuries of philosophical discussion, the efficacy, scope, and validity of such representation has rarely been given direct consideration from a mathematical point of view. This paper introduces a quantitative measure of the effectiveness of symbolic representation, and develops formal constraints under which such representation is in fact warranted. The effectiveness of symbolic representation hinges on the probabilistic structure of the environment that is to be represented. For arbitrary probability distributions (i.e., environments), symbolic representation is generally not warranted. But in modal environments, defined here as those that consist of mixtures of component distributions that are narrow ("spiky") relative to their spreads, symbolic representation can be shown to represent the environment with a relatively negligible loss of information. Modal environments support propositional forms, logical relations, and other familiar features of symbolic representation. Hence the assumption that our environment is, in fact, modal is a key tacit assumption underlying the use of symbols in cognitive science. PMID:22270145

  6. Probabilistic computation by neuromine networks.

    PubMed

    Hangartner, R D; Cull, P

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we address the question, can biologically feasible neural nets compute more than can be computed by deterministic polynomial time algorithms? Since we want to maintain a claim of plausibility and reasonableness we restrict ourselves to algorithmically easy to construct nets and we rule out infinite precision in parameters and in any analog parts of the computation. Our approach is to consider the recent advances in randomized algorithms and see if such randomized computations can be described by neural nets. We start with a pair of neurons and show that by connecting them with reciprocal inhibition and some tonic input, then the steady-state will be one neuron ON and one neuron OFF, but which neuron will be ON and which neuron will be OFF will be chosen at random (perhaps, it would be better to say that microscopic noise in the analog computation will be turned into a megascale random bit). We then show that we can build a small network that uses this random bit process to generate repeatedly random bits. This random bit generator can then be connected with a neural net representing the deterministic part of randomized algorithm. We, therefore, demonstrate that these neural nets can carry out probabilistic computation and thus be less limited than classical neural nets.

  7. Probabilistic modeling of children's handwriting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puri, Mukta; Srihari, Sargur N.; Hanson, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    There is little work done in the analysis of children's handwriting, which can be useful in developing automatic evaluation systems and in quantifying handwriting individuality. We consider the statistical analysis of children's handwriting in early grades. Samples of handwriting of children in Grades 2-4 who were taught the Zaner-Bloser style were considered. The commonly occurring word "and" written in cursive style as well as hand-print were extracted from extended writing. The samples were assigned feature values by human examiners using a truthing tool. The human examiners looked at how the children constructed letter formations in their writing, looking for similarities and differences from the instructions taught in the handwriting copy book. These similarities and differences were measured using a feature space distance measure. Results indicate that the handwriting develops towards more conformity with the class characteristics of the Zaner-Bloser copybook which, with practice, is the expected result. Bayesian networks were learnt from the data to enable answering various probabilistic queries, such as determining students who may continue to produce letter formations as taught during lessons in school and determining the students who will develop a different and/or variation of the those letter formations and the number of different types of letter formations.

  8. Representation of probabilistic scientific knowledge.

    PubMed

    Soldatova, Larisa N; Rzhetsky, Andrey; De Grave, Kurt; King, Ross D

    2013-04-15

    The theory of probability is widely used in biomedical research for data analysis and modelling. In previous work the probabilities of the research hypotheses have been recorded as experimental metadata. The ontology HELO is designed to support probabilistic reasoning, and provides semantic descriptors for reporting on research that involves operations with probabilities. HELO explicitly links research statements such as hypotheses, models, laws, conclusions, etc. to the associated probabilities of these statements being true. HELO enables the explicit semantic representation and accurate recording of probabilities in hypotheses, as well as the inference methods used to generate and update those hypotheses. We demonstrate the utility of HELO on three worked examples: changes in the probability of the hypothesis that sirtuins regulate human life span; changes in the probability of hypotheses about gene functions in the S. cerevisiae aromatic amino acid pathway; and the use of active learning in drug design (quantitative structure activity relation learning), where a strategy for the selection of compounds with the highest probability of improving on the best known compound was used. HELO is open source and available at https://github.com/larisa-soldatova/HELO. PMID:23734675

  9. Representation of probabilistic scientific knowledge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The theory of probability is widely used in biomedical research for data analysis and modelling. In previous work the probabilities of the research hypotheses have been recorded as experimental metadata. The ontology HELO is designed to support probabilistic reasoning, and provides semantic descriptors for reporting on research that involves operations with probabilities. HELO explicitly links research statements such as hypotheses, models, laws, conclusions, etc. to the associated probabilities of these statements being true. HELO enables the explicit semantic representation and accurate recording of probabilities in hypotheses, as well as the inference methods used to generate and update those hypotheses. We demonstrate the utility of HELO on three worked examples: changes in the probability of the hypothesis that sirtuins regulate human life span; changes in the probability of hypotheses about gene functions in the S. cerevisiae aromatic amino acid pathway; and the use of active learning in drug design (quantitative structure activity relation learning), where a strategy for the selection of compounds with the highest probability of improving on the best known compound was used. HELO is open source and available at https://github.com/larisa-soldatova/HELO PMID:23734675

  10. Dynamical systems probabilistic risk assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Denman, Matthew R.; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2014-03-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is the primary tool used to risk-inform nuclear power regulatory and licensing activities. Risk-informed regulations are intended to reduce inherent conservatism in regulatory metrics (e.g., allowable operating conditions and technical specifications) which are built into the regulatory framework by quantifying both the total risk profile as well as the change in the risk profile caused by an event or action (e.g., in-service inspection procedures or power uprates). Dynamical Systems (DS) analysis has been used to understand unintended time-dependent feedbacks in both industrial and organizational settings. In dynamical systems analysis, feedback loops can be characterized and studied as a function of time to describe the changes to the reliability of plant Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs). While DS has been used in many subject areas, some even within the PRA community, it has not been applied toward creating long-time horizon, dynamic PRAs (with time scales ranging between days and decades depending upon the analysis). Understanding slowly developing dynamic effects, such as wear-out, on SSC reliabilities may be instrumental in ensuring a safely and reliably operating nuclear fleet. Improving the estimation of a plant's continuously changing risk profile will allow for more meaningful risk insights, greater stakeholder confidence in risk insights, and increased operational flexibility.

  11. Probabilistic risk assessment familiarization training

    SciTech Connect

    Phillabaum, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    Philadelphia Electric Company (PECo) created a Nuclear Group Risk and Reliability Assessment Program Plan in order to focus the utilization of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) in support of Limerick Generating Station and Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The continuation of a PRA program was committed by PECo to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) prior to be the issuance of an operating license for Limerick Unit 1. It is believed that increased use of PRA techniques to support activities at Limerick and Peach Bottom will enhance PECo's overall nuclear excellence. Training for familiarization with PRA is designed for attendance once by all nuclear group personnel to understand PRA and its potential effect on their jobs. The training content describes the history of PRA and how it applies to PECo's nuclear activities. Key PRA concepts serve as the foundation for the familiarization training. These key concepts are covered in all classes to facilitate an appreciation of the remaining material, which is tailored to the audience. Some of the concepts covered are comparison of regulatory philosophy to PRA techniques, fundamentals of risk/success, risk equation/risk summation, and fault trees and event trees. Building on the concepts, PRA insights and applications are then described that are tailored to the audience.

  12. Probabilistic description of traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahnke, R.; Kaupužs, J.; Lubashevsky, I.

    2005-03-01

    A stochastic description of traffic flow, called probabilistic traffic flow theory, is developed. The general master equation is applied to relatively simple models to describe the formation and dissolution of traffic congestions. Our approach is mainly based on spatially homogeneous systems like periodically closed circular rings without on- and off-ramps. We consider a stochastic one-step process of growth or shrinkage of a car cluster (jam). As generalization we discuss the coexistence of several car clusters of different sizes. The basic problem is to find a physically motivated ansatz for the transition rates of the attachment and detachment of individual cars to a car cluster consistent with the empirical observations in real traffic. The emphasis is put on the analogy with first-order phase transitions and nucleation phenomena in physical systems like supersaturated vapour. The results are summarized in the flux-density relation, the so-called fundamental diagram of traffic flow, and compared with empirical data. Different regimes of traffic flow are discussed: free flow, congested mode as stop-and-go regime, and heavy viscous traffic. The traffic breakdown is studied based on the master equation as well as the Fokker-Planck approximation to calculate mean first passage times or escape rates. Generalizations are developed to allow for on-ramp effects. The calculated flux-density relation and characteristic breakdown times coincide with empirical data measured on highways. Finally, a brief summary of the stochastic cellular automata approach is given.

  13. MOND using a probabilistic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raut, Usha

    2009-05-01

    MOND has been proposed as a viable alternative to the dark matter hypothesis. In the original MOND formulation [1], a modification of Newtonian Dynamics was brought about by postulating new equations of particle motion at extremely low accelerations, as a possible explanation for the flat rotation curves of spiral galaxies. In this paper, we attempt a different approach to modify the usual force laws by trying to link gravity with the probabilistic aspects of quantum mechanics [2]. In order to achieve this, one starts by replacing the classical notion of a continuous distance between two elementary particles with a statistical probability function, π. The gravitational force between two elementary particles then can be interpreted in terms of the probability of interaction between them. We attempt to show that such a modified gravitational force would fall off a lot slower than the usual inverse square law predicts, leading to revised MOND equations. In the limit that the statistical aggregate of the probabilities becomes equal to the usual inverse square law force, we recover Newtonian/Einstein gravity.[3pt] [1] Milgrom, M. 1983, ApJ, 270, 365 [2] Goradia, S. 2002, .org/pdf/physics/0210040

  14. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  15. Shock compression dynamics under a microscope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlott, Dana

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a tabletop laser flyer launch system1 that solves many of the problems that plagued previous efforts. Using a novel mechanism where a spatially-uniform laser pulse creates a shock in a glass substrate just underneath a metal foil, we can launch tiny (0.7 mm diameter x 100 μm thick) flyers at speeds ranging from 0-5 km/s and the foils are flat, cold and intact. This tabletop launch system, where we often launch 100 flyers per day, provides a platform for a wide variety of time-resolved spectroscopies. The shocked material is viewed by a microscope objective that transmits near-infrared light from a photon Doppler velocimeter to monitor the flyer, and collects the light for spectroscopic and video images. Fluorescent probes, which have been highly developed for the biomedical sciences, have proven especially useful for these experiments. Using emission measurements, we have investigated the fundamental mechanisms of many shock wave effects including: viscoelastic compression of high molecular weight polymers, visualization of shocks in porous media such as sand, where we can observe the behavior of individual grains of sand, shock attenuation by passing the shock through reactive materials that undergo endothermic chemical reactions, and shock initiation of nanoenergetic materials.

  16. A hydrocode study of explosive shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, George; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2011-06-01

    This paper discusses the results of hydrocode simulations of shock-induced ignition of PBXN-109, Octol, and PETN, using the History Variable Reactive Burn model in the CTH hydrocode. The simulations began with small-scale sympathetic detonation experiments, from which normalized values of pressure and time were derived and used to define an upper bound for ignition. This upper bound corresponds to the well established Pop-plot data for supported detonation, i . e . detonations in which a constant shock pressure is applied to an explosive until full detonation is achieved. Subsequently, one-dimensional flyer-plate simulations were conducted where the response of constant-amplitude, limited-duration shock pulses into semi-infinite explosive samples was examined. These simulations confirmed not only the existence of an upper bound for ignition as expected, but also showed ignition by ``lower level'' shocks, in which full detonation is reached at a time longer than the input shock duration. These lower-level shocks can be used to define a distinct minimal ignition threshold, below which shock pulses do not result in detonation. Numerical experiments using these bounds offer a new framework for interpreting explosive initiation data.

  17. A hydrocode study of explosive shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, George C.; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2012-03-01

    This paper discusses the results of hydrocode simulations of shock-induced ignition of PBXN-109, Octol, PETN, and HNS explosives using the History Variable Reactive Burn model in the CTH hydrocode. Normalized values of pressure and time were derived from the equations defining the HVRB model, and used to define an upper bound for ignition. This upper bound corresponds to the well established Pop-plot data for supported detonation, i.e. detonations in which a constant shock pressure is applied to an explosive until full detonation is achieved. Subsequently, one-dimensional flyer-plate simulations were conducted in which the responses to varied constant-amplitude, limitedduration shock pulses into semi-infinite explosive samples were examined. These simulations confirmed not only the existence of an upper bound for ignition as expected, but also showed ignition by "lower level" shocks, in which full detonation is reached at a time longer than the input shock duration. These lower-level shocks can be used to define a distinct minimal ignition threshold, below which shock pulses do not result in detonation. Numerical experiments using these bounds offer a new framework for interpreting explosive initiation data.

  18. EXPERIENCES WITH USING PROBABILISTIC EXPOSURE ANALYSIS METHODS IN THE U.S. EPA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade various Offices and Programs within the U.S. EPA have either initiated or increased the development and application of probabilistic exposure analysis models. These models have been applied to a broad range of research or regulatory problems in EPA, such as e...

  19. Shock waves as turbulent mix amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.

    1988-06-09

    In our initial studies of the shockwave-turbulence interaction process we emphasized the apparent enhancement a pre-existing turbulent field induced by shock passage. The present investigations are concerned with the possibly significant changes induced in shock-front structure during interactions with turbulence. The shock front may be diffracted; its initially planar surface may deform into a wrinkled or corrugated pattern; or it may break up into a succession of wavelets. A crucial question is whether or not the shockwave remains a sharp discontinuity albeit randomly wrinkled or corrugated by interaction with random perturbations in density, velocity, and/or pressure associated with the downstream turbulence. An additional question concerns the time of influence exerted by the shockwave in redistribution of turbulence. At some point, the apparent enhancement ceases and the turbulence decays to pre-existing levels. Geometrical distortions at the front alter the mean flow strain pattern influencing the persistence of duration of this shock interaction/turbulent enhancement process after passage of the shock front well downstream of the interaction region. Examination and description of the influence of these alterations to shockwave structure during shock-turbulence interaction are the basic themes of this work. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Detonation in shocked homogeneous high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C.S.; Holmes, N.C.; Souers, P.C.

    1995-11-01

    We have studied shock-induced changes in homogeneous high explosives including nitromethane, tetranitromethane, and single crystals of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by using fast time-resolved emission and Raman spectroscopy at a two-stage light-gas gun. The results reveal three distinct steps during which the homogeneous explosives chemically evolve to final detonation products. These are (1) the initiation of shock compressed high explosives after an induction period, (2) thermal explosion of shock-compressed and/or reacting materials, and (3) a decay to a steady-state representing a transition to the detonation of uncompressed high explosives. Based on a gray-body approximation, we have obtained the CJ temperatures: 3800 K for nitromethane, 2950 K for tetranitromethane, and 4100 K for PETN. We compare the data with various thermochemical equilibrium calculations. In this paper we will also show a preliminary result of single-shot time-resolved Raman spectroscopy applied to shock-compressed nitromethane.

  1. Shock Wave Dynamics in Weakly Ionized Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Joseph A., III

    1998-01-01

    We have begun a comprehensive series of analyses and experiments to study the basic problem of shock wave dynamics in ionized media. Our objective is to isolate the mechanisms that are responsible for the decrease in the shock amplitude and also to determine the relevant plasma parameters that will be required for a drag reduction scheme in an actual high altitude hypersonic flight. Specifically, we have initiated a program of analyses and measurements with the objective of (i) fully characterizing the propagation dynamics in plasmas formed in gases of aerodynamic interest, (ii) isolating the mechanisms responsible for the decreased shock strength and increased shock velocity, (iii) extrapolating the laboratory observations to the technology of supersonic flight.

  2. Shock Propagation and Instability Structures in Compressed Silica Aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Molitoris, J D; DeHaven, M R; Gash, A E; Satcher, J H

    2002-05-30

    We have performed a series of experiments examining shock propagation in low density aerogels. High-pressure ({approx}100 kbar) shock waves are produced by detonating high explosives. Radiography is used to obtain a time sequence imaging of the shocks as they enter and traverse the aerogel. We compress the aerogel by impinging shocks waves on either one or both sides of an aerogel slab. The shock wave initially transmitted to the aerogel is very narrow and flat, but disperses and curves as it propagates. Optical images of the shock front reveal the initial formation of a hot dense region that cools and evolves into a well-defined microstructure. Structures observed in the shock front are examined in the framework of hydrodynamic instabilities generated as the shock traverses the low-density aerogel. The primary features of shock propagation are compared to simulations, which also include modeling the detonation of the high explosive, with a 2-D Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian hydrodynamics code The code includes a detailed thermochemical equation of state and rate law kinetics. We will present an analysis of the data from the time resolved imaging diagnostics and form a consistent picture of the shock transmission, propagation and instability structure.

  3. New radiative shocks experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leygnac, S.; Bouquet, S.; Stehlé, C.; Benuzzi, A.; Boireau, J.-P.; Chièze, J.-P.; Grandjouan, N.; Huser, G.; Koenig, M.; Malka, V.; Merdji, H.; Michaut, C.; Thais, F.; Vinci, T.

    2002-06-01

    An experimental study of shocks with astrophysical relevance is performed with the high energy density laser of the LULI, at the Ecole Polytechnique. The peculiarity of these shocks is the strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. A new experiment has been performed this year where we have observed shocks identified as radiative shocks. We study them in various experimental configurations (several speeds and geometries of the medium where the shock propagates, allowing a quasi-planar or a quasi-spherical expansion). From the measurements it is possible to infer several features of the shock such as the speed, the electronic density, the geometrical shape and spectroscopic informations. The results will be studied with numerical simulations.

  4. Implementation of Probabilistic Design Methodology at Tennessee State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onwubiko, Chinyere

    1996-01-01

    Engineering Design is one of the most important areas in engineering education. Deterministic Design Methodology (DDM) is the only design method that is taught in most engineering schools. This method does not give a direct account of uncertainties in design parameters. Hence, it is impossible to quantify the uncertainties in the response and the actual safety margin remains unknown. The desire for a design methodology tha can identify the primitive (random) variables that affect the structural behavior has led to a growing interest on Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM). This method is gaining more recognition in industries than in educational institutions. Some of the reasons for the limited use of the PDM at the moment are that many are unaware of its potentials, and most of the software developed for PDM are very recent. The central goal of the PDM project at Tennessee State University is to introduce engineering students to the method. The students participating in the project learn about PDM and the computer codes that are available to the design engineer. The software being used of this project is NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) developed under NASA probabilistic structural analysis program. NESSUS has three different modules which make it a very comprehensive computer code for PDM. A research in technology transfer through course offering in PDM is in effect a Tennessee State University. The aim is to familiarize students with the problem of uncertainties in engineering design. Included in the paper are some projects on PDM carried out by some students and faculty. The areas this method is being applied at the moment include, Design of Gears (spur and worm); Design of Shafts; Design of Statistically Indeterminate Frame Structures; Design of Helical Springs; and Design of Shock Absorbers. Some of the current results of these projects are presented.

  5. Implementation of probabilistic design methodology at Tennessee State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onwubiko, Chinyere

    1995-01-01

    The fact that Deterministic Design Method no longer satisfies most design needs calls for methods that will cope with the high trend in technology. The advance in computer technology has reduced the rigors that normally accompany many design analysis methods that account for uncertainties in design parameters. Probabilistic Design Methodology (PDM) is beginning to make impact in engineering design. This method is gaining more recognition in industries than in educational institutions. Some of the reasons for the limited use of the PDM at the moment are that many are unaware of its potentials, and most of the software developed for PDM are very recent. The central goal of the PDM project at Tennessee State University is to introduce engineering students to this method. The students participating in the project learn about PDM and the computer codes that are available to the design engineer. The software being used for this project is NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress) developed under NASA probabilistic structural analysis program. NESSUS has three different modules which make it a very comprehensive computer code for PDM. Since this method is new to the students, its introduction into the engineering curriculum is to be in stages. These range from the introduction of PDM and its software to the applications. While this program is being developed for its eventual inclusion into the engineering curriculum, some graduate and undergraduate students are already carrying out some projects using this method. As the students are increasing their understanding on PDM, they are at the same time applying it to some common design problems. The areas this method is being applied at the moment include, Design of Gears (spur and worm); Design of Brakes; Design of Heat Exchangers Design of Helical Springs; and Design of Shock Absorbers. Some of the current results of these projects are presented.

  6. Observation of off-Hugoniot shocked states with ultrafast time resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Crowhurst, J; Bastea, S; Zaug, J

    2010-02-23

    We apply ultrafast single shot interferometry to determine the pressure and density of argon shocked from up to 7.8 GPa static initial pressure in a diamond anvil cell. This method enables the observation of thermodynamic states distinct from those observed in either single shock or isothermal compression experiments, and the observation of ultrafast dynamics in shocked materials. We also present a straightforward method for interpreting ultrafast shock wave data which determines the index of refraction at the shock front, and the particle and shock velocities for shock waves in transparent materials. Based on these methods, we observe shocked thermodynamic states between the room temperature isotherm of argon and the shock adiabat of cryogenic argon at final shock pressures up to 28 GPa.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SHOCK WAVE DYNAMICS IN MAGNETIZED PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmol K. Podder

    2009-03-17

    In this four-year project (including one-year extension), the project director and his research team built a shock-wave-plasma apparatus to study shock wave dynamics in glow discharge plasmas in nitrogen and argon at medium pressure (1–20 Torr), carried out various plasma and shock diagnostics and measurements that lead to increased understanding of the shock wave acceleration phenomena in plasmas. The measurements clearly show that in the steady-state dc glow discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave velocity increases, its amplitude decreases, and the shock wave disperses non-linearly as a function of the plasma current. In the pulsed discharge plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity increase as a function of the delay between the switch-on of the plasma and shock-launch. In the afterglow plasma, at fixed gas pressure the shock wave dispersion width and velocity decrease as a function of the delay between the plasma switch-off and shock-launch. These changes are found to be opposite and reversing towards the room temperature value which is the initial condition for plasma ignition case. The observed shock wave properties in both igniting and afterglow plasmas correlate well with the inferred temperature changes in the two plasmas.

  8. DIFFUSIVE SHOCK ACCELERATION OF HIGH-ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES AT FAST INTERPLANETARY SHOCKS: A PARAMETER SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Giacalone, Joe

    2015-01-20

    We present results from numerical simulations of the acceleration of solar energetic particles (SEPs) associated with strong, fast, and radially propagating interplanetary shocks. We focus on the phase of the SEP event at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU, which is when the peak intensity at energies below a few MeV is the highest. The shocks in our study start between 2 and 10 solar radii and propagate beyond 1 AU. We study the effect of various shock and particle input parameters, such as the spatial diffusion coefficient, shock speed, solar wind speed, initial location of the shock, and shock deceleration rate, on the total integrated differential intensity, I, of SEPs with kinetic energies > 10 MeV. I is the integral over energy of the differential intensity spectrum at the time of the shock passage at 1 AU. We find that relatively small changes in the parameters can lead to significant event-to-event changes in I. For example, a factor of 2 increase in the diffusion coefficient at a given energy and spatial location, can lead to a decrease in I by as much as a factor of 50. This may help explain why there are fewer large SEP events seen during the current solar maximum compared to previous maxima. It is known that the magnitude of the interplanetary magnetic field is noticeably weaker this solar cycle than it was in the previous cycle and this will naturally lead to a somewhat larger diffusion coefficient of SEPs.

  9. Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fu; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2016-08-01

    The cylindrical converging shock reflection over a plane wedge is investigated experimentally and numerically in a specially designed shock tube which converts a planar shock into a cylindrical one. When the converging shock is moving along the wedge, both the shock strength and the incident angle are changing, which provides the possibility for the wave transition. The results show that both regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are found on the wedge with different initial incident angles. The wave transitions from direct Mach reflection (DiMR) to inverse Mach reflection (InMR) and further to transitioned regular reflection (TRR) are observed with appropriate initial incident angles. The instability development in the shear layer and strong vortices formation near the wall are evident, which are ascribed not only to the interaction of two shear layers but also to the shock impact and the shock converging effect. Because of the flow unsteadiness after the converging shock, the detachment criterion provides a good estimation for the RR → MR transition, but fails to predict the DiMR → InMR transition, and MR is found to persist slightly below the mechanical equilibrium condition. A hysteresis process is found in the MR → TRR transition and becomes more apparent as the increase of the initial incident angle due to the shock converging effect.

  10. Compaction shock dissipation in low density granular explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pratap T.; Gonthier, Keith A.; Chakravarthy, Sunada

    2016-06-01

    The microstructure of granular explosives can affect dissipative heating within compaction shocks that can trigger combustion and initiate detonation. Because initiation occurs over distances that are much larger than the mean particle size, homogenized (macroscale) theories are often used to describe local thermodynamic states within and behind shocks that are regarded as the average manifestation of thermodynamic fields at the particle scale. In this paper, mesoscale modeling and simulation are used to examine how the initial packing density of granular HMX (C4H8N8O8) C4H8N8O8 having a narrow particle size distribution influences dissipation within resolved, planar compaction shocks. The model tracks the evolution of thermomechanical fields within large ensembles of particles due to pore collapse. Effective shock profiles, obtained by averaging mesoscale fields over space and time, are compared with those given by an independent macroscale compaction theory that predicts the variation in effective thermomechanical fields within shocks due to an imbalance between the solid pressure and a configurational stress. Reducing packing density is shown to reduce the dissipation rate within shocks but increase the integrated dissipated work over shock rise times, which is indicative of enhanced sensitivity. In all cases, dissipated work is related to shock pressure by a density-dependent power law, and shock rise time is related to pressure by a power law having an exponent of negative one.

  11. Shock compression of condensed nonideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortov, Vladimir

    2001-06-01

    The physical properties of hot dense plasmas at megabar pressures are of great interest for astro- and planetary physics, inertial confinement fusion, energetics, technology and many other applications. The lecture presents the modern results of experimental investigations of equations of state, compositions, thermodynamical and transport properties, electrical conductivity and opacity of strongly coupled plasmas generated by intense shock and rarefaction waves. The experimental methods for generation of high energy densities in matter, drivers for shock waves and fast diagnostic methods are discussed. The application of intense shock waves to solid and porous targets allows us to degenerate Fermi-like plasmas with maximum pressure up to 4Gbar and temperatures 10^7 K. Compression of plasma by a series of incident and reflected shock waves allows us to decrease irreversible heating effects. As a result, such a multiple compression process becomes close to the isentropic one which permits us to reach much higher densities and lower temperatures compared to single shock compression. On the other hand, to increase the irreversibility effects and to generate high temperature plasma states the experiments on shock compression of porous samples (fine metal powder, aerogels) were performed. The shock compression of saturated metal vapors and previously compressed noble gases by incident and reflected shocks allows us to reach nonideal plasmas on the Hugoniot. The adiabatic expansion of matter initially compressed by intense shocks up to megabars gives us the chance to investigate the intermediate region between the solid and vapor phase of nonideal plasmas, including the metal-insulator transition phase and the high temperature saturation curve with critical points of metals.

  12. Probabilistic Survivability Versus Time Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    This technical paper documents Kennedy Space Centers Independent Assessment team work completed on three assessments for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program to assist the Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer (CSO) and GSDO management during key programmatic reviews. The assessments provided the GSDO Program with an analysis of how egress time affects the likelihood of astronaut and worker survival during an emergency. For each assessment, the team developed probability distributions for hazard scenarios to address statistical uncertainty, resulting in survivability plots over time. The first assessment developed a mathematical model of probabilistic survivability versus time to reach a safe location using an ideal Emergency Egress System at Launch Complex 39B (LC-39B); the second used the first model to evaluate and compare various egress systems under consideration at LC-39B. The third used a modified LC-39B model to determine if a specific hazard decreased survivability more rapidly than other events during flight hardware processing in Kennedys Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB).Based on the composite survivability versus time graphs from the first two assessments, there was a soft knee in the Figure of Merit graphs at eight minutes (ten minutes after egress ordered). Thus, the graphs illustrated to the decision makers that the final emergency egress design selected should have the capability of transporting the flight crew from the top of LC 39B to a safe location in eight minutes or less. Results for the third assessment were dominated by hazards that were classified as instantaneous in nature (e.g. stacking mishaps) and therefore had no effect on survivability vs time to egress the VAB. VAB emergency scenarios that degraded over time (e.g. fire) produced survivability vs time graphs that were line with aerospace industry norms.

  13. RAVEN and Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment: Software overview

    SciTech Connect

    Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita; Antonio Naviglio

    2014-09-01

    RAVEN is a generic software framework to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis based on the response of complex system codes. The initial development was aimed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 [], currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. Although the initial goal has been fully accomplished, RAVEN is now a multi-purpose probabilistic and uncertainty quantification platform, capable to agnostically communicate with any system code. This agnosticism has been employed by providing Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These interfaces are used to allow RAVEN to interact with any code as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable to investigate the system response, investigating the input space using Monte Carlo, Grid, or Latin Hyper Cube sampling schemes, but its strength is focused toward system feature discovery, such as limit surfaces, separating regions of the input space leading to system failure, using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The paper presents an overview of the software capabilities and their implementation schemes followed by some application examples.

  14. Architecture for Integrated Medical Model Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Myers, J. G.; Goodenow, D.; Young, M.; Arellano, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) is a modeling tool used to predict potential outcomes of a complex system based on a statistical understanding of many initiating events. Utilizing a Monte Carlo method, thousands of instances of the model are considered and outcomes are collected. PRA is considered static, utilizing probabilities alone to calculate outcomes. Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (dPRA) is an advanced concept where modeling predicts the outcomes of a complex system based not only on the probabilities of many initiating events, but also on a progression of dependencies brought about by progressing down a time line. Events are placed in a single time line, adding each event to a queue, as managed by a planner. Progression down the time line is guided by rules, as managed by a scheduler. The recently developed Integrated Medical Model (IMM) summarizes astronaut health as governed by the probabilities of medical events and mitigation strategies. Managing the software architecture process provides a systematic means of creating, documenting, and communicating a software design early in the development process. The software architecture process begins with establishing requirements and the design is then derived from the requirements.

  15. Weak shock reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, John K.; Brio, Moysey

    2000-05-01

    We present numerical solutions of a two-dimensional inviscid Burgers equation which provides an asymptotic description of the Mach reflection of weak shocks. In our numerical solutions, the incident, reflected, and Mach shocks meet at a triple point, and there is a supersonic patch behind the triple point, as proposed by Guderley for steady weak-shock reflection. A theoretical analysis indicates that there is an expansion fan at the triple point, in addition to the three shocks. The supersonic patch is extremely small, and this work is the first time it has been resolved.

  16. Anti-Shock Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ames Research Center developed a prototype pressure suit for hemophiliac children, based on research of astronauts' physiological responses in microgravity. Zoex Corporation picked up the design and patents and developed an anti-shock garment for paramedic use. Marketed by Dyna Med, the suit reverses the effect of shock on the body's blood distribution by applying counterpressure to the legs and abdomen, returning blood to vital organs and stabilizing body pressure until the patient reaches a hospital. The DMAST (Dyna Med Anti-Shock Trousers) employ lower pressure than other shock garments, and are non-inflatable.

  17. When shock waves collide

    DOE PAGES

    Martinez, D.; Hartigan, P.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Foster, J.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; et al

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed tomore » quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. Furthermore, the experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.« less

  18. When Shock Waves Collide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, P.; Foster, J.; Frank, A.; Hansen, E.; Yirak, K.; Liao, A. S.; Graham, P.; Wilde, B.; Blue, B.; Martinez, D.; Rosen, P.; Farley, D.; Paguio, R.

    2016-06-01

    Supersonic outflows from objects as varied as stellar jets, massive stars, and novae often exhibit multiple shock waves that overlap one another. When the intersection angle between two shock waves exceeds a critical value, the system reconfigures its geometry to create a normal shock known as a Mach stem where the shocks meet. Mach stems are important for interpreting emission-line images of shocked gas because a normal shock produces higher postshock temperatures, and therefore a higher-excitation spectrum than does an oblique shock. In this paper, we summarize the results of a series of numerical simulations and laboratory experiments designed to quantify how Mach stems behave in supersonic plasmas that are the norm in astrophysical flows. The experiments test analytical predictions for critical angles where Mach stems should form, and quantify how Mach stems grow and decay as intersection angles between the incident shock and a surface change. While small Mach stems are destroyed by surface irregularities and subcritical angles, larger ones persist in these situations and can regrow if the intersection angle changes to become more favorable. The experimental and numerical results show that although Mach stems occur only over a limited range of intersection angles and size scales, within these ranges they are relatively robust, and hence are a viable explanation for variable bright knots observed in Hubble Space Telescope images at the intersections of some bow shocks in stellar jets.

  19. Probabilistic Modeling of Settlement Risk at Land Disposal Facilities - 12304

    SciTech Connect

    Foye, Kevin C.; Soong, Te-Yang

    2012-07-01

    The long-term reliability of land disposal facility final cover systems - and therefore the overall waste containment - depends on the distortions imposed on these systems by differential settlement/subsidence. The evaluation of differential settlement is challenging because of the heterogeneity of the waste mass (caused by inconsistent compaction, void space distribution, debris-soil mix ratio, waste material stiffness, time-dependent primary compression of the fine-grained soil matrix, long-term creep settlement of the soil matrix and the debris, etc.) at most land disposal facilities. Deterministic approaches to long-term final cover settlement prediction are not able to capture the spatial variability in the waste mass and sub-grade properties which control differential settlement. An alternative, probabilistic solution is to use random fields to model the waste and sub-grade properties. The modeling effort informs the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of land disposal facilities. A probabilistic method to establish design criteria for waste placement and compaction is introduced using the model. Random fields are ideally suited to problems of differential settlement modeling of highly heterogeneous foundations, such as waste. Random fields model the seemingly random spatial distribution of a design parameter, such as compressibility. When used for design, the use of these models prompts the need for probabilistic design criteria. It also allows for a statistical approach to waste placement acceptance criteria. An example design evaluation was performed, illustrating the use of the probabilistic differential settlement simulation methodology to assemble a design guidance chart. The purpose of this design evaluation is to enable the designer to select optimal initial combinations of design slopes and quality control acceptance criteria that yield an acceptable proportion of post-settlement slopes meeting some design minimum. For this specific

  20. A Probabilistic Integrity Assessment of Flaw in Zirconium Alloy Pressure Tube Considering Delayed Hydride Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Sang Log; Lee, Joon Seong; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Youn Won

    In the CANDU nuclear reactor, pressure tubes of cold-worked Zr-2.5Nb material are used in the reactor core to contain the nuclear fuel bundles and heavy water coolant. Pressure tubes are major component of nuclear reactor, but only selected samples are periodically examined due to numerous numbers of tubes. Pressure tube material gradually pick up deuterium, as such are susceptible to a crack initiation and propagation process called delayed hydride cracking (DHC), which is the characteristic of pressure tube integrity evaluation. If cracks are not detected, such a cracking mechanism could lead to unstable rupture of the pressure tube. Up to this time, integrity evaluations are performed using conventional deterministic approaches. So it is expected that the results obtained are too conservative to perform a rational evaluation of lifetime. In this respect, a probabilistic safety assessment method is more appropriate for the assessment of overall pressure tube safety. This paper describes failure criteria for probabilistic analysis and fracture mechanics analyses of the pressure tubes in consideration of DHC. Major input parameters such as initial hydrogen concentration, the depth and aspect ratio of an initial surface crack, DHC velocity and fracture toughness are considered as probabilistic variables. Failure assessment diagram of pressure tube material is proposed and applied in the probabilistic analysis. In all the analyses, failure probabilities are calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation. As a result of analysis, conservatism of deterministic failure criteria is showed.

  1. Probabilistic numerics and uncertainty in computations

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Philipp; Osborne, Michael A.; Girolami, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We deliver a call to arms for probabilistic numerical methods: algorithms for numerical tasks, including linear algebra, integration, optimization and solving differential equations, that return uncertainties in their calculations. Such uncertainties, arising from the loss of precision induced by numerical calculation with limited time or hardware, are important for much contemporary science and industry. Within applications such as climate science and astrophysics, the need to make decisions on the basis of computations with large and complex data have led to a renewed focus on the management of numerical uncertainty. We describe how several seminal classic numerical methods can be interpreted naturally as probabilistic inference. We then show that the probabilistic view suggests new algorithms that can flexibly be adapted to suit application specifics, while delivering improved empirical performance. We provide concrete illustrations of the benefits of probabilistic numeric algorithms on real scientific problems from astrometry and astronomical imaging, while highlighting open problems with these new algorithms. Finally, we describe how probabilistic numerical methods provide a coherent framework for identifying the uncertainty in calculations performed with a combination of numerical algorithms (e.g. both numerical optimizers and differential equation solvers), potentially allowing the diagnosis (and control) of error sources in computations. PMID:26346321

  2. Induced thermoluminescence study of experimentally shock-loaded oligoclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivliev, A. I.; Kashkarov, L. L.; Badjukov, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    Artificially induced thermoluminescence (TL) in oligoclase samples which were shock-loaded up to 27 GPa was measured. The essential increase of the TL sensitivity in relation to the total gamma-ray irradiation dose was observed only in samples at the 27 GPa pressure. This result can be explained by the initiation of additional radiation damages in the shocked oligoclace crystal lattice.

  3. Development of an Explosively Driven Sustained Shock Generator for Shock Wave Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P.; Cook, I. T.; Salisbury, D. A.

    2004-07-01

    Investigation of explosive initiation phenomena close to the initiation threshold with explosively driven shock waves is difficult due to the attenuative nature of the pressure input. The design and experimental testing of a sustained shock wave generator based on an explosive plane wave lens and impedance mismatched low density foam and high impedance layers is described. Calibration experiments to develop a 1-D calculational model for the plane wave lens and booster charge were performed. A calculational study was undertaken to determine the sensitivity of the output pulse to plate and foam thicknesses and foam density. A geometry which generates a 24kb almost flat topped shock wave with a duration of over 4μs into the HMX based plastic explosive EDC37 was defined and tested. Experimental shock profile data is compared with pre-shot predictions from the PETRA Eulerian hydrocode incorporating a "snowplough" or simple locking model for the foam. A reasonable match to the observed magnitude and profile of the initial shock is achieved, although the timing of subsequent shock waves is less well matched.

  4. Visualizing Uncertainty for Probabilistic Weather Forecasting based on Reforecast Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelorosso, Leandro; Diehl, Alexandra; Matković, Krešimir; Delrieux, Claudio; Ruiz, Juan; Gröeller, M. Eduard; Bruckner, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Numerical weather forecasts are prone to uncertainty coming from inaccuracies in the initial and boundary conditions and lack of precision in numerical models. Ensemble of forecasts partially addresses these problems by considering several runs of the numerical model. Each forecast is generated with different initial and boundary conditions and different model configurations [GR05]. The ensembles can be expressed as probabilistic forecasts, which have proven to be very effective in the decision-making processes [DE06]. The ensemble of forecasts represents only some of the possible future atmospheric states, usually underestimating the degree of uncertainty in the predictions [KAL03, PH06]. Hamill and Whitaker [HW06] introduced the "Reforecast Analog Regression" (RAR) technique to overcome the limitations of ensemble forecasting. This technique produces probabilistic predictions based on the analysis of historical forecasts and observations. Visual analytics provides tools for processing, visualizing, and exploring data to get new insights and discover hidden information patterns in an interactive exchange between the user and the application [KMS08]. In this work, we introduce Albero, a visual analytics solution for probabilistic weather forecasting based on the RAR technique. Albero targets at least two different type of users: "forecasters", who are meteorologists working in operational weather forecasting and "researchers", who work in the construction of numerical prediction models. Albero is an efficient tool for analyzing precipitation forecasts, allowing forecasters to make and communicate quick decisions. Our solution facilitates the analysis of a set of probabilistic forecasts, associated statistical data, observations and uncertainty. A dashboard with small-multiples of probabilistic forecasts allows the forecasters to analyze at a glance the distribution of probabilities as a function of time, space, and magnitude. It provides the user with a more

  5. Probabilistic Modeling of the Renal Stone Formation Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Best, Lauren M.; Myers, Jerry G.; Goodenow, Debra A.; McRae, Michael P.; Jackson, Travis C.

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is a probabilistic tool, used in mission planning decision making and medical systems risk assessments. The IMM project maintains a database of over 80 medical conditions that could occur during a spaceflight, documenting an incidence rate and end case scenarios for each. In some cases, where observational data are insufficient to adequately define the inflight medical risk, the IMM utilizes external probabilistic modules to model and estimate the event likelihoods. One such medical event of interest is an unpassed renal stone. Due to a high salt diet and high concentrations of calcium in the blood (due to bone depletion caused by unloading in the microgravity environment) astronauts are at a considerable elevated risk for developing renal calculi (nephrolithiasis) while in space. Lack of observed incidences of nephrolithiasis has led HRP to initiate the development of the Renal Stone Formation Module (RSFM) to create a probabilistic simulator capable of estimating the likelihood of symptomatic renal stone presentation in astronauts on exploration missions. The model consists of two major parts. The first is the probabilistic component, which utilizes probability distributions to assess the range of urine electrolyte parameters and a multivariate regression to transform estimated crystal density and size distributions to the likelihood of the presentation of nephrolithiasis symptoms. The second is a deterministic physical and chemical model of renal stone growth in the kidney developed by Kassemi et al. The probabilistic component of the renal stone model couples the input probability distributions describing the urine chemistry, astronaut physiology, and system parameters with the physical and chemical outputs and inputs to the deterministic stone growth model. These two parts of the model are necessary to capture the uncertainty in the likelihood estimate. The model will be driven by Monte Carlo simulations, continuously

  6. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cardiogenic Shock Treated? Cardiogenic shock is life threatening and requires emergency medical treatment. ... arrive. The first goal of emergency treatment for cardiogenic shock is to improve the flow of blood and ...

  7. Degradation monitoring using probabilistic inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpay, Bulent

    In order to increase safety and improve economy and performance in a nuclear power plant (NPP), the source and extent of component degradations should be identified before failures and breakdowns occur. It is also crucial for the next generation of NPPs, which are designed to have a long core life and high fuel burnup to have a degradation monitoring system in order to keep the reactor in a safe state, to meet the designed reactor core lifetime and to optimize the scheduled maintenance. Model-based methods are based on determining the inconsistencies between the actual and expected behavior of the plant, and use these inconsistencies for detection and diagnostics of degradations. By defining degradation as a random abrupt change from the nominal to a constant degraded state of a component, we employed nonlinear filtering techniques based on state/parameter estimation. We utilized a Bayesian recursive estimation formulation in the sequential probabilistic inference framework and constructed a hidden Markov model to represent a general physical system. By addressing the problem of a filter's inability to estimate an abrupt change, which is called the oblivious filter problem in nonlinear extensions of Kalman filtering, and the sample impoverishment problem in particle filtering, we developed techniques to modify filtering algorithms by utilizing additional data sources to improve the filter's response to this problem. We utilized a reliability degradation database that can be constructed from plant specific operational experience and test and maintenance reports to generate proposal densities for probable degradation modes. These are used in a multiple hypothesis testing algorithm. We then test samples drawn from these proposal densities with the particle filtering estimates based on the Bayesian recursive estimation formulation with the Metropolis Hastings algorithm, which is a well-known Markov chain Monte Carlo method (MCMC). This multiple hypothesis testing

  8. Probabilistic Exposure Analysis for Chemical Risk Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Bogen, Kenneth T.; Cullen, Alison C.; Frey, H. Christopher; Price, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes the state of the science of probabilistic exposure assessment (PEA) as applied to chemical risk characterization. Current probabilistic risk analysis methods applied to PEA are reviewed. PEA within the context of risk-based decision making is discussed, including probabilistic treatment of related uncertainty, interindividual heterogeneity, and other sources of variability. Key examples of recent experience gained in assessing human exposures to chemicals in the environment, and other applications to chemical risk characterization and assessment, are presented. It is concluded that, although improvements continue to be made, existing methods suffice for effective application of PEA to support quantitative analyses of the risk of chemically induced toxicity that play an increasing role in key decision-making objectives involving health protection, triage, civil justice, and criminal justice. Different types of information required to apply PEA to these different decision contexts are identified, and specific PEA methods are highlighted that are best suited to exposure assessment in these separate contexts. PMID:19223660

  9. Probabilistic Cue Combination: Less is More

    PubMed Central

    Yurovsky, Daniel; Boyer, Ty W.; Smith, Linda B.; Yu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Learning about the structure of the world requires learning probabilistic relationships: rules in which cues do not predict outcomes with certainty. However, in some cases, the ability to track probabilistic relationships is a handicap, leading adults to perform non-normatively in prediction tasks. For example, in the dilution effect, predictions made from the combination of two cues of different strengths are less accurate than those made from the stronger cue alone. Here we show that dilution is an adult problem; 11-month-old infants combine strong and weak predictors normatively. These results extend and add support for the less is more hypothesis: limited cognitive resources can lead children to represent probabilistic information differently from adults, and this difference in representation can have important downstream consequences for prediction. PMID:23432826

  10. Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry and spectroscopy of laser shocked materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, Cynthia A; Mc Grane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Moore, David S.

    2011-01-20

    Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry is used to measure the material motion and changes in the optical refractive index of laser shock compressed materials. This diagnostic has shown us that the ultrafast laser driven shocks are the same as shocks on longer timescales and larger length scales. We have added spectroscopic diagnostics of infrared absorption, ultra-violet - visible transient absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to begin probing the initiation chemistry that occurs in shock reactive materials. We have also used the femtosecond stimulated Raman scattering to measure the vibrational temperature of materials using the Stokes gain to anti-Stokes loss ratio.

  11. On a Stochastic Failure Model under Random Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Ji Hwan

    2013-02-01

    In most conventional settings, the events caused by an external shock are initiated at the moments of its occurrence. In this paper, we study a new classes of shock model, where each shock from a nonhomogeneous Poisson processes can trigger a failure of a system not immediately, as in classical extreme shock models, but with delay of some random time. We derive the corresponding survival and failure rate functions. Furthermore, we study the limiting behaviour of the failure rate function where it is applicable.

  12. Radiative shocks: An opportunity to study laboratory astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, M.; Vinci, T.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Ozaki, N.; Ravasio, A.; Rabec Le Glohaec, M.; Boireau, L.; Michaut, C.; Bouquet, S.; Atzeni, S.; Schiavi, A.; Peyrusse, O.; Batani, D.

    2006-05-01

    In this paper, experimental results on radiative shocks generated by a high power laser in a xenon gas cell are presented. Two sets of experiments have been performed at the Laser pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) laboratory. Several shock parameters were simultaneously measured: shock temperature and velocities, the precursor two-dimensional (2D) time evolution, its electron density, density gradient, and temperature. Data were obtained varying initial conditions for different laser intensities and gas pressures. Comparisons with 1D and 2D radiative hydrodynamic simulations are shown for all measured parameters (shock velocity, shape, radial expansion, and temperature as well as precursor velocity and electron density).

  13. Exploration of Advanced Probabilistic and Stochastic Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2003-01-01

    The primary objective of the three year research effort was to explore advanced, non-deterministic aerospace system design methods that may have relevance to designers and analysts. The research pursued emerging areas in design methodology and leverage current fundamental research in the area of design decision-making, probabilistic modeling, and optimization. The specific focus of the three year investigation was oriented toward methods to identify and analyze emerging aircraft technologies in a consistent and complete manner, and to explore means to make optimal decisions based on this knowledge in a probabilistic environment. The research efforts were classified into two main areas. First, Task A of the grant has had the objective of conducting research into the relative merits of possible approaches that account for both multiple criteria and uncertainty in design decision-making. In particular, in the final year of research, the focus was on the comparison and contrasting between three methods researched. Specifically, these three are the Joint Probabilistic Decision-Making (JPDM) technique, Physical Programming, and Dempster-Shafer (D-S) theory. The next element of the research, as contained in Task B, was focused upon exploration of the Technology Identification, Evaluation, and Selection (TIES) methodology developed at ASDL, especially with regards to identification of research needs in the baseline method through implementation exercises. The end result of Task B was the documentation of the evolution of the method with time and a technology transfer to the sponsor regarding the method, such that an initial capability for execution could be obtained by the sponsor. Specifically, the results of year 3 efforts were the creation of a detailed tutorial for implementing the TIES method. Within the tutorial package, templates and detailed examples were created for learning and understanding the details of each step. For both research tasks, sample files and

  14. Probabilistic Learning by Rodent Grid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence shows mammalian brains are probabilistic computers, but the specific cells involved remain elusive. Parallel research suggests that grid cells of the mammalian hippocampal formation are fundamental to spatial cognition but their diverse response properties still defy explanation. No plausible model exists which explains stable grids in darkness for twenty minutes or longer, despite being one of the first results ever published on grid cells. Similarly, no current explanation can tie together grid fragmentation and grid rescaling, which show very different forms of flexibility in grid responses when the environment is varied. Other properties such as attractor dynamics and grid anisotropy seem to be at odds with one another unless additional properties are assumed such as a varying velocity gain. Modelling efforts have largely ignored the breadth of response patterns, while also failing to account for the disastrous effects of sensory noise during spatial learning and recall, especially in darkness. Here, published electrophysiological evidence from a range of experiments are reinterpreted using a novel probabilistic learning model, which shows that grid cell responses are accurately predicted by a probabilistic learning process. Diverse response properties of probabilistic grid cells are statistically indistinguishable from rat grid cells across key manipulations. A simple coherent set of probabilistic computations explains stable grid fields in darkness, partial grid rescaling in resized arenas, low-dimensional attractor grid cell dynamics, and grid fragmentation in hairpin mazes. The same computations also reconcile oscillatory dynamics at the single cell level with attractor dynamics at the cell ensemble level. Additionally, a clear functional role for boundary cells is proposed for spatial learning. These findings provide a parsimonious and unified explanation of grid cell function, and implicate grid cells as an accessible neuronal population

  15. Shock Demagnetization of Pyrrhotite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louzada, K. L.; Stewart, S. T.; Weiss, b. P.

    2005-01-01

    Maps of the remanent magnetic field of Mars show demagnetized zones within and around giant impact basins. It is likely that vast regions of the Martian crust were demagnetized due to a shock-induced phase change or magnetic transition of magnetic minerals in the crust. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that around the Hellas and Argyre basins, the edges of the unmagnetized zones roughly correspond with peak shock pressure contour lines of a few GPa. Although pyrrhotite is not a major carrier of magnetization in the Earth s crust, it is a common phase in Martian meteorites and may be an important carrier in the Martian crust. Understanding the effects of shock waves on magnetic minerals is critical for determining the origin of the demagnetized zones in impact basins and possibly for identifying the major magnetic carrier phases. Here we present the results of the first controlled shock demagnetization measurements on pyrrhotite. Previous experiments: Shock demagnetization

  16. Shock Waves in Dispersive Eulerian Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoefer, Mark

    2013-11-01

    Shock waves in dispersive media with negligible dissipation are studied in the context of the compressible Euler equations with weak dispersion. Example fluids of this type include superfluids, shallow water flows, and ion-acoustic plasma. A characterization of one-dimensional dispersive shock waves (DSWs) will be presented. DSWs are sharply distinct from classical, dissipatively regularized shock waves both in terms of physical significance and mathematical description. Drawing on terminology from classical gas dynamics, jump conditions (shock loci and speeds) and admissibility criteria for the long time evolution of step-like initial data will be presented utilizing a nonlinear wave averaging technique. While entropy conditions determine admissible, dissipatively regularized shock waves, conservative, dispersive systems are time reversible and can exhibit positive or negative dispersion. The universal structure of weak shocks will be shown to depend solely upon the dispersion sign and pressure law. Large amplitude DSWs can exhibit novel effects such as cavitation and ``implosion'' yielding internal, multi-phase dynamics. Support from NSF DMS-1008973.

  17. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  18. Probabilistic modeling of subgrade soil strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Y. T.

    1981-09-01

    A concept of spatial average in probabilistic modeling of subgrade soil strength is presented. The advantage of the application of spatial average to pavement engineering is explained. The link between the concept and the overall probability-based pavement design procedure is formulated and explained. In the earlier part of the report, a literature review of the concept and procedure of probabilistic design of pavements, which includes the concepts of variations and reliability, is presented. Finally, an outline of a probability based pavement design procedure for the Corps of Engineers is presented.

  19. The Interaction of a Reflected Shock Wave with the Boundary Layer in a Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mark, Herman

    1958-01-01

    Ideally, the reflection of a shock from the closed end of a shock tube provides, for laboratory study, a quantity of stationary gas at extremely high temperature. Because of the action of viscosity, however, the flow in the real case is not one-dimensional, and a boundary layer grows in the fluid following the initial shock wave. In this paper simplifying assumptions are made to allow an analysis of the interaction of the shock reflected from the closed end with the boundary layer of the initial shock afterflow. The analysis predicts that interactions of several different types will exist in different ranges of initial shock Mach number. It is shown that the cooling effect of the wall on the afterflow boundary layer accounts for the change in interaction type. An experiment is carried out which verifies the existence of the several interaction regions and shows that they are satisfactorily predicted by the theory. Along with these results, sufficient information is obtained from the experiments to make possible a model for the interaction in the most complicated case. This model is further verified by measurements made during the experiment. The case of interaction with a turbulent boundary layer is also considered. Identifying the type of interaction with the state of turbulence of the interacting boundary layer allows for an estimate of the state of turbulence of the boundary layer based on an experimental investigation of the type of interaction. A method is proposed whereby the effect of the boundary-layer interaction on the strength of the reflected shock may be calculated. The calculation indicates that the reflected shock is rapidly attenuated for a short distance after reflection, and this result compares favorably with available experimental results.

  20. Underwater Shock Wave Research Applied to Therapeutic Device Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayama, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Shimokawa, H.

    2013-07-01

    The chronological development of underwater shock wave research performed at the Shock Wave Research Center of the Institute of Fluid Science at the Tohoku University is presented. Firstly, the generation of planar underwater shock waves in shock tubes and their visualization by using the conventional shadowgraph and schlieren methods are described. Secondly, the generation of spherical underwater shock waves by exploding lead azide pellets weighing from several tens of micrograms to 100 mg, that were ignited by irradiating with a Q-switched laser beam, and their visualization by using double exposure holographic interferometry are presented. The initiation, propagation, reflection, focusing of underwater shock waves, and their interaction with various interfaces, in particular, with air bubbles, are visualized quantitatively. Based on such a fundamental underwater shock wave research, collaboration with the School of Medicine at the Tohoku University was started for developing a shock wave assisted therapeutic device, which was named an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL). Miniature shock waves created by irradiation with Q-switched HO:YAG laser beams are studied, as applied to damaged dysfunctional nerve cells in the myocardium in a precisely controlled manner, and are effectively used to design a catheter for treating arrhythmia.

  1. Pathophysiological roles of peroxynitrite in circulatory shock.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Csaba; Módis, Katalin

    2010-09-01

    Peroxynitrite is a reactive oxidant produced from nitric oxide and superoxide, which reacts with proteins, lipids, and DNA, and promotes cytotoxic and proinflammatory responses. Here, we overview the role of peroxynitrite in various forms of circulatory shock. Immunohistochemical and biochemical evidences demonstrate the production of peroxynitrite in various experimental models of endotoxic and hemorrhagic shock both in rodents and in large animals. In addition, biological markers of peroxynitrite have been identified in human tissues after circulatory shock. Peroxynitrite can initiate toxic oxidative reactions in vitro and in vivo. Initiation of lipid peroxidation, direct inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, inactivation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, inhibition of membrane Na+/K+ ATPase activity, inactivation of membrane sodium channels, and other oxidative protein modifications contribute to the cytotoxic effect of peroxynitrite. In addition, peroxynitrite is a potent trigger of DNA strand breakage, with subsequent activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, which promotes cellular energetic collapse and cellular necrosis. Additional actions of peroxynitrite that contribute to the pathogenesis of shock include inactivation of catecholamines and catecholamine receptors (leading to vascular failure) and endothelial and epithelial injury (leading to endothelial and epithelial hyperpermeability and barrier dysfunction), as well as myocyte injury (contributing to loss of cardiac contractile function). Neutralization of peroxynitrite with potent peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts provides cytoprotective and beneficial effects in rodent and large-animal models of circulatory shock.

  2. Boosting probabilistic graphical model inference by incorporating prior knowledge from multiple sources.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Paurush; Fröhlich, Holger

    2013-01-01

    Inferring regulatory networks from experimental data via probabilistic graphical models is a popular framework to gain insights into biological systems. However, the inherent noise in experimental data coupled with a limited sample size reduces the performance of network reverse engineering. Prior knowledge from existing sources of biological information can address this low signal to noise problem by biasing the network inference towards biologically plausible network structures. Although integrating various sources of information is desirable, their heterogeneous nature makes this task challenging. We propose two computational methods to incorporate various information sources into a probabilistic consensus structure prior to be used in graphical model inference. Our first model, called Latent Factor Model (LFM), assumes a high degree of correlation among external information sources and reconstructs a hidden variable as a common source in a Bayesian manner. The second model, a Noisy-OR, picks up the strongest support for an interaction among information sources in a probabilistic fashion. Our extensive computational studies on KEGG signaling pathways as well as on gene expression data from breast cancer and yeast heat shock response reveal that both approaches can significantly enhance the reconstruction accuracy of Bayesian Networks compared to other competing methods as well as to the situation without any prior. Our framework allows for using diverse information sources, like pathway databases, GO terms and protein domain data, etc. and is flexible enough to integrate new sources, if available.

  3. Probabilistic Motor Sequence Yields Greater Offline and Less Online Learning than Fixed Sequence.

    PubMed

    Du, Yue; Prashad, Shikha; Schoenbrun, Ilana; Clark, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    It is well acknowledged that motor sequences can be learned quickly through online learning. Subsequently, the initial acquisition of a motor sequence is boosted or consolidated by offline learning. However, little is known whether offline learning can drive the fast learning of motor sequences (i.e., initial sequence learning in the first training session). To examine offline learning in the fast learning stage, we asked four groups of young adults to perform the serial reaction time (SRT) task with either a fixed or probabilistic sequence and with or without preliminary knowledge (PK) of the presence of a sequence. The sequence and PK were manipulated to emphasize either procedural (probabilistic sequence; no preliminary knowledge (NPK)) or declarative (fixed sequence; with PK) memory that were found to either facilitate or inhibit offline learning. In the SRT task, there were six learning blocks with a 2 min break between each consecutive block. Throughout the session, stimuli followed the same fixed or probabilistic pattern except in Block 5, in which stimuli appeared in a random order. We found that PK facilitated the learning of a fixed sequence, but not a probabilistic sequence. In addition to overall learning measured by the mean reaction time (RT), we examined the progressive changes in RT within and between blocks (i.e., online and offline learning, respectively). It was found that the two groups who performed the fixed sequence, regardless of PK, showed greater online learning than the other two groups who performed the probabilistic sequence. The groups who performed the probabilistic sequence, regardless of PK, did not display online learning, as indicated by a decline in performance within the learning blocks. However, they did demonstrate remarkably greater offline improvement in RT, which suggests that they are learning the probabilistic sequence offline. These results suggest that in the SRT task, the fast acquisition of a motor sequence is driven

  4. Probabilistic Motor Sequence Yields Greater Offline and Less Online Learning than Fixed Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yue; Prashad, Shikha; Schoenbrun, Ilana; Clark, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    It is well acknowledged that motor sequences can be learned quickly through online learning. Subsequently, the initial acquisition of a motor sequence is boosted or consolidated by offline learning. However, little is known whether offline learning can drive the fast learning of motor sequences (i.e., initial sequence learning in the first training session). To examine offline learning in the fast learning stage, we asked four groups of young adults to perform the serial reaction time (SRT) task with either a fixed or probabilistic sequence and with or without preliminary knowledge (PK) of the presence of a sequence. The sequence and PK were manipulated to emphasize either procedural (probabilistic sequence; no preliminary knowledge (NPK)) or declarative (fixed sequence; with PK) memory that were found to either facilitate or inhibit offline learning. In the SRT task, there were six learning blocks with a 2 min break between each consecutive block. Throughout the session, stimuli followed the same fixed or probabilistic pattern except in Block 5, in which stimuli appeared in a random order. We found that PK facilitated the learning of a fixed sequence, but not a probabilistic sequence. In addition to overall learning measured by the mean reaction time (RT), we examined the progressive changes in RT within and between blocks (i.e., online and offline learning, respectively). It was found that the two groups who performed the fixed sequence, regardless of PK, showed greater online learning than the other two groups who performed the probabilistic sequence. The groups who performed the probabilistic sequence, regardless of PK, did not display online learning, as indicated by a decline in performance within the learning blocks. However, they did demonstrate remarkably greater offline improvement in RT, which suggests that they are learning the probabilistic sequence offline. These results suggest that in the SRT task, the fast acquisition of a motor sequence is driven

  5. Numerical investigations of the porosity effect on the shock focusing process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, K.; Eliasson, V.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of cylindrical obstacles and the porosity in between them along the path of a converging cylindrical shock is studied through numerical simulations. An initially cylindrical converging shock wave is perturbed by cylindrical obstacles placed radially in its path. High pressures and temperatures are achieved as the shock wave is focused. Results show that the shape of the shock wave close to the point of convergence as well as the porosity and type of shock wave reflection the converging shock undergoes influence the peak values. Various configurations of the obstacle size and number are considered. The Guderley constant for each case is compared with previous reported experimental values.

  6. Development of Ultra Small Shock Tube for High Energy Molecular Beam Source

    SciTech Connect

    Miyoshi, Nobuya; Nagata, Shuhei; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Shimizu, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Takagi, Shu

    2008-12-31

    A molecular beam source exploiting a small shock tube is described for potential generation of high energy beam in a range of 1-5 eV without any undesirable impurities. The performance of a non-diaphragm type shock tube with an inner diameter of 2 mm was evaluated by measuring the acceleration and attenuation process of shock waves. With this shock tube installed in a molecular beam source, we measured the time-of-flight distributions of shock-heated beams, which demonstrated the ability of controlling the beam energy with the initial pressure ratio of the shock tube.

  7. Dynamics of polymer response to nanosecond shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banishev, Alexandr A.; Shaw, William L.; Curtis, Alexander D.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2014-03-01

    The high strain rate mechanical dynamics of a polymer under shock compression, poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA, MW = 996 000), were probed in experiments that combined two measurement techniques. The km s-1 impacts with laser-launched flyer plates were characterized by a fast interferometer, and the polymer dynamics were characterized by the nanosecond emission redshifting of Rhodamine 6G dye in PMMA. The thicknesses and velocities of the flyer plates were varied to create shock durations in the 5-22 ns range and pressures in the 2.6-9.2 GPa range. The strain rates were on the order of 107 s-1. With shock durations greater than 10 ns, a two-part rise of the redshift transients was observed, which was interpreted with reference to the well-known viscoelastic shock compression paradigm. However, the initial compression stage, lasting ˜10 ns, was found to be only partially elastic. With an elastic compression, after a shock the density should promptly return to its initial value. But even with the shortest-duration 5 ns shocks, the density relaxation after the shock ended was quite small. The critical shear stress where PMMA loses strength and the viscous compression process begins, appeared to be considerably larger with nanosecond shocks than with microsecond shocks. The loss of strength always took ˜10 ns, and could not be accelerated by increasing the shock pressure, suggesting the rate of strength loss was limited by the need for collective motions of the 30-40 nm polymer chains. The rates and amplitudes of the viscous density relaxation process increased with shock duration and shock pressure.

  8. An overview of engineering concepts and current design algorithms for probabilistic structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, S. F.; Hu, J.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    The article begins by examining the fundamentals of traditional deterministic design philosophy. The initial section outlines the concepts of failure criteria and limit state functions two traditional notions that are embedded in deterministic design philosophy. This is followed by a discussion regarding safety factors (a possible limit state function) and the common utilization of statistical concepts in deterministic engineering design approaches. Next the fundamental aspects of a probabilistic failure analysis are explored and it is shown that deterministic design concepts mentioned in the initial portion of the article are embedded in probabilistic design methods. For components fabricated from ceramic materials (and other similarly brittle materials) the probabilistic design approach yields the widely used Weibull analysis after suitable assumptions are incorporated. The authors point out that Weibull analysis provides the rare instance where closed form solutions are available for a probabilistic failure analysis. Since numerical methods are usually required to evaluate component reliabilities, a section on Monte Carlo methods is included to introduce the concept. The article concludes with a presentation of the technical aspects that support the numerical method known as fast probability integration (FPI). This includes a discussion of the Hasofer-Lind and Rackwitz-Fiessler approximations.

  9. A Probabilistic Feature Map-Based Localization System Using a Monocular Camera.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Donghwa; Oh, Taekjun; Choi, Hyun-Taek; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Image-based localization is one of the most widely researched localization techniques in the robotics and computer vision communities. As enormous image data sets are provided through the Internet, many studies on estimating a location with a pre-built image-based 3D map have been conducted. Most research groups use numerous image data sets that contain sufficient features. In contrast, this paper focuses on image-based localization in the case of insufficient images and features. A more accurate localization method is proposed based on a probabilistic map using 3D-to-2D matching correspondences between a map and a query image. The probabilistic feature map is generated in advance by probabilistic modeling of the sensor system as well as the uncertainties of camera poses. Using the conventional PnP algorithm, an initial camera pose is estimated on the probabilistic feature map. The proposed algorithm is optimized from the initial pose by minimizing Mahalanobis distance errors between features from the query image and the map to improve accuracy. To verify that the localization accuracy is improved, the proposed algorithm is compared with the conventional algorithm in a simulation and realenvironments. PMID:26404284

  10. A Probabilistic Feature Map-Based Localization System Using a Monocular Camera.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Donghwa; Oh, Taekjun; Choi, Hyun-Taek; Myung, Hyun

    2015-08-31

    Image-based localization is one of the most widely researched localization techniques in the robotics and computer vision communities. As enormous image data sets are provided through the Internet, many studies on estimating a location with a pre-built image-based 3D map have been conducted. Most research groups use numerous image data sets that contain sufficient features. In contrast, this paper focuses on image-based localization in the case of insufficient images and features. A more accurate localization method is proposed based on a probabilistic map using 3D-to-2D matching correspondences between a map and a query image. The probabilistic feature map is generated in advance by probabilistic modeling of the sensor system as well as the uncertainties of camera poses. Using the conventional PnP algorithm, an initial camera pose is estimated on the probabilistic feature map. The proposed algorithm is optimized from the initial pose by minimizing Mahalanobis distance errors between features from the query image and the map to improve accuracy. To verify that the localization accuracy is improved, the proposed algorithm is compared with the conventional algorithm in a simulation and realenvironments.

  11. A Probabilistic Feature Map-Based Localization System Using a Monocular Camera

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Donghwa; Oh, Taekjun; Choi, Hyun-Taek; Myung, Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Image-based localization is one of the most widely researched localization techniques in the robotics and computer vision communities. As enormous image data sets are provided through the Internet, many studies on estimating a location with a pre-built image-based 3D map have been conducted. Most research groups use numerous image data sets that contain sufficient features. In contrast, this paper focuses on image-based localization in the case of insufficient images and features. A more accurate localization method is proposed based on a probabilistic map using 3D-to-2D matching correspondences between a map and a query image. The probabilistic feature map is generated in advance by probabilistic modeling of the sensor system as well as the uncertainties of camera poses. Using the conventional PnP algorithm, an initial camera pose is estimated on the probabilistic feature map. The proposed algorithm is optimized from the initial pose by minimizing Mahalanobis distance errors between features from the query image and the map to improve accuracy. To verify that the localization accuracy is improved, the proposed algorithm is compared with the conventional algorithm in a simulation and realenvironments. PMID:26404284

  12. Absorption spectra of shocked liquid CS/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Dallman, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of shock initiation of high explosives (HE) was understood as early as 1863 when Alfred Nobel introduced the detonator as a means of detonating nitroglycerine. The critical pressure rise times required to achieve shock initiation and steady propagation of detonation are determined by the chemical and mechanical properties of an explosive. Although progress has been made in the understanding of the effects of mechanical properties, the detailed effects of high pressures on chemical reaction mechanisms are still only poorly understood. This paper reports the results of two experiments using CS/sub 2/, which is known to undergo electronic state transitions when shocked to high pressures. The goal of these experiments was to examine the known shock-generated expansion of CS/sub 2/ absorption bands while generating the shocks with a flyer plate system driven by high explosives.

  13. Optical beam distortions induced by a shock wave.

    PubMed

    Banakh, V A; Sukharev, A A; Falits, A V

    2015-03-10

    The mean intensity and the displacement from the initially given propagation direction of the optical beam passed through the shock wave have been calculated. It has been shown that the spatial inhomogeneity of the refractive index of air caused by the shock wave arising in supersonic flow flowing a conical body can cause the focusing of the beam and strong anisotropic distortions of the intensity distribution in its cross section. The angular displacement of the optical beam from the initially given propagation direction owing to the shock wave depends only on the height above the Earth's surface at which the shock wave is formed. As the height increases, the influence of the shock wave on the optical beam propagating through it decreases.

  14. Flood forecasting using medium-range probabilistic weather prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouweleeuw, B. T.; Thielen, J.; Franchello, G.; de de Roo, A. P. J.; Buizza, R.

    2005-10-01

    Following the developments in short- and medium-range weather forecasting over the last decade, operational flood forecasting also appears to show a shift from a so-called single solution or 'best guess' deterministic approach towards a probabilistic approach based on ensemble techniques. While this probabilistic approach is now more or less common practice and well established in the meteorological community, operational flood forecasters have only started to look for ways to interpret and mitigate for end-users the prediction products obtained by combining so-called Ensemble Prediction Systems (EPS) of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models with rainfall-runoff models. This paper presents initial results obtained by combining deterministic and EPS hindcasts of the global NWP model of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) with the large-scale hydrological model LISFLOOD for two historic flood events: the river Meuse flood in January 1995 and the river Odra flood in July 1997. In addition, a possible way to interpret the obtained ensemble based stream flow prediction is proposed.

  15. A Probabilistic Model of Melody Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temperley, David

    2008-01-01

    This study presents a probabilistic model of melody perception, which infers the key of a melody and also judges the probability of the melody itself. The model uses Bayesian reasoning: For any "surface" pattern and underlying "structure," we can infer the structure maximizing P(structure [vertical bar] surface) based on knowledge of P(surface,…

  16. The Probabilistic Nature of Preferential Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieskamp, Jorg

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has developed a variety of theories explaining when and why people's decisions under risk deviate from the standard economic view of expected utility maximization. These theories are limited in their predictive accuracy in that they do not explain the probabilistic nature of preferential choice, that is, why an individual makes…

  17. Balkanization and Unification of Probabilistic Inferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chong-Ho

    2005-01-01

    Many research-related classes in social sciences present probability as a unified approach based upon mathematical axioms, but neglect the diversity of various probability theories and their associated philosophical assumptions. Although currently the dominant statistical and probabilistic approach is the Fisherian tradition, the use of Fisherian…

  18. Dynamic Probabilistic Instability of Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    A computationally effective method is described to evaluate the non-deterministic dynamic instability (probabilistic dynamic buckling) of thin composite shells. The method is a judicious combination of available computer codes for finite element, composite mechanics and probabilistic structural analysis. The solution method is incrementally updated Lagrangian. It is illustrated by applying it to thin composite cylindrical shell subjected to dynamic loads. Both deterministic and probabilistic buckling loads are evaluated to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. A universal plot is obtained for the specific shell that can be used to approximate buckling loads for different load rates and different probability levels. Results from this plot show that the faster the rate, the higher the buckling load and the shorter the time. The lower the probability, the lower is the buckling load for a specific time. Probabilistic sensitivity results show that the ply thickness, the fiber volume ratio and the fiber longitudinal modulus, dynamic load and loading rate are the dominant uncertainties in that order.

  19. Probabilistic Grammars for Natural Languages. Psychology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick

    The purpose of this paper is to define the framework within which empirical investigations of probabilistic grammars can take place and to sketch how this attack can be made. The full presentation of empirical results will be left to other papers. In the detailed empirical work, the author has depended on the collaboration of E. Gammon and A.…

  20. Probabilistic classification learning in Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kéri, Szabolcs; Szlobodnyik, Csaba; Benedek, György; Janka, Zoltán; Gádoros, Júlia

    2002-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterised by stereotyped involuntary movements, called tics. Some evidence suggests that structural and functional abnormalities of the basal ganglia may explain these motor symptoms. In this study, the probabilistic classification learning (PCL) test was used to evaluate basal ganglia functions in 10 children with less severe tics (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) scores<30) and in 10 children with more severe symptoms (YGTSS score>30). In the PCL task, participants are asked to decide whether different combinations of four geometric forms (cues) predict rainy or sunny weather. Each cue is probabilistically related to a weather outcome, and feedback is provided after each decision. After completion of the probabilistic stimulus-response learning procedure, subjects received a transfer test to assess explicit knowledge about the cues. The children with TS exhibited impaired learning in the PCL task in comparison with the 20 healthy control subjects. This impairment was more pronounced in the TS patients with severe symptoms, and there was a significant negative relationship between the final classification performance and the YGTSS scores. The patients showed normal learning in the transfer test. These results suggest that the neostriatal habit learning system, which may play a central role in the acquisition of probabilistic associations, is dysfunctional in TS, especially in the case of more severe motor symptoms. The classification performance and the severity of tics were independent of the explicit knowledge obtained during the test.

  1. Bayesian probabilistic population projections for all countries

    PubMed Central

    Raftery, Adrian E.; Li, Nan; Ševčíková, Hana; Gerland, Patrick; Heilig, Gerhard K.

    2012-01-01

    Projections of countries’ future populations, broken down by age and sex, are widely used for planning and research. They are mostly done deterministically, but there is a widespread need for probabilistic projections. We propose a Bayesian method for probabilistic population projections for all countries. The total fertility rate and female and male life expectancies at birth are projected probabilistically using Bayesian hierarchical models estimated via Markov chain Monte Carlo using United Nations population data for all countries. These are then converted to age-specific rates and combined with a cohort component projection model. This yields probabilistic projections of any population quantity of interest. The method is illustrated for five countries of different demographic stages, continents and sizes. The method is validated by an out of sample experiment in which data from 1950–1990 are used for estimation, and applied to predict 1990–2010. The method appears reasonably accurate and well calibrated for this period. The results suggest that the current United Nations high and low variants greatly underestimate uncertainty about the number of oldest old from about 2050 and that they underestimate uncertainty for high fertility countries and overstate uncertainty for countries that have completed the demographic transition and whose fertility has started to recover towards replacement level, mostly in Europe. The results also indicate that the potential support ratio (persons aged 20–64 per person aged 65+) will almost certainly decline dramatically in most countries over the coming decades. PMID:22908249

  2. Pigeons' Discounting of Probabilistic and Delayed Reinforcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Calvert, Amanda L.

    2010-01-01

    Pigeons' discounting of probabilistic and delayed food reinforcers was studied using adjusting-amount procedures. In the probability discounting conditions, pigeons chose between an adjusting number of food pellets contingent on a single key peck and a larger, fixed number of pellets contingent on completion of a variable-ratio schedule. In the…

  3. Probabilistic Scale-Space Filtering Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Kutulakos, Kiriakos

    1993-01-01

    Probabilistic Scale-Space Filtering (PSF) computer program implements scale-space technique to describe input signals as collections of nested hills and valleys organized in treelike structure. Helps to construct sparse representations of complicated signals. Calculates probabilities, with extracted features corresponding to physical processes. Written in C language (49 percent) and Common Lisp (51 percent).

  4. Probabilistic Relational Structures and Their Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domotor, Zoltan

    The principal objects of the investigation reported were, first, to study qualitative probability relations on Boolean algebras, and secondly, to describe applications in the theories of probability logic, information, automata, and probabilistic measurement. The main contribution of this work is stated in 10 definitions and 20 theorems. The basic…

  5. Shocks near Jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Leopoldo R.; Turner, Ari M.; van Hecke, Martin; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2012-02-01

    Nonlinear sound is an extreme phenomenon typically observed in solids after violent explosions. But granular media are different. Right when they jam, these fragile and disordered solids exhibit a vanishing rigidity and sound speed, so that even tiny mechanical perturbations form supersonic shocks. Here, we perform simulations in which two-dimensional jammed granular packings are dynamically compressed and demonstrate that the elementary excitations are strongly nonlinear shocks, rather than ordinary phonons. We capture the full dependence of the shock speed on pressure and impact intensity by a surprisingly simple analytical model.

  6. Anthrax-associated shock.

    PubMed

    Goldman, David L; Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    Recent events have brought attention to the potential of Bacillus anthracis as an agent of bioterrorism. The shock like state of anthrax is invariably associated with high mortality, despite anti-microbial and supportive therapy. Multi-system dysfunction is typical, including: enhanced vascular permeability, hemorrhage and inflammation. Important questions concerning the pathophysiology of anthrax-associated shock remain unanswered, including the effects of B. anthracis infection on cardiac function. This review discusses the current state of knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of anthrax-associated shock. PMID:18508494

  7. Interaction of a thin shock with turbulence. I. Effect on shock structure: Analytic model

    SciTech Connect

    Ao Xianzhi; Zank, Gary P.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Shaikh, Dastgeer

    2008-12-15

    A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical model describing the interaction of thin shock waves with turbulence is developed by adopting a multiscale perturbation analysis. The interaction is found to be governed by a two-dimensional inviscid Burgers' equation that includes ''perturbation terms.'' Initially prescribed perturbation profiles are explored with numerical simulations to show how the shock front is modified by turbulence. Our numerical simulations show that magnetic field perturbations play a very important role in modifying the structure of perpendicular and parallel shocks. While turbulence can balance the nonlinear steepening of a shock wave at some regions, it can also help to create a larger jump in physical quantities such as the magnetic field at other regions. The plasma medium in these regions can therefore experience a higher compression, which will result in a downstream state that differs from the usual Rankine-Hugoniot state.

  8. Role of molecular dynamics on descriptions of shock-front processes

    SciTech Connect

    Karo, A.M.

    1981-07-22

    By means of a computational approach based on classical molecular dynamics, we can begin to form a realistic picture of shock-induced processes occurring at the shock front and resulting from the detailed, violent motion associated with shock motion on an atomic scale. Prototype studies of phase transitions will be discussed. We will also examine the interaction of the shock front with defects, surfaces, voids, and inclusions, and across grain boundaries. We will focus on the critical question of how mechanical energy imparted to a condensed material by shock loading is converted to the activation energy required to overcome some initial energy barrier in an initiation process.

  9. The preplasma effect on the properties of the shock wave driven by a fast electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llor Aisa, E.; Ribeyre, X.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.

    2016-08-01

    Strong shock wave generation by a mono-energetic fast electron beam in a plasma with an increasing density profile is studied theoretically. The proposed analytical model describes the shock wave characteristics for a homogeneous plasma preceded by a low density precursor. The shock pressure and the time of shock formation depend on the ratio of the electron stopping length to the preplasma areal density and on the initial energy of injected electrons. The conclusions of theoretical model are confirmed in numerical simulations.

  10. Dynamic Strength of Metals in Shock Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, A; Reisman, D B; Wolfer, W G

    2005-11-09

    It is shown that the Hugoniot and the critical shear stress required to deform a metal plastically in shock compression can be obtained directly from molecular dynamics simulations without recourse to surface velocity profiles, or to details of the dislocation evolution. Specific calculations are shown for aluminum shocked along the [100] direction, and containing an initial distribution of microscopic defects. The presence of such defects has a minor effect on the Hugoniot and on the dynamic strength at high pressures. Computed results agree with experimental data.

  11. Shock-to-Detonation Transition simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2015-07-14

    Shock-to-detonation transition (SDT) experiments with embedded velocity gauges provide data that can be used for both calibration and validation of high explosive (HE) burn models. Typically, a series of experiments is performed for each HE in which the initial shock pressure is varied. Here we describe a methodology for automating a series of SDT simulations and comparing numerical tracer particle velocities with the experimental gauge data. Illustrative examples are shown for PBX 9502 using the HE models implemented in the xRage ASC code at LANL.

  12. A nondeterministic shock and vibration application using polynomial chaos expansions

    SciTech Connect

    FIELD JR.,RICHARD V.; RED-HORSE,JOHN R.; PAEZ,THOMAS L.

    2000-03-28

    In the current study, the generality of the key underpinnings of the Stochastic Finite Element (SFEM) method is exploited in a nonlinear shock and vibration application where parametric uncertainty enters through random variables with probabilistic descriptions assumed to be known. The system output is represented as a vector containing Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) data at a predetermined number of frequency points. In contrast to many reliability-based methods, the goal of the current approach is to provide a means to address more general (vector) output entities, to provide this output as a random process, and to assess characteristics of the response which allow one to avoid issues of statistical dependence among its vector components.

  13. Testing bow shock models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrefay, Thamer; Meziane, Karim; Hamza, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Space plasmas studies of bow shock dynamics, given the fundamental transport role and impact natural transition boundaries, have continued to attract much interest. With the overwhelming availability of data collected by various space science missions, several empirical models have been put forward to account for the location of the Earth's bow shock. Various solar wind and IMF measured parameters are used to constrain the proposed models published in the literature. For each of these empirical models, the bow shock nose velocity, at the standoff distance, is computed; each of these velocities is then compared with the observed shock speed as determined from a multipoint measurement provided by the Cluster quartet. The present study reveals to what extent the model parameters used are significant and determinant, and suggests that some empirical models are more accurate than others are.

  14. Counseling For Future Shock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Lewis B.

    1974-01-01

    In this article the author looks at some of the searing prophecies made by Alvin Toffler in his book Future Shock and relates them to the world of the professional counselor and the clientele the counselor attempts to serve. (Author)

  15. Collisionless parallel shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galeev, A. A.; Galinskii, V. L.

    1993-01-01

    Consideration is given to a collisionless parallel shock based on solitary-type solutions of the modified derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation (MDNLS) for parallel Alfven waves. The standard derivative nonlinear Schroedinger equation is generalized in order to include the possible anisotropy of the plasma distribution and higher-order Korteweg-de Vies-type dispersion. Stationary solutions of MDNLS are discussed. The anisotropic nature of 'adiabatic' reflections leads to the asymmetric particle distribution in the upstream as well as in the downstream regions of the shock. As a result, nonzero heat flux appears near the front of the shock. It is shown that this causes the stochastic behavior of the nonlinear waves, which can significantly contribute to the shock thermalization.

  16. Attosecond shock waves.

    PubMed

    Zhokhov, P A; Zheltikov, A M

    2013-05-01

    Shock-wave formation is a generic scenario of wave dynamics known in nonlinear acoustics, fluid dynamics, astrophysics, seismology, and detonation physics. Here, we show that, in nonlinear optics, remarkably short, attosecond shock transients can be generated through a strongly coupled spatial and temporal dynamics of ultrashort light pulses, suggesting a pulse self-compression scenario whereby multigigawatt attosecond optical waveforms can be synthesized. PMID:23683197

  17. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  18. Experimental shock metamorphism of maximum microcline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    A series of recovery experiments are conducted to study the behavior of single-crystal perthitic maximum microcline shock-loaded to a peak pressure of 417 kbar. Microcline is found to deform in a manner similar to quartz and other alkali feldspars. It is observed that shock-induced cleavages occur initially at or slightly below the Hugoniot elastic limit (60-85 kbar), that shock-induced rather than thermal disordering begins above the Hugoniot elastic limit, and that all types of planar elements form parallel to crystallographic planes of low Miller indices. When increasing pressure, it is found that bulk density, refractive indices, and birefringence of the recovered material decrease and approach diaplectic glass values, whereas disappearance and weakening of reflections in Debye-Sherrer patterns are due to disordering of the feldspar lattice.

  19. Shock compression of low-density foams

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, N.C.

    1993-07-01

    Shock compression of very low density micro-cellular materials allows entirely new regimes of hot fluid states to be investigated experimentally. Using a two-stage light-gas gun to generate strong shocks, temperatures of several eV are readily achieved at densities of roughly 0.5--1 g/cm{sup 3} in large, uniform volumes. The conditions in these hot, expanded fluids are readily found using the Hugoniot jump conditions. We will briefly describe the basic methodology for sample preparation and experimental measurement of shock velocities. We present data for several materials over a range of initial densities. This paper will explore the applications of these methods for investigations of equations of state and phase diagrams, spectroscopy, and plasma physics. Finally, we discus the need for future work on these and related low-density materials.

  20. Gated IR Imaging of Shocked Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Stephen; Turley, Dale; Rightley, Paul; Primas, Lori

    2001-06-01

    Gated IR images have been taken of a series of shocked surface geometries in tin and copper. Metal coupons machined with grooves, steps, and flats with various surface finishes, were mounted directly to high explosive. The HE was point initiated and 500 ns to 1 microsecond wide gated images of the target were taken immediately following shock breakout using a Santa Barbara Focalplane InSb CID camera (SB-134). Raw camera radiance data was temperature calibrated assuming plausible material emissivity. The spatial distribution of temperature was estimated from the images of the shocked flats and found not to be single valued. Several of the geometries were modeled using CTH, a two dimensional Eulerian hydrocode, and comparisons were made to observed results.

  1. Probabilistic Reversal Learning in Schizophrenia: Stability of Deficits and Potential Causal Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Lena Felice; Waltz, James A; Green, Michael F; Wynn, Jonathan K; Horan, William P

    2016-07-01

    Although individuals with schizophrenia show impaired feedback-driven learning on probabilistic reversal learning (PRL) tasks, the specific factors that contribute to these deficits remain unknown. Recent work has suggested several potential causes including neurocognitive impairments, clinical symptoms, and specific types of feedback-related errors. To examine this issue, we administered a PRL task to 126 stable schizophrenia outpatients and 72 matched controls, and patients were retested 4 weeks later. The task involved an initial probabilistic discrimination learning phase and subsequent reversal phases in which subjects had to adjust their responses to sudden shifts in the reinforcement contingencies. Patients showed poorer performance than controls for both the initial discrimination and reversal learning phases of the task, and performance overall showed good test-retest reliability among patients. A subgroup analysis of patients (n = 64) and controls (n = 49) with good initial discrimination learning revealed no between-group differences in reversal learning, indicating that the patients who were able to achieve all of the initial probabilistic discriminations were not impaired in reversal learning. Regarding potential contributors to impaired discrimination learning, several factors were associated with poor PRL, including higher levels of neurocognitive impairment, poor learning from both positive and negative feedback, and higher levels of indiscriminate response shifting. The results suggest that poor PRL performance in schizophrenia can be the product of multiple mechanisms. PMID:26884546

  2. Electron Acceleration in Shock-Shock Interaction: Simulations and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanotani, M.; Matsukiyo, S.; Mazelle, C. X.; Hada, T.

    2015-12-01

    Collisionless shock waves play a crucial role in producing high energy particles (cosmic rays) in space. While most of the past studies about particle acceleration assume the presence of a single shock, in space two shocks frequently come close to or even collide with each other. Hietala et al. [2011] observed the collision of an interplanetary shock and the earth's bow shock and the associated acceleration of energetic ions. The kinetic natures of a shock-shock collision has not been well understood. Only the work done by using hybrid simulation was reported by Cargill et al. [1986], in which they focus on a collision of two supercritical shocks and the resultant ion acceleration. We expect similarly that electron acceleration can also occur in shock-shock collision. To investigate the electron acceleration process in a shock-shock collision, we perform one-dimensional full particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In the simulation energetic electrons are observed between the two approaching shocks before colliding. These energetic electrons are efficiently accelerated through multiple reflections at the two shocks (Fermi acceleration). The reflected electrons create a temperature anisotropy and excite large amplitude waves upstream via the electron fire hose instability. The large amplitude waves can scatter the energetic electrons in pitch angle so that some of them gain large pitch angles and are easily reflected when they encounter the shocks subsequently. The reflected electrons can sustain, or probably even strengthen, them. We further discuss observational results of an interaction of interplanetary shocks and the earth's bow shock by examining mainly Cluster data. We focus on whether or not electrons are accelerated in the shock-shock interaction.

  3. Justifying the Gompertz curve of mortality via the generalized Polya process of shocks.

    PubMed

    Cha, Ji Hwan; Finkelstein, Maxim

    2016-06-01

    A new probabilistic model of aging that can be applied to organisms is suggested and analyzed. Organisms are subject to shocks that follow the generalized Polya process (GPP), which has been recently introduced and characterized in the literature. Distinct from the nonhomogeneous Poisson process that has been widely used in applications, the important feature of this process is the dependence of its future behavior on the number of previous events (shocks). The corresponding survival and the mortality rate functions are derived and analyzed. The general approach is used for justification of the Gompertz law of human mortality.

  4. Justifying the Gompertz curve of mortality via the generalized Polya process of shocks.

    PubMed

    Cha, Ji Hwan; Finkelstein, Maxim

    2016-06-01

    A new probabilistic model of aging that can be applied to organisms is suggested and analyzed. Organisms are subject to shocks that follow the generalized Polya process (GPP), which has been recently introduced and characterized in the literature. Distinct from the nonhomogeneous Poisson process that has been widely used in applications, the important feature of this process is the dependence of its future behavior on the number of previous events (shocks). The corresponding survival and the mortality rate functions are derived and analyzed. The general approach is used for justification of the Gompertz law of human mortality. PMID:26988400

  5. Probabilistic anti-aliasing methods for dynamic variable resolution images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panerai, Francesco M.; Juday, Richard D.

    1996-11-01

    We have attained initial function of a real-time acuity- based video transformation. It matches the transmitted local resolution of video images to the eccentrically-varying acuity of the viewer's human visual system. In previous variable resolution imagery, a variable blockiness produces disturbing aliasing effects. We show how probabilistic methods can be useful to perform anti-aliasing on the variable resolution images, so that smoothing interpolation need not be done to defeat the aliasing. Especially when used in dynamic imaging, the methods consistently reduce the high frequency artifacts perceived by the human eye. The effectiveness of these techniques have been demonstrated with the NASA/Texas Instrument Programmable Remapper, which is able to apply the anti-aliasing methods on the fly on the low bandwidth, acuity-based video signal Video imagery will be shown to demonstrate the technique.

  6. A probabilistic level set formulation for interactive organ segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremers, Daniel; Fluck, Oliver; Rousson, Mikael; Aharon, Shmuel

    2007-03-01

    Level set methods have become increasingly popular as a framework for image segmentation. Yet when used as a generic segmentation tool, they suffer from an important drawback: Current formulations do not allow much user interaction. Upon initialization, boundaries propagate to the final segmentation without the user being able to guide or correct the segmentation. In the present work, we address this limitation by proposing a probabilistic framework for image segmentation which integrates input intensity information and user interaction on equal footings. The resulting algorithm determines the most likely segmentation given the input image and the user input. In order to allow a user interaction in real-time during the segmentation, the algorithm is implemented on a graphics card and in a narrow band formulation.

  7. Probabilistic finite elements for fatigue and fracture analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belytschko, Ted; Liu, Wing Kam

    1993-01-01

    An overview of the probabilistic finite element method (PFEM) developed by the authors and their colleagues in recent years is presented. The primary focus is placed on the development of PFEM for both structural mechanics problems and fracture mechanics problems. The perturbation techniques are used as major tools for the analytical derivation. The following topics are covered: (1) representation and discretization of random fields; (2) development of PFEM for the general linear transient problem and nonlinear elasticity using Hu-Washizu variational principle; (3) computational aspects; (4) discussions of the application of PFEM to the reliability analysis of both brittle fracture and fatigue; and (5) a stochastic computational tool based on stochastic boundary element (SBEM). Results are obtained for the reliability index and corresponding probability of failure for: (1) fatigue crack growth; (2) defect geometry; (3) fatigue parameters; and (4) applied loads. These results show that initial defect is a critical parameter.

  8. Probabilistic assessment of roadway departure risk in a curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, G.; Clair, D.; Fogli, M.; Bernardin, F.

    2011-10-01

    Roadway departure while cornering constitutes a major part of car accidents and casualties in France. Even though drastic policy about overspeeding contributes to reduce accidents, there obviously exist other factors. This article presents the construction of a probabilistic strategy for the roadway departure risk assessment. A specific vehicle dynamic model is developed in which some parameters are modelled by random variables. These parameters are deduced from a sensitivity analysis to ensure an efficient representation of the inherent uncertainties of the system. Then, structural reliability methods are employed to assess the roadway departure risk in function of the initial conditions measured at the entrance of the curve. This study is conducted within the French national road safety project SARI that aims to implement a warning systems alerting the driver in case of dangerous situation.

  9. Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis of APT blanket tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Barsell, A. W.; Kern, K. T.

    2001-01-01

    A probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) model that is specific to the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) helium tubes was developed. The model performs Monte Carlo analyses of potential failure modes caused by cyclic stresses generated by beam trips and depressurizations 60m normal operation, coupled with material aging due to irradiation. Dominant failure probabilities are due to crack through-growth while brittle fracture and ductile tearing have lower probability. Failure mechanisms of global plastic collapse and buckling or crack initiation mechanisms of fatigue or local fracture (upon loss of ductility) have negligible probability. For the population of (7,311) tubes in the APT blanket, the worst-case, annual probability of one tube failing is 3 percent. The probability of 2 or more failures is substantially lower; therefore, unavailability impacts are driven by single failure. The average annual loss of production (unavailability) is below about 0.2 percent. Helium outflow and water inflow rates were characterized for the failures.

  10. Reusable solid rocket motor case - Optimum probabilistic fracture control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, S.; Uppaluri, B.

    1979-01-01

    A methodology for the reliability analysis of a reusable solid rocket motor case is discussed in this paper. The analysis is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and probability distribution for initial flaw sizes. The developed reliability analysis can be used to select the structural design variables of the solid rocket motor case on the basis of minimum expected cost and specified reliability bounds during the projected design life of the case. Effects on failure prevention plans such as nondestructive inspection and the material erosion between missions can also be considered in the developed procedure for selection of design variables. The reliability-based procedure that has been discussed in this paper can easily be modified to consider other similar structures of reusable space vehicle systems with different fracture control plans.

  11. Interaction of Ion-Concentration Shock Waves in Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahga, Supreet S.; Chambers, Robert D.; Santiago, Juan G.

    2011-11-01

    Electrophoresis based separation techniques, such as capillary electrophoresis and isotachophoresis (ITP), are routinely used in microfluidics to separate ionic species from complex mixtures. Nonlinearities in these electrophoretic processes can result in formation of shock and rarefaction waves. We here focus on shock waves which form in ITP between regions of high and low mobility ions. Depending on the charge of ions, these shocks can propagate either towards anode or cathode, and may interact with each other. We here demonstrate simultaneous anionic and cationic ITP process, in which shock waves approach each other and then interact. Using simulations and experimental visualizations, we show that the interaction of these shock waves can modify the electrophoretic conditions and result in formation of new shock and rarefaction waves. We show two applications where we use shock interaction to couple different electrophoretic processes: (i) where we first preconcentrate DNA fragments in anionic ITP and then use shock interaction to initiate DNA separation, and (ii) where we use shock interaction to elongate ITP zones for higher sensitivity.

  12. Multimodality medical image fusion: probabilistic quantification, segmentation, and registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue J.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Xuan, Jian Hua; Zheng, Qinfen; Mun, Seong K.

    1998-06-01

    Multimodality medical image fusion is becoming increasingly important in clinical applications, which involves information processing, registration and visualization of interventional and/or diagnostic images obtained from different modalities. This work is to develop a multimodality medical image fusion technique through probabilistic quantification, segmentation, and registration, based on statistical data mapping, multiple feature correlation, and probabilistic mean ergodic theorems. The goal of image fusion is to geometrically align two or more image areas/volumes so that pixels/voxels representing the same underlying anatomical structure can be superimposed meaningfully. Three steps are involved. To accurately extract the regions of interest, we developed the model supported Bayesian relaxation labeling, and edge detection and region growing integrated algorithms to segment the images into objects. After identifying the shift-invariant features (i.e., edge and region information), we provided an accurate and robust registration technique which is based on matching multiple binary feature images through a site model based image re-projection. The image was initially segmented into specified number of regions. A rough contour can be obtained by delineating and merging some of the segmented regions. We applied region growing and morphological filtering to extract the contour and get rid of some disconnected residual pixels after segmentation. The matching algorithm is implemented as follows: (1) the centroids of PET/CT and MR images are computed and then translated to the center of both images. (2) preliminary registration is performed first to determine an initial range of scaling factors and rotations, and the MR image is then resampled according to the specified parameters. (3) the total binary difference of the corresponding binary maps in both images is calculated for the selected registration parameters, and the final registration is achieved when the

  13. Multiaxial probabilistic elastic-plastic constitutive simulations of soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrinezhad, Arezoo

    Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov (FPK) equation approach has recently been developed to simulate elastic-plastic constitutive behaviors of materials with uncertain material properties. The FPK equation approach transforms the stochastic constitutive rate equation, which is a stochastic, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation (ODE) in the stress-pseudo time space into a second-order accurate, deterministic, linear FPK partial differential equation (PDE) in the probability density of stress-pseudo time space. This approach does not suffer from the drawbacks of the traditional approaches such as the Monte Carlo approach and the perturbation approach for solving nonlinear ODEs with random coefficients. In this study, the existing one dimensional FPK framework for probabilistic constitutive modeling of soils is extended to multi--dimension. However, the multivariate FPK PDEs cannot be solved using the traditional mathematical techniques such as finite difference techniques due to their high computational cost. Therefore, computationally efficient algorithms based on the Fourier spectral approach are developed for solving a class of FPK PDEs that arises in probabilistic elasto-plasticity. This class includes linear FPK PDEs in (stress) space and (pseudo) time - having space-independent but time-dependent, and both space- and time-dependent coefficients - with impulse initial conditions and reflecting boundary conditions. The solution algorithms, rely on first mapping the stress space of the governing PDE between 0 and 2pi using the change of coordinates rule, followed by approximating the solution of the PDE in the 2pi-periodic domain by a finite Fourier series in the stress space and unknown time-dependent solution coefficients. Finally, the time-dependent solution coefficients are obtained from the initial condition. The accuracy and efficiency of the developed algorithms are tested. The developed algorithms are used to simulate uniaxial and multiaxial, monotonic and cyclic

  14. Shock characterization of quartz phenolic composite

    SciTech Connect

    Weirick, L.J.; Chhabildas, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    Goal was to obtain dynamic mechanical property data on a quartz phenolic (abbreviated QP) composite. Shock loading and shock release measurements have been conducted using impact techniques utilizing both a light-gas gun and a powder gun at impact pressures up to 20 GPa. The primary diagnostic tool used was a velocity interferometer. The data analysis includes Hugoniot measurements to give both pressure-particle velocity and shock velocity-particle velocity relationships; spall measurements to determine the fracture stress at which the material spells; and attenuation measurements to determine the shock attenuation with material thickness. The QP Hugoniot relationship was found to be significantly different than that of a phenolic without a filler material indicating that the impedance of the QP used in this investigation was higher. The spall strength was measured to be {approximately}0.075 GPa, similar to nonfilled phenolic, which indicated that the presence of quartz fibers was not contributing to the fracture strength. The material was found to attenuate an imposed shock of approximately 6.3 GPa pressure and 0.18 {mu}s to 50% of the initial impact value after a propagation distance of 7mm.

  15. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi, S. A.; Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-07-01

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ˜4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ˜0.3 micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  16. Analytical model for fast-shock ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, S. A. Farahbod, A. H.; Sobhanian, S.

    2014-07-15

    A model and its improvements are introduced for a recently proposed approach to inertial confinement fusion, called fast-shock ignition (FSI). The analysis is based upon the gain models of fast ignition, shock ignition and considerations for the fast electrons penetration into the pre-compressed fuel to examine the formation of an effective central hot spot. Calculations of fast electrons penetration into the dense fuel show that if the initial electron kinetic energy is of the order ∼4.5 MeV, the electrons effectively reach the central part of the fuel. To evaluate more realistically the performance of FSI approach, we have used a quasi-two temperature electron energy distribution function of Strozzi (2012) and fast ignitor energy formula of Bellei (2013) that are consistent with 3D PIC simulations for different values of fast ignitor laser wavelength and coupling efficiency. The general advantages of fast-shock ignition in comparison with the shock ignition can be estimated to be better than 1.3 and it is seen that the best results can be obtained for the fuel mass around 1.5 mg, fast ignitor laser wavelength ∼0.3  micron and the shock ignitor energy weight factor about 0.25.

  17. Shock/shock interference on a transpiration cooled hemispherical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which show the effectiveness of transpiration cooling in reducing the peak heat flux caused by an impinging shock on a bow shock of a hemispherical model. The 12-inch diameter hemispherical transpiration model with helium coolant was tested in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach 12.1 and freestream unit Reynolds number of 0.33 x 10 to the 6th/ft. An incident shock wave, generated by a blunt flat-plate shock generator inclined at 10 deg to the freestream, intersected the bow shock of the model to produce shock/shock interference. The stagnation heat flux without coolant or shock/shock interference was about 1.6 times a smooth surface laminar prediction due to effective roughness of the coolant ejection slots. A coolant mass flux 31 percent of the freestream mass flux reduced the stagnation heat flux to zero without shock/shock interference. However, for the same coolant mass flux and with shock/shock interference the peak heat flux was only reduced 8.3 percent, even though the total integrated heat load was reduced.

  18. Probabilistic modeling of propagating explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, L.B.; Eisenhawer, S.W.; Bott, T.F.

    1996-03-01

    Weapons containing significant quantities of high explosives (HE) are sometimes located in close proximity to one another. If an explosion occurs in a weapon, the possibility of propagation to one or more additional weapons may exist, with severe consequences possibly resulting. In the general case, a system of concern consists of multiple weapons and various other objects in a complex, three-dimensional geometry. In each weapon, HE is enclosed by (casing) materials that function as protection in the event of a neighbor detonation but become a source of fragments if the HE is initiated. The protection afforded by the casing means that only high-momentum fragments, which occur rarely, are of concern. These fragments, generated in an initial donor weapon are transported to other weapons either directly or by ricochet. Interaction of a fragment with an acceptor weapon can produce a reaction in the acceptor HE and result in a second detonation. In this paper we describe a comprehensive methodology to estimate the probability of various consequences for fragment-induced propagating detonations in arrays of weapons containing HE. Analysis of this problem requires an approach that can both define the circumstances under which rare events can occur and calculate the probability of such occurrences. Our approach is based on combining process tree methodology with Monte Carlo transport simulation. Our Monte Carlo technique very effectively captures important features of these differences. Process tree methodology is described and its use is discussed for a simplified problem and to illustrate the power of Monte Carlo simulation in estimating fragment-induced detonation of an acceptor weapon.

  19. Probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Shiao, Michael C.

    1994-01-01

    A composite wing with spars and bulkheads is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of probabilistic assessment of smart composite structures to control uncertainties in distortions and stresses. Results show that a smart composite wing can be controlled to minimize distortions and to have specified stress levels in the presence of defects. Structural responses such as changes in angle of attack, vertical displacements, and stress in the control and controlled plies are probabilistically assessed to quantify their respective uncertainties. Sensitivity factors are evaluated to identify those parameters that have the greatest influence on a specific structural response. Results show that smart composite structures can be configured to control both distortions and ply stresses to satisfy specified design requirements.

  20. Exact and Approximate Probabilistic Symbolic Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckow, Kasper; Pasareanu, Corina S.; Dwyer, Matthew B.; Filieri, Antonio; Visser, Willem

    2014-01-01

    Probabilistic software analysis seeks to quantify the likelihood of reaching a target event under uncertain environments. Recent approaches compute probabilities of execution paths using symbolic execution, but do not support nondeterminism. Nondeterminism arises naturally when no suitable probabilistic model can capture a program behavior, e.g., for multithreading or distributed systems. In this work, we propose a technique, based on symbolic execution, to synthesize schedulers that resolve nondeterminism to maximize the probability of reaching a target event. To scale to large systems, we also introduce approximate algorithms to search for good schedulers, speeding up established random sampling and reinforcement learning results through the quantification of path probabilities based on symbolic execution. We implemented the techniques in Symbolic PathFinder and evaluated them on nondeterministic Java programs. We show that our algorithms significantly improve upon a state-of- the-art statistical model checking algorithm, originally developed for Markov Decision Processes.